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Sample records for radiotherapy planning ct

  1. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology......This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  2. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 ± 0.80 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 ± 1.22 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy

  3. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus

    2010-01-01

    -invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy......, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and computed tomography (CT) are used to communicate the actual image data created by the modalities. Care must be taken for data security...

  4. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A.; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  5. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation

  6. (18) F-FDG PET/CT for planning external beam radiotherapy alters therapy in 11% of 581 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Loft-Jakobsen, Annika; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (18) F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) used in radiotherapy planning for extra-cerebral malignancy may reveal metastases to distant sites that may affect the choice of therapy. AIM: To investigate the role of FDG PET/CT on treatment strategy changes induced by the use of PET/CT as part...... planning in our institution in the year 2008. All PET/CT scans were performed with the patient in treatment position with the use of immobilization devices according to the intended radiotherapy treatment. All scans were evaluated by a nuclear medicine physician together with a radiologist to delineate PET......% of the patients for whom the PET/CT simulation scan revealed unexpected dissemination, radiotherapy was given - changed (n = 38) or unchanged (n = 13) according to the findings on the FDG PET/CT. CONCLUSION: Unexpected dissemination on the FDG PET/CT scanning performed for radiotherapy planning caused a change...

  7. Energy Dependence of Measured CT Numbers on Substituted Materials Used for CT Number Calibration of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Mahmoudi

    Full Text Available For accurate dose calculations, it is necessary to provide a correct relationship between the CT numbers and electron density in radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy dependence of measured CT numbers on substituted materials used for CT number calibration of radiotherapy TPSs and the resulting errors in the treatment planning calculation doses.In this study, we designed a cylindrical water phantom with different materials used as tissue equivalent materials for the simulation of tissues and obtaining the related CT numbers. For evaluating the effect of CT number variations of substituted materials due to energy changing of scanner (kVp on the dose calculation of TPS, the slices of the scanned phantom at three kVp's were imported into the desired TPSs (MIRS and CorePLAN. Dose calculations were performed on two TPSs.The mean absolute percentage differences between the CT numbers of CT scanner and two treatment planning systems for all the samples were 3.22%±2.57% for CorePLAN and 2.88%±2.11% for MIRS. It was also found that the maximum absolute percentage difference between all of the calculated doses from each photon beam of linac (6 and 15 MV at three kVp's was less than 1.2%.The present study revealed that, for the materials with effective low atomic number, the mean CT number increased with increasing energy, which was opposite for the materials with an effective high atomic number. We concluded that the tissue substitute materials had a different behavior in the energy ranges from 80 to 130 kVp. So, it is necessary to consider the energy dependence of the substitute materials used for the measurement or calibration of CT number for radiotherapy treatment planning systems.

  8. Recommendations for the use of PET and PET-CT for radiotherapy planning in research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somer, E J; Pike, L C; Marsden, P K

    2012-08-01

    With the increasing use of positron emission tomography (PET) for disease staging, follow-up and therapy monitoring in a number of oncological indications there is growing interest in the use of PET and PET-CT for radiation treatment planning. In order to create a strong clinical evidence base for this, it is important to ensure that research data are clinically relevant and of a high quality. Therefore the National Cancer Research Institute PET Research Network make these recommendations to assist investigators in the development of radiotherapy clinical trials involving the use of PET and PET-CT. These recommendations provide an overview of the current literature in this rapidly evolving field, including standards for PET in clinical trials, disease staging, volume delineation, intensity modulated radiotherapy and PET-augmented planning techniques, and are targeted at a general audience. We conclude with specific recommendations for the use of PET in radiotherapy planning in research projects.

  9. Definition of postlumpectomy tumor bed for radiotherapy boost field planning: CT versus surgical clips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Hadassah; Prosnitz, Robert G.; Olson, John A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the location and extent of the tumor bed as defined by surgical clips and computed tomography (CT) scans, after lumpectomy, for electron boost planning as part of breast radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Planning CT images of 31 operated breasts in 30 patients who underwent lumpectomy were reviewed. One or more clips were placed in the lumpectomy cavity. Serial CT images were used to measure the depth and transverse and longitudinal dimensions. The area and geometric center of the tumor bed were defined by the clips and CT. Results: The CT and clip measurements were identical for the maximal tumor depth in 27 of 30 patients. The CT bed extended beyond the clips by 0-7 mm medially in the transverse/longitudinal extent (multiclip patients). The median distance between the geometric centers in the coronal plane for the tumor bed center was larger for patients with single clips than for those with multiple clips (p 2 . The CT bed was more readily visible in patients with a shorter interval between surgery and radiotherapy. Conclusion: The maximal depth of the tumor bed was similar using the two methods. The extent and centers of the clip-and CT-determined beds differed significantly. This may indicate an underestimation of the tumor bed as defined by clips only and justifies integration of CT information in boost field planning

  10. Evaluation of multi-modality CT-MRI-SPECT registration tools for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchini, S.; Alfonso, R.; Castillo, J.; Coca, M.; Torres, L.

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative comparison of registration CT-CT, CT-MR and CT-SPECT performed by the different software and algorithms studies is presented. Only two studied software were full DICOM RT compatible while accepting DICOM images in any layout. Quantitative results of fiducial displacement errors were calculated for all software and available registration methods. The presented methodology demonstrated being effective for assessing the quality of studied image registration tools in the radiotherapy planning context, provided the images are free of significant geometric deformation. When implementing this methodology in real patients, the use of immobilization devices, such as thermoplastic masks, is recommended for enhanced quality of image registration. (Author)

  11. CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, Peter M.; Kirikuta, Ion C.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study was performed to compare the accuracy of clinical treatment set-up and CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer. Material and methods: Between September 1993 and October 1994, 45 women who underwent breast conserving surgery and irradiation containing a boost to the tumour bed were investigated. Prospective evaluation of CT planning of the boost was carried out. The target volume/boost field, electron energy and treatment set-up had been defined on the basis of clinical examination, initial and postsurgical mammograms by one radiotherapist. Next, a planning CT was performed in treatment position and a CT-based treatment plan was calculated according to a target volume defined by another radiotherapist. The clinical treatment set-up was imported into our computer planning system and the resulting isodose plots were compared with those from CT planning and reviewed critically. Results: The clinically defined treatment set-up had to be modified in 80% of the patients. Most discrepancies observed were related to the size of the boost field itself and the chosen electron energy. Minor changes had to be made with respect to angle of table and gantry. Conclusions: Critical review of the isodose plots from both methods showed clear advantages for CT planning. Guidelines for target definition in CT planning of boost irradiation and subgroups of patients benefiting from this technique are described

  12. CT and MRI matching for radiotherapy planning in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasch, C; Keus, R; Touw, A; Lebesque, J; Van Herk, M [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of matched CT and MRI information on target delineation in radiotherapy planning for head and neck tumors. MRI images of eight patients with head and neck cancer in supine position, not necessarily obtained in radiotherapy treatment position were matched to the CT scans made in radiotherapy position using automatic three-dimensional chamfer-matching of bony structures. Four independent observers delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) in CT scans and axial and sagittal MR scans. The GTV`s were compared, overlapping volumes and non-overlapping volumes between the different datasets and observers were determined. In all patients a good match of CT and MRI information was accomplished in the head region. The combined information provided a better visualisation of the GTV, oedema and normal tissues compared with CT or MRI alone. Determination of overlapping and non-overlapping volumes proved to be a valuable tool to measure uncertainties in the determination of the GTV. CT-MRI matching in patients with head and neck tumors is feasible and makes a more accurate irradiation with higher tumor doses and less normal tissue complications possible. Remaining uncertainties in the determination of the GTV can be quantified using the combined information of MRI and CT.

  13. Potential impact of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried; Graf, Reinhold; Denecke, Timm; Geworski, Lilli; Wurm, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with 68 Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV CT/MRI was 22(±19)cm 3 ; GTV PET was 23(±20)cm 3 . Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9(±10)cm 3 and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7(±11)cm 3 ). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15(±14)cm 3 . The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV CT/MRI and GTV PET accounted to 16(±15)cm 3 (93%, p 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration. 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET also allows detection of additional lesions in patients with multiple meningiomas. (orig.)

  14. PET/CT and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; CNR, Milano; S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza; Di Muzio, N.; Picchio, M.; Bettinardi, V.; Gilardi, M.C.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; Fazio, F.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of PET/CT applications in radiotherapy, specifically its use in disease staging, patient selection, treatment planning and treatment evaluation. Diseases for which radiotherapy with radical intent is indicated will be considered, as well as those in which PET/CT may actually change the course of disease. The methodological and technological aspects of PET/CT in radiotherapy are discussed, focusing on the problem of target volume definition with CT and PET functional imaging and the problem of tumor motion with respect to imaging and dose delivery

  15. CT images and radiotherapy treatment planning of patients with breast cancer: A dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here were originally collected for the research project “CT-Scan processing and analysis in patient with breast cancer after radiotherapy”. Also, it reported in our study “Prediction of Lung Tissue Damage by Evaluating Clinical and Dosimetric Parameters in Breast Cancer Patients” (Hasanabdali et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes and directly links to 52 subjects referred to Mahdieh Oncology and Radiotherapy Center from February to August 2015. Treatment planning was done for delivering 50 Gy dose to PTV in 25 fractions. the lungs and heart objects were extracted from CT images along with compliance Dose plan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH and Dose-mass histogram (DMH extracted using CT images and dose plan matrix. Moreover, the complete clinical and dosimetric specifications of subjects is attached.

  16. Contribution of PET–CT in radiotherapy planning of oesophageal carcinoma: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Gabriel Sai Man

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to systematically review published data on the efficacy of positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET–CT) in the radiotherapy planning process of patients with oesophageal carcinoma. Methods: A systematic search of the PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and ScienceDirect databases was performed. The quality of the included studies was appraised using validated assessment tool. Data of the studies were synthesized, compared and evaluated by constructing evidentiary tables. Results: The 37 included studies, comprising a total sample size of 1921 patients, had moderate methodological quality. Overall primary tumour detection rate was 92.7%, and pooling estimate of specificity was 88% (95%CI: 83–91%) for local lymph node metastasis. The pooled studies presented heterogeneity for sensitivity (p < 0.01). The introduction of PET–CT to the radiotherapy planning process has facilitated target volume delineation. A standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 could be used in supplementation to visual assessment by a qualified practitioner. Conclusions: PET–CT has a high specificity but due to its variable sensitivity, information from other clinical investigations should still be sought. Discretion and sound clinical judgment must also be exercised before using the biologic information for radiotherapy planning

  17. New horizons with PET/CT in high-tech radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjieva, T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:The precise delineation of exposed volumes in the high-tech radiotherapy is a major problem. The malignoma imaging was revolutionized by PET. PET became one of the routine imaging methods in developed countries in Europe and USA. PET with 18-FDG, combined with structural and topographic representation of images by CT, currently provides the most reliable information about the location and spread of tumor. Three dimensional radiotherapy planning is a challenge in today's practice and requires the most accurate visualization of the tumor, with its functional characteristics (proliferation activity, hypoxic cells, apoptosis, neoangiogenesis) and surrounding radiosensitive normal tissue and organs. The collected information about the main indications for radiotherapy planning using PET / CT in head and neck cancers , small cell lung carcinoma and some malignant lymphomas has been discussed. The problem of false positive and false negative findings has been also considered. The protocol for 18-FDG PET / CT conducting according to the agreed consensus of the IAEA expert meeting held in 2006 is presented

  18. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Traditional computed tomography (CT) units provide a maximum scan field-of-view (sFOV) diameter of 50 cm and a limited bore size, which cannot accommodate a large patient habitus or an extended simulation setup in radiation therapy (RT). Wide-bore CT scanners with increased bore size were developed to address these needs. Some scanners have the capacity to reconstruct the CT images at an extended FOV (eFOV), through data interpolation or extrapolation, using projection data acquired with a conventional sFOV. Objects that extend past the sFOV for eFOV reconstruction may generate image artifacts resulting from truncated projection data; this may distort CT numbers and structure contours in the region beyond the sFOV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction with a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. Methods: Testing phantoms (i.e., a mini CT phantom with equivalent tissue inserts, a set of CT normal phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms of the thorax and the pelvis) were used to evaluate eFOV artifacts. Reference baseline images of these phantoms were acquired with the phantom centrally positioned within the sFOV. For comparison, the phantoms were then shifted laterally and scanned partially outside the sFOV, but still within the eFOV. Treatment plans were generated for the thoracic and pelvic anthropomorphic phantoms utilizing the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) to study the potential effects of eFOV artifacts on dose calculations. All dose calculations of baseline and test treatment plans were carried out using the same MU. Results: Results show that both body contour and CT numbers are altered by image artifacts in eFOV reconstruction. CT number distortions of up to -356 HU for bone tissue and up to 323 HU for lung tissue were observed in the mini CT phantom. Results from the large body normal phantom, which is close to a clinical patient size, show

  19. 18 F-FDG PET/CT for planning external beam radiotherapy alters therapy in 11% of 581 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Loft-Jakobsen, Annika; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Højgaard, Liselotte; Roed, Henrik; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2018-03-01

    18 F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) used in radiotherapy planning for extra-cerebral malignancy may reveal metastases to distant sites that may affect the choice of therapy. To investigate the role of FDG PET/CT on treatment strategy changes induced by the use of PET/CT as part of the radiotherapy planning. 'A major change of treatment strategy' was defined as either including more lesions in the gross tumour volume (GTV) distant from the primary tumour or a change in treatment modalities. The study includes 581 consecutive patients who underwent an FDG PET/CT scan for radiotherapy planning in our institution in the year 2008. All PET/CT scans were performed with the patient in treatment position with the use of immobilization devices according to the intended radiotherapy treatment. All scans were evaluated by a nuclear medicine physician together with a radiologist to delineate PET-positive GTV (GTV-PET). For 63 of the patients (11%), the PET/CT simulation scans resulted in a major change in treatment strategy because of the additional diagnostic information. Changes were most frequently observed in patients with lung cancer (20%) or upper gastrointestinal cancer (12%). In 65% of the patients for whom the PET/CT simulation scan revealed unexpected dissemination, radiotherapy was given - changed (n = 38) or unchanged (n = 13) according to the findings on the FDG PET/CT. Unexpected dissemination on the FDG PET/CT scanning performed for radiotherapy planning caused a change in treatment strategy in 11% of 581 patients. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. How precise is manual CT-MRI registration for cranial radiotherapy planning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; South, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    Manual fusion is a readily available image registration technique that does not require matching algorithms. The operator performs rigid-body transformations interactively. The precision of Manual fusion (as implemented on the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system) was required for cranial CT-MR images used in radiotherapy planning for typical centrally located planning target volumes . Materials and Methods: A multi-stage Manual fusion procedure was developed which 11 observers followed to match the head contour, bones, soft tissues and contoured structures for 5 patient image-sets. Registration parameters were calculated by solving the transformation matrix following a consistent order of translations (T) and rotations (R). The mean position of centre of each planning target volumes averaged over all observers was used as the reference. The effect of mis registration on the planning target volumes co-ordinates and the volume increase resulting from application of a margin for registration uncertainty were calculated. Results: Mean intra- and inter-observer T/R SDs were 0.5 mm/ 0.4 d ig a nd 1.1 mm/ 1.0 d ig , respectively. Mean intra- and inter-observer registration error (3D distance of each planning target volumes centre from the mean position for all observers) was 0.7 ±0.3 mm (1 SD) and 1.6±0.7 mm respectively, the latter reducing to 1.4±0.6 mm excluding the 3 least experienced operators. A subsequent 2 mm margin for mis registration on average increased the planning target volume by 27%. Conclusion: Moderately trained operators produced clinically acceptable results while experienced operators improved the precision. Manual fusion still has an important role in the registration of cranial CT and MR images for radiotherapy planning especially for under-resourced centers

  1. New perspective in high tech radiotherapy planning using PET/CT images (Radiation oncologist's view on PET/CT usage)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjieva, T.; Bildirev, N.; Koleva, I.; Zahariev, Z.; Vasileva, V.; Encheva, E.; Sultanov, B.

    2010-01-01

    Biological images provided by 18F-FDG PET in combination with structural X ray picture currently offer the most accurate available information on tumour staging, curative antitumour effect for prognosis, impairment of organ function after treatment, as well as primary tumour detection in unknown primary metastatic disease. The authors as radiation oncologists critically have analyzed numerous clinical trials and two guidelines to prove PET/ CT benefit in radiotherapy practice. At present they found lack of scientific evidence to confirm that patient outcomes are superior as a result of the use of PET in RT planning. PET/CT offers a best image for tumour delineation only in some cases of lung cancer, mediastinal lymph nodes and malignant lymphomas. 11C methionin PET adds additional information on postoperative MRI image for brain tumours. Inflammation as postradiation phenomenon, as well as physiological organ movements leads to false-positive PET signal. High tech radiotherapy methods require delineation on precise images given after multidisciplinary team expertise - a practice that is possible only in clinical trials, These unsolved problems have raised many ethical challenges in medical, scientific and social aspect, if wide and routine use of FDG-PET u PET/CT is advocated. (authors)

  2. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT in the planning of radiotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Loft, Annika; Hansen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has excellent survival rates but carries a high risk of late treatment-related adverse effects. Modern, individualised therapeutic strategies require an accurate determination of the extent of the disease. This study investigated the potential impact...... of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computerised tomogrpahy (FDG-PET/CT) in the planning of involved field radiotherapy (IFRT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty patients received staging FDG-PET/CT before therapy, and IFRT after a short course of ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin......, vinblastine, dacarbazine) chemotherapy. IFRT planning was performed using only the CT data from the FDG-PET/CT scan. Later, the IFRT planning was performed anew using the FDG-PET/CT data as basis for contouring. RESULTS: In 20 out of 30 patients, the radiotherapy (RT) course was unaffected by the addition...

  3. Mid-ventilation CT scan construction from four-dimensional respiration-correlated CT scans for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthaus, Jochem W. H.; Schneider, Christoph; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; van Herk, Marcel; Belderbos, José S. A.; Rossi, Maddalena M. G.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Damen, Eugène M. F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Four-dimensional (4D) respiration-correlated imaging techniques can be used to obtain (respiration) artifact-free computed tomography (CT) images of the thorax. Current radiotherapy planning systems, however, do not accommodate 4D-CT data. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple,

  4. The influence of CT image noise on proton range calculation in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V; Paige, Sandra L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to evaluate the relationship between the stochastic errors in CT numbers and the standard deviation of the computed proton beam range in radiotherapy planning. The stochastic voxel-to-voxel variation in CT numbers called 'noise,' may be due to signal registration, processing and numerical image reconstruction technique. Noise in CT images may cause a deviation in the computed proton range from the physical proton range, even assuming that the error due to CT number-stopping power calibration is removed. To obtain the probability density function (PDF) of the computed proton range, we have used the continuing slowing down approximation (CSDA) and the uncorrelated white Gaussian noise along the proton path. The model of white noise was accepted because for the slice-based fan-beam CT scanner; the power-spectrum properties apply only to the axial (x, y) domain and the noise is uncorrelated in the z domain. However, the possible influence of the noise power spectrum on the standard deviation of the range should be investigated in the future. A random number generator was utilized for noise simulation and this procedure was iteratively repeated to obtain convergence of range PDF, which approached a Gaussian distribution. We showed that the standard deviation of the range, σ, increases linearly with the initial proton energy, computational grid size and standard deviation of the voxel values. The 95% confidence interval width of the range PDF, which is defined as 4σ, may reach 0.6 cm for the initial proton energy of 200 MeV, computational grid 0.25 cm and 5% standard deviation of CT voxel values. Our results show that the range uncertainty due to random errors in CT numbers may be significant and comparable to the uncertainties due to calibration of CT numbers. (note)

  5. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1–2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85–6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins.

  6. Potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Graf, Reinhold [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiology, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Geworski, Lilli [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department for Radiation Safety and Medical Physics, Hannover (Germany); Wurm, Reinhard [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder), Department for Radiation Therapy and Radiooncology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV{sub CT/MRI} was 22({+-}19)cm{sup 3}; GTV{sub PET} was 23({+-}20)cm{sup 3}. Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9({+-}10)cm{sup 3} and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7({+-}11)cm{sup 3}). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15({+-}14)cm{sup 3}. The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV{sub CT/MRI} and GTV{sub PET} accounted to 16({+-}15)cm{sup 3} (93%, p < 0.001). In a subgroup of seven patients with multiple meningiomas, PET showed a total of 19 lesions; nine of them were not recognizable by CT or MRI. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration

  7. Classification of fibroglandular tissue distribution in the breast based on radiotherapy planning CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Evans, Philip; Windridge, David; Harris, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of breast tissues is required for a number of applications such as model based deformable registration in breast radiotherapy. The accuracy of breast tissue segmentation is affected by the spatial distribution (or pattern) of fibroglandular tissue (FT). The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate texture features, determined from planning computed tomography (CT) data, to classify the spatial distribution of FT in the breast. Planning CT data of 23 patients were evaluated in this study. Texture features were derived from the radial glandular fraction (RGF), which described the distribution of FT within three breast regions (posterior, middle, and anterior). Using visual assessment, experts grouped patients according to FT spatial distribution: sparse or non-sparse. Differences in the features between the two groups were investigated using the Wilcoxon rank test. Classification performance of the features was evaluated for a range of support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. Experts found eight patients and 15 patients had sparse and non-sparse spatial distribution of FT, respectively. A large proportion of features (>9 of 13) from the individual breast regions had significant differences (p <0.05) between the sparse and non-sparse group. The features from middle region had most significant differences and gave the highest classification accuracy for all the SVM kernels investigated. Overall, the features from middle breast region achieved highest accuracy (91 %) with the linear SVM kernel. This study found that features based on radial glandular fraction provide a means for discriminating between fibroglandular tissue distributions and could achieve a classification accuracy of 91 %

  8. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1-2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85-6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Comparison of CT and positron emission tomography/CT coregistered images in planning radical radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacManus, M.; D'Costa, I.; Ball, D.; Everitt, S.; Andrews, J.; Ackerly, T.; Binns, D.; Lau, E.; Hicks, R.J.; Weih, L.

    2007-01-01

    Imaging with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) significantly improves lung cancer staging, especially when PET and CT information are combined. We describe a method for obtaining CT and PET images at separate acquisitions, which allows coregistration and incorporation of PET information into the radiotherapy (RT) planning process for non-small-cell lung cancer. The influence of PET information on RT planning was analysed for 10 consecutive patients. Computed tomography and PET images were acquired with the patient in an immobilization device, in the treatment position. Using specially written software, PET and CT data were coregistered using fiducial markers and imported into our RT planning system (Cadplan version 6). Treatment plans were prepared with and without access to PET/CT coregistered images and then compared. PET influenced the treatment plan in all cases. In three cases, geographic misses (gross tumour outside planning target volume) would have occurred had PET not been used. In a further three cases, better planning target volume marginal coverage was achieved with PET. In four patients, three with atelectasis, there were significant reductions in V20 (percentage of the total lung volume receiving 20 Gy or more). Use of coregistered PET/CT images significantly altered treatment plans in a majority of cases. This method could be used in routine practice at centres without access to a combined PET/CT scanner

  10. Reconstruction of a time-averaged midposition CT scan for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients using deformable registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthaus, J W H; Sonke, J J; van Herk, M; Damen, E M F

    2008-09-01

    lower lobe lung tumors move with amplitudes of up to 2 cm due to respiration. To reduce respiration imaging artifacts in planning CT scans, 4D imaging techniques are used. Currently, we use a single (midventilation) frame of the 4D data set for clinical delineation of structures and radiotherapy planning. A single frame, however, often contains artifacts due to breathing irregularities, and is noisier than a conventional CT scan since the exposure per frame is lower. Moreover, the tumor may be displaced from the mean tumor position due to hysteresis. The aim of this work is to develop a framework for the acquisition of a good quality scan representing all scanned anatomy in the mean position by averaging transformed (deformed) CT frames, i.e., canceling out motion. A nonrigid registration method is necessary since motion varies over the lung. 4D and inspiration breath-hold (BH) CT scans were acquired for 13 patients. An iterative multiscale motion estimation technique was applied to the 4D CT scan, similar to optical flow but using image phase (gray-value transitions from bright to dark and vice versa) instead. From the (4D) deformation vector field (DVF) derived, the local mean position in the respiratory cycle was computed and the 4D DVF was modified to deform all structures of the original 4D CT scan to this mean position. A 3D midposition (MidP) CT scan was then obtained by (arithmetic or median) averaging of the deformed 4D CT scan. Image registration accuracy, tumor shape deviation with respect to the BH CT scan, and noise were determined to evaluate the image fidelity of the MidP CT scan and the performance of the technique. Accuracy of the used deformable image registration method was comparable to established automated locally rigid registration and to manual landmark registration (average difference to both methods noise of individual 4D CT scan frames. We implemented an accurate method to estimate the motion of structures in a 4D CT scan. Subsequently, a

  11. Dosimetric comparison of stereotactic body radiotherapy using 4D CT and multiphase CT images for treatment planning of lung cancer: Evaluation of the impact on daily dose coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lu; Hayes, Shelly; Paskalev, Kamen; Jin Lihui; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Ma, Charlie C.-M.; Feigenberg, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of using 4D CT and multiphase (helical) CT images for treatment planning target definition and the daily target coverage in hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Materials and methods: For 10 consecutive patients treated with SBRT, a set of 4D CT images and three sets of multiphase helical CT scans, taken during free-breathing, end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold, were obtained. Three separate planning target volumes (PTVs) were created from these image sets. A PTV 4D was created from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed 4D images by adding a 3 mm margin to the internal target volume (ITV). A PTV 3CT was created by generating ITV from gross target volumes (GTVs) contoured from the three multiphase images. Finally, a third conventional PTV (denoted PTV conv ) was created by adding 5 mm in the axial direction and 10 mm in the longitudinal direction to the GTV (in this work, GTV = CTV = clinical target volume) generated from free-breathing helical CT scans. Treatment planning was performed based on PTV 4D (denoted as Plan-1), and the plan was adopted for PTV 3CT and PTV conv to form Plan-2 and Plan-3, respectively, by superimposing 'Plan-1' onto the helical free-breathing CT data set using modified beam apertures that conformed to either PTV 3CT or PTV conv . We first studied the impact of PTV design on treatment planning by evaluating the dosimetry of the three PTVs under the three plans, respectively. Then we examined the effect of the PTV designs on the daily target coverage by utilizing pre-treatment localization CT (CT-on-rails) images for daily GTV contouring and dose recalculation. The changes in the dose parameters of D 95 and D 99 (the dose received by 95% and 99% of the target volume, respectively), and the V p (the volume receiving the prescription dose) of the daily GTVs were compared under the three plans before and after setup error correction

  12. Target volume definition with 18F-FDG PET-CT in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, K. J.; Hanna, G. G.; Hounsell, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using 18F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTF) purposes, and in particular for defining target volumes. This is a rapidly evolving subject and this review describes the background to this application of PET imaging and discusses the issues involved. (authors)

  13. Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features

  14. A prospective study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET on CT-based radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Trevor; Everitt, Craig; Yuen, Kally; Condron, Sara; Hui, Andrew; Ngan, Samuel Y.K.; Pitman, Alexander; Lau, Eddie W.F.; MacManus, Michael; Binns, David; Ackerly, Trevor; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study sought to determine how the use of combined PET/CT for radiotherapy treatment planning of oesophageal cancer would alter the delineation of tumour volumes compared to CT alone if PET/CT is assumed to more accurately represent true disease extent. Patients and methods: All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning in the radiotherapy treatment position. For each patient, two separate gross tumour volumes (GTV) were defined, one based on CT images alone (GTV-CT) and another based on combined PET/CT data (GTV-PET). Corresponding planning target volumes (PTV) were generated, and separate treatment plans were then produced. For each patient, volumetric analysis of GTV-CT, PTV-CT and GTV-PET was performed to quantify the proportion of PET-avid disease that was not included in the GTV and PTV (geographic miss) if CT data alone were used for radiotherapy planning. Assessment of the cranial and caudal extent of the primary oesophageal tumour as defined by CT alone vs PET/CT was also compared. Results: The addition of PET information altered the clinical stage in 8 of 21 eligible patients enrolled on the study (38%); 4 patients had distant metastatic disease and 4 had unsuspected regional nodal disease. Sixteen patients proceeded to the radiotherapy planning phase of the study and received definitive chemoradiation planned with the PET/CT data set. The GTV based on CT information alone excluded PET-avid disease in 11 patients (69%), and in five patients (31%) this would have resulted in a geographic miss of gross tumour. The discordance between CT and PET/CT was due mainly to differences in defining the longitudinal extent of disease in the oesophagus. The cranial extent of the primary tumour as defined by CT vs PET/CT differed in 75% of cases, while the caudal extent differed in 81%. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that if combined PET/CT is used for radiotherapy treatment planning, there may be alterations to the delineation

  15. Linked statistical shape models for multi-modal segmentation: application to prostate CT-MR segmentation in radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Najeeb; Chappelow, Jonathan; Toth, Robert; Kim, Sung; Hahn, Stephen; Vapiwala, Neha; Lin, Haibo; Both, Stefan; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate delineations of a SOI's boundary on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. We apply the LSSM in the context of multi-modal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where we segment the prostate on MRI and CT simultaneously. Prostate capsule segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans have to be formulated on CT. Since accurate delineations of the prostate boundary are very difficult to obtain on CT, pre-treatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to do compared to CT. Hence, our framework incorporates multi-modal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of prostate (obtained from an expert radiation oncologist) on MR training images onto corresponding CT images. The delineations of the prostate capsule on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. We acquired 7 MRI-CT patient studies and used the leave-one-out strategy to train and evaluate our LSSM (fLSSM), built using expert ground truth delineations on MRI and MRI-CT fusion derived capsule delineations on CT. A unique attribute of our fLSSM is that it does not require expert delineations of the capsule on CT. In order to perform prostate MRI segmentation using the fLSSM, we employed a regionbased approach where we deformed the evolving prostate boundary to optimize a mutual information based cost criterion, which took into account region-based intensity statistics of the image being segmented. The final prostate segmentation was then

  16. Reconstruction of a time-averaged midposition CT scan for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients using deformable registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Sonke, J.-J.; Herk, M. van; Damen, E. M. F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: lower lobe lung tumors move with amplitudes of up to 2 cm due to respiration. To reduce respiration imaging artifacts in planning CT scans, 4D imaging techniques are used. Currently, we use a single (midventilation) frame of the 4D data set for clinical delineation of structures and radiotherapy planning. A single frame, however, often contains artifacts due to breathing irregularities, and is noisier than a conventional CT scan since the exposure per frame is lower. Moreover, the tumor may be displaced from the mean tumor position due to hysteresis. The aim of this work is to develop a framework for the acquisition of a good quality scan representing all scanned anatomy in the mean position by averaging transformed (deformed) CT frames, i.e., canceling out motion. A nonrigid registration method is necessary since motion varies over the lung. Methods and Materials: 4D and inspiration breath-hold (BH) CT scans were acquired for 13 patients. An iterative multiscale motion estimation technique was applied to the 4D CT scan, similar to optical flow but using image phase (gray-value transitions from bright to dark and vice versa) instead. From the (4D) deformation vector field (DVF) derived, the local mean position in the respiratory cycle was computed and the 4D DVF was modified to deform all structures of the original 4D CT scan to this mean position. A 3D midposition (MidP) CT scan was then obtained by (arithmetic or median) averaging of the deformed 4D CT scan. Image registration accuracy, tumor shape deviation with respect to the BH CT scan, and noise were determined to evaluate the image fidelity of the MidP CT scan and the performance of the technique. Results: Accuracy of the used deformable image registration method was comparable to established automated locally rigid registration and to manual landmark registration (average difference to both methods <0.5 mm for all directions) for the tumor region. From visual assessment, the registration was good

  17. SU-F-J-81: Evaluation of Automated Deformable Registration Between Planning Computed Tomography (CT) and Daily Cone Beam CT Images Over the Course of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matney, J; Hammers, J; Kaidar-Person, O; Wang, A; Chen, R; Das, S; Marks, L; Mavroidis, P [University North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compute daily dose delivered during radiotherapy, deformable registration needs to be relatively fast, automated, and accurate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of commercial deformable registration software for deforming between two modalities: planning computed tomography (pCT) images acquired for treatment planning and cone beam (CB) CT images acquired prior to each fraction of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Methods: A workflow was designed using MIM Software™ that aligned and deformed pCT into daily CBCT images in two steps: (1) rigid shifts applied after daily CBCT imaging to align patient anatomy to the pCT and (2) normalized intensity-based deformable registration to account for interfractional anatomical variations. The physician-approved CTV and organ and risk (OAR) contours were deformed from the pCT to daily CBCT over the course of treatment. The same structures were delineated on each daily CBCT by a radiation oncologist. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) mean and standard deviations were calculated to quantify the deformable registration quality for prostate, bladder, rectum and femoral heads. Results: To date, contour comparisons have been analyzed for 31 daily fractions of 2 of 10 of the cohort. Interim analysis shows that right and left femoral head contours demonstrate the highest agreement (DSC: 0.96±0.02) with physician contours. Additionally, deformed bladder (DSC: 0.81±0.09) and prostate (DSC: 0.80±0.07) have good agreement with physician-defined daily contours. Rectum contours have the highest variations (DSC: 0.66±0.10) between the deformed and physician-defined contours on daily CBCT imaging. Conclusion: For structures with relatively high contrast boundaries on CBCT, the MIM automated deformable registration provided accurate representations of the daily contours during treatment delivery. These findings will permit subsequent investigations to automate daily dose computation from CBCT. However

  18. A method of computerized evaluation of CT based treatment plans in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heufelder, J.; Zink, K.; Scholz, M.; Kramer, K.D.; Welker, K.

    2003-01-01

    Selection of an optimal treatment plan requires the comparison of dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVH) of all plan variants calculated for the patient. Each treatment plan consists generally of 30 to 40 CT slices, making the comparison difficult and time consuming. The present study proposes an objective index that takes into account both physical and biological criteria for the evaluation of the dose distribution. The DHV-based evaluation index can be calculated according to the following four criteria: ICRU conformity (review of the differences between the dose in the planning target volume and the ICRU recommendations); mean dose and dose homogeneity of the planning target volume; the product of tumour complication probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP); and finally a criterion that takes into account the dose load of non-segmented tissue portions within the CT slice. The application of the objective index is demonstrated for two different clinical cases (esophagus and breast carcinoma). During the evaluation period, the objective index showed a good correlation between the doctor's decision and the proposed objective index. Thus, the objective index is suitable for a computer-based evaluation of treatment plans. (orig.) [de

  19. Quality evaluation of radiotherapy treatment planning using 3-dimensional CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Yutaka; Isobe, Yoshihide; Ozaki, Shin; Hosoki, Takuya; Mori, Shigeru; Ikeda, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Recently superimposition of dose distribution onto CT images has become available with the use of planning computers. However, the distribution is mostly along the plane of central axis of the beam, and evaluation of the quality of planning has not yet been established. In this paper, a method to evaluate the quality is demonstrated, using the extended definitions of ICRU 29 concept in to 3-dimensions. Therapeutic efficiency (Target Volume dose/Treatment Volume dose) is the main key to evaluate it. Concept and procedures are described in detail with two case examples. (author)

  20. MRI or CT for pretreatment staging and radiotherapy planning for radiochemotherapy in distal rectal cancer. Radiologists point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vloka, M.; Kirkova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In the recent years, the therapeutic approach to rectal cancer changed dramatically. Implementation of a common mesorectal excision and preoperative radiotherapy has become a standard procedure. Noninvasive imaging methods have become basic and leading methods in the process of pre-therapy staging and rectal cancer radiotherapy planning. What you will learn : Following the recommendations of the 2013 ESGAR EURECCA 2012 we will present: a comparative data about the place and role of MRI and CT in the algorithm for low rectal carcinoma staging ; a standard MRI protocol for low rectum carcinoma staging as well as the questions concerning the image interpretation that the radiologist needs to answer. Discussion : Based on the European rules and consensus in the standard protocols implementation of in conducting MRI in rectal cancer, we have the opportunity for preoperative staging of the tumor and hence for proper treatment. The high spatial and tissue resolution of MRI allows carcinoma’s visualization at the depth infiltration of the wall of rectum, distance from mesorectal fascia, involvement of anorectal sphincter, pelvic floor and adjacent bodies, involvement of the venous plexus and the metastatic pararectal lymph nodes presence. Additional performed lung, abdomen and pelvis CT (MDCT) has limited chance for tumor staging, but it serves for distant metastases detection. Conclusion: MRI is the main method for T and N staging and re-staging of low carcinoma of the rectum. MDCT is used for determination of the N stages of the disease

  1. Computerised tomography in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badcock, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of computed tomography as an adjunct to radiotherapy planning. Until recently, acquisition of accurate data concerning tumour anatomy lagged behind other developments in radiotherapy. With the advent of computer-tomography (CT), these data can be displayed and transmitted to a treatment planning computer. It is concluded that the greatest inaccuracies in the radiation treatment of patients are to be found in both the inadequate delineation of the target volume within the patient and changes in body outline relative to the target volume over the length of the irradiated volume. The technique was useful in various subgroups (pelvic, intra-thoracic and chest-wall tumours) and for those patients being treated palliatively. With an estimated improvement in cure rate of 4.5% and cost-effective factors of between 3.3 and 5, CT-assisted radiotherapy planning appears to be a worthwhile procedure. (orig.)

  2. An assessment of the number of CT slices necessary to plan breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, D.; Beckham, W.; Delaney, G.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the number of CT slices required to produce satisfactory dose distribution for tangential field irradiation of the chest wall and breast and to assess correlation of this with the volume of breast tissue treated. We conclude that a single-slice plan is unsatisfactory in providing sufficient information about the dose variation across the treatment volume and that ideally a 3D plan with DVHs should be produced. If the required data is unavailable then a minimum of three slices should be used as an approximation. We also propose a software tool for treatment planning systems, which calculates the percentage of the total PTV having dose outside the ICRU 50 radiation dose distribution homogeneity guideline range

  3. Increased risk of biochemical and local failure in patients with distended rectum on the planning CT for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crevoisier, Renaud de; Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Cheung, Rex; Cox, James D.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively test the hypothesis that rectal distension on the planning computed tomography (CT) scan is associated with an increased risk of biochemical and local failure among patients irradiated for prostate carcinoma when a daily repositioning technique based on direct prostate-organ localization is not used. Methods and Materials: This study included 127 patients who received definitive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer to a total dose of 78 Gy at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Rectal distension was assessed by calculation of the average cross-sectional rectal area (CSA; defined as the rectal volume divided by length) and measuring three rectal diameters on the planning CT. The impact of rectal distension on biochemical control, 2-year prostate biopsy results, and incidence of Grade 2 or greater late rectal bleeding was assessed. Results: The incidence of biochemical failure was significantly higher among patients with distended rectums (CSA >11.2 cm 2 ) on the planning CT scan (p 0.0009, log-rank test). Multivariate analysis indicates that rectal distension and high-risk disease are independent risk factors for biochemical failure, with hazard ratios of 3.89 (95% C.I. 1.58 to 9.56, p = 0.003) and 2.45 (95% C.I. 1.18 to 5.08, p = 0.016), respectively. The probability of residual tumor without evidence of radiation treatment (as scored by the pathologist) increased significantly with rectal distension (p = 0.010, logistic analysis), and a lower incidence of Grade 2 or greater late rectal bleeding within 2 years was simultaneously observed with higher CSA values (p = 0.031, logistic analysis). Conclusions: We found strong evidence that rectal distension on the treatment-planning CT scan decreased the probability of biochemical control, local control, and rectal toxicity in patients who were treated without daily image-guided prostate localization, presumably because of geographic misses. Therefore, an

  4. An interactive tool for CT volume rendering and sagittal plane-picking of the prostate for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jani, Ashesh B.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Chen, George T.Y.; Grzezcszuk, Robert P.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Accurate and precise target volume and critical structure definition is a basic necessity in radiotherapy. The prostate, particularly the apex (an important potential site of recurrence in prostate cancer patients), is a challenging structure to define using any modality, including conventional axial CT. Invasive or expensive techniques, such as retrograde urethrography or MRI, could be avoided if localization of the prostate were possible using information already available on the planning CT. Our primary objective was to build a software tool to determine whether volume rendering and sagittal plane-picking, which are CT-based, noninvasive visualization techniques, were of utility in radiotherapy treatment planning for the prostate. Methods: Using AVS (Application Visualization System) on a Silicon Graphics Indigo 2 High Impact workstation, we have developed a tool that enables the clinician to efficiently navigate a CT volume and to use volume rendering and sagittal plane-picking to better define structures at any anatomic site. We applied the tool to the specific example of the prostate to compare the two visualization techniques with the current standard of axial CT. The prostate was defined on 80-slice CT scans (scanning thickness 4mm, pixel size 2mm x 2mm) of prostate cancer patients using axial CT images, volume-rendered CT images, and sagittal plane-picked images. Results: The navigation of the prostate using the different visualization techniques qualitatively demonstrated that the sagittal plane-picked images, and even more so the volume-rendered images, revealed the prostate (particularly the lower border) better in relationship to the surrounding regional anatomy (bladder, rectum, pelvis, and penile structures) than did the axial images. A quantitative comparison of the target volumes obtained by navigating using the different visualization techniques demonstrated that, when compared to the prostate volume defined on axial CT, a larger volume

  5. A One-Step Cone-Beam CT-Enabled Planning-to-Treatment Model for Palliative Radiotherapy-From Development to Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Rebecca K.S., E-mail: rebecca.wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel; Varma, Anita [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bissonnette, Jean Pierre; Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Elder, Christine [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Martin, Melanie; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Panzarella, Tony [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gospodarowicz, Mary [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-enabled one-step simulation-to-treatment process for the treatment of bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A three-phase prospective study was conducted. Patients requiring palliative radiotherapy to the spine, mediastinum, or abdomen/pelvis suitable for treatment with simple beam geometry ({<=}2 beams) were accrued. Phase A established the accuracy of cone-beam CT images for the purpose of gross tumor target volume (GTV) definition. Phase B evaluated the feasibility of implementing the cone-beam CT-enabled planning process at the treatment unit. Phase C evaluated the online cone-beam CT-enabled process for the planning and treatment of patients requiring radiotherapy for bone metastases. Results: Eighty-four patients participated in this study. Phase A (n = 9) established the adequacy of cone-beam CT images for target definition. Phase B (n = 45) established the quality of treatment plans to be adequate for clinical implementation for bone metastases. When the process was applied clinically in bone metastases (Phase C), the degree of overlap between planning computed tomography (PCT) and cone-beam CT for GTV and between PCT and cone-beam CT for treatment field was 82% {+-} 11% and 97% {+-} 4%, respectively. The oncologist's decision to accept the plan under a time-pressured environment remained of high quality, with the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivering at least 90% of the prescribed dose to 100% {+-} 0% of the cone-beam CT planning target volume (PTV). With the assumption that the PCT PTV is the gold-standard target, the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivered at least 90% and at least 95% of dose to 98% {+-} 2% and 97% {+-} 5% of the PCT PTV, respectively. The mean time for the online planning and treatment process was 32.7 {+-} 4.0 minutes. Patient satisfaction was high, with a trend for superior satisfaction with the cone-beam CT-enabled process. Conclusions: The cone

  6. PLANNING NATIONAL RADIOTHERAPY SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo eRosenblatt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Countries, states and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centres are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment.This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centres, equipment, staff, education pr

  7. Conventional 3D staging PET/CT in CT simulation for lung cancer: impact of rigid and deformable target volume alignments for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, G G; Van Sörnsen De Koste, J R; Carson, K J; O'Sullivan, J M; Hounsell, A R; Senan, S

    2011-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans can improve target definition in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As staging PET/CT scans are increasingly available, we evaluated different methods for co-registration of staging PET/CT data to radiotherapy simulation (RTP) scans. 10 patients underwent staging PET/CT followed by RTP PET/CT. On both scans, gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were delineated using CT (GTV(CT)) and PET display settings. Four PET-based contours (manual delineation, two threshold methods and a source-to-background ratio method) were delineated. The CT component of the staging scan was co-registered using both rigid and deformable techniques to the CT component of RTP PET/CT. Subsequently rigid registration and deformation warps were used to transfer PET and CT contours from the staging scan to the RTP scan. Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was used to assess the registration accuracy of staging-based GTVs following both registration methods with the GTVs delineated on the RTP PET/CT scan. When the GTV(CT) delineated on the staging scan after both rigid registration and deformation was compared with the GTV(CT)on the RTP scan, a significant improvement in overlap (registration) using deformation was observed (mean DSC 0.66 for rigid registration and 0.82 for deformable registration, p = 0.008). A similar comparison for PET contours revealed no significant improvement in overlap with the use of deformable registration. No consistent improvements in similarity measures were observed when deformable registration was used for transferring PET-based contours from a staging PET/CT. This suggests that currently the use of rigid registration remains the most appropriate method for RTP in NSCLC.

  8. SU-E-T-504: Usefulness of CT-MR Fusion in Radiotherapy Planning for Prostate Cancer Patient with Bilateral Hip Replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, R.; Giri, Shankar [University of Mississippi Med. Center, Jackson, MS (United States); VA Medical Center at Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Kumar, P. [VA Medical Center at Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Hu, Y.; Suggs, J.; Yang, C. [University of Mississippi Med. Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Target localization of prostate for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in patients with bilateral hip replacements is difficult due to artifacts in Computed Tomography (CT) images generated from the prostheses high Z materials. In this study, Magnetic Resonance (MR) images fused with CT images are tested as a solution. Methods: CT images of 2.5 mm slice thickness were acquired on a GE Lightspeed scanner with a flat-topped couch for a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip replacements. T2 weighted images of 5 mm separation were acquired on a MR Scanner. After the MR-CT registration on a radiotherapy treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian), the target volumes were defined by the radiation oncologists on MR images and then transferred to CT images for planning and dose calculation. The CT Hounsfield Units (HU) was reassigned to zero (as water) for artifacts. The Varian flat panel treatment couch was modeled for dose calculation accuracy with heterogeneity correction. A Volume Matrix Arc Therapy (VMAT) and a seven-field IMRT plans were generated, each avoiding any beam transversing the prostheses; the two plans were compared. The superior VMAT plan was used for treating the patient. In-vivo dosimetry was performed using MOSFET (Best Canada) placed in a surgical tube inserted into the patient rectum during therapy. The measured dose was compared with planned dose for MOSFET location. Results: The registration of MR-CT images and the agreement of target volumes were confirmed by three physicians. VMAT plan was deemed superior to IMRT based on dose to critical nearby structures and overall conformality of target dosing. In-vivo measured dose compared with calculated dose was -4.5% which was likely due to attenuation of the surgical tube surrounding MOSFET. Conclusion: When artifacts are present on planning CT due to bilateral hip prostheses, MR-CT image fusion is a feasible solution for target delineation.

  9. SU-E-T-504: Usefulness of CT-MR Fusion in Radiotherapy Planning for Prostate Cancer Patient with Bilateral Hip Replacements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, R.; Giri, Shankar; Kumar, P.; Hu, Y.; Suggs, J.; Yang, C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Target localization of prostate for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in patients with bilateral hip replacements is difficult due to artifacts in Computed Tomography (CT) images generated from the prostheses high Z materials. In this study, Magnetic Resonance (MR) images fused with CT images are tested as a solution. Methods: CT images of 2.5 mm slice thickness were acquired on a GE Lightspeed scanner with a flat-topped couch for a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip replacements. T2 weighted images of 5 mm separation were acquired on a MR Scanner. After the MR-CT registration on a radiotherapy treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian), the target volumes were defined by the radiation oncologists on MR images and then transferred to CT images for planning and dose calculation. The CT Hounsfield Units (HU) was reassigned to zero (as water) for artifacts. The Varian flat panel treatment couch was modeled for dose calculation accuracy with heterogeneity correction. A Volume Matrix Arc Therapy (VMAT) and a seven-field IMRT plans were generated, each avoiding any beam transversing the prostheses; the two plans were compared. The superior VMAT plan was used for treating the patient. In-vivo dosimetry was performed using MOSFET (Best Canada) placed in a surgical tube inserted into the patient rectum during therapy. The measured dose was compared with planned dose for MOSFET location. Results: The registration of MR-CT images and the agreement of target volumes were confirmed by three physicians. VMAT plan was deemed superior to IMRT based on dose to critical nearby structures and overall conformality of target dosing. In-vivo measured dose compared with calculated dose was -4.5% which was likely due to attenuation of the surgical tube surrounding MOSFET. Conclusion: When artifacts are present on planning CT due to bilateral hip prostheses, MR-CT image fusion is a feasible solution for target delineation

  10. A One-Step Cone-Beam CT-Enabled Planning-to-Treatment Model for Palliative Radiotherapy-From Development to Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Letourneau, Daniel; Varma, Anita; Bissonnette, Jean Pierre; Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Elder, Christine; Martin, Melanie; Bezjak, Andrea; Panzarella, Tony; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Jaffray, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a cone-beam computed tomography (CT)–enabled one-step simulation-to-treatment process for the treatment of bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A three-phase prospective study was conducted. Patients requiring palliative radiotherapy to the spine, mediastinum, or abdomen/pelvis suitable for treatment with simple beam geometry (≤2 beams) were accrued. Phase A established the accuracy of cone-beam CT images for the purpose of gross tumor target volume (GTV) definition. Phase B evaluated the feasibility of implementing the cone-beam CT–enabled planning process at the treatment unit. Phase C evaluated the online cone-beam CT–enabled process for the planning and treatment of patients requiring radiotherapy for bone metastases. Results: Eighty-four patients participated in this study. Phase A (n = 9) established the adequacy of cone-beam CT images for target definition. Phase B (n = 45) established the quality of treatment plans to be adequate for clinical implementation for bone metastases. When the process was applied clinically in bone metastases (Phase C), the degree of overlap between planning computed tomography (PCT) and cone-beam CT for GTV and between PCT and cone-beam CT for treatment field was 82% ± 11% and 97% ± 4%, respectively. The oncologist’s decision to accept the plan under a time-pressured environment remained of high quality, with the cone-beam CT–generated treatment plan delivering at least 90% of the prescribed dose to 100% ± 0% of the cone-beam CT planning target volume (PTV). With the assumption that the PCT PTV is the gold-standard target, the cone-beam CT–generated treatment plan delivered at least 90% and at least 95% of dose to 98% ± 2% and 97% ± 5% of the PCT PTV, respectively. The mean time for the online planning and treatment process was 32.7 ± 4.0 minutes. Patient satisfaction was high, with a trend for superior satisfaction with the cone-beam CT–enabled process. Conclusions: The cone-beam CT

  11. Accuracy of software-assisted contour propagation from planning CT to cone beam CT in head and neck radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Christian A.; Elstrøm, Ulrik V.; Jensen, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    ) algorithm for organs at risk (OAR) in the neck region, when applied to CBCT. Material and methods: For 30 head and neck cancer (HNC) patients 14 OARs including parotid glands, swallowing structures and spinal cord were delineated. Contours were propagated by DIR from CT to the CBCTs of the first and last...... consequences of uncertainties in DIR were reviewed. Results: Mean DSC values of ≥0.8 were considered adequate and were achieved in tongue base (0.91), esophagus (0.85), glottic (0.81) and supraglottic larynx (0.83), inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (0.84), spinal cord (0.89) and all salivary glands...... in the first CBCT. For the last CBCT by direct propagation, adequate DSC values were achieved for tongue base (0.85), esophagus (0.84), spinal cord (0.87) and all salivary glands. Using indirect propagation only tongue base (0.80) and parotid glands (0.87) were ≥0.8. Mean relative dose difference between...

  12. Automated replication of cone beam CT-guided treatments in the Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system for adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Catriona; Mason, Nicole; Guidi, Robyn; Miller, Julie-Anne; Becker, Jillian; Moores, Matthew; Mengersen, Kerrie; Poulsen, Michael; Harden, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    Time-consuming manual methods have been required to register cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with plans in the Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system in order to replicate delivered treatments for adaptive radiotherapy. These methods rely on fiducial marker (FM) placement during CBCT acquisition or the image mid-point to localise the image isocentre. A quality assurance study was conducted to validate an automated CBCT-plan registration method utilising the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Structure Set (RS) and Spatial Registration (RE) files created during online image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). CBCTs of a phantom were acquired with FMs and predetermined setup errors using various online IGRT workflows. The CBCTs, DICOM RS and RE files were imported into Pinnacle(3) plans of the phantom and the resulting automated CBCT-plan registrations were compared to existing manual methods. A clinical protocol for the automated method was subsequently developed and tested retrospectively using CBCTs and plans for six bladder patients. The automated CBCT-plan registration method was successfully applied to thirty-four phantom CBCT images acquired with an online 0 mm action level workflow. Ten CBCTs acquired with other IGRT workflows required manual workarounds. This was addressed during the development and testing of the clinical protocol using twenty-eight patient CBCTs. The automated CBCT-plan registrations were instantaneous, replicating delivered treatments in Pinnacle(3) with errors of ±0.5 mm. These errors were comparable to mid-point-dependant manual registrations but superior to FM-dependant manual registrations. The automated CBCT-plan registration method quickly and reliably replicates delivered treatments in Pinnacle(3) for adaptive radiotherapy.

  13. Fiducial marker guided stereotactic liver radiotherapy: Is a time delay between marker implantation and planning CT needed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Esben S; Bertholet, Jenny; Høyer, Morten

    2016-01-01

    To minimize the risk of marker migration in fiducial marker guided liver SBRT it is common to add a delay of a week between marker implantation and planning CT. This study found that such a delay is unnecessary and could be avoided to minimize the treatment preparation time.......To minimize the risk of marker migration in fiducial marker guided liver SBRT it is common to add a delay of a week between marker implantation and planning CT. This study found that such a delay is unnecessary and could be avoided to minimize the treatment preparation time....

  14. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi [Division of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Noto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Niigata 951-8520 (Japan); Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi, E-mail: masaito@clg.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  15. Automatic quantification of calcifications in the coronary arteries and thoracic aorta on radiotherapy planning CT scans of Western and Asian breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernaat, Sofie A M; van Velzen, Sanne G M; Koh, Vicky; Emaus, Marleen J; Išgum, Ivana; Lessmann, Nikolas; Moes, Shinta; Jacobson, Anouk; Tan, Poey W; Grobbee, Diederick E; van den Bongard, Desiree H J; Tang, Johann I; Verkooijen, Helena M

    2018-04-24

    This study automatically quantified calcifications in coronary arteries (CAC) and thoracic aorta (TAC) on breast planning computed tomography (CT) scans and assessed its reproducibility compared to manual scoring. Dutch (n = 1199) and Singaporean (n = 1090) breast cancer patients with radiotherapy planning CT scan were included. CAC and TAC were automatically scored using deep learning algorithm. CVD risk categories were based on Agatson CAC: 0, 1-10, 11-100, 101-400 and >400. Reliability between automatic and manual scoring was assessed in 120 randomly selected CT scans from each population, with linearly weighted kappa for CAC categories and intraclass correlation coefficient for TAC. Median age was higher in Dutch patients than Singaporean patients: 57 versus 52 years. CAC and TAC increased with age and were more present in Dutch patients than Singaporean patients: 24.2% versus 17.3% and 73.0% versus 62.2%, respectively. Reliability of CAC categories and TAC was excellent in the Netherlands (0.85 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.77-0.93) and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.96-0.98) respectively) and Singapore (0.90 (95% CI = 0.84-0.96) and 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98-0.99) respectively). CAC and TAC prevalence was considerable and increased with age. Deep learning software is a reliable method to automatically measure CAC and TAC on radiotherapy breast CT scans. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Contribution of PET and PET/CT in CTV/PTV-modulation for planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehler, W.; Baum, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    PET and PET/CT enlarge the possibilities of purely anatomic imaging by opening up new horizons in determining the metabolic and molecular properties of tumors. This enables to determine the spread of tumors with higher accuracy, especially concerning the primary staging and the diagnosis of recurrences. Patients with locoregional disease which are curable by surgery or local radiotherapy (eventually in combination with chemotherapy) can be differentiated from those patients, where only palliative treatment is indicated. Novel nuclear medicine procedures, which use specific tracers, open the door for the molecular treatment of tumors. This will be especially important for radiation oncology. In future it will be possible to define specific tumor areas within a morphologically homogeneous tumor (e.g. areas of tumor hypoxia, increased local tumor stem cell concentration, tumor parts with higher proliferative activity etc.). With IMRT (intensity modulated radiotherapy) we have already now the opportunity, to concentrate the dose to these specific tumor areas, without overloading normal tissues and organs at risk. (orig.)

  17. The construction of trunk voxel phantom by using CT images and application to 3 dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. S.; Lee, J. K. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    Trunk voxel phantom was constructed by using whole body CT images and tumor doses were calculated by using Monte Carlo method after simulating situation of radiotheraphy treatment planning. The whole body CT images of VHP (Visual Human Project) man were acquired from National Library of Medicine of USA. 153 slices of trunk part were extracted from whole body CT images and MCNP4B, a general purpose Monte Carlo code, was used for dose calculation. Gray scale of CT images were converted into density of medium and processed into trunk voxel phantom ported to MCNP4B input deck. The conversion method was verified by comparing cross sectional images of voxel phantom with original CT images. Tumor volumes with diameter of 3 cm were defined in liver, stomach and right lung and irradiated with 5, 10 and 15 MeV gamma beam with diameter of 6 cm. The technical basis for 3D dose calculation was established through this study for localization of 3D RTP system.

  18. Validation of nonrigid registration for multi-tracer PET-CT treatment planning in rectal cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagmolen, Pieter; Roels, Sarah; Loeckx, Dirk; Haustermans, Karin; Maes, Frederik

    2009-02-01

    The goal of radiotherapy is to deliver maximal dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the surrounding tissue. This requires accurate target definition. In sites were the tumor is difficult to see on the CT images, such as for rectal cancer, PET-CT imaging can be used to better define the target. If the information from multiple PETCT images with different tracers needs to be combined, a nonrigid registration is indispensable to compensate for rectal tissue deformations. Such registration is complicated by the presence of different volumes of bowel gas in the images to be registered. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of different nonrigid registration approaches by looking at the overlap of manually delineated rectum contours after registration. Using a B-spline transformation model, the results for two similarity measures, sum of squared differences and mutual information, either calculated over the entire image or on a region of interest are compared. Finally, we also assess the effect of the registration direction. We show that the combination of MI with a region of interest is best able to cope with residual rectal contrast and differences in bowel filling. We also show that for optimal performance the registration direction should be chosen depending on the difference in bowel filling in the images to be registered.

  19. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    This Ph.d. project describes the development of a workflow for Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for clinical radiotherapy plans. The workflow may be utilized to perform an independent dose verification of treatment plans. Modern radiotherapy treatment delivery is often conducted by dynamically...... modulating the intensity of the field during the irradiation. The workflow described has the potential to fully model the dynamic delivery, including gantry rotation during irradiation, of modern radiotherapy. Three corner stones of Monte Carlo Treatment Planning are identified: Building, commissioning...... and validation of a Monte Carlo model of a medical linear accelerator (i), converting a CT scan of a patient to a Monte Carlo compliant phantom (ii) and translating the treatment plan parameters (including beam energy, angles of incidence, collimator settings etc) to a Monte Carlo input file (iii). A protocol...

  20. The precision of proton range calculations in proton radiotherapy treatment planning: experimental verification of the relation between CT-HU and proton stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffner, B.; Pedroni, E.

    1998-01-01

    The precision in proton radiotherapy treatment planning depends on the accuracy of the information used to calculate the stopping power properties of the tissues in the patient's body. This information is obtained from computed tomography (CT) images using a calibration curve to convert CT Hounsfield units into relative proton stopping power values. The validity of a stoichiometric method to create the calibration curve has been verified by measuring pairs of Hounsfield units and stopping power values for animal tissue samples. It was found that the agreement between measurement and calibration curve is better than 1% if beam hardening effects in the acquisition of the CT images can be neglected. The influence of beam hardening effects on the quantitative reading of the CT measurements is discussed and an estimation for the overall range precision of proton beams is given. It is expected that the range of protons in the human body can be controlled to better than ±1.1% of the water equivalent range in soft tissue and ±1.8% in bone, which translates into a range precision of about 1-3 mm in typical treatment situations. (author)

  1. A formulation of tissue- and water-equivalent materials using the stoichiometric analysis method for CT-number calibration in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Kolditz, Daniel; Langner, Oliver; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-03-01

    Tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) are widely used in quality assurance and calibration procedures, both in radiodiagnostics and radiotherapy. In radiotherapy, particularly, the TEMs are often used for computed tomography (CT) number calibration in treatment planning systems. However, currently available TEMs may not be very accurate in the determination of the calibration curves due to their limitation in mimicking radiation characteristics of the corresponding real tissues in both low- and high-energy ranges. Therefore, we are proposing a new formulation of TEMs using a stoichiometric analysis method to obtain TEMs for the calibration purposes. We combined the stoichiometric calibration and the basic data method to compose base materials to develop TEMs matching standard real tissues from ICRU Report 44 and 46. First, the CT numbers of six materials with known elemental compositions were measured to get constants for the stoichiometric calibration. The results of the stoichiometric calibration were used together with the basic data method to formulate new TEMs. These new TEMs were scanned to validate their CT numbers. The electron density and the stopping power calibration curves were also generated. The absolute differences of the measured CT numbers of the new TEMs were less than 4 HU for the soft tissues and less than 22 HU for the bone compared to the ICRU real tissues. Furthermore, the calculated relative electron density and electron and proton stopping powers of the new TEMs differed by less than 2% from the corresponding ICRU real tissues. The new TEMs which were formulated using the proposed technique increase the simplicity of the calibration process and preserve the accuracy of the stoichiometric calibration simultaneously.

  2. SU-E-J-219: A Dixon Based Pseudo-CT Generation Method for MR-Only Radiotherapy Treatment Planning of the Pelvis and Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maspero, M.; Meijer, G.J.; Lagendijk, J.J.W.; Berg, C.A.T. van den [Department of Radiotherapy, UMC Utrecht (Netherlands); Seevinck, P.R.; Viergever, M.A. [Image Science Institute, UMC Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Mw IMDI Programme, project name: “RASOR sharp: MRI based radiotherapy planning using a single MRI sequence”, project number: 10-104003010.

  3. Automatic segmentation of thoracic and pelvic CT images for radiotherapy planning using implicit anatomic knowledge and organ-specific segmentation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, B; Coradi, T; Scholz, M; Kunz, P; Huber, M; Oppitz, U; Andre, L; Lengkeek, V; Huyskens, D; Esch, A van; Reddick, R

    2008-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in medical images is a valuable tool for efficient computer-aided radiotherapy and surgery planning and an enabling technology for dynamic adaptive radiotherapy. This paper presents the design, algorithms and validation of new software for the automatic segmentation of CT images used for radiotherapy treatment planning. A coarse to fine approach is followed that consists of presegmentation, anatomic orientation and structure segmentation. No user input or a priori information about the image content is required. In presegmentation, the body outline, the bones and lung equivalent tissue are detected. Anatomic orientation recognizes the patient's position, orientation and gender and creates an elastic mapping of the slice positions to a reference scale. Structure segmentation is divided into localization, outlining and refinement, performed by procedures with implicit anatomic knowledge using standard image processing operations. The presented version of algorithms automatically segments the body outline and bones in any gender and patient position, the prostate, bladder and femoral heads for male pelvis in supine position, and the spinal canal, lungs, heart and trachea in supine position. The software was developed and tested on a collection of over 600 clinical radiotherapy planning CT stacks. In a qualitative validation on this test collection, anatomic orientation correctly detected gender, patient position and body region in 98% of the cases, a correct mapping was produced for 89% of thorax and 94% of pelvis cases. The average processing time for the entire segmentation of a CT stack was less than 1 min on a standard personal computer. Two independent retrospective studies were carried out for clinical validation. Study I was performed on 66 cases (30 pelvis, 36 thorax) with dosimetrists, study II on 52 cases (39 pelvis, 13 thorax) with radio-oncologists as experts. The experts rated the automatically produced

  4. Impact of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT staging on treatment planning in radiotherapy incorporating elective nodal irradiation for non-small-cell lung cancer: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk, Milena; Kepka, Lucyna; Dziuk, Miroslaw; Zawadzka, Anna; Szalus, Norbert; Gizewska, Agnieszka; Bujko, Krzysztof

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate prospectively how positron emission tomography (PET) information changes treatment plans for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving or not receiving elective nodal irradiation (ENI). One hundred consecutive patients referred for curative radiotherapy were included in the study. Treatment plans were carried out with CT data sets only. For stage III patients, mediastinal ENI was planned. Then, patients underwent PET-CT for diagnostic/planning purposes. PET/CT was fused with the CT data for final planning. New targets were delineated. For stage III patients with minimal N disease (N0-N1, single N2), the ENI was omitted in the new plans. Patients were treated according to the PET-based volumes and plans. The gross tumor volume (GTV)/planning tumor volume (PTV) and doses for critical structures were compared for both data sets. The doses for areas of potential geographical misses derived with the CT data set alone were compared in patients with and without initially planned ENI. In the 75 patients for whom the decision about curative radiotherapy was maintained after PET/CT, there would have been 20 cases (27%) with potential geographical misses by using the CT data set alone. Among them, 13 patients would receive ENI; of those patients, only 2 patients had the PET-based PTV covered by 90% isodose by using the plans based on CT alone, and the mean of the minimum dose within the missed GTV was 55% of the prescribed dose, while for 7 patients without ENI, it was 10% (p = 0.006). The lung, heart, and esophageal doses were significantly lower for plans with ENI omission than for plans with ENI use based on CT alone. PET/CT should be incorporated in the planning of radiotherapy for NSCLC, even in the setting of ENI. However, if PET/CT is unavailable, ENI may to some extent compensate for an inadequate dose coverage resulting from diagnostic uncertainties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT Staging on Treatment Planning in Radiotherapy Incorporating Elective Nodal Irradiation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Milena; Kepka, Lucyna; Dziuk, Miroslaw; Zawadzka, Anna; Szalus, Norbert; Gizewska, Agnieszka; Bujko, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively how positron emission tomography (PET) information changes treatment plans for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving or not receiving elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive patients referred for curative radiotherapy were included in the study. Treatment plans were carried out with CT data sets only. For stage III patients, mediastinal ENI was planned. Then, patients underwent PET-CT for diagnostic/planning purposes. PET/CT was fused with the CT data for final planning. New targets were delineated. For stage III patients with minimal N disease (N0-N1, single N2), the ENI was omitted in the new plans. Patients were treated according to the PET-based volumes and plans. The gross tumor volume (GTV)/planning tumor volume (PTV) and doses for critical structures were compared for both data sets. The doses for areas of potential geographical misses derived with the CT data set alone were compared in patients with and without initially planned ENI. Results: In the 75 patients for whom the decision about curative radiotherapy was maintained after PET/CT, there would have been 20 cases (27%) with potential geographical misses by using the CT data set alone. Among them, 13 patients would receive ENI; of those patients, only 2 patients had the PET-based PTV covered by 90% isodose by using the plans based on CT alone, and the mean of the minimum dose within the missed GTV was 55% of the prescribed dose, while for 7 patients without ENI, it was 10% (p = 0.006). The lung, heart, and esophageal doses were significantly lower for plans with ENI omission than for plans with ENI use based on CT alone. Conclusions: PET/CT should be incorporated in the planning of radiotherapy for NSCLC, even in the setting of ENI. However, if PET/CT is unavailable, ENI may to some extent compensate for an inadequate dose coverage resulting from diagnostic uncertainties.

  6. The potential advantages of (18)FDG PET/CT-based target volume delineation in radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Russell N; Kayani, Irfan; Moinuddin, Syed A; Meer, Khalda; Lemon, Catherine; Goodchild, Kathleen; Saunders, Michele I

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated two fixed threshold methods to delineate the target volume using (18)FDG PET/CT before and during a course of radical radiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients were enrolled into the study between March 2006 and May 2008. (18)FDG PET/CT scans were carried out 72h prior to the start of radiotherapy and then at 10, 44 and 66Gy. Functional volumes were delineated according to the SUV Cut Off (SUVCO) (2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0bwg/ml) and percentage of the SUVmax (30%, 35%, 40%, 45%, and 50%) thresholds. The background (18)FDG uptake and the SUVmax within the volumes were also assessed. Primary and lymph node volumes for the eight patients significantly reduced with each increase in the delineation threshold (for example 2.5-3.0bwg/ml SUVCO) compared to the baseline threshold at each imaging point. There was a significant reduction in the volume (p⩽0.0001-0.01) after 36Gy compared to the 0Gy by the SUVCO method. There was a negative correlation between the SUVmax within the primary and lymph node volumes and delivered radiation dose (p⩽0.0001-0.011) but no difference in the SUV within the background reference region. The volumes delineated by the PTSUVmax method increased with the increase in the delivered radiation dose after 36Gy because the SUVmax within the region of interest used to define the edge of the volume was equal or less than the background (18)FDG uptake and the software was unable to effectively differentiate between tumour and background uptake. The changes in the target volumes delineated by the SUVCO method were less susceptible to background (18)FDG uptake compared to those delineated by the PTSUVmax and may be more helpful in radiotherapy planning. The best method and threshold have still to be determined within institutions, both nationally and internationally. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment planning systems for high precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Computerized Treatment Planning System (TPS) play an important role in radiotherapy with the intent to maximize tumor control and minimize normal tissue complications. Treatment planning during earlier days was generally carried out through the manual summations of standard isodose charts on to patient body contours that were generated by direct tracing or lead wire representation, and relied heavily on the careful choices of beam weights and wedging. Since then there had been tremendous advances in field of Radiation Oncology in last few decades. The linear accelerators had evolved from MLC's to IGRT, the techniques like 3DCRT, IMRT has become almost routine affair. The simulation has seen transition from simple 2D film/fluoroscopy localization to CT Simulator with added development in PET, PET- CT and MR imaging. The Networking and advances in computer technology has made it possible to direct transfer of Images, contours to the treatment planning systems

  8. The planning target volume margins detected by cone-beam CT in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jun; Chen Hong; Zhang Guoqiao; Chen Fei; Zhang Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the planning target volume margins of head and neck cancers treated by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods: 464 sets cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images before setup correction and 126 sets CBCT images after correction were obtained from 51 head and neck cancer patients treated by IGRT in our department. The systematic and random errors were evaluated by either online or offline correction through registering the CBCT images to the planning CT. The data was divided into 3 groups according to the online correction times. Results: The isocenter shift were 0.37 mm ± 2.37 mm, -0.43 mm ± 2.30 mm and 0.47 mm ± 2.65 mm in right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively before correction, and it reduced to 0.08 mm ± 0.68 mm, -0.03 mm ± 0.74 mm and 0.03 mm ± 0.80 mm when evaluated by 126 sets corrected CBCT images. The planning target volume (PTV) margin from clinical target volume (CTV) before correction were: 6.41 mm, 6.15 mm and 7.10 mm based on two parameter model, and it reduced to 1.78 mm, 1.80 mm and 1.97 mm after correction. The PTV margins were 3.8 mm, 3.8 mm, 4.0 mm; 4.0 mm, 4.0 mm, 5.0 mm and 5.4 mm, 5.2 mm, 6.1 mm in RL, AP and SI respectively when online-correction times were more than 15 times, 11-15 times, 5-10 times. Conclusions: CBCT-based on online correction reduce the PTV margin for head and neck cancers treated by IGRT and ensure more precise dose delivery and less normal tissue complications. (authors)

  9. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [de

  10. CT-guided intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison of conventional point A plan with clinical target volume-based three-dimensional plan using dose-volume parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Jung Keun; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Chie, Eui Kyu; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) plan comparison between the conventional point A plan (conventional plan) and computed tomography (CT)-guided clinical target volume-based plan (CTV plan) by analysis of the quantitative dose-volume parameters and irradiated volumes of organs at risk in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty plans for 192 Ir high-dose-rate ICR after 30-40-Gy external beam radiotherapy were investigated. CT images were acquired at the first ICR session with artifact-free applicators in place. The gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV), point A, and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 rectal and bladder points were defined on reconstructed CT images. A fractional 100% dose was prescribed to point A in the conventional plan and to the outermost point to cover all CTVs in the CTV plan. The reference volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V ref ), and the dose-volume parameters of the coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were calculated from the dose-volume histogram. The bladder, rectal point doses, and percentage of volumes receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the prescribed dose were also analyzed. Results: Conventional plans were performed, and patients were categorized on the basis of whether the 100% isodose line of point A prescription dose fully encompassed the CTV (Group 1, n = 20) or not (Group 2, n = 10). The mean gross tumor volume (11.6 cm 3 ) and CTV (24.9 cm 3 ) of Group 1 were smaller than the corresponding values (23.7 and 44.7 cm 3 , respectively) for Group 2 (p = 0.003). The mean V ref for all patients was 129.6 cm 3 for the conventional plan and 97.0 cm 3 for the CTV plan (p = 0.003). The mean V ref in Group 1 decreased markedly with the CTV plan (p < 0.001). For the conventional and CTV plans in all patients, the mean coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were 0.98 and 1.0, 0.23 and 0.34, and 3.86 and

  11. Influence of the contrast agents on dose-volume histograms in radiotherapy treatment planning based on CT-scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahel Heydarheydari

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: The results showed statistical insignificant difference between with and without CA CTs treatment plan in pelvic field for targets and OARs. These results may serve as a reference to justify the use of CECT data sets for 3D-CRT planning of pelvic region cancers using DosiSoft ISOgray system.

  12. A modified VMAT adaptive radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer patients based on CT-CT image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Xiance; Han, Ce; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Yan, Huawei; Xie, Congying

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and benefits of a modified adaptive radiotherapy (ART) by replanning in the initial CT (iCT) with new contours from a repeat CT (rCT) based on CT-CT image fusion for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients underwent volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). Nine NPC patients underwent VMAT treatment with a rCT at 23rd fraction were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric differences for replanning VMAT plans in the iCT and in the rCT were compared. Volumetric and dosimetric changes of gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) of this modified ART were also investigated. No dosimetric differences between replanning in the iCT and in the rCT were observed. The average volume of GTV decreased from 78.83 ± 38.42 cm 3 in the iCT to 71.44 ± 37.46 cm 3 in the rCT, but with no significant difference (p = 0.42).The average volume of the left and right parotid decreased from 19.91 ± 4.89 cm 3 and 21.58 ± 6.16 cm 3 in the iCT to 11.80 ± 2.79 cm 3 and 13.29 ± 4.17 cm 3 in the rCT (both p < 0.01), respectively. The volume of other OARs did not shrink very much. No significant differences on PTV GTV and PTV CTV coverage were observed for replanning with this modified ART. Compared to the initial plans, the average mean dose of the left and right parotid after re-optimization were decreased by 62.5 cGy (p = 0.05) and 67.3 cGy (p = 0.02), respectively, and the V5 (the volume receiving 5 Gy) of the left and right parotids were decreased by 7.8% (p = 0.01) and 11.2% (p = 0.001), respectively. There was no significant difference on the dose delivered to other OARs. Patients with NPC undergoing VMAT have significant anatomic and dosimetric changes to parotids. Repeat CT as an anatomic changes reference and re-optimization in the iCT based on CT-CT image fusion was accurate enough to identify the volume changes and to ensure safe dose to parotids

  13. The feasibility of utilizing pseudo CT-data for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for a stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of spinal bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogcarspel, Stan J; Van der Velden, Joanne M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Van Vulpen, Marco; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what pseudo-CT (pCT) strategy is sufficient for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation of a stereotactic treatment for spinal bone metastases. For this purpose, the dosimetric accuracy of five increasingly complex pCT strategies was evaluated using the planning CT data of 20 patients suffering from spinal metastases. For each pCT, a treatment plan was developed and simulated on both the pCT and the original CT data of the patient. The two resulting dose distributions were compared using gamma analysis of 2%/2 mm. In this paper, a Gamma Pass Rate (GPR) of ⩾95% within the Target Volume (TV) was considered clinically acceptable. We additionally demonstrated in this paper the automatic generation of each investigated pCT strategy with the use of dedicated MRI data complemented with pre-treatment CT data of a patient in treatment position. The dosimetric accuracy of a pCT increases when additional bulk densities are utilized for a pCT. However, the dosimetric accuracy of even the most complex ‘bulk density’ pCT strategy used in this study had an average GPR of only 78% within the TV. However, if information on the heterogeneous electron density distribution within the affected vertebral body was available, a clinically acceptable 99% mean GPR was observed. All pCTs could successfully be generated using the MRI data in combination with the CT data of a patient in treatment position. The results presented in this study show that a simple ‘bulk density’ pseudo-CT strategy is not feasible for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for spinal bone metastases. However, a clinically acceptable result is generated if the information on the heterogeneous electron density (ED) distribution within the affected vertebral bone is available. Therefore, any pCT strategy for this tumor site should include a method which can estimate the heterogeneous ED of the affected vertebral bone. (paper)

  14. Characterisation of radiotherapy planning volumes using textural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nailon, William H.; Redpath, Anthony T.; McLaren, Duncan B. (Dept. of Oncology Physics, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom))

    2008-08-15

    Computer-based artificial intelligence methods for classification and delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) on computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images do not, at present, provide the accuracy required for radiotherapy applications. This paper describes an image analysis method for classification of distinct regions within the GTV, and other clinically relevant regions, on CT images acquired on eight bladder cancer patients at the radiotherapy planning stage and thereafter at regular intervals during treatment. Statistical and fractal textural features (N=27) were calculated on the bladder, rectum and a control region identified on axial, coronal and sagittal CT images. Unsupervised classification results demonstrate that with a reduced feature set (N=3) the approach offers significant classification accuracy on axial, coronal and sagittal CT image planes and has the potential to be developed further for radiotherapy applications, particularly towards an automatic outlining approach

  15. Characterisation of radiotherapy planning volumes using textural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nailon, William H.; Redpath, Anthony T.; McLaren, Duncan B.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based artificial intelligence methods for classification and delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) on computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images do not, at present, provide the accuracy required for radiotherapy applications. This paper describes an image analysis method for classification of distinct regions within the GTV, and other clinically relevant regions, on CT images acquired on eight bladder cancer patients at the radiotherapy planning stage and thereafter at regular intervals during treatment. Statistical and fractal textural features (N=27) were calculated on the bladder, rectum and a control region identified on axial, coronal and sagittal CT images. Unsupervised classification results demonstrate that with a reduced feature set (N=3) the approach offers significant classification accuracy on axial, coronal and sagittal CT image planes and has the potential to be developed further for radiotherapy applications, particularly towards an automatic outlining approach

  16. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieler, F; Wenz, F; Abo-Madyan, Y; Schweizer, B; Polednik, M; Herskind, C; Giordano, F A; Mai, S

    2016-11-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49°/0.18 ± 0.20°/0.05 ± 0.36° and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT.

  17. Construction of a remote radiotherapy planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Chiaki; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Shogo; Seiji, Hiromasa; Sasaki, Kazuya

    2005-01-01

    We constructed a remote radiotherapy planning system, and we examined the usefulness of and faults in our system in this study. Two identical radiotherapy planning systems, one installed at our institution and the other installed at an affiliated hospital, were used for radiotherapy planning. The two systems were connected by a wide area network (WAN), using a leased line. Beam data for the linear accelerator at the affiliated hospital were installed in the two systems. During the period from December 2001 to December 2002, 43 remote radiotherapy plans were made using this system. Data were transmitted using a file transfer protocol (FTP) software program. The 43 radiotherapy plans examined in this study consisted of 13 ordinary radiotherapy plans, 28 radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents, and 2 radiotherapy plans for emergency cases. There were ten minor planning changes made in radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents. Our remote radiotherapy planning system based on WAN using a leased line is useful for remote radiotherapy, with advantages for both radiation oncologists and medical residents. (author)

  18. Radiotherapy and the importance of CT for the nasopharyngeal squammous cell carcinoma, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Shoji; Dokiya, Takushi.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (NPC) were examined with computed tomography (CT) before definitive radiotherapy. CT clearly delincated the extent of the primary tumors. CT frequently showed subtle destruction of the paranasal sinuses and pterygoid plate, which was not usually detected by conventional X-ray examinations. T-staging was made according to the UICC TNM classification system (1978), depending on the clinical findings and the conventional X-ray examinations (non-CT T-stage). Then the non-CT T-stage of each patient was compared with T-stage diagnosed with CT findings alone (CT T-stage). CT upstaged non-CT T-stage in 14 of the 35 patients. Only one patient was downstaged by CT ; this patient had cranial nerve palsy but no detectable bone destruction as shown by CT. Since CT can reveal both bones and abnormal soft tissues well, it is a very useful diagnostic tool for the staging of the tumor assessment of treatment planning. Before radiotherapy, we should use CT to confirm that whether the tumor was located within the radiation field. CT is also useful to see the tumor regression after definitive radiotherapy. We conclude that CT is the single, most reliable imaging method for primary tumors of the NPC patients. (author)

  19. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [German] Das Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Schweden) ermoeglicht die stereotaktische Behandlung von Patienten mittels Cone-beam-Computertomographie (CBCT

  20. Planning and clinical studies of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations for head-and-neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kon, Hyuck Jun; Ye, Sung Joon; Kim, Jung In; Park, Jong Min; Lee, Jae Gi; Heo, Tae Min; Kim Kyung Su; Chun, Young Mi; Callahan, Zachariah

    2013-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT) images, the presence of high Z materials induces typical streak artifacts, called metal artifacts which can pervert CT Hounsfield numbers in the reconstructed images. These artifact-induced distortion of CT images can impact on the dose calculation based on the CT images. In the radiation therapy of Head-and-Neck cancer because of the concave-shaped target volumes, the complex anatomy, a lot of sensitive normal tissues and air cavity structures, it is important to get accurate CT images for dose calculation. But dental implant is common for H and N patients so that it is hard to get undistorted CT images. Moreover because dental implants are generally with the air cavity like oral cavity and nasal cavity in the same CT slice, they can make lots of distortion. In this study, we focused on evaluating the distortion on air cavity by the metal artifact and the effectiveness of the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) about the metal artifacts induced by the dental implant. The O-MAR algorithm increases the accuracy of CT Hounsfield numbers and reducing noises. Thus, it can contribute to the entire radiation treatment planning process, especially for contouring/segmentation. Although there was no significant difference in dose distributions for most cases, the O-MAR correction was shown to have an impact on high dose regions in air cavity

  1. Planning and clinical studies of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations for head-and-neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kon, Hyuck Jun; Ye, Sung Joon [Interdisplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung In; Park, Jong Min; Lee, Jae Gi; Heo, Tae Min [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim Kyung Su [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Young Mi [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Callahan, Zachariah [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Dept. of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    In computed tomography (CT) images, the presence of high Z materials induces typical streak artifacts, called metal artifacts which can pervert CT Hounsfield numbers in the reconstructed images. These artifact-induced distortion of CT images can impact on the dose calculation based on the CT images. In the radiation therapy of Head-and-Neck cancer because of the concave-shaped target volumes, the complex anatomy, a lot of sensitive normal tissues and air cavity structures, it is important to get accurate CT images for dose calculation. But dental implant is common for H and N patients so that it is hard to get undistorted CT images. Moreover because dental implants are generally with the air cavity like oral cavity and nasal cavity in the same CT slice, they can make lots of distortion. In this study, we focused on evaluating the distortion on air cavity by the metal artifact and the effectiveness of the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) about the metal artifacts induced by the dental implant. The O-MAR algorithm increases the accuracy of CT Hounsfield numbers and reducing noises. Thus, it can contribute to the entire radiation treatment planning process, especially for contouring/segmentation. Although there was no significant difference in dose distributions for most cases, the O-MAR correction was shown to have an impact on high dose regions in air cavity.

  2. [Method of radiotherapy planning for head and neck tumors using simulated CT images and radiographic data, developed at the Gustave Roussy Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridier, A; Diaz, J C; Kafrouni, H; Leclerc, A; Barrois, M M; Rivet, P; Wibault, P; Bourhis, J; Eschwège, F

    2001-06-01

    The paper deals with the recent improvements introduced in the most usual method applied in the Institut Gustave Roussy radiotherapy department for obtaining the anatomical data of patients treated for head and neck tumors. For each of these patients, five to seven transverses slices and a lateral radiographic film are taken from a Mecaserto simulator-CT. The anatomical representation of the patient sagittal plane is carried out from the digitalisation of the radiographic film on a Vidar Vxr-12 Plus film scanner and integrated into the Dosigray dose calculation programme in order to be used as a support for the laying out of the dose distribution in reference to the treatment. The sagittal anatomical representation obtained from the radiographic film digitalisation is compared with the one resulting from the interpolation between a limited number of irregularly-spaced transverse slices taken on the simulator-CT. The method using the simulator-scanner transverse slices and the radiographic film digitalisation represents an interesting alternative for obtaining an anatomy simulation representative of the patient in hospitals where a scanner is not available full-time for the needs of the radiotherapy process.

  3. Local failure after radical radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer in relation to the planning FDG-PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandi, M; Hoffmann, L; Sloth Moeller, D

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Local recurrence (rec) in lung cancer is associated with poor survival. This study examined whether the pattern of failure is associated with the most PET avid volume in the planning-FDG-PET/CT scan (p-PET/CT). METHODS: 162 consecutive inoperable NSCLC patients (pts) receiving...... 50% of SUVpeak on p-PET/CT and the volume of T-rec was calculated: OF = (SUVp50∩T-rec)/min(SUVp50, T-rec). Similarly for the GTV on the p-CT: OF = (GTV∩T-rec)/min(GTV, T-rec). OF was based on a rigid registration between p-PET/CT and rec-CT with PET guided delineation of T- rec. For lymph nodes (LN...... in these stations; 4R (55%) and 7 (83%). CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that the most PET active volume on p-PET-CT is a driver for rec at T-site. LN-recurrences predominantly appear in station 2R, 4R, 7 and right hilum. Additional confirmatory studies regarding lymph node mapping and selective lymph node...

  4. How to use PET/CT in the evaluation of response to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decazes, Pierre; Thureau, Sébastien; Dubray, Bernard; Vera, Pierre

    2017-11-28

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality for many cancers. Tumor response after radiotherapy determines the subsequent steps of the patient's management (surveillance, adjuvant or salvage treatment and palliative care). Tumor response assessed during radiotherapy offers a promising opportunity to adapt the treatment plan to reduced / increased target volume, to specifically target sub-volumes with relevant biological characteristics (metabolism, hypoxia, proliferation ...) and to further spare the organs at risk. In addition to its role in the diagnosis and the initial staging, Positron Emission Tomography combined with a Computed Tomography (PET/CT) provides functional information and is therefore attractive to evaluate tumor response. To review the published data addressing PET/CT as an evaluation tool in irradiated tumors. Reports on PET/CT acquired at various times (during radiotherapy, after initial (chemo-)radiotherapy, after definitive radiotherapy and during posttreatment follow-up) in solid tumors (lung, head-and-neck, cervix, esophagus, prostate and rectum) were collected and reviewed. Various tracers and technical are also discussed. 18F-FDG PET/CT has a well-established role in clinical routine after definitive chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancers. 18F-choline PET/CT is indicated in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure. 18F-FDG PET/CT is optional in many others circumstances and the clinical benefits of assessing tumor response with PET/CT remain a field of very active research. The combination of PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) may prove to be valuable in irradiated rectal and cervix cancers. Tumor response can be evaluated by PET/CT with clinical consequences in multiple situations, notably in head and neck and prostate cancers, after radiotherapy. Further clinical evaluation for most cancers is still needed, possibly in association to MRI.

  5. A megavoltage CT scanner for radiotherapy verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.G.; Swindell, W.; Morton, E.J.; Evans, P.M.; Xiao, Z.R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have developed a system for generating megavoltage CT images immediately prior to the administration of external beam radiotherapy. The detector is based on the scanner of Simpson (Simpson et al 1982) - the major differences being a significant reduction in dose required for image formation, faster image formation and greater convenience of use in the clinical setting. Attention has been paid to the problem of ring artefacts in the images. Specifically, a Fourier-space filter has been applied to the sinogram data. After suitable detector calibration, it has been shown that the device operates close to its theoretical specification of 3 mm spatial resolution and a few percent contrast resolution. Ring artefacts continue to be a major source of image degradation. A number of clinical images are presented. (author)

  6. Progress of radiotherapy by three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Hajime; Nomoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    The recent progress of three-dimensional radiation treatment planning was reviewed. And clinical cases such as lung cancer and breast cancer are introduced. In the University of Occupational and Development Health, the treatment system FOCUS which is made up of CT simulator and linac was used mainly. Three-dimensional treatment planning was carried for about 90% of 330 patients who underwent radiotherapy for one year. The target becomes to be accurate and dose distribution with all CT slices in radiation field can be confirmed by using three-dimensional radiation treatment planning apparatus. High dose irradiation localized to tumor part is possible. Relations between total dose and volume of normal tissue and/or tumor can be estimated numerically and easily by DVH. A prediction of indication and affection became possible by this procedure. In conclusion, generalization of three-dimensional radiation treatment planning will bring progress of more effective radiotherapy with less adverse reaction. (K.H.). 21 refs

  7. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabi, H.; Koutsouvelis, N.; Rouzaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial t......-CT images from conventional Dixon MRI sequences with improved bone extraction accuracy. The approach is promising for potential use in PET AC and MRI-only or hybrid PET/MRI-guided RT treatment planning. © 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial...... the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas...

  8. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K.; Roedal, Jan; Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  9. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  10. MR vs CT imaging: low rectal cancer tumour delineation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, B D P

    2009-06-01

    Modern three-dimentional radiotherapy is based upon CT. For rectal cancer, this relies upon target definition on CT, which is not the optimal imaging modality. The major limitation of CT is its low inherent contrast resolution. Targets defined by MRI could facilitate smaller, more accurate, tumour volumes than CT. Our study reviewed imaging and planning data for 10 patients with locally advanced low rectal cancer (defined as < 6 cm from the anal verge on digital examination). Tumour volume and location were compared for sagittal pre-treatment MRI and planning CT. CT consistently overestimated all tumour radiological parameters. Estimates of tumour volume, tumour length and height of proximal tumour from the anal verge were larger on planning CT than on MRI (p < 0.05). Tumour volumes defined on MRI are smaller, shorter and more distal from the anal sphincter than CT-based volumes. For radiotherapy planning, this may result in smaller treatment volumes, which could lead to a reduction in dose to organs at risk and facilitate dose escalation.

  11. Radiation Planning Assistant - A Streamlined, Fully Automated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Laurence E.; Kisling, Kelly; McCarroll, Rachel; Zhang, Lifei; Yang, Jinzhong; Simonds, Hannah; du Toit, Monique; Trauernicht, Chris; Burger, Hester; Parkes, Jeannette; Mejia, Mike; Bojador, Maureen; Balter, Peter; Branco, Daniela; Steinmann, Angela; Baltz, Garrett; Gay, Skylar; Anderson, Brian; Cardenas, Carlos; Jhingran, Anuja; Shaitelman, Simona; Bogler, Oliver; Schmeller, Kathleen; Followill, David; Howell, Rebecca; Nelson, Christopher; Peterson, Christine; Beadle, Beth

    2018-01-01

    The Radiation Planning Assistant (RPA) is a system developed for the fully automated creation of radiotherapy treatment plans, including volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for patients with head/neck cancer and 4-field box plans for patients with cervical cancer. It is a combination of specially developed in-house software that uses an application programming interface to communicate with a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. It also interfaces with a commercial secondary dose verification software. The necessary inputs to the system are a Treatment Plan Order, approved by the radiation oncologist, and a simulation computed tomography (CT) image, approved by the radiographer. The RPA then generates a complete radiotherapy treatment plan. For the cervical cancer treatment plans, no additional user intervention is necessary until the plan is complete. For head/neck treatment plans, after the normal tissue and some of the target structures are automatically delineated on the CT image, the radiation oncologist must review the contours, making edits if necessary. They also delineate the gross tumor volume. The RPA then completes the treatment planning process, creating a VMAT plan. Finally, the completed plan must be reviewed by qualified clinical staff. PMID:29708544

  12. Contribution of PET and PET/CT in CTV/PTV-modulation for planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT); Aktueller Beitrag der PET und PET/CT zur Zielvolumenmodulation fuer die biologischmedizinische Planung im Rahmen der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehler, W. [Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Suedharz-Krankenhaus Nordhausen (Germany); Baum, R.P. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin/PET-Zentrum, Zentralklinik Bad Berka (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    PET and PET/CT enlarge the possibilities of purely anatomic imaging by opening up new horizons in determining the metabolic and molecular properties of tumors. This enables to determine the spread of tumors with higher accuracy, especially concerning the primary staging and the diagnosis of recurrences. Patients with locoregional disease which are curable by surgery or local radiotherapy (eventually in combination with chemotherapy) can be differentiated from those patients, where only palliative treatment is indicated. Novel nuclear medicine procedures, which use specific tracers, open the door for the molecular treatment of tumors. This will be especially important for radiation oncology. In future it will be possible to define specific tumor areas within a morphologically homogeneous tumor (e.g. areas of tumor hypoxia, increased local tumor stem cell concentration, tumor parts with higher proliferative activity etc.). With IMRT (intensity modulated radiotherapy) we have already now the opportunity, to concentrate the dose to these specific tumor areas, without overloading normal tissues and organs at risk. (orig.)

  13. The Effect of Therapy Oriented CT in Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se

    1987-01-01

    The success of radiation therapy depends on exact treatment of the tumor with significant high dose for maximizing local control and excluding the normal tissues for minimizing unwanted complications. To achieve these goals, correct estimation of target volume in three dimension, exact dose distribution in tumor and normal critical structures and correction of tissue inhomogeneity are required. The effect of therapy oriented CT (planning CT) were compared with conventional simulation method in necessity of planning change, set dose, and proper distribution of tumor dose. Of 365 new patients examined, planning CT was performed in 104 patients (28%). Treatment planning was changed in 47% of head and neck tumor, 79% of intrathoracic tumor and 63% of abdominal tumor. In breast cancer and musculoskeletal tumors, planning CT was recommended for selection of adequate energy and calculation of exact dose to critical structures such as kidney or spinal cord. The average difference of tumor doses between CT planning and conventional simulation was 10% in intrathoracic and intra-abdominal tumors but 20% in head and neck tumors which suggested that tumor dose may be overestimated in conventional simulation. Although some limitations and disadvantages including the cost and irradiation during CT are still criticizing, our study showed that CT planning is very helpful in radiotherapy planning

  14. Combined use of (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FMISO in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer patients planned for radiotherapy: a dynamic PET/CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Thieke, Christian; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Nicolay, Nils H; Huber, Peter E; Thomas, Michael; Dimitrakopoulou, Georgia; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare, by means of dynamic and static PET/CT, the distribution patterns and pharmacokinetics of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and of fluorine-18-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients scheduled for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Thirteen patients suffering from inoperable stage III NSCLC underwent PET/CTs with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FMISO for tumor metabolism and hypoxia assessment accordingly. Evaluation of PET/CT studies was based on visual analysis, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculations and absolute quantitative estimations, after application of a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed all thirteen primary lung tumors as sites of increased (18)F-FDG uptake. Six patients demonstrated also in total 43 (18)F-FDG avid metastases; these patients were excluded from radiotherapy. (18)F-MISO PET/CT demonstrated 12/13 primary lung tumors with faint tracer uptake. Only one tumor was clearly (18)F-FMISO avid, (SUVaverage = 3.4, SUVmax = 5.0). Mean values for (18)F-FDG, as derived from dPET/CT data, were SUVaverage = 8.9, SUVmax = 15.1, K1 = 0.23, k2 = 0.53, k3 = 0.17, k4 = 0.02, influx = 0.05 and fractal dimension (FD) = 1.25 for the primary tumors. The respective values for (18)F-FMISO were SUVaverage = 1.4, SUVmax = 2.2, K1 = 0.26, k2 = 0.56, k3 = 0.06, k4 = 0.06, influx = 0.02 and FD = 1.14. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the two tracers. (18)F-FDG PET/CT changed therapy management in six patients, by excluding them from planned IMRT. (18)F-FMISO PET/CT revealed absence of significant tracer uptake in the majority of the (18)F-FDG avid NSCLCs. Lack of correlation between the two tracers' kinetics indicates that they reflect different molecular mechanisms and implies the discordance between increased glycolysis and hypoxia in the malignancy.

  15. A virtual reality solution for evaluation of radiotherapy plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Daniel; Muren, Ludvig; Mehus, Anfinn

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a VR system for evaluation of treatment plans used in radiotherapy (RT), developed to improve the understanding of the spatial relationships between the patient anatomy and the calculated dose distribution. The VR system offers visualization through interactive volume rendering...... of RT dose distribution and computed tomography (CT) and surface and line rendering of RT structures such as target volumes and organs at risk. The VR system has been installed and networked in a hospital room used for the daily RT conferences, making stereoscopic viewing of treatment planning data...

  16. A virtual reality solution for evaluation of radiotherapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Daniel; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Mehus, Anfinn; Kvinnsland, Yngve; Ulvang, Dag Magne; Villanger, Kare P.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a VR system for evaluation of treatment plans used in radiotherapy (RT), developed to improve the understanding of the spatial relationships between the patient anatomy and the calculated dose distribution. The VR system offers visualization through interactive volume rendering of RT dose distribution and computed tomography (CT) and surface and line rendering of RT structures such as target volumes and organs at risk. The VR system has been installed and networked in a hospital room used for the daily RT conferences, making stereoscopic viewing of treatment planning data for clinical cases possible

  17. Application of CT perfusion imaging in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Guangrong; Liu Guimei; He Wen; Jin Guohua; Xie Ruming; Xu Yongxiang; Li Xiaobo; Li Xuebing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of CT perfusion imaging in evaluation of therapeutic effect and prognosis in radiotherapy for lung cancer. Methods: Fifty-one cases of lung cancer who were unable or refused to be operated on, 36 males and 15 females, aged 37-80, underwent CT perfusion imaging, 29 of which only before radiotherapy and 22 before and after radiotherapy twice. The images were collected by cine dynamic scanning (5 mm/4 slices) and input into the GE AW4.0 workstation for data processing. The slice positions of CT imaging were determined according to the largest tumor size in CT scan. Regions of interest of tumor were drawn at the region corresponding to the original images of CT perfusion. Radiotherapy was performed after CT perfusion imaging. Relevant parameters, including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface (PS) were calculated. The treatment response after radiotherapy was evaluated by RECIST. At 2 -4 weeks after the treatment, CT examination was conducted once more. Results: The tests of the 51 patients showed that the BV was 13.6 ml·100 g -1 , the BF was 129.5 ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , the MTT was 9.1 s, and the PS was 10.0 ml· min -1 · 100 g -1 before radiotherapy. The tests of the 22 of the 51 patients showed that the values of BV and BF after radiotherapy were 7.6 ml· 100 g -1 and 97.8 ml·min -1 · 100 g -1 , respectively, both lower than those before radiotherapy (11.2 and 108.7 ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , respectively), however, both not significantly (t=1.28, 0.40, P>0.05); and the values of MTT and PS after radiotherapy were 8.9 s and 7.8 ml·min -1 · 100 g -1 , respectively, both not significantly higher than those before radiotherapy (7.2 s and 6.8 ml· min -1 · 100 g -1 , respectively, t=-1.15, -0.57, P>0.05). The mean area of tumor after radiotherapy was 1189.6 mm 2 , significantly less than that before radiotherapy (1920.3 mm 2 , t=3.98, P<0.05). The MTT of the SCLC patients was 12

  18. [Positioning errors of CT common rail technique in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Xu, Zihai; Mo, Li; Zhu, Chaohua; Chen, Chaomin

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the value of CT common rail technique for application in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty-seven NPC patients underwent Somatom CT scans using the Siemens CTVision system prior to the commencement of the radiotherapy sessions. The acquired CT images were registered with the planning CT images using the matching function of the system to obtain the linear set-up errors of 3 directions, namely X (left to right), Y (superior to inferior), and Z (anterior to posterior). The errors were then corrected online on the moving couch. The 27 NPC patients underwent a total of 110 CT scans and the displacement deviations of the X, Y and Z directions were -0.16∓1.68 mm, 0.25∓1.66 mm, and 0.33∓1.09 mm, respectively. CT common rail technique can accurately and rapidly measure the space error between the posture and the target area to improve the set-up precision of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for NPC.

  19. PET/CT scanning guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Xue-lian, E-mail: duxuelian23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: melody23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Sheng, Xiu-gui, E-mail: jnsd2000@yahoo.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Qing-shui, E-mail: lqs1966@126.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Wang, Cong, E-mail: jnwc1981@hotmail.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: jnyh2200@sina.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical contribution of positron emission tomography using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and integrated computer tomography (FDG-PET/CT) guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight patients with recurrent ovarian cancer from 2003 to 2008 were retrospectively studied. In these patients, 28 received PET/CT guided IMRT (PET/CT-IMRT group), and 30 received CT guided IMRT (CT-IMRT group). Treatment plans, tumor response, toxicities and survival were evaluated. Results: Changes in GTV delineation were found in 10 (35.7%) patients based on PET-CT information compared with CT data, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the metastasis tumor. PET/CT guided IMRT improved tumor response compared to CT-IMRT group (CR: 64.3% vs. 46.7%, P = 0.021; PR: 25.0% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.036). The 3-year overall survival was significantly higher in the PET-CT/IMRT group than control (34.1% vs. 13.2%, P = 0.014). Conclusions: PET/CT guided IMRT in recurrent ovarian cancer patients improved the delineation of GTV and reduce the likelihood of geographic misses and therefore improve the clinical outcome.

  20. Leukoencephalopaty post chemo and radiotherapy. CT Aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potente, G; Iozzino, M; Amici, A; Vitturini, A; Capua, A; Tombolini, V

    1987-01-01

    22 patients submitted to radio chemotherapy of the central nervous system have been examined. 6 of them (28%) showed at Ct signs of post radiochemotherapic lekoencephalopathy 4 of them suffered of acute myeloid leukemia and 2 of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  1. MRI-based treatment plan simulation and adaptation for ion radiotherapy using a classification-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rank, Christopher M; Tremmel, Christoph; Hünemohr, Nora; Nagel, Armin M; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    In order to benefit from the highly conformal irradiation of tumors in ion radiotherapy, sophisticated treatment planning and simulation are required. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of MRI for ion radiotherapy treatment plan simulation and adaptation using a classification-based approach. Firstly, a voxelwise tissue classification was applied to derive pseudo CT numbers from MR images using up to 8 contrasts. Appropriate MR sequences and parameters were evaluated in cross-validation studies of three phantoms. Secondly, ion radiotherapy treatment plans were optimized using both MRI-based pseudo CT and reference CT and recalculated on reference CT. Finally, a target shift was simulated and a treatment plan adapted to the shift was optimized on a pseudo CT and compared to reference CT optimizations without plan adaptation. The derivation of pseudo CT values led to mean absolute errors in the range of 81 - 95 HU. Most significant deviations appeared at borders between air and different tissue classes and originated from partial volume effects. Simulations of ion radiotherapy treatment plans using pseudo CT for optimization revealed only small underdosages in distal regions of a target volume with deviations of the mean dose of PTV between 1.4 - 3.1% compared to reference CT optimizations. A plan adapted to the target volume shift and optimized on the pseudo CT exhibited a comparable target dose coverage as a non-adapted plan optimized on a reference CT. We were able to show that a MRI-based derivation of pseudo CT values using a purely statistical classification approach is feasible although no physical relationship exists. Large errors appeared at compact bone classes and came from an imperfect distinction of bones and other tissue types in MRI. In simulations of treatment plans, it was demonstrated that these deviations are comparable to uncertainties of a target volume shift of 2 mm in two directions indicating that especially

  2. IMRT plan verification in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlk, P.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the procedure for verification of IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy) plan, which is used in the Oncological Institute of St. Elisabeth in Bratislava. It contains basic description of IMRT technology and developing a deployment plan for IMRT planning system CORVUS 6.0, the device Mimic (Multilammelar intensity modulated collimator) and the overall process of verifying the schedule created. The aim of verification is particularly good control of the functions of MIMIC and evaluate the overall reliability of IMRT planning. (author)

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Integrated PET/CT-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, Matthew R.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Schultz, Christopher J.; Michel, Michelle A.; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang Dian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We previously reported the advantages of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) fused with CT for radiotherapy planning over CT alone in head and neck carcinoma (HNC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the predictive value of PET for patients receiving PET/CT-guided definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From December 2002 to August 2006, 42 patients received PET/CT imaging as part of staging and radiotherapy planning. Clinical outcomes including locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, death, and treatment-related toxicities were collected retrospectively and analyzed for disease-free and overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence. Results: Median follow-up from initiation of treatment was 32 months. Overall survival and disease-free survival were 82.8% and 71.0%, respectively, at 2 years, and 74.1% and 66.9% at 3 years. Of the 42 patients, seven recurrences were identified (three LR, one DM, three both LR and DM). Mean time to recurrence was 9.4 months. Cumulative risk of recurrence was 18.7%. The maximum standard uptake volume (SUV) of primary tumor, adenopathy, or both on PET did not correlate with recurrence, with mean values of 12.0 for treatment failures vs. 11.7 for all patients. Toxicities identified in those patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were also evaluated. Conclusions: A high level of disease control combined with favorable toxicity profiles was achieved in a cohort of HNC patients receiving PET/CT fusion guided radiotherapy plus/minus chemotherapy. Maximum SUV of primary tumor and/or adenopathy was not predictive of risk of disease recurrence

  4. Radiotherapy volume delineation using 18F-FDG-PET/CT modifies gross node volume in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Jimenez, E; Mateos, P; Aymar, N; Roncero, R; Ortiz, I; Gimenez, M; Pardo, J; Salinas, J; Sabater, S

    2018-05-02

    Evidence supporting the use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the segmentation process of oesophageal cancer for radiotherapy planning is limited. Our aim was to compare the volumes and tumour lengths defined by fused PET/CT vs. CT simulation. Twenty-nine patients were analyzed. All patients underwent a single PET/CT simulation scan. Two separate GTVs were defined: one based on CT data alone and another based on fused PET/CT data. Volume sizes for both data sets were compared and the spatial overlap was assessed by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The gross tumour volume (GTVtumour) and maximum tumour diameter were greater by PET/CT, and length of primary tumour was greater by CT, but differences were not statistically significant. However, the gross node volume (GTVnode) was significantly greater by PET/CT. The DSC analysis showed excellent agreement for GTVtumour, 0.72, but was very low for GTVnode, 0.25. Our study shows that the volume definition by PET/CT and CT data differs. CT simulation, without taking into account PET/CT information, might leave cancer-involved nodes out of the radiotherapy-delineated volumes.

  5. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-01-01

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 × 1−2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior–posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior–posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  6. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  7. Dosimetric comparison between CT and X-ray simulation of radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kali Ayguli, Zhang Jinrong; Wang Juwu; Ge Feng; Wang Haifeng; Xu Suling

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare radiotherapy plan of conventional X-ray simulation with CT simulation by 3D-TPS for lung cancer. Methods: Thirty-three patients were allotted to receive both conventional X-ray simulation and CT simulation in the same treatment position. 3D-TPS was used to design 4-field conventional plan of X-ray simulation (RT), 4-field two dimensional plan(2D)and three dimensional conformal radiation plan(3DCRT) of CT simulation for all patients. The total dose was 50 Gy. Dose volume histogram(DVH) was applied to evaluate the difference of target coverage, dose distribution and normal tissue protection among the three plans. Results: 3DCRT and 2D based on CT simulation were superior to RT in the target coverage, target conformity index (TCI) and target homogeneity (TH) (P 20 , V 30 and mean lung dose were similar among 3DCRT, 2D and RT plans. Moreover, the maximum doses of spinal cord were significantly different among the three plans. No statistical differences of doses to 30% of the heart and esophagus volume among the three plans were observed. Conclusions: There is significantly better tumour volume coverage in CT simulation when compared with X-ray conventional simulation. Target volume delineation by CT simulation is improved significantly. The dose distribution is improved by using three dimensional treatment planning system. 3DCRT plan is superior to 2D plans in target conformity index and target homogeneity. Doses delivered to organs surrounding the target such as lung and heart were reduced significantly in 3DCRT. (authors)

  8. A new methodological approach for PET implementation in radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Elena; Ferretti, Alice; Capirci, Carlo; Grassetto, Gaia; Gava, Marcello; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Virdis, Graziella; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Massaro, Arianna; Rubello, Domenico; Nibale, Otello

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, a new methodological approach to using PET information in radiotherapy treatment planning has been discussed. Computed tomography (CT) represents the primary modality to plan personalized radiation treatment, because it provides the basic electron density map for correct dose calculation. If PET scanning is also performed it is typically coregistered with the CT study. This operation can be executed automatically by a hybrid PET/CT scanner or, if the PET and CT imaging sets have been acquired through different equipment, by a dedicated module of the radiotherapy treatment planning system. Both approaches have some disadvantages: in the first case, the bore of a PET/CT system generally used in clinical practice often does not allow the use of certain bulky devices for patient immobilization in radiotherapy, whereas in the second case the result could be affected by limitations in window/level visualization of two different image modalities, and the displayed PET volumes can appear not to be related to the actual uptake into the patient. To overcome these problems, at our centre a specific procedure has been studied and tested in 30 patients, allowing good results of precision in the target contouring to be obtained. The process consists of segmentation of the biological target volume by a dedicated PET/CT console and its export to a dedicated radiotherapy system, where an image registration between the CT images acquired by the PET/CT scanner and a large-bore CT is performed. The planning target volume is contoured only on the large-bore CT and is used for virtual simulation, to individuate permanent skin markers on the patient.

  9. Algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Takashi; Egawa, Sunao

    1991-01-01

    New algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images were developed. One, designated plane weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the position of the beam element passing through the voxel. The other, designated solid weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the length of the beam element passing through the voxel and the volume of voxel. Phantom experiments showed fair spatial resolution in the transverse direction. In the longitudinal direction, however, spatial resolution of under slice thickness could not be obtained. Contrast resolution was equivalent for both methods. In patient studies, the reconstructed radiotherapy simulation image was almost similar in visual perception of the density resolution to a simulation film taken by X-ray simulator. (author)

  10. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C. M.; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  11. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  12. Dosimetry audit simulation of treatment planning system in multicenters radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmuri, S.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Treatment Planning System (TPS) is an important modality that determines radiotherapy outcome. TPS requires input data obtained through commissioning and the potentially error occurred. Error in this stage may result in the systematic error. The aim of this study to verify the TPS dosimetry to know deviation range between calculated and measurement dose. This study used CIRS phantom 002LFC representing the human thorax and simulated all external beam radiotherapy stages. The phantom was scanned using CT Scanner and planned 8 test cases that were similar to those in clinical practice situation were made, tested in four radiotherapy centers. Dose measurement using 0.6 cc ionization chamber. The results of this study showed that generally, deviation of all test cases in four centers was within agreement criteria with average deviation about -0.17±1.59 %, -1.64±1.92 %, 0.34±1.34 % and 0.13±1.81 %. The conclusion of this study was all TPS involved in this study showed good performance. The superposition algorithm showed rather poor performance than either analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and convolution algorithm with average deviation about -1.64±1.92 %, -0.17±1.59 % and -0.27±1.51 % respectively.

  13. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  14. SU-C-BRA-04: Automated Segmentation of Head-And-Neck CT Images for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Via Multi-Atlas Machine Learning (MAML)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, X; Gao, H; Sharp, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate image segmentation is a crucial step during image guided radiation therapy. This work proposes multi-atlas machine learning (MAML) algorithm for automated segmentation of head-and-neck CT images. Methods: As the first step, the algorithm utilizes normalized mutual information as similarity metric, affine registration combined with multiresolution B-Spline registration, and then fuses together using the label fusion strategy via Plastimatch. As the second step, the following feature selection strategy is proposed to extract five feature components from reference or atlas images: intensity (I), distance map (D), box (B), center of gravity (C) and stable point (S). The box feature B is novel. It describes a relative position from each point to minimum inscribed rectangle of ROI. The center-of-gravity feature C is the 3D Euclidean distance from a sample point to the ROI center of gravity, and then S is the distance of the sample point to the landmarks. Then, we adopt random forest (RF) in Scikit-learn, a Python module integrating a wide range of state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms as classifier. Different feature and atlas strategies are used for different ROIs for improved performance, such as multi-atlas strategy with reference box for brainstem, and single-atlas strategy with reference landmark for optic chiasm. Results: The algorithm was validated on a set of 33 CT images with manual contours using a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy. Dice similarity coefficients between manual contours and automated contours were calculated: the proposed MAML method had an improvement from 0.79 to 0.83 for brainstem and 0.11 to 0.52 for optic chiasm with respect to multi-atlas segmentation method (MA). Conclusion: A MAML method has been proposed for automated segmentation of head-and-neck CT images with improved performance. It provides the comparable result in brainstem and the improved result in optic chiasm compared with MA. Xuhua Ren and Hao

  15. SU-C-BRA-04: Automated Segmentation of Head-And-Neck CT Images for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Via Multi-Atlas Machine Learning (MAML)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, X; Gao, H [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Sharp, G [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate image segmentation is a crucial step during image guided radiation therapy. This work proposes multi-atlas machine learning (MAML) algorithm for automated segmentation of head-and-neck CT images. Methods: As the first step, the algorithm utilizes normalized mutual information as similarity metric, affine registration combined with multiresolution B-Spline registration, and then fuses together using the label fusion strategy via Plastimatch. As the second step, the following feature selection strategy is proposed to extract five feature components from reference or atlas images: intensity (I), distance map (D), box (B), center of gravity (C) and stable point (S). The box feature B is novel. It describes a relative position from each point to minimum inscribed rectangle of ROI. The center-of-gravity feature C is the 3D Euclidean distance from a sample point to the ROI center of gravity, and then S is the distance of the sample point to the landmarks. Then, we adopt random forest (RF) in Scikit-learn, a Python module integrating a wide range of state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms as classifier. Different feature and atlas strategies are used for different ROIs for improved performance, such as multi-atlas strategy with reference box for brainstem, and single-atlas strategy with reference landmark for optic chiasm. Results: The algorithm was validated on a set of 33 CT images with manual contours using a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy. Dice similarity coefficients between manual contours and automated contours were calculated: the proposed MAML method had an improvement from 0.79 to 0.83 for brainstem and 0.11 to 0.52 for optic chiasm with respect to multi-atlas segmentation method (MA). Conclusion: A MAML method has been proposed for automated segmentation of head-and-neck CT images with improved performance. It provides the comparable result in brainstem and the improved result in optic chiasm compared with MA. Xuhua Ren and Hao

  16. Use of computed tomography for irradiation planning in practical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riessbeck, K.H.; Achtert, J.; Hegewald, H.

    1985-01-01

    Experience of several years comprising computed tomography into irradiation planning resulted in substantial and organizational arrangements in practical radiotherapy. Precising the individual topography of patient, target volume, and risk organs in the central radiation plane as well as in other planes beeing of interest, permits to optimize the irradiation area. In patients whose radiotherapy requires a complicated field adjustment (for instance head fields, bronchial esophagical cancer) and in all patients who receive an irradiation in motion the irradiation planning is done by the help of CT examination without omitting the localization diagnosis procedure approved. The method of irradiation planning in one plane is represented in which the spatial dimension of target volume can be considered yet after superprojection into the planning plane. However, the topometric gain alone can not result in new irradiation methods. Approved irradiation methods should be modified only in connection with increased knowledge on pathobiology of tumors and on tolerance of healthy tissue with regard to keeping or improving the ratio of curing to complication rate. (author)

  17. Electron Density Calibration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Martinez, F.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Celis-Lopez, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, A.

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images are used as basic input data for most modern radiosurgery treatment planning systems (TPS). CT data not only provide anatomic information to delineate target volumes, but also allow the introduction of corrections for tissue inhomogeneities into dose calculations during the treatment planning procedure. These corrections involve the determination of a relationship between tissue electron density (ρe) and their corresponding Hounsfield Units (HU). In this work, an elemental analysis of different commercial tissue equivalent materials using Scanning Electron Microscopy was carried out to characterize their chemical composition. The tissue equivalent materials were chosen to ensure a large range of ρe to be included in the CT scanner calibration. A phantom was designed and constructed with these materials to simulate the size of a human head

  18. The Utility of PET/CT in the Planning of External Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, Jeremie; Cao, Minsong; Nickols, Nicholas G

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy are the definitive treatment options for patients with localized prostate cancer. A rising level of prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy indicates prostate cancer recurrence, and these patients may still be cured with salvage radiotherapy. To maximize chance for cure, the irradiated volumes should completely encompass the extent of disease. Therefore, accurate estimation of the location of disease is critical for radiotherapy planning in both the definitive and the salvage settings. Current first-line imaging for prostate cancer has limited sensitivity for detection of disease both at initial staging and at biochemical recurrence. Integration of PET into routine evaluation of prostate cancer patients may improve both staging accuracy and radiotherapy planning. 18 F-FDG PET/CT is now routinely used in radiation planning for several cancer types. However, 18 F-FDG PET/CT has low sensitivity for prostate cancer. Additional PET probes evaluated in prostate cancer include 18 F-sodium fluoride, 11 C-acetate, 11 C- or 18 F-choline, 18 F-fluciclovine, and 68 Ga- or 18 F-labeled ligands that bind prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). PSMA ligands appear to be the most sensitive and specific but have not yet received Food and Drug Administration New Drug Application approval for use in the United States. Retrospective and prospective investigations suggest a potential major impact of PET/CT on prostate radiation treatment planning. Prospective trials randomizing patients to routine radiotherapy planning versus PET/CT-aided planning may show meaningful clinical outcomes. Prospective clinical trials evaluating the addition of 18 F-fluciclovine PET/CT for planning of salvage radiotherapy with clinical endpoints are under way. Prospective trials evaluating the clinical impact of PSMA PET/CT on prostate radiation planning are indicated. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. Differences in the definition of internal target volumes using slow CT alone or in combination with thin-slice CT under breath-holding conditions during the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Satoshi; Kunieda, Etsuo; Takeda, Atsuya; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Deloar, Hossain M.; Kawase, Takatsugu; Fukada, Junichi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Uematsu, Minoru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how the delineations of the internal target volume (ITV) made from 'slow' CT alter with reference to 'thin-slice' CT. Materials and methods: Thin-slice CT images taken under breath-holding conditions and slow CT images taken under shallow-breathing conditions (8 s/image) of 11 lung cancers were used for this study. Five radiation oncologists delineated ITV of the 11 lesions using slow CT images (ITV1), and then redefined them with reference to thin-slice CT images (ITV2). SD-images (standard deviation image) were created for all patients from ITV images in order to visualize the regional variation of the ITVs. Results: The mean value of ITV2 was smaller than that initially defined by ITV1. There was no significant change in ITV1 and ITV2 between operators with regard to standard deviation in volume. There was a significant difference in the distribution of the ratio of ITV1 to ITV2 obtained on thin-slice CTs between cases with and without ground glass opacity. In cases without ground glass opacity there was a tendency for ITV2 to have a smaller volume than ITV1. Conclusions: Combined use of slow CT and thin-slice CT in delineation of ITV contours appeared to be useful in making adjustments for obscured tumor images caused by respiratory movement

  20. Planned combined radiotherapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, C.L.; Marks, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Though the planned combined use of surgery and radiation has been shown to be beneficial for other tumors, the authors feel that the present evidence is far from persuasive in demonstrating a definite superiority of combined therapy over surgery or radiation alone for advanced laryngeal tumors. The actuarial or disease-free survival rates for patients treated with combined therapy have not been significantly increased over those obtained with a single modality in any randomized, well-controlled study, although the trend is toward improved local regional control. Many of the retrospective studies are probably flawed by selection bias; the patients selected for combined treatment generally have more advanced cancers and represent a worse prognostic group. It is clear from this review that the positive value of irradiation for advanced transglottic and supraglottic tumors needs to be documented by a controlled study that compares surgery alone with salvage radiation at time of recurrence to surgery plus adjuvant radiation. The authors feel that such a study is needed to put to rest the present controversy before they can advocate a course of treatment that is expensive, time-consuming, and difficult for the patients to tolerate owing to severe acute side effects and potentially morbid late effects (xerostomia, necrosis) that can greatly lessen the quality of life for these patients

  1. Feasibility of MR-only proton dose calculations for prostate cancer radiotherapy using a commercial pseudo-CT generation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, Matteo; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Landry, Guillaume; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia; Seevinck, Peter R.; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Kurz, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    A magnetic resonance (MR)-only radiotherapy workflow can reduce cost, radiation exposure and uncertainties introduced by CT-MRI registration. A crucial prerequisite is generating the so called pseudo-CT (pCT) images for accurate dose calculation and planning. Many pCT generation methods have been proposed in the scope of photon radiotherapy. This work aims at verifying for the first time whether a commercially available photon-oriented pCT generation method can be employed for accurate intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) dose calculation. A retrospective study was conducted on ten prostate cancer patients. For pCT generation from MR images, a commercial solution for creating bulk-assigned pCTs, called MR for Attenuation Correction (MRCAT), was employed. The assigned pseudo-Hounsfield Unit (HU) values were adapted to yield an increased agreement to the reference CT in terms of proton range. Internal air cavities were copied from the CT to minimise inter-scan differences. CT- and MRCAT-based dose calculations for opposing beam IMPT plans were compared by gamma analysis and evaluation of clinically relevant target and organ at risk dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters. The proton range in beam’s eye view (BEV) was compared using single field uniform dose (SFUD) plans. On average, a (2%, 2 mm) gamma pass rate of 98.4% was obtained using a 10% dose threshold after adaptation of the pseudo-HU values. Mean differences between CT- and MRCAT-based dose in the DVH parameters were below 1 Gy (radiotherapy, is feasible following adaptation of the assigned pseudo-HU values.

  2. A DICOM-RT-based toolbox for the evaluation and verification of radiotherapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezi, E; Lewis, D G; Smith, C W

    2002-01-01

    The verification of radiotherapy plans is an essential step in the treatment planning process. This is especially important for highly conformal and IMRT plans which produce non-intuitive fluence maps and complex 3D dose distributions. In this work we present a DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) based toolbox, developed for the evaluation and the verification of radiotherapy treatment plans. The toolbox offers the possibility of importing treatment plans generated with different calculation algorithms and/or different optimization engines and evaluating dose distributions on an independent platform. Furthermore the radiotherapy set-up can be exported to the BEAM Monte Carlo code system for dose verification. This can be done by simulating the irradiation of the patient CT dataset or the irradiation of a software-generated water phantom. We show the application of some of the functions implemented in this toolbox for the evaluation and verification of an IMRT treatment of the head and neck region

  3. Image-Guided Radiotherapy via Daily Online Cone-Beam CT Substantially Reduces Margin Requirements for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry L.; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, K. Kenneth; Wloch, Jennifer; Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment accuracy and margins for stereotactic lung radiotherapy with and without cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. Methods and Materials: Acquired for the study were 308 CBCT of 24 patients with solitary peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame (SBF) or alpha-cradle and treated with image guidance using daily CBCT. Four (T1) or five (T2/metastatic) 12-Gy fractions were prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) edge. The PTV margin was ≥5 mm depending on a pretreatment estimate of tumor excursion. Initial daily setup was according to SBF coordinates or tattoos for alpha-cradle cases. A CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using soft tissue registration of the target. The initial setup error/precorrection position, was recorded for the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions. The couch was adjusted to correct the tumor positional error. A second CBCT verified tumor position after correction. Patients were treated in the corrected position after the residual errors were ≤2 mm. A final CBCT after treatment assessed intrafraction tumor displacement. Results: The precorrection systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) for the population ranged from 2-3 mm for SBF and 2-6 mm for alpha-cradle patients; postcorrection errors ranged from 0.4-1.0 mm. Calculated population margins were 9 to 13 mm (SBF) and 10-14 mm (cradle) precorrection, 1-2 mm (SBF), and 2-3 mm (cradle) postcorrection, and 2-4 mm (SBF) and 2-5 mm (cradle) posttreatment. Conclusions: Setup for stereotactic lung radiotherapy using a SBF or alpha-cradle alone is suboptimal. CBCT image guidance significantly improves target positioning and substantially reduces required target margins and normal tissue irradiation

  4. Accuracy verification of PET-CT image fusion and its utilization in target delineation of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuetao; Yu Jinming; Yang Guoren; Gong Heyi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the accuracy of co-registration of PET and CT (PET-CT) images on line with phantom, and utilize it on patients to provide clinical evidence for target delineation in radiotherapy. Methods: A phantom with markers and different volume cylinders was infused with various concentrations of 18 FDG, and scanned at 4 mm by PET and CT respectively. After having been transmitted into GE eNTEGRA and treatment planning system (TPS) workstations, the images were fused and reconstructed. The distance between the markers and the errors were monitored in PET and CT images respectively. The volume of cylinder in PET and CT images were measured and compared by certain pixel value proportion deduction method. The same procedure was performed on the pulmonary tumor image in ten patients. Results: eNTEGRA and TPS workstations had a good length linearity, but the fusion error of the latter was markedly greater than the former. Tumors in different volume filled by varying concentrations of 18 FDG required different pixel deduction proportion. The cylinder volume of PET and CT images were almost the same, so were the images of pulmonary tumor of ten patients. Conclusions: The accuracy of image co-registration of PET-CT on line may fulfill the clinical demand. Pixel value proportion deduction method can be used for target delineation on PET image. (authors)

  5. Evaluation of isocenter reproducibility in telemedicine of 3D-radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Saeko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Kimura, Kouji; Takada, Yoshiki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Kono, Michio; Soejima, Toshinori; Kodama, Akihisa

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the utility in telemedicine of Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Treatment Planning (tele-3D-RTP) and to examine the accuracy of isocenter reproducibility in its offline trial. CT data of phantoms and patients in the satellite hospital were transferred to our hospital via floppy-disk and 3D-radiotherapy plans were generated by 3D-RTP computer in our hospital. Profile data of CT and treatment beams in the satellite hospital were pre-installed into the computer. Tele-3D-RTPs were performed in 3 phantom plans and 14 clinical plans for 13 patients. Planned isocenters were well reproduced, especially in the immobilized head and neck/brain tumor cases, whose 3D-vector of aberration was 1.96±1.38 (SD) mm. This teletherapy system is well applicable for practical use and can provides cost-reduction through sharing the resources of expensive equipment and radiation oncologists. (author)

  6. Evaluation of isocenter reproducibility in telemedicine of 3D-radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Kimura, Kouji; Takada, Yoshiki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Kono, Michio [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Soejima, Toshinori; Kodama, Akihisa

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the utility in telemedicine of Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Treatment Planning (tele-3D-RTP) and to examine the accuracy of isocenter reproducibility in its offline trial. CT data of phantoms and patients in the satellite hospital were transferred to our hospital via floppy-disk and 3D-radiotherapy plans were generated by 3D-RTP computer in our hospital. Profile data of CT and treatment beams in the satellite hospital were pre-installed into the computer. Tele-3D-RTPs were performed in 3 phantom plans and 14 clinical plans for 13 patients. Planned isocenters were well reproduced, especially in the immobilized head and neck/brain tumor cases, whose 3D-vector of aberration was 1.96{+-}1.38 (SD) mm. This teletherapy system is well applicable for practical use and can provides cost-reduction through sharing the resources of expensive equipment and radiation oncologists. (author)

  7. Technical Note: MRI only prostate radiotherapy planning using the statistical decomposition algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siversson, Carl; Nordström, Fredrik; Nilsson, Terese; Nyholm, Tufve; Jonsson, Joakim; Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn; Olsson, Lars E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In order to enable a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only workflow in radiotherapy treatment planning, methods are required for generating Hounsfield unit (HU) maps (i.e., synthetic computed tomography, sCT) for dose calculations, directly from MRI. The Statistical Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is a method for automatically generating sCT images from a single MR image volume, based on automatic tissue classification in combination with a model trained using a multimodal template material. This study compares dose calculations between sCT generated by the SDA and conventional CT in the male pelvic region. Methods: The study comprised ten prostate cancer patients, for whom a 3D T2 weighted MRI and a conventional planning CT were acquired. For each patient, sCT images were generated from the acquired MRI using the SDA. In order to decouple the effect of variations in patient geometry between imaging modalities from the effect of uncertainties in the SDA, the conventional CT was nonrigidly registered to the MRI to assure that their geometries were well aligned. For each patient, a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was created for the registered CT (rCT) and recalculated for both the sCT and the conventional CT. The results were evaluated using several methods, including mean average error (MAE), a set of dose-volume histogram parameters, and a restrictive gamma criterion (2% local dose/1 mm). Results: The MAE within the body contour was 36.5 ± 4.1 (1 s.d.) HU between sCT and rCT. Average mean absorbed dose difference to target was 0.0% ± 0.2% (1 s.d.) between sCT and rCT, whereas it was −0.3% ± 0.3% (1 s.d.) between CT and rCT. The average gamma pass rate was 99.9% for sCT vs rCT, whereas it was 90.3% for CT vs rCT. Conclusions: The SDA enables a highly accurate MRI only workflow in prostate radiotherapy planning. The dosimetric uncertainties originating from the SDA appear negligible and are notably lower than the uncertainties

  8. Cone Beam CT Imaging Analysis of Interfractional Variations in Bladder Volume and Position During Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Rathee, Satyapal; Ghosh, Sunita; Ko, Lawrence; Murray, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm). The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (± standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm 3 (SD, 29.71 cm 3 ). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm 3 (SD, 21.64 cm 3 ). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm 3 (SD, 36.51 cm 3 ). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm 3 (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm 3 (SD, 3.97 cm 3 ). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.

  9. Accuracy requirements in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdar, S. A.; Afzal, M.; Nazir, A.; Gadhi, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy attempts to deliver ionizing radiation to the tumour and can improve the survival chances and/or quality of life of patients. There are chances of errors and uncertainties in the entire process of radiotherapy that may affect the accuracy and precision of treatment management and decrease degree of conformation. All expected inaccuracies, like radiation dose determination, volume calculation, complete evaluation of the full extent of the tumour, biological behaviour of specific tumour types, organ motion during radiotherapy, imaging, biological/molecular uncertainties, sub-clinical diseases, microscopic spread of the disease, uncertainty in normal tissue responses and radiation morbidity need sound appreciation. Conformity can be increased by reduction of such inaccuracies. With the yearly increase in computing speed and advancement in other technologies the future will provide the opportunity to optimize a greater number of variables and reduce the errors in the treatment planning process. In multi-disciplined task of radiotherapy, efforts are needed to overcome the errors and uncertainty, not only by the physicists but also by radiologists, pathologists and oncologists to reduce molecular and biological uncertainties. The radiation therapy physics is advancing towards an optimal goal that is definitely to improve accuracy where necessary and to reduce uncertainty where possible. (author)

  10. A multi-modality concept for radiotherapy planning with imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.

    1993-01-01

    The reported multi-modality concept of radiotherapy planning in the LAN can be realised in any hospital with standard equipment, although in some cases by way of auxiliary configurations. A software is currently developed as a tool for reducing the entire planning work. The heart of any radiotherapy planning is the therapy simulator, which has to be abreast with the requirements of modern radiotherapy. Integration of tomograpy, digitalisation, and electronic data processing has added important modalities to therapy planning which allow more precise target volume definition, and better biophysical planning. This is what is needed in order to achieve well differentiated radiotherapy for treatment of the manifold tumors, and the quality standards expected by the supervisory quality assurance regime and the population. At present, the CT data still are transferred indirect, on storage media, to the EDP processing system of the radiotherapy planning system. Based on the tomographic slices given by the imaging data, the contours and technical problem solutions are derived automatically, either for multi-field radiotherapy or moving field irradiation, depending on the anatomy or the targets to be protected from ionizing radiation. (orig./VHE) [de

  11. Automatic liver contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dengwang; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    To develop automatic and efficient liver contouring software for planning 3D-CT and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for application in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems.The algorithm comprises three steps for overcoming the challenge of similar intensities between the liver region and its surrounding tissues. First, the total variation model with the L1 norm (TV-L1), which has the characteristic of multi-scale decomposition and an edge-preserving property, is used for removing the surrounding muscles and tissues. Second, an improved level set model that contains both global and local energy functions is utilized to extract liver contour information sequentially. In the global energy function, the local correlation coefficient (LCC) is constructed based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix both of the initial liver region and the background region. The LCC can calculate the correlation of a pixel with the foreground and background regions, respectively. The LCC is combined with intensity distribution models to classify pixels during the evolutionary process of the level set based method. The obtained liver contour is used as the candidate liver region for the following step. In the third step, voxel-based texture characterization is employed for refining the liver region and obtaining the final liver contours.The proposed method was validated based on the planning CT images of a group of 25 patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment planning. These included ten lung cancer patients with normal appearing livers and ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The method was also tested on abdominal 4D-CT images of a group of five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The false positive volume percentage, the false negative volume percentage, and the dice similarity coefficient between liver contours obtained by a developed algorithm and a current standard delineated by the expert group

  12. Cine Computed Tomography Without Respiratory Surrogate in Planning Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegel, Adam C. B.A.; Chang, Joe Y.; Vedam, Sastry S.; Johnson, Valen; Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda; Pan, Tinsu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether cine computed tomography (CT) can serve as an alternative to four-dimensional (4D)-CT by providing tumor motion information and producing equivalent target volumes when used to contour in radiotherapy planning without a respiratory surrogate. Methods and Materials: Cine CT images from a commercial CT scanner were used to form maximum intensity projection and respiratory-averaged CT image sets. These image sets then were used together to define the targets for radiotherapy. Phantoms oscillating under irregular motion were used to assess the differences between contouring using cine CT and 4D-CT. We also retrospectively reviewed the image sets for 26 patients (27 lesions) at our institution who had undergone stereotactic radiotherapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. The patients were included if the tumor motion was >1 cm. The lesions were first contoured using maximum intensity projection and respiratory-averaged CT image sets processed from cine CT and then with 4D-CT maximum intensity projection and 10-phase image sets. The mean ratios of the volume magnitude were compared with intraobserver variation, the mean centroid shifts were calculated, and the volume overlap was assessed with the normalized Dice similarity coefficient index. Results: The phantom studies demonstrated that cine CT captured a greater extent of irregular tumor motion than did 4D-CT, producing a larger tumor volume. The patient studies demonstrated that the gross tumor defined using cine CT imaging was similar to, or slightly larger than, that defined using 4D-CT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that cine CT is a promising alternative to 4D-CT for stereotactic radiotherapy planning

  13. [Optimization of radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using 18FDG-PET].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S; Nestle, U; Walter, K; Licht, N; Ukena, D; Schnabel, K; Kirsch, C M

    2002-10-01

    In recent years, FDG-PET examinations have become more important for problems in oncology, especially in staging of bronchogenic carcinoma. In the retrospective study presented here, the influence of PET on the planning of radiotherapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was investigated. The study involved 39 patients with NSCLC who had been examined by PET for staging. They received radiotherapy on the basis of the anterior/posterior portals including the primary tumour and the mediastinum planned according to CT- and bronchoscopic findings. The results of the PET examination were not considered in initial radiotherapy planning. The portals were retrospectively redefined on the basis of FDG uptake considering the size and localization of the primary tumour; and FDG activities outside the mediastinal part of the portals. In 15 out of 39 patients, the CT/PET-planned portals differed from the CT-planned ones. In most causes (n = 12) the CT/PET field was smaller than the CT field. The median geometric field size of the portals was 179 cm2, after redefinition using PET 166 cm2. In 20 patients with disturbed ventilation caused by the tumour (atelectasis, dystelectosis), a correction of the portal was suggested significantly more frequently than in the other patients (p = 0.03). Our results demonstrate the synergism of topographical (CT) and metabolic (FDG-PET) information, which could be helpful in planning radiotherapy of bronchial carcinoma, especially for patients with disturbed ventilation.

  14. A Monte Carlo dose calculation tool for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.S.; Pawlicki, T.; Jiang, S.B.; Deng, J.; Lee, M.C.; Koumrian, T.; Luxton, M.; Brain, S.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo user code, MCDOSE, has been developed for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) dose calculations. MCDOSE is designed as a dose calculation module suitable for adaptation to host RTP systems. MCDOSE can be used for both conventional photon/electron beam calculation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. MCDOSE uses a multiple-source model to reconstruct the treatment beam phase space. Based on Monte Carlo simulated or measured beam data acquired during commissioning, source-model parameters are adjusted through an automated procedure. Beam modifiers such as jaws, physical and dynamic wedges, compensators, blocks, electron cut-outs and bolus are simulated by MCDOSE together with a 3D rectilinear patient geometry model built from CT data. Dose distributions calculated using MCDOSE agreed well with those calculated by the EGS4/DOSXYZ code using different beam set-ups and beam modifiers. Heterogeneity correction factors for layered-lung or layered-bone phantoms as calculated by both codes were consistent with measured data to within 1%. The effect of energy cut-offs for particle transport was investigated. Variance reduction techniques were implemented in MCDOSE to achieve a speedup factor of 10-30 compared to DOSXYZ. (author)

  15. Telemedicine in radiotherapy treatment planning: requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.R.; Bruland, O.S.; Davis, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    Telemedicine facilitates decentralized radiotherapy services by allowing remote treatment planning and quality assurance of treatment delivery. A prerequisite is digital storage of relevant data and an efficient and reliable telecommunication system between satellite units and the main radiotherapy clinic. The requirements of a telemedicine system in radiotherapy is influenced by the level of support needed. In this paper we differentiate between three categories of telemedicine support in radiotherapy. Level 1 features video conferencing and display of radiotherapy images and dose plans. Level 2 involves replication of selected data from the radiotherapy database - facilitating remote treatment planning and evaluation. Level 3 includes real-time, remote operations, e.g. target volume delineation and treatment planning performed by the team at the satellite unit under supervision and guidance from more experienced colleagues at the main clinic. (author)

  16. Four-dimensional treatment planning and fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy for moving tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shinichi; Kitamura, Kei; Nishioka, Takeshi; Kagei, Kenji; Hashimoto, Seiko; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Kunieda, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Nobuo; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve precise three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy for mobile tumors, a new radiotherapy system and its treatment planning system were developed and used for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: We developed a linear accelerator synchronized with a fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking system by which 3D coordinates of a 2.0-mm gold marker in the tumor can be determined every 0.03 second. The 3D relationships between the marker and the tumor at different respiratory phases are evaluated using CT image at each respiratory phase, whereby the optimum phase can be selected to synchronize with irradiation (4D treatment planning). The linac is triggered to irradiate the tumor only when the marker is located within the region of the planned coordinates relative to the isocenter. Results: The coordinates of the marker were detected with an accuracy of ± 1 mm during radiotherapy in the phantom experiment. The time delay between recognition of the marker position and the start or stop of megavoltage X-ray irradiation was 0.03 second. Fourteen patients with various tumors were treated by conformal radiotherapy with a 'tight' planning target volume (PTV) margin. They were surviving without relapse or complications with a median follow-up of 6 months. Conclusion: Fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy following 4D treatment planning was developed and shown to be feasible to improve the accuracy of the radiotherapy for mobile tumors

  17. Interobserver Delineation variation using CT versus combined CT + MRI in intensity- modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Vaerenbergh, K. van; Vakaet, L.; Bral, S.; Claus, F.; Neve, W.J. de; Meerleer, G.O. de

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to quantify interobserver variation of prostate and seminal vesicle delineations using CT only versus CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. Material and methods: the prostate and seminal vesicles of 13 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma were retrospectively delineated by three radiation oncologists on CT only and on CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. The volumes and margin positions were calculated and intermodality and interobserver variations were assessed for the clinical target volume (CTV), seminal vesicles, prostate and three prostatic subdivisions (apical, middle and basal third). Results: using CT + MRI as compared to CT alone, the mean CTV, prostate and seminal vesicle volumes significantly decreased by 6.54%, 5.21% and 10.47%, respectively. More importantly, their standard deviations significantly decreased by 63.06%, 62.65% and 44.83%, respectively. The highest level of variation was found at the prostatic apex, followed by the prostatic base and seminal vesicles. Conclusion: addition of MRI to CT in consensus reading with a radiologist results in a moderate decrease of the CTV, but an important decrease of the interobserver delineation variation, especially at the prostatic apex. (orig.)

  18. MRI-based treatment planning for radiotherapy: Dosimetric verification for prostate IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lili; Price, Robert A.; Wang Lu; Li Jinsheng; Qin Lihong; McNeeley, Shawn; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Freedman, Gary M.; Pollack, Alan

    2004-01-01

    and dose predicted by the planning system in the physical phantom. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful tool for radiotherapy simulation. Compared with CT-based treatment planning, MR imaging-based treatment planning meets the accuracy for dose calculation and provides consistent treatment plans for prostate IMRT. Because MR imaging-based digitally reconstructed radiographs do not provide adequate bony structure information, a technique is suggested for producing a wire-frame image that is intended to replace the traditional digitally reconstructed radiographs that are made from CT information

  19. Protocol for quality control of scanners used in the simulation of radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanes, Yaima; Alfonso, Rodolfo; Silvestre, Ileana

    2009-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become the tool fundamental imaging of modern radiation therapy, to locate targets and critical organs and dose planning. Tomographs used for these purposes require strict assurance program quality, which differs in many aspects of monitoring required for diagnostic use only with intention. The aim of this work has been the design and validation of a quality control protocol applicable to any TAC used for simulation, radiotherapy planning. (author)

  20. Lung cancer: Value of computed tomography in radiotherapy planning and evaluation of tumour remission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyerabend, T.; Schmitt, R.; Richter, E.; Bohndorf, W.

    1990-01-01

    434 CT examinations of 133 patients with histologically proven bronchogenic carcinoma (22 out of 133 with small cell lung cancer) were analysed before and after radiotherapy. The study evaluates the use of CT for determining target volume, tumour volume and remission rate: 1. Concerning determination of target volume conventional roentgendiagnostic simulator methods are much inferior to CT aided planning; as for our patients changes of the target volume were necessary in 50%, in 22% the changes were crucial. This happened more often in non-small cell lung cancer than in small cell carcinomas. 2. The response rate (CR + PR) after radiotherapy (based on the calculated tumour volumes by CT) was 70 to 80%. The rate of CR of the primary was 45% (non-small cell carcinoma) and 67% (small cell carcinoma). 3. The crucial point for the evaluation of tumour remission after radiotherapy is the point of time. One to three months and four to nine months after irradiation we found complete remissions in 19% and 62%, respectively. Hence, the evaluation of treatment results earlier than three months after radiotherapy may be incorrect. We deem it indispensable to use CT for determination of target, calculation of dose distribution and accurate evaluation of tumour remission and side effects during and after irradiation of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  1. Automated radiotherapy treatment plan integrity verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Deshan; Moore, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In our clinic, physicists spend from 15 to 60 min to verify the physical and dosimetric integrity of radiotherapy plans before presentation to radiation oncology physicians for approval. The purpose of this study was to design and implement a framework to automate as many elements of this quality control (QC) step as possible. Methods: A comprehensive computer application was developed to carry out a majority of these verification tasks in the Philips PINNACLE treatment planning system (TPS). This QC tool functions based on both PINNACLE scripting elements and PERL sub-routines. The core of this technique is the method of dynamic scripting, which involves a PERL programming module that is flexible and powerful for treatment plan data handling. Run-time plan data are collected, saved into temporary files, and analyzed against standard values and predefined logical rules. The results were summarized in a hypertext markup language (HTML) report that is displayed to the user. Results: This tool has been in clinical use for over a year. The occurrence frequency of technical problems, which would cause delays and suboptimal plans, has been reduced since clinical implementation. Conclusions: In addition to drastically reducing the set of human-driven logical comparisons, this QC tool also accomplished some tasks that are otherwise either quite laborious or impractical for humans to verify, e.g., identifying conflicts amongst IMRT optimization objectives.

  2. Automated radiotherapy treatment plan integrity verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Deshan; Moore, Kevin L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In our clinic, physicists spend from 15 to 60 min to verify the physical and dosimetric integrity of radiotherapy plans before presentation to radiation oncology physicians for approval. The purpose of this study was to design and implement a framework to automate as many elements of this quality control (QC) step as possible. Methods: A comprehensive computer application was developed to carry out a majority of these verification tasks in the Philips PINNACLE treatment planning system (TPS). This QC tool functions based on both PINNACLE scripting elements and PERL sub-routines. The core of this technique is the method of dynamic scripting, which involves a PERL programming module that is flexible and powerful for treatment plan data handling. Run-time plan data are collected, saved into temporary files, and analyzed against standard values and predefined logical rules. The results were summarized in a hypertext markup language (HTML) report that is displayed to the user. Results: This tool has been in clinical use for over a year. The occurrence frequency of technical problems, which would cause delays and suboptimal plans, has been reduced since clinical implementation. Conclusions: In addition to drastically reducing the set of human-driven logical comparisons, this QC tool also accomplished some tasks that are otherwise either quite laborious or impractical for humans to verify, e.g., identifying conflicts amongst IMRT optimization objectives.

  3. CT simulation in stereotactic brain radiotherapy - analysis of isocenter reproducibility with mask fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willner, Jochen; Flentje, Michael; Bratengeier, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: CT verification and measurement of isocenter deviation using repeated mask fixation in linac-based stereotactic high dose radiotherapy of brain metastases were performed in this study. Materials and methods: For stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases a commercial head mask fixation device based on thermoplastic materials (BrainLAB) was used. A two-step planning-treatment procedure was performed. Immediately before treatment the patient was relocated in the mask and a verification CT scan of the radiopaque marked isocenter was performed and if necessary its position was corrected. The verification procedure is described in detail. Twenty-two CT verifications in 16 patients were analyzed. Deviations were measured separately for each direction. A 3D-deviation vector was calculated. Additionally the average amount of deviation in each of the three dimensions was calculated. Results: The mean deviation and standard deviation (SD) of the isocenter was 0.4 mm (SD 1.5 mm) in the longitudinal direction, -0.1 mm (SD 1.8 mm) in the lateral direction and 0.1 mm (SD 1.2 mm) in the anterior-posterior direction. The mean three-dimensional distance (3D-vector) between the verified and the corrected isocenter was 2.4 mm (SD 1.3 mm). The average deviation (without consideration of direction) was 1.1 mm (SD 1.1 mm), 1.3 mm (SD 1.3 mm) and 0.8 mm (SD 0.9 mm) in the longitudinal, lateral and sagittal directions, respectively. No correlation was found between 3D-deviation and the distance of the isocenter from the reference plane nor between deviation and the position of metastases in the brain (central versus peripheral or between different lobes), or the date of treatment. Conclusion: Reproducibility of the isocenter using the presented mask fixation is in the range of positioning reproducibility reported for other non-invasive fixation devices for stereotactic brain treatment. Our results underline the importance of CT verification as a quality

  4. Dosimetry audit of radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulski, Wojciech; Chelminski, Krzysztof; Rostkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) various calculation algorithms are used. The accuracy of dose calculations has to be verified. Numerous phantom types, detectors and measurement methodologies are proposed to verify the TPS calculations with dosimetric measurements. A heterogeneous slab phantom has been designed within a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the IAEA. The heterogeneous phantom was developed in the frame of the IAEA CRP. The phantom consists of frame slabs made with polystyrene and exchangeable inhomogeneity slabs equivalent to bone or lung tissue. Special inserts allow to position thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) capsules within the polystyrene slabs below the bone or lung equivalent slabs and also within the lung equivalent material. Additionally, there are inserts that allow to position films or ionisation chamber in the phantom. Ten Polish radiotherapy centres (of 30 in total) were audited during on-site visits. Six different TPSs and five calculation algorithms were examined in the presence of inhomogeneities. Generally, most of the results from TLD were within 5 % tolerance. Differences between doses calculated by TPSs and measured with TLD did not exceed 4 % for bone and polystyrene equivalent materials. Under the lung equivalent material, on the beam axis the differences were lower than 5 %, whereas inside the lung equivalent material, off the beam axis, in some cases they were of around 7 %. The TLD results were confirmed with the ionisation chamber measurements. The comparison results of the calculations and the measurements allow to detect limitations of TPS calculation algorithms. The audits performed with the use of heterogeneous phantom and TLD seem to be an effective tool for detecting the limitations in the TPS performance or beam configuration errors at audited radiotherapy departments. (authors)

  5. Dosimetry audit of radiotherapy treatment planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulski, Wojciech; Chełmiński, Krzysztof; Rostkowska, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    In radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) various calculation algorithms are used. The accuracy of dose calculations has to be verified. Numerous phantom types, detectors and measurement methodologies are proposed to verify the TPS calculations with dosimetric measurements. A heterogeneous slab phantom has been designed within a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the IAEA. The heterogeneous phantom was developed in the frame of the IAEA CRP. The phantom consists of frame slabs made with polystyrene and exchangeable inhomogeneity slabs equivalent to bone or lung tissue. Special inserts allow to position thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) capsules within the polystyrene slabs below the bone or lung equivalent slabs and also within the lung equivalent material. Additionally, there are inserts that allow to position films or ionisation chamber in the phantom. Ten Polish radiotherapy centres (of 30 in total) were audited during on-site visits. Six different TPSs and five calculation algorithms were examined in the presence of inhomogeneities. Generally, most of the results from TLD were within 5 % tolerance. Differences between doses calculated by TPSs and measured with TLD did not exceed 4 % for bone and polystyrene equivalent materials. Under the lung equivalent material, on the beam axis the differences were lower than 5 %, whereas inside the lung equivalent material, off the beam axis, in some cases they were of around 7 %. The TLD results were confirmed with the ionisation chamber measurements. The comparison results of the calculations and the measurements allow to detect limitations of TPS calculation algorithms. The audits performed with the use of heterogeneous phantom and TLD seem to be an effective tool for detecting the limitations in the TPS performance or beam configuration errors at audited radiotherapy departments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Contouring and dose calculation in head and neck cancer radiotherapy after reduction of metal artifacts in CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rønn; Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Lorenzen, Ebbe Laugaard

    2017-01-01

    of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in H&N patients in terms of delineation consistency and dose calculation precision in radiation treatment planning. Material and methods: Tumor and OAR delineations were evaluated in planning CT scans of eleven oropharynx patients with streaking artifacts in the tumor...... region preceding curative radiotherapy (RT). The GTV-tumor (GTV-T), GTV-node and parotid glands were contoured by four independent observers on standard CT images and MAR images. Dose calculation was evaluated on thirty H&N patients with dental implants near the treated volume. For each patient, the dose...

  7. Systematisation of spatial uncertainties for comparison between a MR and a CT-based radiotherapy workflow for prostate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, Tufve; Nyberg, Morgan; Karlsson, Magnus G; Karlsson, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we compared the spatial uncertainties associated with a MR-based workflow for external radiotherapy of prostate cancer to a standard CT-based workflow. The MR-based workflow relies on target definition and patient positioning based on MR imaging. A solution for patient transport between the MR scanner and the treatment units has been developed. For the CT-based workflow, the target is defined on a MR series but then transferred to a CT study through image registration before treatment planning, and a patient positioning using portal imaging and fiducial markers. An 'open bore' 1.5T MRI scanner, Siemens Espree, has been installed in the radiotherapy department in near proximity to a treatment unit to enable patient transport between the two installations, and hence use the MRI for patient positioning. The spatial uncertainty caused by the transport was added to the uncertainty originating from the target definition process, estimated through a review of the scientific literature. The uncertainty in the CT-based workflow was estimated through a literature review. The systematic uncertainties, affecting all treatment fractions, are reduced from 3-4 mm (1Sd) with a CT based workflow to 2-3 mm with a MR based workflow. The main contributing factor to this improvement is the exclusion of registration between MR and CT in the planning phase of the treatment. Treatment planning directly on MR images reduce the spatial uncertainty for prostate treatments

  8. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoos, T; Nilsson, P [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Anders, A [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam`s eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam`s eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment.

  9. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoos, T.; Nilsson, P.; Anders, A.

    1995-01-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam's eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam's eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment

  10. The influence of CT control examinations on the irradiation planning for patients with cerebral metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haumann, S.

    1986-01-01

    The thesis is aimed at reviewing a therapy plan worked out previously for the treatment of patients with cerebral metastases, and at studying computerized tomography for its potential benefit in the planning and implementation of radiotherapy. 61 patients were irradiated and examined neurologically and by CT before, during and after treatment, thus allowing a thorough-going analysis of the findings. CT evaluations differentiated between the change of volume and the number of metastases as well as the change of the extension of perifocal oedema. Our experience shows a dose of 30 Gy related to the centre of the skull to be sufficient, on the one hand, in order to determine by CT whether or not the existing intracerebral tumour metastases of the patient concerned will be accessible by radiotherapy at all, and, on the other hand, to destroy metastases smaller than 5 mm which cannot be detected by CT. (orig./MG) [de

  11. 3-D CT for cardiovascular treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildermuth, S.; Leschka, S.; Duru, F.; Alkadhi, H.

    2005-01-01

    The recently developed 64-slice CT scanner together with the use of 2-D and 3-D reconstructions can aid the cardiovascular surgeon and interventional radiologist in visualizing exact geometric relationships to plan and execute complex procedures via minimally invasive or standard approaches.Cardiac 64-slice CT considerably benefits from the high temporal and spatial resolution allowing the reliable depiction of small coronary segments. Similarly, abdominal vascular 64-slice CT became possible within short examination times and allowing an optimal arterial contrast bolus exploitation. We demonstrate four representative cardiac and abdominal examples using the new 64-slice CT technology which reveal the impact of the new scanner generation for cardiovascular treatment planning. (orig.)

  12. Neurovascular bundle–sparing radiotherapy for prostate cancer using MRI-CT registration: A dosimetric feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, R.J., E-mail: richardjcassidy@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yang, X.; Liu, T.; Thomas, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nour, S.G. [Department of Radiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, A.B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer remains an important late adverse toxicity. The neurovascular bundles (NVB) that lie posterolaterally to the prostate are typically spared during prostatectomy, but in traditional radiotherapy planning they are not contoured as an organ-at-risk with dose constraints. Our goal was to determine the dosimetric feasibility of “NVB-sparing” prostate radiotherapy while still delivering adequate dose to the prostate. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients with prostate cancer (with no extraprostatic disease on pelvic magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) who that were treated with external beam radiotherapy, with the same primary planning target volume margins, to a dose of 79.2 Gy were evaluated. Pelvic MRI and simulation computed tomography scans were registered using dedicated software to allow for bilateral NVB target delineation on T2-weighted MRI. A volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated using the NVB bilaterally with 2 mm margin as an organ to spare and compared to the patient’s previously delivered plan. Dose-volume histogram endpoints for NVB, rectum, bladder, and planning target volume 79.2 were compared between the 2 plans using a 2-tailed paired t-test. Results: The V70 for the NVB was significantly lower on the NVB-sparing plan (p <0.01), while rectum and bladder endpoints were similar. Target V100% was similar but V{sub 105%} was higher for the NVB-sparing plans (p <0.01). Conclusions: “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is dosimetrically feasible using CT-MRI registration, and for volumetric modulated arc therapy technology — target coverage is acceptable without increased dose to other normal structures, but with higher target dose inhomogeneity. The clinical impact of “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is currently under study at our institution.

  13. Clinical validation of FDG-PET/CT in the radiation treatment planning for patients with oesophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijs, Christina T.; Beukema, Jannet C.; Woutersen, Dankert; Mul, Veronique E.; Berveling, Maaike J.; Pruim, Jan; van der Jagt, Eric J.; Hospers, Geke A. P.; Groen, Henk; Plukker, John Th.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the proportion of locoregional recurrences (LRRs) that could have been prevented if radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer was based on PET/CT instead of CT. Materials and methods: Ninety oesophageal cancer patients,

  14. Accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT: comparison of deformable registration and image correction based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, T. E.; Joshi, K. D.; Moore, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can be inaccurate due to unreliable Hounsfield units (HU) in the CBCT. Deformable image registration of planning CT images to CBCT, and direct correction of CBCT image values are two methods proposed to allow heterogeneity corrected dose calculations based on CBCT. In this paper we compare the accuracy and robustness of these two approaches. CBCT images for 44 patients were used including pelvis, lung and head & neck sites. CBCT HU were corrected using a ‘shading correction’ algorithm and via deformable registration of planning CT to CBCT using either Elastix or Niftyreg. Radiotherapy dose distributions were re-calculated with heterogeneity correction based on the corrected CBCT and several relevant dose metrics for target and OAR volumes were calculated. Accuracy of CBCT based dose metrics was determined using an ‘override ratio’ method where the ratio of the dose metric to that calculated on a bulk-density assigned version of the same image is assumed to be constant for each patient, allowing comparison to the patient’s planning CT as a gold standard. Similar performance is achieved by shading corrected CBCT and both deformable registration algorithms, with mean and standard deviation of dose metric error less than 1% for all sites studied. For lung images, use of deformed CT leads to slightly larger standard deviation of dose metric error than shading corrected CBCT with more dose metric errors greater than 2% observed (7% versus 1%).

  15. An approach to contouring the dorsal vagal complex for radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Steen, Lillie; Amdur, Robert J., E-mail: amdurr@shands.ufl.edu

    2016-04-01

    Multiple studies suggest that radiation dose to the area of the brainstem called the “dorsal vagal complex (DVC)” influences the frequency of nausea and vomiting during radiotherapy. The purpose of this didactic article is to describe the step-by-step process that we use to contour the general area of the DVC on axial computed tomography (CT) images as would be done for radiotherapy planning. The contouring procedure that we describe for contouring the area of the DVC is useful to medical dosimetrists and radiation oncologists.

  16. Comparison of DVH data from multiple radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M A; Kearvell, R; Hooton, B; Spry, N A; Bydder, S A; Joseph, D J; Haworth, A; Hug, B

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the variation of dose-volume histogram (DVH) data sourced from multiple radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs). Treatment plan exports were obtained from 33 Australian and New Zealand centres during a dosimetry study. Plan information, including DVH data, was exported from the TPS at each centre and reviewed in a digital review system (SWAN). The review system was then used to produce an independent calculation of DVH information for each delineated structure. The relationships between DVHs extracted from each TPS and independently calculated were examined, particularly in terms of the influence of CT scan slice and pixel widths, the resolution of dose calculation grids and the TPS manufacturer. Calculation of total volume and DVH data was consistent between SWAN and each TPS, with the small discrepancies found tending to increase with decreasing structure size. This was significantly influenced by the TPS model used to derive the data. For target structures covered with relatively uniform dose distributions, there was a significant difference between the minimum dose in each TPS-exported DVH and that calculated independently. (note)

  17. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E.

    2007-01-01

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=3.3 mm±1.0 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=3.6 mm±1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=0.7 mm±0.8 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=0.3 mm±1.7 mm. We also noted that differences found for each of the fusion methods were similar for

  18. Assessment of prostate motion during radiotherapy using fiducial markers and CT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, J.; Salhani, D.; Yang, H.; Deshaies, Y.; Raymond, Y.; Malone, S.; Esche, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess changes in prostate position during a course of pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer using fiducial markers and sequential planning CT scans. Methods and Materials: Three gold seeds are implanted in the apex, base and posterior aspect of the prostate under trans-rectal ultrasound guidance prior to initial simulation. In addition, treatment planning CT scans with 5 mm slices through the prostate are obtained at 0 and 40 Gy. Patients are scanned, simulated and treated with full bladder and are positioned using a standard foam leg support from the knees to the ankles. Prostate movement is assessed by two independent methods: [1] Localization of the fiducial markers using orthogonal simulator films taken just prior to the initial and boost stages of treatment and [2] a three-dimensional reconstruction methodology using CT datasets again obtained prior to the initial and boost stages. In both cases, rigid-body transformations of selected bony landmarks were used to eliminate patient movement between simulations and CT scans. For CT reconstruction, high order polynomial extrapolation and Chebychev multi-domain interpolation methods are employed to determine the coordinates of the fiducial markers. Prostatic movement, between initial and boost imaging, is estimated from the variance of the position of the corresponding seeds. Results: At present, seed data is available for sixty (60) patients. An additional nineteen (19) patients were excluded because of suspected seed migration > 3.0 mm or a localization uncertainty > 1.5 mm. The range of movement seen in the lateral direction is -0.25 to 0.48 cm (mean: 0.11, SD: 0.15), in the cranio-caudal direction -1.57 to 0.64 cm (mean: 0.59 SD: 0.48), and in the antero-posterior direction -1.91 to .47 cm (mean: 0.53, SD: 0.39). Results disclosed 53% of the patients with a caudal shift of the prostate > 0.5 cm and 10% > 1.0 cm. Further, 60% of the patients showed a posterior shift > 0.5 cm and 27% > 1.0 cm. CT

  19. IMRT treatment plans and functional planning with functional lung imaging from 4D-CT for thoracic cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tzung-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Currently, the inhomogeneity of the pulmonary function is not considered when treatment plans are generated in thoracic cancer radiotherapy. This study evaluates the dose of treatment plans on highly-functional volumes and performs functional treatment planning by incorporation of ventilation data from 4D-CT. Materials and methods Eleven patients were included in this retrospective study. Ventilation was calculated using 4D-CT. Two treatment plans were generated for each case, the first one without the incorporation of the ventilation and the second with it. The dose of the first plans was overlapped with the ventilation and analyzed. Highly-functional regions were avoided in the second treatment plans. Results For small targets in the first plans (PTV  Conclusion Radiation treatments affect functional lung more seriously in large tumor cases. With compromise of dose to other critical organs, functional treatment planning to reduce dose in highly-functional lung volumes can be achieved

  20. SU-F-T-427: Utilization and Evaluation of Diagnostic CT Imaging with MAR Technique for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, M; Foster, R; Parks, H; Pankuch, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to utilize and evaluate diagnostic CT-MAR technique for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: A Toshiba-diagnostic-CT acquisition with SEMAR(Single-energy-MAR)-algorism was performed to make the metal-artifact-reduction (MAR) for patient treatment planning. CT-imaging datasets with and without SEMAR were taken on a Catphan-phantom. Two sets of CT-numbers were calibrated with the relative electron densities (RED). A tissue characterization phantom with Gammex various simulating material rods was used to establish the relationship between known REDs and corresponding CT-numbers. A GE-CT-sim acquisition was taken on the Catphan for comparison. A patient with bilateral hip arthroplasty was scanned in the radiotherapy CT-sim and the diagnostic SEMAR-CT on a flat panel. The derived SEMAR images were used as a primary CT dataset to create contours for the target, critical-structures, and for planning. A deformable registration was performed with VelocityAI to track voxel changes between SEMAR and CT-sim images. The SEMAR-CT images with minimal artifacts and high quality of geometrical and spatial integrity were employed for a treatment plan. Treatment-plans were evaluated based on deformable registration of SEMAR-CT and CT-sim dataset with assigned CT-numbers in the metal artifact regions in Eclipse v11 TPS. Results: The RED and CT-number relationships were consistent for the datasets in CT-sim and CT’s with and without SEMAR. SEMAR datasets with high image quality were used for PTV and organ delineation in the treatment planning process. For dose distribution to the PTV through the DVH analysis, the plan using CT-sim with the assigned CT-number showed a good agreement to those on deformable CT-SEMAR. Conclusion: A diagnostic-CT with MAR-algorithm can be utilized for radiotherapy treatment planning with CT-number calibrated to the RED. Treatment planning comparison and DVH shows a good agreement in the PTV and critical organs between

  1. Modification of staging and treatment of head and neck cancer by FDG-PET/CT prior to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyuk, A.; University Hospital Dresden; Appold, S.; Zoephel, K.; Baumann, M.; University Hospital Dresden; Abolmaali, N.; University Hospital Dresden

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reliable tumor staging is a fundamental pre-requisite for efficient tumor therapy and further prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare head and neck cancer (HNC) staging before and after FDG-PET/CT, evaluating the stage modifications for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Patients and methods: A total of 102 patients with untreated primary HNC, who underwent conventional staging and staging including FDG-PET/CT before RT, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Blinded pre-FDG-PET/CT and post-FDG-PET/CT staging data were compared. The impact on patient management was tested by comparing the intention before and after FDG-PET/CT. Results: Significant modifications of T, N, and M stage as well as clinical stage were detected after inclusion of FDG-PET/CT data (p = 0.002, 0.0006, 0.001, 0.03, respectively). Overall, the implementation of FDG-PET/CT led to modification of RT intention decision in 14 patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT demonstrates essential influence on tumor staging in HNC patients scheduled for irradiation. Implementation of FDG-PET/CT in imaging protocol improves selection of candidates for curative and palliative RT and allows further optimization of treatment management and therapy intention. (orig.)

  2. Planning National Radiotherapy Services: A Practical Tool (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The current and future burden of cancer incidence in developing countries requires the planning, establishment and upgrading of radiotherapy services at the national level. This publication is a practical guide outlining the main issues at stake when planning national radiotherapy services. It provides an assessment of the cancer burden, evaluates the existing resources, and determines what is needed and how to cover the gap in a resource oriented rational way. The publication will be of practical value to decision makers and programme managers in public health facing the organization or reorganization of radiotherapy services in their countries.

  3. Use of digitally reconstructed radiographs in radiotherapy treatment planning and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.; Guiney, M.; Hughes, P.; Leung, S.; Liew, K.H.; Matar, J.; Quong, G.

    2000-01-01

    The authors present 3 years of experience of using digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) for radiotherapy planning and verification. Comparison is made with simulation film (SF) to illustrate the advantages of DRR over SF. Emphasis is placed on using the appropriate equipment and applying the correct technique. A brief discourse on the principle of CT imaging is presented to illustrate the operation of CT software and optimization of image display for axial slices and DRR. Emphasis placed on the application of clinical knowledge to enhance the usefulness as well as the technical quality of the DRR. Illustrative examples are given. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. A new strategy for online adaptive prostate radiotherapy based on cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggula, Ramesh; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Lohr, Frank; Wolff, Dirk; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik; Wertz, Hansjoerg

    2009-01-01

    Interfractional organ motion and patient positioning errors during prostate radiotherapy can have deleterious clinical consequences. It has become clinical practice to re-position the patient with image-guided translational position correction before each treatment to compensate for those errors. However, tilt errors can only be corrected with table corrections in six degrees of freedom or ''full'' adaptive treatment planning strategies. Organ shape deformations can only be corrected by ''full'' plan adaptation. This study evaluates the potential of instant treatment plan adaptation (fast isodose line adaptation with real-time dose manipulating tools) based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) to further improve treatment quality. Using in-house software, CBCTs were modified to approximate a correct density calibration. To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy, dose distributions based on CBCTs were compared with dose distributions calculated on conventional planning CTs (PCT) for four datasets (one inhomogeneous phantom, three patient datasets). To determine the potential dosimetric benefit of a ''full'' plan adaptation over translational position correction, dose distributions were re-optimized using graphical ''online'' dose modification tools for three additional patients' CT-datasets with a substantially distended rectum while the original plans have been created with an empty rectum (single treatment fraction estimates). Absolute dose deviations of up to 51% in comparison to the PCT were observed when uncorrected CBCTs were used for replanning. After density calibration of the CBCTs, 97% of the dose deviations were ≤3% (gamma index: 3%/3 mm). Translational position correction restored the PTV dose (D 95 ) to 73% of the corresponding dose of the reference plan. After plan adaptation, larger improvements of dose restoration to 95% were observed. Additionally, the rectal dose (D 30 ) was further decreased by 42 percentage points (mean of three patient datasets). An accurate dose

  5. New development of integrated CT simulation system for radiation therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushima, Takeyuki; Kono, Michio

    1993-01-01

    In order to put more accurate radiotherapy into practice, a radiotherapy planning system using CT, which is named CT simulation system, has been developed and introduced at Kobe University Hospital. The CT simulation system consists of a CT scanner, an image processing work-station, and a laser marking system. The target area of radiation is determined on each CT axial image of scout view in the work-station. Three-dimensional treatment planning is feasible on the basis of the two-dimensional tumor information in CT axial images. After setting treatment parameters, the contour of the radiation field on beam's eye view and the iso-center position are calculated by computer. This system makes it possible to choose an appropriate irradiation method and an optimal dose distribution. In the present study we examined the fundamental capability of this system. The laser marking system proved to have a very high degree of accuracy. The outcome of a phantom test raised the strong possibility that this system may be applied clinically. In addition to these basic findings, this paper describes preliminary clinical observations that support the good reproducibility of the radiation field projected with the CT simulator. In conclusion, this system is of high value for radiation therapy planning. (author)

  6. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G., E-mail: nkyj@regionsjaelland.dk [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Stewart, Errol [Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kozak, Roman [Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8 mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  7. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G.; Stewart, Errol; Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara; Kozak, Roman; Chen, Jeff; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8 mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT

  8. CT treatment planning of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, M.

    1988-01-01

    The article deals with CT treatment planning of the liver to maximize the dose to the liver but minimize the dose to the right kidney, spinal cord, and bowels. (The left kidney is out of the field due to the oblique angles of the fields.) This is achieved by right kidney shielding reconstruction from multislice CT treatment planning and by the oblique angles of the fields. Without CT, it is not possible to utilize oblique fields to cover the liver. With conventional AP-PA fields, not only is the whole liver treated but also most of the right kidney, half of the left kidney, bowels and spinal cord. Tolerance dose to the kidneys is exceeded if adequate dose is delivered to the liver. Some new computer algorithms display a bird's eye view of the shielding but this paper presents for the first time, a technique for actual shielding reconstruction from multislice CT treatment planning for use by the radiation oncologist when shielding blocks are drawn on the simulator films

  9. A patch-based pseudo-CT approach for MRI-only radiotherapy in the pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Daniel, E-mail: dana@dtu.dk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark and Radiotherapy Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Van Leemput, Koen [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark and A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Edmund, Jens M. [Radiotherapy Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev (Denmark)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy based only on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), knowledge about tissue electron densities must be derived from the MRI. This can be achieved by converting the MRI scan to the so-called pseudo-computed tomography (pCT). An obstacle is that the voxel intensities in conventional MRI scans are not uniquely related to electron density. The authors previously demonstrated that a patch-based method could produce accurate pCTs of the brain using conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans. The method was driven mainly by local patch similarities and relied on simple affine registrations between an atlas database of the co-registered MRI/CT scan pairs and the MRI scan to be converted. In this study, the authors investigate the applicability of the patch-based approach in the pelvis. This region is challenging for a method based on local similarities due to the greater inter-patient variation. The authors benchmark the method against a baseline pCT strategy where all voxels inside the body contour are assigned a water-equivalent bulk density. Furthermore, the authors implement a parallelized approximate patch search strategy to speed up the pCT generation time to a more clinically relevant level. Methods: The data consisted of CT and T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans of 10 prostate patients. pCTs were generated using an approximate patch search algorithm in a leave-one-out fashion and compared with the CT using frequently described metrics such as the voxel-wise mean absolute error (MAE{sub vox}) and the deviation in water-equivalent path lengths. Furthermore, the dosimetric accuracy was tested for a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan using dose–volume histogram (DVH) point deviations and γ-index analysis. Results: The patch-based approach had an average MAE{sub vox} of 54 HU; median deviations of less than 0.4% in relevant DVH points and a γ-index pass rate of 0.97 using a 1%/1 mm criterion. The patch-based approach showed a significantly better

  10. Evaluation of deformable image registration for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Zhang, Y Y; Shi, Y H; Zhou, L H; Zhen, X

    2016-04-29

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) to propagate contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contours mapping, seven intensity-based DIR strategies are tested on the planning CT and weekly CBCT images from six Head & Neck cancer patients who underwent a 6 ∼ 7 weeks intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e. the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), are employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician delineated ground truths. It is found that the performance of all the evaluated DIR algorithms declines as the treatment proceeds. No statistically significant performance difference is observed between different DIR algorithms (p> 0.05), except for the double force demons (DFD) which yields the worst result in terms of DSC and PE. For the metric HD, all the DIR algorithms behaved unsatisfactorily with no statistically significant performance difference (p= 0.273). These findings suggested that special care should be taken when utilizing the intensity-based DIR algorithms involved in this study to deform OAR contours between CT and CBCT, especially for those organs with low contrast.

  11. The incorporation of SPECT functional lung imaging into inverse radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; McNair, Helen A.; Cronin, Bernadette; Courbon, Frederic; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often have inhomogeneous lung perfusion. Radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT) scans have been accurately co-registered with lung perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans to design radiotherapy treatments which limit dose to healthy 'perfused' lung. Patients and methods: Patients with localised NSCLC had CT and SPECT scans accurately co-registered in the planning system. The SPECT images were used to define a volume of perfused 'functioning' lung (FL). Inverse planning software was used to create 3D-conformal plans, the planning objective being either to minimise the dose to whole lungs (WL) or to minimise the dose to FL. Results: Four plans were created for each of six patients. The mean difference in volume between WL and FL was 1011.7 cm 3 (range 596.2-1581.1 cm 3 ). One patient with bilateral upper lobe perfusion deficits had a 16% reduction in FLV 2 (the percentage volume of functioning lung receiving ≥20 Gy). The remaining patients had inhomogeneous perfusion deficits such that inverse planning was not able to sufficiently optimise beam angles to avoid functioning lung. Conclusion: SPECT perfusion images can be accurately co-registered with radiotherapy planning CT scans and may be helpful in creating treatment plans for patients with large perfusion deficits

  12. Comparison of manual and automatic MR-CT registration for radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Carl, Jesper; Riis Østergaard, Lasse

    2016-05-08

    In image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, delineation of the clini-cal target volume (CTV) often relies on magnetic resonance (MR) because of its good soft-tissue visualization. Registration of MR and computed tomography (CT) is required in order to add this accurate delineation to the dose planning CT. An automatic approach for local MR-CT registration of the prostate has previously been developed using a voxel property-based registration as an alternative to a manual landmark-based registration. The aim of this study is to compare the two registration approaches and to investigate the clinical potential for replacing the manual registration with the automatic registration. Registrations and analysis were performed for 30 prostate cancer patients treated with IGRT using a Ni-Ti prostate stent as a fiducial marker. The comparison included computing translational and rotational differences between the approaches, visual inspection, and computing the overlap of the CTV. The computed mean translational difference was 1.65, 1.60, and 1.80mm and the computed mean rotational difference was 1.51°, 3.93°, and 2.09° in the superior/inferior, anterior/posterior, and medial/lateral direction, respectively. The sensitivity of overlap was 87%. The results demonstrate that the automatic registration approach performs registrations comparable to the manual registration.

  13. Comparison of manual and automatic MR‐CT registration for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Jesper; Østergaard, Lasse Riis

    2016-01-01

    In image‐guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) often relies on magnetic resonance (MR) because of its good soft‐tissue visualization. Registration of MR and computed tomography (CT) is required in order to add this accurate delineation to the dose planning CT. An automatic approach for local MR‐CT registration of the prostate has previously been developed using a voxel property‐based registration as an alternative to a manual landmark‐based registration. The aim of this study is to compare the two registration approaches and to investigate the clinical potential for replacing the manual registration with the automatic registration. Registrations and analysis were performed for 30 prostate cancer patients treated with IGRT using a Ni‐Ti prostate stent as a fiducial marker. The comparison included computing translational and rotational differences between the approaches, visual inspection, and computing the overlap of the CTV. The computed mean translational difference was 1.65, 1.60, and 1.80 mm and the computed mean rotational difference was 1.51°, 3.93°, and 2.09° in the superior/inferior, anterior/posterior, and medial/lateral direction, respectively. The sensitivity of overlap was 87%. The results demonstrate that the automatic registration approach performs registrations comparable to the manual registration. PACS number(s): 87.57.nj, 87.61.‐c, 87.57.Q‐, 87.56.J‐ PMID:27167285

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate bed radiotherapy planning: An inter- and intra-observer variability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkati, Maroie; Simard, Dany; Taussky, Daniel; Delouya, Guiula

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the inter- and intra-observer variability in contouring the prostate bed for radiation therapy planning using MRI compared with computed tomography (CT). We selected 15 patients with prior radical prostatectomy. All had CT and MRI simulation for planning purposes. Image fusions were done between CT and MRI. Three radiation oncologists with several years of experience in treating prostate cancer contoured the prostate bed first on CT and then on MRI. Before contouring, each radiation oncologist had to review the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group guidelines for postoperative external beam radiotherapy. The agreement between volumes was calculated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Analysis was done using the Matlab software. The DSC was compared using non-parametric statistical tests. Contouring on CT alone showed a statistically significant (P = 0.001) higher similarity between observers with a mean DSC of 0.76 (standard deviation ± 0.05) compared with contouring on MRI with a mean of 0.66 (standard deviation ± 0.05). Mean intra-observer variability between CT and MRI was 0.68, 0.75 and 0.78 for the three observers. The clinical target volume was 19 - 74% larger on CT than on MRI. The intra-observer difference in clinical target volume between CT and MRI was statistically significant in two observers and non-significant in the third one (P = 0.09). We found less inter-observer variability when contouring on CT than on MRI. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring guidelines are based on anatomical landmarks readily visible on CT. These landmarks are more inter-observer dependent on MRI. Therefore, present contouring guidelines might not be applicable to MRI planning.

  15. Stereotactic imaging for radiotherapy: accuracy of CT, MRI, PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karger, Christian P; Hipp, Peter; Henze, Marcus; Echner, Gernot; Hoess, Angelika; Schad, Lothar; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2003-01-01

    CT, MRI, PET and SPECT provide complementary information for treatment planning in stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic correlation of these images requires commissioning tests to confirm the localization accuracy of each modality. A phantom was developed to measure the accuracy of stereotactic localization for CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. To this end, the stereotactically measured coordinates of structures within the phantom were compared with their mechanically defined coordinates. For MRI, PET and SPECT, measurements were performed using two different devices. For MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging sequences were applied. For each measurement, the mean radial deviation in space between the stereotactically measured and mechanically defined position of target points was determined. For CT, the mean radial deviation was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. For MRI, the mean deviations ranged between 0.7 ± 0.2 mm and 1.4 ± 0.5 mm, depending on the MRI device and the imaging sequence. For PET, mean deviations of 1.1 ± 0.5 mm and 2.4 ± 0.3 mm were obtained. The mean deviations for SPECT were 1.6 ± 0.5 mm and 2.0 ± 0.6 mm. The phantom is well suited to determine the accuracy of stereotactic localization with CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. The obtained accuracy is well below the physical resolution for CT, PET and SPECT, and of comparable magnitude for MRI. Since the localization accuracy may be device dependent, results obtained at one device cannot be generalized to others

  16. Non-rigid CT/CBCT to CBCT registration for online external beam radiotherapy guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, Cornel; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; Kotte, Alexis N. T. J.; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Moonen, Chrit T. W.; Ries, Mario

    2018-01-01

    Image-guided external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) allows radiation dose deposition with a high degree of accuracy and precision. Guidance is usually achieved by estimating the displacements, via image registration, between cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different stages of the therapy. The resulting displacements are then used to reposition the patient such that the location of the tumor at the time of treatment matches its position during planning. Moreover, ongoing research aims to use CBCT-CT image registration for online plan adaptation. However, CBCT images are usually acquired using a small number of x-ray projections and/or low beam intensities. This often leads to the images being subject to low contrast, low signal-to-noise ratio and artifacts, which ends-up hampering the image registration process. Previous studies addressed this by integrating additional image processing steps into the registration procedure. However, these steps are usually designed for particular image acquisition schemes, therefore limiting their use on a case-by-case basis. In the current study we address CT to CBCT and CBCT to CBCT registration by the means of the recently proposed EVolution registration algorithm. Contrary to previous approaches, EVolution does not require the integration of additional image processing steps in the registration scheme. Moreover, the algorithm requires a low number of input parameters, is easily parallelizable and provides an elastic deformation on a point-by-point basis. Results have shown that relative to a pure CT-based registration, the intrinsic artifacts present in typical CBCT images only have a sub-millimeter impact on the accuracy and precision of the estimated deformation. In addition, the algorithm has low computational requirements, which are compatible with online image-based guidance of EBRT treatments.

  17. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wagter, C [ed.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions.

  18. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wagter, C.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions

  19. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, K.M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2000-01-01

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  20. Feasibility of using intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans in lung cancer treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jianghong; Zhang Hong; Gong Youling; Fu Yuchuan; Tang Bin; Wang Shichao; Jiang Qingfeng; Li Ping

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning for lung cancers, respectively. Materials and methods: Twelve patients with bulky lung tumors and 14 patients with small lung tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient took two sets of CT in the same position with active breathing control (ABC) technique before and after intravenous contrast agent (CA) injections. Bulky tumors were planned with 3D-CRT, while SBRT plans were generated for patients with small tumors based on CT scans with intravenous CA. In addition, IMRT plans were generated for patients with bulky tumors to continue on a planning study. All plans were copied and replaced on the scans without intravenous CA. The radiation doses calculated from the two sets of CTs were compared with regard to planning volumes (PTV), the organ at-risk (OAR) and the lungs using Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: In comparisons for 3D-CRT plans, CT scans with intravenous CA reduced the mean dose and the maximum dose of PTV with significant differences (p 95 ) for targets, respectively (p < 0.05). There was no statistical significance for lung parameters between two sets of scans in SBRT plans and IMRT plans. Conclusions: The enhanced CT scans can be used for both target delineation and treatment planning in 3D-CRT. The dose difference caused by intravenous CA is small. But for SBRT and IMRT, the minimum irradiation dose in targets may be estimated to be increased up to 2.71% while the maximum dose may be estimated to be decreased up to 1.36%. However, the difference in dose distribution in most cases were found to be clinical tolerable.

  1. Evaluation of the impact of dental artefacts on intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, Gareth J.; Rowbottom, Carl G.; Mackay, Ranald I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: High density materials create severe artefacts in the computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiotherapy dose calculations. Increased use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat oropharyngeal cancers raises concerns over the accuracy of the resulting dose calculation. This work quantifies their impact and evaluates a simple corrective technique. Materials and methods: Fifteen oropharyngeal patients with severe artefacts were retrospectively planned with IMRT using two different CT/density look-up tables. Each plan was recalculated using a corrected CT dataset to evaluate the dose distribution delivered to the patient. Plan quality in the absence of dental artefacts was similarly assessed. A range of dosimetric and radiobiological parameters were compared pre- and post-correction. Results: Plans using a standard CT/density look-up table (density ≤1.8 g/cm 3 ) revealed inconsistent inter-patient errors, mostly within clinical acceptance, although potentially significantly reducing target coverage for individual patients. Using an extended CT/density look-up table (density ≤10.0 g/cm 3 ) greatly reduced the errors for 13/15 patients. In 2/15 patients with residual errors the CTV extended into the severely affected region and could be corrected by applying a simple manual correction. Conclusions: Use of an extended CT/density look-up table together with a simple manual bulk density correction reduces the impact of dental artefacts on head and neck IMRT planning to acceptable levels.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  3. Integration of the radiotherapy irradiation planning in the digital workflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehner, F.; Schmucker, M.; Henne, K.; Bruggmoser, G.; Grosu, A.L.; Frommhold, H.; Heinemann, F.E.; Momm, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: At the Clinic of Radiotherapy at the University Hospital Freiburg, all relevant workflow is paperless. After implementing the Operating Schedule System (OSS) as a framework, all processes are being implemented into the departmental system MOSAIQ. Designing a digital workflow for radiotherapy irradiation planning is a large challenge, it requires interdisciplinary expertise and therefore the interfaces between the professions also have to be interdisciplinary. For every single step of radiotherapy irradiation planning, distinct responsibilities have to be defined and documented. All aspects of digital storage, backup and long-term availability of data were considered and have already been realized during the OSS project. Method: After an analysis of the complete workflow and the statutory requirements, a detailed project plan was designed. In an interdisciplinary workgroup, problems were discussed and a detailed flowchart was developed. The new functionalities were implemented in a testing environment by the Clinical and Administrative IT Department (CAI). After extensive tests they were integrated into the new modular department system. Results and conclusion: The Clinic of Radiotherapy succeeded in realizing a completely digital workflow for radiotherapy irradiation planning. During the testing phase, our digital workflow was examined and afterwards was approved by the responsible authority. (orig.)

  4. An Investigation of Methods for CT Synthesis in MR-only Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel

    In recent years, the interest in using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in radiotherapy (RT) has increased. This is because MR has a superior soft tissue contrast compared to computed tomography (CT), which makes it a better modality for delineating the target volume (tumor) and possible organs...... at risk (OARs). In an MR/CT work-flow, independent MR and CT scans are acquired. The target and possible OARs are delineated on the MR and then transferred to CT by aligning the data using a registration. This introduces the risk of systematic registration errors especially in non-rigid body structures......, the consequence being a systematic miss of target or increased dose to healthy tissue. Radiotherapy based on MR as the only modality removes this uncertainty and simplifies the clinical work-flow. However, the information on electron density which is usually contained in the CT must now be derived from the MR...

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  6. FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging and target volume delineation in conformal radiotherapy of anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krengli, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Milia, Maria E; Turri, Lucia; Mones, Eleonora; Bassi, Maria C; Cannillo, Barbara; Deantonio, Letizia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Brambilla, Marco

    2010-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT imaging has an emerging role in staging and treatment planning of various tumor locations and a number of literature studies show that also the carcinoma of the anal canal may benefit from this diagnostic approach. We analyzed the potential impact of FDG-PET/CT in stage definition and target volume delineation of patients affected by carcinoma of the anal canal and candidates for curative radiotherapy. Twenty seven patients with biopsy proven anal carcinoma were enrolled. Pathology was squamous cell carcinoma in 20 cases, cloacogenic carcinoma in 3, adenocarcinoma in 2, and basal cell carcinoma in 2. Simulation was performed by PET/CT imaging with patient in treatment position. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) and Clinical Target Volume (CTV) were drawn on CT and on PET/CT fused images. PET-GTV and PET-CTV were respectively compared to CT-GTV and CT-CTV by Wilcoxon rank test for paired data. PET/CT fused images led to change the stage in 5/27 cases (18.5%): 3 cases from N0 to N2 and 2 from M0 to M1 leading to change the treatment intent from curative to palliative in a case. Based on PET/CT imaging, GTV and CTV contours changed in 15/27 (55.6%) and in 10/27 cases (37.0%) respectively. PET-GTV and PET-CTV resulted significantly smaller than CT-GTV (p = 1.2 × 10 -4 ) and CT-CTV (p = 2.9 × 10 -4 ). PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV, that were used for clinical purposes, were significantly greater than CT-GTV (p = 6 × 10 -5 ) and CT-CTV (p = 6 × 10 -5 ). FDG-PET/CT has a potential relevant impact in staging and target volume delineation of the carcinoma of the anal canal. Clinical stage variation occurred in 18.5% of cases with change of treatment intent in 3.7%. The GTV and the CTV changed in shape and in size based on PET/CT imaging

  7. The NUKDOS software for treatment planning in molecular radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kletting, Peter; Schimmel, Sebastian [Univ. Ulm (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Haenscheid, Heribert; Fernandez, Maria; Lassmann, Michael [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Luster, Markus [Univ. Marburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Nosske, Dietmar [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Fachbereich Strahlenschutz und Gesundheit, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg Univ., Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was the development of a software tool for treatment planning prior to molecular radiotherapy, which comprises all functionality to objectively determine the activity to administer and the pertaining absorbed doses (including the corresponding error) based on a series of gamma camera images and one SPECT/CT or probe data. NUKDOS was developed in MATLAB. The workflow is based on the MIRD formalism For determination of the tissue or organ pharmacokinetics, gamma camera images as well as probe, urine, serum and blood activity data can be processed. To estimate the time-integrated activity coefficients (TIAC), sums of exponentials are fitted to the time activity data and integrated analytically. To obtain the TIAC on the voxel level, the voxel activity distribution from the quantitative 3D SPECT/CT (or PET/CT) is used for scaling and weighting the TIAC derived from the 2D organ data. The voxel S-values are automatically calculated based on the voxel-size of the image and the therapeutic nuclide ({sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I or {sup 177}Lu). The absorbed dose coefficients are computed by convolution of the voxel TIAC and the voxel S-values. The activity to administer and the pertaining absorbed doses are determined by entering the absorbed dose for the organ at risk. The overall error of the calculated absorbed doses is determined by Gaussian error propagation. NUKDOS was tested for the operation systems Windows {sup registered} 7 (64 Bit) and 8 (64 Bit). The results of each working step were compared to commercially available (SAAMII, OLINDA/EXM) and in-house (UlmDOS) software. The application of the software is demonstrated using examples form peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) and from radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. For the example from PRRT, the calculated activity to administer differed by 4% comparing NUKDOS and the final result using UlmDos, SAAMII and OLINDA/EXM sequentially. The absorbed dose for the spleen and tumour

  8. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  9. Automated Planning of Tangential Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using Heuristic Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Letourneau, Daniel; Hill, Christine; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present an automated technique for two-field tangential breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Method and Materials: A total of 158 planned patients with Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer treated using whole-breast IMRT were retrospectively replanned using automated treatment planning tools. The tools developed are integrated into the existing clinical treatment planning system (Pinnacle 3 ) and are designed to perform the manual volume delineation, beam placement, and IMRT treatment planning steps carried out by the treatment planning radiation therapist. The automated algorithm, using only the radio-opaque markers placed at CT simulation as inputs, optimizes the tangential beam parameters to geometrically minimize the amount of lung and heart treated while covering the whole-breast volume. The IMRT parameters are optimized according to the automatically delineated whole-breast volume. Results: The mean time to generate a complete treatment plan was 6 min, 50 s ± 1 min 12 s. For the automated plans, 157 of 158 plans (99%) were deemed clinically acceptable, and 138 of 158 plans (87%) were deemed clinically improved or equal to the corresponding clinical plan when reviewed in a randomized, double-blinded study by one experienced breast radiation oncologist. In addition, overall the automated plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the clinical plans when scored for target coverage and lung and heart doses. Conclusion: We have developed robust and efficient automated tools for fully inversed planned tangential breast IMRT planning that can be readily integrated into clinical practice. The tools produce clinically acceptable plans using only the common anatomic landmarks from the CT simulation process as an input. We anticipate the tools will improve patient access to high-quality IMRT treatment by simplifying the planning process and will reduce the effort and cost of incorporating more advanced planning into clinical practice.

  10. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: calculation and optimization of biologically effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Scholz, M.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel approach to treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy based on the local effect model (LEM) which allows to calculate the biologically effective dose not only for the target region but for the entire irradiation volume. LEM is ideally suited to be used as an integral part of treatment planning code systems for active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. Thus, it has been incorporated into our standard treatment planning system for ion therapy (TRiP). Single intensity modulated fields can be optimized with respect to homogeneous biologically effective dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is calculated separately for each voxel of the patient CT. Our radiobiologically oriented code system is in use since 1995 for the planning of irradiation experiments with cell cultures and animals such as rats and minipigs. Since 1997 it is in regular and successful use for patient treatment planning. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of compensation in breast radiotherapy: a planning study using multiple static fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Ellen M.; Johnson, Ursula; Shentall, Glyn; Evans, Philip M.; Neal, Anthony J.; Yarnold, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: A method that uses electronic portal imaging to design intensity-modulated beams for compensation in breast radiotherapy was implemented using multiple static fields in a planning study. We present the results of the study to verify the algorithm, and to assess improvements to the dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were imaged with computed tomography (CT) and on a treatment unit using an electronic portal imager. The portal imaging data were used to design intensity-modulated beams to give an ideal dose distribution in the breast. These beams were implemented as multiple static fields added to standard wedged tangential fields. Planning of these treatments was performed on a commercial treatment planning system (Target 2, IGE Medical Systems, Slough, U.K.) using the CT data for each patient. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the plans with and without multileaf collimator (MLC) compensation was carried out. This work has been used as the basis for a randomized clinical trial investigating whether improvements in dosimetry are correlated with the reduction of long-term side effects from breast radiotherapy. Results: The planning analysis showed a mean increase in target volume receiving 95-105% of prescribed dose of 7.5% (range -0.8% to 15.9%) when additional MLC compensation was applied. There was no change to the minimum dose for all 14 patient data sets. The change in the volume of breast tissue receiving over 105% of prescribed dose, when applying MLC compensation, was between -1.4% and 11.9%, with positive numbers indicating an improvement. These effects showed a correlation with breast size; the larger the breast the greater the amount of improvement. Conclusions: The method for designing compensation for breast treatments using an electronic portal imager has been verified using planning on CT data for 14 patients. An improvement was seen in planning when applying MLC compensation and this effect was greater the larger the

  12. Individualized margins in 3D conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer: analysis of physiological movements and their dosimetric impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, François; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, André

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage.

  13. Individualized Margins in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Physiological Movements and Their Dosimetric Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, Francois; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage

  14. Adaptive Radiotherapy Planning on Decreasing Gross Tumor Volumes as Seen on Megavoltage Computed Tomography Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav; Dar, A. Rashid; Bauman, Glenn; Van Dyk, Jake

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate gross tumor volume (GTV) changes for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer by using daily megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT) studies acquired before each treatment fraction on helical tomotherapy and to relate the potential benefit of adaptive image-guided radiotherapy to changes in GTV. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were prescribed 30 fractions of radiotherapy on helical tomotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer at London Regional Cancer Program from Dec 2005 to March 2007. The GTV was contoured on the daily MVCT studies of each patient. Adapted plans were created using merged MVCT-kilovoltage CT image sets to investigate the advantages of replanning for patients with differing GTV regression characteristics. Results: Average GTV change observed over 30 fractions was -38%, ranging from -12 to -87%. No significant correlation was observed between GTV change and patient's physical or tumor features. Patterns of GTV changes in the 17 patients could be divided broadly into three groups with distinctive potential for benefit from adaptive planning. Conclusions: Changes in GTV are difficult to predict quantitatively based on patient or tumor characteristics. If changes occur, there are points in time during the treatment course when it may be appropriate to adapt the plan to improve sparing of normal tissues. If GTV decreases by greater than 30% at any point in the first 20 fractions of treatment, adaptive planning is appropriate to further improve the therapeutic ratio

  15. PET/CT in radiation therapy planning; PET/CT in der Strahlentherapieplanung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosu, A.L. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Krause, B.J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Nestle, U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy PET offers advantages in terms of tumor delineation and the description of biological processes. To define the real impact of this investigation in radiation treatment planning, following experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analysis are required. FDG-PET has a significant impact on GTV and PTV delineation in lung cancer and can detect lymph node involvement and differentiation of malignant tissue from atelectasis. In high-grade gliomas and meningiomas, methionine-PET helps to define the GTV and differentiate tumor from normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, cervix cancer and prostate cancer the value of FDG-PET for radiation treatment planning is still under investigation. For example, FDG-PET can be superior to CT and MRI in the detection of lymph node metastases in head and neck, unknown primary cancer and differentiation of viable tumor tissue after treatment. Therefore, it could play an important role in GTV definition and sparing of normal tissue. For other entities like gastro-intestinal cancer, lymphomas, sarcoma etc., the data of the literature are yet insufficient. The imaging of hypoxia, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis and gene expression leads to the identification of different areas of a biologically heterogeneous tumor mass that can be individually targeted using IMRT. In addition, a biological dose distribution can be generated, the so-called dose painting. However, systematical experimental and clinical trials are necessary to validate this hypothesis. (orig.)

  16. [68Ga]-DOTATOC-PET/CT for meningioma IMRT treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamberg Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The observation that human meningioma cells strongly express somatostatin receptor (SSTR 2 was the rationale to analyze retrospectively in how far DOTATOC PET/CT is helpful to improve target volume delineation for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Patients and Methods In 26 consecutive patients with preferentially skull base meningioma, diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and planning-computed tomography (CT was complemented with data from [68Ga]-DOTA-D Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (DOTATOC-PET/CT. Image fusion of PET/CT, diagnostic computed tomography, MRI and radiotherapy planning CT as well as target volume delineation was performed with OTP-Masterplan®. Initial gross tumor volume (GTV definition was based on MRI data only and was secondarily complemented with DOTATOC-PET information. Irradiation was performed as EUD based IMRT, using the Hyperion Software package. Results The integration of the DOTATOC data led to additional information concerning tumor extension in 17 of 26 patients (65%. There were major changes of the clinical target volume (CTV which modify the PTV in 14 patients, minor changes were realized in 3 patients. Overall the GTV-MRI/CT was larger than the GTV-PET in 10 patients (38%, smaller in 13 patients (50% and almost the same in 3 patients (12%. Most of the adaptations were performed in close vicinity to bony skull base structures or after complex surgery. Median GTV based on MRI was 18.1 cc, based on PET 25.3 cc and subsequently the CTV was 37.4 cc. Radiation planning and treatment of the DOTATOC-adapted volumes was feasible. Conclusion DOTATOC-PET/CT information may strongly complement patho-anatomical data from MRI and CT in cases with complex meningioma and is thus helpful for improved target volume delineation especially for skull base manifestations and recurrent disease after surgery.

  17. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugtenburg, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    The Markov chain method can be used to incorporate measured data in Monte Carlo based radiotherapy treatment planning. This paper shows that convergence to the measured data, within the target precision, is achievable. Relative output factors for blocked fields and oblique beams are shown to compare well with independent measurements according to the same criterion. (orig.)

  18. Radiotherapy facilities: Master planning and concept design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology, a typical project work plan and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals.

  19. Radiotherapy Facilities: Master Planning and Concept Design Considerations (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology and a typical project work plan, and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals

  20. Radiotherapy facilities: Master planning and concept design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology, a typical project work plan and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals

  1. 18F-Fdg-PET-guided Planning and Re-Planning (Adaptive) Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer: Current State of Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Eleonora; Ferioli, Martina; Castellucci, Paolo; Farina, Arianna; Zanirato Rambaldi, Giuseppe; Cilla, Savino; Cammelli, Silvia; Fanti, Stefano; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-12-01

    A review of the literature is proposed as a contribution to current knowledge on technical, physical, and clinical issues about PET-guided planning and re-planning radiotherapy (RT) in head and neck cancer. PubMed and Scopus electronic databases were searched for articles including clinical trials. Search terms were "gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation", "head and neck cancer", "radiotherapy", "adaptive radiotherapy" in combination with "PET". A 18 F-FDG-PET and CT-scan comparison in GTV definition for RT planning of head and neck cancer was shown in twenty-seven clinical trials with a total of 712 patients. Only two clinical trials focused on PET-guided adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a total of 31 patients. 18 F-FDG-PET is able to achieve an accurate and precise definition of GTV boundaries during RT planning, especially in combination with CT-scan. ART strategies are proposed to evaluate tumor volume changes, plan boost irradiation on metabolically active residual neoplasm and protect organs at risk (OaRs). Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of CT and integrated PET-CT based radiation therapy planning in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlivan, Berrin; Topkan, Erkan; Onal, Cem; Nursal, Gul Nihal; Yuksel, Oznur; Dolek, Yemliha; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Yavuz, Ali Aydin

    2009-01-01

    When combined with adequate tumoricidal doses, accurate target volume delineation remains to be the one of the most important predictive factors for radiotherapy (RT) success in locally advanced or medically inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients. Recently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) has demonstrated significant improvements in diagnosis and accurate staging of MPM. However, role of additional PET data has not been studied in RT planning (RTP) of patients with inoperable MPM or in those who refuse surgery. Therefore, we planned to compare CT with co-registered PET-CT as the basis for delineating target volumes in these patients group. Retrospectively, the CT and co-registered PET-CT data of 13 patients with histologically proven MPM were utilized to delineate target volumes separately. For each patient, target volumes (gross tumor volume [GTV], clinical target volume [CTV], and planning target volume [PTV]) were defined using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. The PTV was measured in two ways: PTV1 was CTV plus a 1-cm margin, and PTV2 was GTV plus a 1-cm margin. We analyzed differences in target volumes. In 12 of 13 patients, compared to CT-based delineation, PET-CT-based delineation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the mean GTV, CTV, PTV1, and PTV2. In these 12 patients, mean GTV decreased by 47.1% ± 28.4%, mean CTV decreased by 38.7% ± 24.7%, mean PTV1 decreased by 31.1% ± 23.1%, and mean PTV2 decreased by 40.0% ± 24.0%. In 4 of 13 patients, hilar lymph nodes were identified by PET-CT that was not identified by CT alone, changing the nodal status of tumor staging in those patients. This study demonstrated the usefulness of PET-CT-based target volume delineation in patients with MPM. Co-registration of PET and CT information reduces the likelihood of geographic misses, and additionally, significant reductions observed in target volumes may potentially allow escalation of RT dose beyond

  3. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuyu; Shi, Yinghua; Wu, Shuyu; Xiao, Yang; Gu, Xuejun; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong

    2017-01-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT) images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories-optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based-were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N) cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB), the vertebral foramen (VF), the parotid gland (PG) and the submandibular gland (SMG). It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems.

  4. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    Full Text Available Deformable image registration (DIR is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories-optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based-were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, the percentage error (PE and the Hausdorff distance (HD, were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB, the vertebral foramen (VF, the parotid gland (PG and the submandibular gland (SMG. It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems.

  5. Application of PET-CT for radiotherapy of the patient with carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia; Luo Quanyong; Yuan Zhibin

    2006-01-01

    PET-CT is an advanced imaging instrument combing anatomical and metabolic information into one. Combined with the radiation planning system, PET-CT is playing an increasingly important tool in the diagnosis and staging of malignant disease image-guided therapy planning, and treatment monitoring. Especially, PET-CT has a significant role in the delineation of tumor target volume, optimization of radiation planning. (authors)

  6. Comparison between conventional and three-dimensional conformal treatment planning for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, J.M.; Auliard, A.; Sarrazin, T.; Gibon, D.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Castelain, B.

    2001-01-01

    Comparison between conventional and three-dimensional conformal treatment planning for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors. Purpose. - We prospectively compared a conventional treatment planning (PT2D) and 3-dimensional conformal treatment planning (PT3D) for radiotherapy of cerebral tumours. Patients and methods.- Patients treated between 1/10/98 and 1/4/99 by irradiation for cerebral tumours were analysed. For each case, we planned PT2D using conventional orthogonal x-ray films, and afterward, PT3D using CT scan. Gross tumor volume, planning target volume and normal tissue volumes were defined. Dose was prescribed according to report 50 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). We compared surfaces of sagittal view targets defined on PT2D and PT3D and called them S2D and S3D, respectively. Irradiated volumes by 90% isodoses (VE-90%) and normal tissue volumes irradiated by 20, 50, 90% isodoses were calculated and compared using Student's paired t-test. Results. -There was a concordance of 84% of target surfaces defined on PT2D and PT3D. Percentages of target surface under- or-over defined by PT2D were 16 and 13% respectively. VE-90% was decreased by 15% (p = 0.07) with PT3D. Normal brain volume irradiated by 90% isodose was decreased by 27% with PT3D (p = 0.04). Conclusion.- For radiotherapy of cerebral tumors using only coplanar beams, PT3D leads to a reduction of normal brain tissue irradiated. We recommend PT3D for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors, particularly for low-grade or benign tumors (meningiomas, neuromas, etc.). (authors)

  7. The role of X-CT volumetry in radiotherapy of carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kentaro; Itami, Jun; Ogata, Hitoshi

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography(X-CT) of squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix was done before and after radiotherapy in forty cases. Changes on X-CT images and its relationship to local control are discussed. Volume of the cervix measured by X-CT is turned out to be a very important factor in radiotherapy of carcinoma of the uterine cervix. 2 cases whose volumes of the cervix exceed 100 cc before radiotherapy failed to obtain local control (p 0.005). After radiotherapy in 6 cases whose volumes of the cervix were more than 20 cc, 5 cases of all failed in local and in 33 cases whose volumes of the cervix were less than 20 cc, 32 cases of all obtained 1 year local control (p < 0.001). In about half cases in which contrast medium was administered low density areas in cervix were observed, in most of all this low density area disappeared after radiotherapy. In the cases in which this low density remained, 3 out of 4 cases failed locally. (author)

  8. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  9. Automatic prostate localization on cone-beam CT scans for high precision image-guided radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smitsmans, Monique H. P.; de Bois, Josien; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Zijp, Lambert J.; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; van Herk, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Previously, we developed an automatic three-dimensional gray-value registration (GR) method for fast prostate localization that could be used during online or offline image-guided radiotherapy. The method was tested on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. In this study, the

  10. Bayesian network models for error detection in radiotherapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalet, Alan M; Ford, Eric C; Phillips, Mark H; Gennari, John H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design and develop a probabilistic network for detecting errors in radiotherapy plans for use at the time of initial plan verification. Our group has initiated a multi-pronged approach to reduce these errors. We report on our development of Bayesian models of radiotherapy plans. Bayesian networks consist of joint probability distributions that define the probability of one event, given some set of other known information. Using the networks, we find the probability of obtaining certain radiotherapy parameters, given a set of initial clinical information. A low probability in a propagated network then corresponds to potential errors to be flagged for investigation. To build our networks we first interviewed medical physicists and other domain experts to identify the relevant radiotherapy concepts and their associated interdependencies and to construct a network topology. Next, to populate the network’s conditional probability tables, we used the Hugin Expert software to learn parameter distributions from a subset of de-identified data derived from a radiation oncology based clinical information database system. These data represent 4990 unique prescription cases over a 5 year period. Under test case scenarios with approximately 1.5% introduced error rates, network performance produced areas under the ROC curve of 0.88, 0.98, and 0.89 for the lung, brain and female breast cancer error detection networks, respectively. Comparison of the brain network to human experts performance (AUC of 0.90 ± 0.01) shows the Bayes network model performs better than domain experts under the same test conditions. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of comprehensive probabilistic models as part of decision support systems for improved detection of errors in initial radiotherapy plan verification procedures. (paper)

  11. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasiri, Akila; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H&N) adaptive radiotherapy. Ten H&N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3-4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm(3). Organs with volumes <3 cm(3) and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼ 0.5-0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm(3)), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was "clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours." Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine

  12. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumarasiri, Akila; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm 3 . Organs with volumes <3 cm 3 and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm 3 ), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours.” Conclusions

  13. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumarasiri, Akila, E-mail: akumara1@hfhs.org; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  14. Absorbed doses behind bones with MR image-based dose calculations for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Juha; Kapanen, Mika; Keyrilainen, Jani; Seppala, Tiina; Tuomikoski, Laura; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images are used increasingly in external radiotherapy target delineation because of their superior soft tissue contrast compared to computed tomography (CT) images. Nevertheless, radiotherapy treatment planning has traditionally been based on the use of CT images, due to the restrictive features of MR images such as lack of electron density information. This research aimed to measure absorbed radiation doses in material behind different bone parts, and to evaluate dose calculation errors in two pseudo-CT images; first, by assuming a single electron density value for the bones, and second, by converting the electron density values inside bones from T(1)∕T(2)∗-weighted MR image intensity values. A dedicated phantom was constructed using fresh deer bones and gelatine. The effect of different bone parts to the absorbed dose behind them was investigated with a single open field at 6 and 15 MV, and measuring clinically detectable dose deviations by an ionization chamber matrix. Dose calculation deviations in a conversion-based pseudo-CT image and in a bulk density pseudo-CT image, where the relative electron density to water for the bones was set as 1.3, were quantified by comparing the calculation results with those obtained in a standard CT image by superposition and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations revealed that the applied bulk density pseudo-CT image causes deviations up to 2.7% (6 MV) and 2.0% (15 MV) to the dose behind the examined bones. The corresponding values in the conversion-based pseudo-CT image were 1.3% (6 MV) and 1.0% (15 MV). The examinations illustrated that the representation of the heterogeneous femoral bone (cortex denser compared to core) by using a bulk density for the whole bone causes dose deviations up to 2% both behind the bone edge and the middle part of the bone (diameter bones). This study indicates that the decrease in absorbed dose is not dependent on the bone diameter with all types of bones. Thus

  15. Technical aspects of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scripes, Paola G; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra

    2012-09-01

    The usage of functional data in radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning (RTP) process is currently the focus of significant technical, scientific, and clinical development. Positron emission tomography (PET) using ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose is being increasingly used in RT planning in recent years. Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiotracer for diagnosis, staging, recurrent disease detection, and monitoring of tumor response to therapy (Lung Cancer 2012;76:344-349; Lung Cancer 2009;64:301-307; J Nucl Med 2008;49:532-540; J Nucl Med 2007;48:58S-67S). All the efforts to improve both PET and computed tomography (CT) image quality and, consequently, lesion detectability have a common objective to increase the accuracy in functional imaging and thus of coregistration into RT planning systems. In radiotherapy, improvement in target localization permits reduction of tumor margins, consequently reducing volume of normal tissue irradiated. Furthermore, smaller treated target volumes create the possibility of dose escalation, leading to increased chances of tumor cure and control. This article focuses on the technical aspects of PET/CT image acquisition, fusion, usage, and impact on the physics of RTP. The authors review the basic elements of RTP, modern radiation delivery, and the technical parameters of coregistration of PET/CT into RT computerized planning systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging for radiotherapy planning of brain cancer patients using immobilization and surface coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanvey, S.; Glegg, M.; Foster, J.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the compatibility of a head and neck immobilization device with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The immobilization device is used to position a patient in the same way as when receiving a computed tomography (CT) scan for radiotherapy planning and radiation treatment. The advantage of using immobilization in MR is improved accuracy in CT/MR image registration enabling greater confidence in the delineation of structures. The main practical difficulty in using an immobilization device in MRI is that physical constraints make their use incompatible with head imaging coils. Within this paper we describe a method for MR imaging of the brain which allows the use of head and neck immobilization devices. By a series of image quality tests we obtained the same or better image quality as a multi-channel head coil.

  17. Gamma histograms for radiotherapy plan evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezi, Emiliano; Lewis, D. Geraint

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: The technique known as the 'γ evaluation method' incorporates pass-fail criteria for both distance-to-agreement and dose difference analysis of 3D dose distributions and provides a numerical index (γ) as a measure of the agreement between two datasets. As the γ evaluation index is being adopted in more centres as part of treatment plan verification procedures for 2D and 3D dose maps, the development of methods capable of encapsulating the information provided by this technique is recommended. Patients and methods: In this work the concept of γ index was extended to create gamma histograms (GH) in order to provide a measure of the agreement between two datasets in two or three dimensions. Gamma area histogram (GAH) and gamma volume histogram (GVH) graphs were produced using one or more 2D γ maps generated for each slice of the irradiated volume. GHs were calculated for IMRT plans, evaluating the 3D dose distribution from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) compared to a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation used as reference dataset. Results: The extent of local anatomical inhomogenities in the plans under consideration was strongly correlated with the level of difference between reference and evaluated calculations. GHs provided an immediate visual representation of the proportion of the treated volume that fulfilled the γ criterion and offered a concise method for comparative numerical evaluation of dose distributions. Conclusions: We have introduced the concept of GHs and investigated its applications to the evaluation and verification of IMRT plans. The gamma histogram concept set out in this paper can provide a valuable technique for quantitative comparison of dose distributions and could be applied as a tool for the quality assurance of treatment planning systems

  18. Prediction of PET/CT to alleviate radiation pneumonitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer for 3-dimentional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Heyi; Yu Jinming; Li Jianbin; Li Baosheng; Fu Zheng; Liu Tonghai

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of PET/CT on clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), delineation of target volume, and prediction to alleviate radiation pneumonitis (RP) from 3-dimentional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning. Methods: From October 2002 to June 2004, 34 patients diagnosed cytologically or pathologically with NSCLC, who were candidates for radical radiotherapy or surgery, received PET/CT scanning. Both images were transmitted into treatment planning system (TPS) workstations respectively and were fused and reconstructed. All patients were staged according to the 1997 World Health Organization (WHO) staging system. The impact of PET/CT on the clinical staging of all the patients was determined. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the CT imaging and PET/CTfused imaging respectively. Based on the two images, 3D- CRT planning was made respectively at the TPS workstation with Topslane software, the planning target volumes (PTV) being defined with a 15 mm margin around GTV of primary lumps (PTV 1 ) and 7 mm for involved lymph nodes (PTV 2 ). Evaluating indexes including V PTV (volume of PTV, V PTV = V PTV1 + V PTV2 ), V 20 (percentage of the total lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy), MLD (mean lung dose) , TCP (tumor control probability) , NTCP (normal tissue complication probability) , and Ds (dose to spinal cord) were selected to be paralleled to compare the quality of the two plans and the impact of PET/CT on RP was further analyzed. Results: In 13 of 34 (38.2%) cases, PET/CT information changed the clinical staging, 8 of which were upstaged and 5 downstaged. For 10 of 34 (29.4%) cases, PET/CT results modified their management decisions. Among 16 patients performed by surgery, 14 had consistent PET/CT staging with pathologic staging. The sensitivity of PET/CT was 93.3% and accuracy 87.5%. Difference of indexes including V PTV , V 20 and MLD between the two radiation planning was statistically significant, but Ds

  19. Approximating convex Pareto surfaces in multiobjective radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, David L.; Halabi, Tarek F.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy planning involves inherent tradeoffs: the primary mission, to treat the tumor with a high, uniform dose, is in conflict with normal tissue sparing. We seek to understand these tradeoffs on a case-to-case basis, by computing for each patient a database of Pareto optimal plans. A treatment plan is Pareto optimal if there does not exist another plan which is better in every measurable dimension. The set of all such plans is called the Pareto optimal surface. This article presents an algorithm for computing well distributed points on the (convex) Pareto optimal surface of a multiobjective programming problem. The algorithm is applied to intensity-modulated radiation therapy inverse planning problems, and results of a prostate case and a skull base case are presented, in three and four dimensions, investigating tradeoffs between tumor coverage and critical organ sparing

  20. Effect of contrast agent administration on consequences of dosimetry and biology in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Ching-Jung; Yang, Pei-Ying; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tu, Shu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment planning of radiation therapy, patients may be administrated with contrast media in CT scanning to assist physicians for accurate delineation of the target or organs. However, contrast media are not used in patients during the treatment delivery. In particular, contrast media contain materials with high atomic numbers and dosimetric variations may occur between scenarios where contrast media are present in treatment planning and absent in treatment delivery. In this study we evaluate the effect of contrast media on the dosimetry and biological consequence. An analytical phantom based on AAPM TG 119 and five sets of CT images from clinical patients are included. Different techniques of treatment planning are considered, including 1-field AP, 2-field AP+PA, 4-field box, 7-field IMRT, and RapidArc. RapidArc is a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy and is used in our study of contrast media in clinical scenarios. The effect of RapidArc on dosimetry and biological consequence for administration of contrast media in radiotherapy is not discussed previously in literature. It is shown that dose difference is reduced as the number of external beams is increased, suggesting RapidArc may be favored to be used in the treatment planning enhanced by contrast media. Linear trend lines are fitted for assessment of percent dose differences in the planning target volume versus concentrations of contrast media between plans where contrast media are present and absent, respectively

  1. Evaluation of delivered dose for a clinical daily adaptive plan selection strategy for bladder cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Visser, Jorrit; Jong, Rianne de; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To account for variable bladder size during bladder cancer radiotherapy, a daily plan selection strategy was implemented. The aim of this study was to calculate the actually delivered dose using an adaptive strategy, compared to a non-adaptive approach. Material and methods: Ten patients were treated to the bladder and lymph nodes with an adaptive full bladder strategy. Interpolated delineations of bladder and tumor on a full and empty bladder CT scan resulted in five PTVs for which VMAT plans were created. Daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scans were used for plan selection. Bowel, rectum and target volumes were delineated on these CBCTs, and delivered dose for these was calculated using both the adaptive plan, and a non-adaptive plan. Results: Target coverage for lymph nodes improved using an adaptive strategy. The full bladder strategy spared the healthy part of the bladder from a high dose. Average bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy significantly reduced with 60 and 69 ml, respectively (p < 0.01). Other parameters for bowel and rectum remained unchanged. Conclusions: Daily plan selection compared to a non-adaptive strategy yielded similar bladder coverage and improved coverage for lymph nodes, with a significant reduction in bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy only, while other sparing was limited

  2. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 ± 1.5% error, 4.4 ± 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 ± 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  3. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively

  4. An optimized workflow for the integration of biological information into radiotherapy planning: experiences with T1w DCE-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, T; Kiessling, F; Brix, G; Baudendistel, K; Zechmann, C; Giesel, F L; Bendl, R

    2005-01-01

    Planning of radiotherapy is often difficult due to restrictions on morphological images. New imaging techniques enable the integration of biological information into treatment planning and help to improve the detection of vital and aggressive tumour areas. This might improve clinical outcome. However, nowadays morphological data sets are still the gold standard in the planning of radiotherapy. In this paper, we introduce an in-house software platform enabling us to combine images from different imaging modalities yielding biological and morphological information in a workflow driven approach. This is demonstrated for the combination of morphological CT, MRI, functional DCE-MRI and PET data. Data of patients with a tumour of the prostate and with a meningioma were examined with DCE-MRI by applying pharmacokinetic two-compartment models for post-processing. The results were compared with the clinical plans for radiation therapy. Generated parameter maps give additional information about tumour spread, which can be incorporated in the definition of safety margins

  5. Clinical considerations of Monte Carlo for electron radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddegon, Bruce; Balogh, Judith; Mackenzie, Robert; Scora, Daryl

    1998-01-01

    Technical requirements for Monte Carlo based electron radiotherapy treatment planning are outlined. The targeted overall accuracy for estimate of the delivered dose is the least restrictive of 5% in dose, 5 mm in isodose position. A system based on EGS4 and capable of achieving this accuracy is described. Experience gained in system design and commissioning is summarized. The key obstacle to widespread clinical use of Monte Carlo is lack of clinically acceptable measurement based methodology for accurate commissioning

  6. Automatic planning on hippocampal avoidance whole-brain radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuo, E-mail: shuo0220@gmail.com; Zheng, Dandan; Zhang, Chi; Ma, Rongtao; Bennion, Nathan R.; Lei, Yu; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Enke, Charles A.; Zhou, Sumin

    2017-04-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that radiation-induced damage to the hippocampus plays a role in neurocognitive decline for patients receiving whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Hippocampal avoidance whole-brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) has been proposed to reduce the putative neurocognitive deficits by limiting the dose to the hippocampus. However, urgency of palliation for patients as well as the complexities of the treatment planning may be barriers to protocol enrollment to accumulate further clinical evidence. This warrants expedited quality planning of HA-WBRT. Pinnacle{sup 3} Automatic treatment planning was designed to increase planning efficiency while maintaining or improving plan quality and consistency. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the performance of the Pinnacle{sup 3} Auto-Planning on HA-WBRT treatment planning. Ten patients previously treated for brain metastases were selected. Hippocampal volumes were contoured on T1 magnetic resonance (MR) images, and planning target volumes (PTVs) were generated based on RTOG0933. The following 2 types of plans were generated by Pinnacle{sup 3} Auto-Planning: the one with 2 coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) arcs and the other with 9-field noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). D{sub 2%} and D{sub 98%} of PTV were used to calculate homogeneity index (HI). HI and Paddick Conformity index (CI) of PTV as well as D{sub 100%} and D{sub max} of the hippocampus were used to evaluate the plan quality. All the auto-plans met the dose coverage and constraint objectives based on RTOG0933. The auto-plans eliminated the necessity of generating pseudostructures by the planners, and it required little manual intervention which expedited the planning process. IMRT quality assurance (QA) results also suggest that all the auto-plans are practically acceptable on delivery. Pinnacle{sup 3} Auto-Planning generates acceptable plans by RTOG0933 criteria without time-consuming planning process. The

  7. Automatic planning on hippocampal avoidance whole-brain radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shuo; Zheng, Dandan; Zhang, Chi; Ma, Rongtao; Bennion, Nathan R.; Lei, Yu; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Enke, Charles A.; Zhou, Sumin

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that radiation-induced damage to the hippocampus plays a role in neurocognitive decline for patients receiving whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Hippocampal avoidance whole-brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) has been proposed to reduce the putative neurocognitive deficits by limiting the dose to the hippocampus. However, urgency of palliation for patients as well as the complexities of the treatment planning may be barriers to protocol enrollment to accumulate further clinical evidence. This warrants expedited quality planning of HA-WBRT. Pinnacle 3 Automatic treatment planning was designed to increase planning efficiency while maintaining or improving plan quality and consistency. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the performance of the Pinnacle 3 Auto-Planning on HA-WBRT treatment planning. Ten patients previously treated for brain metastases were selected. Hippocampal volumes were contoured on T1 magnetic resonance (MR) images, and planning target volumes (PTVs) were generated based on RTOG0933. The following 2 types of plans were generated by Pinnacle 3 Auto-Planning: the one with 2 coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) arcs and the other with 9-field noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). D 2% and D 98% of PTV were used to calculate homogeneity index (HI). HI and Paddick Conformity index (CI) of PTV as well as D 100% and D max of the hippocampus were used to evaluate the plan quality. All the auto-plans met the dose coverage and constraint objectives based on RTOG0933. The auto-plans eliminated the necessity of generating pseudostructures by the planners, and it required little manual intervention which expedited the planning process. IMRT quality assurance (QA) results also suggest that all the auto-plans are practically acceptable on delivery. Pinnacle 3 Auto-Planning generates acceptable plans by RTOG0933 criteria without time-consuming planning process. The expedited quality planning achieved by

  8. Development of model plans in three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyo, Hongryull; Kim, Gwieon; Keum, Kichang; Chang, Sekyung; Suh, Changok; Lee, Sanghoon

    2002-01-01

    Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning is being used widely for the treatment of patients with brain tumor. However, it takes much time to develop an optimal treatment plan, therefore, it is difficult to apply this technique to all patients. To increase the efficiency of this technique, we need to develop standard radiotherapy plans for each site of the brain. Therefore we developed several 3 dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans (3D plans) for tumors at each site of brain, compared them with each other, and with 2 dimensional radiotherapy plans. Finally model plans for each site of the brain were decided. Imaginary tumors, with sizes commonly observed in the clinic, were designed for each site of the brain and drawn on CT images. The planning target volumes (PTVs) were as follows; temporal tumor-5.7 x 8.2 x 7.6 cm, suprasellar tumor-3 x 4 x 4.1 cm, thalamic tumor-3.1 x 5.9 x 3.7 cm, frontoparietal tumor-5.5 x 7 x 5.5 cm, and occipitoparietal tumor-5 x 5.5 x 5 cm. Plans using parallel opposed 2-portals and/or 3 portals including fronto-vertex and 2 lateral fields were developed manually as the conventional 2D plans, and 3D noncoplanar conformal plans were developed using beam's eye view and the automatic block drawing tool. Total tumor dose was 54 Gy for a suprasellar tumor, 59.4 Gy and 72 Gy for the other tumors. All dose plans (including 2D plans) were calculated using 3D plan software. Developed plans were compared with each other using dose-volume histograms (DVH), normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) and variable dose statistic values (minimum, maximum and mean dose, D5, V83, V85 and V95). Finally a best radiotherapy plan for each site of brain was selected. 1) Temporal tumor; NTCPs and DVHs of the normal tissue of all 3D plans were superior to 2D plans and this trend was more definite when total dose was escalated to 72 Gy (NTCPs of normal brain 2D plans: 27%, 8% → 3D plans: 1%, 1%). Various dose statistic values did not show any

  9. Dosimetric benefit of adaptive re-planning in pancreatic cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongbao [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hoisak, Jeremy D.P.; Li, Nan; Jiang, Carrie [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Tian, Zhen [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gautier, Quentin; Zarepisheh, Masoud [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Jia, Xun [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) shows promise in unresectable pancreatic cancer, though this treatment modality has high rates of normal tissue toxicity. This study explores the dosimetric utility of daily adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT. We used a previously developed supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) to re-plan 10 patients with pancreas SBRT. Tumor and normal tissue contours were deformed from treatment planning computed tomographies (CTs) and transferred to daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans before re-optimizing each daily treatment plan. We compared the intended radiation dose, the actual radiation dose, and the optimized radiation dose for the pancreas tumor planning target volume (PTV) and the duodenum. Treatment re-optimization improved coverage of the PTV and reduced dose to the duodenum. Within the PTV, the actual hot spot (volume receiving 110% of the prescription dose) decreased from 4.5% to 0.5% after daily adaptive re-planning. Within the duodenum, the volume receiving the prescription dose decreased from 0.9% to 0.3% after re-planning. It is noteworthy that variation in the amount of air within a patient's stomach substantially changed dose to the PTV. Adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT has the ability to improve dose to the tumor and decrease dose to the nearby duodenum, thereby reducing the risk of toxicity.

  10. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Erik W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D to three-dimensional (3D-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV, absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. Results With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. Conclusion The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on

  11. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V; Maduro, John H; Korevaar, Erik W; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2008-01-01

    The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D)-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT)-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV), absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on clinical data confirming tumour control probability and normal

  12. Organ doses can be estimated from the computed tomography (CT) dose index for cone-beam CT on radiotherapy equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Colin J; Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Metwaly, Mohamed; Gentle, David J

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems are fitted to radiotherapy linear accelerators and used for patient positioning prior to treatment by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Radiotherapists' and radiographers' knowledge of doses to organs from CBCT imaging is limited. The weighted CT dose index for a reference beam of width 20 mm (CTDIw,ref) is displayed on Varian CBCT imaging equipment known as an On-Board Imager (OBI) linked to the Truebeam linear accelerator. This has the potential to provide an indication of organ doses. This knowledge would be helpful for guidance of radiotherapy clinicians preparing treatments. Monte Carlo simulations of imaging protocols for head, thorax and pelvic scans have been performed using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, and ICRP reference computational male and female phantoms to derive the mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues, which have been compared with values for the CTDIw,ref displayed on the CBCT scanner console. Substantial variations in dose were observed between male and female phantoms. Nevertheless, the CTDIw,ref gave doses within  ±21% for the stomach and liver in thorax scans and 2  ×  CTDIw,ref can be used as a measure of doses to breast, lung and oesophagus. The CTDIw,ref could provide indications of doses to the brain for head scans, and the colon for pelvic scans. It is proposed that knowledge of the link between CTDIw for CBCT should be promoted and included in the training of radiotherapy staff.

  13. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2015-01-01

    scans. In this study, we investigate the potential of a patch-based method for creating a pCT based on conventional T1-weighted MRI scans without using deformable registrations. We compare this method against two state-of-the-art methods within the voxel-based and atlas-based categories. Methods...... based on water equivalent path lengths was carried out, comparing the upper hemisphere of the head in the pCT and the real CT. Finally, the dosimetric accuracy was tested and compared for a photon treatment plan. Results:The pCTs produced with the patch-based method had the best voxel-wise, geometric......Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan...

  14. Correlating metabolic and anatomic responses of primary lung cancers to radiotherapy by combined F-18 FDG PET-CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grills Inga

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To correlate the metabolic changes with size changes for tumor response by concomitant PET-CT evaluation of lung cancers after radiotherapy. Methods 36 patients were studied pre- and post-radiotherapy with18FDG PET-CT scans at a median interval of 71 days. All of the patients were followed clinically and radiographically after a mean period of 342 days for assessment of local control or failure rates. Change in size (sum of maximum orthogonal diameters was correlated with that of maximum standard uptake value (SUV of the primary lung cancer before and after conventional radiotherapy. Results There was a significant reduction in both SUV and size of the primary cancer after radiotherapy (p Conclusion Correlating and incorporating metabolic change by PET into size change by concomitant CT is more sensitive in assessing therapeutic response than CT alone.

  15. Preirradiation evaluation and technical assessment of involved-field radiotherapy using computed tomographic (CT) simulation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Sawamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Keishiro; Ikeda, Jun; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the importance of preirradiation mental and endocrinological evaluation, and the effectiveness of involved-field radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Following etoposide and cisplatin with or without ifosfamide, 13 patients with nondisseminated disease received involved-field irradiation of 24 Gy in 12 fractions within 3 weeks and 2 patients with disseminated germinoma received 24 Gy craniospinal irradiation (CSI). CT simulation was used to cover the tumor bed. Results: Full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) tests given at the time of the initial radiotherapy showed less than 90 in 7 of 11 patients who had tumors involving the neurohypophyseal region, but the 4 patients who had solitary pineal tumors showed higher scores. Panhypopituitarism was observed in 9 patients with tumors involving the neurohypophyseal region. All patients are alive without disease, with a median follow-up period of 40 months. No in-field relapse was noted after the involved-field radiotherapy. One patient experienced a recurrence outside of the planning target volume. Conclusion: Decline of neurocognitive and endocrine functions were often seen in patients with tumors involving the hypophyseal region, but not in patients with solitary pineal germinoma before radiotherapy. Involved-field radiotherapy using 24 Gy is effective with the help of CT simulation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy

  16. Investigating the generalisation of an atlas-based synthetic-CT algorithm to another centre and MR scanner for prostate MR-only radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Jonathan J.; Dowling, Jason A.; Kelly, Charles G.; McKenna, Jill; Johnstone, Emily; Speight, Richard; Henry, Ann; Greer, Peter B.; McCallum, Hazel M.

    2017-12-01

    There is increasing interest in MR-only radiotherapy planning since it provides superb soft-tissue contrast without the registration uncertainties inherent in a CT-MR registration. However, MR images cannot readily provide the electron density information necessary for radiotherapy dose calculation. An algorithm which generates synthetic CTs for dose calculations from MR images of the prostate using an atlas of 3 T MR images has been previously reported by two of the authors. This paper aimed to evaluate this algorithm using MR data acquired at a different field strength and a different centre to the algorithm atlas. Twenty-one prostate patients received planning 1.5 T MR and CT scans with routine immobilisation devices on a flat-top couch set-up using external lasers. The MR receive coils were supported by a coil bridge. Synthetic CTs were generated from the planning MR images with (sCT1V ) and without (sCT) a one voxel body contour expansion included in the algorithm. This was to test whether this expansion was required for 1.5 T images. Both synthetic CTs were rigidly registered to the planning CT (pCT). A 6 MV volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was created on the pCT and recalculated on the sCT and sCT1V . The synthetic CTs’ dose distributions were compared to the dose distribution calculated on the pCT. The percentage dose difference at isocentre without the body contour expansion (sCT-pCT) was Δ D_sCT=(0.9 +/- 0.8) % and with (sCT1V -pCT) was Δ D_sCT1V=(-0.7 +/- 0.7) % (mean  ±  one standard deviation). The sCT1V result was within one standard deviation of zero and agreed with the result reported previously using 3 T MR data. The sCT dose difference only agreed within two standard deviations. The mean  ±  one standard deviation gamma pass rate was Γ_sCT = 96.1 +/- 2.9 % for the sCT and Γ_sCT1V = 98.8 +/- 0.5 % for the sCT1V (with 2% global dose difference and 2~mm distance to agreement gamma criteria). The one voxel body contour

  17. Radiotherapy of abdomen with precise renal assessment with SPECT/CT imaging (RAPRASI): design and methodology of a prospective trial to improve the understanding of kidney radiation dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gaitan, Juanita; O’Mara, Brenton; Chu, Julie; Faggian, Jessica; Williams, Luke; Hofman, Michael S; Spry, Nigel A; Ebert, Martin A; Robins, Peter; Boucek, Jan; Leong, Trevor; Willis, David; Bydder, Sean; Podias, Peter; Waters, Gemma

    2013-01-01

    The kidneys are a principal dose-limiting organ in radiotherapy for upper abdominal cancers. The current understanding of kidney radiation dose response is rudimentary. More precise dose-volume response models that allow direct correlation of delivered radiation dose with spatio-temporal changes in kidney function may improve radiotherapy treatment planning for upper-abdominal tumours. Our current understanding of kidney dose response and tolerance is limited and this is hindering efforts to introduce advanced radiotherapy techniques for upper-abdominal cancers, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this study is to utilise radiotherapy and combined anatomical/functional imaging data to allow direct correlation of radiation dose with spatio-temporal changes in kidney function. The data can then be used to develop a more precise dose-volume response model which has the potential to optimise and individualise upper abdominal radiotherapy plans. The Radiotherapy of Abdomen with Precise Renal Assessment with SPECT/CT Imaging (RAPRASI) is an observational clinical research study with participating sites at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) in Perth, Australia and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC) in Melbourne, Australia. Eligible patients are those with upper gastrointestinal cancer, without metastatic disease, undergoing conformal radiotherapy that will involve incidental radiation to one or both kidneys. For each patient, total kidney function is being assessed before commencement of radiotherapy treatment and then at 4, 12, 26, 52 and 78 weeks after the first radiotherapy fraction, using two procedures: a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) measurement using the 51 Cr-ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) clearance; and a regional kidney perfusion measurement assessing renal uptake of 99m Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), imaged with a Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography / Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) system. The CT component

  18. Practical performance for CT simulator set up and commissioning for 3d radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Rinks, A.; Zealey, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We present a summary of the protocol used to commission two GE LightSpeed and One Siemens CT-Sim for 3D radiotherapy in early 2004. The protocol defined was based on AAPM TG-66 and ACPSEM 1997 position paper. Scanning Med-TEC Iso-align Laser Alignment Device for three-D isocentre alignment 1. Couch Movement Accuracy for both manual and scanning movement checked before isocentre alignment, as the reference distance is required for the external isocentre setup. 2. Gantry scan rotation circle vertical and tilted angle alignment checked by overlaying the vertical and horizontal image coordinate lines using the aligned ball-bearings in the phantom to determine the gantry cross plane image vertical accuracy and tilt angle accuracy. 3. Zero scan position determined by scanning the horizontally set Med-Align phantom, and adjusting the phantom position forward and backward to match the image scanning centre. 4. Internal lasers position determined by the position of aligned Med-Align phantom after the scanning centre determined. 5. Couch top to Gantry Perpendicular checked by matching the couch axis in the longitudinal and lateral direction to the position of the laser lines determined according to the CT scanning orientation. 6. Couch Central Axis aligned to ensure the couch travels though the internal isocentre for the full range of longitudinal of movement. 7. External isocentre and laser focus can be determined by moving the couch back a set distance (50cm or 60cm normally) from the internal isocentre. Planning image transfer and DRR image alignment 1. Scanning Centre indicated on the planning image depends on the functionality of the planning system. Some planning systems load the image with the scanning centre at zero position, others load up the image with the absolute distance. 2. Zero Slice position aligned to the centre of the phantom using the external laser. 3. Orientation and Distance were checked by scanning the Iso-align in both vertical and

  19. PET CT Thresholds for Radiotherapy Target Definition in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: How Close are we to the Pathologic Findings?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kailiang; Ung, Yee C.; Hornby, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Optimal target delineation threshold values for positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) radiotherapy planning is controversial. In this present study, different PET CT threshold values were used for target delineation and then compared pathologically. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 non-small-cell lung cancer patients underwent PET CT before surgery. The maximal diameter (MD) of the pathologic primary tumor was obtained. The CT-based gross tumor volumes (GTV CT ) were delineated for CT window-level thresholds at 1,600 and -300 Hounsfield units (HU) (GTV CT1 ); 1,600 and -400 (GTV CT2 ); 1,600 and -450 HU (GTV CT3 ); 1,600 and -600 HU (GTV CT4 ); 1,200 and -700 HU (GTV CT5 ); 900 and -450 HU (GTV CT6 ); and 700 and -450 HU (GTV CT7 ). The PET-based GTVs (GTV PET ) were autocontoured at 20% (GTV 20 ), 30% (GTV 30 ), 40% (GTV 40 ), 45% (GTV 45 ), 50% (GTV 50 ), and 55% (GTV 55 ) of the maximal intensity level. The MD of each image-based GTV in three-dimensional orientation was determined. The MD of the GTV PET and GTV CT were compared with the pathologically determined MD. Results: The median MD of the GTV CT changed from 2.89 (GTV CT2 ) to 4.46 (GTV CT7 ) as the CT thresholds were varied. The correlation coefficient of the GTV CT compared with the pathologically determined MD ranged from 0.76 to 0.87. The correlation coefficient of the GTV CT1 was the best (r = 0.87). The median MD of GTV PET changed from 5.72cm to 2.67cm as the PET thresholds increased. The correlation coefficient of the GTV PET compared with the pathologic finding ranged from 0.51 to 0.77. The correlation coefficient of GTV 50 was the best (r = 0.77). Conclusion: Compared with the MD of GTV PET , the MD of GTV CT had better correlation with the pathologic MD. The GTV CT1 and GTV 50 had the best correlation with the pathologic results.

  20. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy in Denmark: From 2D to 3D treatment planning guidelines of The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette Skovhus; Berg, Martin; Nielsen, Hanne M.

    2008-01-01

    centres participated. This work also included a definition of the tissue structures needed to be outlined on the planning CT-scan. The work was initiated in 2003 and the guidelines were approved by the DBCG Radiotherapy Committee in 2006. The first of January 2007 the 3D guidelines had been fully...

  1. Adaptive plan selection vs. re-optimisation in radiotherapy for bladder cancer: A dose accumulation comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Søndergaard, Jimmi; Elstrøm, Ulrik Vindelev; Høyer, Morten; Petersen, Jørgen B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with urinary bladder cancer are obvious candidates for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional variation in bladder volumes. In this study we have compared the normal tissue sparing potential of two ART strategies: daily plan selection (PlanSelect) and daily plan re-optimisation (ReOpt). Materials and methods: Seven patients with bladder cancer were included in the study. For the PlanSelect strategy, a patient-specific library of three plans was generated, and the most suitable plan based on the pre-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) was selected. For the daily ReOpt strategy, plans were re-optimised based on the CBCT from each daily fraction. Bladder contours were propagated to the CBCT scan using deformable image registration (DIR). Accumulated dose distributions for the ART strategies as well as the non-adaptive RT were calculated. Results: A considerable sparing of normal tissue was achieved with both ART approaches, with ReOpt being the superior technique. Compared to non-adaptive RT, the volume receiving more than 57 Gy (corresponding to 95% of the prescribed dose) was reduced to 66% (range 48–100%) for PlanSelect and to 41% (range 33–50%) for ReOpt. Conclusion: This study demonstrated a considerable normal tissue sparing potential of ART for bladder irradiation, with clearly superior results by daily adaptive re-optimisation

  2. Clinical studies on the use of PET in radiotherapy planning in Germany. An update; Klinische Studien zum Einsatz der PET in der Bestrahlungsplanung in Deutschland. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestle, U.; Mix, M.; Weber, W.; Grosu, A.L. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Kliniken fuer Strahlenheilkunde und Nuklearmedizin

    2011-07-15

    In recent years, PET and PET/CT have well been established for staging and restaging of various malignancies. Increasingly, the modality is also used for radiotherapy treatment planning. However, clinical studies investigating the patients benefit by the inclusion of those modalities into RT treatment planning are mandatory, simultaneously defining standards for future care. Chances and problems of such studies are discussed using the examples of the PET-Plan and GLIAA trials. (orig.)

  3. Optimization of rotational radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulovsky, Vladimir; Ringor, Michael; Papiez, Lech

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Rotational therapy treatment planning for rotationally symmetric geometry of tumor and healthy tissue provides an important example of testing various approaches to optimizing dose distributions for therapeutic x-ray irradiations. In this article, dose distribution optimization is formulated as a variational problem. This problem is solved analytically and numerically. Methods and Materials: The classical Lagrange method is used to derive equations and inequalities that give necessary conditions for minimizing the mean-square deviation between the ideal dose distribution and the achievable dose distribution. The solution of the resulting integral equation with Cauchy kernel is used to derive analytical formulas for the minimizing irradiation intensity function. Results: The solutions are evaluated numerically and the graphs of the minimizing intensity functions and the corresponding dose distributions are presented. Conclusions: The optimal solutions obtained using the mean-square criterion lead to significant underdosage in some areas of the tumor volume. Possible solutions to this shortcoming are investigated and medically more appropriate criteria for optimization are proposed for future investigations

  4. Ultrasonic and computed tomography in radiotherapy planning - a comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schertel, L.

    1980-01-01

    The precondition of any radiotherapy is radiation planning. This must be done individually for every patient and must be applicable for any region of the body. Modern irradiation planning requires pictures of the body parts concerned; these can be made by means of the ultrasonic method and computed tomography. This comparative investigation leads to the result (see fig. 4 and 5) that computed tomographic body part pictures should be preferred to those made sonographically. The opinion of Huenig and Co. [8] that ultrasonic tomography will soon lose some of its importance within irradiation planning once computed tomography is introduced could be confirmed by the latest developments. The authors can confirm this also out of their own experience and agree with Winkel and Hermann [23] that computed tomography cannot be done without any more irradiation planning. (orig.) [de

  5. Multi-objective optimization of inverse planning for accurate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ruifen; Pei Xi; Cheng Mengyun; Li Gui; Hu Liqin; Wu Yican; Jing Jia; Li Guoli

    2011-01-01

    The multi-objective optimization of inverse planning based on the Pareto solution set, according to the multi-objective character of inverse planning in accurate radiotherapy, was studied in this paper. Firstly, the clinical requirements of a treatment plan were transformed into a multi-objective optimization problem with multiple constraints. Then, the fast and elitist multi-objective Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) was introduced to optimize the problem. A clinical example was tested using this method. The results show that an obtained set of non-dominated solutions were uniformly distributed and the corresponding dose distribution of each solution not only approached the expected dose distribution, but also met the dose-volume constraints. It was indicated that the clinical requirements were better satisfied using the method and the planner could select the optimal treatment plan from the non-dominated solution set. (authors)

  6. Feasibility of dose planning using CBCT images combined with MSCT images for adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Keisuke; Kunieda, Etsuo; Ogawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    If a kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system mounted on a linear accelerator becomes available for dose calculation, we can confirm the dose distribution of treatment in each day by referring it to the initially planned dose distribution. In this paper, we verified the validity of the calculation method using CBCT images combined with multi-slice CT images. To evaluate the accuracy of calculated dose distribution, γ analysis, distance-to-agreement analysis and dose-volume-histogram analysis were used as the conventional dose calculation methods using CBCT images. The results showed that the dose distribution calculated by our proposed method agreed with the initial treatment plan better compared with the other methods. In addition, our method was so stable that the calculated dose distribution was insensitive to variations in clinical conditions. We demonstrated the feasibility of our proposed method for adaptive radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Medical images fusion for application in treatment planning systems in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros, Renato Assenci

    2006-01-01

    Software for medical images fusion was developed for utilization in CAT3D radiotherapy and MNPS radiosurgery treatment planning systems. A mutual information maximization methodology was used to make the image registration of different modalities by measure of the statistical dependence between the voxels pairs. The alignment by references points makes an initial approximation to the non linear optimization process by downhill simplex method for estimation of the joint histogram. The coordinates transformation function use a trilinear interpolation and search for the global maximum value in a 6 dimensional space, with 3 degree of freedom for translation and 3 degree of freedom for rotation, by making use of the rigid body model. This method was evaluated with CT, MR and PET images from Vanderbilt University database to verify its accuracy by comparison of transformation coordinates of each images fusion with gold-standard values. The median of images alignment error values was 1.6 mm for CT-MR fusion and 3.5 mm for PET-MR fusion, with gold-standard accuracy estimated as 0.4 mm for CT-MR fusion and 1.7 mm for PET-MR fusion. The maximum error values were 5.3 mm for CT-MR fusion and 7.4 mm for PET-MR fusion, and 99.1% of alignment errors were images subvoxels values. The mean computing time was 24 s. The software was successfully finished and implemented in 59 radiotherapy routine services, of which 42 are in Brazil and 17 are in Latin America. This method does not have limitation about different resolutions from images, pixels sizes and slice thickness. Besides, the alignment may be accomplished by axial, coronal or sagittal images. (author)

  8. Ongoing development of digital radiotherapy plan review tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M.A.; Hatton, J.; Cornes, D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: To describe ongoing development of software to support the review of radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) data. The 'SWAN' software program was conceived in 2000 and initially developed for the RADAR (TROG 03.04) prostate radiotherapy trial. Validation of the SWAN program has been occurring via implementation by TROG in support of multiple clinical trials. Development has continued and the SWAN software program is now supported by modular components which comprise the 'SW AN system'. This provides a comprehensive set of tools for the review, analysis and archive of TPS exports. The SWAN system has now been used in support of over 20 radiotherapy trials and to review the plans of over 2,000 trial participants. The use of the system for the RADAR trial is now culminating in the derivation of dose-outcomes indices for prostate treatment toxicity. Newly developed SWAN tools include enhanced remote data archive/retrieval, display of dose in both relative and absolute modes, and interfacing to a Matlab-based add-on ('VAST') that allows quantitative analysis of delineated volumes including regional overlap statistics for multi-observer studies. Efforts are continuing to develop the SWAN system in the context of international collaboration aimed at harmonising the quality-assurance activities of collaborative trials groups. Tools such as the SWAN system are essential for ensuring the collection of accurate and reliable evidence to guide future radiotherapy treatments. One of the principal challenges of developing such a tool is establishing a development path that will ensure its validity and applicability well into the future.

  9. SU-E-J-137: Incorporating Tumor Regression Into Robust Plan Optimization for Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P; Hu, J; Tyagi, N; Mageras, G; Lee, N; Hunt, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a robust planning paradigm which incorporates a tumor regression model into the optimization process to ensure tumor coverage in head and neck radiotherapy. Methods: Simulation and weekly MR images were acquired for a group of head and neck patients to characterize tumor regression during radiotherapy. For each patient, the tumor and parotid glands were segmented on the MR images and the weekly changes were formulated with an affine transformation, where morphological shrinkage and positional changes are modeled by a scaling factor, and centroid shifts, respectively. The tumor and parotid contours were also transferred to the planning CT via rigid registration. To perform the robust planning, weekly predicted PTV and parotid structures were created by transforming the corresponding simulation structures according to the weekly affine transformation matrix averaged over patients other than him/herself. Next, robust PTV and parotid structures were generated as the union of the simulation and weekly prediction contours. In the subsequent robust optimization process, attainment of the clinical dose objectives was required for the robust PTV and parotids, as well as other organs at risk (OAR). The resulting robust plans were evaluated by looking at the weekly and total accumulated dose to the actual weekly PTV and parotid structures. The robust plan was compared with the original plan based on the planning CT to determine its potential clinical benefit. Results: For four patients, the average weekly change to tumor volume and position was −4% and 1.2 mm laterally-posteriorly. Due to these temporal changes, the robust plans resulted in an accumulated PTV D95 that was, on average, 2.7 Gy higher than the plan created from the planning CT. OAR doses were similar. Conclusion: Integration of a tumor regression model into target delineation and plan robust optimization is feasible and may yield improved tumor coverage. Part of this research is supported

  10. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: A comparison between two modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Tiina; Visapää, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Beule, Annette; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion.

  11. Tumor Localization Using Cone-Beam CT Reduces Setup Margins in Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Li, Jonathan G.; Shi Wenyin; Newlin, Heather E.; Chvetsov, Alexei; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.; Olivier, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether setup margins can be reduced using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to localize tumor in conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 lung cancer patients were treated with curative intent with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy using daily image guidance with CBCT. Of these, 13 lung cancer patients had sufficient CBCT scans for analysis (389 CBCT scans). The patients underwent treatment simulation in the BodyFix immobilization system using four-dimensional CT to account for respiratory motion. Daily alignment was first done according to skin tattoos, followed by CBCT. All 389 CBCT scans were retrospectively registered to the planning CT scans using automated soft-tissue and bony registration; the resulting couch shifts in three dimensions were recorded. Results: The daily alignment to skin tattoos with no image guidance resulted in systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors of 3.2-5.6 mm and 2.0-3.5 mm, respectively. The margin required to account for the setup error introduced by aligning to skin tattoos with no image guidance was approximately 1-1.6 cm. The difference in the couch shifts obtained from the bone and soft-tissue registration resulted in systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors of 1.5-4.1 mm and 1.8-5.3 mm, respectively. The margin required to account for the setup error introduced using bony anatomy as a surrogate for the target, instead of localizing the target itself, was 0.5-1.4 cm. Conclusion: Using daily CBCT soft-tissue registration to localize the tumor in conventionally fractionated radiotherapy reduced the required setup margin by up to approximately 1.5 cm compared with both no image guidance and image guidance using bony anatomy as a surrogate for the target.

  12. Improved Planning Time and Plan Quality Through Multicriteria Optimization for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, David L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. Results: In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. Conclusions: This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error–based IMRT planning approach.

  13. [18F]fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT imaging for radiation treatment planning of recurrent and primary prostate cancer with dose escalation to PET/CT-positive lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahl Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present there is no consensus on irradiation treatment volumes for intermediate to high-risk primary cancers or recurrent disease. Conventional imaging modalities, such as CT, MRI and transrectal ultrasound, are considered suboptimal for treatment decisions. Choline-PET/CT might be considered as the imaging modality in radiooncology to select and delineate clinical target volumes extending the prostate gland or prostate fossa. In conjunction with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and imaged guided radiotherapy (IGRT, it might offer the opportunity of dose escalation to selected sites while avoiding unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissues. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary (n = 7 or recurrent (n = 19 prostate cancer received Choline-PET/CT planned 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy. The median age of the patients was 65 yrs (range 45 to 78 yrs. PET/CT-scans with F18-fluoroethylcholine (FEC were performed on a combined PET/CT-scanner equipped for radiation therapy planning. The majority of patients had intermediate to high risk prostate cancer. All patients received 3D conformal or intensity modulated and imaged guided radiotherapy with megavoltage cone beam CT. The median dose to primary tumours was 75.6 Gy and to FEC-positive recurrent lymph nodal sites 66,6 Gy. The median follow-up time was 28.8 months. Results The mean SUVmax in primary cancer was 5,97 in the prostate gland and 3,2 in pelvic lymph nodes. Patients with recurrent cancer had a mean SUVmax of 4,38. Two patients had negative PET/CT scans. At 28 months the overall survival rate is 94%. Biochemical relapse free survival is 83% for primary cancer and 49% for recurrent tumours. Distant disease free survival is 100% and 75% for primary and recurrent cancer, respectively. Acute normal tissue toxicity was mild in 85% and moderate (grade 2 in 15%. No or mild late side effects were observed in the majority of patients (84%. One patient had

  14. Efficient CT simulation of the four-field technique for conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Waterman, Frank M.; Croce, Raymond J.; Corn, Benjamin; Suntharalingam, Nagalingam; Curran, Walter J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma relies on contouring of individual CT slices for target and normal tissue localization. This process can be very time consuming. In the present report, we describe a method to more efficiently localize pelvic anatomy directly from digital reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Materials and Methods: Ten patients with prostate carcinoma underwent CT simulation (the spiral mode at 3 mm separation) for conformal four-field 'box' radiotherapy. The bulbous urethra and bladder were opacified with iodinated contrast media. On lateral and anteroposterior DRRs, the volume of interest (VOI) was restricted to 1.0-1.5 cm tissue thickness to optimize digital radiograph reconstruction of the prostate and seminal vesicles. By removing unessential voxel elements, this method provided direct visualization of those structures. For comparison, the targets of each patient were also obtained by contouring CT axial slices. Results: The method was successfully performed if the target structures were readily visualized and geometrically corresponded to those generated by contouring axial images. The targets in 9 of 10 patients were reliable representations of the CT-contoured volumes. One patient had 18 mm variation due to the lack of bladder opacification. Using VOIs to generate thin tissue DRRs, the time required for target and normal tissue localization was on the average less than 5 min. Conclusion: In CT simulation of the four-field irradiation technique for prostate carcinoma, thin-tissue DRRs allowed for efficient and accurate target localization without requiring individual axial image contouring. This method may facilitate positioning of the beam isocenter and provide reliable conformal radiotherapy

  15. Establishing locoregional control of malignant pleural mesothelioma using high-dose radiotherapy and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigen, Malcolm; Lawford, Catherine; Churcher, Katheryn; Zupan, Eddy; Hamilton, Chris; Lee, Sze Ting; Scott, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    The management of malignant pleural mesothelioma represents one of the most challenging issues in oncology, as there is no proven long-term benefit from surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone or in combination. Locoregional progression remains the major cause of death, but radical surgical resection may produce major postoperative morbidity. While radical or postoperative radiotherapy using conventional techniques has resulted in severe toxicity with no impact on survival, recent advances in radiotherapy delivery may be more effective. We treated patients with locally advanced mesothelioma whose tumours had been sub optimally resected with high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to large volumes of one hemithorax, using CT and positron emission tomography (PET) scan-based treatment planning. Clinical outcomes were assessed by determining patterns of failure and metabolic changes in total glycolytic volume (TGV) between pre- and post-irradiation 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans and by recording acute and late toxicity grades. Fourteen patients were analysed with 40 PET scans performed before and up to 4.5 years after radiotherapy. Eleven patients had pleurectomy/decortications, one had an extrapleural pneumonectomy and two had no surgery. Four patients who received chemotherapy had all progressed prior to radiotherapy. After radiotherapy, the in-field local control rate was 71%. No progression occurred in two patients, one was salvaged with further radiotherapy to a new site, four recurred inside the irradiated volume all with concurrent distant metastases and the other seven had distant metastases only. The TGVs were reduced by an average of 67% (range 12–100%) after doses of 45 to 60 Gy to part or all of one hemithorax. There were no serious treatment-related toxicities. Median survival was 25 months from diagnosis and 17 months after starting radiotherapy. We have established that mesothelioma can be

  16. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer with or without intensity modulated beams: a planning comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerleer, Gert O. de; Vakaet, Luc A.M.L.; Gersem, Werner R.T. de; Wagter, Carlos de; Naeyer, Bart de; Neve, Wilfried de

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) by static segmented beams allows the dose to the main portion of the prostate target to escalate while keeping the maximal dose at the anterior rectal wall at 72 Gy. The value of such IMRT plans was analyzed by comparison with non-IMRT plans using the same beam incidences. Methods and Materials: We performed a planning study on the CT data of 32 consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Three fields in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0 deg. , 116 deg. , and 244 deg. were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume (prostate and seminal vesicles). The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view autocontouring of the target volume with a margin of 1.5 cm. In study 1, the beam weights were determined by a human planner (3D-man) or by computer optimization using a biological objective function with (3D-optim-lim) or without (3D-optim-unlim) a physical term to limit target dose inhomogeneity. In study 2, the 3 beam incidences mentioned above were used and in-field uniform segments were added to allow IMRT. Plans with (IMRT-lim) or without (IMRT-unlim) constraints on target dose inhomogeneity were compared. In the IMRT-lim plan, target dose inhomogeneity was constrained between 15% and 20%. After optimization, plans in both studies were normalized to a maximal rectal dose of 72 Gy. Biological (tumor control probability [TCP], normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]) and physical indices for tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities were computed, as well as the probability of the uncomplicated local control (P+). Results: The IMRT-lim plan was superior to all other plans concerning TCP (p =no. 89%). For bladder, maximal bladder dose was significantly higher in the IMRT-unlim plan compared to all other plans (p no. <=no. 0.0001). P+ was significantly higher in both IMRT-plans than in all other plans. The 3D

  17. Pattern of occult nodal relapse diagnosed with 18F-fluoro-choline PET/CT in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after prostate-only radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lépinoy, Alexis; Cochet, Alexandre; Cueff, Adèle; Cormier, Luc; Martin, Etienne; Maingon, Philippe; Bosset, Jean François; Brunotte, François; Créhange, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of nodal relapse with 18 F-fluoro-choline (FCH) Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography (PET/CT) in prostate cancer patients after radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Eighty-three patients had a FCH PET/CT at time of biochemical failure. Of 65 patients with positive findings, 33 had positive nodes. This analysis included 31 patients who had undergone prior prostate-only radiotherapy with or without a prior radical prostatectomy. Each FCH positive node was assigned to a lymph node station with respect to the CTV defined by the RTOG guidelines (CTV RTOG ). 3D mapping was performed after each node was manually placed in a reference planning CT scan after automatic co-registration of the two scans based on bone anatomy. Eighteen patients (58%) underwent focal salvage FCH PET-guided stereotactic radiotherapy with no hormones. Results: Fourteen patients (45.2%) had a relapse outside the CTV RTOG . Of the 17 patients with a positive node inside the CTV RTOG , 15 had a single node (88.2%) while seven patients out of the 13 evaluable patients (53.9%) who had a relapse outside the CTV RTOG had ⩾2 positive nodes on FCH PET/CT (OR = 8.75, [95% CI: 1.38–54.80], p = 0.020). Relapses that occurred outside the CTV RTOG involved the proximal common iliac (19.3%) and lower periaortic nodes (19.3%) up to L2–L3. Conclusion: 3D mapping of nodal relapses evaluated with FCH PET/CT suggests that with IMRT the upper field limit of pelvic radiotherapy could be extended to L2–L3 safely to cover 95% of nodal stations at risk of an occult relapse

  18. Registration and planning of radiotherapy and proton therapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bausse, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Within the frame of an update and renewal project, the Orsay Proton Therapy Centre of the Curie Institute (IPCO) renews its software used for the treatment of patients by proton therapy, a radiotherapy technique which uses proton beams. High energies used in these treatments and the precision provided by proton particle characteristics require a more precise patient positioning than conventional radiotherapy: proton therapy requires a precision of about a millimetre. Thus, markers are placed on the skull which are generally well accepted by patients, but are a problem in the case of paediatric treatment, notably for the youngest children whose skull is still growing. The first objective of this research is thus to use only intrinsic information from X-ray images used when positioning the patient. A second objective is to make the new software (TPS Isogray) perfectly compatible with IPCO requirements by maintaining the strengths of the previous TPS (Treatment Planning System) and being prepared to the implementation of a new installation. After a presentation of the context and state of the art in radiotherapy and patient positioning, the author proposes an overview of 2D registration methods, presents a new method for 2x2D registration, and addresses the problem of 3D registration. Then, after a presentation of proton therapy, the author addresses different specific issues and aspects: the compensator (simulation, calculation, and tests), dose calculation, the 'Pencil-Beam' algorithm, tests, and introduced improvements [fr

  19. Value of CT scanning in radiation therapy treatment planning: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goitein, M.; Wittenberg, J.; Mendiondo, M.; Doucette, J.; Friedberg, C.; Ferrucci, J.; Gunderson, L.; Linggood, R.; Shipley, W.U.; Fineberg, H.V.

    1979-01-01

    We report the results of a prospective study in which we assessed the value of computed tomography (CT) scanning in planning radiation therapy for 77 patients. First, conventional studies were performed, treatment fields were designed and simulated and, where appropriate, computer generated treatment plans drawn up. Then a CT scan was performed to delineate the location of the tumor and adjacent uninvolved tissues. The treatment goals and plans were reevaluated and changed when necessary. Forty of the 77 patients (52%) had their treatment changed as a result of the CT scan. Of these, four (5%) had a change of treatment modality. Thirty-two patients (42%) had changes in the radiotherapy technique because of inadequate tumor coverage (in 24 patients (31%) part of the tumor was outside one or more of the fields and in the other 8 patients (10%) the tumor coverage was marginal). Field changes resulting only from considerations of normal tissue coverage were made for 4 of these patients (5%). In total, normal tissue coverage was affected in 36 patients (47%). When the significance of these changes was evaluated, CT scanning was judged to be of major value for 28 of the 77 patients (36%) and of minor value in a further 12 patients

  20. Automatic prostate localization on cone-beam CT scans for high precision image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Zijp, Lambert J.; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Previously, we developed an automatic three-dimensional gray-value registration (GR) method for fast prostate localization that could be used during online or offline image-guided radiotherapy. The method was tested on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. In this study, the performance of the algorithm to localize the prostate on cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans acquired on the treatment machine was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Five to 17 CBCT scans of 32 prostate cancer patients (332 scans in total) were used. For 18 patients (190 CBCT scans), the CBCT scans were acquired with a collimated field of view (FOV) (craniocaudal). This procedure improved the image quality considerably. The prostate (i.e., prostate plus seminal vesicles) in each CBCT scan was registered to the prostate in the planning CT scan by automatic 3D gray-value registration (normal GR) starting from a registration on the bony anatomy. When these failed, registrations were repeated with a fixed rotation point locked at the prostate apex (fixed apex GR). Registrations were visually assessed in 3D by one observer with the help of an expansion (by 3.6 mm) of the delineated prostate contours of the planning CT scan. The percentage of successfully registered cases was determined from the combined normal and fixed apex GR assessment results. The error in gray-value registration for both registration methods was determined from the position of one clearly defined calcification in the prostate gland (9 patients, 71 successful registrations). Results: The percentage of successfully registered CBCT scans that were acquired with a collimated FOV was about 10% higher than for CBCT scans that were acquired with an uncollimated FOV. For CBCT scans that were acquired with a collimated FOV, the percentage of successfully registered cases improved from 65%, when only normal GR was applied, to 83% when the results of normal and fixed apex GR were combined. Gray-value registration mainly failed (or

  1. Navigator channel adaptation to reconstruct three dimensional heart volumes from two dimensional radiotherapy planning data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Angela; Nguyen, Thao-Nguyen; Moseley, Joanne L; Hodgson, David C; Sharpe, Michael B; Brock, Kristy K

    2012-01-01

    Biologically-based models that utilize 3D radiation dosimetry data to estimate the risk of late cardiac effects could have significant utility for planning radiotherapy in young patients. A major challenge arises from having only 2D treatment planning data for patients with long-term follow-up. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of an advanced deformable image registration (DIR) and navigator channels (NC) adaptation technique to reconstruct 3D heart volumes from 2D radiotherapy planning images for Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL) patients. Planning CT images were obtained for 50 HL patients who underwent mediastinal radiotherapy. Twelve image sets (6 male, 6 female) were used to construct a male and a female population heart model, which was registered to 23 HL 'Reference' patients' CT images using a DIR algorithm, MORFEUS. This generated a series of population-to-Reference patient specific 3D deformation maps. The technique was independently tested on 15 additional 'Test' patients by reconstructing their 3D heart volumes using 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR). The technique involved: 1) identifying a matching Reference patient for each Test patient using thorax measurements, 2) placement of six NCs on matching Reference and Test patients' DRRs to capture differences in significant heart curvatures, 3) adapting the population-to-Reference patient-specific deformation maps to generate population-to-Test patient-specific deformation maps using linear and bilinear interpolation methods, 4) applying population-to-Test patient specific deformation to the population model to reconstruct Test-patient specific 3D heart models. The percentage volume overlap between the NC-adapted reconstruction and actual Test patient's true heart volume was calculated using the Dice coefficient. The average Dice coefficient expressed as a percentage between the NC-adapted and actual Test model was 89.4 ± 2.8%. The modified NC adaptation

  2. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fatyga, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  3. A feature alignment score for online cone-beam CT-based image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Catriona; Deegan, Timothy; Poulsen, Michael; Bednarz, Tomasz; Harden, Fiona; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2018-05-17

    To develop a method for scoring online cone-beam CT (CBCT)-to-planning CT image feature alignment to inform prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) decision-making. The feasibility of incorporating volume variation metric thresholds predictive of delivering planned dose into weighted functions, was investigated. Radiation therapists and radiation oncologists participated in workshops where they reviewed prostate CBCT-IGRT case examples and completed a paper-based survey of image feature matching practices. For 36 prostate cancer patients, one daily CBCT was retrospectively contoured then registered with their plan to simulate delivered dose if (a) no online setup corrections and (b) online image alignment and setup corrections, were performed. Survey results were used to select variables for inclusion in classification and regression tree (CART) and boosted regression trees (BRT) modeling of volume variation metric thresholds predictive of delivering planned dose to the prostate, proximal seminal vesicles (PSV), bladder, and rectum. Weighted functions incorporating the CART and BRT results were used to calculate a score of individual tumor and organ at risk image feature alignment (FAS TV _ OAR ). Scaled and weighted FAS TV _ OAR were then used to calculate a score of overall treatment compliance (FAS global ) for a given CBCT-planning CT registration. The FAS TV _ OAR were assessed for sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power. FAS global thresholds indicative of high, medium, or low overall treatment plan compliance were determined using coefficients from multiple linear regression analysis. Thirty-two participants completed the prostate CBCT-IGRT survey. While responses demonstrated consensus of practice for preferential ranking of planning CT and CBCT match features in the presence of deformation and rotation, variation existed in the specified thresholds for observed volume differences requiring patient repositioning or repeat bladder and bowel

  4. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen; Jaekel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  5. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Jaekel, Oliver [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  6. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Raya R; Hünemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Parotid Gland Dose in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Is What You Plan What You Get?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.; Garden, Adam S.; Schwartz, David L.; Wang He; Ang, Kian K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Rosenthal, David I.; Morrison, William H.; Asper, Joshua A.; Zhang Lifei; Tung Shihming; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the differences between planned and delivered parotid gland and target doses, and to assess the benefits of daily bone alignment for head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eleven head and neck cancer patients received two CT scans per week with an in-room CT scanner over the course of their radiotherapy. The clinical IMRT plans, designed with 3-mm to 4-mm planning margins, were recalculated on the repeat CT images. The plans were aligned using the actual treatment isocenter marked with radiopaque markers (BB) and bone alignment to the cervical vertebrae to simulate image-guided setup. In-house deformable image registration software was used to map daily dose distributions to the original treatment plan and to calculate a cumulative delivered dose distribution for each patient. Results: Using conventional BB alignment led to increases in the parotid gland mean dose above the planned dose by 5 to 7 Gy in 45% of the patients (median, 3.0 Gy ipsilateral, p = 0.026; median, 1.0 Gy contralateral, p = 0.016). Use of bone alignment led to reductions relative to BB alignment in 91% of patients (median, 2 Gy; range, 0.3-8.3 Gy; 15 of 22 parotids improved). However, the parotid dose from bone alignment was still greater than planned (median, 1.0 Gy, p = 0.007). Neither approach affected tumor dose coverage. Conclusions: With conventional BB alignment, the parotid gland mean dose was significantly increased above the planned mean dose. Using daily bone alignment reduced the parotid dose compared with BB alignment in almost all patients. A 3- to 4-mm planning margin was adequate for tumor dose coverage

  8. Analysis and reduction of 3D systematic and random setup errors during the simulation and treatment of lung cancer patients with CT-based external beam radiotherapy dose planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de; Sornsen de Koste, J.R. van; Senan, S.; Visser, A.G.; Heijmen, B.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the magnitude of the errors made in (a) the setup of patients with lung cancer on the simulator relative to their intended setup with respect to the planned treatment beams and (b) in the setup of these patients on the treatment unit. To investigate how the systematic component

  9. Knowledge-based computer systems for radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalet, I J; Paluszynski, W

    1990-08-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the first areas of clinical medicine to utilize computers in support of routine clinical decision making. The role of the computer has evolved from simple dose calculations to elaborate interactive graphic three-dimensional simulations. These simulations can combine external irradiation from megavoltage photons, electrons, and particle beams with interstitial and intracavitary sources. With the flexibility and power of modern radiotherapy equipment and the ability of computer programs that simulate anything the machinery can do, we now face a challenge to utilize this capability to design more effective radiation treatments. How can we manage the increased complexity of sophisticated treatment planning? A promising approach will be to use artificial intelligence techniques to systematize our present knowledge about design of treatment plans, and to provide a framework for developing new treatment strategies. Far from replacing the physician, physicist, or dosimetrist, artificial intelligence-based software tools can assist the treatment planning team in producing more powerful and effective treatment plans. Research in progress using knowledge-based (AI) programming in treatment planning already has indicated the usefulness of such concepts as rule-based reasoning, hierarchical organization of knowledge, and reasoning from prototypes. Problems to be solved include how to handle continuously varying parameters and how to evaluate plans in order to direct improvements.

  10. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Meyer, J; Sandison, G A; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [ 18 F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/B mean ) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT

  11. 3-Dimentional radiotherapy versus conventional treatment plans for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghili M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: The current standard of adjuvant management for gastric cancer after curative resection based on the results of intergroup 0116 is concurrent chemoradiation. Current guidelines for designing these challenging fields still include two-dimensional simulation with simple AP-PA parallel opposed design. However, the implementation of radiotherapy (RT remains a concern. Our objective was to compare three-dimensional (3D techniques to the more commonly used AP-PA technique."n"nMethods: A total of 24 patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation with simple AP-PA technique, using Cobalt-60. Total radiation dose was 50.4Gy. Landmark-based fields were simulated to assess PTV coverage. For each patient, three additional radiotherapy treatment plans were generated using three-dimensional (3D technique. The four treatment plans were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues (liver, spinal cord, kidneys using dose volume histogram (DVH analysis."n"nResults: The three-dimensional planning techniques provided 10% superior PTV coverage compared to conventional AP-PA fields (p<0.001. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney

  12. Dosimetric verification of radiotherapy treatment planning systems in Serbia: national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutonjski, Laza; Petrović, Borislava; Baucal, Milutin; Teodorović, Milan; Cudić, Ozren; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Izewska, Joanna

    2012-09-12

    Independent external audits play an important role in quality assurance programme in radiation oncology. The audit supported by the IAEA in Serbia was designed to review the whole chain of activities in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) workflow, from patient data acquisition to treatment planning and dose delivery. The audit was based on the IAEA recommendations and focused on dosimetry part of the treatment planning and delivery processes. The audit was conducted in three radiotherapy departments of Serbia. An anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with a computed tomography unit (CT) and treatment plans for eight different test cases involving various beam configurations suggested by the IAEA were prepared on local treatment planning systems (TPSs). The phantom was irradiated following the treatment plans for these test cases and doses in specific points were measured with an ionization chamber. The differences between the measured and calculated doses were reported. The measurements were conducted for different photon beam energies and TPS calculation algorithms. The deviation between the measured and calculated values for all test cases made with advanced algorithms were within the agreement criteria, while the larger deviations were observed for simpler algorithms. The number of measurements with results outside the agreement criteria increased with the increase of the beam energy and decreased with TPS calculation algorithm sophistication. Also, a few errors in the basic dosimetry data in TPS were detected and corrected. The audit helped the users to better understand the operational features and limitations of their TPSs and resulted in increased confidence in dose calculation accuracy using TPSs. The audit results indicated the shortcomings of simpler algorithms for the test cases performed and, therefore the transition to more advanced algorithms is highly desirable.

  13. Dosimetric verification of radiotherapy treatment planning systems in Serbia: national audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutonjski, Laza; Petrović, Borislava; Baucal, Milutin; Teodorović, Milan; Čudić, Ozren; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Izewska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Independent external audits play an important role in quality assurance programme in radiation oncology. The audit supported by the IAEA in Serbia was designed to review the whole chain of activities in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) workflow, from patient data acquisition to treatment planning and dose delivery. The audit was based on the IAEA recommendations and focused on dosimetry part of the treatment planning and delivery processes. The audit was conducted in three radiotherapy departments of Serbia. An anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with a computed tomography unit (CT) and treatment plans for eight different test cases involving various beam configurations suggested by the IAEA were prepared on local treatment planning systems (TPSs). The phantom was irradiated following the treatment plans for these test cases and doses in specific points were measured with an ionization chamber. The differences between the measured and calculated doses were reported. The measurements were conducted for different photon beam energies and TPS calculation algorithms. The deviation between the measured and calculated values for all test cases made with advanced algorithms were within the agreement criteria, while the larger deviations were observed for simpler algorithms. The number of measurements with results outside the agreement criteria increased with the increase of the beam energy and decreased with TPS calculation algorithm sophistication. Also, a few errors in the basic dosimetry data in TPS were detected and corrected. The audit helped the users to better understand the operational features and limitations of their TPSs and resulted in increased confidence in dose calculation accuracy using TPSs. The audit results indicated the shortcomings of simpler algorithms for the test cases performed and, therefore the transition to more advanced algorithms is highly desirable

  14. Dosimetric verification of radiotherapy treatment planning systems in Serbia: national audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutonjski Laza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Independent external audits play an important role in quality assurance programme in radiation oncology. The audit supported by the IAEA in Serbia was designed to review the whole chain of activities in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT workflow, from patient data acquisition to treatment planning and dose delivery. The audit was based on the IAEA recommendations and focused on dosimetry part of the treatment planning and delivery processes. Methods The audit was conducted in three radiotherapy departments of Serbia. An anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with a computed tomography unit (CT and treatment plans for eight different test cases involving various beam configurations suggested by the IAEA were prepared on local treatment planning systems (TPSs. The phantom was irradiated following the treatment plans for these test cases and doses in specific points were measured with an ionization chamber. The differences between the measured and calculated doses were reported. Results The measurements were conducted for different photon beam energies and TPS calculation algorithms. The deviation between the measured and calculated values for all test cases made with advanced algorithms were within the agreement criteria, while the larger deviations were observed for simpler algorithms. The number of measurements with results outside the agreement criteria increased with the increase of the beam energy and decreased with TPS calculation algorithm sophistication. Also, a few errors in the basic dosimetry data in TPS were detected and corrected. Conclusions The audit helped the users to better understand the operational features and limitations of their TPSs and resulted in increased confidence in dose calculation accuracy using TPSs. The audit results indicated the shortcomings of simpler algorithms for the test cases performed and, therefore the transition to more advanced algorithms is highly desirable.

  15. A phantom for testing of 4D-CT for radiotherapy of small lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Callahan, J.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The use of time-resolved four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) in radiotherapy requires strict quality assurance to ensure the accuracy of motion management protocols. The aim of this work was to design and test a phantom capable of large amplitude motion for use in 4D-CT, with particular interest in small lesions typical for stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods: The phantom of “see-saw” design is light weight, capable of including various sample materials and compatible with several surrogate marker signal acquisition systems. It is constructed of polymethylmethacrylate (Perspex) and its movement is controlled via a dc motor and drive wheel. It was tested using two CT scanners with different 4D acquisition methods: the Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT (helical scan, pressure belt) and a General Electric Discovery STE PET/CT (axial scan, infrared marker). Amplitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.0 cm and frequencies of up to 40 cycles per minute were used to study the effect of motion on image quality. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs), as well as average intensity projections (AIPs) of moving objects were investigated and their quality dependence on the number of phase reconstruction bins assessed. Results: CT number discrepancies between moving and stationary objects were found to have no systematic dependence on amplitude, frequency, or specific interphase variability. MIP-delineated amplitudes of motion were found to match physical phantom amplitudes to within 2 mm for all motion scenarios tested. Objects undergoing large amplitude motions (>3.0 cm) were shown to cause artefacts in MIP and AIP projections when ten phase bins were assigned. This problem can be mitigated by increasing the number of phase bins in a 4D-CT scan. Conclusions: The phantom was found to be a suitable tool for evaluating the image quality of 4D-CT motion management technology, as well as providing a quality assurance tool for intercenter/intervendor testing of commercial

  16. Spatiotemporal radiotherapy planning using a global optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Ali; Salari, Ehsan

    2018-02-01

    This paper aims at quantifying the extent of potential therapeutic gain, measured using biologically effective dose (BED), that can be achieved by altering the radiation dose distribution over treatment sessions in fractionated radiotherapy. To that end, a spatiotemporally integrated planning approach is developed, where the spatial and temporal dose modulations are optimized simultaneously. The concept of equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) is used to quantify and compare the clinical quality of spatiotemporally heterogeneous dose distributions in target and critical structures. This gives rise to a large-scale non-convex treatment-plan optimization problem, which is solved using global optimization techniques. The proposed spatiotemporal planning approach is tested on two stylized cancer cases resembling two different tumor sites and sensitivity analysis is performed for radio-biological and EUBED parameters. Numerical results validate that spatiotemporal plans are capable of delivering a larger BED to the target volume without increasing the BED in critical structures compared to conventional time-invariant plans. In particular, this additional gain is attributed to the irradiation of different regions of the target volume at different treatment sessions. Additionally, the trade-off between the potential therapeutic gain and the number of distinct dose distributions is quantified, which suggests a diminishing marginal gain as the number of dose distributions increases.

  17. Pilot study on virtual imaging for patient information on radiotherapy planning and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulé-Suso, J.; Finney, S.; Bisson, J.; Hammersley, S.; Jassel, S.; Knight, R.; Hicks, C.; Sargeant, S.; Lam, K.-P.; Belcher, J.; Collins, D.; Bhana, R.; Adab, F.; O'Donovan, C.; Moloney, A.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that health professionals might sometimes underestimate cancer patients' needs for information on the complex process of radiotherapy (RT) planning and delivery. Furthermore, relatives might also feel excluded from the treatment of their loved ones. This pilot study was carried out in order to assess whether both patients and their relatives would welcome further information on RT planning and delivery using the virtual reality (VR) system VERT. One hundred and fifty patients with different types of cancer receiving radical RT were included in the study. Patients and relatives were shown using VERT on a one-to-one basis with an oncologist or a radiographer, a standard room where RT is given, a linear accelerator, and how RT is planned and delivered using their own planning CT Scans. Patients welcomed this information as it helped them to reduce their fears about RT. Relatives felt also more involved in the treatment of their loved one. The results obtained in this pilot study show that VR aids could become an important tool for delivering information on RT to both patients and relatives. - Highlights: • Virtual imaging helps patients to better understand RT planning and delivery. • Virtual imaging reduces the fear factor. • Virtual imaging improves patients and relatives satisfaction

  18. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-05-07

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [(18)F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT delivery under a dose painting paradigm is feasible within an integrated respiratory motion phantom workflow. For a limited set of cases, the magnitude

  19. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by 6 different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses (EUD), and 2%-2mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT delivery under a dose painting paradigm is feasible within an integrated respiratory motion phantom workflow. For a limited set of cases, the

  20. WE-AB-204-03: A Novel 3D Printed Phantom for 4D PET/CT Imaging and SIB Radiotherapy Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To construct and test a 3D printed phantom designed to mimic variable PET tracer uptake seen in lung tumor volumes. To assess segmentation accuracy of sub-volumes of the phantom following 4D PET/CT scanning with ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion. To plan, deliver and verify delivery of PET-driven, gated, simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy plans. Methods: A set of phantoms and inserts were designed and manufactured for a realistic representation of lung cancer gated radiotherapy steps from 4D PET/CT scanning to dose delivery. A cylindrical phantom (40x 120 mm) holds inserts for PET/CT scanning. The novel 3D printed insert dedicated to 4D PET/CT mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and lower uptake in the periphery. This insert is a variable density porous cylinder (22.12×70 mm), ABS-P430 thermoplastic, 3D printed by uPrint SE Plus with inner void volume (5.5×42 mm). The square pores (1.8×1.8 mm2 each) fill 50% of outer volume, resulting in a 2:1 SUV ratio of PET-tracer in the void volume with respect to porous volume. A matching in size cylindrical phantom is dedicated to validate gated radiotherapy. It contains eight peripheral holes matching the location of the porous part of the 3D printed insert, and one central hole. These holes accommodate adaptors for Farmer-type ion chamber and cells vials. Results: End-to-end test were performed from 4D PET/CT scanning to transferring data to the planning system and target volume delineation. 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of the phantom with different respiratory motion patterns and gating windows. A measured 2:1 18F-FDG SUV ratio between inner void and outer volume matched the 3D printed design. Conclusion: The novel 3D printed phantom mimics variable PET tracer uptake typical of tumors. Obtained 4D PET/CT scans are suitable for segmentation, treatment planning and delivery in SIB gated treatments of NSCLC

  1. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours (PTV range 416–4549 cm 3 ) were selected. For each patient, 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated and the Conformity Index (CI), organ at risk (OAR) doses and monitor unit (MU) were evaluated. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare dose delivered to both target and OARs. The mean number of fields for 3DCRT and IMRT were 6.3 ± 2.1, 7.2 ± 1.8. The mean number of arcs for VMAT was 3.7 ± 1.1. The mean conformity index of VMAT (0.98 ± 0.14) was similar to that of IMRT (1.03 ± 0.13), both of which were significantly better than 3DCRT (1.35 ± 0.20; p = 0.005). The mean dose to lung was significantly higher for 3DCRT (11.9Gy ± 7.9) compared to IMRT (9.4Gy ± 5.4, p = 0.014) and VMAT (8.9Gy ± 4.5, p = 0.017). For the 3 females, the low dose regions in the ipsilateral breast for VMAT were generally less with VMAT. IMRT plans required 1427 ± 532 MU per fraction which was almost 4-fold higher than 3DCRT (313 ± 112, P = 0.005). Compared to IMRT, VMAT plans required 60 % less MU (570 ± 285, P = 0.005). For inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours, VMAT delivered equivalent target coverage when compared to IMRT but required 60 % less MU. Both VMAT and IMRT were superior to 3DCRT in terms of better PTV coverage and sparing of lung tissue

  2. PET/CT in Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2018-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important component of the management of lymphoma patients. Most lymphomas are metabolically active and accumulate 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Positron emission tomography with computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging using FDG is used routinely in staging and treatment...

  3. "SABER": A new software tool for radiotherapy treatment plan evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Joiner, Michael C; Orton, Colin G; Burmeister, Jay

    2010-11-01

    Both spatial and biological information are necessary in order to perform true optimization of a treatment plan and for predicting clinical outcome. The goal of this work is to develop an enhanced treatment plan evaluation tool which incorporates biological parameters and retains spatial dose information. A software system is developed which provides biological plan evaluation with a novel combination of features. It incorporates hyper-radiosensitivity using the induced-repair model and applies the new concept of dose convolution filter (DCF) to simulate dose wash-out effects due to cell migration, bystander effect, and/or tissue motion during treatment. Further, the concept of spatial DVH (sDVH) is introduced to evaluate and potentially optimize the spatial dose distribution in the target volume. Finally, generalized equivalent uniform dose is derived from both the physical dose distribution (gEUD) and the distribution of equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (gEUD2) and the software provides three separate models for calculation of tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and probability of uncomplicated tumor control (P+). TCP, NTCP, and P+ are provided as a function of prescribed dose and multivariable TCP, NTCP, and P+ plots are provided to illustrate the dependence on individual parameters used to calculate these quantities. Ten plans from two clinical treatment sites are selected to test the three calculation models provided by this software. By retaining both spatial and biological information about the dose distribution, the software is able to distinguish features of radiotherapy treatment plans not discernible using commercial systems. Plans that have similar DVHs may have different spatial and biological characteristics and the application of novel tools such as sDVH and DCF within the software may substantially change the apparent plan quality or predicted plan metrics such as TCP and NTCP. For the cases examined

  4. Quantitative dosimetric assessment for effect of gold nanoparticles as contrast media on radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Yang, Pei-Ying; Hong, Ji-Hong; Lo, Ching-Jung

    2013-07-01

    In CT planning for radiation therapy, patients may be asked to have a medical procedure of contrast agent (CA) administration as required by their physicians. CA media improve quality of CT images and assist radiation oncologists in delineation of the target or organs with accuracy. However, dosimetric discrepancy may occur between scenarios in which CA media are present in CT planning and absent in treatment delivery. In recent preclinical experiments of small animals, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been identified as an excellent contrast material of x-ray imaging. In this work, we quantitatively evaluate the effect of AuNPs to be used as a potential material of contrast enhancement in radiotherapy planning with an analytical phantom and clinical case. Conray 60, an iodine-based product for contrast enhancement in clinical uses, is included as a comparison. Other additional variables such as different concentrations of CA media, radiation delivery techniques and dose calculation algorithms are included. We consider 1-field AP, 4-field box, 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). CA media of AuNPs (Conray 60) with concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% containing 28.2, 56.4, 84.6, 112.8 and 141.0 mg of gold (iodine) per mL were prepared prior to CT scanning. A virtual phantom with a target where nanoparticle media are loaded and clinical case of gastric lymphoma in which the Conray 60 media were given to the patient prior to the CT planning are included for the study. Compared to Conray 60 media with concentration of 10%/50%, Hounsfield units for AuNP media of 10%/50% are 322/1608 higher due to the fact that atomic number of Au (Z=79) is larger than I (Z=53). In consequence, dosimetric discrepancy of AuNPs is magnified between presence and absence of contrast media. It was found in the phantom study that percent dose differences between presence and absence of CA media may be

  5. Specification and acceptance testing of radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in the radiation therapy treatment planning process is essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. The computerized radiotherapy treatment planning systems (RTPSs) are now widely available in industrialized and developing countries and it is of special importance to support hospitals in Member States in developing procedures for acceptance testing, commissioning and QA of their RTPSs. Responding to these needs, a group of experts developed an IAEA publication with such recommendations, which was published in 2004 as IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 430. This report provides a general framework and describes a large number of tests and procedures that should be considered by the users of new RTPSs. However, small hospitals with limited resources or large hospitals with high patient load and limited staff are not always able to perform complete characterization, validation and software testing of algorithms used in RTPSs. Therefore, the IAEA proposed more specific guidelines that provide a step-by-step recommendation for users at hospitals or cancer centres how to implement acceptance and commissioning procedures for newly purchased RTPSs. The current publication was developed in the framework of the Coordinated Research Project on Development of Procedures for Quality Assurance for Dosimetry Calculations in Radiotherapy and uses the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard IEC 62083, Requirements for the Safety of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems as its basis. The report addresses the procedures for specification and acceptance testing of RTPSs to be used by both manufacturers and users at the hospitals. Recommendations are provided for specific tests to be performed at the manufacturing facility known as type tests, and for acceptance tests to be performed at the hospital known as site tests. The purpose of acceptance testing is to demonstrate to the

  6. Tumor and normal structures volume localization and quantitation in 3D radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, R.; Andreucci, L.

    1995-01-01

    Improvements in imaging technology have significantly enhanced the ability of the radiation oncologist to stage and to evaluate the response of tumor during and after treatment. Over the last few year, in fact, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging radiolabelled monoclonal tumor antibodies have allowed tumor definition and evaluation. Concerning the above mentioned techniques accurate methods for the integration of morphological (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT, MRS) information can be very useful for volumes definition. In fact three-dimensional treatment planning depends heavily on volume displays and calculation based on volumes to convey information to the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. The accuracy and reproducibility of the methods for creating these volumes are fundamental limitations of current treatment planning systems. Slice by slice manual contouring, which is extremely labor-intensive, and automatic edge detection, which has a high failure rate and requires human intervention are representative of the current standard of practice. The aim of our work is both to develop methods of image data integration and automatic segmentation, and to make the treatment planning system able to combine these multiple information in unified data set in order to get a better tumor volume definition and dose distribution calculation. Then the possibility of using morphological and functional images and other information coming from MR spectroscopy and electronic or confocal microscopy can allow the development into the treatment planning system of biological calculation models for evaluating tumor and normal tissue control probabilities (TCP, NTCP). The definitive use of these models into the 3-D treatment plannings will offer a considerable improvement in the biological efficacy of radiotherapy and it will constitute the object

  7. Quantitative dosimetric assessment for effect of gold nanoparticles as contrast media on radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Yang, Pei-Ying; Hong, Ji-Hong; Lo, Ching-Jung

    2013-01-01

    In CT planning for radiation therapy, patients may be asked to have a medical procedure of contrast agent (CA) administration as required by their physicians. CA media improve quality of CT images and assist radiation oncologists in delineation of the target or organs with accuracy. However, dosimetric discrepancy may occur between scenarios in which CA media are present in CT planning and absent in treatment delivery. In recent preclinical experiments of small animals, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been identified as an excellent contrast material of x-ray imaging. In this work, we quantitatively evaluate the effect of AuNPs to be used as a potential material of contrast enhancement in radiotherapy planning with an analytical phantom and clinical case. Conray 60, an iodine-based product for contrast enhancement in clinical uses, is included as a comparison. Other additional variables such as different concentrations of CA media, radiation delivery techniques and dose calculation algorithms are included. We consider 1-field AP, 4-field box, 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). CA media of AuNPs (Conray 60) with concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% containing 28.2, 56.4, 84.6, 112.8 and 141.0 mg of gold (iodine) per mL were prepared prior to CT scanning. A virtual phantom with a target where nanoparticle media are loaded and clinical case of gastric lymphoma in which the Conray 60 media were given to the patient prior to the CT planning are included for the study. Compared to Conray 60 media with concentration of 10%/50%, Hounsfield units for AuNP media of 10%/50% are 322/1608 higher due to the fact that atomic number of Au (Z=79) is larger than I (Z=53). In consequence, dosimetric discrepancy of AuNPs is magnified between presence and absence of contrast media. It was found in the phantom study that percent dose differences between presence and absence of CA media may be

  8. Comparison of RapidArc plans and fixed field intensity modulated radiotherapy planning in cervical cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiangyu; Liu Xianfeng; He Ya'nan; Yin Wenjuan; Wu Yongzhong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the advantages and disadvantages between the RapidArc plans and fixed-field IMRT plan (IMRT). Methods: Ten cases of cervical cancer,aged 55 (36-70), who were to receive post-operative radiotherapy were selected randomly. Single arc (Arc 1), two arcs (Arc 2), and three arc (Arc 3) RapidArc plans and fixed-field IMRT plan were designed respectively in the Eclipse 8.6 planning system. The designing, treatment time, target area, and dose distribution of organs at risk by these 4 planning techniques were compared. Results: The values of average planned treatment time by the Arc 1, Arc 2, and Arc 3 ten cases was 98, 155, 185, and 46 min, respectively. The values of average treatment time in the Varian IX accelerator were 2.15, 3.32, 4.48, and 6.95 min, respectively. The average mean doses were (48.99±1.08),(49.40±0.51), (49.51±0.62), and (48.65±0.92) Gy, respectively. The values of homogeneity index (HI) of target were 1.11±0.07, 1.07±0.02, 1.06±0.02, and 1.12±0.05, respectively. The values of conformal index (CI) of target were 0.73±0.13, 0.87±0.06, 0.87±0.06, and 0.79±0.06, respectively. The doses at rectum, bladder, and small intestine calculated by IMRT plan were the lowest, and the doses at the femoral neck calculated by these 4 plans were similar. Conclusions: The RapidArc plan is superior in dose distribution at target, HI, CI, and treatment time to IMRT, but IMRT plan is superior to RapidArc in planned dose calculation time and protection of organs at risk. However, in general, the RapidArc plan is better in clinical application than IMRT plan. (authors)

  9. An improved fast and elitist multi-objective genetic algorithm-ANSGA-II for multi-objective optimization of inverse radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ruifen; Li Guoli; Song Gang; Zhao Pan; Lin Hui; Wu Aidong; Huang Chenyu; Wu Yican

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To provide a fast and effective multi-objective optimization algorithm for inverse radiotherapy treatment planning system. Methods: Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-NSGA-II is a representative of multi-objective evolutionary optimization algorithms and excels the others. The paper produces ANSGA-II that makes use of advantage of NSGA-II, and uses adaptive crossover and mutation to improve its flexibility; according the character of inverse radiotherapy treatment planning, the paper uses the pre-known knowledge to generate individuals of every generation in the course of optimization, which enhances the convergent speed and improves efficiency. Results: The example of optimizing average dose of a sheet of CT, including PTV, OAR, NT, proves the algorithm could find satisfied solutions in several minutes. Conclusions: The algorithm could provide clinic inverse radiotherapy treatment planning system with selection of optimization algorithms. (authors)

  10. Magnetic Resonance-Based Treatment Planning for Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Creation of Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lili; Nguyen, Thai-Binh; Jones, Elan; Chen Zuoqun; Luo Wei; Wang Lu; Price, Robert A.; Pollack, Alan; Ma, C.-M. Charlie

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a technique to create magnetic resonance (MR)-based digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) for initial patient setup for routine clinical applications of MR-based treatment planning for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty prostate cancer patients' computed tomography (CT) and MR images were used for the study. Computed tomography and MR images were fused. The pelvic bony structures, including femoral heads, pubic rami, ischium, and ischial tuberosity, that are relevant for routine clinical patient setup were manually contoured on axial MR images. The contoured bony structures were then assigned a bulk density of 2.0 g/cm 3 . The MR-based DRRs were generated. The accuracy of the MR-based DDRs was quantitatively evaluated by comparing MR-based DRRs with CT-based DRRs for these patients. For each patient, eight measuring points on both coronal and sagittal DRRs were used for quantitative evaluation. Results: The maximum difference in the mean values of these measurement points was 1.3 ± 1.6 mm, and the maximum difference in absolute positions was within 3 mm for the 20 patients investigated. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance-based DRRs are comparable to CT-based DRRs for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and can be used for patient treatment setup when MR-based treatment planning is applied clinically

  11. Design of planning target volume margin using an active breathing control and Varian image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system in unresectable liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Jinbo; Yu Jinming; Liu Jing; Liu Tonghai; Yin Yong; Shi Xuetao; Song Jinlong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To define the planning target volume(PTV) margin with an active breathing control (ABC) and the Varian image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system. Methods: Thirteen patients with liver cancer were treated with radiotherapy from May 2006 to September 2006. Prior to radiotherapy, all patients had undergone transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) by infusing a mixture of iodized oil contrast medium and chemotherapeutic agents, kV fluoroscopy was used to measure the potential motion of lipiodol spot positions during ABC breath-holds. ABC was used for planning CT scan and radiation delivery, with the breath held at the same phase of the respiratory cycle (near end-exhalation). Cone beam CT (CBCT) was taken using Varian IGRT system, which was then compared online with planning CT using a 3 D-3 D matching tool. Analysis relied on lipiodol spots on planning CT and CBCT manually. The treatment table was moved to produce acceptable setup before treatment delivery. Repeated CBCT image and another analysis were obtained after irradiation. Results: No motion of the intrahepatic tumor was observed on fluoroscopy during ABC breath-holds. The estimated required PTV margins, calculated according to the Stroom formula, were 4.4 mm, 5.3 mm and 7.8 mm in the x, y and z axis directions before radiotherapy. The corresponding parameters were 2.5m, 2.6 mm and 3.9 mm after radiotherapy. Conclusions: We have adopted a PTV margin of 5 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm in the x, y and z axis directions with ABC, and 3,3 and 4 mm with ABC and on-line kilovoltage CBCT. (authors)

  12. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  13. Radiographer-led plan selection for bladder cancer radiotherapy: initiating a training programme and maintaining competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, H A; Hafeez, S; Taylor, H; Lalondrelle, S; McDonald, F; Hansen, V N; Huddart, R

    2015-04-01

    The implementation of plan of the day selection for patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) for bladder cancer requires efficient and confident decision-making. This article describes the development of a training programme and maintenance of competency. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired on patients receiving RT for bladder cancer were assessed to establish baseline competency and training needs. A training programme was implemented, and observers were asked to select planning target volumes (PTVs) on two groups of 20 patients' images. After clinical implementation, the PTVs chosen were reviewed offline, and an audit performed after 3 years. A mean of 73% (range, 53-93%) concordance rate was achieved prior to training. Subsequent to training, the mean score decreased to 66% (Round 1), then increased to 76% (Round 2). Six radiographers and two clinicians successfully completed the training programme. An independent observer reviewed the images offline after clinical implementation, and a 91% (126/139) concordance rate was achieved. During the audit, 125 CBCT images from 13 patients were reviewed by a single observer and concordance was 92%. Radiographer-led selection of plan of the day was implemented successfully with the use of a training programme and continual assessment. Quality has been maintained over a period of 3 years. The training programme was successful in achieving and maintaining competency for a plan of the day technique.

  14. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  15. A method for generating large datasets of organ geometries for radiotherapy treatment planning studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Nan; Cerviño, Laura; Segars, Paul; Lewis, John; Shan, Jinlu; Jiang, Steve; Zheng, Xiaolin; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    With the rapidly increasing application of adaptive radiotherapy, large datasets of organ geometries based on the patient’s anatomy are desired to support clinical application or research work, such as image segmentation, re-planning, and organ deformation analysis. Sometimes only limited datasets are available in clinical practice. In this study, we propose a new method to generate large datasets of organ geometries to be utilized in adaptive radiotherapy. Given a training dataset of organ shapes derived from daily cone-beam CT, we align them into a common coordinate frame and select one of the training surfaces as reference surface. A statistical shape model of organs was constructed, based on the establishment of point correspondence between surfaces and non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) representation. A principal component analysis is performed on the sampled surface points to capture the major variation modes of each organ. A set of principal components and their respective coefficients, which represent organ surface deformation, were obtained, and a statistical analysis of the coefficients was performed. New sets of statistically equivalent coefficients can be constructed and assigned to the principal components, resulting in a larger geometry dataset for the patient’s organs. These generated organ geometries are realistic and statistically representative

  16. A strategy for multimodal deformable image registration to integrate PET/MR into radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibfarth, Sara; Moennich, David; Thorwarth, Daniela; Welz, Stefan; Siegel, Christine; Zips, Daniel; Schwenzer, Nina; Holger Schmidt, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background: Combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly promising for biologically individualized radiotherapy (RT). Hence, the purpose of this work was to develop an accurate and robust registration strategy to integrate combined PET/MR data into RT treatment planning. Material and methods: Eight patient datasets consisting of an FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) and a subsequently acquired PET/MR of the head and neck (HN) region were available. Registration strategies were developed based on CT and MR data only, whereas the PET components were fused with the resulting deformation field. Following a rigid registration, deformable registration was performed with a transform parametrized by B-splines. Three different optimization metrics were investigated: global mutual information (GMI), GMI combined with a bending energy penalty (BEP) for regularization (GMI + BEP) and localized mutual information with BEP (LMI + BEP). Different quantitative registration quality measures were developed, including volumetric overlap and mean distance measures for structures segmented on CT and MR as well as anatomical landmark distances. Moreover, the local registration quality in the tumor region was assessed by the normalized cross correlation (NCC) of the two PET datasets. Results: LMI + BEP yielded the most robust and accurate registration results. For GMI, GMI + BEP and LMI + BEP, mean landmark distances (standard deviations) were 23.9 mm (15.5 mm), 4.8 mm (4.0 mm) and 3.0 mm (1.0 mm), and mean NCC values (standard deviations) were 0.29 (0.29), 0.84 (0.14) and 0.88 (0.06), respectively. Conclusion: Accurate and robust multimodal deformable image registration of CT and MR in the HN region can be performed using a B-spline parametrized transform and LMI + BEP as optimization metric. With this strategy, biologically individualized RT based on combined PET/MRI in terms of dose painting is possible

  17. MR-CT registration using a Ni-Ti prostate stent in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Carl, Jesper; Østergaard, Lasse Riis

    2013-06-01

    In image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer defining the clinical target volume often relies on magnetic resonance (MR). The task of transferring the clinical target volume from MR to standard planning computed tomography (CT) is not trivial due to prostate mobility. In this paper, an automatic local registration approach is proposed based on a newly developed removable Ni-Ti prostate stent. The registration uses the voxel similarity measure mutual information in a two-step approach where the pelvic bones are used to establish an initial registration for the local registration. In a phantom study, the accuracy was measured to 0.97 mm and visual inspection showed accurate registration of all 30 data sets. The consistency of the registration was examined where translation and rotation displacements yield a rotation error of 0.41° ± 0.45° and a translation error of 1.67 ± 2.24 mm. This study demonstrated the feasibility for an automatic local MR-CT registration using the prostate stent.

  18. MR-CT registration using a Ni-Ti prostate stent in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Østergaard, Lasse Riis; Carl, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer defining the clinical target volume often relies on magnetic resonance (MR). The task of transferring the clinical target volume from MR to standard planning computed tomography (CT) is not trivial due to prostate mobility. In this paper, an automatic local registration approach is proposed based on a newly developed removable Ni-Ti prostate stent.Methods: The registration uses the voxel similarity measure mutual information in a two-step approach where the pelvic bones are used to establish an initial registration for the local registration.Results: In a phantom study, the accuracy was measured to 0.97 mm and visual inspection showed accurate registration of all 30 data sets. The consistency of the registration was examined where translation and rotation displacements yield a rotation error of 0.41° ± 0.45° and a translation error of 1.67 ± 2.24 mm.Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility for an automatic local MR-CT registration using the prostate stent.

  19. MR-CT registration using a Ni-Ti prostate stent in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Ostergaard, Lasse Riis [Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg 9220 (Denmark); Carl, Jesper [Department of Medical Physics, Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg 9100 (Denmark)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer defining the clinical target volume often relies on magnetic resonance (MR). The task of transferring the clinical target volume from MR to standard planning computed tomography (CT) is not trivial due to prostate mobility. In this paper, an automatic local registration approach is proposed based on a newly developed removable Ni-Ti prostate stent.Methods: The registration uses the voxel similarity measure mutual information in a two-step approach where the pelvic bones are used to establish an initial registration for the local registration.Results: In a phantom study, the accuracy was measured to 0.97 mm and visual inspection showed accurate registration of all 30 data sets. The consistency of the registration was examined where translation and rotation displacements yield a rotation error of 0.41 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.45 Degree-Sign and a translation error of 1.67 {+-} 2.24 mm.Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility for an automatic local MR-CT registration using the prostate stent.

  20. CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Brooke; Pun, Emma; Tay, Huilee; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Ball, David; Siva, Shankar; Samuel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment technique for pulmonary metastases in which conventional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) may be inadequate. This study aims to assess the utility of CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases after SABR. In this ethics board-approved prospective study, 11 patients underwent a 26-Gy single fraction of SABR to pulmonary metastases. CT perfusion imaging occurred prior to and at 14 and 70 days post-SABR. Blood flow (mL/100 mL/min), blood volume (mL/100 mL), time to peak (seconds) and surface permeability (mL/100 mL/min), perfusion parameters of pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR, were independently assessed by two radiologists. Inter-observer variability was analysed. CT perfusion results were analysed for early response assessment comparing day 14 with baseline scans and for late response by comparing day 70 with baseline scans. The largest diameter of the pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR was recorded. Ten patients completed all three scans and one patient had baseline and early response assessment CT perfusion scans only. There was strong level of inter-observer agreement of CT perfusion interpretation with a median intraclass coefficient of 0.87 (range 0.20–0.98). Changes in all four perfusion parameters and tumour sizes were not statistically significant. CT perfusion imaging of pulmonary metastases is a highly reproducible imaging technique that may provide additional response assessment information above that of conventional RECIST, and it warrants further study in a larger cohort of patients undergoing SABR.

  1. Localization of the prostatic apex for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Fone, Patricia D.; Jones, C. Darryl; White, Ralph DeVere

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: There is no consensus on the optimal method for localizing the prostatic apex in patients with early stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Some radiation oncologists have recommended that transrectal ultrasound or MRI scans be used to define the inferior border of radiation portals. The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the ability of retrograde urethrograms and CT scans to accurately define the prostatic apex in the craniocaudad dimension, using urethroscopy as a reference. Materials and Methods: Following construction of an Alpha cradle, plain radiographs of the pelvis were obtained in 15 patients with early stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate, with the tip of a urethroscope placed at the superior border of the external sphincter (which most closely approximates the prostatic apex). The scope was then withdrawn, and a retrograde urethrogram was performed. Immediately afterwards, a treatment planning CT scan of the pelvis was obtained. Since differential filling of the bladder and rectum affects the position of the prostatic apex, patients voided prior to rather than in between the 3 consecutive studies. Results: The urethroscopy-defined prostatic apex was located 28 ± 3 mm (mean ± SE) superior to the ischial tuberosities, 12 ± 1 mm (mean ± SE) superior to the urethrogram tip and 8 ± 2 mm (mean ± SE) superior to the CT-defined apex. Placement of the inferior border of the radiation portals at the ischial tuberosities would have resulted in irradiation of > 20 mm membranous and spongy urethra in all of the patients. Conclusion: Retrograde urethrograms provide more helpful information than CT scans with regard to localization of the prostatic apex and are more cost effective than sonograms or MRI scans. The prostatic apex is typically 12 mm superior to the urethrogram tip with little variability. Retrograde urethrograms allow one to spare as much urethra as possible in the radiation portals, which should theoretically reduce

  2. 4D-CT-based target volume definition in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours: Comparison with a conventional technique using individual margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, Holger; Rhein, Bernhard; Haering, Peter; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of integration of 4D-CT in the planning target volume (PTV) definition process compared to conventional PTV definition using individual margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours. Material and methods: Two different PTVs were defined: PTV conv consisting of the helical-CT-based clinical target volume (CTV) enlarged isotropically for each spatial direction by the individually measured amount of motion in the 4D-CT, and PTV 4D encompassing the CTVs defined in the 4D-CT phases displaying the extremes of the tumour position. Tumour motion as well as volumetric and dosimetric differences and relations of both PTVs were evaluated. Results: Volumetric examinations revealed a significant reduction of the mean PTV by 4D-CT from 57.7 to 40.7 cm 3 (31%) (p 4D in PTV conv (r = -0.69, 90% confidence limits: -0.87 and -0.34, p = 0.007). Mean lung dose (MLD) was decreased significantly by 17% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In SBRT of lung tumours the mere use of individual margins for target volume definition cannot compensate for the additional effects that the implementation of 4D-CT phases can offer.

  3. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  4. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T-H; Liang, C-H; Wu, J-K; Lien, C-Y; Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S; Huang, Y-H

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  5. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer. A comparison between two modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Tiina; Visapaeae, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Comprehensive Cancer Center, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland); Beule, Annette [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion. (orig.) [German] Ziel unserer Studie war es, die Umstellung der Strahlentherapieplanung des Prostatakarzinoms von CT-gestuetzter in ausschliesslich MR-gestuetzte Zieldefinition zu untersuchen. Bei 30 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom wurden eine CT und eine MRT unter Planungsbedingungen durchgefuehrt. Zwei Untersucher konturierten die Prostata in CT- und T2-gewichteten MR-Bildern. Mit Hilfe der Position von Goldstiften und der anatomischen Grenzen der Prostata wurden die CT- und MR-Bilder koregistriert. Es wurden die Genauigkeit der Koregistrierung sowie die Unterschiede der Zielvolumina und der

  6. FoCa: a modular treatment planning system for proton radiotherapy with research and educational purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D; Kondrla, M; Shaindlin, A; Carabe, A

    2014-12-07

    FoCa is an in-house modular treatment planning system, developed entirely in MATLAB, which includes forward dose calculation of proton radiotherapy plans in both active and passive modalities as well as a generic optimization suite for inverse treatment planning. The software has a dual education and research purpose. From the educational point of view, it can be an invaluable teaching tool for educating medical physicists, showing the insights of a treatment planning system from a well-known and widely accessible software platform. From the research point of view, its current and potential uses range from the fast calculation of any physical, radiobiological or clinical quantity in a patient CT geometry, to the development of new treatment modalities not yet available in commercial treatment planning systems. The physical models in FoCa were compared with the commissioning data from our institution and show an excellent agreement in depth dose distributions and longitudinal and transversal fluence profiles for both passive scattering and active scanning modalities. 3D dose distributions in phantom and patient geometries were compared with a commercial treatment planning system, yielding a gamma-index pass rate of above 94% (using FoCa's most accurate algorithm) for all cases considered. Finally, the inverse treatment planning suite was used to produce the first prototype of intensity-modulated, passive-scattered proton therapy, using 13 passive scattering proton fields and multi-leaf modulation to produce a concave dose distribution on a cylindrical solid water phantom without any field-specific compensator.

  7. A novel four-dimensional radiotherapy planning strategy from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Cohen, Patrice; Xie, Huchen; Low, Daniel; Li, Diana; Rimner, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) planning from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view (ttBEV) with reliable gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation, realistic normal tissue representation, high planning accuracy and low clinical workload, we propose and validate a novel 4D conformal planning strategy based on a synthesized 3.5D computed tomographic (3.5DCT) image with a motion-compensated tumor. To recreate patient anatomy from a ttBEV in the moving tumor coordinate system for 4DRT planning (or 4D planning), the centers of delineated GTVs in all phase CT images of 4DCT were aligned, and then the aligned CTs were averaged to produce a new 3.5DCT image. This GTV-motion-compensated CT contains a motionless target (with motion artifacts minimized) and motion-blurred normal tissues (with a realistic temporal density average). Semi-automatic threshold-based segmentation of the tumor, lung and body was applied, while manual delineation was used for other organs at risk (OARs). To validate this 3.5DCT-based 4D planning strategy, five patients with peripheral lung lesions of small size (tumor and a minor beam aperture and weighting adjustment to maintain plan conformality. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the 4DCT plan was created with two methods: one is an integrated DVH (iDVH4D), which is defined as the temporal average of all 3D-phase-plan DVHs, and the other (DVH4D) is based on the dose distribution in a reference phase CT image by dose warping from all phase plans using the displacement vector field (DVF) from a free-form deformable image registration (DIR). The DVH3.5D (for the 3.5DCT plan) was compared with both iDVH4D and DVH4D. To quantify the DVH difference between the 3.5DCT plan and the 4DCT plan, two methods were used: relative difference (%) of the areas underneath the DVH curves and the volumes receiving more than 20% (V20) and 50% (V50) of prescribed dose of these 4D plans. The volume of the delineated GTV from different phase

  8. SU-E-J-254: Utility of Pinnacle Dynamic Planning Module Utilizing Deformable Image Registration in Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jani, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose For certain highly conformal treatment techniques, changes in patient anatomy due to weight loss and/or tumor shrinkage can result in significant changes in dose distribution. Recently, the Pinnacle treatment planning system added a Dynamic Planning module utilizing Deformable Image Registration (DIR). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this software in adapting to altered anatomy and adjusting treatment plans to account for it. Methods We simulated significant tumor response by changing patient thickness and altered chin positions using a commercially-available head and neck (H and N) phantom. In addition, we studied 23 CT image sets of fifteen (15) patients with H and N tumors and eight (8) patients with prostate cancer. In each case, we applied deformable image registration through Dynamic Planning module of our Pinnacle Treatment Planning System. The dose distribution of the original CT image set was compared to the newly computed dose without altering any treatment parameter. Result was a dose if we did not adjust the plan to reflect anatomical changes. Results For the H and N phantom, a tumor response of up to 3.5 cm was correctly deformed by the Pinnacle Dynamic module. Recomputed isodose contours on new anatomies were within 1 mm of the expected distribution. The Pinnacle system configuration allowed dose computations resulting from original plans on new anatomies without leaving the planning system. Original and new doses were available side-by-side with both CT image sets. Based on DIR, about 75% of H and N patients (11/15) required a re-plan using new anatomy. Among prostate patients, the DIR predicted near-correct bladder volume in 62% of the patients (5/8). Conclusions The Dynamic Planning module of the Pinnacle system proved to be an accurate and useful tool in our ability to adapt to changes in patient anatomy during a course of radiotherapy

  9. Radiation therapy treatment planning: CT, MR imaging and three-dimensional planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichter, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy and sophistication of radiation therapy treatment planning have increased rapidly in the last decade. Currently, CT-based treatment planning is standard throughout the country. Care must be taken when CT is used for treatment planning because of clear differences between diagnostic scans and scans intended for therapeutic management. The use of CT in radiation therapy planning is discussed and illustrated. MR imaging adds another dimension to treatment planning. The ability to use MR imaging directly in treatment planning involves an additional complex set of capabilities from a treatment planning system. The ability to unwarp the geometrically distorted MR image is a first step. Three-dimensional dose calculations are important to display the dose on sagittal and acoronal sections. The ability to integrate the MR and CT images into a unified radiographic image is critical. CT and MR images are two-dimensional representations of a three-dimensional problem. Through sophisticated computer graphics techniques, radiation therapists are now able to integrate a three-dimensional image of the patient into the treatment planning process. This allows the use of noncoplanar treatment plans and a detailed analysis of tumor and normal tissue anatomy; it is the first step toward a fully conformational treatment planning system. These concepts are illustrated and future research goals outlined

  10. Literature-based recommendations for treatment planning and execution in high-dose radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senan, Suresh; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Giraud, Philippe; Mirimanoff, Rene; Budach, Volker

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: To review the literature on techniques used in high-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice and for use in research protocols. Patients and methods: A literature search was performed for articles and abstracts that were considered both clinically relevant and practical to use. The relevant information was arbitrarily categorized under the following headings: patient positioning, CT scanning, incorporating tumour mobility, definition of target volumes, radiotherapy planning, treatment delivery, and scoring of response and toxicity. Results: Recommendations were made for each of the above steps from the published literature. Although most of the recommended techniques have yet to be evaluated in multicenter clinical trials, their use in high-dose radiotherapy to the thorax appears to be rational on the basis of current evidence. Conclusions: Recommendations for the clinical implementation of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for lung tumours were identified in the literature. Procedures that are still considered to be investigational were also highlighted

  11. The Comparison 2D and 3D Treatment Planning in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy with Emphasis on Dose Homogeneity and Lung Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Falahatpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast conserving radiotherapy is one of the most common procedures performed in any radiation oncology department. A tangential parallel-opposed pair is usually used for this purpose. This technique is performed using 2D or 3D treatment planning systems. The aim of this study was to compare 2D treatment planning with 3D treatment planning in tangential irradiation in breast conserving radiotherapy. In this comparison, homogeneity of isodoses in the breast volume and lung dose were considered. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery were included in this study. The patients were CT scanned. Two-dimensional treatment planning with the Alfard 2D TPS was performed for each patient using a single central CT slice. The data used on the Alfard 2D TPS was imported into the Eclipse 3D TPS, on which 3D treatment planning was performed. Cobalt-60 beams were used in all plans. Results: Comparing 2D and 3D treatment planning, homogeneity of isodoses was improved in 3D treatment planning (p30Gy was increased in 3D treatment planning (p< 0.01. Discussion and Conclusion: 3D treatment planning is a more suitable option for patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery because of improved dose homogeneity in 3D treatment planning. The results of the treatment can be improved with reduced recurrence probability and skin problems.

  12. Dosimetric and Radiobiologic Comparison of 3D Conformal Versus Intensity Modulated Planning Techniques for Prostate Bed Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Das, Shiva; Temple, Kathy; Bynum, Sigrun; Catalano, Suzanne; Koontz, Jason I.; Montana, Gustavo S.; Oleson, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer improves biochemical and clinical disease-free survival. While comparisons in intact prostate cancer show a benefit for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal planning, this has not been studied for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT). This study compares normal tissue and target dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of IMRT vs. 3D conformal planning in the postoperative setting. 3D conformal plans were designed for 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT planning for salvage post-prostatectomy RT. The same computed tomography (CT) and target/normal structure contours, as well as prescription dose, was used for both IMRT and 3D plans. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated based on the dose given to the bladder and rectum by both plans. Dose-volume histogram and NTCP data were compared by paired t-test. Bladder and rectal sparing were improved with IMRT planning compared to 3D conformal planning. The volume of the bladder receiving at least 75% (V75) and 50% (V50) of the dose was significantly reduced by 28% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.002 and 0.037). Rectal dose was similarly reduced, V75 by 33% and V50 by 17% (p = 0.001 and 0.004). While there was no difference in the volume of rectum receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), IMRT planning significant reduced the volume receiving 40 Gy or more (V40, p = 0.009). Bladder V40 and V65 were not significantly different between planning modalities. Despite these dosimetric differences, there was no significant difference in the NTCP for either bladder or rectal injury. IMRT planning reduces the volume of bladder and rectum receiving high doses during post-prostatectomy RT. Because of relatively low doses given to the bladder and rectum, there was no statistically significant improvement in NTCP between the 3D conformal and IMRT plans.

  13. Dosimetric and radiobiologic comparison of 3D conformal versus intensity modulated planning techniques for prostate bed radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Das, Shiva; Temple, Kathy; Bynum, Sigrun; Catalano, Suzanne; Koontz, Jason I; Montana, Gustavo S; Oleson, James R

    2009-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer improves biochemical and clinical disease-free survival. While comparisons in intact prostate cancer show a benefit for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal planning, this has not been studied for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT). This study compares normal tissue and target dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of IMRT vs. 3D conformal planning in the postoperative setting. 3D conformal plans were designed for 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT planning for salvage post-prostatectomy RT. The same computed tomography (CT) and target/normal structure contours, as well as prescription dose, was used for both IMRT and 3D plans. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated based on the dose given to the bladder and rectum by both plans. Dose-volume histogram and NTCP data were compared by paired t-test. Bladder and rectal sparing were improved with IMRT planning compared to 3D conformal planning. The volume of the bladder receiving at least 75% (V75) and 50% (V50) of the dose was significantly reduced by 28% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.002 and 0.037). Rectal dose was similarly reduced, V75 by 33% and V50 by 17% (p = 0.001 and 0.004). While there was no difference in the volume of rectum receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), IMRT planning significant reduced the volume receiving 40 Gy or more (V40, p = 0.009). Bladder V40 and V65 were not significantly different between planning modalities. Despite these dosimetric differences, there was no significant difference in the NTCP for either bladder or rectal injury. IMRT planning reduces the volume of bladder and rectum receiving high doses during post-prostatectomy RT. Because of relatively low doses given to the bladder and rectum, there was no statistically significant improvement in NTCP between the 3D conformal and IMRT plans.

  14. Value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma target delineation and radiotherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Feng Yanlin

    2011-01-01

    18 F-FDG PET-CT has widely used in nasopharyngeal carcinoma diagnosis and staging in recent years, it's effecten target volume delineation has received great attention. The article lays stress on the clinical research progress of 18 F-FDG PET-CT in the radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma improve the accuracy of target delineation, reduce the difference of target delineation, guide the dose painting and boost. (authors)

  15. Inverse planning of energy-modulated electron beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, John R.; Steeves, Richard; Paliwal, Bhudatt A.

    2006-01-01

    The use of megavoltage electron beams often poses a clinical challenge in that the planning target volume (PTV) is anterior to other radiosensitive structures and has variable depth. To ensure that skin as well as the deepest extent of the PTV receives the prescribed dose entails prescribing to a point beyond the depth of peak dose for a single electron energy. This causes dose inhomogeneities and heightened potential for tissue fibrosis, scarring, and possible soft tissue necrosis. Use of bolus on the skin improves the entrant dose at the cost of decreasing the therapeutic depth that can be treated. Selection of a higher energy to improve dose homogeneity results in increased dose to structures beyond the PTV, as well as enlargement of the volume receiving heightened dose. Measured electron data from a linear accelerator was used as input to create an inverse planning tool employing energy and intensity modulation using bolus (e-IMRT TM ). Using tools readily available in a radiotherapy department, the applications of energy and intensity modulation on the central axis makes it possible to remove hot spots of 115% or more over the depths clinically encountered. The e-IMRT TM algorithm enables the development of patient-specific dose distributions with user-defined positions of peak dose, range, and reduced dose to points beyond the prescription point

  16. [Automatic Extraction and Analysis of Dosimetry Data in Radiotherapy Plans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhao, Di; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Biyun; Ma, Jun; Yu, Dahai

    To improve the efficiency and accuracy of extraction and analysis of dosimetry data in radiotherapy plans for a batch of patients. With the interface function provided in Matlab platform, a program was written to extract the dosimetry data exported from treatment planning system in DICOM RT format and exported the dose-volume data to an Excel file with the SPSS compatible format. This method was compared with manual operation for 14 gastric carcinoma patients to validate the efficiency and accuracy. The output Excel data were compatible with SPSS in format, the dosimetry data error for PTV dose interval of 90%-98%, PTV dose interval of 99%-106% and all OARs were -3.48E-5 ± 3.01E-5, -1.11E-3 ± 7.68E-4, -7.85E-5 ± 9.91E-5 respectively. Compared with manual operation, the time required was reduced from 5.3 h to 0.19 h and input error was reduced from 0.002 to 0. The automatic extraction of dosimetry data in DICOM RT format for batch patients, the SPSS compatible data exportation, quick analysis were achieved in this paper. The efficiency of clinical researches based on dosimetry data analysis of large number of patients will be improved with this methods.

  17. SU-F-J-113: Multi-Atlas Based Automatic Organ Segmentation for Lung Radiotherapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J; Han, J; Ailawadi, S; Baker, J; Hsia, A; Xu, Z; Ryu, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Normal organ segmentation is one time-consuming and labor-intensive step for lung radiotherapy treatment planning. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a multi-atlas based segmentation approach for automatic organs at risk (OAR) delineation. Methods: Fifteen Lung stereotactic body radiation therapy patients were randomly selected. Planning CT images and OAR contours of the heart - HT, aorta - AO, vena cava - VC, pulmonary trunk - PT, and esophagus – ES were exported and used as reference and atlas sets. For automatic organ delineation for a given target CT, 1) all atlas sets were deformably warped to the target CT, 2) the deformed sets were accumulated and normalized to produce organ probability density (OPD) maps, and 3) the OPD maps were converted to contours via image thresholding. Optimal threshold for each organ was empirically determined by comparing the auto-segmented contours against their respective reference contours. The delineated results were evaluated by measuring contour similarity metrics: DICE, mean distance (MD), and true detection rate (TD), where DICE=(intersection volume/sum of two volumes) and TD = {1.0 - (false positive + false negative)/2.0}. Diffeomorphic Demons algorithm was employed for CT-CT deformable image registrations. Results: Optimal thresholds were determined to be 0.53 for HT, 0.38 for AO, 0.28 for PT, 0.43 for VC, and 0.31 for ES. The mean similarity metrics (DICE[%], MD[mm], TD[%]) were (88, 3.2, 89) for HT, (79, 3.2, 82) for AO, (75, 2.7, 77) for PT, (68, 3.4, 73) for VC, and (51,2.7, 60) for ES. Conclusion: The investigated multi-atlas based approach produced reliable segmentations for the organs with large and relatively clear boundaries (HT and AO). However, the detection of small and narrow organs with diffused boundaries (ES) were challenging. Sophisticated atlas selection and multi-atlas fusion algorithms may further improve the quality of segmentations.

  18. SU-F-J-113: Multi-Atlas Based Automatic Organ Segmentation for Lung Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J; Han, J; Ailawadi, S; Baker, J; Hsia, A; Xu, Z; Ryu, S [Stony Brook University Hospital, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Normal organ segmentation is one time-consuming and labor-intensive step for lung radiotherapy treatment planning. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a multi-atlas based segmentation approach for automatic organs at risk (OAR) delineation. Methods: Fifteen Lung stereotactic body radiation therapy patients were randomly selected. Planning CT images and OAR contours of the heart - HT, aorta - AO, vena cava - VC, pulmonary trunk - PT, and esophagus – ES were exported and used as reference and atlas sets. For automatic organ delineation for a given target CT, 1) all atlas sets were deformably warped to the target CT, 2) the deformed sets were accumulated and normalized to produce organ probability density (OPD) maps, and 3) the OPD maps were converted to contours via image thresholding. Optimal threshold for each organ was empirically determined by comparing the auto-segmented contours against their respective reference contours. The delineated results were evaluated by measuring contour similarity metrics: DICE, mean distance (MD), and true detection rate (TD), where DICE=(intersection volume/sum of two volumes) and TD = {1.0 - (false positive + false negative)/2.0}. Diffeomorphic Demons algorithm was employed for CT-CT deformable image registrations. Results: Optimal thresholds were determined to be 0.53 for HT, 0.38 for AO, 0.28 for PT, 0.43 for VC, and 0.31 for ES. The mean similarity metrics (DICE[%], MD[mm], TD[%]) were (88, 3.2, 89) for HT, (79, 3.2, 82) for AO, (75, 2.7, 77) for PT, (68, 3.4, 73) for VC, and (51,2.7, 60) for ES. Conclusion: The investigated multi-atlas based approach produced reliable segmentations for the organs with large and relatively clear boundaries (HT and AO). However, the detection of small and narrow organs with diffused boundaries (ES) were challenging. Sophisticated atlas selection and multi-atlas fusion algorithms may further improve the quality of segmentations.

  19. Considerations of MCNP Monte Carlo code to be used as a radiotherapy treatment planning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, B; Miro, R; Gallardo, S; Verdu, G; Santos, A

    2005-01-01

    The present work has simulated the photon and electron transport in a Theratron 780® (MDS Nordion)60Co radiotherapy unit, using the Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle). This project explains mainly the different methodologies carried out to speedup calculations in order to apply this code efficiently in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  20. Challenges of radiotherapy: report on the 4D treatment planning workshop 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopf, Antje; Nill, Simeon; Yohannes, Indra; Graeff, Christian; Dowdell, Stephen; Kurz, Christopher; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Biegun, Aleksandra K; Lang, Stephanie; McClelland, Jamie R.; Champion, Benjamin; Fast, Martin; Wölfelschneider, Jens; Gianoli, Chiara; Rucinski, Antoni; Baroni, Guido; Richter, Christian; van de Water, Steven; Grassberger, Clemens; Weber, Damien; Poulsen, Per; Shimizu, Shinichi; Bert, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This report, compiled by experts on the treatment of mobile targets with advanced radiotherapy, summarizes the main conclusions and innovations achieved during the 4D treatment planning workshop 2013. This annual workshop focuses on research aiming to advance 4D radiotherapy treatments, including

  1. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  2. Outcome after PSMA PET/CT based radiotherapy in patients with biochemical persistence or recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Ilhan, Harun; Herlemann, Annika; Buchner, Alexander; Stief, Christian; Eze, Chukwuka; Rogowski, Paul; Li, Minglun; Bartenstein, Peter; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus

    2018-03-02

    PSMA PET/CT visualises prostate cancer residual disease or recurrence at lower PSA levels compared to conventional imaging and results in a change of treatment in a remarkable high number of patients. Radiotherapy with dose escalation to the former prostate bed has been associated with improved biochemical recurrence-free survival. Thus, it can be hypothesised that PSMA PET/CT-based radiotherapy might improve the prognosis of these patients. One hundred twenty-nine patients underwent PSMA PET/CT due to biochemical persistence (52%) or recurrence (48%) after radical prostatectomy without evidence of distant metastases (February 2014-May 2017) and received PSMA PET/CT-based radiotherapy. Biochemical recurrence free survival (PSA ≤ 0.2 ng/ml) was defined as the study endpoint. Patients with biochemical persistence were significantly more often high-risk patients with significantly shorter time interval before PSMA PET/CT than patients with biochemical recurrence. Patients with biochemical recurrence had significantly more often no evidence of disease or local recurrence only in PSMA PET/CT, whereas patients with biochemical persistence had significantly more often lymph node involvement. Seventy-three patients were started on antiandrogen therapy prior to radiotherapy due to macroscopic disease in PSMA PET/CT. Cumulatively, 70 (66-70.6) Gy was delivered to local macroscopic tumor, 66 (63-66) Gy to the prostate fossa, 61.6 (53.2-66) Gy to PET-positive lymph nodes and 50.4 (45-52.3) Gy to lymphatic pathways. Median PSA after radiotherapy was 0.07 ng/ml with 74% of patients having a PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/ml. After a median follow-up of 20 months, median PSA was 0.07 ng/ml with ongoing antiandrogen therapy in 30 patients. PET-positive patients without antiandrogen therapy at last follow-up (45 patients) had a median PSA of 0.05 ng/ml with 89% of all patients, 94% of patients with biochemical recurrence and 82% of patients with biochemical persistence having a

  3. Safety Improvement in Radiotherapy Treatment Plan. Planning vs Redundant Check vs in vivo Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Diaz, J.; Ascencion Ybarra, Y.; La Fuentes Rosales, L. de; Lara Mas, E.; Larrinaga Cortinas, E.

    2013-01-01

    In Cuba it is mandatory to have an independent monitor units check before any radiotherapy treatment is started. The main objective of this paper is to enhance the safety of the radiotherapy planning by developing and testing a practical tool to double check the monitor units calculation for external beam high energy photon therapy. A software for monitor units (MUs) verification was designed and coded. It considers the common in clinical practice isocentric set-ups. The in vivo dosimetry measurements were done with a silicon diode system for 6 MV photon beams to support the validation of the software. The results show a discrepancy within 5% between the 3 methods which is in accordance with international recommendations. (Author)

  4. New customized patient repositioning system for use in three dimensional (3D) treatment planning and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Toshihiro; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Takekawa, Naomitu; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To develop a safe and easy method for customized patient repositioning and immobilization prior to 3-D treatment planning and during precise radiotherapy. Materials and methods: The new material consists of impression material, and covering material to fix and hold the impression. The impression material is composed of numerous effervescent polystyrene beads (3.1 mm in diameter) coated by polymerizing substance, urethane prepolymer. When being wet, the material beads adhere to each other due to polymelization, and it is hardened in 5 to 10 minutes. Within one hour the mold is sufficiently dry to be used for treatment planning utilizing computed tomography(CT). The physical characteristics of the material, the subjective comfort of the patient, the reduction in time required for repositioning in the treatment of the head and neck tumors, and the reduction in patient movement in the treatment of the breast cancers were investigated. Results: During the hardening stage, the maximum temperature of the material was 33 deg. C. Non-toxic CO 2 gas was produced and evaporated from the covering fabric. The mold, with a density of 0.095, was strong enough to endure compression, flexure, and scratching. In the healthy volunteers, no sensitivity to the skin was observed after 12 hours' attachment to the skin. The CT number of the material was less than minus 800, and no build-up effect was demonstrated in megavoltage photon therapy. Various molds were made and used as neck rest adjunctive to thermoplastic face mask, whole body cast, and arm rest (Figure). A questionnaire survey administered to 59 patients with brain, head and neck tumors, and to 18 patients with breast cancers, revealed that subjective comfort was markedly improved (90.9%) of improved (9.1%) by virtue of the new material. In the treatment of head and neck tumors, the mean time and SD for repositioning were 61.1 ± 13.6 seconds with the ready-made neck-rest and 49.4 ± 8.4 seconds with the

  5. Computational tools for the construction of calibration curves for use in dose calculations in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Alex C.H.; Vieira, Jose W.; Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco , Recife, PE

    2011-01-01

    The realization of tissue inhomogeneity corrections in image-based treatment planning improves the accuracy of radiation dose calculations for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy. Before the tissue inhomogeneity correction can be applied, the relationship between the computed tomography (CT) numbers and density must be established. This relationship is typically established by a calibration curve empirically obtained from CT images of a phantom that has several inserts of tissue-equivalent materials, covering a wide range of densities. This calibration curve is scanner-dependent and allows the conversion of CT numbers in densities for use in dose calculations. This paper describes the implementation of computational tools necessary to construct calibration curves. These tools are used for reading and displaying of CT images in DICOM format, determination of the mean CT numbers (and their standard deviations) of each tissue-equivalent material and construction of calibration curves by fits with bilinear equations. All these tools have been implemented in the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 in C≠ programming language. (author)

  6. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, T.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  7. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, T. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  8. Implementation of single-breath-hold cone beam CT guided hypofraction radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Renming; Lu, You; Wang, Jin; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Feng; Liu, Li; Zhou, Jidan; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Nianyong; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the feasibility of active breath control (ABC), the lung tumor reproducibility and the rationale for single-breath-hold cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided hypofraction radiotherapy. Single-breath-hold CBCT images were acquired using ABC in a cohort of 83 lung cancer patients (95 tumors) treated with hypofraction radiotherapy. For all alignments between the reference CT and CBCT images (including the pre-correction, post-correction and post-treatment CBCT images), the tumor reproducibility was evaluated via online manual alignment of the tumors, and the vertebral bone uncertainties were evaluated via offline manual alignment of the vertebral bones. The difference between the tumor reproducibility and the vertebral bone uncertainty represents the change in the tumor position relative to the vertebral bone. The relative tumor positions along the coronal, sagittal and transverse axes were measured based on the reference CT image. The correlations between the vertebral bone uncertainty, the relative tumor position, the total treatment time and the tumor reproducibility were evaluated using the Pearson correlations. Pre-correction, the systematic/random errors of tumor reproducibility were 4.5/2.6 (medial-lateral, ML), 5.1/4.8 (cranial-caudal, CC) and 4.0/3.6 mm (anterior-posterior, AP). These errors were significantly decreased to within 3 mm, both post-correction and post-treatment. The corresponding PTV margins were 4.7 (ML), 7.4 (CC) and 5.4 (AP) mm. The changes in the tumor position relative to the vertebral bone displayed systematic/random errors of 2.2/2.0 (ML), 4.1/4.4 (CC) and 3.1/3.3 (AP) mm. The uncertainty of the vertebral bone significantly correlated to the reproducibility of the tumor position (P < 0.05), except in the CC direction post-treatment. However, no significant correlation was detected between the relative tumor position, the total treatment time and the tumor reproducibility (P > 0.05). Using ABC for single-breath-hold CBCT guidance is an

  9. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N P; Björk-Eriksson, T; Birk Christensen, C; Kiil-Berthelsen, A; Aznar, M C; Hollensen, C; Markova, E; Munck af Rosenschöld, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of including fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in the planning of paediatric radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Target volumes were first delineated without and subsequently re-delineated with access to 18F-FDG PET scan information, on duplicate CT sets. RT plans were generated for three-dimensional conformal photon RT (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The results were evaluated by comparison of target volumes, target dose coverage parameters, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). Results: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target volumes, target dose coverage, irradiated volumes, estimated NTCP or SC risk, neither for IMPT nor 3DCRT. Conclusion: Our results imply that the inclusion of PET/CT scans in the RT planning process could have considerable impact for individual patients. There were no general trends of increasing or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. Advances in knowledge: 18F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11 patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT. PMID:25494657

  10. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    CT (CBCT) can be used for MRI-only image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and for verifying the correctness of the corresponding pCT. Material and methods. Six patients receiving palliative cranial RT were included in the study. Each patient had three-dimensional (3D) T1W MRI, a CBCT and a CT for reference...

  11. Comparison study of portable bladder scanner versus cone-beam CT scan for measuring bladder volumes in post-prostatectomy patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, K A; White, R; Mathlum, M; Mak-Hau, V; Lynch, R

    2014-01-01

    In post-prostatectomy radiotherapy to the prostatic bed, consistent bladder volume is essential to maintain the position of treatment target volume. We assessed the differences between bladder volume readings from a portable bladder scanner (BS-V) and those obtained from planning CT (CT-V) or cone-beam CT (CBCT-V). Interfraction bladder volume variation was also determined. BS-V was recorded before and after planning CT or CBCT. The percentage differences between the readings using the two imaging modalities, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals were determined. Data were analysed for the whole patient cohort and separately for the older BladderScan™ BVI3000 and newer BVI9400 model. Interfraction bladder volume variation was determined from the percentage difference between the CT-V and CBCT-V. Treatment duration, incorporating the time needed for BS and CBCT, was recorded. Fourteen patients were enrolled, producing 133 data sets for analysis. BS-V was taken using the BVI9400 in four patients (43 data sets). The mean BS-V was 253.2 mL, and the mean CT-V or CBCT-V was 199 cm(3). The mean percentage difference between the two modalities was 19.7% (SD 42.2; 95%CI 12.4 to 26.9). The BVI9400 model produced more consistent readings, with a mean percentage difference of -6.2% (SD 27.8; 95% CI -14.7 to -2.4%). The mean percentage difference between CT-V and CBCT-V was 31.3% (range -48% to 199.4%). Treatment duration from time of first BS reading to CBCT was, on average, 12 min (range 6-27). The BS produces bladder volume readings of an average 19.7% difference from CT-V or CBCT-V and can potentially be used to screen for large interfraction bladder volume variations in radiotherapy to prostatic bed. The observed interfraction bladder volume variation suggests the need to improve bladder volume consistency. Incorporating the BS into practice is feasible. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. Comparison study of portable bladder scanner versus cone-beam CT scan for measuring bladder volumes in post-prostatectomy patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung, K.A.; White, R.; Mathlum, M.; Lynch, R.; Mak-Hau, V.

    2014-01-01

    In post-prostatectomy radiotherapy to the prostatic bed, consistent bladder volume is essential to maintain the position of treatment target volume. We assessed the differences between bladder volume readings from a portable bladder scanner (BS-V) and those obtained from planning CT (CT-V) or cone-beam CT (CBCT-V). Interfraction bladder volume variation was also determined. BS-V was recorded before and after planning CT or CBCT. The percentage differences between the readings using the two imaging modalities, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals were determined. Data were analysed for the whole patient cohort and separately for the older BladderScan™ BVI3000 and newer BVI9400 model. Interfraction bladder volume variation was determined from the percentage difference between the CT-V and CBCT-V. Treatment duration, incorporating the time needed for BS and CBCT, was recorded. Fourteen patients were enrolled, producing 133 data sets for analysis. BS-V was taken using the BVI9400 in four patients (43 data sets). The mean BS-V was 253.2mL, and the mean CT-V or CBCT-V was 199cm3. The mean percentage difference between the two modalities was 19.7% (SD 42.2; 95%CI 12.4 to 26.9). The BVI9400 model produced more consistent readings, with a mean percentage difference of −6.2% (SD 27.8; 95% CI −14.7 to −2.4%). The mean percentage difference between CT-V and CBCT-V was 31.3% (range −48% to 199.4%). Treatment duration from time of first BS reading to CBCT was, on average, 12min (range 6–27). The BS produces bladder volume readings of an average 19.7% difference from CT-V or CBCT-V and can potentially be used to screen for large interfraction bladder volume variations in radiotherapy to prostatic bed. The observed interfraction bladder volume variation suggests the need to improve bladder volume consistency. Incorporating the BS into practice is feasible.

  13. Validation of Fully Automated VMAT Plan Generation for Library-Based Plan-of-the-Day Cervical Cancer Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter W. J.; Heijkoop, Sabrina T.; Mens, Jan-Willem M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To develop and validate fully automated generation of VMAT plan-libraries for plan-of-the-day adaptive radiotherapy in locally-advanced cervical cancer. Material and Methods: Our framework for fully automated treatment plan generation (Erasmus-iCycle) was adapted to create dual-arc VMAT treatment plan libraries for cervical cancer patients. For each of 34 patients, automatically generated VMAT plans (autoVMAT) were compared to manually generated, clinically delivered 9-be...

  14. Linear programming based on neural networks for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingen Wu; Limin Luo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a neural network model for linear programming that is designed to optimize radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). This kind of neural network can be easily implemented by using a kind of 'neural' electronic system in order to obtain an optimization solution in real time. We first give an introduction to the RTP problem and construct a non-constraint objective function for the neural network model. We adopt a gradient algorithm to minimize the objective function and design the structure of the neural network for RTP. Compared to traditional linear programming methods, this neural network model can reduce the time needed for convergence, the size of problems (i.e., the number of variables to be searched) and the number of extra slack and surplus variables needed. We obtained a set of optimized beam weights that result in a better dose distribution as compared to that obtained using the simplex algorithm under the same initial condition. The example presented in this paper shows that this model is feasible in three-dimensional RTP. (author)

  15. Incremental clinical value of a dedicated RT planning FDG PET-CT over staging PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Som, S.; Vinod, S.; Lin, M.; Shon, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To evaluate whether FDG-PET performed for radiotherapy planning can detect disease progression, compared with staging PET. Methods: Thirteen patients underwent a planning PET-CT for curative RT ( R T-PET ) within eight weeks of a staging PET-CT for newly diagnosed NSCLC between 10/2007 and 1/2009. All studies were acquired on a Philips GXL PET-CT using the same protocols, except RT-PET is acquired on a RT flat bed. The images were interpreted by consensus readings of two physicians: location/number, visual grading (0-4:3> liver, 4>brain), max transverse diameter ( M ax D ) (tumour margin is delineated by a SUV threshold of 2.5) and max SUV of each lesion. Progressive disease (PD) is defined as >10% increase in max D. Results: RT-PET detected PD (primary or nodal) or new metastases in 8 pts (61%) (mean interval:30.2±14 days, range:7-54 days). For primary tumour, RT-PET detected PD in 5 pts (range: 12-32% increase in max D and 12-39% increase in SUV) and RT-CT detected PD in 3 pts (11-21% increase in max D, paired t test: p = 0.19). Stage-PET detected 28 mediastinal/hilar nodal sites. RT-PET detected PD in 11 of these lesions in 4 pts (31%) and CT detected similar progression in 8 lesions in 2 pts. RT-PET detected 10 new lesions in 3 pts (23%) resulting in upstaging to N3 in 2 pts (supraclavicular and hilar nodes) and M1 in 1 pt (bone). Conclusion: A dedicated RT PET-CT has the potential to detect disease progression and impact on RT planning in a large number of patients.

  16. SU-E-J-267: Weekly Volumetric and Dosimetric Changes in Adaptive Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell-Lung Cancer Using 4D CT and Gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z; Shang, Q; Xiong, F; Zhang, X; Zhang, Q; Fu, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study was to evaluate the significance of weekly imageguided patient setup and to assess the volumetric and dosimetric changes in no-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with adaptive conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 9 NSCLC patients treated with 3D CRT underwent 4D CT-on-rail every five fractions. ITV was generated from three phases of the 4DCT (the end of exhalation, 25% before and after the end of exhalation). The margin of ITV to PTV is 5mm. 6 weekly CTs were acquired for each patient. The weekly CTs were fused with the planning CT by vertebrae. The couch shift was recorded for each weekly CT to evaluate the setup error. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on weekly CT images by a physician. Beams from the original plans were applied to weekly CTs to calculate the delivered doses. All patients underwent replanning after 20 fractions. Results: Among the total 54 CTs, the average setup error was 2.0± 1.7, 2.6± 2.1, 2.7± 2.2 mm in X, Y, and Z direction, respectively. The average volume of the primary GTV was reduced from 42.45 cc to 22.78 cc (47.04%) after 6 weeks. The maximal volume regression occurred between 15 and 20 fractions. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) reduced the V20 and V5 of the lung by 33.5% and 16.89%, respectively. ART also reduced Dmean and D1/3 of the heart by 31.7% and 32.32%, respectively. Dmax of the spinal cord did not vary much during the treatment course. Conclusion: 5 mm margin is sufficient for 4D weekly CTguided radiotherapy in lung cancer. Tumor regression was observed in the majority of patients. ART significantly reduced the OARs dose. Our preliminary results indicated that an off-line ART approach is appropriate in clinical practice

  17. SU-F-BRF-10: Deformable MRI to CT Validation Employing Same Day Planning MRI for Surrogate Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padgett, K; Stoyanova, R; Johnson, P; Dogan, N; Pollack, A [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Piper, J; Javorek, A [MIM Software, Inc., Beachwood, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare rigid and deformable registrations of the prostate in the multi-modality setting (diagnostic-MRI to planning-CT) by utilizing a planning-MRI as a surrogate. The surrogate allows for the direct quantitative analysis which can be difficult in the multi-modality domain where intensity mapping differs. Methods: For ten subjects, T2 fast-spin-echo images were acquired at two different time points, the first several weeks prior to planning (diagnostic-MRI) and the second on the same day in which the planning CT was collected (planning-MRI). Significant effort in patient positioning and bowel/bladder preparation was undertaken to minimize distortion of the prostate in all datasets. The diagnostic-MRI was deformed to the planning-CT utilizing a commercially available deformable registration algorithm synthesized from local registrations. The deformed MRI was then rigidly aligned to the planning MRI which was used as the surrogate for the planning-CT. Agreement between the two MRI datasets was scored using intensity based metrics including Pearson correlation and normalized mutual information, NMI. A local analysis was performed by looking only within the prostate, proximal seminal vesicles, penile bulb and combined areas. A similar method was used to assess a rigid registration between the diagnostic-MRI and planning-CT. Results: Utilizing the NMI, the deformable registrations were superior to the rigid registrations in 9 of 10 cases demonstrating a 15.94% improvement (p-value < 0.001) within the combined area. The Pearson correlation showed similar results with the deformable registration superior in the same number of cases and demonstrating a 6.97% improvement (p-value <0.011). Conclusion: Validating deformable multi-modality registrations using spatial intensity based metrics is difficult due to the inherent differences in intensity mapping. This population provides an ideal testing ground for MRI to CT deformable registrations by obviating the need

  18. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  19. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  20. Pelvic insufficiency fracture after radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer in the era of PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Shin Hyung; Kim, Jae Chul; Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    To determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) in patients with cervical cancer. Between July 2004 and August 2009, 235 patients with non-metastatic cervical cancer were treated with definitive chemoradiation or postoperative radiotherapy. Among 235 patients, 117 (49.8%) underwent the first positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) within 1 year after radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 55 Gy (range, 45 to 60 Gy). Medical charts and imaging studies, including PET/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT, bone scintigraphy were reviewed to evaluate the patients with PIF. Among 235 patients, 16 developed PIF. The 5-year detection rate of PIF was 9.5%. The 5-year detection rate of PIF in patients who underwent the first PET/CT within a year was 15.6%. The median time to development of PIF was 12.5 months (range, 5 to 30 months). The sites of fracture included 12 sacroiliac joints, 3 pubic rami, 3 iliac bones, and 1 femoral neck. Eleven of 16 patients having PIF complained of hip pain requiring medications. One patient required hospitalization for pain control. The significant risk factors of PIF were old age, body mass index less than 23, bone mineral density less than -3.5 SD, and the first PET/CT within a year after radiotherapy. Radiation dose and concurrent chemotherapy had no impact on PIF rate. PIFs were not rare after pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients in the era of PET/CT. Timely diagnosis and management of PIF can improve quality of life in patients with cervical cancer, in addition to reducing unnecessary medical expenses.

  1. Pelvic insufficiency fracture after radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer in the era of PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Shin Hyung; Kim, Jae Chul; Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, In Kyu

    2011-01-01

    To determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) in patients with cervical cancer. Between July 2004 and August 2009, 235 patients with non-metastatic cervical cancer were treated with definitive chemoradiation or postoperative radiotherapy. Among 235 patients, 117 (49.8%) underwent the first positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) within 1 year after radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 55 Gy (range, 45 to 60 Gy). Medical charts and imaging studies, including PET/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT, bone scintigraphy were reviewed to evaluate the patients with PIF. Among 235 patients, 16 developed PIF. The 5-year detection rate of PIF was 9.5%. The 5-year detection rate of PIF in patients who underwent the first PET/CT within a year was 15.6%. The median time to development of PIF was 12.5 months (range, 5 to 30 months). The sites of fracture included 12 sacroiliac joints, 3 pubic rami, 3 iliac bones, and 1 femoral neck. Eleven of 16 patients having PIF complained of hip pain requiring medications. One patient required hospitalization for pain control. The significant risk factors of PIF were old age, body mass index less than 23, bone mineral density less than -3.5 SD, and the first PET/CT within a year after radiotherapy. Radiation dose and concurrent chemotherapy had no impact on PIF rate. PIFs were not rare after pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients in the era of PET/CT. Timely diagnosis and management of PIF can improve quality of life in patients with cervical cancer, in addition to reducing unnecessary medical expenses.

  2. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  3. Enable dosimetric of the Stereotactic Body Frame from Elekta in treatment planning systems for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Perez, Y.; Caballero Pinelo, R.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the commissioning of a stereotactic body frame (SBF ® , Elekta) professional treatment planning systems (TPS) model Elekta's PrecisePlan ® and ERGO++®, for highly foxused delivery of megavoltage photon beams intended for treating tumors located in the thorax and abdominal region. For this purpose we applicated a dedicate stereotactic body frame (SBF ® , Elekta) intended for high precision radiotherapy in extra-cranial located tumors was studied. Issues associated with their implementation in the TPSs were evaluated comparing the dose calculations in two studies of CT under different conditions. an anthropomorphic thorax phantom, model CIRS Thorax IMRT ® , was used in designing several test cases. Ion chamber measurement was permormed in selected points in the phantom, for comparison purposes with dose calculated by the treatment planning systems. The commissioning of the stereotactic body frame (SBF ® , Elekta) and the stereotactic localization was verified, including the dose calculation verification in presence the SBF. The attenuation factors measured for the SBF were obtained and corrected in the TPS PrecisePlan ® , the biggest discrepancies obtained were ∼5% for the oblique sectors (inferior corners), because the minimum permissible value for the software is 0.95 while the real value measured was 0.898. It was studied the SBF, their components and their interference in depth with the photon beams and their implementation in the TPS. The introduction of the correction factors demonstrated to be effective to reduce the eventual errors of dose calculation in the TPS . (Author)

  4. Clinical variability of target volume description and treatment plans in conformal radiotherapy in muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logue, John P; Sharrock, Carole L; Cowan, Richard A.; Read, Graham; Marrs, Julie; Mott, David

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The delineation of tumor and the production of a treatment plan to encompass this is the prime step in radiotherapy planning. Conformal radiotherapy is developing rapidly and although plentiful research has addressed the implementation of the radiotherapy prescription, scant attention has been made to the fundamental step of production, by the clinician, of an appropriate target volume. As part of an ongoing randomized trial of conformal radiotherapy, in bladder cancer, we have therefore assessed the interphysician variability of radiologists and radiation oncologists (RO) in assessing Gross Tumor Volume(GTV) (ICRU 50) and the adherence of the radiation oncologists to the study protocol of producing a Planning Target Volume (PTV). Materials and Methods: Four patients with T3 carcinoma of bladder who had been entered into the trial were identified. The clinical details, MR scans and CT scans were made available. Eight RO and 3 dedicated diagnostic oncology radiologists were invited to directly outline the GTV onto CT images on a planning computer consul. The RO in addition created a PTV following the trial protocol of 15mm margin around the GTV. Three RO sub-specialized in Urological radiotherapy; all RO had completed training. Volumes were produced, for each clinician, and comparison of these volumes and their isocenters were analyzed. In addition the margins allowed were measured and compared. Results: There was a maximum variation ratio (largest to smallest volume outlined) of the GTV in the four cases of 1.74 among radiologists and 3.74 among oncologists. There was a significant difference (p=0.01) in mean GTV between RO and the radiologists. The mean GTV of the RO exceeded the radiologists by a factor of 1.29 with a mean difference of 13.4 cm 3 The between observer variance within speciality comprised only 9.9% of the total variance in the data having accounted for case and observers speciality. The variation ratio in PTV among oncologists

  5. Olfactory neuroblastoma: the long-term outcome and late toxicity of multimodal therapy including radiotherapy based on treatment planning using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takashi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Koichi; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Homma, Akihiro; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare tumor originating from olfactory epithelium. Here we retrospectively analyzed the long-term treatment outcomes and toxicity of radiotherapy for ONB patients for whom computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional treatment planning was conducted to reappraise the role of radiotherapy in the light of recent advanced technology and chemotherapy. Seventeen patients with ONB treated between July 1992 and June 2013 were included. Three patients were Kadish stage B and 14 were stage C. All patients were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery or chemotherapy. The radiation dose was distributed from 50 Gy to 66 Gy except for one patient who received 40 Gy preoperatively. The median follow-up time was 95 months (range 8–173 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were estimated at 88% and 74%, respectively. Five patients with stage C disease had recurrence with the median time to recurrence of 59 months (range 7–115 months). Late adverse events equal to or above Grade 2 in CTCAE v4.03 were observed in three patients. Multimodal therapy including radiotherapy with precise treatment planning based on CT simulation achieved an excellent local control rate with acceptable toxicity and reasonable overall survival for patients with ONB

  6. Evaluation of the role of 18FDG-PET/CT in radiotherapy target definition in patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, Katie L; Partridge, Mike; Cook, Gary; Sharma, Bhupinder; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Background and purpose. As techniques for radiotherapy delivery have developed, increasingly accurate localisation of disease is demanded. Functional imaging, particularly PET and its fusion with anatomical modalities, such as PET/CT, promises to improve detection and characterisation of disease. This study evaluated the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on radiotherapy target volume definition in head and neck cancer (HNC). Materials and methods. The PET/CT scans of patients with HNC were used in a radiotherapy planning (RTP) study. The gross tumour volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were defined conventionally and compared to those defined using the PET/CT. Data were reported as the median value with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Eighteen patients were consented, 9 had known primary tumour site, 9 presented as unknown primary. In nine cases where the primary site was known, the combined primary and nodal GTV (GTVp+n) increased by a median of 6.1cm3 (2.6, 12.2) or 78% (18, 313), p=0.008 with CTV increasing by a median of 10.1cm3 (1.3, 30.6) or 4% (0, 13) p=0.012. In 9 cases of unknown primary the GTVp+n increased by a median 6.3cm3 (0.2, 15.7) or 61% (4, 210), p=0.012, with CTV increasing by a median 155.4cm3 (2.7, 281.7) or 95% (1, 137), p=0.008. Conclusion. 18FDG-PET revealed disease lying outside the conventional target volume, either extending a known area or highlighting a previously unknown area of disease, including the primary tumour in 5 cases. We recommend PET/CT in the RTP of all cases of unknown primary. In patients with a known primary, although the change in volume was statistically significant the clinical impact is less clear. 18FDG-PET can also show areas within the conventional target volume that are hypermetabolic which may be possible biological target volumes for dose escalation studies in the future

  7. Upright 3D Treatment Planning Using a Vertical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Anand P.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Kirk, Michael C.; Chen, Sea S.; Kroc, Thomas K.; Zusag, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we describe a novel technique used to plan and administer external beam radiation therapy to a patient in the upright position. A patient required reirradiation for thymic carcinoma but was unable to tolerate the supine position due to bilateral phrenic nerve injury and paralysis of the diaphragm. Computed tomography (CT) images in the upright position were acquired at the Northern Illinois University Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab. The CT data were imported into a standard 3-dimensional (3D) treatment planning system. Treatment was designed to deliver 24 Gy to the target volume while respecting normal tissue tolerances. A custom chair that locked into the treatment table indexing system was constructed for immobilization, and port films verified the reproducibility of setup. Radiation was administered using mixed photon and electron AP fields

  8. Volumetric visualization of head and neck CT data for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jean S.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Chen, George T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the utility of volume rendering, an alternative visualization technique to surface rendering, in the practice of CT based radiotherapy planning for the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Rendo-avs, a volume visualization tool developed at the University of Chicago, was used to volume render head and neck CT scans from two cases. Rendo-avs is a volume rendering tool operating within the graphical user interface environment of AVS (Application Visualization System). Users adjust the opacity of various tissues by defining the opacity transfer function (OTF), a function which preclassifies voxels by opacity prior to rendering. By defining the opacity map (OTF), the user selectively enhances and suppresses structures of various intensity. Additional graphics tools are available within the AVS network, allowing for the manipulation of perspective, field of view, data orientation. Users may draw directly on volume rendered images, create a partial surface, and thereby correlate objects in the 3D scene to points on original axial slices. Information in volume rendered images is mapped into the original CT slices via a Z buffer, which contains the depth information (Z coordinate) for each pixel in the rendered view. Locally developed software was used to project conventionally designed GTV contours onto volume rendered images. Results: The lymph nodes, salivary glands, vessels, and airway are visualized in detail without prior manual segmentation. Volume rendering can be used to explore the finer anatomic structures that appear on consecutive axial slices as 'points'. Rendo-avs allowed for acceptable interactivity, with a processing time of approximately 5 seconds per 256 x 256 pixel output image. Conclusions: Volume rendering is a useful alternative to surface rendering, offering high-quality visualization, 3D anatomic delineation, and time savings to the user, due to the elimination of manual segmentation as a preprocessing step. Volume rendered

  9. A semiautomatic tool for prostate segmentation in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Jörn; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Tømmerås, Veronika Kristine; Marienhagen, Kirsten; Godtliebsen, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Delineation of the target volume is a time-consuming task in radiotherapy treatment planning, yet essential for a successful treatment of cancers such as prostate cancer. To facilitate the delineation procedure, the paper proposes an intuitive approach for 3D modeling of the prostate by slice-wise best fitting ellipses. The proposed estimate is initialized by the definition of a few control points in a new patient. The method is not restricted to particular image modalities but assumes a smooth shape with elliptic cross sections of the object. A training data set of 23 patients was used to calculate a prior shape model. The mean shape model was evaluated based on the manual contour of 10 test patients. The patient records of training and test data are based on axial T1-weighted 3D fast-field echo (FFE) sequences. The manual contours were considered as the reference model. Volume overlap (Vo), accuracy (Ac) (both ratio, range 0-1, optimal value 1) and Hausdorff distance (HD) (mm, optimal value 0) were calculated as evaluation parameters. The median and median absolute deviation (MAD) between manual delineation and deformed mean best fitting ellipses (MBFE) was Vo (0.9 ± 0.02), Ac (0.81 ± 0.03) and HD (4.05 ± 1.3)mm and between manual delineation and best fitting ellipses (BFE) was Vo (0.96 ± 0.01), Ac (0.92 ± 0.01) and HD (1.6 ± 0.27)mm. Additional results show a moderate improvement of the MBFE results after Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) method. The results emphasize the potential of the proposed method of modeling the prostate by best fitting ellipses. It shows the robustness and reproducibility of the model. A small sample test on 8 patients suggest possible time saving using the model

  10. Comparative evaluation of 11C-MET PET-CT and MRI for GTV delineation in precision radiotherapy for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ru; Qian Liting; Wang Shicun; Liu Wei; Luo Wenguang; Zhang Hongbo; Li Guanghu; Hu Zhigang; Liu Lei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the difference between MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in the precision radiotherapy for gliomas. Methods: Six patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gliomas were selected for target delineation. Five physicians in our department were called to delineate the GTV based on the preoperative MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT images of these patients. The GTVs based on the two methods were compared. Results: There was no significant difference between the GTVs based on MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT (P=0.917), and their coefficients of variation were also similar (P=0.600). The coincidences of GTVs were different among the patients, with a maximum value of 73.0% and a minimum value of 51.8%. GTV showed no significant difference when defined by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT (P=0.709); the biggest difference was 27.66 cm 3 on PET-CT and 40.37 cm 3 on MRI. Conclusions: The boundaries of gliomas defined on MRI and PET-CT are different. The GTVs delineated by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT are similar, and the biggest difference on PET-CT is smaller than that on MRI, which suggests that 11 C-MET PET-CT is a more direct way for displaying GTV. (authors)

  11. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  12. Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online

  13. Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang [Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou (China) and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou 510510 (China); Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online

  14. Fast shading correction for cone beam CT in radiation therapy via sparse sampling on planning CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linxi; Tsui, Tiffany; Wei, Jikun; Zhu, Lei

    2017-05-01

    The image quality of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is limited by severe shading artifacts, hindering its quantitative applications in radiation therapy. In this work, we propose an image-domain shading correction method using planning CT (pCT) as prior information which is highly adaptive to clinical environment. We propose to perform shading correction via sparse sampling on pCT. The method starts with a coarse mapping between the first-pass CBCT images obtained from the Varian TrueBeam system and the pCT. The scatter correction method embedded in the Varian commercial software removes some image errors but the CBCT images still contain severe shading artifacts. The difference images between the mapped pCT and the CBCT are considered as shading errors, but only sparse shading samples are selected for correction using empirical constraints to avoid carrying over false information from pCT. A Fourier-Transform-based technique, referred to as local filtration, is proposed to efficiently process the sparse data for effective shading correction. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on one anthropomorphic pelvis phantom and 17 patients, who were scheduled for radiation therapy. (The codes of the proposed method and sample data can be downloaded from https://sites.google.com/view/linxicbct) RESULTS: The proposed shading correction substantially improves the CBCT image quality on both the phantom and the patients to a level close to that of the pCT images. On the phantom, the spatial nonuniformity (SNU) difference between CBCT and pCT is reduced from 74 to 1 HU. The root of mean square difference of SNU between CBCT and pCT is reduced from 83 to 10 HU on the pelvis patients, and from 101 to 12 HU on the thorax patients. The robustness of the proposed shading correction is fully investigated with simulated registration errors between CBCT and pCT on the phantom and mis-registration on patients. The sparse sampling scheme of our method successfully

  15. FDG-PET-based radiotherapy planning in lung cancer. Optimum breathing protocol and patient positioning - an intraindividual comparison; FDG-PET-basierte Bestrahlungsplanung von nicht kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinomen. Optimales Atemprotokoll und Patientenpositionierung - ein intraindividueller Vergleich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grgic, A.; Schaefer-Schuler, A.; Kirsch, C.M.; Hellwig, D. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Nestle, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Kremp, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2008-12-15

    FDG-PET and PET / CT is increasingly used for radiotherapy (RT) planning in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The planning process is often based on separately-acquired FDG-PET / CT and planning CT. We compared intraindividual differences between PET acquired in diagnostic and radiotherapy treatment position coregistered with planning CTs acquired using different breathing protocols. Sixteen patients with NSCLC underwent two PET acquisitions (diagnostic position-D-PET, radiotherapy position-RT-PET) and three planning-CT acquisitions (expiration-EXP, inspiration-INS, mid-breathhold-MID) on the same day. All scans were rigidly coregistered resulting in six fused datasets: D-INS, D-EXP, D-MID, RT-INS, RT-EXP and RT-MID. Fusion accuracy was assessed by three readers at eight anatomical landmarks: lung apices, aortic arch, heart, spine, sternum, carina, diaphragm and tumor using an alignment score ranging from 1 (no alignment) to 5 (exact alignment). RT-PET showed better alignment with any CT than D-PET (p < 0.001). With regard to breathing, RT-MID showed the best mean alignment score (3.7 {+-} 1.0) followed by RT-EXP (3.5 {+-} 0.9) and RT-INS (3.0 {+-} 0.8), all differences being significant (p < 0.001). Comparing the alignment scores with regard to anatomical landmarks, the largest deviations were found at diaphragm, heart and apices. Overall, there was a fair agreement (? = 0.48; p < 0.001) among the three readers. Significantly better fusion of PET and planning-CT can be reached with PET acquired in RT-position. The best intraindividual fusion results are obtained with the planning-CT performed during mid-breathhold. Our data justify the acquisition of a separate planning-PET in RT-treatment position if only a diagnostic PET-scan is available. (orig.)

  16. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivula, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  17. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Lauri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 180, Helsinki 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  18. Use of PET and PET/CT for Radiation Therapy Planning: IAEA expert report 2006-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacManus, Michael; Nestle, Ursula; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Carrio, Ignasi; Messa, Cristina; Belohlavek, Otakar; Danna, Massimo; Inoue, Tomio; Deniaud-Alexandre, Elizabeth; Schipani, Stefano; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Dondi, Maurizio; Jeremic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a significant advance in cancer imaging with great potential for optimizing radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning and thereby improving outcomes for patients. The use of PET and PET/CT in RT planning was reviewed by an international panel. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized two synchronized and overlapping consultants' meetings with experts from different regions of the world in Vienna in July 2006. Nine experts and three IAEA staff evaluated the available data on the use of PET in RT planning, and considered practical methods for integrating it into routine practice. For RT planning, 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was the most valuable pharmaceutical. Numerous studies supported the routine use of FDG-PET for RT target volume determination in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). There was also evidence for utility of PET in head and neck cancers, lymphoma and in esophageal cancers, with promising preliminary data in many other cancers. The best available approach employs integrated PET/CT images, acquired on a dual scanner in the radiotherapy treatment position after administration of tracer according to a standardized protocol, with careful optimization of images within the RT planning system and carefully considered rules for contouring tumor volumes. PET scans that are not recent or were acquired without proper patient positioning should be repeated for RT planning. PET will play an increasing valuable role in RT planning for a wide range of cancers. When requesting PET scans, physicians should be aware of their potential role in RT planning.

  19. Automatic treatment plan re-optimization for adaptive radiotherapy guided with the initial plan DVHs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Nan; Zarepisheh, Masoud; Uribe-Sanchez, Andres; Moore, Kevin; Tian, Zhen; Zhen, Xin; Graves, Yan Jiang; Gautier, Quentin; Mell, Loren; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve; Zhou, Linghong

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) can reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. Developing an efficient and effective re-planning algorithm is an important step toward the clinical realization of ART. For the re-planning process, manual trial-and-error approach to fine-tune planning parameters is time-consuming and is usually considered unpractical, especially for online ART. It is desirable to automate this step to yield a plan of acceptable quality with minimal interventions. In ART, prior information in the original plan is available, such as dose–volume histogram (DVH), which can be employed to facilitate the automatic re-planning process. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic re-planning algorithm to generate a plan with similar, or possibly better, DVH curves compared with the clinically delivered original plan. Specifically, our algorithm iterates the following two loops. An inner loop is the traditional fluence map optimization, in which we optimize a quadratic objective function penalizing the deviation of the dose received by each voxel from its prescribed or threshold dose with a set of fixed voxel weighting factors. In outer loop, the voxel weighting factors in the objective function are adjusted according to the deviation of the current DVH curves from those in the original plan. The process is repeated until the DVH curves are acceptable or maximum iteration step is reached. The whole algorithm is implemented on GPU for high efficiency. The feasibility of our algorithm has been demonstrated with three head-and-neck cancer IMRT cases, each having an initial planning CT scan and another treatment CT scan acquired in the middle of treatment course. Compared with the DVH curves in the original plan, the DVH curves in the resulting plan using our algorithm with 30 iterations are better for almost all structures. The re-optimization process takes about 30

  20. Comparison of CT based-CTV plan and CT based-ICRU38 plan in brachytherapy planning of uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jin Sup; Jo, Jung Kun; Si, Chang Keun; Lee, Ki Ho; Lee, Du Hyun; Choi, Kye Suk

    2004-01-01

    Although Improve of CT, MRI Radio-diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Planing, but we still use ICRU38 Planning system(2D film-based) broadly. 3-Dimensional ICR plan(CT image based) is not only offer tumor and normal tissue dose but also support DVH information. On this study, we plan irradiation-goal dose on CTV(CTV plan) and irradiation-goal dose on ICRU 38 point(ICRU38 plan) by use CT image. And compare with tumor-dose, rectal-dose, bladder-dose on both planning, and analysis DVH Sample 11 patients who treated by Ir-192 HDR. After 40 Gy external radiation therapy, ICR plan established. All the patients carry out CT-image scanned by CT-simulator. And we use PLATO(Nucletron) v.14.2 planing system. We draw CTV, rectum, bladder on the CT image. And establish plan irradiation- dose on CTV(CTV plan) and irradiation- dose on A-point(ICRU38 plan) CTV volume(average±SD) is 21.8±26.6 cm 3 , rectum volume(average±SD) is 60.9±25.0 cm 3 , bladder volume(average±SD) is 116.1±40.1cm 3 sampled 11 patients. The volume including 100% dose is 126.7±18.9 cm 3 on ICRU plan and 98.2±74.5 cm 3 on CTV plan. On ICRU planning, the other one's 22.0 cm 3 CTV volume who residual tumor size excess 4cm is not including 100% isodose. 8 patient's 12.9±5.9 cm 3 tumor volume who residual tumor size below 4 cm irradiated 100% dose. Bladder dose(recommended by ICRU 38) is 90.1±21.3 % on ICRU plan, 68.7±26.6% on CTV plan, and rectal dose is 86.4±18.3%, 76.9±15.6%. Bladder and Rectum maximum dose is 137.2±5.9%, 101.1±41.8% on ICRU plan, 107.6±47.9%, 86.9±30.8% on CTV plan. Therefore CTV plan more less normal issue-irradiated dose than ICRU plan. But one patient case who residual tumor size excess 4 cm, Normal tissue dose more higher than critical dose remarkably on CTV plan. 80% over-Irradiated rectal dose(V80rec) is 1.8±2.4 cm 3 on ICRU plan, 0.7±1.0 cm 3 on CTV plan. 80% over-Irradiated bladder dose(V80bla) is 12.2%±8.9 cm 3 on ICRU plan, 3.5±4.1 cm 3 on CTV plan. Likewise, CTV

  1. Dose enhancement in radiotherapy of small lung tumors using inline magnetic fields: A Monte Carlo based planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oborn, B. M., E-mail: brad.oborn@gmail.com [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Ge, Y. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hardcastle, N. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Metcalfe, P. E. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2500, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); Keall, P. J. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To report on significant dose enhancement effects caused by magnetic fields aligned parallel to 6 MV photon beam radiotherapy of small lung tumors. Findings are applicable to future inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems. Methods: A total of eight clinical lung tumor cases were recalculated using Monte Carlo methods, and external magnetic fields of 0.5, 1.0, and 3 T were included to observe the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and gross tumor volume (GTV). Three plans were 6 MV 3D-CRT plans while 6 were 6 MV IMRT. The GTV’s ranged from 0.8 to 16 cm{sup 3}, while the PTV’s ranged from 1 to 59 cm{sup 3}. In addition, the dose changes in a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were investigated for small beams. The central 20 cm of this phantom contained either water or lung density insert. Results: For single beams, an inline magnetic field of 1 T has a small impact in lung dose distributions by reducing the lateral scatter of secondary electrons, resulting in a small dose increase along the beam. Superposition of multiple small beams leads to significant dose enhancements. Clinically, this process occurs in the lung tissue typically surrounding the GTV, resulting in increases to the D{sub 98%} (PTV). Two isolated tumors with very small PTVs (3 and 6 cm{sup 3}) showed increases in D{sub 98%} of 23% and 22%. Larger PTVs of 13, 26, and 59 cm{sup 3} had increases of 9%, 6%, and 4%, describing a natural fall-off in enhancement with increasing PTV size. However, three PTVs bounded to the lung wall showed no significant increase, due to lack of dose enhancement in the denser PTV volume. In general, at 0.5 T, the GTV mean dose enhancement is around 60% lower than that at 1 T, while at 3 T, it is 5%–60% higher than 1 T. Conclusions: Monte Carlo methods have described significant and predictable dose enhancement effects in small lung tumor plans for 6 MV radiotherapy when an external inline magnetic field is included. Results of this study

  2. The functional imaging in target volume delineation of radiotherapy planning for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jingxiong; Wu Hua

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of important treatments for glioma. Functional imaging, such as PET, SPECT and MRI, may provide more valuable information not only in display of the evasion extent of glioma but also in demonstration of some biological characteristics of the tumor, such as perfusion, metabolism, hypoxia or proliferation. Thus it may play a role in making an individualized and more exact radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  3. A study on the precise examination needed to decide an optimal planning target volume for carbon ion radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hirotoshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Junetsu; Kandatsu, Susumu; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Minohara, Shinichi; Ohto, Masao

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make two pictures of the randomly-selected cross section of the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesion using three dimensional (3D) image data obtained from the three dimensional computed tomography (CT) and the three dimensional ultrasonography (US), and to prove their identity as an image of the same cross section. Using the measurement system of three inclined angles of a cross section from the three planes, a horizontal plane and two vertical planes in the three dimensional space, we obtained two images of the same cross section of the HCC lesion originating from 3D-US and 3D-CT image data (US-CT 3D-dual image). To prove the identity of the two images of the US-CT 3D-dual image, 3D-US and 3D-CT images, we compared the two images to the original cross section of the resected HCC specimen. We could visually prove the identity of the two images consisting in the US-CT 3D-dual image originating from the 3D-US image data and 3D-CT image data. The US-CT 3D-dual image seems to be effective to make an exact treatment plan of carbon ion radiotherapy for HCC. (author)

  4. Three-dimensional spiral CT for neurosurgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H M; Bertalanffy, H; Mayfrank, L; Thron, A; Günther, R W; Gilsbach, J M

    1994-08-01

    We carried out 22 examinations to determine the value of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric CT (spiral CT) for planning neurosurgical procedures. All examinations were carried out on a of the first generation spiral CT. A tube model was used to investigate the influence of different parameter settings. Bolus injection of nonionic contrast medium was used when vessels or strongly enhancing tumours were to be delineated. 3D reconstructions were carried out using the integrated 3D software of the scanner. We found a table feed of 3 mm/s with a slice thickness of 2 mm and an increment of 1 mm to be suitable for most purposes. For larger regions of interest a table feed of 5 mm was the maximum which could be used without blurring of the 3D images. Particular advantages of 3D reconstructed spiral scanning were seen in the planning of approaches to the lower clivus, acquired or congenital bony abnormalities and when the relationship between vessels, tumour and bone was important.

  5. Three-dimensional spiral CT for neurosurgical planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, H.M.; Bertalanffy, H.; Mayfrank, L.; Thron, A.; Guenther, R.W.; Gilsbach, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out 22 examinations to determine the value of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric CT (spiral CT) for planning neurosurgical procedures. All examinations were carried out on a of the first generation spiral CT. A tube model was used to investigate the influence of different parameter settings. Bolus injection of nonionic contrast medium was used when vessels or strongly enhancing tumours were to be delineated. 3D reconstructions were carried out using the integrated 3D software of the scanner. We found a table feed of 3 mm/s with a slice thickness of 2 mm and an increment of 1 mm to be suitable for most purposes. For larger regions of interest a table feed of 5 mm was the maximum which could be used without blurring of the 3D images. Particular advantages of 3D reconstructed spiral scanning were seen in the planning of approaches to the lower clivus, acquired or congenital bony abnormalities and when the relationship between vessels, tumour and bone was important. (orig.)

  6. Deep MR to CT synthesis using unpaired data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M.; Dinkla, Anna M.; Savenije, Mark H.F.; Seevinck, Peter R.; van den Berg, Cornelis A.T.; Išgum, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    MR-only radiotherapy treatment planning requires accurate MR-to-CT synthesis. Current deep learning methods for MR-to-CT synthesis depend on pairwise aligned MR and CT training images of the same patient. However, misalignment between paired images could lead to errors in synthesized CT images. To

  7. Cone beam CT dose reduction in prostate radiotherapy using Likert scale methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Keith A; Newton, Louise A; Jordan, Suzanne; Smith, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    To use a Likert scale method to optimize image quality (IQ) for cone beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue matching for image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate. 23 males with local/locally advanced prostate cancer had the CBCT IQ assessed using a 4-point Likert scale (4 = excellent, no artefacts; 3 = good, few artefacts; 2 = poor, just able to match; 1 = unsatisfactory, not able to match) at three levels of exposure. The lateral separations of the subjects were also measured. The Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to determine if the IQ was associated with the exposure level. We used the point-biserial correlation and a χ(2) test to investigate the relationship between the separation and IQ. The Friedman test showed that the IQ was related to exposure (p = 2 × 10(-7)) and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test demonstrated that the IQ decreased as exposure decreased (all p-values <0.005). We did not find a correlation between the IQ and the separation (correlation coefficient 0.045), but for separations <35 cm, it was possible to use the lowest exposure parameters studied. We can reduce exposure factors to 80% of those supplied with the system without hindering the matching process for all patients. For patients with lateral separations <35 cm, the exposure factors can be reduced further to 64% of the original values. Likert scales are a useful tool for measuring IQ in the optimization of CBCT IQ for soft-tissue matching in radiotherapy image guidance applications.

  8. Incremental clinical value of a dedicated RT planning FDG PET-CT over staging PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Som, S.; Vinod, S.; Lin, M.; Shon, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To evaluate whether FDG-PET performed for radiotherapy planning can detect disease progression, compared with staging PET. Methods: Thirteen patients underwent a planning PET-CT for curative RT ( R T-PET ) within eight weeks of a staging PET-CT for newly diagnosed NSCLC between 10/2007 and 1/2009. All studies were acquired on a Philips GXL PET-CT using the same protocols, except RT-PET is acquired on a RT flat bed. The images were interpreted by consensus readings of two physicians: location/number, visual grading (0-4:3> liver, 4>brain), max transverse diameter ( M ax D ) (tumour margin is delineated by a SUV threshold of 2.5) and max SUV of each lesion. Progressive disease (PD) is defined as >10% increase in max D. Results: RT-PET detected PD (primary or nodal) or new metastases in 8 pts (61%) (mean interval:30.2±14 days, range:7-54 days). For primary tumour, RT-PET detected PD in 5

  9. The effect of irregular breathing patterns on internal target volumes in four-dimensional CT and cone-beam CT images in the context of stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, N.; Kron, T.; Roxby, P.; Franich, R.; Dunn, L.; Aarons, Y.; Chesson, B.; Siva, S.; Duplan, D.; Ball, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic lung radiotherapy is complicated by tumor motion from patient respiration. Four-dimensional CT (4DCT) imaging is a motion compensation method used in treatment planning to generate a maximum intensity projection (MIP) internal target volume (ITV). Image guided radiotherapy during treatment may involve acquiring a volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) image and visually aligning the tumor to the planning 4DCT MIP ITV contour. Moving targets imaged with CBCT can appear blurred and currently there are no studies reporting on the effect that irregular breathing patterns have on CBCT volumes and their alignment to 4DCT MIP ITV contours. The objective of this work was therefore to image a phantom moving with irregular breathing patterns to determine whether any configurations resulted in errors in volume contouring or alignment. Methods: A Perspex thorax phantom was used to simulate a patient. Three wooden “lung” inserts with embedded Perspex “lesions” were moved up to 4 cm with computer-generated motion patterns, and up to 1 cm with patient-specific breathing patterns. The phantom was imaged on 4DCT and CBCT with the same acquisition settings used for stereotactic lung patients in the clinic and the volumes on all phantom images were contoured. This project assessed the volumes for qualitative and quantitative changes including volume, length of the volume, and errors in alignment between CBCT volumes and 4DCT MIP ITV contours. Results: When motion was introduced 4DCT and CBCT volumes were reduced by up to 20% and 30% and shortened by up to 7 and 11 mm, respectively, indicating that volume was being under-represented at the extremes of motion. Banding artifacts were present in 4DCT MIP images, while CBCT volumes were largely reduced in contrast. When variable amplitudes from patient traces were used and CBCT ITVs were compared to 4DCT MIP ITVs there was a distinct trend in reduced ITV with increasing amplitude that was not seen when compared to

  10. The effect of irregular breathing patterns on internal target volumes in four-dimensional CT and cone-beam CT images in the context of stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, N. [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002, Australia and Department of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Kron, T.; Roxby, P. [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 (Australia); Franich, R.; Dunn, L. [Department of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Aarons, Y.; Chesson, B. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 (Australia); Siva, S.; Duplan, D.; Ball, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 (Australia)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic lung radiotherapy is complicated by tumor motion from patient respiration. Four-dimensional CT (4DCT) imaging is a motion compensation method used in treatment planning to generate a maximum intensity projection (MIP) internal target volume (ITV). Image guided radiotherapy during treatment may involve acquiring a volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) image and visually aligning the tumor to the planning 4DCT MIP ITV contour. Moving targets imaged with CBCT can appear blurred and currently there are no studies reporting on the effect that irregular breathing patterns have on CBCT volumes and their alignment to 4DCT MIP ITV contours. The objective of this work was therefore to image a phantom moving with irregular breathing patterns to determine whether any configurations resulted in errors in volume contouring or alignment. Methods: A Perspex thorax phantom was used to simulate a patient. Three wooden 'lung' inserts with embedded Perspex 'lesions' were moved up to 4 cm with computer-generated motion patterns, and up to 1 cm with patient-specific breathing patterns. The phantom was imaged on 4DCT and CBCT with the same acquisition settings used for stereotactic lung patients in the clinic and the volumes on all phantom images were contoured. This project assessed the volumes for qualitative and quantitative changes including volume, length of the volume, and errors in alignment between CBCT volumes and 4DCT MIP ITV contours. Results: When motion was introduced 4DCT and CBCT volumes were reduced by up to 20% and 30% and shortened by up to 7 and 11 mm, respectively, indicating that volume was being under-represented at the extremes of motion. Banding artifacts were present in 4DCT MIP images, while CBCT volumes were largely reduced in contrast. When variable amplitudes from patient traces were used and CBCT ITVs were compared to 4DCT MIP ITVs there was a distinct trend in reduced ITV with increasing amplitude that was not seen when

  11. Preoperative CT planning of screw length in arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Gerometta, Antoine; Granger, Benjamin; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure has shown its efficiency for the treatment of anterior shoulder dislocation. The success of this technique depends on the correct positioning and fusion of the bone block. The length of the screws that fix the bone block can be a problem. They can increase the risk of non-union if too short or be the cause of nerve lesion or soft tissue discomfort if too long. Suprascapular nerve injuries have been reported during shoulder stabilisation surgery up to 6 % of the case. Bone block non-union depending on the series is found around 20 % of the cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of this CT preoperative planning to predict optimal screws length. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the efficiency of CT planning to predict screw length. Inclusion criteria were patients with chronic anterior instability of the shoulder with an ISIS superior to 4. Exclusion criteria were patients with multidirectional instability or any previous surgery on this shoulder. Thirty patients were included prospectively, 11 of them went threw a CT planning, before their arthroscopic Latarjet. Optimal length of both screws was calculated, adding the size of the coracoid at 5 and 15 mm from the tip to the glenoid. Thirty-two-mm screws were used for patients without planning. On a post-operative CT scan with 3D reconstruction, the distance between the screw tip and the posterior cortex was measured. A one-sample Wilcoxon test was used to compare the distance from the tip of the screw to an acceptable positioning of ±2 mm from the posterior cortex. In the group without planning, screw 1 tended to differ from the acceptable positioning: mean 3.44 mm ± 3.13, med 2.9 mm, q1; q3 [0.6; 4.75] p = 0.1118, and screw 2 differed significantly from the acceptable position: mean 4.83 mm ± 4.11, med 3.7 mm, q1; q3 [1.7; 5.45] p = 0.0045. In the group with planning, position of

  12. A hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yu; Wu Qiuwen

    2010-01-01

    Offline adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been used to effectively correct and compensate for prostate motion and reduce the required margin. The efficacy depends on the characteristics of the patient setup error and interfraction motion through the whole treatment; specifically, systematic errors are corrected and random errors are compensated for through the margins. In online image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, the translational setup error and inter-fractional prostate motion are corrected through pre-treatment imaging and couch correction at each fraction. However, the rotation and deformation of the target are not corrected and only accounted for with margins in treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the offline ART strategy is necessary for an online IGRT protocol and to evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy. First, to investigate the rationale of the hybrid strategy, 592 cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before and after each fraction for an online IGRT protocol from 16 patients were analyzed. Specifically, the characteristics of prostate rotation were analyzed. It was found that there exist systematic inter-fractional prostate rotations, and they are patient specific. These rotations, if not corrected, are persistent through the treatment fraction, and rotations detected in early fractions are representative of those in later fractions. These findings suggest that the offline adaptive replanning strategy is beneficial to the online IGRT protocol with further margin reductions. Second, to quantitatively evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy, 412 repeated helical CT scans from 25 patients during the course of treatment were included in the replanning study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, clinical target volume, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles) were included in the simulation. The contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were

  13. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Moinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); D’Souza, Derek [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    a replan CT. The DD is smaller than 2% of the prescribed dose on 90% of the body's voxels and it passes a 2% and 2 mm gamma-test on over 95% of the voxels. Target coverage similarity was assessed in terms of the 95%-isodose volumes. A mean value of 0.962 was obtained for the DSC, while the distance between surfaces is less than 2 mm in 95.4% of the pixels. The method proposed provided adequate dose estimation, closer to the gold standard than the other two approaches. Differences in DVH curves were mainly due to differences in the OARs definition (manual vs warped) and not due to differences in dose estimation (dose calculated in replan CT vs dose calculated in deformed CT). Conclusions: Deforming a planning CT to match a daily CBCT provides the tools needed for the calculation of the “dose of the day” without the need to acquire a new CT. The initial clinical application of our method will be weekly offline calculations of the “dose of the day,” and use this information to inform adaptive radiotherapy (ART). The work here presented is a first step into a full implementation of a “dose-driven” online ART.

  14. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for "dose of the day" calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Catarina; McClelland, Jamie; Moinuddin, Syed; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; D'Souza, Derek; Royle, Gary

    2014-03-01

    than 2% of the prescribed dose on 90% of the body's voxels and it passes a 2% and 2 mm gamma-test on over 95% of the voxels. Target coverage similarity was assessed in terms of the 95%-isodose volumes. A mean value of 0.962 was obtained for the DSC, while the distance between surfaces is less than 2 mm in 95.4% of the pixels. The method proposed provided adequate dose estimation, closer to the gold standard than the other two approaches. Differences in DVH curves were mainly due to differences in the OARs definition (manual vs warped) and not due to differences in dose estimation (dose calculated in replan CT vs dose calculated in deformed CT). Deforming a planning CT to match a daily CBCT provides the tools needed for the calculation of the "dose of the day" without the need to acquire a new CT. The initial clinical application of our method will be weekly offline calculations of the "dose of the day," and use this information to inform adaptive radiotherapy (ART). The work here presented is a first step into a full implementation of a "dose-driven" online ART.

  15. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, Catarina; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary; McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; Moinuddin, Syed; D’Souza, Derek

    2014-01-01

    a replan CT. The DD is smaller than 2% of the prescribed dose on 90% of the body's voxels and it passes a 2% and 2 mm gamma-test on over 95% of the voxels. Target coverage similarity was assessed in terms of the 95%-isodose volumes. A mean value of 0.962 was obtained for the DSC, while the distance between surfaces is less than 2 mm in 95.4% of the pixels. The method proposed provided adequate dose estimation, closer to the gold standard than the other two approaches. Differences in DVH curves were mainly due to differences in the OARs definition (manual vs warped) and not due to differences in dose estimation (dose calculated in replan CT vs dose calculated in deformed CT). Conclusions: Deforming a planning CT to match a daily CBCT provides the tools needed for the calculation of the “dose of the day” without the need to acquire a new CT. The initial clinical application of our method will be weekly offline calculations of the “dose of the day,” and use this information to inform adaptive radiotherapy (ART). The work here presented is a first step into a full implementation of a “dose-driven” online ART

  16. Development of re-locatable head frame system using hydraulic arms for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and CT evaluation of repositioning accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masayuki; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Ando, Yutaka; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Shiba, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel re-locatable head frame system consisting of a dental cast and hydraulic arms as an immobilization device for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and to evaluate the repositioning accuracy by measurement of landmark coordinates in repeated computed tomography (CT) examinations. The acrylic dental casts were customized for each patient. First the dental cast was attached to the upper jaw of the patient, then the dental cast was connected to a Leksell stereotactic frame, which was finally secured by two hydraulic arms. Since this system is compatible with the Leksell frame, stereotactic indicators could be used to obtain coordinates of anatomical landmarks of the head. Seven patients treated by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy underwent repeated quality-assurance CTs during their treatment courses. We evaluated the coordinates of the short process of incus and the top of crista galli as reference points for evaluation of variation in a total of 26 repeat CT data sets, and then x, y, and z fluctuations relative to their positions in the treatment-planning CTs. The distances among the reference points of both processes of incus and the top of crista galli were calculated to evaluate the feasibility of the method. The distances were less than 0.5 mm on averages and less than 1 mm in the standard deviations. The respective fluctuations in the x, y and z directions were less than 1 mm in mean values and less than 2 mm in standard deviations. The fluctuations in distance were less than 2 mm on average and in standard deviations. The fluctuation of the center of three reference points was 0.7 mm on average and the rotation of the cranium was 1.0 degree in average. We concluded that our evaluation method is feasible and the reproducibility of the fixation system is acceptable for its routine use in stereotactic radiotherapy. (author)

  17. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358 deg. arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy x 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45 deg. or 315 deg. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior-inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system

  18. Dosimetric aspects of breast radiotherapy with three-dimensional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy helical tomotherapy planning modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Yan, Yue, E-mail: yyan5@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ignatowski, Tasha [Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Olson, Anna [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the dosimetric differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans and the three-dimensional (3D) helical plans based on the TomoTherapy system. A total of 15 patients with supine setup were randomly selected from the data base. For patients with lumpectomy planning target volume (PTV), regional lymph nodes were also included as part of the target. For dose sparing, the significant differences between the helical IMRT and helical 3D were only found in the heart and contralateral breast. For the dose to the heart, helical IMRT reduced the maximum point dose by 6.98 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan (p = 0.01). For contralateral breast, the helical IMRT plans significantly reduced the maximum point dose by 5.6 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan. However, compared to the helical 3D plan, the helical IMRT plan increased the volume for lower dose (13.08% increase in V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, p = 0.01). In general, there are no significant differences in dose sparing between helical IMRT and helical 3D plans.

  19. Dosimetric aspects of breast radiotherapy with three-dimensional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy helical tomotherapy planning modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Yan, Yue; Ignatowski, Tasha; Olson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the dosimetric differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans and the three-dimensional (3D) helical plans based on the TomoTherapy system. A total of 15 patients with supine setup were randomly selected from the data base. For patients with lumpectomy planning target volume (PTV), regional lymph nodes were also included as part of the target. For dose sparing, the significant differences between the helical IMRT and helical 3D were only found in the heart and contralateral breast. For the dose to the heart, helical IMRT reduced the maximum point dose by 6.98 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan (p = 0.01). For contralateral breast, the helical IMRT plans significantly reduced the maximum point dose by 5.6 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan. However, compared to the helical 3D plan, the helical IMRT plan increased the volume for lower dose (13.08% increase in V 5 Gy , p = 0.01). In general, there are no significant differences in dose sparing between helical IMRT and helical 3D plans.

  20. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET in definition of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Wenli; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging modality, which can give some biological information of tumor. PET is more and more important in the definition of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning. Depending on its sensitivity and specificity, 18 F-fluorideoxyglucose 18 F-FDG PET has been shown to influence the selection of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancers, for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas or for esophageal tumors. On the other hand, for tumors such as rectal carcinomas, convincing data on the value of 18 F-FDG PET for target volume selection are still lacking. However, the application of 18 F-FDG PET in many aspects of radiotherapy is still controversy. Further researches in its clinical application are still needed to investigate whether 18 F-FDG PET for treatment planning should be routine because of the lack of prospective studies. (authors)

  1. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy of brain tumours. In this study an open low-field MR-simulator is evaluated in order to eliminate the cost of and time spent on additional CT scanning. Materials and methods: Eleven...

  2. Is there any advantage of CT based 3-dimensional conformal planning over conventional orthogonal x-ray based planning in HDR brachytherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Idris, N.R.; Zakaria, A.B.; Khairul, N.

    2003-01-01

    The conventional brachytherapy dose calculation is based on a particular brachytherapy rule or individual dosimetry based on the reconstruction of the sources from the orthogonal films. In the recent years many centers are using CT based 3D conformal brachytherapy in order to improve the dosimetric outcome of a given plan. Here we would like to present our experience on the use of both techniques to deliver HDR interstitial brachytherapy as boost in early breast cancer. From January 2001 to January 2003, we treated 4 breast cancer patients using conventional orthogonal x-rays and CT scan in 3 cases for the treatment plan. All patients received an external beam radiotherapy dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions over 4.5 weeks to the whole breast using 6 MV photon beam. Subsequently the primary lesion was supplimented with HDR brachytherapy to a dose of 2.5 Gy BID for 3 consecutive days using a (192)Ir microSelectronHDR. The dose prescription was individualized to encompass the tumor volume with a 10 mm margin. The differences of the dosimetric outcome were compared. All patients completed above schedule of radiotherapy. The primary was implanted with single plane in 3 patients and multiplane implant in 4 patients. Orthogonal x-ray based localization was performed in 4 patients and CT scan based localization in 3 cases. Three patients were implanted single plane and 4 patients with multiplane implants with a median catheter number of 9 (range 6-14). The 3D conformal dose optimization was performed using Nucletron planning system (Plato). The mean 100% and 150% isodose volume was 67.3 cm 3 and 31.25cm 3 respectively. The identification of primary tumor volume, organ at risk, and identification of afterloading catheters were superior in CT based plan than conventional planning. CT scan based 3D conformal brachytherapy planning give better identification of tumor volume and its curvature, decrease the time to identify the sources and evaluate the radiation dose to organs at

  3. Commissioning and quality assurances of the CMS XIO radiotherapy treatment planning system for external beam photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidhar, K.R.; Anurupa; Soubhagya; Sudhakar; Shiva; Krishnam Raju, A.; Narayana Murthy, P.

    2008-01-01

    The commissioning of XIO treatment planning system (TPS) was carried out by Computerized Medical Devices, USA for Siemens and Elekta linear accelerators. The Commissioning and quality assurance of the CMS XIO radiotherapy treatment planning system involves many steps, beginning from beam data acquisition and entry into the computerized TPS, through patient data acquisition, to treatment plan generation and the final transfer of data to the treatment machine and quality assurance of TPS

  4. Multimodality imaging with CT, MR and FDG-PET for radiotherapy target volume delineation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, David; Scarsbrook, Andrew F.; Sykes, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Satiavani; Subesinghe, Manil; Carey, Brendan; Wilson, Daniel J.; Roberts, Neil; McDermott, Gary; Karakaya, Ebru; Bayman, Evrim; Sen, Mehmet; Speight, Richard; Prestwich, Robin J.D.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the variation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation between CT, MR and FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective, single centre, pilot study was undertaken where 11 patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancers (2 tonsil, 9 base of tongue primaries) underwent pre-treatment, contrast enhanced, FDG PET-CT and MR imaging, all performed in a radiotherapy treatment mask. CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs were contoured by 5 clinicians (2 radiologists and 3 radiation oncologists). A semi-automated segmentation algorithm was used to contour PET GTVs. Volume and positional analyses were undertaken, accounting for inter-observer variation, using linear mixed effects models and contour comparison metrics respectively. Significant differences in mean GTV volume were found between CT (11.9 cm 3 ) and CT-MR (14.1 cm 3 ), p < 0.006, CT-MR and PET (9.5 cm 3 ), p < 0.0009, and MR (12.7 cm 3 ) and PET, p < 0.016. Substantial differences in GTV position were found between all modalities with the exception of CT-MR and MR GTVs. A mean of 64 %, 74 % and 77 % of the PET GTVs were included within the CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs respectively. A mean of 57 % of the MR GTVs were included within the CT GTV; conversely a mean of 63 % of the CT GTVs were included within the MR GTV. CT inter-observer variability was found to be significantly higher in terms of position and/or volume than both MR and CT-MR (p < 0.05). Significant differences in GTV volume were found between GTV volumes delineated by radiologists (9.7 cm 3 ) and oncologists (14.6 cm 3 ) for all modalities (p = 0.001). The use of different imaging modalities produced significantly different GTVs, with no single imaging technique encompassing all potential GTV regions. The use of MR reduced inter-observer variability. These data suggest delineation based on multimodality imaging has the potential to improve accuracy of GTV definition. ISRCTN Registry: ISRCTN34165059. Registered 2

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  6. IMRT, IGRT, SBRT - Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, JL

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 4 years, IMRT, IGRT, SBRT: Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy has become a standard reference in the field. During this time, however, significant progress in high-precision technologies for the planning and delivery of radiotherapy in cancer treatment has called for a second edition to include these new developments. Thoroughly updated and extended, this new edition offers a comprehensive guide and overview of these new technologies and the many clinical treatment programs that bring them into practical use. Advances in intensity-modulated radiothera

  7. Respiratory-gated segment reconstruction for radiation treatment planning using 256-slice CT-scanner during free breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Kohno, Ryosuke; Minohara, Shinichi; Kohno, Kazutoshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya

    2005-04-01

    The conventional respiratory-gated CT scan technique includes anatomic motion induced artifacts due to the low temporal resolution. They are a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning for the thorax and upper abdomen. Temporal resolution and image quality are important factors to minimize planning target volume margin due to the respiratory motion. To achieve high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio, we developed a respiratory gated segment reconstruction algorithm and adapted it to Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm (FDK) with a 256-detector row CT. The 256-detector row CT could scan approximately 100 mm in the cranio-caudal direction with 0.5 mm slice thickness in one rotation. Data acquisition for the RS-FDK relies on the assistance of the respiratory sensing system by a cine scan mode (table remains stationary). We evaluated RS-FDK in phantom study with the 256-detector row CT and compared it with full scan (FS-FDK) and HS-FDK results with regard to volume accuracy and image noise, and finally adapted the RS-FDK to an animal study. The RS-FDK gave a more accurate volume than the others and it had the same signal-to-noise ratio as the FS-FDK. In the animal study, the RS-FDK visualized the clearest edges of the liver and pulmonary vessels of all the algorithms. In conclusion, the RS-FDK algorithm has a capability of high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore it will be useful when combined with new radiotherapy techniques including image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and 4D radiation therapy.

  8. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  9. Planning target volumes for radiotherapy: how much margin is needed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolak, John A.; Rosen, Isaac I.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The radiotherapy planning target volume (PTV) encloses the clinical target volume (CTV) with anisotropic margins to account for possible uncertainties in beam alignment, patient positioning, organ motion, and organ deformation. Ideally, the CTV-PTV margin should be determined solely by the magnitudes of the uncertainties involved. In practice, the clinician usually also considers doses to abutting healthy tissues when deciding on the size of the CTV-PTV margin. This study calculates the ideal size of the CTV-PTV margin when only physical position uncertainties are considered. Methods and Materials: The position of the CTV for any treatment is assumed to be described by independent Gaussian distributions in each of the three Cartesian directions. Three strategies for choosing a CTV-PTV margin are analyzed. The CTV-PTV margin can be based on: 1. the probability that the CTV is completely enclosed by the PTV; 2. the probability that the projection of the CTV in the beam's eye view (BEV) is completely enclosed by the projection of the PTV in the BEV; and 3. the probability that a point on the edge of the CTV is within the PTV. Cumulative probability distributions are derived for each of the above strategies. Results: Expansion of the CTV by 1 standard deviation (SD) in each direction results in the CTV being entirely enclosed within the PTV 24% of the time; the BEV projection of the CTV is enclosed within the BEV projection of the PTV 39% of the time; and a point on the edge of the CTV is within the PTV 84% of the time. To have the CTV enclosed entirely within the PTV 95% of the time requires a margin of 2.8 SD. For the BEV projection of the CTV to be within the BEV projection of the PTV 95% of the time requires a margin of 2.45 SD. To have any point on the surface of the CTV be within the PTV 95% of the time requires a margin of 1.65 SD. Conclusion: In the first two strategies for selecting a margin, the probability of finding the CTV within the PTV is

  10. A phase I study on stereotactic body radiotherapy of liver metastases based on functional treatment planning using positron emission tomography with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-galactose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mette Marie; Bak-Fredslund, Kirstine; Petersen, Jørgen Baltzer

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The galactose analog 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-galactose (FDGal) is used for quantification of regional hepatic metabolic capacity by functional positron emission tomography computerized tomography (PET/CT). In the present study, FDGal PET/CT was used for functional treatment...... planning (FTP) of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of liver metastases with the aim of minimizing radiation dose to the best functioning liver tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fourteen patients referred for SBRT had FDGal PET/CT performed before and one month after the treatment. The planning CT...... and the FDGal PET/CT images were deformable co-registered. RESULTS: A reduction in the mean dose of approximately 2 Gy to the best functioning sub-volumes was obtained. One patient developed grade 2 acute morbidity and no patients experienced grade 3 or higher acute morbidities. The regional hepatic metabolic...

  11. Semi-automated segmentation of the sigmoid and descending colon for radiotherapy planning using the fast marching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losnegaard, Are; Hodneland, Erlend; Lundervold, Arvid; Hysing, Liv Bolstad; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2010-01-01

    A fast and accurate segmentation of organs at risk, such as the healthy colon, would be of benefit for planning of radiotherapy, in particular in an adaptive scenario. For the treatment of pelvic tumours, a great challenge is the segmentation of the most adjacent and sensitive parts of the gastrointestinal tract, the sigmoid and descending colon. We propose a semi-automated method to segment these bowel parts using the fast marching (FM) method. Standard 3D computed tomography (CT) image data obtained from routine radiotherapy planning were used. Our pre-processing steps distinguish the intestine, muscles and air from connective tissue. The core part of our method separates the sigmoid and descending colon from the muscles and other segments of the intestine. This is done by utilizing the ability of the FM method to compute a specified minimal energy functional integrated along a path, and thereby extracting the colon centre line between user-defined control points in the sigmoid and descending colon. Further, we reconstruct the tube-shaped geometry of the sigmoid and descending colon by fitting ellipsoids to points on the path and by adding adjacent voxels that are likely voxels belonging to these bowel parts. Our results were compared to manually outlined sigmoid and descending colon, and evaluated using the Dice coefficient (DC). Tests on 11 patients gave an average DC of 0.83 (±0.07) with little user interaction. We conclude that the proposed method makes it possible to fast and accurately segment the sigmoid and descending colon from routine CT image data.

  12. Radiotherapy volume delineation using dynamic [18F]-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with oropharyngeal cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvoniemi, Antti; Din, Mueez U; Suilamo, Sami; Shepherd, Tony; Minn, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    Delineation of gross tumour volume in 3D is a critical step in the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Static [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT imaging has been suggested as a method to improve the reproducibility of tumour delineation, but it suffers from low specificity. We undertook this pilot study in which dynamic features in time-activity curves (TACs) of [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT images were applied to help the discrimination of tumour from inflammation and adjacent normal tissue. Five patients with OPC underwent dynamic [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT imaging in treatment position. Voxel-by-voxel analysis was performed to evaluate seven dynamic features developed with the knowledge of differences in glucose metabolism in different tissue types and visual inspection of TACs. The Gaussian mixture model and K-means algorithms were used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic features in discriminating tumour voxels compared to the performance of standardized uptake values obtained from static imaging. Some dynamic features showed a trend towards discrimination of different metabolic areas but lack of consistency means that clinical application is not recommended based on these results alone. Impact of inflammatory tissue remains a problem for volume delineation in RT of OPC, but a simple dynamic imaging protocol proved practicable and enabled simple data analysis techniques that show promise for complementing the information in static uptake values.

  13. Poster — Thur Eve — 59: Atlas Selection for Automated Segmentation of Pelvic CT for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallawi, A; Farrell, T; Diamond, K; Wierzbicki, M

    2014-01-01

    Automated atlas-based segmentation has recently been evaluated for use in planning prostate cancer radiotherapy. In the typical approach, the essential step is the selection of an atlas from a database that best matches the target image. This work proposes an atlas selection strategy and evaluates its impact on the final segmentation accuracy. Prostate length (PL), right femoral head diameter (RFHD), and left femoral head diameter (LFHD) were measured in CT images of 20 patients. Each subject was then taken as the target image to which all remaining 19 images were affinely registered. For each pair of registered images, the overlap between prostate and femoral head contours was quantified using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Finally, we designed an atlas selection strategy that computed the ratio of PL (prostate segmentation), RFHD (right femur segmentation), and LFHD (left femur segmentation) between the target subject and each subject in the atlas database. Five atlas subjects yielding ratios nearest to one were then selected for further analysis. RFHD and LFHD were excellent parameters for atlas selection, achieving a mean femoral head DSC of 0.82 ± 0.06. PL had a moderate ability to select the most similar prostate, with a mean DSC of 0.63 ± 0.18. The DSC obtained with the proposed selection method were slightly lower than the maximums established using brute force, but this does not include potential improvements expected with deformable registration. Atlas selection based on PL for prostate and femoral diameter for femoral heads provides reasonable segmentation accuracy

  14. Poster — Thur Eve — 59: Atlas Selection for Automated Segmentation of Pelvic CT for Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallawi, A [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Farrell, T; Diamond, K; Wierzbicki, M [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Medical Physics Department, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Automated atlas-based segmentation has recently been evaluated for use in planning prostate cancer radiotherapy. In the typical approach, the essential step is the selection of an atlas from a database that best matches the target image. This work proposes an atlas selection strategy and evaluates its impact on the final segmentation accuracy. Prostate length (PL), right femoral head diameter (RFHD), and left femoral head diameter (LFHD) were measured in CT images of 20 patients. Each subject was then taken as the target image to which all remaining 19 images were affinely registered. For each pair of registered images, the overlap between prostate and femoral head contours was quantified using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Finally, we designed an atlas selection strategy that computed the ratio of PL (prostate segmentation), RFHD (right femur segmentation), and LFHD (left femur segmentation) between the target subject and each subject in the atlas database. Five atlas subjects yielding ratios nearest to one were then selected for further analysis. RFHD and LFHD were excellent parameters for atlas selection, achieving a mean femoral head DSC of 0.82 ± 0.06. PL had a moderate ability to select the most similar prostate, with a mean DSC of 0.63 ± 0.18. The DSC obtained with the proposed selection method were slightly lower than the maximums established using brute force, but this does not include potential improvements expected with deformable registration. Atlas selection based on PL for prostate and femoral diameter for femoral heads provides reasonable segmentation accuracy.

  15. Dosimetric comparison between intensity modulated brachytherapy versus external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy for cervix cancer: a treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramani, V.; Sharma, D.N.; Jothy Basu, K.S.; Rath, G.K.; Gopishankar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric superiority of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) based on inverse planning optimization technique with classical brachytherapy optimization and also with external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy planning technique in patients of cervical carcinoma

  16. Utilization of cone-beam CT for offline evaluation of target volume coverage during prostate image-guided radiotherapy based on bony anatomy alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluska, Petr; Hanus, Josef; Sefrova, Jana; Rouskova, Lucie; Grepl, Jakub; Jansa, Jan; Kasaova, Linda; Hodek, Miroslav; Zouhar, Milan; Vosmik, Milan; Petera, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    To assess target volume coverage during prostate image-guided radiotherapy based on bony anatomy alignment and to assess possibility of safety margin reduction. Implementation of IGRT should influence safety margins. Utilization of cone-beam CT provides current 3D anatomic information directly in irradiation position. Such information enables reconstruction of the actual dose distribution. Seventeen prostate patients were treated with daily bony anatomy image-guidance. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired once a week immediately after bony anatomy alignment. After the prostate, seminal vesicles, rectum and bladder were contoured, the delivered dose distribution was reconstructed. Target dose coverage was evaluated by the proportion of the CTV encompassed by the 95% isodose. Original plans employed a 1 cm safety margin. Alternative plans assuming a smaller 7 mm margin between CTV and PTV were evaluated in the same way. Rectal and bladder volumes were compared with the initial ones. Rectal and bladder volumes irradiated with doses higher than 75 Gy, 70 Gy, 60 Gy, 50 Gy and 40 Gy were analyzed. In 12% of reconstructed plans the prostate coverage was not sufficient. The prostate underdosage was observed in 5 patients. Coverage of seminal vesicles was not satisfactory in 3% of plans. Most of the target underdosage corresponded to excessive rectal or bladder filling. Evaluation of alternative plans assuming a smaller 7 mm margin revealed 22% and 11% of plans where prostate and seminal vesicles coverage, respectively, was compromised. These were distributed over 8 and 7 patients, respectively. Sufficient dose coverage of target volumes was not achieved for all patients. Reducing of safety margin is not acceptable. Initial rectal and bladder volumes cannot be considered representative for subsequent treatment.

  17. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC or metastatic tumors in lung. Methods 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. Results The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR, superior-inferior (SI, anterior-posterior (AP directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20% grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15% grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10% grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5% grade 1 late esophagitis. Conclusion The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used.

  18. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT) guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC) for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic tumors in lung. Methods 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. Results The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP) directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20%) grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15%) grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10%) grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5%) grade 1 late esophagitis. Conclusion The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used. PMID:20187962

  19. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yali; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jin; Zhong, Renming; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Xu, Qinfeng; Wang, Xin; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT) guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC) for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic tumors in lung. 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP) directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20%) grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15%) grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10%) grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5%) grade 1 late esophagitis. The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used

  20. Clinical treatment planning for stereotactic radiotherapy, evaluation by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairn, T.; Aland, T.; Kenny, J.; Knight, R.T.; Crowe, S.B.; Langton, C.M.; Franich, R.D.; Johnston, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This study uses re-evaluates the doses delivered by a series of clinical stereotactic radiotherapy treatments, to test the accuracy of treatment planning predictions for very small radiation fields. Stereotactic radiotherapy treatment plans for meningiomas near the petrous temporal bone and the foramen magnum (incorp rating fields smaller than I c m2) were examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Important differences between treatment planning predictions and Monte Carlo calculation