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Sample records for radiotherapy outcomes including

  1. Olfactory neuroblastoma: the long-term outcome and late toxicity of multimodal therapy including radiotherapy based on treatment planning using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takashi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Koichi; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Homma, Akihiro; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare tumor originating from olfactory epithelium. Here we retrospectively analyzed the long-term treatment outcomes and toxicity of radiotherapy for ONB patients for whom computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional treatment planning was conducted to reappraise the role of radiotherapy in the light of recent advanced technology and chemotherapy. Seventeen patients with ONB treated between July 1992 and June 2013 were included. Three patients were Kadish stage B and 14 were stage C. All patients were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery or chemotherapy. The radiation dose was distributed from 50 Gy to 66 Gy except for one patient who received 40 Gy preoperatively. The median follow-up time was 95 months (range 8–173 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were estimated at 88% and 74%, respectively. Five patients with stage C disease had recurrence with the median time to recurrence of 59 months (range 7–115 months). Late adverse events equal to or above Grade 2 in CTCAE v4.03 were observed in three patients. Multimodal therapy including radiotherapy with precise treatment planning based on CT simulation achieved an excellent local control rate with acceptable toxicity and reasonable overall survival for patients with ONB

  2. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.; Glanzmann, C.; Taussky, D.; Luetolf, U.M.; Schmid, S.; Moe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m 2 daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of ≥grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and highly

  3. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

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    Huguenin, P.; Glanzmann, C.; Taussky, D.; Luetolf, U.M. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Radiation Oncology Dept.; Schmid, S.; Moe, K. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1998-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m{sup 2} daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of {>=}grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and

  4. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

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    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  5. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

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    Childs, Stephanie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Johnson Creek, Madison, WI (United States); Friedmann, Alison M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  6. A case study of the neuropsychological outcomes following microsurgery, conventional radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy for an adult's recurrent craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, David; Allan, Alfred; Becerra, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the neuropsychological outcomes for an adult patient, 2 years after receiving microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy for a recurrent craniopharyngioma; and the impact of a further intervention, stereotactic radiotherapy, on this level of neuropsychological functioning. JD, a 30 year old male whose recurrent craniopharyngioma had 2 years earlier been treated with two operations and conventional radiotherapy. JD was assessed (using standardized clinical tests) before and after a course of stereotactic radiotherapy. Prior to stereotactic radiotherapy (and 2 years after microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy) JD's IQ was intact, but considerable impairments were present in executive functioning, memory, theory of mind and processing speed. Fifteen months after stereotactic radiotherapy, all neuropsychological domains remained largely static or improved, supporting the utility of this treatment option in the neuropsychological domain. However, deficits in executive functioning, memory and processing speed remained. These findings suggest that, even after multiple treatments, substantial cognitive impairments can be present in an adult patient with a recurrent craniopharyngioma. This profile of deficits underlines the inadequacy of relying purely on IQ as a marker for cognitive health in this population and emphasizes the need to include neuropsychological impairments as a focus of rehabilitation with these patients.

  7. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Deasy, Joseph O; Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  8. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma: long-term outcome and sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, Mark W.; Buatti, John M.; Fennell, Eileen M.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.; Rhoton, Albert L.; Grant, Maria B.; Friedman, William A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To review outcome and treatment sequelae in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-one patients with pituitary adenomas received radiotherapy at the University of Florida and had 2-year minimum potential follow-up. One hundred twenty-one had newly diagnosed adenomas, and 20 had recurrent tumors. Newly diagnosed tumors were treated with surgery and radiotherapy (n = 98) or radiotherapy alone (n = 23). Patients with recurrent tumors received salvage treatment with surgery and radiotherapy (n = 10) or radiotherapy alone (n = 10). The impact of age, sex, presenting symptoms, tumor extent, surgery type, degree of resection, hormonal activity, primary or salvage therapy, and radiotherapy dose on tumor control was analyzed. Tumor control is defined by the absence of radiographic progression and stable or decreased hormone level (in hormonally active tumors) after treatment. Effect of therapy on vision, hormonal function, neurocognitive function, life satisfaction, and affective symptoms were examined. A Likert categorical scale survey was used for assessment of neurocognitive, life satisfaction, and affective symptom status. Survey results from the radiotherapy patients were compared with a control group treated with transsphenoidal surgery alone. Multivariate analysis used the forward step-wise sequence of chi squares for the log rank test. Results: At 10 years, tumor control for the surgery and radiotherapy group (S + RT) was 95% and not statistically different (p = 0.58) than for patients treated with radiotherapy alone (RT) (90%). Patients with prolactin- and ACTH-secreting tumors had significantly worse tumor control, as did patients treated for recurrent tumors. Multivariate analysis for tumor control revealed that only young age was predictive of worse outcome (p = 0.0354). Visual function was either unaffected or improved in most patients, although four patients developed visual

  9. Radiotherapy Plus Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Portal Vein: Long-Term Patient Outcomes

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    Yoon, Sang Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Suk [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hyung Jin [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon, E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kang Mo; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Gyu [Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dong Jin [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods and Materials: A registry database of 412 patients treated with TACE and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for HCC with PVTT between August 2002 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The radiotherapy volume included the PVTT, with a 2- to 3-cm margin to cover adjacent HCC. Intrahepatic primary HCC was managed by TACE before or after radiotherapy. Results: Median patient age was 52 years old, and 88.1% of patients were male. Main or bilateral PVTT was observed in 200 (48.5%) patients. Median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 21-60 Gy) delivered in 2- to 5-Gy fractions. We found that 3.6% of patients achieved a complete response and that 24.3% of patients achieved a partial response. The response and progression-free rates of PVTT were 39.6% and 85.6%, respectively. Median patient survival was 10.6 months, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 42.5% and 22.8%, respectively. Significant independent variables associated with overall survival included advanced tumor stage, alpha-fetoprotein level, degree of PVTT, and response to radiotherapy. Forty-one patients (10.0%) showed grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity during or 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. Grades 2-3 gastroduodenal complications were observed in 15 patients (3.6%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVTT in patients with HCC. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and radiotherapy is a treatment option for relieving and/or stabilizing PVTT in patients with advanced HCC.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  11. Outcome of 289 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Guangfei; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Feng Qinfu; Zhou Zongmei; Lv Jima; Liang Jun; Wang Mei; Yin Weibo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Methods: 289 patients who were treated either by radiotherapy alone (168 patients) or radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (121 patients) from Dec. 1999 to Dec. 2002 were entered into the database for analysis. Pathological types: squamous cancer (152), adenocarcinoma(74), squamoadenocarcinoma(2) and other types (2). 24 showed cancer unclassificable and 35 were diagnosed without pathological proof. Stages: 74 had III A and 215 III B stage disease. Among the 121 patients treated with combined modality, 24 were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, 78 radiotherapy after chemotherapy(C + R), and 19 radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy(R + C). In patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy or C + R, 38 received consolidation chemotherapy after induction treatment. Results: The 1-, 3-, 5-year overall survival, and the median survival were: 45% , 16% , 8%, and 16.2 months for all patients; 57%, 27%, 11%, and 21.7 months for stage IIIA; 41%, 12%, 7%, and 15.3 months for IIIB. By logrank test, clinical stage, KPS performance, tumor volume, hemoglobin level before treatment, consolidation chemotherapy, radiation dose, and response to treatment showed statistically dramatic impact on overall survival. The overall survival rate and median survival time were slightly higher in the combined group than in the radiotherapy alone group, but the difference is statistically insignificant. In Cox multivariable regression, stage and consolidation chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors; KPS performance, radiation dose, and response to treatment were at the margin of statistical significance. Esophagitis and pneumonitis of Grade II or higher were 24% and 8%, respectively. Failure sites included in the thorax(41%), outside of thorax(48%), and both in and outside the thorax(11%). There was no difference between the

  12. Outcome of post-prostatectomy radiotherapy in one institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, M.; Buxton, S.; Heilbornn, C.; Wong, H. Z.; Sutherland, P.; Bolt, J.; Steele, D.; Stapleton, A.; Porter, A.; Landers, B.

    2006-01-01

    We present a retrospective study to evaluate the outcome of postoperative radiotherapy for biochemical or clinical recurrent prostate cancer. Twenty-six patients (median age 60 years) underwent radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy between January 1997 and January 2004. Seven patients received adjuvant radiotherapy and 19 received salvage radiotherapy. The median prostate-specific antigen at diagnosis was 8.6 (0.9-89) and most (23 patients) presented with T 3N 0 disease. The median follow up was 19.5 months (5-84 months). All patients received a dose of 61.2 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction, 20 initially receiving 45 Gy to the lesser pelvis. The median dose to the bladder, rectum and left femoral head were 55.6, 57.5 and 33.8 Gy, respectively. All patients were managed radiotherapeutically by the first author. Twenty-four patients are alive. Two patients have died, one from oesophageal cancer and the second from metastatic prostate cancer. Two other patients also developed metastatic disease. Four asymptomatic patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen are under observation. None of the 26 patients has developed a local recurrence. Seven patients have developed grade 1 late bowel effects and three a grade 2 late effect. Eight patients suffer from grade 1 late genitourinary effects and two from grade 2 effects. One patient developed impotence, whereas 23 patients were rendered impotent postoperatively. There were no grade 3/4 late effects. Postoperative radiotherapy is well tolerated and provides effective local control

  13. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma: long-term outcome and sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, Mark W.; Buatti, John M.; Fennel, Eileen M.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.; Friedman, William A.; Rhoton, Albert L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To review outcome and treatment sequelae in patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas. Materials and Methods: One hundred forty-one patients with pituitary adenomas received radiotherapy and had 2-year minimum follow-up. One hundred twenty-one patients had newly diagnosed adenomas and 20 patients had recurrent tumors. Newly diagnosed tumors were treated with surgery and radiotherapy (S + RT; n=98) or radiotherapy alone (RT; n=23). Patients with recurrent tumors received salvage treatment with S+RT (n=10) or RT (n=10). The impact of age, sex, presenting symptoms, tumor extent, surgery type, degree of resection, hormonal activity, primary or salvage therapy, and radiotherapy dose on local control and cause-specific survival was analyzed. Effect of therapy on vision, hormonal function, life satisfaction, neurocognitive function, and affective symptoms was examined. A Likert scale survey was used for assessment of life satisfaction, neurocognitive status, and affective symptoms after therapy. Survey results from the RT patients were compared to a control group treated with transsphenoidal surgery alone (S). Survival analysis employed the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis used the forward step-wise sequence of chi-squares for the log-rank test. Results: At 10 years, local control for the S+RT group (S + RT) was 95% and not statistically different (p=.58) than for patients in the RT group (90%). Cause-specific survival rates were also similar (p=.88) between the S+RT (97%) and RT (99%) groups. Patients with prolactin- and ACTH-secreting tumors had significantly worse local control, as did patients treated for recurrent tumors. Cause-specific survival was not decreased in any patient group. Multivariate analysis for local control and cause-specific survival revealed only young age to be predictive of worse outcome (p=.0354 and p=.0355 respectively). Visual function was either unaffected or improved in most patients

  14. Solitary bone plasmacytoma: outcome and prognostic factors following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebross, Robert H.; Ha, Chul S.; Cox, James D.; Weber, Donna; Delasalle, Kay; Alexanian, Raymond

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the natural history of solitary plasmacytoma of bone (SBP) after radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1965-1996, we identified 57 previously untreated patients with a SBP. A serum myeloma protein was present in 33 patients (58%) and Bence Jones proteinuria was present in an additional eight patients (14%). The median radiotherapy dose was 50 Gy (range, 30-70 Gy). Overall survival, cause-specific survival, and freedom from progression to multiple myeloma were calculated actuarially. Results: Local control was achieved in 55 of 57 patients (96%). For those 29 patients (51%) who subsequently developed multiple myeloma, the median time to progression was 1.8 years. There was a direct correlation between persistence of abnormal protein following radiotherapy and the likelihood of developing multiple myeloma. Among 11 patients with disappearance of myeloma protein, only two developed multiple myeloma after 4 and 12 years, in contrast to progression in 57% of patients with a persistent protein peak and 63% of those with nonsecretory disease (p = 0.02). Among 23 patients with thoracolumbar spine disease, 7 of 8 patients staged with plain radiographs alone developed multiple myeloma in comparison with 1 of 7 patients who also had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (p = 0.08). For all patients, the median survival from radiotherapy was 11.0 years. The median cause-specific survival of patients with disappearance of myeloma protein was significantly longer than that of the remaining patients (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Results supported the importance of precise staging that includes MRI of the spine for optimum patient selection and the application of definitive radiotherapy. Those patients with myeloma protein that disappears following radiotherapy represent a category with a high likelihood of cure

  15. Does Treatment Duration Affect Outcome After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Li Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.; Chen, David Y.T.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The protraction of external beam radiotherapy (RT) time is detrimental in several disease sites. In prostate cancer, the overall treatment time can be considerable, as can the potential for treatment breaks. We evaluated the effect of elapsed treatment time on outcome after RT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and November 2004, 1,796 men with prostate cancer were treated with RT alone. The nontreatment day ratio (NTDR) was defined as the number of nontreatment days divided by the total elapsed days of RT. This ratio was used to account for the relationship between treatment duration and total RT dose. Men were stratified into low risk (n = 789), intermediate risk (n = 798), and high risk (n = 209) using a single-factor model. Results: The 10-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rate was 68% for a NTDR <33% vs. 58% for NTDR ≥33% (p = 0.02; BF was defined as a prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL). In the low-risk group, the 10-year FFBF rate was 82% for NTDR <33% vs. 57% for NTDR ≥33% (p = 0.0019). The NTDR was independently predictive for FFBF (p = 0.03), in addition to T stage (p = 0.005) and initial prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) on multivariate analysis, including Gleason score and radiation dose. The NTDR was not a significant predictor of FFBF when examined in the intermediate-risk group, high-risk group, or all risk groups combined. Conclusions: A proportionally longer treatment duration was identified as an adverse factor in low-risk patients. Treatment breaks resulting in a NTDR of ≥33% (e.g., four or more breaks during a 40-fraction treatment, 5 d/wk) should be avoided

  16. Radiotherapy Alone is Associated with Improved Outcomes Over Surgery in the Management of Solitary Plasmacytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Wen; Niu, Shao-Qing; Wang, Han-Yu; Wen, Ge; Li, Yi-Yang; Xia, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Jing

    2015-01-01

    A moderate dose of radiation is the recommended treatment for solitary plasmacytoma (SP), but there is controversy over the role of surgery. Our study aimed at comparing different treatment modalities in the management of SP. Data from 38 consecutive patients with solitary plasmacytoma, including 16 with bone plasmacytoma and 22 with extramedullary plasmacytoma, were retrospectively reviewed. 15 patients received radiotherapy alone; 11 received surgery alone, and 12 received both. The median radiation dose was 50Gy. All operations were performed as radical resections. Local progression-free survival (LPFS), multiple myeloma-free survival (MMFS), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated and outcomes of different therapies were compared. The median follow-up time was 55 months. 5-year LPFS, MMFS, PFS and OS were 87.0%, 80.9%, 69.8% and 87.4%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed, compared with surgery alone, radiotherapy alone was associated with significantly higher 5-year LPFS (100% vs 69.3%, p=0.016), MMFS (100% vs 51.4%, p=0.006), PFS (100% vs 33.7%, p=0.0004) and OS (100% vs 70%, p=0.041). Radiotherapy alone can be considered as a more effective treatment for SP over surgery. Whether a combination of radiotherapy and surgery improves outcomes requires further study.

  17. Outcomes of Kimura's disease after radiotherapy or nonradiotherapeutic treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ah Ram; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Jun, Yoon Kyung

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of Kimura's disease and to identify the optimal treatment regimen for Kimura's disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 14 patients with Kimura's disease were treated with radiotherapy (RT) and 9 patients were treated with local excision or systemic steroids. The radiation doses ranged from 20 to 45 Gy. Immunohistochemical studies were performed in 13 cases. Results: At RT completion, a marked response in terms of tumor size was noted in most cases. The median follow-up was 65 months. Local control was obtained in 9 (64.3%) of the 14 in the RT group and in 2 (22.2%) of the 9 in the non-RT group. No secondary malignancies were observed in the RT group. Conclusion: These results supports the finding that RT is more effective against Kimura's disease. Simple or immunohistochemical features did not influence the treatment outcome

  18. Postoperative radiotherapy in patients with salivary duct carcinoma. Clinical outcomes and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoto, Makoto; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the clinical outcome and the role of postoperative radiotherapy for patients with salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) who had undergone surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of 25 SDC patients treated between 1998 and 2011 with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. The median prescribed dose was 60 Gy (range, 49.5-61.4 Gy). The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the tumor bed in four patients, the tumor bed and ipsilateral neck in 14 patients, and the tumor bed and bilateral neck in six patients. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and prognostic variables were analyzed with the log-rank test. The 5-year LC, DFS and OS were 67%, 45% and 47%, respectively. Disease recurrence was found in 12 patients: seven as local, four as regional and eight as distant failure. Perineural and lymphovascular invasion was a significant prognostic factor for LC (P=0.03). Local failure was common, and the presence of local recurrence significantly affected the OS (P<0.05). We conclude that surgery and postoperative radiotherapy is expected to decrease the risk of local failure and contribute to good prognoses for patients with SDC. It might be advisable to have the CTV include the cranial nerves involved and the corresponding parts of the skull base in cases of pathologically positive perineural invasion. (author)

  19. Associations between nutritional status, weight loss, radiotherapy treatment toxicity and treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Amanda; Kiss, Nicole; Hodgson, Belinda; Crowe, Timothy C; Walsh, Adam D

    2011-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to nutritional deterioration which may be compounded by radiotherapy treatment toxicities. This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy were associated with treatment toxicity and outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Seventy-three gastrointestinal cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy underwent medical record audits assessing body weight, radiotherapy toxicity, unplanned treatment breaks or hospital admissions and completion of prescribed treatment/s. Nutritional status was assessed in a subset of patients (n = 11) using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment tool. Seventy-five percent of patients lost weight throughout radiotherapy. Weight loss was significantly greater in patients experiencing unplanned radiotherapy breaks (-3.1% vs -1.6%, p nutritional status during radiotherapy (as measured by weight loss) may be associated with poorer short-term treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Patient numbers were too small to definitively determine the effect of nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy (defined by PG-SGA) on treatment outcomes. Further research is required to investigate this in larger, longer-term studies. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Outcome analysis of 300 prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Geoffrey S.; McLaren, Duncan B.; Kerr, Gillian R.; Elliott, Tony; Howard, Grahame

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy is an established treatment for localized prostate carcinoma. This study sought to analyze the outcomes of patients treated with relatively low-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred patients with T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated between 1996 and 2001. Patients were prescribed 3 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation before receiving 5250 cGy in 20 fractions. Patients' case notes and the oncology database were used to retrospectively assess outcomes. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results: Patients presented with prostate cancer with poorer prognostic indicators than that reported in other series. At 5 years, the actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 83.2% and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse rate was 57.3%. Metastatic disease had developed in 23.4% of patients. PSA relapse continued to occur 5 years from treatment in all prognostic groups. Independent prognostic factors for relapse included treatment near the start of the study period, neoadjuvant oral anti-androgen monotherapy rather than neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone releasing hormone therapy, and diagnosis through transurethral resection of the prostate rather than transrectal ultrasound. Conclusion: This is the largest reported series of patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy in the United Kingdom. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not appear to adequately compensate for the relatively low effective radiation dose used

  1. Outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy for anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiayun; Li, Duanshu; Hu, Chaosu; Wang, Zhuoying; Ying, Hongmei; Wu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a malignancy with one of the highest fatality rates. We reviewed our recent clinical experience with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with surgery and chemotherapy for the management of ATC. 13 patients with ATC who were treated by IMRT in our institution between October 2008 and February 2011, have been analyzed. The target volume for IMRT was planned to include Gross tumor volume (GTV): primary tumor plus any N + disease (66 Gy/33 F/6.6 W), with elective irradiation of thyroid bed, bilateral level II through VI and mediastinal lymph nodes to the level of the carina (54-60 Gy). Seven patients received surgical intervention and eleven patients had chemotherapy. The median radiotherapy dose to GTV was 60 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks. The median survival time of the 13 patients was 9 months. The direct causes of death were distant metastases (75%) and progression of the locoregional disease (25%). Ten patients were spared dyspnea and tracheostomy because their primary neck lesion did not progress. The results showed that IMRT combined by surgery and chemotherapy for ATC might be beneficial to improve locoregional control. Further new therapies are needed to control metastases

  2. Radiological response and clinical outcome in patients with femoral bone metastases after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Kamata, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the radiological response and clinical outcome in patients with femoral bone metastases after radiotherapy. 102 consecutive patients with femoral metastases without pathological fracture were treated by surgery or radiotherapy between 2002 and 2005. Twelve of them initially treated with surgery were excluded from this study. The remaining 90 patients with 102 lesions underwent radiation therapy as the initial treatment. Twelve patients who died within 30 days by disease progression and 6 who were lost to follow-up were excluded. The remaining 72 patients with 84 lesions including 43 impending fractures were enrolled in this analysis. Radiological changes were categorized into complete response, partial response, no change, and progressive disease based on plain radiograph findings. Pain relief was reviewed for 77 painful lesions. The median radiation dose was 30 Gy. No re-irradiation was performed. 35 lesions (42%) achieved radiological responses median 3 months after radiotherapy. Pain relief was obtained in 36 of 77 lesions (47%). There was no significant correlation between radiological response and pain relief (P=0.166). Eleven lesions eventually required surgery and considered as treatment failure. The treatment failure rate in the radiological progressive disease (PD) group (8/19, 42%) was significantly higher than that in the non-PD group (3/65, 5%) (P<0.001). Among 43 impending fracture lesions, 15 lesions (36%) experienced radiological response and 35 lesions (81%) required no surgical interventions. Our data suggest that radiotherapy can enable metastatic bone healing and avoid surgery in many lesions. However, radiological PD lesions often require surgery after radiotherapy. (author)

  3. The impact of radiotherapy on clinical outcomes in parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Lim, Do Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) is considered a mainstay of treatment in parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). We aim to determine the treatment outcomes and prognostic factors for PM-RMS patients who treated with RT. In addition, we tried to evaluate the adequate dose and timing of RT. Twenty-two patients with PM-RMS from 1995 to 2013 were evaluated. Seven patients had intracranial extension (ICE) and 17 patients had skull base bony erosion (SBBE). Five patients showed distant metastases at the time of diagnosis. All patients underwent chemotherapy and RT. The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 40.0 to 56.0 Gy). The median follow-up was 28.7 months. Twelve patients (54.5%) experienced failure after treatment; 4 local, 2 regional, and 6 distant failures. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 77.7% and 38.5%, respectively. The 5-year OS rate was 50.8% for patients without distant metastases and 0% for patients with metastases (p < 0.001). Radiation dose (<50 Gy vs. ≥50 Gy) did not compromise the LC (p = 0.645). However, LC was affected by ICE (p = 0.031). Delayed administration (>22 weeks) of RT was related to a higher rate of local failure (40.0%). RT resulted in a higher rate of local control in PM-RMS. However, it was not extended to survival outcome. A more effective treatment for PM-RMS is warranted.

  4. Comparative effectiveness of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy in prostate cancer: Observational study of mortality outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Sooriakumaran (Prasanna); T. Nyberg (Tommy); O. Akre (Olof); L. Haendler (Leif); I. Heus (Inge); M. Olsson (Marita); S. Carlsson (Sigrid); M.J. Roobol-Bouts (Monique); G. Steineck (Gunnar); P. Wiklund (Peter)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the survival outcomes of patients treated with surgery or radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Design: Observational study. Setting: Sweden, 1996-2010. Participants: 34 515 men primarily treated for prostate cancer with surgery (n=21 533) or radiotherapy (n=12 982).

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Integrated PET/CT-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, Matthew R.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Schultz, Christopher J.; Michel, Michelle A.; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang Dian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We previously reported the advantages of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) fused with CT for radiotherapy planning over CT alone in head and neck carcinoma (HNC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the predictive value of PET for patients receiving PET/CT-guided definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From December 2002 to August 2006, 42 patients received PET/CT imaging as part of staging and radiotherapy planning. Clinical outcomes including locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, death, and treatment-related toxicities were collected retrospectively and analyzed for disease-free and overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence. Results: Median follow-up from initiation of treatment was 32 months. Overall survival and disease-free survival were 82.8% and 71.0%, respectively, at 2 years, and 74.1% and 66.9% at 3 years. Of the 42 patients, seven recurrences were identified (three LR, one DM, three both LR and DM). Mean time to recurrence was 9.4 months. Cumulative risk of recurrence was 18.7%. The maximum standard uptake volume (SUV) of primary tumor, adenopathy, or both on PET did not correlate with recurrence, with mean values of 12.0 for treatment failures vs. 11.7 for all patients. Toxicities identified in those patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were also evaluated. Conclusions: A high level of disease control combined with favorable toxicity profiles was achieved in a cohort of HNC patients receiving PET/CT fusion guided radiotherapy plus/minus chemotherapy. Maximum SUV of primary tumor and/or adenopathy was not predictive of risk of disease recurrence

  6. Cell Cycle Inhibitors and Outcome after Radiotherapy in Bladder Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roetterud, Ranveig; Pettersen, Erik O.; Berner, Aasmund; Holm, Ruth; Olsen, Dag Rune; Fossaa, Sophie D.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the expression of cell cycle inhibitors with outcome of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy (46 Gy/4-5 weeks or 20 Gy/1 week) and cystectomy. Patients with pT3b (n=42) or pT0 (n=17) were included in the study. Expression of p16INK4a and p27KIP1 was assessed immunohistochemically in pre-radiotherapy biopsies and cystectomy specimens. Previously reported results of p21CIP1 expression were also included. No difference in pretreatment protein expression was found between patients with pT0 and pT3b. Expression of p21CIP1 and p27KIP1 was lower in cystectomy specimens than in pretreatment biopsies. None of the proteins showed significant impact on survival when analysed separately. However, patients with tumours showing > 50% expression of p16INK4a, p21CIP1, or p27KIP1 displayed poorer cancer-specific survival rates compared with the remaining patients (p=0.025). This effect was more pronounced in patients receiving 46 Gy than in those receiving 20 Gy. In conclusion, low expression of cell cycle inhibitors is related to favourable survival after precystectomy radiotherapy

  7. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  8. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in pediatric patients: analysis of indications and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Bilal; Mønsted, Anne; Jensen, Josephine Harding

    2010-01-01

    We describe indications, outcomes, and risk profiles of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and single fraction "radiosurgery" (SRS) in pediatric patients compared to the adult population and evaluate the causal role of SRS and SRT in inducing new neurological complications....

  9. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Ewing’s Sarcoma: Initial Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rombi, Barbara; DeLaney, Thomas F.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Huang, Mary S.; Ebb, David H.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Marcus, Karen J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy (PT) has been prescribed similarly to photon radiotherapy to achieve comparable disease control rates at comparable doses. The chief advantage of protons in this setting is to reduce acute and late toxicities by decreasing the amount of normal tissue irradiated. We report the preliminary clinical outcomes including late effects on our pediatric Ewing’s sarcoma patients treated with PT at the Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of the medical records of 30 children with Ewing’s sarcoma who were treated with PT between April 2003 and April 2009. Results: A total of 14 male and 16 female patients with tumors in several anatomic sites were treated with PT at a median age of 10 years. The median dose was 54 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) with a median follow-up of 38.4 months. The 3-year actuarial rates of event-free survival, local control, and overall survival were 60%, 86%, and 89%, respectively. PT was acutely well tolerated, with mostly mild-to-moderate skin reactions. At the time of writing, the only serious late effects have been four hematologic malignancies, which are known risks of topoisomerase and anthracyline exposure. Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy was well tolerated, with few adverse events. Longer follow-up is needed to more fully assess tumor control and late effects, but the preliminary results are encouraging.

  10. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Ewing's Sarcoma: Initial Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombi, Barbara [ATreP (Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy), Trento (Italy); DeLaney, Thomas F.; MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Huang, Mary S.; Ebb, David H. [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Liebsch, Norbert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Raskin, Kevin A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Marcus, Karen J. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy (PT) has been prescribed similarly to photon radiotherapy to achieve comparable disease control rates at comparable doses. The chief advantage of protons in this setting is to reduce acute and late toxicities by decreasing the amount of normal tissue irradiated. We report the preliminary clinical outcomes including late effects on our pediatric Ewing's sarcoma patients treated with PT at the Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of the medical records of 30 children with Ewing's sarcoma who were treated with PT between April 2003 and April 2009. Results: A total of 14 male and 16 female patients with tumors in several anatomic sites were treated with PT at a median age of 10 years. The median dose was 54 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) with a median follow-up of 38.4 months. The 3-year actuarial rates of event-free survival, local control, and overall survival were 60%, 86%, and 89%, respectively. PT was acutely well tolerated, with mostly mild-to-moderate skin reactions. At the time of writing, the only serious late effects have been four hematologic malignancies, which are known risks of topoisomerase and anthracyline exposure. Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy was well tolerated, with few adverse events. Longer follow-up is needed to more fully assess tumor control and late effects, but the preliminary results are encouraging.

  11. Clinical outcome of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer patients after definitive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Primarily combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used to treat unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer; however, the results are not satisfactory. In this study treatment results were retrospectively analyzed and the prognostic factors related to survival were identified. From March 1999 to January 2004, 102 patients with stage IIIA/IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Radiotherapy involved a daily dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy five times a week; 60 Gy was set as the total dose. Maximal chemotherapy was given to patients with normal kidney, liver, and bone marrow functions. The 5-year overall survival rate was 22.2%; the median survival was 18 months. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53 months. The complete or partial response rate was 85%. At the time of the last follow-up, 21 patients were alive and 81 patients had died, including 5 patients who had died due to radiation pneumonitis. There were significant differences in survival and in the fatal radiation pneumonitis rate between patients with superior lobe lesions and those with middle or inferior lobe lesions. Patients whose primary tumor is located in the superior lobe appear to have a better clinical outcome.

  12. Outcome analysis of salvage radiotherapy for occult cervical cancer found after simple hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Hyeon-Kang; Jeon, Wan; Kim, Hak-Jae; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui-Kyu; Ha, Sung-W.

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the outcomes of the patients, who received salvage radiotherapy for incidentally discovered cervical cancer following simple hysterectomy, and to identify the influence of intracavitary radiotherapy on treatment outcomes. Data from 117 patients with occult cervical cancer who underwent simple hysterectomy followed by salvage radiotherapy from September 1979 to November 2010 were collected. All the patients received external beam radiotherapy with (n=45) or without (n=72) intracavitary radiotherapy. Local control, disease-free survival, overall survival and treatment-related toxicity were investigated. The median follow-up time was 75 months. The 5- and 10-year local control/disease-free survival/overall survival rates were 93/87/87% and 90/84/83%, respectively. Among 98 patients who had no residual disease and negative resection margin on surgical specimens, 32 (33%) received intracavitary radiotherapy and 66 (67%) did not. There were no differences in patient and tumor characteristics between patients treated with and without intracavitary radiotherapy. The 5-year local control rate for the non-intracavitary radiotherapy group was 93 versus 94% for the intracavitary radiotherapy group (P=0.564); the disease-free survival rate was 88 versus 94% (P=0.894); the overall survival rate was 95 versus 85% (P=0.106), respectively. Among all patients, there were 5% of Grade 3 or higher late toxicities. Patients with occult invasive cervical cancer discovered following simple hysterectomy could be treated safely and effectively with salvage radiotherapy. For patients with no residual disease and negative resection margin, intracavitary radiotherapy could be omitted. (author)

  13. Daily Megavoltage Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: Correlation Between Volumetric Changes and Local Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bral, Samuel; De Ridder, Mark; Duchateau, Michael; Gevaert, Thierry; Engels, Benedikt; Schallier, Denis; Storme, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the predictive or comparative value of volumetric changes, measured on daily megavoltage computed tomography during radiotherapy for lung cancer. Patients and Methods: We included 80 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiotherapy was combined with concurrent chemotherapy, combined with induction chemotherapy, or given as primary treatment. Patients entered two parallel studies with moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy. Tumor volume contouring was done on the daily acquired images. A regression coefficient was derived from the volumetric changes on megavoltage computed tomography, and its predictive value was validated. Logarithmic or polynomial fits were applied to the intratreatment changes to compare the different treatment schedules radiobiologically. Results: Regardless of the treatment type, a high regression coefficient during radiotherapy predicted for a significantly prolonged cause-specific local progression free-survival (p = 0.05). Significant differences were found in the response during radiotherapy. The significant difference in volumetric treatment response between radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy plus induction chemotherapy translated to a superior long-term local progression-free survival for concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03). An enhancement ratio of 1.3 was measured for the used platinum/taxane doublet in comparison with radiotherapy alone. Conclusion: Contouring on daily megavoltage computed tomography images during radiotherapy enabled us to predict the efficacy of a given treatment. The significant differences in volumetric response between treatment strategies makes it a possible tool for future schedule comparison.

  14. Combined curative radiotherapy including HDR brachytherapy and androgen deprivation in localized prostate cancer: A prospective assessment of acute and late treatment toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, Thomas; Nilsson, Sten; Ryberg, Marianne; Brandberg, Yvonne; Lennernaes, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Self-reported symptoms including urinary, bowel and sexual side effects were investigated prospectively at multiple assessment points before and after combined radiotherapy of prostate cancer including HDR brachytherapy and neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Between April 2000 and June 2003, patients with predominantly advanced localized prostate tumours subjected to this treatment were asked before treatment and on follow-up visits to complete a questionnaire covering urinary, bowel and sexual problems. The mainly descriptive analyses included 525 patients, responding to at least one questionnaire before or during the period 2-34 months after radiotherapy. Adding androgen deprivation before radiotherapy significantly worsened sexual function. During radiotherapy, urinary, bowel and sexual problems increased and were reported at higher levels up to 34 months, although there seemed to be a general tendency to less pronounced irritative bowel and urinary tract symptoms over time. No side effects requiring surgery were reported. Classic late irradiation effects such as mucosal bleeding were demonstrated mainly during the second year after therapy, but appear less pronounced in comparison with dose escalated EBRT series. In conclusion, despite the high radiation dose given, the toxicity seemed comparable with that of other series but long term (5-10 years) symptom outcome has to be determined

  15. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  16. Use of artificial neural networks to predict biological outcomes for patients receiving radical radiotherapy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Rowbottom, Carl G.; Corne, David W.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: This paper discusses the application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in predicting biological outcomes following prostate radiotherapy. A number of model-based methods have been developed to correlate the dose distributions calculated for a patient receiving radiotherapy and the radiobiological effect this will produce. Most widely used are the normal tissue complication probability and tumour control probability models. An alternative method for predicting specific examples of tumour control and normal tissue complications is to use an ANN. One of the advantages of this method is that there is no need for a priori information regarding the relationship between the data being correlated. Patients and methods: A set of retrospective clinical data from patients who received radical prostate radiotherapy was used to train ANNs to predict specific biological outcomes by learning the relationship between the treatment plan prescription, dose distribution and the corresponding biological effect. The dose and volume were included as a differential dose-volume histogram in order to provide a holistic description of the available data. Results: It was shown that the ANNs were able to predict biochemical control and specific bladder and rectum complications with sensitivity and specificity of above 55% when the outcomes were dichotomised. It was also possible to analyse information from the ANNs to investigate the effect of individual treatment parameters on the outcome. Conclusion: ANNs have been shown to learn something of the complex relationship between treatment parameters and outcome which, if developed further, may prove to be a useful tool in predicting biological outcomes

  17. The influence of radiotherapy on cosmetic outcome after breast conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, Beryl; Sacchini, Virgilio; Luini, Alberto; Agresti, Roberto; Greco, Marco; Manzari, Antonella; Mariani, Luigi; Zucali, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The influence of radiotherapy in the cosmetic outcome after conservative surgery for breast cancer was evaluated using an objective method of calculating the asymmetry between the two breasts. Methods and Materials: One hundred and one patients treated with the same conservative surgery were evaluated for cosmetic outcome. Sixty-one of them received external radiotherapy (50 + 10 Gy) to the residual breast; the remaining 40 underwent surgery only. The aspect of the patients' breasts was objectively assessed for symmetry by means of a computerized technique. A subjective assessment of the cosmetic outcome was performed both by physician and patient. These objective and subjective assessments were compared in the two groups treated with or without radiotherapy. Results: The results obtained did not show significant differences in terms of cosmetic outcome in the two groups. Skin telangectasia was noted in two radiotherapy patients, while hypertrophic breast scars were only noted in six nonirradiated patients. Conclusions: We found that standard radiotherapy does not seem to influence the symmetry and the cosmetic results in breast conservative treatment when compared to a similar group of patients with the same quadrantectomy procedure and no radiotherapy

  18. Outcome of postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy: a single institutional experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sea Won; Chung, Mi Joo; Jeong, Song Mi; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Kon; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei Chul [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This single institutional study is aimed to observe the outcome of patients who received postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. A total of 59 men with histologically identified prostate adenocarcinoma who had received postoperative radiation after radical prostatectomy from August 2005 to July 2011 in Seoul St. Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea, was included. They received 45-50 Gy to the pelvis and boost on the prostate bed was given up to total dose of 63-72 Gy (median, 64.8 Gy) in conventional fractionation. The proportion of patients given hormonal therapy and the pattern in which it was given were analyzed. Primary endpoint was biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) after radiotherapy completion. Secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Biochemical relapse was defined as a prostate-specific antigen level above 0.2 ng/mL. After median follow-up of 53 months (range, 0 to 104 months), the 5-year bRFS of all patients was estimated 80.4%. The 5-year OS was estimated 96.6%. Patients who were given androgen deprivation therapy had a 5-year bRFS of 95.1% while the ones who were not given any had that of 40.0% (p < 0.01). However, the statistical significance in survival difference did not persist in multivariate analysis. The 3-year actuarial grade 3 chronic toxicity was 1.7% and no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The biochemical and toxicity outcome of post-radical prostatectomy radiotherapy in our institution is favorable and comparable to those of other studies.

  19. Outcomes of dogs undergoing radiotherapy for treatment of oral malignant melanoma: 111 cases (2006-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Mifumi; Mori, Takashi; Ito, Yusuke; Murakami, Mami; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Maruo, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of dogs with stage I, II, III, or IV oral malignant melanoma treated by various types of radiotherapy. Retrospective case series. 111 dogs. Medical records of dogs with oral malignant melanoma treated by radiotherapy (with or without adjunctive treatments) at a veterinary medical center between July 2006 and December 2012 were reviewed. Information regarding signalment, tumor location, disease stage, treatment protocols, adverse effects, and survival time were obtained from medical records and by telephone follow-up. Associations between variables of interest and outcome were analyzed. Dogs received orthovoltage x-ray (n = 68), megavoltage x-ray (39), or electron beam (4) radiotherapy. Adjunctive treatments included debulking surgery (n = 18), chemotherapy (39), or both (27). Median survival times for dogs with stage I, II, III, and IV melanoma were 758 days (n = 19), 278 days (24), 163 days (37), and 80 days (31), respectively, and differed significantly between dogs with stage I disease and those with all other disease stages. Among dogs with stage III melanoma, risk of death was significantly higher in those that received orthovoltage x-ray treatment than in those that received megavoltage x-ray treatment. Severe (primary or secondary) adverse effects were identified in 9 dogs. Median survival time was significantly longer for dogs with stage I oral malignant melanoma than for dogs with more advanced disease at the time of staging. The staging system used may be a useful tool for prognosis prediction in dogs undergoing similar treatment protocols for oral malignant melanomas.

  20. Outcome and late complications of radiotherapy in patients with unicentric Castleman disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhof, Dirk; Debus, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Castleman disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. Surgery is considered standard therapy for the unicentric type. However, case reports have documented favorable responses to radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical outcomes of five patients with unicentric Castleman disease treated with radiotherapy between 1991 and 2005. Mediastinal lymph nodes were the most common site of disease (four patients). Three patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, two patients with surgery and radiotherapy. Patients were treated with radiotherapy doses ranging from 40 Gy to 50 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-175 months). During follow-up only one patient had progressive disease and died of Castleman disease. At the time of last follow-up two patients were in complete remission, one patient in partial remission, and one patient had stable disease. One patient showed serious acute and late toxicities. At the end of radiotherapy a paraneoplastic pemphigus vulgaris occurred, and eight to 11 months after radiotherapy a stenosis of the esophagus, of the left bronchus, and of the trachea due to scars. The study shows that unicentric Castleman disease is successfully treated with radiotherapy. However, for detection of possible complications as pemphigus vulgaris or stenosis of the esophagus or trachea an accurate follow-up is necessary

  1. Maximum recovery potential of human tumor cells may predict clinical outcome in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.

    1987-01-01

    We studied inherent radiosensitivity/resistance (D0), ability to accumulate sublethal damage (n) and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in established human tumor cell lines as well as early passage human tumor cell lines derived from patients with known outcome following radiotherapy. Survival 24 hrs after treatment of human tumor cells with X rays in plateau phase cultures is a function of initial damage (D0, n), as well as recovery over 24 hrs (PLDR). A surviving fraction greater than .1 24 hrs following treatment with 7 Gy in plateau phase cultures is associated with tumor cell types (melanoma, osteosarcoma) with a high probability of radiotherapy failure or tumor cells derived from patients who actually failed radiotherapy. Therefore, total cellular recovery following radiation may be an important determinant of radiocurability. Accurate assays of radiotherapy outcome may need to account for all these radiobiological parameters

  2. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  3. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Maxillary Sinus Cancer: Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicities of Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bristol, Ian J.; Ahamad, Anesa; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A.; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, K. Kian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of three changes in radiotherapy technique on the outcomes for patients irradiated postoperatively for maxillary sinus cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 146 patients treated between 1969 and 2002 were reviewed. The patients were separated into two groups according to the date of treatment. Group 1 included 90 patients treated before 1991 and Group 2 included 56 patients treated after 1991, when the three changes were implemented. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: No differences were found in the 5-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, local control, nodal control, or distant metastasis rates between the two groups (51% vs. 62%, 51% vs. 57%, 76% vs. 70%, 82% vs. 83%, and 28% vs. 17% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively). The three changes were to increase the portals to cover the base of the skull in patients with perineural invasion, reducing their risk of local recurrence; the addition of elective neck irradiation in patients with squamous or undifferentiated histologic features, improving the nodal control, distant metastasis, and recurrence-free survival rates (64% vs. 93%, 20% vs. 3%, and 45% vs. 67%, respectively; p < 0.05 for all comparisons); and improving the dose distributions within the target volume, reducing the late Grade 3-4 complication rates (34% in Group 1 vs. 8% in Group 2, p = 0.014). Multivariate analysis revealed advancing age, the need for enucleation, and positive margins as independent predictors of worse overall survival. The need for enucleation also predicted for worse local control. Conclusion: The three changes in radiotherapy technique improved the outcomes for select patients as predicted. Despite these changes, little demonstrable overall improvement occurred in local control or survival for these patients and additional work must be done

  4. Long-Term Outcomes of Vestibular Schwannomas Treated With Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy: An Institutional Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, Sumit; Batra, Sachin; Carson, Kathryn; Shuck, John; Kharkar, Siddharth; Gandhi, Rahul; Jackson, Juan; Wemmer, Jan; Terezakis, Stephanie; Shokek, Ori; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed clinical outcome and long-term tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for unilateral schwannoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2007, 496 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy at Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD); 385 patients had radiologic follow-up that met the inclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was treatment failure. Secondary endpoints were radiologic progression and clinical outcome. Logistic regression analysis assessed the association of age, race, tumor side, sex, and pretreatment symptoms. Results: In 11 patients (3%) treatment failed, and they required salvage (microsurgical) treatment. Radiologic progression was observed in 116 patients (30.0%), including 35 patients (9%) in whom the treatment volume more than doubled during the follow-up period, although none required surgical resection. Tumors with baseline volumes of less than 1 cm 3 were 18.02 times more likely to progress than those with tumor volumes of 1 cm 3 or greater (odds ratio, 18.02; 95% confidence interval, 4.25-76.32). Treatment-induced neurologic morbidity included 8 patients (1.6%) with new facial weakness, 12 patients (2.8%) with new trigeminal paresthesias, 4 patients (0.9%) with hydrocephalus (1 communicating and 3 obstructive), and 2 patients (0.5%) with possibly radiation-induced neoplasia. Conclusions: Although the rate of treatment failure is low (3%), careful follow-up shows that radiologic progression occurs frequently. When reporting outcome, the 'no salvage surgery needed' and 'no additional treatment needed' criteria for treatment success need to be complemented by the radiologic data.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy. Effect on outcome and toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, M.; Nevens, D.; Nuyts, S. [University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-03-15

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has rapidly become standard of care in the management of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In this study, our aim was to retrospectively investigate the effect of the introducing IMRT on outcome and treatment-related toxicity compared to parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Material and methods: A total of 245 patients with stage III and IV HNSCC treated with primary radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2010 were included in this analysis: 135 patients were treated with 3DCRT, 110 patients with IMRT. Groups were compared for acute and late toxicity, locoregional control (LRC), and overall survival (OS). Oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using a log-rank test. Acute toxicity was analyzed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and late toxicity was scored using the RTOG/EORTC late toxicity scoring system. Results: Median follow-up was 35 months in the IMRT group and 68 months in the 3DCRT group. No significant differences were found in 3-year LRC and OS rates between the IMRT group and 3DCRT group. Significantly less acute mucositis {>=} grade 3 was observed in the IMRT group (32% vs. 44%, p = 0.03). There was significantly less late xerostomia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group than in the 3DCRT group (23% vs. 68%, p < 0.001). After 24 months, there was less dysphagia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group although differences failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The introduction of IMRT in the radiotherapeutic management of locally advanced head and neck cancer significantly improved late toxicity without compromising tumor control compared to a parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. (orig.)

  6. Clinical target volume delineation including elective nodal irradiation in preoperative and definitive radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caravatta Luciana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT is widely used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Currently, recommendation has been given for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV in adjuvant RT. Based on recently reviewed pathologic data, the aim of this study is to propose criteria for the CTV definition and delineation including elective nodal irradiation (ENI in the preoperative and definitive treatment of pancreatic cancer. Methods The anatomical structures of interest, as well as the abdominal vasculature were identified on intravenous contrast-enhanced CT scans of two different patients with pancreatic cancer of the head and the body. To delineate the lymph node area, a margin of 10 mm was added to the arteries. Results We proposed a set of guidelines for elective treatment of high-risk nodal areas and CTV delineation. Reference CT images were provided. Conclusions The proposed guidelines could be used for preoperative or definitive RT for carcinoma of the head and body of the pancreas. Further clinical investigations are needed to validate the defined CTVs.

  7. Outcomes in Newly Diagnosed Elderly Glioblastoma Patients after Concomitant Temozolomide Administration and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ludovic T. [Neurology Department, CHU Hautepierre, rue Molière, Strasbourg 67000 (France); Touch, Socheat [Radiation Oncology University Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Radiation Oncology Department, Soviet-Khmer Friendship Hospital, Pnom-Pehn 12400 (Cambodia); Nehme-Schuster, Hélène [Oncology Geriatric Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Antoni, Delphine [Radiation Oncology University Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Eav, Sokha [Radiation Oncology Department, Soviet-Khmer Friendship Hospital, Pnom-Pehn 12400 (Cambodia); Clavier, Jean-Baptiste; Bauer, Nicolas; Vigneron, Céline [Radiation Oncology University Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Schott, Roland [Oncology Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Kehrli, Pierre [Neurosurgery Department, CHU Hautepierre, rue Molière, Strasbourg 67000 (France); Noël, Georges, E-mail: gnoel@strasbourg.unicancer.fr [Radiation Oncology University Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Laboratoire EA 3430, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg (FMTS), Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg 67000 (France)

    2013-09-24

    This study aimed to analyze the treatment and outcomes of older glioblastoma patients. Forty-four patients older than 70 years of age were referred to the Paul Strauss Center for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The median age was 75.5 years old (range: 70–84), and the patients included 18 females and 26 males. The median Karnofsky index (KI) was 70%. The Charlson indices varied from 4 to 6. All of the patients underwent surgery. O{sub 6}-methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status was determined in 25 patients. All of the patients received radiation therapy. Thirty-eight patients adhered to a hypofractionated radiation therapy schedule and six patients to a normofractionated schedule. Neoadjuvant, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens were administered to 12, 35 and 20 patients, respectively. At the time of this analysis, 41 patients had died. The median time to relapse was 6.7 months. Twenty-nine patients relapsed, and 10 patients received chemotherapy upon relapse. The median overall survival (OS) was 7.2 months and the one- and two-year OS rates were 32% and 12%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, only the Karnofsky index was a prognostic factor. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy with temozolomide are feasible and acceptably tolerated in older patients. However, relevant prognostic factors are needed to optimize treatment proposals.

  8. Outcomes in Newly Diagnosed Elderly Glioblastoma Patients after Concomitant Temozolomide Administration and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ludovic T.; Touch, Socheat; Nehme-Schuster, Hélène; Antoni, Delphine; Eav, Sokha; Clavier, Jean-Baptiste; Bauer, Nicolas; Vigneron, Céline; Schott, Roland; Kehrli, Pierre; Noël, Georges

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the treatment and outcomes of older glioblastoma patients. Forty-four patients older than 70 years of age were referred to the Paul Strauss Center for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The median age was 75.5 years old (range: 70–84), and the patients included 18 females and 26 males. The median Karnofsky index (KI) was 70%. The Charlson indices varied from 4 to 6. All of the patients underwent surgery. O 6 -methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status was determined in 25 patients. All of the patients received radiation therapy. Thirty-eight patients adhered to a hypofractionated radiation therapy schedule and six patients to a normofractionated schedule. Neoadjuvant, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens were administered to 12, 35 and 20 patients, respectively. At the time of this analysis, 41 patients had died. The median time to relapse was 6.7 months. Twenty-nine patients relapsed, and 10 patients received chemotherapy upon relapse. The median overall survival (OS) was 7.2 months and the one- and two-year OS rates were 32% and 12%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, only the Karnofsky index was a prognostic factor. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy with temozolomide are feasible and acceptably tolerated in older patients. However, relevant prognostic factors are needed to optimize treatment proposals

  9. Combined modality treatment including intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveit, Kjell Maque; Wiig, Johan N.; Olsen, Dag Rune; Storaas, Andreas; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    1997-01-01

    Background: Treatment of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer usually has a high local recurrence rate and poor survival. Promising results have been reported by combined external radiotherapy, extensive surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced rectal cancers fixed to the pelvic wall or locally recurrent rectal cancers underwent preoperative external radiotherapy with 46-50 Gy. Six to 8 weeks later radical pelvic surgery was attempted, and was combined with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (15-20 Gy) in 66 patients. The patients were followed closely to evaluate complication rate, local and distant recurrence rate and survival. Results: Surgery with no macroscopic tumour remaining was obtained in 65% of the patients with no postoperative deaths. Pelvic infection was the major complication (21%). Although the observation time is short (3-60 months), the local recurrence rate seems low (22%) and survival seems promising (about 60% at 4 years) in patients with complete tumour resection, in contrast to patients with residual tumour (none living at 4 years). Conclusions: The combined modality treatment with preoperative external radiotherapy and extensive pelvic surgery with IORT is sufficiently promising to start a randomized trial on the clinical value of IORT as a boost treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to this disease

  10. Long term outcomes after salvage radiotherapy for postoperative locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Chang Hoon; Kim, Jae Sung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The outcomes and toxicities of locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative radiotherapy were evaluated in the modern era. Fifty-seven patients receiving radical radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent NSCLC without distant metastasis after surgery from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Forty-two patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), and 15 patients with radiotherapy alone. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy (range, 45 to 70 Gy). Lung function change after radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing pulmonary function tests before and at 1, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 53.6 months (range, 12.0 to 107.5 months) among the survivors. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 54.8 months (range, 3.0 to 116.9 months) and 12.2 months (range, 0.8 to 100.2 months), respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that single locoregional recurrence focus and use of concurrent chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS (p = 0.048 and p = 0.001, respectively) and PFS (p = 0.002 and p = 0.026, respectively). There was no significant change in predicted forced expiratory volume in one second after radiotherapy. Although diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide decreased significantly at 1 month after radiotherapy (p < 0.001), it recovered to pretreatment levels within 12 months. Acute grade 3 radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were observed in 3 and 2 patients, respectively. There was no chronic complication observed in all patients. Salvage radiotherapy showed good survival outcomes without severe complications in postoperative locoregionally recurrent NSCLC patients. A single locoregional recurrent focus and the use of CCRT chemotherapy were associated with improved survival. CCRT should be considered as a salvage treatment in patients with good prognostic factors.

  11. Objective assessment of cosmetic outcome after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R S; Williams, Norman R; Bulsara, Max

    2013-01-01

    and thus impair cosmesis further, so we objectively evaluated the aesthetic outcome of patients within the TARGIT randomised controlled trial. We have used an objective assessment tool for evaluation of cosmetic outcome. Frontal digital photographs were taken at baseline (before TARGIT or EBRT) and yearly...... in a randomised setting, the aesthetic outcome of patients demonstrates that those treated with TARGIT have a superior cosmetic result to those patients who received conventional external beam radiotherapy....

  12. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  13. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  14. Risk factors predicting the outcome of salvage radiotherapy in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Yosuke; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Salvage radiotherapy is the only curative treatment for patients with prostate cancer showing biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy. In this study, we evaluated the clinicopathological parameters that influence the outcome of salvage radiotherapy. Medical records of 49 patients who underwent salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2008 at the Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, were retrospectively reviewed. Radiotherapy was carried out with 66 Gy on the prostatic bed. Biochemical progression-free survival after salvage radiotherapy at 2, 5 and 7 years was 51.0%, 42.2% and 42.2%, respectively. Significant parameters predicting biochemical progression after salvage radiotherapy by Cox regression analysis were prostatectomy Gleason score sum ≥8 (hazard ratio 0.08; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.22; P=0.001), prostate-specific antigen nadir after radical prostatectomy ≥0.04 ng/mL (hazard ratio 0.30; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.69; P=0.005) and negative surgical margin (hazard ratio 0.28; 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.70; P=0.006). When the patients were subgrouped by these risk factors, the 5-year progression-free survival rates after salvage radiotherapy were 77.8%, 50.0% and 6.7% in patients with 0, 1 and ≥2 predictors, respectively. In order to discriminate favorable candidates for salvage radiotherapy, Gleason score of prostatectomy, prostate-specific antigen nadir after prostatectomy and positive surgical margin represent independent predictors. Thus, progression-free survival might be more precisely predicted according to the presence/absence of these risk factors. The significance of this risk classification should be confirmed by large prospective studies. (author)

  15. Cosmetic outcome and curative effect of radiotherapy for early breast cancer after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Changuo; Ma Yuanyuan; Zhao Shuhong; Wang Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the cosmetic outcome and curative effect of 6 MV X-ray tangential field radiotherapy for early stage breast cancer after conservative surgery. Methods: The eligible criteria were single tumor ≤3 cm in diameter, surgical margin negative and lymph node negative. The exclusive criteria were inflammatory carcinoma or male breast cancer. After conservative surgery, 42 patients with stage 0, I or II breast cancer were treated with conventional radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast and 10 Gy boost to the tumor bed. The efficacy and the cosmetic outcome of radiotherapy were evaluated every 3 months for the first 2 years and every 6 months after that and every 12 months after 5 years. Results: The follow up time was 19-90 months (median 56 months). Two patients died of metastasis after 16 months and 36 months, which was diagnosed by CT scan. Excellent or good cosmetic outcome was > 93% at 36 months. The local control rate was 100%. The 1- and 3-year survival rates was 100% and 98%, respectively. Conclusions: Tangential field radiotherapy for early breast cancer after conservative surgery has a satisfied result in both tumor control and cosmetic outcome, which can definitely improve the life quality of the patients. (authors)

  16. Factors Influencing Neurocognitive Outcomes in Young Patients With Benign and Low-Grade Brain Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Mallick, Indranil; Dutta, Debnarayan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the effect of radiotherapy doses to different volumes of normal structures on neurocognitive outcomes in young patients with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients (median age, 13 years) with residual/progressive brain tumors (10 craniopharyngioma, 8 cerebellar astrocytoma, 6 optic pathway glioma and 4 cerebral low-grade glioma) were treated with SCRT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks. Prospective neuropsychological assessments were done at baseline before RT and at subsequent follow-up examinations. The change in intelligence quotient (IQ) scores was correlated with various factors, including dose-volume to normal structures. Results: Although the overall mean full-scale IQ (FSIQ) at baseline before RT remained unchanged at 2-year follow-up after SCRT, one third of patients did show a >10% decline in FSIQ as compared with baseline. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that patients aged 10% drop in FSIQ than older patients (53% vs. 10%, p = 0.03). Dosimetric comparison in patients showing a >10% decline vs. patients showing a 43.2 Gy to >13% of volume of the left temporal lobe were the ones to show a significant drop in FSIQ (p = 0.048). Radiotherapy doses to other normal structures, including supratentorial brain, right temporal lobe, and frontal lobes, did not reveal any significant correlation. Conclusion: Our prospectively collected dosimetric data show younger age and radiotherapy doses to left temporal lobe to be predictors of neurocognitive decline, and may well be used as possible dose constraints for high-precision radiotherapy planning.

  17. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  18. Initial clinical outcomes of proton beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Yoo, Gyu Sang; Cho, Sungkoo; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih; Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Boram; Kang, Wonseok; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Paik, Yong-Han; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Park, Hee Chul

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the initial outcomes of proton beam therapy (PBT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in terms of tumor response and safety. HCC patients who were not indicated for standard curative local modalities and who were treated with PBT at Samsung Medical Center from January 2016 to February 2017 were enrolled. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Tumor response was evaluated using modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). A total of 101 HCC patients treated with PBT were included. Patients were treated with an equivalent dose of 62-92 GyE 10 . Liver function status was not significantly affected after PBT. Greater than 80% of patients had Child-Pugh class A and albumin-bilirubin (ALBI) grade 1 up to 3-months after PBT. Of 78 patients followed for three months after PBT, infield complete and partial responses were achieved in 54 (69.2%) and 14 (17.9%) patients, respectively. PBT treatment of HCC patients showed a favorable infield complete response rate of 69.2% with acceptable acute toxicity. An additional follow-up study of these patients will be conducted.

  19. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: long-term outcome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Jung AE; Kim, Chul Yong [Korea University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    To evaluate long-term local control rate and toxicity in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for pituitary adenomas. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 60 patients treated with EBRT for pituitary adenoma at Korea University Medical Center from 1996 and 2006. Thirty-fi ve patients had hormone secreting tumors, 25 patients had non-secreting tumors. Fifty-seven patients had received postoperative radiotherapy (RT), and 3 had received RT alone. Median total dose was 54 Gy (range, 36 to 61.2 Gy). The definition of tumor progression were as follows: evidence of tumor progression on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, worsening of clinical sign requiring additional operation or others, rising serum hormone level against a previously stable or falling value, and failure of controlling serum hormone level so that the hormone level had been far from optimal range until last follow-up. Age, sex, hormone secretion, tumor extension, tumor size, and radiation dose were analyzed for prognostic significance in tumor control. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 2 to 14.4 years). The 10-year actuarial local control rates for non-secreting and secreting adenomas were 96% and 66%, respectively. In univariate analysis, hormone secretion was significant prognostic factor (p = 0.042) and cavernous sinus extension was marginally significant factor (p = 0.054) for adverse local control. All other factors were not significant. In multivariate analysis, hormone secretion and gender were significant. Fifty-three patients had mass-effect symptoms (headache, dizziness, visual disturbance, hypopituitarism, loss of consciousness, and cranial nerve palsy). A total of 17 of 23 patients with headache and 27 of 34 patients with visual impairment were improved. Twenty-seven patients experienced symptoms of endocrine hypersecretion (galactorrhea, amenorrhea, irregular menstruation, decreased libido, gynecomastia, acromegaly, and Cushing

  20. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: long-term outcome and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Jung AE; Kim, Chul Yong

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate long-term local control rate and toxicity in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for pituitary adenomas. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 60 patients treated with EBRT for pituitary adenoma at Korea University Medical Center from 1996 and 2006. Thirty-fi ve patients had hormone secreting tumors, 25 patients had non-secreting tumors. Fifty-seven patients had received postoperative radiotherapy (RT), and 3 had received RT alone. Median total dose was 54 Gy (range, 36 to 61.2 Gy). The definition of tumor progression were as follows: evidence of tumor progression on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, worsening of clinical sign requiring additional operation or others, rising serum hormone level against a previously stable or falling value, and failure of controlling serum hormone level so that the hormone level had been far from optimal range until last follow-up. Age, sex, hormone secretion, tumor extension, tumor size, and radiation dose were analyzed for prognostic significance in tumor control. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 2 to 14.4 years). The 10-year actuarial local control rates for non-secreting and secreting adenomas were 96% and 66%, respectively. In univariate analysis, hormone secretion was significant prognostic factor (p = 0.042) and cavernous sinus extension was marginally significant factor (p = 0.054) for adverse local control. All other factors were not significant. In multivariate analysis, hormone secretion and gender were significant. Fifty-three patients had mass-effect symptoms (headache, dizziness, visual disturbance, hypopituitarism, loss of consciousness, and cranial nerve palsy). A total of 17 of 23 patients with headache and 27 of 34 patients with visual impairment were improved. Twenty-seven patients experienced symptoms of endocrine hypersecretion (galactorrhea, amenorrhea, irregular menstruation, decreased libido, gynecomastia, acromegaly, and Cushing's disease

  1. Outcome Prediction after Radiotherapy with Medical Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magome, Taiki

    2016-01-01

    Data science is becoming more important in many fields. In medical physics field, we are facing huge data every day. Treatment outcomes after radiation therapy are determined by complex interactions between clinical, biological, and dosimetrical factors. A key concept of recent radiation oncology research is to predict the outcome based on medical big data for personalized medicine. Here, some reports, which are analyzing medical databases with machine learning techniques, were reviewed and feasibility of outcome prediction after radiation therapy was discussed. In addition, some strategies for saving manual labors to analyze huge data in medical physics were discussed.

  2. Peripheral lymphocyte subset variation predicts prostate cancer carbon ion radiotherapy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ze-Liang; Li, Bing-Xin; Wu, Xian-Wei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qing; Wei, Xun-Bin; Fu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a complementary role in the cytotoxic activity of radiotherapy. Here, we examined changes in immune cell subsets after heavy ion therapy for prostate cancer. The lymphocyte counts were compared with acute radiotherapy-related toxicity, defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, and short-term local efficacy, defined based on prostate-specific antigen concentrations. Confirmed prostate cancer patients who had not received previous radiotherapy were administered carbon ion radiotherapy (CIR) in daily fractions of 2.74 GyE with a total dose of 63-66 GyE. Lymphocyte subset counts were investigated before, during and after radiotherapy, and at a 1 month follow-up. Most notable among our findings, the CD4/CD8 ratio and CD19+ cell counts were consistently higher in patients with a complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) to CIR than in those classified in the stable disease (SD) group (P<0.05 for both). But CD3+ and CD8+ cell counts were lower in the CR and PR groups than in the SD group. These results indicate that variations in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations are predictive of outcome after CIR for prostate cancer. PMID:27029063

  3. Merkel cell carcinoma: Outcome and role of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador Alonso, R.; Lahbabi, I.; Ben Hassel, M.; Boisselier, P.; Crevoisier, R. de; Chaari, N.; Lesimple, T.; Chevrier, S.

    2008-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (M.C.C.) are rare neuroendocrine malignant tumor of the skin, occurring in elderly patients. It affects primarily the sun-exposed areas of the skin, with approximately 50% of all tumors occurring in the face and neck and 40% in the extremities. Immunohistochemical markers (C.K.20+, C.K.7- and T.T.F.1-) are used to distinguish between M.C.C. and other tumors. M.C.C. have a tendency to rapid local progression, frequent spread to regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. Due to the rarity of the disease, the optimal treatment has not been fully defined. Localized stages (stages I and II) are treated by surgical excision of the primary tumor (with 2 to 3 cm margin) and lymphadenectomy in case of node-positive disease, followed by external beam radiotherapy (E.B.R.T.) to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy in the tumor bed. Adjuvant E.B.R.T. has been shown to decrease markedly locoregional recurrences and to increase survival in recent studies. Treatment of lymph nodes area is more controversial. Chemotherapy is recommended only for metastatic disease. (authors)

  4. Long-Term Outcomes of Radiotherapy for Pituitary Adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Felicia E.; Amdur, Robert J. M.D.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term local control and toxicity for pituitary adenomas treated with fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The records of 100 patients with pituitary adenomas treated between 1983 and 2003 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-one patients had hormone-secreting tumors; 69 patients were treated with surgery and postoperative RT. Median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.6-20.2 years) for all patients and 6.2 years (range, 2-20.2 years) for living patients. The mean dose delivered was 45 Gy (range, 43-50.4 Gy). Results: The 10-year actuarial local control rates for nonsecreting and secreting adenomas were 98% and 73%, respectively (p 0.0015). Actuarial 10-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 95% and 88%, and overall survival rates were 66% and 79% for nonsecreting and secreting adenomas, respectively. Involvement of the sphenoid sinus was found to be significantly associated with decreased 10-year CSS (p = 0.0453). When compared with the two- or three-field techniques, stereotactic RT was associated with improved CSS (p = 0.0775). CSS was not significantly associated with hormone excretion, extent of surgery, or whether RT was administrated postoperatively or for salvage after a postsurgical recurrence. New cases of hypopituitarism occurred in 35 patients. One patient experienced vision loss, and one patient developed a post-treatment glioma. Conclusions: This is one of the most mature series in the literature that documents excellent results with fractionated RT for pituitary adenoma. We recommend 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction using stereotactic noncoplanar fields

  5. A Dosimetric Comparison of Breast Radiotherapy Techniques to Treat Locoregional Lymph Nodes Including the Internal Mammary Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, A; Dunlop, A; Hutchinson, K; Convery, H; Maclennan, M K; Chantler, H; Twyman, N; Rose, C; McQuaid, D; Amos, R A; Griffin, C; deSouza, N M; Donovan, E; Harris, E; Coles, C E; Kirby, A

    2018-06-01

    Radiotherapy target volumes in early breast cancer treatment increasingly include the internal mammary chain (IMC). In order to maximise survival benefits of IMC radiotherapy, doses to the heart and lung should be minimised. This dosimetry study compared the ability of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, arc therapy and proton beam therapy (PBT) techniques with and without breath-hold to achieve target volume constraints while minimising dose to organs at risk (OARs). In 14 patients' datasets, seven IMC radiotherapy techniques were compared: wide tangent (WT) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and PBT, each in voluntary deep inspiratory breath-hold (vDIBH) and free breathing (FB), and tomotherapy in FB only. Target volume coverage and OAR doses were measured for each technique. These were compared using a one-way ANOVA with all pairwise comparisons tested using Bonferroni's multiple comparisons test, with adjusted P-values ≤ 0.05 indicating statistical significance. One hundred per cent of WT(vDIBH), 43% of WT(FB), 100% of VMAT(vDIBH), 86% of VMAT(FB), 100% of tomotherapy FB and 100% of PBT plans in vDIBH and FB passed all mandatory constraints. However, coverage of the IMC with 90% of the prescribed dose was significantly better than all other techniques using VMAT(vDIBH), PBT(vDIBH) and PBT(FB) (mean IMC coverage ± 1 standard deviation = 96.0% ± 4.3, 99.8% ± 0.3 and 99.0% ± 0.2, respectively). The mean heart dose was significantly reduced in vDIBH compared with FB for both the WT (P FB). Simple WT radiotherapy delivered in vDIBH achieves satisfactory coverage of the IMC while meeting heart and lung dose constraints. However, where higher isodose coverage is required, VMAT(vDIBH) is the optimal photon technique. The lowest OAR doses are achieved by PBT, in which the use of vDIBH does not improve dose statistics. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cyclophilin B Expression Is Associated with In Vitro Radioresistance and Clinical Outcome after Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Williams

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The tools for predicting clinical outcome after radiotherapy are not yet optimal. To improve on this, we applied the COXEN informatics approach to in vitro radiation sensitivity data of transcriptionally profiled human cells and gene expression data from untreated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC and bladder tumors to generate a multigene predictive model that is independent of histologic findings and reports on tumor radiosensitivity. The predictive ability of this 41-gene model was evaluated in patients with HNSCC and was found to stratify clinical outcome after radiotherapy. In contrast, this model was not useful in stratifying similar patients not treated with radiation. This led us to hypothesize that expression of some of the 41 genes contributes to tumor radioresistance and clinical recurrence. Hence, we evaluated the expression the 41 genes as a function of in vitro radioresistance in the NCI-60 cancer cell line panel and found cyclophilin B (PPIB, a peptidylprolyl isomerase and target of cyclosporine A (CsA, had the strongest direct correlation. Functional inhibition of PPIB by small interfering RNA depletion or CsA treatment leads to radiosensitization in cancer cells and reduced cellular DNA repair. Immunohistochemical evaluation of PPIB expression in patients with HNSCC was found to be associated with outcome after radiotherapy. This work demonstrates that a novel 41-gene expression model of radiation sensitivity developed in bladder cancer cell lines and human skin fibroblasts predicts clinical outcome after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients and identifies PPIB as a potential target for clinical radiosensitization.

  7. Outcome following radiotherapy for loco-regionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foo, K.; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, R.; Foroudi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Local and regional recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer is reported to occur in 13-20% of treatment failures after resection. Reported post-recurrent median survival following radiotherapy ranges from 9 to 14 months. This study examines survival following radiotherapy alone for patients with loco-regionally recurring non-small cell lung cancer after initial surgery. Fifty-five patients, receiving radiotherapy at Westmead Hospital between 1979 and 1997, were eligible for study. Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing patient records. The end-point was overall survival. Symptom control was also recorded. Prognostic factors for analysis included age, sex, original presenting stage, disease-free interval (DFI), performance status, site of recurrence, treatment intent and dose. The median overall survival was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval: 8.1-13.0). Survival following treatment with radical intent was 26 months compared to 10.5 months for patients treated with palliative intent (P = 0.025). There was no significant difference in survival for short (<2 years) or long DFI, performance status, radiation dose, age, sex, site of recurrence or stage. Most patients (55%) had partial or complete resolution of symptoms. Radiotherapy results in overall post-recurrence median survival of nearly 1 year, consistent with previous published data. Radical treatment intent predicts better prognosis as a result of patient selection and higher dose. Radiotherapy is effective at palliating symptoms of this disease Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  8. Neuropsychological outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for base of skull meningiomas: a prospective 1-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinvorth, Sarah; Welzel, Grit; Fuss, Martin; Debus, Juergen; Wildermuth, Susanne; Wannenmacher, Michael; Wenz, Frederik

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cognitive outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with base of skull meningiomas. Methods and material: A total of 40 patients with base of skull meningiomas were neuro psychologically evaluated before, after the first fraction (1.8 Gy), at the end of FSRT (n=37), 6 weeks (n=24), 6 (n=18) and 12 months (n=14) after FSRT. A comprehensive test battery including assessment of general intelligence, attention and memory functions was used. Alternate forms were used and current mood state was controlled. Results: After the first fraction a transient decline in memory function and simultaneous improvements in attention functions were observed. No cognitive deteriorations were seen during further follow-up, but increases in attention and memory functions were observed. Mood state improved after the first fraction, at the end of radiotherapy and 6 weeks after radiotherapy. Conclusion: The present data support the conclusion that the probability for the development of permanent cognitive dysfunctions appears to be very low after FSRT. The transient memory impairments on day 1 are interpreted as most likely related to an increase of a preexisting peritumoral edema, whereas the significant acute improvements in attention functions are interpreted as practice effects. An analysis of localization specific effects of radiation failed to show clear hemisphere specific cognitive changes

  9. Outcomes following negative prostate biopsy for patients with persistent disease after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob H. Cohen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: When faced with biochemical recurrence after definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer, clinicians must determine whether the recurrence is local or systemic. Post radiotherapy prostate biopsies to detect persistent local disease are difficult to interpret histopathologically and are subject to sampling error. Our study examines outcomes for patients with a negative prostate biopsy performed for rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels after prostate radiation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of 238 prostate cancer patients with a negative biopsy following definitive radiotherapy. Seventy-five of these patients had biochemical recurrence at the time of biopsy. A negative biopsy was defined as the absence of prostate cancer without radiation-treatment effect in the specimen. RESULTS: Patients underwent biopsy at a mean of 41 months after the completion of radiation. They had a mean PSA of 6. Patients were followed for an average of 63 months. Thirty-two patients (43% developed metastasis, and 11 (15% died of prostate cancer despite a negative post-radiation biopsy. Five of nine patients (56% with sequential biopsies had a positive second biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with PSA recurrence and a negative post-radiation biopsy have a high chance of persistent local disease, progression, and death from prostate cancer. Furthermore, an initial negative biopsy does not rule-out local recurrence. Patients with biochemical recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer need to be evaluated earlier for local recurrence.

  10. Radiotherapy outcomes in laryngeal cancer - a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hliniak, A.; Rolski, W.; Michalski, W.; Szutkowski, Z.; Jarzabski, A.; Laskus, Z.; Frenkiel, Z.; Osmolski, A.

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the importance of pre-treatment factors (age, sex, T, N, histological differentiation, site, Hb level, performance status) and to investigate the influence of cigarette smoking and pulmonary and cardiac diseases on treatment outcomes in laryngeal cancer patients. From the year 1989 until May 1995 372 consecutive patients with cancer of the larynx were radically irradiated at the 2nd Teleradiotherapy Department of the Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology in Warsaw (MSCMCC). Pt. characteristics - 88% men, 12% women, age: 29-82 years, stages: T1-20%, T2 -34%, T3 -30%, T4 -16%, lymph node metastases: 27%. Complete response to treatment (CR) - 71% of cases. Loco-regional control after 2 years 52% (T1-T2 - 64%, T3 - T4 - 40%). Early reactions: pain on swallowing, confluent mucositis and moist skin reaction in 69%, 48% and 41 % of cases, respectively. Serious late complications - 19 patients. In a majority of these cases several forms of serious damage were observed. Patients with advanced disease (T3-T4) present a two times higher death risk as compared to patients in earlier stages of the disease (T1-T2). Patients with cervical node metastases also present a two times higher death risk as compared to N0 cases. Patients with performance status 1 or more had a respectively three or four times higher death risk than patients with performance status - 0. No significant influence of sex, histological differentiation, site, hemoglobin level and cigarette smoking, pulmonary and coronary diseases on treatment outcome has been found. The survival curves come down steeply three and more years after treatment completion due to causes other than local failure. The limited number of serious early and late reactions suggests the possibility of a total dose increase. (author)

  11. Influence of Radiotherapy Treatment Concept on the Outcome of Patients With Localized Ependymomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kelter, Verena; Welzel, Thomas; Behnisch, Wolfgang; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Bischof, Marc; Hof, Holger; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcome of 57 patients with localized ependymomas treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Fifty-seven patients with localized ependymomas were treated with RT. Histology was myxopapillary ependymoma (n = 4), ependymoma (n = 23), and anaplastic ependymoma (n = 30). In 16 patients, irradiation of the craniospinal axis (CSI) was performed with a median dose of 20 Gy. Forty-one patients were treated with local RT, with a local dose of 45 Gy to the posterior fossa, including a boost to the tumor bed of 9 Gy. In 19 patients, the tumor bed was irradiated with a median dose of 54 Gy. Results: Overall survival after primary diagnosis was 83% and 71% at 3 and 5 years. Five-year overall survival was 80% in low-grade and 79% in high-grade tumors. Survival from RT was 79% at 3 and 64% at 5 years. We could not show a significant difference in overall survival between CSI and local RT only. Freedom of local failure was 67% at 5 years in patients treated with CSI and 60% at 5 years after local RT. A rate of 83% for distant failure-free survival could be observed in the CSI group as opposed to 93% in the group receiving local RT only. Conclusion: Local RT in patients with localized tumors is equieffective to CSI. The radiation oncologist must keep in mind that patients with localized ependymomas benefit from local doses ≥45 Gy

  12. Influence of radiotherapy treatment concept on the outcome of patients with localized ependymomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Kelter, Verena; Welzel, Thomas; Behnisch, Wolfgang; Kulozik, Andreas E; Bischof, Marc; Hof, Holger; Debus, Jürgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2008-07-15

    To assess the outcome of 57 patients with localized ependymomas treated with radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-seven patients with localized ependymomas were treated with RT. Histology was myxopapillary ependymoma (n = 4), ependymoma (n = 23), and anaplastic ependymoma (n = 30). In 16 patients, irradiation of the craniospinal axis (CSI) was performed with a median dose of 20 Gy. Forty-one patients were treated with local RT, with a local dose of 45 Gy to the posterior fossa, including a boost to the tumor bed of 9 Gy. In 19 patients, the tumor bed was irradiated with a median dose of 54 Gy. Overall survival after primary diagnosis was 83% and 71% at 3 and 5 years. Five-year overall survival was 80% in low-grade and 79% in high-grade tumors. Survival from RT was 79% at 3 and 64% at 5 years. We could not show a significant difference in overall survival between CSI and local RT only. Freedom of local failure was 67% at 5 years in patients treated with CSI and 60% at 5 years after local RT. A rate of 83% for distant failure-free survival could be observed in the CSI group as opposed to 93% in the group receiving local RT only. Local RT in patients with localized tumors is equieffective to CSI. The radiation oncologist must keep in mind that patients with localized ependymomas benefit from local doses > or =45 Gy.

  13. Clinical problems of multiple primary cancers including head and neck cancers. From the viewpoint of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masamichi; Myojin, Miyako; Nishiyama, Noriaki; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masaru; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    A total of 2144 head and neck cancers were treated by radiotherapy at the National Sapporo Hospital between 1974 and 2001. Of these, 313 (14.6%) were found to have other primary cancers besides head and neck cancer, in which double cancers were 79% and triple or more cancers were 21%. Frequency according to primary site of the first head and neck cancer was oral cavity: 107/603 (17.7%), epipharynx cancer: 7/117 (6.0%), oropharyngeal cancer: 63/257 (24.5%), hypopharyngeal cancer: 65/200 (32.5%), laryngeal cancer: 114/558 (20.4%), and nose/paranasal sinus: 4.9% respectively. Esophageal cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer and gastric cancer were very frequent as other primary sites combined with the head and neck. The first onset region was the head and neck in 233 out of 313 cases with multiple primary cancers. The five-year survival rate from the onset of head and neck cancers is 52%, 10-year: 30%, and 5-year cause-specific survival rate 82%, and 10-year: 78%, respectively. The treatment possibilities in multiple primary cancers tend to be limited because the treatment areas are sometimes overlapped. New approaches to the treatment of multiple primary cancers should be considered in the future. (author)

  14. Quality of life outcomes after primary radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Giselle J.; Parsons, James T.; Mendenhall, William M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine quality of life functional outcome after primary radiotherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue. Methods and Materials: At the University of Florida, essentially all patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue are treated with primary continuous-course, external-beam radiotherapy alone or followed by a neck dissection. Fifty-three patients who remained continuously free of disease at 2 to 23 years were eligible to participate in an assessment of the posttreatment quality of their lives. Three patients could not be located for quality of life assessment, and one patient refused to participate, leaving 49 evaluable patients. Radiotherapy doses were 60 to 75 Gy in once daily fractions, or 74 to 79 Gy in twice daily fractions. The subjective Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck Cancer, which assigns a functional score ranging from 0 to 100, was completed by each of the patients during routine follow-up appointments. The scale measures ability to eat in public, understandability of speech, and normalcy of diet. Results: Patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy alone had excellent results with regard to eating in public, though scores showed a decline as T stage increased (average scores were T1: 90.6%; T2: 88.1%; T3: 82.8%; T4: 75.0%). Results for understandability of speech were T1: 93.75%; T2: 100%; T3: 82.8%; and T4: 87.5%. Fixation of the tongue at diagnosis was not a predictor of poor function. Normalcy of diet scores likewise decreased with increasing T stage: T1: 93.8%; T2: 89.5%; T3: 71.3%; T4: 60.0%. The addition of a neck dissection had no impact on the functional outcomes that were evaluated. Functional results did not deteriorate with prolonged follow-up of more than 5 years. Results were compared with those from the literature for patients treated by surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy or external-beam irradiation plus interstitial 192 Ir implant. The functional results of high-dose external

  15. Influence of boost technique (external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy) on the outcome of patients with carcinoma of the base of the tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regueiro, C.A.; Millan, I.; Torre, A. de la; Valcarcel, F.J.; Magallon, R.; Fernandez, E.; Aragon, G.

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed 90 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the base of the tongue. Fifty-three patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy alone (3 T1, 11 T2, 21 T3, and 18 T4 tumors) and thirty-seven patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy boost (4 T1, 15 T2, 11 T3, and 7 T4 tumors). For patients with T1, T2 and T3 primaries, the actuarial 3-year local relapse-free survival was 42% following external beam radiotherapy alone and 67% following external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy (p<0.05). The actuarial 3-year cause specific survival for these T-stages was 37% for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy alone and 53% for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy (p=0.1). In the Cox multivariate analyses restricted patients with T1, T2 and T3 staged tumors, treatment modality was the only predictor for local control but no influence on specific survival was found. The trend towards significant differences in specific survival found in the univariate comparison of both treatment modalities was probably due to the significantly higher number of N-positive patients treated with external beam radiotherapy alone. When all stages were included in the Cox analysis, low hemoglobin level, invasion of deep muscle, number of palpable nodes, and history of weight loss significantly influenced the outcome. Soft tissue necrosis occurred more frequently in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy (33% vs. 10%, p=0.52). (orig.)

  16. Treatment outcome after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Ja; Park, Kyung Ran [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery.

  17. Potential clinical predictors of outcome after postoperative radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buetof, R. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Kirchner, K.; Appold, S. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Loeck, S. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Rolle, A. [Lungenfachklinik Coswig, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Coswig (Germany); Hoeffken, G. [Lungenfachklinik Coswig, Department of Pneumology, Coswig (Germany); Krause, M.; Baumann, M. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on local control and survival after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with special focus on waiting and overall treatment times. For 100 NSCLC patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy, overall, relapse-free and metastases-free survival was retrospectively analysed using Kaplan-Meier methods. The impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on treatment outcome was evaluated in uni- and multivariate Cox regression analysis. No statistically significant difference between the survival curves of the groups with a short versus a long time interval between surgery and radiotherapy could be shown in uni- or multivariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant decrease in overall survival times for patients with prolonged overall radiotherapy treatment times exceeding 42 days (16 vs. 36 months) and for patients with radiation-induced pneumonitis (8 vs. 29 months). Radiation-induced pneumonitis and prolonged radiation treatment times significantly reduced overall survival after adjuvant radiotherapy in NSCLC patients. The negative impact of a longer radiotherapy treatment time could be shown for the first time in an adjuvant setting. The hypothesis of a negative impact of longer waiting times prior to commencement of adjuvant radiotherapy could not be confirmed. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel der vorliegenden Analyse war, den Einfluss von tumor-, patienten- und therapieabhaengigen Kofaktoren auf die lokoregionale Tumorkontrolle und das Ueberleben nach postoperativer adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patienten mit einem nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) zu untersuchen. Ein spezieller Fokus lag dabei auf der Wartezeit zwischen Operation und Beginn der Strahlentherapie sowie der Gesamtbehandlungszeit der Strahlentherapie. Fuer 100 Patienten, die eine postoperative

  18. The Outcome of Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The best treatment for advanced esophageal cancer is chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. In spite of the advance of multimodality therapy, most patients with esophageal cancer are treated with radiation therapy alone. This study reports the outcome of the use of conventional external beam radiotherapy alone for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Between January 1998 and December 2005, 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with external beam radiotherapy using a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered with a total dose of 44-60 Gy (median dose, 57.2 Gy) over 36 {approx}115 days (median time, 45 days). Thirteen patients (43.3%) had a history of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, lye stricture, asthma, cerebral infarct, and cancers. Four patients metachronously had double primary cancers. The most common location of a tumor was the mid-thoracic portion of the esophagus (56.7%). Tumor lengths ranged from 2 cm to 11 cm, with a median length of 6 cm. For AJCC staging, stage III was the most common (63.3%). Five patients had metastases at diagnosis. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The survival rates at 1-year and 2-years were 33.3% and 18.7%, respectively. The complete response rate 1{approx}3 months after radiotherapy was 20% (6/30) and the partial response rate was 70% (21/30). Sixteen patients (53.3%) had an improved symptom of dysphagia. Significant prognostic factors were age, tumor length, stage, degree of dysphagia at the time of diagnosis and tumor response. Cox regression analysis revealed the aim of treatment, clinical tumor response and tumor length as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Twenty-eight patients had local failure and another four patients had metastases. Three patients were detected with double primary cancers in this analysis. A complication of esophageal stricture was observed in three patients (10%), and radiation pneumonitis occurred in two

  19. The Outcome of Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Young

    2008-01-01

    The best treatment for advanced esophageal cancer is chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. In spite of the advance of multimodality therapy, most patients with esophageal cancer are treated with radiation therapy alone. This study reports the outcome of the use of conventional external beam radiotherapy alone for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Between January 1998 and December 2005, 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with external beam radiotherapy using a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered with a total dose of 44-60 Gy (median dose, 57.2 Gy) over 36 ∼115 days (median time, 45 days). Thirteen patients (43.3%) had a history of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, lye stricture, asthma, cerebral infarct, and cancers. Four patients metachronously had double primary cancers. The most common location of a tumor was the mid-thoracic portion of the esophagus (56.7%). Tumor lengths ranged from 2 cm to 11 cm, with a median length of 6 cm. For AJCC staging, stage III was the most common (63.3%). Five patients had metastases at diagnosis. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The survival rates at 1-year and 2-years were 33.3% and 18.7%, respectively. The complete response rate 1∼3 months after radiotherapy was 20% (6/30) and the partial response rate was 70% (21/30). Sixteen patients (53.3%) had an improved symptom of dysphagia. Significant prognostic factors were age, tumor length, stage, degree of dysphagia at the time of diagnosis and tumor response. Cox regression analysis revealed the aim of treatment, clinical tumor response and tumor length as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Twenty-eight patients had local failure and another four patients had metastases. Three patients were detected with double primary cancers in this analysis. A complication of esophageal stricture was observed in three patients (10%), and radiation pneumonitis occurred in two patients (6

  20. Late sequelae and cosmetic outcome after radiotherapy in breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dore, M.; Hennequin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy for early breast cancer is reported to adversely affect the cosmetic outcome. The incidence of radiation-induced fibro-atrophy is around 10% at 5 years. A better knowledge of its pathophysiology has revealed the essential role of activated fibroblasts and reactive oxygen species, mediated by TGF beta 1, allowing the development of antioxidant in the management of the established radiation-induced fibro-atrophy. Cosmetic sequelae are evaluated with standardized scales, such as the LENT-SOMA and must be monitored during at least 5 years. The main factors determining the occurrence of sequelae are a large breast volume, dose heterogeneity and the use of tumour bed boost after whole-breast radiation therapy. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and partial breast irradiation position themselves as a good alternatives to reduce the incidence of late skin side effects. The use of predictive tests of intrinsic radiosensitivity might fit into the therapeutic strategy. (authors)

  1. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes Following IMRT Versus Conventional Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Min; Karnell, Lucy H.; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Dornfeld, Ken; Buatti, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were extracted from the database of an ongoing longitudinal Outcome Assessment Project. Eligible criteria included (1) treated with definitive radiation, and (2) provided 12-month posttreatment HRQOL data. Excluded were 7 patients who received IMRT before October 1, 2002, during this institution's developmental phase of the IMRT technique. The HRQOL outcomes of patients treated with IMRT were compared with those of patients who received CRT. Results: Twenty-six patients treated using IMRT and 27 patients treated using CRT were included. Patients in the IMRT group were older and had more advanced-stage diseases and more patients received concurrent chemotherapy. However, the IMRT group had higher mean Head and Neck Cancer Inventory scores (which represent better outcomes) for each of the four head-and-neck cancer-specific domains, including eating, speech, aesthetics, and social disruption, at 12 months after treatment. A significantly greater percentage of patients in the CRT group had restricted diets compared with those in the IMRT group (48.0% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.032). At 3 months after treatment, both groups had significant decreases from pretreatment eating scores. However, the IMRT group had a significant improvement during the first year, but the CRT group had only small improvement. Conclusions: Proper delivery of IMRT can improve HRQOL for patients with oropharyngeal cancer compared with CRT

  2. Do pigeons prefer alternatives that include near-hit outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagner, Jessica P; Case, Jacob P; Sticklen, Mary F; Duncan, Amanda K; Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-07-01

    Pigeons show suboptimal choice on a gambling-like task similar to that shown by humans. Humans also show a preference for gambles in which there are near hits (losses that come close to winning). In the present research, we asked if pigeons would show a preference for alternatives with near-hit-like trials. In Experiment 1, we included an alternative that presented a near hit, in which a stimulus associated with reinforcement (a presumed conditioned reinforcer) changed to a stimulus associated with the absence of reinforcement (a presumed conditioned inhibitor). The pigeons tended to avoid this alternative. In Experiment 2, we varied the duration of the presumed conditioned reinforcer (2 vs. 8 s) that changed to a presumed conditioned inhibitor (8 vs. 2 s) and found that the longer the conditioned reinforcer was presented, the more the pigeons avoided it. In Experiment 3, the near-hit alternative involved an ambiguous stimulus for 8 s that changed to a presumed conditioned reinforcer (or a presumed conditioned inhibitor) for 2 s, but the pigeons still avoided it. In Experiment 4, we controlled for the duration of the conditioned reinforcer by presenting it first for 2 s followed by the ambiguous stimulus for 8 s. Once again, the pigeons avoided the alternative with the near-hit trials. In all 4 experiments, the pigeons tended to avoid alternatives that provided near-hit-like trials. We concluded that humans may be attracted to near-hit trials because near-hit trials give them the illusion of control, whereas this does not appear to be a factor for pigeons. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. The radiobiology of prostate cancer including new aspects of fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, Jack F.

    2005-01-01

    Total radiation dose is not a reliable measure of biological effect when dose-per-fraction or dose-rate is changed. Large differences in biological effectiveness (per gray) are seen between the 2 Gy doses of external beam radiotherapy and the large boost doses given at high dose-rate from afterloading sources. The effects are profoundly different in rapidly or slowly proliferating tissues, that is for most tumors versus late complications. These differences work the opposite way round for prostate tumors versus late complications compared with most other types of tumor. Using the Linear-Quadratic formula it is aimed to explain these differences, especially for treatments of prostate cancer. The unusually slow growth rate of prostate cancers is associated with their high sensitivity to increased fraction size, so a large number of small fractions, such as 35 or 40 'daily' doses of 2 Gy, is not an optimum treatment. Theoretical modeling shows a stronger enhancement of tumor effect than of late complications for larger (and fewer) fractions, in prostate tumors uniquely. Biologically Effective Doses and Normalized Total Doses (in 2 Gy fraction equivalents) are given for prostate tumor, late rectal reactions, and - a new development - acute rectal mucosa. Tables showing the change of fraction-size sensitivity (the alpha/beta ratio) with proliferation rates of tissues lead to the association of slow cell doubling times in prostate tumors with small alpha/beta ratios. Clinical evidence to confirm this biological expectation is reviewed. The alpha/beta ratios of prostate tumors appear to be as low as 1.5 Gy (95% confidence interval 1.3-1.8 Gy), in contrast with the value of about 10 Gy for most other types of tumor. The important point is that alpha/beta ratio=1.5 Gy appears to be significantly less than the alpha/beta ratio=3 Gy for late complications in rectal tissues. Such differences are also emerging from recent clinical results. From this important difference stems

  4. Outcome of wide local excision in dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and use of radiotherapy for margin-positive disease

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    Raashid Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Wide local excision (WLE is the preferred treatment of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP. The aim is to achieve negtive margins. We followed the impact of radiotherapy used postoperatively for both margin-negative and margin-positive DFSP tumors. Materials and Methods: Outcome of treatment of 36 patients of DFSP treated at our hospital was assessed. Thirty patients received radiotherapy postoperatively and six patients received radiotherapy alone. The maximum dimension of the lesion was 15 cm 2 . Patients were followed up for varying periods of time for any recurrence. Results: 10-year actuarial local control rate was determined. Local control was realized in six patients who were treated with radiotherapy alone. 30 patients were treated by radiotherapy and surgery. Out of these 30 patients, there were 6 local failures (failure rate 10%. Actuarial control rate was 82%. The failures were among patients who had positive margins. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is effective, and it decreases the recurrence rate in the treatment of DFSP. It is especially helpful in margin-positive disease. This appears true for patients treated with radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy used postoperatively.

  5. Acute cardiotoxicity with concurrent trastuzumab and radiotherapy including internal mammary chain nodes: A retrospective single-institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, Richard; Tyldesley, Scott; Rolles, Martin; Chia, Stephen; Mohamed, Islam

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the acute cardiotoxicity of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation with concurrent trastuzumab. Materials and Methods: Clinical and cardiac function data were collected on 59 patients with early breast cancer who were treated with adjuvant trastuzumab and chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy (often including IMC) at BC Cancer Agency in 2005. Results: Forty-four of fifty-nine patients received adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Thirteen had left-sided IMC RT. For left-sided RT, IMC inclusion increased the mean percentage dose to 5% of the heart, but the mean doses to 50% and 90% of the heart were similar. Median baseline left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 62% and similar in all groups. Median absolute decrease in LVEF after RT was 4%, which was not significantly different according to side or inclusion of IMCs. Trastuzumab was stopped in 11 of 59 patients (18.6%) due to decrease in LVEF. After median follow up of 15 months, three patients developed clinical congestive heart failure, none of whom received left-sided IMC RT. Conclusions: There was no excess acute cardiotoxicity observed with the combination of left-sided IMC irradiation and concurrent trastuzumab

  6. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

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    Abouaf, Lucie [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Girard, Nicolas [Radiotherapy-Oncology Department, Lyon Sud Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Lefort, Thibaud [Neuro-Radiology Department, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); D' hombres, Anne [Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Mornex, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.mornex@chu-lyon.fr [Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  7. Dying cell clearance and its impact on the outcome of tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauber, Kirsten; Ernst, Anne; Orth, Michael; Herrmann, Martin; Belka, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The induction of tumor cell death is one of the major goals of radiotherapy and has been considered to be the central determinant of its therapeutic outcome for a long time. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the success of radiotherapy does not only derive from direct cytotoxic effects on the tumor cells alone, but instead might also depend – at least in part – on innate as well as adaptive immune responses, which can particularly target tumor cells that survive local irradiation. The clearance of dying tumor cells by phagocytic cells of the innate immune system represents a crucial step in this scenario. Dendritic cells and macrophages, which engulf, process and present dying tumor cell material to adaptive immune cells, can trigger, skew, or inhibit adaptive immune responses, respectively. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of different forms of cell death induced by ionizing radiation, the multi-step process of dying cell clearance, and its immunological consequences with special regard toward the potential exploitation of these mechanisms for the improvement of tumor radiotherapy.

  8. Outcomes of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Combined Chemotherapy with Radiotherapy Without Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supaadirek, Chunsri; Pesee, Montien; Thamronganantasakul, Komsan; Thalangsri, Pimsiree; Krusun, Srichai; Supakalin, Narudom

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or combined chemotherapy together with radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery. A total of 84 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma (stage II or III) between January 1st, 2003 and December 31st, 2013 were enrolled, 48 treated with preoperative CCRT (Gr.I) and 36 with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery (Gr.II). The chemotherapeutic agents used concurrent with radiotherapy were either 5fluorouracil short infusion plus leucovorin and/or capecitabine or 5fluorouracil infusion alone. All patients received pelvic irradiation. There were 5 patients (10.4%) with a complete pathological response. The 3 yearoverall survival rates were 83.2% in Gr.I and 24.8 % in Gr.II (prectal cancer demonstrated that in preoperative CCRT a sphincter sparing procedure can be performed. The results of treatment with preoperative CCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer showed comparable rates of overall survival and sphincter sparing procedures as compared to previous studies.

  9. Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, Timothy M.; White, Rebekah R.; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Papavassiliou, Paulie; Papalezova, Katia T.; Guy, Cynthia D.; Broadwater, Gloria; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

  10. Outcome of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy with or without hormonal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Rex; Kamat, Ashish M.; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Allen, Pamela K.; Lee, Andrew K.; Tucker, Susan L.; Pisters, Louis; Babaian, Richard J.; Kuban, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study analyzed the outcome of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). By comparing the outcomes for patients who received RT alone and for those who received combined RT and hormonal therapy, we assessed the potential benefits of hormonal therapy. Patients and Methods: This cohort was comprised of 101 patients who received salvage RT between 1990 and 2001 for biochemical failure after RP. Fifty-nine of these patients also received hormone. Margin status (positive vs. negative), extracapsular extension (yes vs. no), seminal vesicle involvement (yes vs. no), pathologic stage, Gleason score, pre-RP PSA, post-RP PSA, pre-RT PSA, hormonal use, radiotherapy dose and technique, RP at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, and time from RP to salvage RT were analyzed. Statistically significant variables were used to construct prognostic groups. Results: Independent prognostic factors for the RT-alone group were margin status and pre-RT PSA. RP at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center was marginally significant (p = 0.06) in multivariate analysis. Pre-RT PSA was the only significant prognostic factor for the combined-therapy group. We used a combination of margin status and pre-RT PSA to construct a prognostic model for response to the salvage treatment based on the RT group. We identified the favorable group as those patients with positive margin and pre-RT PSA ≤0.5 ng/mL vs. the unfavorable group as otherwise. This stratification separates patients into clinically meaningful groups. The 5-year PSA control probabilities for the favorable vs. the unfavorable group were 83.7% vs. 61.7% with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.03). Androgen ablation seemed to be most beneficial in the unfavorable group. Conclusion: After prostatectomy, favorable-group patients may fare well with salvage radiotherapy alone. These patients may be spared the toxicity of androgen ablation. The other patients may benefit most from a combined approach with hormonal

  11. The role of Human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer and the impact on radiotherapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassen, Pernille

    2010-01-01

    The profound influence of Human papillomavirus (HPV) on the epidemiological pattern and clinical course of head and neck cancer (HNSCC) has led to a change in the traditional understanding of this disease entity. Separate therapeutic strategies based on tumour HPV status are under consideration and in this light provision of knowledge concerning the influence of tumour HPV on the radiation response in HNSCC appears highly relevant. This review provides a summary of the current understanding of the role of HPV in head and neck cancer with specific focus on the viral impact on radiotherapy outcome of HNSCC.

  12. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicities of Intraoperative Radiotherapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillis, Amy M.; Sutton, Elizabeth; DeWitt, Kelly D.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Weinberg, Vivian; Fisch, Benjamin M.; Chan, Albert; Gooding, Charles; Daldrup-Link, Heike; Wara, William M.; Farmer, Diana L.; Harrison, Michael R.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To review a historical cohort of consecutively accrued patients with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) to determine the therapeutic effect and late complications of this treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2002, 31 patients with newly diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma were treated with IORT as part of multimodality therapy. Their medical records were reviewed to determine the outcome and complications. Kaplan-Meier probability estimates of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival at 36 months after diagnosis were recorded. Results: Intraoperative radiotherapy to the primary site and associated lymph nodes achieved excellent local control at a median follow-up of 44 months. The 3-year estimate of the local recurrence rate was 15%, less than that of most previously published series. Only 1 of 22 patients who had undergone gross total resection developed recurrence at the primary tumor site. The 3-year estimate of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival was 85%, 47%, and 60%, respectively. Side effects attributable to either the disease process or multimodality treatment were observed in 7 patients who developed either hypertension or vascular stenosis. These late complications resulted in the death of 2 patients. Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy at the time of primary resection offers effective local control in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Compared with historical controls, IORT achieved comparable control and survival rates while avoiding many side effects associated with external beam radiotherapy in young children. Although complications were observed, additional analysis is needed to determine the relative contributions of the disease process and specific components of the multimodality treatment to these adverse events

  13. Solitary plasmacytoma treated with radiotherapy: Impact of tumor size on outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Richard W.; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Pintilie, Melania; Bezjak, Andrea; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Stewart, A. Keith

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Solitary plasmacytoma (SP) is a rare presentation of plasma cell neoplasms. In contrast to multiple myeloma, long-term disease-free survival and cure is possible following local radiotherapy (RT), particularly for soft tissue presentations. In this study, we attempt to identify factors that predict for local failure, progression to multiple myeloma, and disease-free survival (DFS) in patients mainly managed with local RT. Methods and Materials: We identified 46 patients referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital between 1982 and 1993. The median age was 63 years (range 35-95), with a male:female ratio of 1.9:1. All patients had biopsy-proven SP (osseous: 32, soft tissue: 14). M-protein was abnormal in 19 patients (41%). All patients were treated with local RT (median dose 35 Gy), with 5 patients (11%) also receiving chemotherapy. Maximum tumor size pre-RT ranged from 0 to 18 cm (median 2.5). Results: The 8-year overall survival, DFS, and myeloma-free rates were 65%, 44%, and 50%, respectively. The local control rate was 83%. Factors predictive of progression to myeloma (and poorer DFS) included bone presentation and older age. However, these two factors did not influence local control, which was affected by tumor size. All tumors < 5 cm in bulk (34 patients) were controlled by RT. Anatomic location did not predict outcome; however, 3 of the 5 tumors arising in paranasal sinuses did not achieve local control. Lower RT dose (≤35 Gy) was not associated with a higher risk of local failure. Conclusion: Solitary plasmacytomas are effectively treated with moderate-dose RT, although osseous tumors have a high rate of recurrence as systemic myeloma. Large tumor bulk locally (≥5 cm) predicts for local failure. Combined chemotherapy and RT should be investigated in these high-risk patients to increase the local control rate and the cure rate

  14. Outcomes of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone using altered fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Sullivan, Brian; Huang Shaohui; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Massey, Christine; Siu, Lillian L.; Weinreb, Ilan; Hope, Andrew; Kim, John; Bayley, Andrew J.; Cummings, Bernard; Ringash, Jolie; Dawson, Laura A.; Cho, B.C. John; Chen, Eric; Irish, Jonathan; Gilbert, Ralph W.; Hui, Angela; Liu Feifei; Zhao, Helen; Waldron, John N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcome of HPV-related [HPV(+)] oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) managed predominantly by altered-fractionation radiotherapy-alone (RT-alone). Methods: OPCs treated with RT-alone (n = 207) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 151) from 2001 to 2008 were included. Overall survival (OS), local (LC), regional (RC) and distant (DC) control were compared for HPV(+) vs. HPV-unrelated [HPV(−)], by RT-alone vs. CRT, and by smoking pack-years (⩽10 vs. >10). Multivariate analysis identified predictors. Results: HPV(+) (n = 277) had better OS (81% vs. 44%), LC (93% vs. 76%), RC (94% vs. 79%) (all p < 0.01) but similar DC (89% vs. 86%, p = 0.87) vs. HPV(−) (n = 81). HPV(+) stage IV CRT (n = 125) had better OS (89% vs. 70%, p < 0.01), but similar LC (93% vs. 90%, p = 0.41), RC (94% vs. 90%, p = 0.31) and DC (90% vs. 83%, p = 0.22) vs. RT-alone (n = 96). Both HPV(+) RT-alone (n = 37) and CRT (n = 67) stage IV minimal smokers had favorable OS (86% vs. 88%, p = 0.45), LC (95% vs. 92%, p = 0.52), RC (97% vs. 93%, p = 0.22), and DC (92% vs. 86%, p = 0.37). RT-alone and heavy-smoking were independent predictors for lower OS but not CSS in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Overall, HPV(+) RT-alone stage IV demonstrated lower survival but comparable disease control vs. CRT, but no difference was apparent among minimal smokers.

  15. Proton Radiotherapy for High-Risk Pediatric Neuroblastoma: Early Outcomes and Dose Comparison

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    Hattangadi, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Rombi, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy, Trento (Italy); Yock, Torunn I.; Broussard, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Friedmann, Alison M.; Huang, Mary [Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Kooy, Hanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for children with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiotherapy (RT) and to compare the dose distributions for intensity-modulated photon RT (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton RT (3D-CPT), and intensity-modulated proton RT to the postoperative tumor bed. Methods and Materials: All patients with high-risk (International Neuroblastoma Staging System Stage III or IV) neuroblastoma treated between 2005 and 2010 at our institution were included. All patients received induction chemotherapy, surgical resection of residual disease, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue, and adjuvant 3D-CPT to the primary tumor sites. The patients were followed with clinical examinations, imaging, and laboratory testing every 6 months to monitor disease control and side effects. IMRT, 3D-CPT, and intensity-modulated proton RT plans were generated and compared for a representative case of adjuvant RT to the primary tumor bed followed by a boost. Results: Nine patients were treated with 3D-CPT. The median age at diagnosis was 2 years (range 10 months to 4 years), and all patients had Stage IV disease. All patients had unfavorable histologic characteristics (poorly differentiated histologic features in 8, N-Myc amplification in 6, and 1p/11q chromosomal abnormalities in 4). The median tumor size at diagnosis was 11.4 cm (range 7-16) in maximal dimension. At a median follow-up of 38 months (range 11-70), there were no local failures. Four patients developed distant failure, and, of these, two died of disease. Acute side effects included Grade 1 skin erythema in 5 patients and Grade 2 anorexia in 2 patients. Although comparable target coverage was achieved with all three modalities, proton therapy achieved substantial normal tissue sparing compared with IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton RT allowed additional sparing of the kidneys, lungs, and heart. Conclusions: Preliminary outcomes reveal excellent local control with proton therapy

  16. Outcome of radiotherapy for localized stage I E and II E nasal NK/T cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Yao Bo; Fang Hui; Liu Xinfan; Zhou Liqiang; Lv Ning; Yu Zihao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: With the optimal therapy remains unclear for nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, the aim of this study is to analyze the outcome of radiotherapy as primary treatment for localized stage I E and II E diseases. Methods: Between January. 1983 and December 2003, 105 patients with stage I E and II E primary nasal NK/T cell lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed. According to the Ann Arbor Staging System, there were 83 stage I E and 22 stage II E. Stage I E was subdivided into limited stage I E confined to the nasal cavity (37 patients), or extensive stage I E with an extension beyond the nasal cavity (46 patients). Thirty-one patients received radiotherapy alone. Thirty-four patients were treated with radiotherapy followed by 2-4 cycles of chemotherapy. Thirty-seven patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and 3 with chemotherapy alone. Of 83 patients with stage I E disease, 26 were primarily treated with radiotherapy alone, 30 with. radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, and 27 with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Results: The five-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival rates (PIS) for all patients was 71% and 59%, respectively. The 5-year OS for stage I E and stage II E was 78% and 46% (P<0.01), while the 5-year PFS for stage I E and stage II E was 63% and 40%, respectively (P<0.01). Patients with limited stage I E had a better OS and PFS than those with extensive stage I E, with 5-year OS and PFS of 82% and 80% versus 75% and 45%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 91 (87%) patients after radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Initial radiotherapy resulted in a superior CR as compared to initial chemotherapy, with 54 of 65 (83%) patients achieving CR with initial radiotherapy, versus only 8 of 40 (20%) with initial chemotherapy. For 102 patients who received radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, the outcome of primary, treatment with radiotherapy alone was compared to that of CMT. Five-year OS and

  17. Carbonic anhydrase XII expression is associated with histologic grade of cervical cancer and superior radiotherapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Chong Woo; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Joo-Young; Shin, Hye-Jin; Lim, Hyunsun; Lee, Sun; Lee, Su-Kyoung; Lim, Myong-Cheol; Song, Yong-Jung

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether expression of carbonic anhydrase XII (CA12) is associated with histologic grade of the tumors and radiotherapy outcomes of the patients with invasive cervical cancer. CA12 expression was examined by immunohistochemical stains in cervical cancer tissues from 183 radiotherapy patients. Histological grading was classified as well (WD), moderately (MD) or poorly differentiated (PD). Oligonucleotide microarray experiment was performed using seven cervical cancer samples to examine differentially expressed genes between WD and PD cervical cancers. The association between CA12 and histological grade was analyzed by chi-square test. CA12 and histological grades were analyzed individually and as combined CA12 and histologic grade categories for effects on survival outcome. Immunohistochemical expression of CA12 was highly associated with the histologic grade of cervical cancer. Lack of CA12 expression was associated with PD histology, with an odds ratio of 3.9 (P = 0.01). Microarray analysis showed a fourfold reduction in CA12 gene expression in PD tumors. CA12 expression was marginally associated with superior disease-free survival. Application of the new combined categories resulted in further discrimination of the prognosis of patients with moderate and poorly differentiated tumor grade. Our study indicates that CA12 may be used as a novel prognostic marker in combination with histologic grade of the tumors

  18. The relationship between waiting time for radiotherapy and clinical outcomes: A systematic review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zheng; King, Will; Pearcey, Robert; Kerba, Marc; Mackillop, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To synthesize the direct clinical evidence relating waiting times (WTs) for radiotherapy (RT) to the outcomes of RT. Methods and materials: We did a systematic review of the literature between 1975 and 2005 to identify clinical studies describing the relationship between WTs and outcomes of RT. Only high quality (HQ) studies that had adequately controlled for confounding factors were included in the primary analysis. WTs that had originally been reported as a categorical variable were converted to a continuous variable based on the distribution of WTs in each category. Meta-analyses were done using a fixed-effect model. Results: The systematic review identified 44 relevant studies. Meta-analyses of 20 HQ studies of local control demonstrated a significant increase in the risk of local failure with increasing WT, RR localrecurrence/month = 1.14, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 1.09-1.21. For post-operative RT for breast cancer; RR localrecurrence/month = 1.11, 95%CI: 1.04-1.19. For post-operative RT for head and neck cancer, RR localrecurrenc/month = 1.28, 95%CI: 1.08-1.52. For definitive RT for head and neck cancer, RR localrecurrence/month = 1.15, 95%CI: 1.02-1.29. There was little evidence of any association between WTs and the risk of distant metastasis. Meta-analyses of the 6 HQ studies of breast cancer showed RR metastasis/month = 1.04, 95%CI: 0.98-1.09. Meta-analyses of 4 HQ studies of breast cancer showed no significant decrease in survival with increasing WT, RR death/month = 1.06, 95%CI: 0.97-1.16, but there was a marginally significant decrease in survival in 4 HQ studies of head and neck cancer, RR death/month = 1.16, 95%CI: 1.02-1.32. Conclusions: The risk of local recurrence increases with increasing WTs for RT. The increase in local recurrence rate may translate into decreased survival in some clinical situations. WTs for RT should be as short as reasonably achievable

  19. Serum PSA Evaluations during salvage radiotherapy for post-prostatectomy biochemical failures as prognosticators for treatment outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Tri; Dave, Giatri; Parker, Robert; Kagan, A. Robert

    2001-01-01

    Introduction: Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels have proved to be sensitive markers for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. In addition, PSA levels are useful for detecting and monitoring prostate cancer progression after radiotherapy. Serum PSA evaluations during radiotherapy, however, have not been well documented. In this study, we investigate the prognostic value of PSA evaluations during salvage radiotherapy for prostatectomy failures. Methods: Forty-one patients with biochemical failures after prostatectomy treated with salvage radiotherapy consented to have their serum PSA levels evaluated at 30 Gy and 45 Gy of irradiation. All 41 patients had negative metastatic workup and pathologically uninvolved pelvic lymph nodes at the time of referral for salvage radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was delivered with 10-25 MV photons, with doses of 59.4-66.6 Gy. No patients received hormonal ablation therapy before irradiation. Results: The mean follow-up for all patients was 30.9 months. At last follow-up, 28/41 patients (68.3%) were free from biochemical failure, with 20 of 41 patients (48.8%) expressing undetectable PSA levels. Serum PSA evaluations at 30 Gy did not significantly predict for either biochemical (p=0.0917) or clinical (p=0.106) disease-free outcome. However, serum PSA evaluations at 45 Gy significantly predicted for both biochemical (p=0.0043) and clinical (p=0.0244) disease-free outcomes, with PSA elevations at 45 Gy significantly associated with poor outcomes. On univariate analysis of prognosticators for biochemical failures, the following were significant: an elevation in serum PSA levels at 45 Gy, detectable serum PSA immediately after prostatectomy, Gleason score 7-10, and serum PSA level >1 ng/ml before salvage radiotherapy. Conclusion: Evaluation of serum PSA level at 45 Gy of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical relapses after prostatectomy may serve as a significant prognosticator for both biochemical and clinical disease-free outcomes

  20. Breast cancer in female carriers of ATM gene alterations: outcome of adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; John, Esther; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: We analyzed the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients carrying sequence variants in the ATM gene who received postoperative radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery to test whether an increased cellular radiosensitivity may translate into enhanced tumor cell killing and thereby result in an improvement of the therapeutic ratio. Patients and methods: We investigated a cohort of 138 breast cancer patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservative surgery for T1 and T2 tumors. Genomic DNA samples of these patients had previously been scanned for mutations in the ATM gene. Follow-up data were available in 135 patients, with a median follow-up of 87 months. Local relapse-free, metastasis-free and overall survival were compared between carriers and non-carriers of a sequence variant in the ATM gene. Results: Twenty patients were found to carry a sequence variant in the ATM gene (truncating, 7; missense, 13). The actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival of carriers vs. non-carriers were 88 vs. 94% (P=0.34). Actuarial metastasis-free and overall survival after 7 years were 63 vs. 85% (P=0.01) and 73 vs. 89% (P=0.055), respectively. However, the presence of a variant in the ATM gene did not remain a significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (P=0.068). Conclusions: Our results do not support the hypothesis that breast cancer patients carrying a sequence variant in the ATM gene differentially benefit from postoperative radiotherapy. These findings have to be verified using larger number of cases to clarify the clinical consequences of sequence variants in the ATM gene

  1. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy: predictive clinical and dosimetric factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciammella, Patrizia; Podgornii, Ala; Galeandro, Maria; Micera, Renato; Ramundo, Dafne; Palmieri, Tamara; Cagni, Elisabetta; Iotti, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate toxicity and cosmetic outcome in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant hypo fractionated radiotherapy to the whole breast, and to identify the risk factors for toxicity. Two hundred twelve women with early breast cancer underwent conserving surgery were enrolled in the study. The patients received 40.05 Gy in 15 daily fractions, 2.67 Gy per fraction. The boost to the tumor bed was administered with a total dose of 9 Gy in 3 consecutive fractions in 55 women. Physician-rated acute and late toxicity and cosmetic outcome (both subjective and objective) were prospectively assessed during and after radiotherapy. In our population study the mean age was 63 with the 17% (36 pts) of the women younger than 50 years. The median follow-up was 34 months. By the end of RT, 35 patients out of 212 (16%) no acute toxicity, according to the RTOG criteria, while 145 (68%) and 31 patients (15%) developed grade 1 and grade 2 acute skin toxicity, respectively. Late skin toxicity evaluation was available for all 212 patients with a minimum follow up of 8 months. The distribution of toxicity was: 39 pts (18%) with grade 1 and 2 pts (1%) with grade 2. No worse late skin toxicity was observed. Late subcutaneous grade 0-1 toxicity was recorded in 208 patients (98%) and grade 2 toxicity in 3 patients (2%), while grade 3 was observed in 1 patient only. At last follow up, a subjective and objective good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 93% and 92% of the women, respectively. At univariate and multivariate analysis, the late skin toxicity was correlated with the additional boost delivery (p=0.007 and p=0.023). Regarding the late subcutaneous tissue, a correlation with diabetes was found (p=0.0283). These results confirm the feasibility and safety of the hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer. In our population the boost administration was resulted to be a significant adverse prognostic factor for acute

  2. Long-term Outcome after Radiotherapy for FIGO Stage IIIB and IVA Carcinoma of the Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Morgan, Linda S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcome after radiotherapy with curative intent for Stage IIIB and IVA carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 patients treated with radiotherapy with curative intent at University of Florida between January 1980 and December 2003 for Stage IIIB (84 patients) or IVA (7 patients) carcinoma of the cervix. Results: The median follow-up of the surviving patients was 8.8 years. The 5- and 10-year estimates of local control, regional control, locoregional control, relapse-free survival, and overall survival were 53% and 53%, 55% and 47%, 34% and 29%, 30% and 26%, and 29% and 21%, respectively. Ninety percent of the recurrences occurred within 2 years of treatment. Of these, 60% of all failures were local, 29% were regional, and 11% were distant failures alone. Also, 17% of the failures were in the paraaortic nodes with no evidence of failure in the pelvis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with the endpoint of relapse-free or overall survival. No factor was statistically significant. Complications from therapy were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading system; the overall severe late complication rate was 13% (Grade 3-5). Conclusion: This series is one of the most mature of published reports. With long-term follow-up, approximately one-third of patients with Stage IIIB or IVA carcinoma of the cervix were cured, with a 13% complication rate

  3. Tolerance and early outcome results of postprostatectomy three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Aschkenasy, Eric; Kelsen, Suzanne; Leibel, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) has been associated with a reduction in acute and late toxicity among patients treated for localized prostatic cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the acute and late toxicity of 3D-CRT delivered to patients in the postprostatectomy setting and to analyze which factors predict for durable biochemical control in this group of patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1994, 42 patients were treated after prostatectomy with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The median time from prostatectomy to radiotherapy was 11 months. Indications for treatment included a rising serum PSA level in 28 patients (65%) and positive surgical margins without a rising PSA level in 14 (35%). Twenty-five patients (60%) had pathologic stage T3 disease, and 32 (74%) had tumor at or close to the surgical margins. The median dose was 64.8 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2 years. Results: 3D-CRT in the postprostatectomy setting was well tolerated. Three patients (7%) experienced Grade II acute genitourinary toxicity and nine patients (21%) experienced Grade II acute gastrointestinal toxicity during treatment. No patient experienced Grade III or higher acute morbidity. The 2-year actuarial risk for Grade II late genitourinary and gastrointestinal late complications were 5 and 9%, respectively. In patients with existing incontinence, the incidence of worsening stress incontinence 6 months after treatment was 17%, which resolved within 12 months to its preradiotherapy level in four of six cases (66%). The overall 2-year postirradiation PSA relapse-free survival rate was 53%. The 2-year PSA relapse-free survival was 66% for patients with undetectable PSA levels in the immediate postoperative period compared to 26% for those with detectable levels of PSA after surgery (p 1.0 ng/ml (p 1 ng/ml (p < 0.002) was the most important covariate predicting for a rising PSA after radiotherapy. Conclusions: After

  4. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  5. Fifteen-Year Radiotherapy Outcomes of the Randomized PORTEC-1 Trial for Endometrial Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creutzberg, Carien L., E-mail: c.l.creutzberg@lumc.nl [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Lybeert, Marnix L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital Eindhoven (Netherlands); Warlam-Rodenhuis, Carla C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Jobsen, Jan J. [Department of Radiotherapy, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Mens, Jan-Willem M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, ErasmusMC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lutgens, Ludy C.H.W. [MAASTRO clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pras, Elisabeth [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven and Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases, Tilburg University (Netherlands); Putten, Wim L.J. van [Department of Biostatistics, ErasmusMC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the very long-term results of the randomized Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma (PORTEC)-1 trial for patients with Stage I endometrial carcinoma (EC), focusing on the role of prognostic factors for treatment selection and the long-term risk of second cancers. Patients and Methods: The PORTEC trial (1990-1997) included 714 patients with Stage IC Grade 1-2 or Stage IB Grade 2-3 EC. After surgery, patients were randomly allocated to external-beam pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT) or no additional treatment (NAT). Analysis was by intention to treat. Results: 426 patients were alive at the date of analysis. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. The 15-year actuarial locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates were 6% for EBRT vs. 15.5% for NAT (p < 0.0001). The 15-year overall survival was 52% vs. 60% (p = 0.14), and the failure-free survival was 50% vs. 54% (p = 0.94). For patients with high-intermediate risk criteria, the 15-year overall survival was 41% vs. 48% (p = 0.51), and the 15-year EC-related death was 14% vs. 13%. Most LRR in the NAT group were vaginal recurrences (11.0% of 15.5%). The 15-year rates of distant metastases were 9% vs. 7% (p = 0.25). Second primary cancers had been diagnosed over 15 years in 19% of all patients, 22% vs. 16% for EBRT vs. NAT (p = 0.10), with observed vs. expected ratios of 1.6 (EBRT) and 1.2 (NAT) compared with a matched population (p = NS). Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostic significance of Grade 3 for LRR (hazard ratio [HR] 3.4, p = 0.0003) and for EC death (HR 7.3, p < 0.0001), of age >60 (HR 3.9, p = 0.002 for LRR and 2.7, p = 0.01 for EC death) and myometrial invasion >50% (HR 1.9, p = 0.03 and HR 1.9, p = 0.02). Conclusions: The 15-year outcomes of PORTEC-1 confirm the relevance of HIR criteria for treatment selection, and a trend for long-term risk of second cancers. EBRT should be avoided in patients with low- and intermediate-risk EC.

  6. Long-term outcome for gastric marginal zone lymphoma treated with radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, A; Gospodarowicz, M; Aleman, B M P

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term results of radiotherapy for patients with gastric marginal zone lymphoma (GMZL).......We evaluated the long-term results of radiotherapy for patients with gastric marginal zone lymphoma (GMZL)....

  7. The effect of surgery and radiotherapy on outcome of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N; Muzikansky, Alona; Gaz, Randall D; Faquin, William C; Ott, Mark J

    2002-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is an aggressive rare tumor. We analyzed our experience for prognosis and the effect of surgery and radiotherapy on patients with ATC. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients (n = 67) with ATC treated at a tertiary care center from 1969 to 1999. Survivor median follow-up was 51 months. Tumor and patient characteristics and therapy were assessed for effect on survival by multivariate analysis. Patients presented with a neck mass (99%), change of voice (51%), dysphagia (33%), and dyspnea (28%). Surgery was performed in 44 of 67 patients, with 12 complete resections. The 6-month and 1- and 3-year survival rates were 92%, 92%, and 83% after complete resection; 53%, 35%, and 0% after debulking; and 22%, 4%, and 0% after no resection, respectively (P 45 Gy improved survival as compared with a lower dose (P = .02). Multivariate analysis showed that age 45 Gy improves outcome.

  8. Stress associated gene expression in blood cells is related to outcome in radiotherapy treated head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bøhn, Siv K; Blomhoff, Rune; Russnes, Kjell M; Sakhi, Amrit K; Thoresen, Magne; Holden, Marit; Moskaug, JanØ; Myhrstad, Mari C; Olstad, Ole K; Smeland, Sigbjørn

    2012-01-01

    We previously observed that a radiotherapy-induced biochemical response in plasma was associated with favourable outcome in head and neck squamous carcinoma cancer (HNSCC) patients. The aim of the present study was to compare stress associated blood cell gene expression between two sub-groups of HNSCC patients with different biochemical responses to radiotherapy. Out of 87 patients (histologically verified), 10 biochemical ‘responders’ having a high relative increase in plasma oxidative damage and a concomitant decrease in plasma antioxidants during radiotherapy and 10 ‘poor-responders’ were selected for gene-expression analysis and compared using gene set enrichment analysis. There was a significant induction of stress-relevant gene-sets in the responders following radiotherapy compared to the poor-responders. The relevance of the involvement of similar stress associated gene expression for HNSCC cancer and radioresistance was verified using two publicly available data sets of 42 HNSCC cases and 14 controls (GEO GSE6791), and radiation resistant and radiation sensitive HNSCC xenografts (E-GEOD-9716). Radiotherapy induces a systemic stress response, as revealed by induction of stress relevant gene expression in blood cells, which is associated to favourable outcome in a cohort of 87 HNSCC patients. Whether these changes in gene expression reflects a systemic effect or are biomarkers of the tumour micro-environmental status needs further study. Raw data are available at ArrayExpress under accession number E-MEXP-2460

  9. Re-irradiation: Outcome, cumulative dose and toxicity in patients retreated with stereotactic radiotherapy in the abdominal or pelvic region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Abusaris (Huda); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa); J.J.M.E. Nuyttens (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the present study was to explore the outcome, cumulative dose in tumor and organs at risk and toxicity after extra-cranial stereotactic re-irradiation. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated who had been re-irradiated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) after

  10. Factors affecting the local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Yamashita, Motohiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors affecting local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors. Between June 2006 and June 2009, 159 lung tumors in 144 patients (primary lung cancer, 128; metastatic lung tumor, 31) were treated with SBRT with 48-60 Gy (mean 50.1 Gy) in 4-5 fractions. Higher doses were given to larger tumors and metastatic tumors in principle. Assessed factors were age, gender, tumor origin (primary vs. metastatic), histological subtype, tumor size, tumor appearance (solid vs. ground glass opacity), maximum standardized uptake value of positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and SBRT doses. Follow-up time was 1-60 months (median 18 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local failure-free rates of all lesions were 90, 80, and 77%, respectively. On univariate analysis, metastatic tumors (p<0.0001), solid tumors (p=0.0246), and higher SBRT doses (p=0.0334) were the statistically significant unfavorable factors for local control. On multivariate analysis, only tumor origin was statistically significant (p=0.0027). The 2-year local failure-free rates of primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors were 87 and 50%, respectively. A metastatic tumor was the only independently significant unfavorable factor for local control after SBRT. (author)

  11. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma: outcome and prognostic factors following conservation surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagars, Gunar K.; Mullen, John R.; Pollack, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Malignant fibrous histiocytoma is the most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. This communication presents an analysis of outcome and prognostic factors based on a retrospective review of patients with this disease treated by conservation surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1966 to 1991, 271 consecutive patients with malignant fibrous histiocytoma were treated with conservation surgery and radiotherapy. The outcome with local control, metastatic relapse, and survival as end points was evaluated by univariate and multivariate statistics to delineate independently significant prognostic factors. Results: Postoperative radiation at a mean dose of 62.8 Gy was used in 195 patients and preoperative radiation at a mean dose of 50 Gy was used in 76 patients. At a median follow-up of 7.3 years, 123 patients (45%) developed disease relapse at some site. Fifty-seven (21%) developed local recurrence leading to an actuarial local relapse rate of 26% at 10 years, 83 (31%) developed metastatic relapse for a 10-year actuarial metastatic rate of 33%, and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year survival rates were 68, 60, and 46%, respectively. For local control, prior local recurrence (in 53 patients) was identified as an adverse factor, yielding a 10-year recurrence rate of 42% compared to 22% for 218 patients without prior disease (p 5 cm), and histology (myxoid vs. nonmyxoid) were not significant determinants of local outcome. For metastatic relapse, the major determinants of outcome were histology (myxoid vs. nonmyxoid) and tumor size. Myxoid tumors (59 patients) had a low metastatic propensity (13% 10-year metastatic rate) compared to nonmyxoid tumors (212 patients) (40% 10-year metastatic rate) (p 5 cm) were the only independent determinants of outcome. Conclusion: Malignant fibrous histiocytoma is a heterogeneous disease and its myxoid variant must be recognized as a distinct entity. Both variants are locally aggressive and require equally aggressive local

  12. Impact of Image Guidance on Outcomes After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To verify whether rectal distention at the time of planning impacts outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2002, a total of 488 prostate cancer patients were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was 70 Gy delivered at 2.5 Gy per fraction in all cases. All cases were treated with a 4-mm margin posteriorly. In all cases the total rectal volume documented on the CT scan was used for treatment planning. No special bowel preparation instructions were given, either for the simulation or the daily treatments. Before each daily treatment, alignment of the prostate was performed with the B-mode acquisition and targeting (BAT) transabdominal ultrasound system. The median follow-up for all 488 patients was 60 months (range, 24-96 months). Results: For all patients the biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate at 5 years was 86%. The 5-year bRFS rate for the rectal distention 3 , 50 to 3 , and ≥100 cm 3 groups was 90%, 83%, and 85%, respectively (p = 0.18). To adjust for other potential variables affecting bRFS rates, a multivariate time-to-failure analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model was performed. Rectal distention was not an independent predictor of biochemical failure on multivariate analysis (p = 0.80). Rectal distention was not a predictor of rectal or urinary toxicity. Conclusion: The use of daily image guidance eliminates errors such as rectal distention at the initial planning stage that can affect outcomes after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

  13. Does radiotherapy after surgery affect outcomes in Ewing's sarcoma of the pelvis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Puri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT on outcomes has been a matter of debate after adequate resection in Ewing's sarcoma of the pelvis. We evaluated our cases after surgical excision in pelvic Ewing's sarcoma and assessed local control and overall survival (OS with respect to PORT and chemotherapy-induced percentage necrosis. Materials and Methods: Forty four surgically operated patients (June 2002–November 2014 of localized Ewing's sarcoma were retrospectively reviewed. There were 31 males and 13 females. Age ranged from 2 to 53 years. All patients received institutional chemotherapy protocol. No patient received preoperative radiotherapy. Specimen was analyzed for margins and chemotherapy-induced percentage necrosis. PORT was offered to patients on case-by-case basis. Presence of a large preoperative soft-tissue component, margin evaluation, and percentage necrosis were factors considered. At time of the last followup, 29 patients were alive, 11 died, and 4 were lost to followup. Survivors had a minimum followup of 2 years (range: 31–118 months, mean = 69 months. Results: One of twenty (5% patients with PORT had a local recurrence as against 2 of 24 (8% without PORT. OS of all patients was 76% at 5 years. Twelve patients with 90% necrosis had OS of 83% (P = 0.040. OS of patients with PORT was 74%, without PORT was 78% (P = 0.629. Conclusions: The decision to offer PORT after surgical excision in pelvic Ewing's sarcoma is multifactorial; the absence of PORT in selected cases is not detrimental to local control. Poor responders to chemotherapy had poorer survival while PORT did not impact on outcomes.

  14. Does Radiotherapy after Surgery Affect Outcomes in Ewing's Sarcoma of the Pelvis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Ajay; Gulia, Ashish; Crasto, Saniya; Vora, Tushar; Khanna, Nehal; Laskar, Siddharth

    2018-01-01

    The impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on outcomes has been a matter of debate after adequate resection in Ewing's sarcoma of the pelvis. We evaluated our cases after surgical excision in pelvic Ewing's sarcoma and assessed local control and overall survival (OS) with respect to PORT and chemotherapy-induced percentage necrosis. Forty four surgically operated patients (June 2002-November 2014) of localized Ewing's sarcoma were retrospectively reviewed. There were 31 males and 13 females. Age ranged from 2 to 53 years. All patients received institutional chemotherapy protocol. No patient received preoperative radiotherapy. Specimen was analyzed for margins and chemotherapy-induced percentage necrosis. PORT was offered to patients on case-by-case basis. Presence of a large preoperative soft-tissue component, margin evaluation, and percentage necrosis were factors considered. At time of the last followup, 29 patients were alive, 11 died, and 4 were lost to followup. Survivors had a minimum followup of 2 years (range: 31-118 months, mean = 69 months). One of twenty (5%) patients with PORT had a local recurrence as against 2 of 24 (8%) without PORT. OS of all patients was 76% at 5 years. Twelve patients with 90% necrosis had OS of 83% ( P = 0.040). OS of patients with PORT was 74%, without PORT was 78% ( P = 0.629). The decision to offer PORT after surgical excision in pelvic Ewing's sarcoma is multifactorial; the absence of PORT in selected cases is not detrimental to local control. Poor responders to chemotherapy had poorer survival while PORT did not impact on outcomes.

  15. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  16. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  17. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  18. The revision of RP 91 on criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Malone, J. F.; Christofides, S.; Lillicrap, S.; Horton, P.

    2013-01-01

    In 1997 the European Commission published Radiation Protection 91: 'Criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations'(1). This document specified the minimum criteria for acceptability. It has been used to this effect in legislation, codes of practice and by individual professionals. In a single document, it defined a level of performance at which remedial action was required. The document specified a series of parameters which characterised equipment performance and acceptable levels of performance. In its time it proved to be a useful document which was applied in member states to various degrees. Since the publication of Report 91 in 1997(1), a series of weaknesses emerged over time. Development of new radiological systems and technologies, as well as improvements in traditional technologies, has created circumstances where the acceptability criteria were in need of review. These weaknesses were recognised by the European Commission and a tender for its revision was issued. The criteria were developed by a team drawn from a broad range of backgrounds including hospitals, industry, government bodies, regulators and standardisation organisations. Representatives were mainly from Europe, but individuals from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and International Atomic Energy Agency were included in the drafting process. This study describes the process employed in developing the revised document and the consultation process involved. One of the major difficulties the revision team encountered was related to an understanding of the actual meaning of the EC Directive(2). The view taken by the revision team was that Article 8, paragraph 3 places responsibilities on both the holders of radiological equipment and competent authorities. The acceptability criteria have been produced consistent with the European Commission's Medical Exposures Directive(2), which requires that patient exposures are

  19. Comparing the effects of conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapies on early skin toxicity and cosmetic outcomes after breast cancer conserving surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouzegar Hashemi F

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high number of breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy after surgery has caused many to think about a shorter period of radiotherapy, which can significantly reduce the radiotherapy machine time, labor hours, and fewer patient visits. This study was designed to evaluate the acute skin effects and cosmetic outcomes of short course radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer in comparison with the conventional treatment method.Methods: Fifty-two patients with operable breast cancer (pT1-3pN0M0 who underwent breast conservation surgery in Tehran Cancer Institute during January 2011 to January 2012, were randomly assigned to undergo radiotherapy by either receiving conventional treatment (dose: 50 Gy in 25 fractions with subsequent electron boost or a short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (dose: 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions and a subsequent electron boost.Results: There were no skin changes during the first or the second week of treatment in the two groups. Cutaneous complications began after the third week as grade 1 skin toxicity after termination of the short-course radiotherapy but there were no difference in complication rate after four weeks of treatment. Six months and one year after treatment, there were no differences in terms of skin complications or cosmetic outcomes between the two groups.Conclusion: Although the use of a whole-breast irradiation with a hypofractionated schedule was associated with desirable outcomes, in term of skin toxicity and cosmetics, but longer follow-up periods with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm these results.

  20. Twenty-five year outcome of sequential abdominopelvic radiotherapy and alkylating agent chemotherapy for ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellairs, Ellen E.; Twiggs, Leo B.; Potish, Roger A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study of sequential surgery, abdominopelvic radiotherapy and single agent alkylating chemotherapy was conducted to evaluate survival and toxicity in the management of ovarian carcinoma. Methods: From 1970-1976, 95 women with stage I-III epithelial ovarian carcinoma were scheduled to receive postoperative radiotherapy consisting of 20.0 Gy to the whole abdomen (1.0 Gy/day), a 29.75 Gy pelvic boost (1.75 Gy/day) and 10 subsequent courses of Melphalan (1 mg/kg/course). Endpoints were overall survival, disease-free survival(DFS), and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: The evaluable 94 patients included 19 stage I, 25 stage II, and 50 stage III. Of the latter, 21 had no palpable disease postoperatively (IIIN) and 29 had postoperative palpable disease (IIIP). Overall survival at 5, 10, 15 and 20 years was 42%, 30%, 23% and 22%. DFS for the entire group was 54% at 5 years and remained 50% from 10 to 25 years. All but two recurrences were noted within the first 27 months. No recurrence or treatment-related deaths occurred after 8 years. After 10 years, the survival of the study group became parallel to the general population. Prognostic factors were only related to stage (p<.001) and the presence of postoperative palpable disease(p<.001). DFS at 25 years was 95 % for stage I, 71% at 5 years and 66% from 10 to 25 years for stage II, and 17% at 5 years and 11% thereafter for stage III patients(p<.001). Although no stage IIIP patients were cured, 25% lived beyond 2 years. Five year DFS was significantly better in IIIN (45%) vs. IIIP (0%) patients (p<.001). The 65 patients without postoperative palpable disease, (stage I-IIIN) achieved DFS at 5 and 25 years of 69%, and 61%, respectively. Of 31 patients undergoing a second-look surgery, 84% were found to be free of tumor. Two recurred at 3.5 and 7 years after surgery. Acute tolerance was acceptable. Chronic toxicity included an 11.7% rate of small bowel obstruction requiring surgery and a 3% rate of

  1. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011–0.013) clinical factor was “previous abdominal surgery.” As second significant (p = 0.012–0.016) factor, “cardiac history” was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including “diabetes” was significant (p = 0.039–0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003–0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D 50 . Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions

  2. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defraene, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.defraene@uzleuven.be [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Laura [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Heemsbergen, Wilma [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lebesque, Joos V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints

  3. Accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy for inflammatory breast carcinoma: complete response predicts outcome and allows for breast conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Douglas W.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; Friedman, Richard B.; Wazer, David E.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Amir, Cyrus; Bear, Harry D.; Hackney, Mary Helen; Smith, Thomas J.; Lawrence, Walter

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Chemotherapy and accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy were prospectively applied for inflammatory breast carcinoma with the intent of breast conservation. The efficacy, failure patterns, and patient tolerance utilizing this approach were analyzed. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1996, 52 patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma presented to the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals of VCU and the New England Medical Center. Thirty-eight of these patients were jointly evaluated in multidisciplinary breast clinics and managed according to a defined prospectively applied treatment policy. Patients received induction chemotherapy, accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy, selected use of mastectomy, and concluded with additional chemotherapy. The majority were treated with 1.5 Gy twice daily to field arrangements covering the entire breast and regional lymphatics. An additional 18-21 Gy was then delivered to the breast and clinically involved nodal regions. Total dose to clinically involved areas was 63-66 Gy. Following chemoradiotherapy, patients were evaluated with physical examination, mammogram, and fine needle aspiration x 3. Mastectomy was reserved for those patients with evidence of persistent or progressive disease in the involved breast. All patients received additional chemotherapy. Results: Median age was 51 years. Median follow-up was 23.9 months (6-86) months. The breast preservation rate at the time of last follow-up was 74%. The treated breast or chest wall as the first site of failure occurred in only 13%, and the ultimate local control rate with the selected use of mastectomy was 74%. Ten patients underwent mastectomy, 2 of which had pathologically negative specimens despite a clinically palpable residual mass. Response to chemotherapy was predictive of treatment outcome. Of the 15 patients achieving a complete response, 87% remain locoregionally controlled without the use of mastectomy. Five-year overall survival for

  4. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  5. Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Prognostic Variables and Treatment Outcomes after Chemo - Radiotherapy and Conservative Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaza, A.; El-Shanshoury, H.

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) constitute a group of rare and heterogeneous cancers, that diverse a wide spectrum of histology and varied clinical behavior. The aim was to study, retrospectively the clinico-epidemiologic manifestation, response to therapy and prognostic factors of retroperitoneal (RPS), extremity and other STS patients treated with conservative surgery plus chemo - radiotherapy (CRT) attending the Pediatric Oncology Clinic, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University during 6 years period (inclusive). Files of 66 STS patients were revised for history, staging, investigations, treatment modalities and outcome of therapy. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 21 years. The male to female ratio was 1.87:1. Most of the patients belong to stage 3 and 1. Radiotherapy (RTH) and surgery remains the backbone of the multi - modality treatment plan. Complete remission (CR) was obtained in 80.3% of STS patients. Meanwhile, 6% of cases had disease progression and 6% died. The 2 - years overall survival rate (OS) and Disease - free survivals (DFS) we re 74.2% and 57.6% respectively. However, 20.8% of patients develop relapse>2 years after the end of treatment. Age at diagnosis, stage of the disease, tumor mass, pathological subtype and the RTH used were statistically significant prognostic variables affecting survival. Finally, the use of RTH in the treatment of STS gives positive impact on the survival of patients. Recommendation regarding further studies would be required to identify methods of increasing the radiation dose selectively. Also, using the newly developed radiation technologies to make dose escalation and sparing normal tissue

  6. Low-dose radiotherapy in 179 patients with Peyronie's disease: Treatment outcome and current sexual functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incrocci, Luca; Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Slob, A. Koos; Hop, Wim C.J.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To analyse retrospectively treatment outcome in patients irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Methods and Materials: The records of 179 patients, median age 52 years, that received radiotherapy (RT) between 1982 and 1997 were reviewed. 78% presented with painful erections and 89% with penile deformity. The symptoms were present for a median duration of 6 months (range, 1-72 months). The RT schedule consisted of 13.5 Gy (9 x 1.5 Gy, 3 fractions per week) using orthovoltage X-rays in 123 patients or 12 Gy (6 x 2 Gy, daily fractions) using electrons in 56 patients. A questionnaire regarding current sexual functioning was mailed to 130 patients whose addresses could be traced; 106 (82%) responded. Results: At mean follow-up period of 3 months, 83% reported that pain was diminished or had disappeared after RT. Twenty-three percent of patients reported a decrease in penile deformity. Following RT, surgical correction of penile curvature was performed in 29% of patients. No RT-related complications occurred except transient dysuria in 1 patient. Questionnaire data: 72% of patients were currently sexually active, 48% had erectile dysfunction, and 49% expressed dissatisfaction with their current sexual functioning. Conclusion: Low-dose external RT (12-13.5 Gy) results in relief of pain in the majority of patients with Peyronie's disease. Improvement in penile deformity was observed, avoiding surgery in a number of patients. No significant RT-associated morbidity was encountered. It is disappointing that almost 50% of patients complain of sexual functioning, but this is presumably not related to radiotherapy

  7. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  8. Single Fraction Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastasis: Outcomes from 132 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhidasan, S; Ball, D; Kron, T; Bressel, M; Shaw, M; Chu, J; Chander, S; Wheeler, G; Plumridge, N; Chesson, B; David, S; Siva, S

    2018-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is currently used to treat oligometastases, but the optimum dose/fractionation schedule is unknown. In this study, we evaluated outcomes after single fraction SABR in patients with oligometastatic disease. Single institutional retrospective review of patients treated with single fraction SABR for one to three oligometastases between 2010 and 2015. The primary outcome was freedom from widespread disease defined as distant recurrence not amenable to surgery or SABR; or recurrence with four or more metastases. In total, 186 treatments were delivered in 132 patients. The two most common target sites were lung (51%) and bone (40%). The most frequent single fraction prescription dose was 26 Gy (47%). The most common primary malignancy was genitourinary (n = 46 patients). Freedom from widespread disease was 75% at 1 year (95% confidence interval 67-83%) and 52% at 2 years (95% confidence interval 42-63%). Freedom from local progression at 1 year was 90% (95% confidence interval 85-95%) and at 2 years was 84% (95% confidence interval 77-91%). A compression fracture of the lumbar vertebra was the only grade 3+ treatment-related toxicity. Single fraction SABR is associated with a high rate of freedom from widespread disease, favourable local control and low toxicity comparable with historic multi-fraction SABR reports. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer: five-year outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment approach for prostate cancer. We present the outcomes for low-risk prostate cancer patients with a median follow-up of 5 years after SBRT. Method and Materials Between Dec. 2003 and Dec. 2005, a pooled cohort of 41 consecutive patients from Stanford, CA and Naples, FL received SBRT with CyberKnife for clinically localized, low-risk prostate cancer. Prescribed dose was 35-36.25 Gy in five fractions. No patient received hormone therapy. Kaplan-Meier biochemical progression-free survival (defined using the Phoenix method and RTOG toxicity outcomes were assessed. Results At a median follow-up of 5 years, the biochemical progression-free survival was 93% (95% CI = 84.7% to 100%. Acute side effects resolved within 1-3 months of treatment completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. No late grade 3 rectal toxicity occurred, and only one late grade 3 genitourinary toxicity occurred following repeated urologic instrumentation. Conclusion Five-year results of SBRT for localized prostate cancer demonstrate the efficacy and safety of shorter courses of high dose per fraction radiation delivered with SBRT technique. Ongoing clinical trials are underway to further explore this treatment approach.

  10. Long-term outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of central neurocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi-Dong; Li, Wen-Bin; Feng, Jin; Qiu, Xiao-Guang

    2014-01-01

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy for central neurocytomas (CNs) is not clear. Therefore, we aimed to examine the clinical outcomes of treating histologically confirmed CNs with adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Sixty-three CN patients were retrospectively evaluated: 24 patients underwent gross total resection (GTR); 28, subtotal resection (STR); 9, partial resection (PR), and 2, biopsy (Bx). They underwent adjuvant RT after surgery (median dose, 54 Gy). The median follow-up was 69 months (15–129 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) were 94.4% and 95% after GTR + RT, 96.4% and 100% after STR + RT, and 100% and 90.9% after PR + RT. Only three patients had tumor recurrence: at the primary site at 30 and 24 months in two GTR + PR patients, and dissemination to the spinal cord at 75 months in one STR + RT patient. Thirty-eight (63.3%) patients experienced late neurotoxicity (28, grade 1; 7, grade 2; 3, grade 3). Short-term memory impairment was the most common toxicity. RT after incomplete resection (IR) led to OS and PFS comparable to those for GTR. Considering the excellent outcomes and limited late toxicity, adjuvant RT maybe a good option for CN patients who undergo IR

  11. Health-related quality of life outcome for oral cancer survivors after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Fu-Min; Chien, Chih-Yen; Wang, Chong-Jong; Tsai, Wen-Ling; Chiu, Herng-Chia

    2004-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) data are becoming an important supplement to information pertaining to treatment outcome for cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the HRQL outcome for oral cancer survivors after surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and to investigate the variables associated with their HRQL. Sixty-six oral cancer patients with cancer-free survival after surgery plus postoperative RT of >2 years were enrolled. The Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire in the Taiwan Chinese version was self-reported by all participants at the clinics. The linear regression model was used to analyze the socio-demographic and medical-related variables correlated with the physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) in SF-36. The mean scores of the eight functional domains in the SF-36 were markedly lower for oral cancer survivors compared with the Taiwanese and US norms. Those with older age, lower annual family income, more advanced cancer stage and flap reconstruction had significantly worse PCS, and those with lower annual family income, unemployment and more advanced cancer stage reported significantly worse MCS. This model accounts for 63% of variance in PCS, and 51% in MCS. These results provided patient-reported evidence that oral cancer survivors lived with a worse HRQL compared with the general Taiwanese population. Socio-economic factors and cancer stage were important factors correlated with their HRQL. (authors)

  12. Tolerability and outcomes of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 70 years and older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Xin; Wu, Hongbin; Peng, Junjie; Zhu, Ji; Cai, Sanjun; Cai, Gang; Zhang, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    To assess the safety and outcomes of radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in elderly patients (≥70) with rectal cancer. Elderly patients aged 70 and older with rectal cancer, who were treated with RT or CRT at a single institution, were retrospectively analyzed. Performance status (KPS and ECOG score) and comorbidity (Charlson comorbidity index) were calculated, and their correlation with treatment toxicity and overall survival were studied. Risk factors for overall survival were investigated using univariate and multivariate survival analysis. A total of 126 patients with locally advanced disease, local recurrence or synchronous metastasis were included, with a 3-year OS rate of 48.1%. Scheduled dosage of radiation was delivered to 69% of patients. Grade 3 toxicities occurred more often in patients treated with CRT versus RT. The occurrence of grade 3 toxicities was not related to KPS score, ECOG score, number of comorbidities, and Charlson score. Multivariate analysis found that only age and Charlson score were independent prognostic factors for predicting patients’ 3-year OS. The 3-year OS rate was significantly higher in patients with Charlson score <4 vs Charlson score ≥4 (71.1% vs. 26.4%, P=0.0003). Although toxicities may be significant, elderly patients with rectal cancer of varied stages can be safely treated with RT or CRT with careful monitoring and frequent modification of treatment. Except for patients’ age, Charlson comorbidity index may be helpful in assessing patients’ outcomes in elderly patients with rectal cancer

  13. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy between Breast Cancer Patients with and without Immediate Flap Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hua Lee

    Full Text Available To compare the long-term clinical outcomes of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT between breast cancer patients with and without immediate transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap reconstruction.The study included 492 patients with stage II or III breast cancer who underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM and chemotherapy followed by PMRT between 1997 and 2011. Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate the differences between overall and disease-free survival rates in the 2 groups.Among 492 patients, 213 patients had immediate TRAM flap reconstruction. The mean follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 11-191 months. The 5-year and 10-year disease free survival rates were 81% and 76% for the TRAM flap group and 78% and 73% for the non-flap group. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 89% and 73% for the TRAM flap group and 83% and 74% for the non-flap group.There exists no statistically significant difference in the rates of local recurrence, distant metastasis, disease-free and overall survival when comparing immediate TRAM flap reconstruction with no reconstruction. Our results suggest that immediate TRAM flap reconstruction does not compromise long term clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients requiring PMRT.

  14. Difference in target definition using three different methods to include respiratory motion in radiotherapy of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloth Møller, Ditte; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Nyeng, Tine Bisballe; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Holt, Marianne Ingerslev; Kandi, Maria; Hoffmann, Lone

    2017-11-01

    Minimizing the planning target volume (PTV) while ensuring sufficient target coverage during the entire respiratory cycle is essential for free-breathing radiotherapy of lung cancer. Different methods are used to incorporate the respiratory motion into the PTV. Fifteen patients were analyzed. Respiration can be included in the target delineation process creating a respiratory GTV, denoted iGTV. Alternatively, the respiratory amplitude (A) can be measured based on the 4D-CT and A can be incorporated in the margin expansion. The GTV expanded by A yielded GTV + resp, which was compared to iGTV in terms of overlap. Three methods for PTV generation were compared. PTV del (delineated iGTV expanded to CTV plus PTV margin), PTV σ (GTV expanded to CTV and A was included as a random uncertainty in the CTV to PTV margin) and PTV ∑ (GTV expanded to CTV, succeeded by CTV linear expansion by A to CTV + resp, which was finally expanded to PTV ∑ ). Deformation of tumor and lymph nodes during respiration resulted in volume changes between the respiratory phases. The overlap between iGTV and GTV + resp showed that on average 7% of iGTV was outside the GTV + resp implying that GTV + resp did not capture the tumor during the full deformable respiration cycle. A comparison of the PTV volumes showed that PTV σ was smallest and PTV Σ largest for all patients. PTV σ was in mean 14% (31 cm 3 ) smaller than PTV del , while PTV del was 7% (20 cm 3 ) smaller than PTV Σ . PTV σ yields the smallest volumes but does not ensure coverage of tumor during the full respiratory motion due to tumor deformation. Incorporating the respiratory motion in the delineation (PTV del ) takes into account the entire respiratory cycle including deformation, but at the cost, however, of larger treatment volumes. PTV Σ should not be used, since it incorporates the disadvantages of both PTV del and PTV σ .

  15. Role of interim {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for the early prediction of clinical outcomes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) during radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Marta; Garibaldi, Cristina [European Institute of Oncology, Radiation Research Unit, Milano (Italy); Gilardi, Laura; Travaini, Laura Lavinia; Grana, Chiara Maria [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila Esmeralda; Botta, Francesca [Medical Physics Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Piperno, Gaia; Ronchi, Sara; Ciardo, Delia [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dallas, TX (United States); Baroni, Guido [Politecnico di Milano University, Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Milano (Italy); Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Milano (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Milano (Italy); European Institute of Oncology, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Milano (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is characterized by aggressiveness and includes the majority of thorax malignancies. The possibility of early stratification of patients as responsive and non-responsive to radiotherapy with a non-invasive method is extremely appealing. The distribution of the Fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in tumours, provided by Positron-Emission-Tomography (PET) images, has been proved to be useful to assess the initial staging of the disease, recurrence, and response to chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy (CRT). In the last years, particular efforts have been focused on the possibility of using ad interim {sup 18}F-FDG PET (FDG{sub int}) to evaluate response already in the course of radiotherapy. However, controversial findings have been reported for various malignancies, although several results would support the use of FDG{sub int} for individual therapeutic decisions, at least in some pathologies. The objective of the present review is to assemble comprehensively the literature concerning NSCLC, to evaluate where and whether FDG{sub int} may offer predictive potential. Several searches were completed on Medline and the Embase database, combining different keywords. Original papers published in the English language from 2005 to 2016 with studies involving FDG{sub int} in patients affected by NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy or chemo-radiotherapy only were chosen. Twenty-one studies out of 970 in Pubmed and 1256 in Embase were selected, reporting on 627 patients. Certainly, the lack of univocal PET parameters was identified as a major drawback, while standardization would be required for best practice. In any case, all these papers denoted FDG{sub int} as promising and a challenging examination for early assessment of outcomes during CRT, sustaining its predictivity in lung cancer. (orig.)

  16. Patient reported outcomes following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy or surgery for stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer : Results from the ROSEL multicenter randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louie, Alexander V.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Chen, Hanbo; Smit, Egbert F.; Paul, Marinus A.; Widder, Joachim; Groen, Harry J. M.; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    We report quality of life and indirect costs from patient reported outcomes from the ROSEL randomized control trial comparing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, also known as stereotactic body radiotherapy or SBRT) versus surgical resection for medically operable stage IA non-small cell lung

  17. Outcomes and xerostomia after postoperative radiotherapy for oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-He; Yan, Chao; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Ping; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Tu, Wen-Yong; Kirwan, Jessica; Mendenhall, William M

    2014-10-01

    We compared outcomes and xerostomia grade after postoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (RT) in patients with oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. Eighty-eight patients with oral cavity (n = 77) and oropharyngeal (n = 11) carcinoma underwent postoperative IMRT (n = 44) or conventional RT (n = 44). Outcomes, failure patterns, volume, doses, salivary gland V30, and xerostomia grade were evaluated. The median follow-up was 53 months (range, 48-58 months). The median interval from surgery to RT was 4 weeks (range, 3-6 weeks). Twenty-one patients (7 and 14 for the IMRT and conventional RT groups, respectively) experienced local-regional failure. For the IMRT group, all 7 local-regional failures occurred in the high-dose target volumes. For the conventional RT group, there were 12 in-field failures, 1 at the margin, and 1 out-of-field. Nine patients experienced distant failure (5 and 4 for the IMRT and conventional RT groups, respectively). The 4-year local-regional control, disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and distant-metastasis rates for the IMRT and conventional RT groups were 84.1% versus 68.2% (p = .055), 68.2% versus 52.3% (p = .091), 70.5% versus 56.8% (p = .124), and 11.4% versus 9.1% (p = .927), respectively. Xerostomia grade after RT was lower for IMRT compared to conventional RT (p xerostomia grade when compared to conventional RT. The predominant failure pattern was local. No differences were found in survival outcomes between both groups. There was a marginal difference in local-regional control. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated with Precision-Oriented Radiation Therapy Techniques Including Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shan Liu

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports preliminary results with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Between August 2000 and May 2001, we treated 19 patients with NPC using IMRT. Twelve patients had stage I-II disease and seven had stage III-IV disease. Six patients received 9.0-19.8 Gy three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT before IMRT and 18 patients received a brachytherapy boost after IMRT. The mean follow-up time was 13.0 months. All patients with stage II-IV disease except one received two cycles of chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU during radiotherapy, followed by two to four cycles of chemotherapy after radiotherapy. Tumor response was assessed using clinical examination and computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The mean doses administered to the gross tumor volume and clinical tumor volume were 70.9 Gy and 63.2 Gy, respectively. The mean doses administered to the right and left parotid glands were 38.1 Gy and 38.6 Gy, respectively. All 19 patients had a complete response of primary and lymph node disease. Grade III mucositis developed during chemoradiotherapy in 15 patients (79%. In addition, clinical grade I xerostomia was recorded in nine patients, grade II in nine, and grade III in one. This study demonstrated that 3D-CRT, IMRT, intracavitary brachytherapy, and chemotherapy are effective and safe methods to treat NPC. Although IMRT treatment spared parotid gland function, its efficacy may be significantly influenced by disease stage and location of the neck lymph nodes. More cases and a longer follow-up to assess survival and complications are planned.

  19. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm 3 , 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm 3 this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm 3 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm 3 (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10 10 cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm 3 (∝1 cm in diameter with 10 9 cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  20. Comparison of clinical and functional outcome between surgical treatment and carbon ion radiotherapy for pelvic chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outani, Hidetatsu; Hamada, Kenichiro; Imura, Yoshinori; Oshima, Kazuya; Sotobori, Tsukasa; Demizu, Yusuke; Kakunaga, Shigeki; Joyama, Susumu; Imai, Reiko; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Naka, Norifumi; Kudawara, Ikuo; Ueda, Takafumi; Araki, Nobuhito; Kamada, Tadashi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    As there are no reports of studies in patients with pelvic chondrosarcoma treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT), the aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of CIRT for patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis. The medical records of 31 patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis treated either by surgical resection or by CIRT between 1983 and 2014 were reviewed. There were 22 males and 9 females with a median age of 43 years (range 16-77 years). The median duration of follow-up was 66 months (range 5-289 months). Twenty-four patients underwent surgery, and 7 patients received CIRT (70.4 GyE in 16 fractions over 4 weeks). The overall local recurrence rate was 32 %, and the estimated overall 5- and 10-year survival rates were 72 and 57 %, respectively. The mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional score was 59 %. The treatment procedures (surgery or CIRT) did not affect overall survival (P = 0.347). However, the patients who underwent surgery had impaired function compared with those who received CIRT (P = 0.03). Although more patients need to be monitored to assess the clinical and functional outcomes of CIRT for patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis, this treatment might offer an acceptable alternative.

  1. Clinical Outcome of Dose-Escalated Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Richter, Anne; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases and paraspinal tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 14 patients, 12 with spinal metastases and a long life expectancy and 2 with paraspinal tumors, were treated for 16 lesions with intensity-modulated, image-guided RT. A median biologic effective dose of 74 Gy 10 (range, 55-86) in a median of 20 fractions (range, 3-34) was prescribed to the target volume. The spinal canal was treated to 40 Gy in 20 fractions using a second intensity-modulated RT dose level in the case of epidural involvement. Results: After median follow-up of 17 months, one local recurrence was observed, for an actuarial local control rate of 88% after 2 years. Local control was associated with rapid and long-term pain relief. Of 11 patients treated for a solitary spinal metastasis, 6 developed systemic disease progression. The actuarial overall survival rate for metastatic patients was 85% and 63% after 1 and 2 years, respectively. Acute Grade 2-3 skin toxicity was seen in 2 patients with no late toxicity greater than Grade 2. No radiation-induced myelopathy was observed. Conclusion: Dose-escalated irradiation of spinal metastases was safe and resulted in excellent local control. Oligometastatic patients with a long life expectancy and epidural involvement are considered to benefit the most from fractionated RT.

  2. Clinical characteristics and outcome of pneumothorax after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kaori; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Terashima, Kotaro; Shinoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hidenari; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We retrospectively investigated the clinical characteristics and outcome of pneumothorax after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Between April 2003 and July 2012, 473 patients with lung tumors were treated with SBRT. We identified 12 patients (2.5 %) with pneumothorax caused by SBRT, and evaluated the clinical features of pneumothorax. All of the tumors were primary lung cancers. The severity of radiation pneumonitis was grade 1 in 10 patients and grade 2 in two patients. Nine patients had emphysema. The planning target volume and pleura overlapped in 11 patients, and the tumors were attached to the pleura in 7 patients. Rib fractures were observed in three patients before or at the same time as the diagnosis of pneumothorax. The median time to onset of pneumothorax after SBRT was 18.5 months (4-84 months). The severity of pneumothorax was grade 1 in 11 patients and grade 3 in one patient. Although pneumothorax was a relatively rare late adverse effect after SBRT, some patients demonstrated pneumothorax after SBRT for peripheral lung tumors. Although most pneumothorax was generally tolerable and self-limiting, careful follow-up is needed.

  3. Long-term outcomes of surgery and radiotherapy for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, El

    2016-01-01

    To investigate treatment outcome and long term complication after surgery and radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary adenoma. From 1990 to 2009, 73 patients with surgery and RT for pituitary adenoma were analyzed in this study. Median age was 51 years (range, 25 to 71 years). Median tumor size was 3 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm) with suprasellar (n = 21), cavernous sinus extension (n = 14) or both (n = 5). Hormone secreting tumor was diagnosed in 29 patients; 16 patients with prolactin, 12 patients with growth hormone, and 1 patient with adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Impairment of visual acuity or visual field was presented in 33 patients at first diagnosis. Most patients (n = 64) received RT as postoperative adjuvant setting. Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 45 to 59.4 Gy). Median follow-up duration was 8 years (range, 3 to 22 years). In secreting tumors, hormone normalization rate was 55% (16 of 29 patients). For 25 patients with evaluable visual field and visual acuity test, 21 patients (84%) showed improvement of visual disturbance after treatment. The 10-year tumor control rate for non-secreting and secreting adenoma was 100% and 58%, respectively (p < 0.001). Progression free survival rate at 10 years was 98%. Only 1 patient experienced endocrinological recurrence. Following surgery, 60% (n = 44) suffered from pituitary function deficit. Late complication associated with RT was only 1 patient, who developed cataract. Surgery and RT are very effective and safe in hormonal and tumor growth control for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma

  4. The predictive value of 2-year posttreatment biopsy after prostate cancer radiotherapy for eventual biochemical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, Waseet; Tucker, Susan L.; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Kuban, Deborah A.; Cheung, M. Rex

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of a 2-year post-radiotherapy (RT) prostate biopsy for predicting eventual biochemical failure in patients who were treated for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This study comprised 164 patients who underwent a planned 2-year post-RT prostate biopsy. The independent prognostic value of the biopsy results for forecasting eventual biochemical outcome and overall survival was tested with other factors (the Gleason score, 1992 American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, risk group, and RT dose) in a multivariate analysis. The current nadir + 2 (CN + 2) definition of biochemical failure was used. Patients with rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or suspicious digital rectal examination before the biopsy were excluded. Results: The biopsy results were normal in 78 patients, scant atypical and malignant cells in 30, carcinoma with treatment effect in 43, and carcinoma without treatment effect in 13. Using the CN + 2 definition, we found a significant association between biopsy results and eventual biochemical failure. We also found that the biopsy status provides predictive information independent of the PSA status at the time of biopsy. Conclusion: A 2-year post-RT prostate biopsy may be useful for forecasting CN + 2 biochemical failure. Posttreatment prostate biopsy may be useful for identifying patients for aggressive salvage therapy

  5. Long-term outcomes of surgery and radiotherapy for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, El [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate treatment outcome and long term complication after surgery and radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary adenoma. From 1990 to 2009, 73 patients with surgery and RT for pituitary adenoma were analyzed in this study. Median age was 51 years (range, 25 to 71 years). Median tumor size was 3 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm) with suprasellar (n = 21), cavernous sinus extension (n = 14) or both (n = 5). Hormone secreting tumor was diagnosed in 29 patients; 16 patients with prolactin, 12 patients with growth hormone, and 1 patient with adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Impairment of visual acuity or visual field was presented in 33 patients at first diagnosis. Most patients (n = 64) received RT as postoperative adjuvant setting. Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 45 to 59.4 Gy). Median follow-up duration was 8 years (range, 3 to 22 years). In secreting tumors, hormone normalization rate was 55% (16 of 29 patients). For 25 patients with evaluable visual field and visual acuity test, 21 patients (84%) showed improvement of visual disturbance after treatment. The 10-year tumor control rate for non-secreting and secreting adenoma was 100% and 58%, respectively (p < 0.001). Progression free survival rate at 10 years was 98%. Only 1 patient experienced endocrinological recurrence. Following surgery, 60% (n = 44) suffered from pituitary function deficit. Late complication associated with RT was only 1 patient, who developed cataract. Surgery and RT are very effective and safe in hormonal and tumor growth control for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  6. Outcome after whole brain radiotherapy alone in intracranial leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gani, C.; Mueller, A.C.; Eckert, F.; Schroeder, C.; Bamberg, M.; Berger, B. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bender, B. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostics and Interventional Neuroradiology; Pantazis, G. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate outcome after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone as a palliative treatment without concomitant chemotherapy for intracranial leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC). Overall survival and treatment response were retrospectively analyzed in 27 consecutive patients with LMC from breast and lung cancer. All patients had evidence of intracranial manifestations of LMC. Seven potential prognostic factors were evaluated. Median overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 8.1 weeks. OS rates after 6 and 12 months were 26% and 15%, respectively. Improvement of neurological deficits was observed in 3 patients. In 3 of 4 patients with follow-up MRI studies, a decreased size of contrast-enhanced lesions was observed. Prognostic factors for improved OS on univariate analysis were absence of cranial nerve dysfunction, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) > 60%, and time interval > 35 months between the initial diagnosis of malignant disease and development of LMC. On multivariate analysis, absence of cranial nerve dysfunction remained the only significant prognosticator for OS (median 3.7 vs. 19.4 weeks, p < 0.001). WBRT alone is an effective palliative treatment for patients unfit/unsuitable for chemotherapy and low performance status suffering from intracranial LMC. However, prognostic factors should be considered in order to identify patients who are likely to benefit from WBRT. (orig.)

  7. Long-Term Outcome and Prognostic Factors for Adenocarcinoma/Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix After Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hsueh, Swei; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To study the outcomes of patients with adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix primarily treated with radiotherapy (RT), identify the prognostic factors, and evaluate the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 148 patients with Stage I-IVA AC/ASC of cervix after full-course definitive RT were included. Of the 148 patients, 77% had advanced stage disease. Treatment failure was categorized as either distant or local failure. Local failure was further separated into persistent tumor or local relapse after complete remission. The effectiveness of CCRT with cisplatin and/or paclitaxel was examined, and the surgical salvage rate for local failure was reviewed. Results: The 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 68%, 38%, 49%, 30%, and 0% for those with Stage IB/IIA nonbulky, IB/IIA bulky, IIB, III, and IVA disease, respectively, and appeared inferior to that of those with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated using the same RT protocol. Incomplete tumor regression after RT, a low hemoglobin level, and positive lymph node metastasis were independent poor prognostic factors for relapse-free survival. CCRT with weekly cisplatinum did not improve the outcome for our AC/ASC patients. Salvage surgery rescued 30% of patients with persistent disease. Conclusion: Patients with AC/ASC of the cervix primarily treated with RT had inferior outcomes compared to those with squamous cell carcinoma. Incomplete tumor regression after RT was the most important prognostic factor for local failure. Salvage surgery for patients with persistent tumor should be encouraged for selected patients. Our results did not demonstrate a benefit of CCRT with cisplatin for this disease.

  8. Organ Preservation Using Contact Radiotherapy for Early Rectal Cancer: Outcomes of Patients Treated at a Single Centre in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadda, A S; Martin, A; Killeen, S; Hunter, I A

    2017-03-01

    Contact radiotherapy for early rectal cancer uses 50 kV X-rays to treat rectal cancers under direct vision. We present data of a series of patients treated at a single centre with prospective follow-up and functional assessment. All patients were treated at the Queen's Centre for Oncology, Hull, UK between September 2011 and October 2015. Patients received a biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver/pelvis, computed tomography of the chest and endorectal ultrasound. Patients were deemed to be either unfit for radical surgery or refused it due to the need for a permanent stoma. Follow-up consisted of 3 monthly flexible sigmoidoscopy and MRI of the liver/pelvis and 12 monthly computed tomography of the chest. In total, 42 patients were treated with contact radiotherapy ± external beam chemo/radiotherapy without any primary surgical excision. The median age was 78 years (range 50-94 years). Local recurrence-free survival was 88%, disease-free survival was 86% and overall survival was 88% with a median follow-up of 24 months (range 5-54 months). The median time to recurrence was 12 months (range 4-14 months). The estimated 30 day surgical mortality for this cohort with radical surgery was 12%. Mortality from the contact radiotherapy procedure was 0%. Functional outcomes as investigated by the Low Anterior Resection Syndrome (LARS) score were good, with 65% having no LARS. Contact radiotherapy for early rectal cancer is a safe, well-tolerated outpatient procedure, allowing organ preservation, with excellent oncological and functional outcomes. For elderly co-morbid patients with suitable rectal cancers this should be considered as a standard of care. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Adjuvant sequential chemo and radiotherapy improves the oncological outcome in high risk endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Mauro; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto; De Ponti, Elena; Grassi, Tommaso; Ponti, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the impact of sequential chemoradiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer (EC). Methods Two hundred fifty-four women with stage IB grade 3, II and III EC (2009 FIGO staging), were included in this retrospective study. Results Stage I, II, and III was 24%, 28.7%, and 47.3%, respectively. Grade 3 tumor was 53.2% and 71.3% had deep myometrial invasion. One hundred sixty-five women (65%) underwent pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy and 58 (22.8%) had nodal metastases. Ninety-eight women (38.6%) underwent radiotherapy, 59 (23.2%) chemotherapy, 42 (16.5%) sequential chemoradiotherapy, and 55 (21.7%) were only observed. After a median follow-up of 101 months, 78 women (30.7%) relapsed and 91 women (35.8%) died. Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved survival rates in women who did not undergo nodal evaluation (disease-free survival [DFS], p=0.040; overall survival [OS], p=0.024) or pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy (DFS, p=0.008; OS, p=0.021). Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved both DFS (p=0.015) and OS (p=0.014) in stage III, while only a trend was found for DFS (p=0.210) and OS (p=0.102) in stage I-II EC. In the multivariate analysis, only age (≤65 years) and sequential chemoradiotherapy were statistically related to the prognosis. Conclusion Sequential chemoradiotherapy improves survival rates in high risk EC compared with chemotherapy or radiotherapy alone, in particular in stage III. PMID:26197768

  10. Influence of Cranial Radiotherapy on Outcome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated With Contemporary Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreano, Anita; Pui, Ching-Hon; Hunger, Stephen P.; Schrappe, Martin; Moericke, Anja; Biondi, Andrea; Escherich, Gabriele; Silverman, Lewis B.; Goulden, Nicholas; Taskinen, Mervi; Pieters, Rob; Horibe, Keizo; Devidas, Meenakshi; Locatelli, Franco; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to determine whether cranial radiotherapy (CRT) is necessary to prevent relapse in any subgroup of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods We obtained aggregate data on relapse and survival outcomes for 16,623 patients age 1 to 18 years old with newly diagnosed ALL treated between 1996 and 2007 by 10 cooperative study groups from around the world. The proportion of patients eligible for prophylactic CRT varied from 0% to 33% by trial and was not related to the proportion eligible for allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in first complete remission. Using a random effects model, with CRT as a dichotomous covariate, we performed a single-arm meta-analysis to compare event-free survival and cumulative incidence of isolated or any CNS relapse and isolated bone marrow relapse in high-risk subgroups of patients who either did or did not receive CRT. Results Although there was significant heterogeneity in all outcome end points according to trial, CRT was associated with a reduced risk of relapse only in the small subgroup of patients with overt CNS disease at diagnosis, who had a significantly lower risk of isolated CNS relapse (4% with CRT v 17% without CRT; P = .02) and a trend toward lower risk of any CNS relapse (7% with CRT v 17% without CRT; P = .09). However, this group had a relatively high rate of events regardless of whether or not they received CRT (32% [95% CI, 26% to 39%] v 34% [95% CI, 19% to 54%]; P = .8). Conclusion CRT does not have an impact on the risk of relapse in children with ALL treated on contemporary protocols. PMID:26755523

  11. Angiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy: long-term outcomes with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Morris, Christopher G; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Copeland, Edward M; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2010-04-15

    With breast-conserving therapy (BCT) as the standard of care for patients with noninvasive and early stage invasive breast cancer, a small incidence of post-BCT angiosarcoma has emerged. The majority of therapeutic interventions have been unsuccessful. To the authors' knowledge, there is no consensus in the medical literature to date regarding the treatment of this malignancy. The current study was conducted to report the long-term outcomes of a novel approach using hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy (HART) for angiosarcoma developing after BCT. The authors retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 14 patients treated with HART with or without surgery at the University of Florida between November 1997 and March 2006 for angiosarcoma that developed after BCT. At the time of last follow-up, 9 patients had remained continuously without evidence of disease for a median of 61 months after HART (range, 36-127 months). Five patients had further manifestations of angiosarcoma after HART at a median of 1 month (range, 1-28 months): 3 with progressive pulmonary and/or mediastinal disease that was likely present before HART and 2 with local or regional disease extension. Progression-free survival rates for the 14 patients at 2 years and 5 years were 71% and 64%, respectively. The overall and cause-specific survival rates were both 86% at 2 years and 5 years. To the best of the authors' knowledge, HART with or without subsequent surgery, as documented in the current series, is the first approach to provide a high rate of local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival after the development of post-BCT angiosarcoma. The authors believe the success noted with this approach is related to both the hyperfractionation and acceleration of the RT. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  12. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Efstathiou, Jason; Liao Kaijun; Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64–0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83–1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83–1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14–1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  13. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Shido, Yoji; Wasa, Junji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  14. Treatment outcome and prognostic variables for local control and survival in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokdal, Lars; Hoeyer, Morten; Maase, Hans von der [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the outcome of radical radiotherapy in 292 patients with bladder cancer and to identify prognostic factors for local control and survival. Median age was 72.3 years (range 45-83 years). Median follow up was 66 months (range 18-121 months). All patients were treated by use of a standard 3-field technique with 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the tumor and the bladder. The elective lymph nodes were treated with doses in the range from 46 Gy to 60 Gy. Complete response was obtained in 52% of the patients at 3-month control. However, 41% of all patients with an initial CR developed recurrence during follow-up. The 3-year and 5-year overall survival rate was 31% and 21%, respectively. Performance status, T-stage, macroscopic complete TURB, hydronephrosis, and serum creatinine were independent prognostic factors for overall survival and, thus, important for the selection of patients for curative intended radiotherapy. During radiotherapy acute transient side effects were recorded in 78% of the patients; severe bowel complications were recorded in 9 patients (3%). Following radiotherapy, 10 patients (3%) developed intestinal reactions requiring surgery. Three patients (1%) were cystectomized because of severe radiation reactions in the bladder. At 5-year follow-up, the actuarial risk of complications requiring surgery was 15%. Treatment-related mortality was 2%.

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; Daly, Megan E.; Murphy, James D.; Abelson, Jonathan; Chapman, Chris H.; Chung, Melody; Yu, Yao; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy; Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for tumors of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity (PNS/NC). Methods/Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2009, 52 patients with tumors of the PNS/NC underwent postoperative or definitive radiation with IMRT. Twenty-eight (54%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Twenty-nine patients (56%) received chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 26.6 months (range, 2.9-118.4) for all patients and 30.9 months for living patients. Results: Eighteen patients (35%) developed local-regional failure (LRF) at median time of 7.2 months. Thirteen local failures (25%) were observed, 12 in-field and 1 marginal. Six regional failures were observed, two in-field and four out-of-field. No patients treated with elective nodal radiation had nodal regional failure. Two-year local-regional control (LRC), in-field LRC, freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and overall survival (OS) were 64%, 74%, 71%, and 66% among all patients, respectively, and 43%, 61%, 61%, and 53% among patients with SCC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, SCC and >1 subsite involved had worse LRC (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.046, respectively) and OS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.046, respectively). Cribriform plate invasion (p = 0.005) and residual disease (p = 0.047) also had worse LRC. Acute toxicities included Grade {>=}3 mucositis in 19 patients (37%), and Grade 3 dermatitis in 8 patients (15%). Six patients had Grade {>=}3 late toxicity including one optic toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT for patients with PNS/NC tumors has good outcomes compared with historical series and is well tolerated. Patients with SCC have worse LRC and OS. LRF is the predominant pattern of failure.

  16. Predicting two-year longitudinal MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory outcomes after intensity modulated radiotherapy for locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, Ryan P; Lewin, Jan S; Barrow, Martha P; Fuller, C David; Lai, Stephen Y; Song, Juhee; Hobbs, Brian P; Gunn, G Brandon; Beadle, Beth M; Rosenthal, David I; Garden, Adam S; Kies, Merrill S; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vali A; Schwartz, David L; Hutcheson, Katherine A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the factors associated with longitudinal patient-reported dysphagia as measured by the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) in locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) survivors treated with split-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Retrospective patient analysis. A retrospective analysis combined data from three single-institution clinical trials for stage III/IV head and neck carcinoma. According to trial protocols, patients had prospectively collected MDADI at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. OPC patients with baseline and at least one post-treatment MDADI were included. Longitudinal analysis was completed with multivariate linear mixed effects modeling. There were 116 patients who met inclusion criteria. Mean baseline MDADI composite was 88.3, dropping to 73.8 at 6 months, and rising to 78.6 and 83.3 by 12 and 24 months, respectively (compared to baseline, all P dysphagia early after split-field IMRT for locoregionally advanced OPC that remains apparent 6 months after treatment. MDADI scores recover slowly thereafter, but remain depressed at 24 months compared to baseline. Higher tumor stage and smoking status are important markers of patient-reported function through the course of treatment, suggesting these are important groups for heightened surveillance and more intensive interventions to optimize swallowing outcomes. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:842-848, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Whither radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W M

    1987-03-01

    The 1986 Glyn Evans Memorial Lecture, given at the Joint Provincial Meeting of the Royal College of Radiologists, Sheffield, September 1986, sketches an outline of the history of radiotherapy and discusses the future development of the art. Topics included are siting of centres, training needs, the relationship of radiotherapy to other medical specialities, and the advantages and disadvantages of radiotherapy practitioners forming a separate medical College. (U.K.)

  18. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo; Azumi, Atsushi; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22–85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  19. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Naoki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei, E-mail: rsasaki@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Azumi, Atsushi [Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Matsui, Toshimitsu [Division of Hematology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22-85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  20. Outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer treated by radiotherapy after confirming the absence of lymph node invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Noriyuki; Shimbo, Masaki; Amiya, Yoshiyasu; Tomioka, Susumu; Shima, Takayuki; Murakami, Shino; Nakatsu, Hiroomi; Oota, Sayako; Shimazaki, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Management of lymph nodes in radiotherapy for prostate cancer is an issue for curative intent. To find the influence of lymph nodes, patients with T1-T3 prostate cancer and surgically confirmed negative nodes were treated with radiotherapy. After lymphadenectomy, 118 patients received photon beam radiotherapy with 66 Gy to the prostate. No adjuvant treatment was performed until biochemical failure. After failure, hormone therapy was administered. Follow-up period was 57 months (mean). Biochemical failure occurred in 47 patients. Few failures were observed in patients with low (24%) and intermediate risks (14%). In contrast, 64% of high-risk patients experienced failure, 97% of whom showed until 36 months. Most patients with failure responded well to hormone therapy. After 15 months (mean), a second biochemical failure occurred in 21% of patients who had the first failure, most of them were high risk. Factors involving failure were high initial and nadir prostate-specific antigen, advanced stage, short prostate-specific antigen-doubling time and duration between radiation and first failure. Failure showed an insufficient reduction in prostate-specific antigen after radiotherapy. Factor for second failure was prostate-specific antigen-doubling time at first failure. Half of high-risk patients experienced biochemical failure, indicating one of the causes involves factors other than lymph nodes. Low-, intermediate- and the other half of high-risk patients did not need to take immediate hormone therapy after radiotherapy. After failure, delayed hormone therapy was effective. Prostate-specific antigen parameters were predictive factors for further outcome. (author)

  1. Comparison of mortality outcomes after radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer. A population-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollah, F.; Schmitges, J.; Sun, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the mortality outcomes of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy as treatment modalities for patients with localized prostate cancer. Our cohort consisted of 68 665 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, between 1992 and 2005. Propensity-score matching was used to minimize potential bias related to treatment assignment. Competing-risks analyses tested the effect of treatment type on cancer-specific mortality, after accounting for other-cause mortality. All analyses were stratified according to prostate cancer risk groups, baseline Charlson Comorbidity Index and age. For patients treated with radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy, the 10-year cancer-specific mortality rates were 1.4 versus 3.9% in low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and 6.8 versus 11.5% in high-risk prostate cancer, respectively. Rates were 2.4 versus 5.9% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 0, 2.4 versus 5.1% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 1, and 2.9 versus 5.2% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of ≥2. Rates were 2.1 versus 5.0% in patients aged 65-69 years, 2.8 versus 5.5% in patients aged 70-74 years, and 2.9 versus 7.6% in patients aged 75-80 years (all P<0.001). At multivariable analyses, radiotherapy was associated with less favorable cancer-specific mortality in all categories (all P<0.001). Patients treated with radical prostatectomy fare substantially better than those treated with radiotherapy. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer benefit the most from radical prostatectomy. Conversely, the lowest benefit was observed in patients with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and/or multiple comorbidities. An intermediate benefit was observed in the other examined categories. (author)

  2. Effect of postoperative brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy on functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair after radical parotidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Qiu, Shan-Shan; Marré, Diego

    2014-01-01

    There is much controversy regarding the effect of radiotherapy on facial nerve regeneration. However, the effect of brachytherapy has not been studied. Fifty-three patients underwent total parotidectomy of which 13 were radical with immediate facial nerve repair with sural nerve grafts. Six patients (group 1) did not receive adjuvant treatment whereas 7 patients (group 2) received postoperative brachytherapy plus radiotherapy. Functional outcomes were compared using Facial Clima. Mean percentage of blink recovery was 92.6 ± 4.2 for group 1 and 90.7 ± 5.2 for group 2 (p = .37). Mean percentage of commissural excursion restoration was 78.1 ± 3.5 for group 1 and 74.9 ± 5.9 for group 2 (p = .17). Mean time from surgery to first movement was 5.7 ± 0.9 months for group 1 and 6.3 ± 0.5 months for group 2 (p = .15). Brachytherapy plus radiotherapy does not affect the functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair with nerve grafts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Outcomes in 24 selected patients with stage IVB cervical cancer and excellent performance status treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zighelboim, Israel; Taylor, Nicholas P.; Powell, Matthew A.; Gibb, Randall K.; Rader, Janet S.; Mutch, David G.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2006-01-01

    We sought to review outcomes in patients with stage IVB carcinoma of the cervix treated with irradiation in combination with chemotherapy. We report outcomes of 24 consecutive patients with good performance status treated from 1998 to 2005. Most of these patients underwent concurrent irradiation with platinum-based chemotherapy. Some patients received subsequent systemic chemotherapy. All patients underwent external beam radiotherapy; 7 patients (29%) had additional high-dose-rate and 12 (50%) low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Two patients (8%) received an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) boost instead of brachytherapy. The mean dose to point A was variable (73.9±19.2 Gy). Twenty patients (83%) received radio-sensitizing platinum-based chemotherapy, and the remaining had radiotherapy alone. Seven patients (29%) had further combination chemotherapy. Therapy was well tolerated. The overall survival was 44% at 36 months and 22% at 5 years. Patients with stage IVB cervical cancer have mostly been treated with palliative intent. With the advent of concurrent chemoradiation, we have treated many of these cases with aggressive combination therapy. In this series, the use of radiotherapy and multiagent chemotherapy in patients with stage IVB cervical carcinoma and good performance status was well tolerated and resulted in higher survival rates than previously reported. (author)

  4. High-precision radiotherapy for meningiomas. Long-term results and patient-reported outcome (PRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Fischer, Hanna; Combs, Stephanie E. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (HMGU), Institute for Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Department of Radiation Sciences DRS, Neuherberg (Germany); Oechnser, Markus [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Zimmer, Claus [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Meyer, Bernhard [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate long-term outcome after high-precision radiotherapy (RT) of meningioma patients in terms of survival and side effects. We analyzed 275 meningioma cases: 147 low-grade and 43 high-grade meningiomas (WHO II: n = 40, III: n = 3). In all, 85 patients had no pathologically confirmed histology but were determined as low-grade based on multimodal imaging. Surgery was performed in 183 cases. RT was delivered as either radiosurgery (RS, n = 16), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT, n = 241), or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, n = 18). Of 218 patients contacted for patient-reported-outcome (PRO), 207 responded (95%). Median follow-up was 7.2 years. For low-grade meningioma the survival rate (OS) was 97% at 3 years, 85% at 10 years, and 64% at 15 years, for atypical meningioma 91% at 3 years, 62% at 10 years, and 50% at 15 years. Local control rate (PFS) for low-grade meningioma was 91% at 3 years, 87% at 5 years, and 86% at 10 years, for atypical cases 67% at 3 years and 55% at 5 years. Of all, 3.0% of patients reported worsened or new symptoms grade ≥3 during RT and the first 6 months thereafter; 17.5% reported a deterioration after more than 2 years. We found the prognostic factors tumor volume and age significantly influencing OS and PFS. Complemented by PRO, we found long-term low toxicity rates in addition to excellent local control. Thus, due to the beneficial risk-benefit profile of benign and high-risk meningiomas, RT should be performed as adjuvant treatment and should not be postponed until tumor progression. (orig.) [German] Langzeitergebnisse nach Hochpraezisionsstrahlentherapie (RT) von Patienten mit Meningeomen hinsichtlich Ueberleben und Nebenwirkungen. Es wurden 275 Meningeomfaelle untersucht: 145 benigne (WHO I), 40 atypische (WHO II) und 3 anaplastische (WHO III) Meningeome; bei 85 Patienten bestand keine histologische Sicherung. Voroperiert waren 183 Faelle (67 %). Bei 16 Patienten wurde eine Radiochirurgie (RS

  5. Lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a coplanar versus a non-coplanar beam technique: a comparison of clinical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Bauer, Heather J.; Mayo, Charles S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine if lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using a coplanar beam technique was associated with similar outcomes as lung SBRT using a non-coplanar beam technique. Methods A retrospective review was performed of patients undergoing lung SBRT between January 2008 and April 2011. SBRT was initially delivered with multiple non-coplanar, non-overlapping beams; however, starting in December 2009, SBRT was delivered predominantly with all coplanar beams in order to reduce treatment time and complexity. Results This analysis included 149 patients; the median follow-up was 21 months. SBRT was delivered for primary (n = 90) or recurrent (n = 17) non-small cell lung cancer, or lung oligometastasis (n = 42). The most common dose (Gy)/fraction (fx) regimens were 48 Gy/4 fx (39%), 54 Gy/3 fx (37%), and 50 Gy/5 fx (17%). The beam arrangement was coplanar in 61 patients (41%) and non-coplanar in 88 patients (59%). In patients treated with 54 Gy/3 fx, the mean treatment times per fraction for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 10 and 14 minutes (p < 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier 2-year estimates of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and local control (LC) for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 65% vs. 56% (p = 0.30), 47% vs. 39% (p = 0.71), and 92% and 92% (p = 0.94), respectively. The 1-year estimates of grade 2-5 pulmonary toxicity for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 11% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.30). On multivariate analysis, beam arrangement was not significantly associated with OS, LC or pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions Patients treated with lung SBRT using a coplanar technique had similar outcomes as those treated with a non-coplanar technique. PMID:29296365

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade ≥3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  7. Clinical outcomes in patients treated with radiotherapy after surgery for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kyung Mi; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie; Lee, Jeong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes from cervical cancer and stratify patients into risk groups for prognostic factors for early-stage disease. We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage IB or IIA cervical cancer treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) following primary surgery at Samsung Medical Center from 2001 to 2011. Adjuvant RT was added for patients with intermediate-risk factors, and adjuvant CCRT was performed on high-risk patients after surgery. We reviewed 247 patients—149 in the high-risk group and 98 in intermediate-risk group. The median follow-up was 62 months. Loco-regional failure (LRF) alone occurred in 7 patients (2.8%), distant metastasis alone in 37 patients (15.0%) and LRF with DM in 4 patients (1.6%). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for both groups were 79.7% and 87.6%, respectively. In the high-risk group, the 5-year DFS and OS probabilities were 72.5% and 81.9%, respectively. Histologic type, pathologic tumor size, and the number of pelvic lymph node (PLN) metastasis were significant prognostic factors for DFS and OS. We suggest a scoring system (0–3) using these prognostic factors to predict poor prognosis in high-risk patients. Using this system, patients with higher scores have higher recurrence and lower survival rates. In the high-risk cervical-cancer group who received primary surgery and adjuvant CCRT, non-squamous type, large tumor size and the number of PLN metastasis were significant prognostic factors, and the number of these factors was associated with survival rates.

  8. Quality of Life and Survival Outcome for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-A Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, F.-M.; Chien, C.-Y.; Tsai, W.-L.; Chen, H.-C.; Hsu, H.-C.; Lui, C.-C.; Huang, T.-L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the changes of quality of life (QoL) and survival outcomes for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Two hundred and three newly diagnosed NPC patients, who were curatively treated by 3D-CRT (n = 93) or IMRT (n = 110) between March 2002 and July 2004, were analyzed. The distributions of clinical stage according to American Joint Committee on Cancer 1997 were I: 15 (7.4%), II: 78 (38.4%), III: 74 (36.5%), and IV: 36 (17.7%). QoL was longitudinally assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires at the five time points: before RT, during RT (36 Gy), and 3 months, 12 months, and 24 months after RT. Results: The 3-year locoregional control, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rates were 84.8%, 76.7%, and 81.7% for the 3D-CRT group, respectively, compared with 84.2%, 82.6%, and 85.4% for the IMRT group (p value > 0.05). A general trend of maximal deterioration in most QoL scales was observed during RT, followed by a gradual recovery thereafter. There was no significant difference in most scales between the two groups at each time point. The exception was that patients treated by IMRT had a both statistically and clinically significant improvement in global QoL, fatigue, taste/smell, dry mouth, and feeling ill at the time point of 3 months after RT. Conclusions: The potential advantage of IMRT over 3D-CRT in treating NPC patients might occur in QoL outcome during the recovery phase of acute toxicity

  9. Sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy for low rectal cancers: feasibility, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.; Soravia, C.; Gertsch, P.; Bieri, S.; Sprangers, M.A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In cancers of the distal rectum, preoperative radiotherapy is often associated with low anterior resection. This study assesses the choice of surgical procedure, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes in a retrospective cohort of patients with low-lying rectal cancers. The results obtained reinforce the notion of the feasibility, in routine practice, of sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy in a significant proportion of low rectal cancers. The oncological results seem to be unaffected by the choice of surgical procedure. However, with the possible exception of body image and sexual aspects in males, quality of life parameters were not necessarily better in the restorative surgery group. Prospective studies are mandatory to clarify the putative quality of life advantages of sphincter-conserving procedures in this context. (author)

  10. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J., E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paul, Marinus A. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  11. Prior surgical intervention and tumor size impact clinical outcome after precision radiotherapy for the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeberg, Sebastian; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed our long-term experience with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with meningioma of the optic nerve sheath (ONSM). Between January 1991 and January 2010, 40 patients with ONSM were treated using FSRT. Of these, 19 patients received radiotherapy as primary treatment, and 21 patients were treated after surgical resection. The median target volume was 9.2 ml, median total dose was 54 Gy in median single fractions of 1,8 Gy. Local progression-free survival was 100%. Median survival after FSRT was 60 months (range 4-228 months). In all patients overall toleration of FSRT was very good. Acute toxicity was mild. Prior to RT, 29 patients complained about any kind of visual impairment including visual field deficits, diplopia or amaurosis. Prior surgical resection was identified as a negative prognostic factor for visual outcome, whereas patients with larger tumor volumes demonstrated a higher number of patients with improvement of pre-existing visual deficits. Long-term outcome after FSRT for ONSM shows improved vision in patients not treated surgically prior to RT; moreover, the best improvement of visual deficits are observed in patients with larger target volumes. The absence of tumor recurrences supports that FSRT is a strong alternative to surgical resection especially in small tumors without extensive compression of normal tissue structures

  12. Factors influencing survival outcome for radiotherapy for biliary tract cancer: A multicenter retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Oikawa, Hirobumi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Uchida, Nobue; Maebayashi, Toshiya; Kanesaka, Naoto; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Asakura, Hirofumi; Kosugi, Takashi; Hatano, Kazuo; Yoshimura, Michio; Yamada, Kazunari; Tokumaru, Sunao; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masao; Soejima, Toshinori; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To seek for the possible factors influencing overall survival (OS) with radiotherapy (RT) for biliary tract cancer. Materials and methods: Data were collected retrospectively from RT database of 31 institutions in Japan. All patients underwent at least external beam RT. The factors influencing OS were investigated. Results: Data of 498 patients were analyzed. Median OS of the 212 patients who underwent surgery was significantly better than that of the 286 patients without surgery (31 vs. 15 months, p < 0.001). The OS for the R0 or R1 resection group was significantly longer than that for the R2 or non-surgery group, as well as for n0 compared to n1 (all p < 0.001). Chemoradiotherapy (CRT), both sequential and concurrent, resulted in a better OS than RT alone for the n1 group (31 vs. 13 months, p < 0.001), and marginally better for the R0/R1 group (p = 0.065; p = 0.054 for concurrent CRT). However, no such benefit was observed for the R2/non-surgical patients. Multivariate analysis identified performance status, clinical stage, and surgery as significant factors. Conclusion: Surgery, especially R0/R1 resection, seemed as the gold standard for treatment of biliary tract cancer including RT, even in the highly heterogeneous population obtained from the multicenter retrospective study. The possibility was shown that CRT yielded better survival benefit especially for n1 patients. We recommend that future prospective trials include an arm of adjuvant CRT at least for n1 and possibly R0/R1 patients

  13. Factors influencing the treatment outcome for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Ichiro; Kanehira, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Aoki, Manabu; Takagi, Sayako; Shirahama, Jun; Honda, Chikara

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic factors affecting local outcomes for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy. A total of 48 patients with T2N0 squamous cell carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy between 1992 and 2005 were studied. Cumulative probability of overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control and larynx-preserving were calculated according the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic significance of patient's age, number of subsites involved, impaired cord mobility, anterior commisure involved, total dose and overall treatment time were analyzed using the log-rank test in univariate analysis and Cox regression in multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 13 to 141 months (median, 62 months). Five-year survivals were: overall, 95.3%; cause-specific, 97.9% and five years rates were local control, 61.4%; larynx-preserving, 76.4%. Multivariate analyses of the six parameters showed that overall treatment time significantly influenced the probability of local control, and impaired mobility and overall treatment time affected the probability of larynx-preserving. Our study showed that longer overall treatment time significantly worsened the percentage of local control and larynx-preserving for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy. Therefore, we suggest treating, the patients in a shorter treatment course. (author)

  14. A retrospective comparison of outcome and toxicity of preoperative image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus conventional pelvic radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chih-Jen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare clinical outcomes and toxicity between 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) administered through helical tomotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We reviewed 144 patients with Stage II–III rectal cancer receiving preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy followed by radical resection. Tumor responses following chemoradiotherapy were evaluated using the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG). Of the 144 patients, 45 received IG-IMRT and 99 received 3DCRT. A significant reduction in Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (IG-IMRT, 6.7%; 3DCRT, 15.1%; P = 0.039) was observed by IG-IMRT. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate did not differ between the IG-IMRT and the 3DCRT group (17.8% vs 15.1%, P = 0.52). Patients in the IG-IMRT group had the trend of favorable tumor regressions (TRG 3 or 4) compared with those in the 3DCRT group (66.7% vs 43.5%, P = 0.071). The median follow-up was 53 months (range, 18–95 months) in the 3DCRT group and 43 months (range, 17–69 months) in the IG-IMRT group. Four-year overall, disease-free, and local failure–free survival rates of the IG-IMRT and 3DCRT groups were 81.6% and 67.9% (P = 0.12), 53.8% and 51.8% (P = 0.51), and 88% and 75.1% (P = 0.031), respectively. LARC patients treated with preoperative IG-IMRT achieved lower acute gastrointestinal adverse effects and a higher local control rate than those treated with 3DCRT, but there was no prominent difference in distant metastasis rate and overall survival between two treatment modalities.

  15. Treatment outcome of localized prostate cancer by 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a customized rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Chang Geol; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Suh, Chang Ok; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome and long-term toxicity of 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer using a customized rectal balloon. We reviewed medical records of 86 prostate cancer patients who received curative radiotherapy between January 2004 and December 2011 at our institution. Patients were designated as low (12.8%), intermediate (20.9%), or high risk (66.3%). Thirty patients received a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions over 5 weeks via IMRT (the Hypo-IMRT group); 56 received 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions over 7 weeks via 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (the CF-3DRT group, which served as a reference for comparison). A customized rectal balloon was placed in Hypo-IMRT group throughout the entire radiotherapy course. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 47 patients (Hypo-IMRT group, 17; CF-3DRT group, 30). Late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up period was 74.4 months (range, 18.8 to 125.9 months). The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 100%, 100%, and 88.5%, respectively, for the Hypo-IMRT group and 80%, 77.8%, and 63.6%, respectively, for the CF-3DRT group (p < 0.046). No patient presented with acute or late GU toxicity > or =grade 3. Late grade 3 GI toxicity occurred in 2 patients (3.6%) in the CF-3DRT group and 1 patient (3.3%) in the Hypo-IMRT group. Hypo-IMRT with a customized rectal balloon resulted in excellent biochemical control rates with minimal toxicity in localized prostate cancer patients.

  16. Correlations between contouring similarity metrics and simulated treatment outcome for prostate radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, D.; Jameson, M. G.; Dowling, J. A.; Ebert, M. A.; Greer, P. B.; Kennedy, A. M.; Watt, S.; Holloway, L. C.

    2018-02-01

    Many similarity metrics exist for inter-observer contouring variation studies, however no correlation between metric choice and prostate cancer radiotherapy dosimetry has been explored. These correlations were investigated in this study. Two separate trials were undertaken, the first a thirty-five patient cohort with three observers, the second a five patient dataset with ten observers. Clinical and planning target volumes (CTV and PTV), rectum, and bladder were independently contoured by all observers in each trial. Structures were contoured on T2-weighted MRI and transferred onto CT following rigid registration for treatment planning in the first trial. Structures were contoured directly on CT in the second trial. STAPLE and majority voting volumes were generated as reference gold standard volumes for each structure for the two trials respectively. VMAT treatment plans (78 Gy to PTV) were simulated for observer and gold standard volumes, and dosimetry assessed using multiple radiobiological metrics. Correlations between contouring similarity metrics and dosimetry were calculated using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. No correlations were observed between contouring similarity metrics and dosimetry for CTV within either trial. Volume similarity correlated most strongly with radiobiological metrics for PTV in both trials, including TCPPoisson (ρ  =  0.57, 0.65), TCPLogit (ρ  =  0.39, 0.62), and EUD (ρ  =  0.43, 0.61) for each respective trial. Rectum and bladder metric correlations displayed no consistency for the two trials. PTV volume similarity was found to significantly correlate with rectum normal tissue complication probability (ρ  =  0.33, 0.48). Minimal to no correlations with dosimetry were observed for overlap or boundary contouring metrics. Future inter-observer contouring variation studies for prostate cancer should incorporate volume similarity to provide additional insights into dosimetry during analysis.

  17. Postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers: Impact of anatomic subsite on treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, M.J.; Harrison, L.B.; Fass, D.E.; Armstrong, J.; Spiro, R.H.; Shah, J.P.; Strong, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    We have retrospectively reviewed the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for advanced oral cavity cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of anatomic subsite on the results of treatment. Between 1975 and 1985, 51 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (OT = 29 patients) and floor of mouth (FOM = 22 patients) were treated with combined surgery plus RT. All had an indication(s) for RT including advanced primary disease (T3 or T4) (29 patients), close or positive margins (34 patients), and multiple positive neck nodes and/or extracapsular extension (41 patients). With a median follow-up of 6 years, the 5-year actuarial local control rate was 74% and the rate of distant metastasis (DM) was 34%. Despite the similar T stage, margin status and median RT dose, the 5-year actuarial local failure rate was 38% for OT vs. 11% for FOM (p = 0.03). Furthermore, the median survival after recurrence was 9 months for OT and 40 months for FOM (p = 0.02). At 5 years the determinate survival for both sites was (55%), and the likelihood of developing a second malignancy was 31%. The likelihood of developing DM was 50% for FOM (N0-N1 = 3 of 12, N2-N3 = 8 of 10) and 21% for OT (N0-N1 = 4 of 21, N2-N3 = 1 of 8). This study highlights significant differences between FOM and OT cancers in response to combined surgery and RT. Future strategies should be directed at the enhancement of local control for OT and better systemic therapy for those with advanced N-stage FOM

  18. Survival Outcomes in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Effect of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Shivnani, Anand T.; Chen, Ke; Lee, Christopher M.; Tward, Jonathan D.; MacDonald, O. Kenneth; Crane, Christopher H.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Munoz, Louis L.; Small, William

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has not been clearly established. We analyzed survival outcomes of patients with resected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and examined the effect of adjuvant RT. Methods and Materials: Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2003. The primary endpoint was the overall survival time. Cox regression analysis was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the following clinical variables: age, year of diagnosis, histologic grade, localized (Stage T1-T2) vs. regional (Stage T3 or greater and/or node positive) stage, gender, race, and the use of adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Results: The records for 2,332 patients were obtained. Patients with previous malignancy, distant disease, incomplete or conflicting records, atypical histologic features, and those treated with preoperative/intraoperative RT were excluded. Of the remaining 1,491 patients eligible for analysis, 473 (32%) had undergone adjuvant RT. After a median follow-up of 27 months (among surviving patients), the median overall survival time for the entire cohort was 20 months. Patients with localized and regional disease had a median survival time of 33 and 18 months, respectively (p < .001). The addition of adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in overall or cause-specific survival for patients with local or regional disease. Conclusion: Patients with localized disease had significantly better overall survival than those with regional disease. Adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in long-term overall survival in patients with resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Key data, including margin status and the use of combined chemotherapy, was not available through the SEER database.

  19. Clinical outcome in 520 consecutive Danish rectal cancer patients treated with short course preoperative radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L H; Altaf, R; Harling, H

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of preoperative short course radiotherapy in a consecutive, national cohort of patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: Through a validated, prospective national database we identified 520 Danish patients who presented with high-risk mobile...... tumours in the lower two thirds of the rectum and were referred for preoperative radiotherapy with 5 x 5 Gy. The inclusion period was 56 months. Radiotherapy data was retrospectively collected. RESULTS: Of the 520 patients, 514 completed radiotherapy and 506 had surgery. Surgery was considered curative...... in 439 patients. The 3-year local recurrence rate was 4.0% (95% CI 2.5-6.5%) and the distant recurrence rate at 3 years was 18.7% (95% CI 15.4-22.5%). The 5-year disease free survival rate was 40.2% (95% CI 27.0-53.1%) and overall survival 50.4% (95% CI 36.1-63.1%). Most tumours (61%) were classified...

  20. Whole pelvis radiotherapy for pathological node-positive prostate cancer. Oncological outcome and prognostic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poelaert, Filip; Decaestecker, Karel; Claeys, Tom; Dhondt, Bert; Lumen, Nicolaas [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Urology, Ghent (Belgium); Fonteyne, Valerie; Ost, Piet [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent (Belgium); Troyer, Bart de [AZ Nikolaas, Department of Urology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Meerleer, Gert de [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Visschere, Pieter de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    The goal of this work was to investigate the oncological outcome of whole pelvis radiotherapy (wpRT) in pathologic pelvic lymph node-positive (pN1) prostate cancer (PCa), evaluate the location of relapse, and identify potential prognostic factors. All patients undergoing pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) since the year 2000 at a single tertiary care center were evaluated. A total of 154 patients with pN1 PCa were treated with wpRT (39 in an adjuvant setting) and 2-3 years of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to estimate biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (CSS). Uni- and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors. Estimated bRFS was 67%, cPFS was 71%, and CSS was 96% at 5 years. Median follow-up was 55 months (interquartile range 25-87). Multivariate analysis identified having only 1 positive lymph node, a shorter time between diagnosis and PLND, and older age as independent favorable prognostic factors for biochemical and clinical recurrence. The number of positive lymph nodes was prognostic for CSS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.17-1.54) and OS (HR 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.36). Bone metastases were the most frequent location of PCa relapse (n = 32, 64%). Patients with pN1 PCa treated with wpRT and 2-3 years ADT have an encouraging 5-year CSS. Understaging of the disease extent may be the most important enemy in definitive pN1 PCa treatment. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie war es, das onkologische Outcome der Bestrahlung des gesamten Beckens (wpRT) beim histologisch gesicherten nodal metastasierten Prostatakarzinom zu untersuchen, die Lokalisation eines eventuellen Rezidivs zu charakterisieren und moegliche prognostische Faktoren zu identifizieren. Alle Patienten, bei denen seit dem Jahr 2000 eine pelvine Lymphknotendissektion (PLND) durchgefuehrt worden war

  1. Definitive radiotherapy for carcinoma of the vagina: outcome and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyle, Valerian; Zagars, Gunar K.; Wheeler, James A.; Wharton, J. Taylor; Delclos, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Primary carcinoma of the vagina is an uncommon tumor. Because of the long-standing interest in this disease at our institution a substantial number of patients with this disease has been accumulated, and this retrospective review was performed to define disease outcome, to delineate significant prognostic factors, and to provide treatment guidelines. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 301 patients with vaginal carcinoma (271 with squamous cell and 30 with adenocarcinoma) who received definitive radiotherapy between 1953 and 1991. Prognostic factors for outcome (local control, pelvic control, metastatic relapse, survival, and complications) were evaluated using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: Patients disease was staged using the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) system, and stages were distributed as follows: 0, 37 (12%); I, 65 (22%); II, 122 (40%); III, 60 (20%); and, IVA, 17 (6%). Treatment varied according to stage, with brachytherapy predominating for early disease but external beam playing a prominent role for more advanced disease. Patients with in situ disease received brachytherapy alone or transvaginal orthovoltage irradiation. For Stage I, brachytherapy alone was used in 25, external beam and brachytherapy in 38, and transvaginal alone in 2. For Stage II, brachytherapy alone was used in 20, external and brachytherapy in 66, and external irradiation alone in 36. For Stage III, external and brachytherapy was used in 15, and external alone in 45. Two patients with Stage IVA received brachytherapy alone, 10 received a combination of external and brachytherapy, and 6 received external irradiation alone. Total doses ranged from 10 to 154 Gy (mean 74.7 Gy, median 70.0 Gy), but only 18 (6%) received less than 55 Gy. At a median follow-up of 13 years, the 5-, 10-, 15-, 20-, and 25-year survival rates were 60%, 49%, 38%, 29%, and 23%, respectively. Beyond 5 years the survival rates relative

  2. Endocrine outcomes with proton and photon radiotherapy for standard risk medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Bree R; Esiashvili, Natia; Kim, Sungjin; Patterson, Briana; Weyman, Elizabeth A; Thornton, Lauren T; Mazewski, Claire; MacDonald, Tobey J; Ebb, David; MacDonald, Shannon M; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I

    2016-06-01

    Endocrine dysfunction is a common sequela of craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Dosimetric data suggest that proton radiotherapy (PRT) may reduce radiation-associated endocrine dysfunction but clinical data are limited. Seventy-seven children were treated with chemotherapy and proton (n = 40) or photon (n = 37) radiation between 2000 and 2009 with ≥3 years of endocrine screening. The incidence of multiple endocrinopathies among the proton and photon cohorts is compared. Multivariable analysis and propensity score adjusted analysis are performed to estimate the effect of radiotherapy type while adjusting for other variables. The median age at diagnosis was 6.2 and 8.3 years for the proton and photon cohorts, respectively (P = .010). Cohorts were similar with respect to gender, histology, CSI dose, and total radiotherapy dose and whether the radiotherapy boost was delivered to the posterior fossa or tumor bed. The median follow-up time was 5.8 years for proton patients and 7.0 years for photon patients (P = .010). PRT was associated with a reduced risk of hypothyroidism (23% vs 69%, P < .001), sex hormone deficiency (3% vs 19%, P = .025), requirement for any endocrine replacement therapy (55% vs 78%, P = .030), and a greater height standard deviation score (mean (± SD) -1.19 (± 1.22) vs -2 (± 1.35), P = .020) on both univariate and multivariate and propensity score adjusted analysis. There was no significant difference in the incidence of growth hormone deficiency (53% vs 57%), adrenal insufficiency (5% vs 8%), or precocious puberty (18% vs 16%). Proton radiotherapy may reduce the risk of some, but not all, radiation-associated late endocrine abnormalities. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicity of Concurrent Paclitaxel and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citrin, Deborah; Mansueti, John; Likhacheva, Anna; Sciuto, Linda; Albert, Paul S.; Rudy, Susan F.; Cooley-Zgela, Theresa; Cotrim, Ana; Solomon, Beth; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Russo, Angelo; Morris, John C.; Herscher, Laurie; Smith, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcomes and toxicity of a regimen of infusion paclitaxel delivered concurrently with radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 1999, 35 patients with nonmetastatic, Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with three cycles of paclitaxel as a 120-h continuous infusion beginning on Days 1, 21, and 42, concurrent with radiotherapy. The initial 16 patients received 105 mg/m 2 /cycle, and the subsequent 19 patients received 120 mg/m 2 /cycle. External beam radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70.2-72 Gy at five fractions weekly. Patients were followed to evaluate the disease outcomes and late toxicity of this regimen. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 56.5 months. The median survival was 56.5 months, and the median time to local recurrence was not reached. Of the 35 patients, 15 (43%) developed hypothyroidism. Of the 33 patients who underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement, 11 were percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependent until death or their last follow-up visit. Also, 5 patients (14%) required a tracheostomy until death, and 3 (9%) developed a severe esophageal stricture. All evaluated long-term survivors exhibited salivary hypofunction. Fibrosis in the radiation field occurred in 24 patients (69%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a 120-h infusion of paclitaxel provides long-term local control and survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Xerostomia, hypothyroidism, esophageal and pharyngeal complications, and subcutaneous fibrosis were common long-term toxicities; however, the vast majority of toxicities were grade 1 or 2.

  4. A population-based study of the use and outcome of radical radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, Charles R.R.; Paszat, Lawrence F.; Groome, Patti A.; Schulze, Karleen; Mackillop, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to describe the use and outcome of radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer in the province of Ontario, Canada, between 1982 and 1994. Methods: Electronic records of invasive bladder cancer (ICD code 188) from the Ontario Cancer Registry were linked to surgical records from all Ontario hospitals and radiotherapy (RT) records from all Ontario cancer centers. We identified cases receiving radical RT by selecting RT records containing 'bladder' or 'pelvis' anatomic region codes and a radical or curative intent code (or dose > 39.5 Gy if intent missing). We identified cases receiving salvage total cystectomy by selecting total cystectomy procedure codes occurring at any time beyond 4 months from the start of radical RT. We used life table methods to compute the following: the time from diagnosis to radical RT, the time from radical RT to salvage cystectomy, overall and cause-specific survival from radical radiotherapy to death, and overall and cause-specific survival from salvage cystectomy to death. We modeled the factors associated with time to death, time to cystectomy conditional on survival, and time to cystectomy or death, whichever came first, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: From the 20,906 new cases of bladder cancer diagnosed in Ontario from 1982 to 1994, we identified 1,372 cases treated by radical radiotherapy (78% male, 22% female; mean age 69.8 years). The median interval to start of radical RT from diagnosis was 13.4 weeks. Ninety-three percent of patients were treated on high-energy linacs, and the most common dose/fractionation scheme was 60 Gy/30 (31% of cases). Five-year survival rates were as follows: bladder cancer cause-specific, 41%; overall, 28%; cystectomy-free, 25%; bladder cancer cause-specific following salvage cystectomy, 36%; overall following salvage cystectomy, 28%. Factors associated with a higher risk of death and a poorer cystectomy-free survival were histology (squamous or

  5. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael H; Fierke, Kerry K; Sucher, Brandon J; Janke, Kristin K

    2015-05-25

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI experts for structuring and planning EI development. Finally, we make 9 recommendations' to inform the process of including EI in pharmacy curricula.

  6. Outcome of early detection and radiotherapy for occult spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Barbachano, Yolanda; Dearnaley, David P.; Parker, Christopher C.; Khoo, Vincent; Huddart, Robert A.; Eeles, Rosalind; Horwich, Alan; Aslam Sohaib, S.

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective analysis in 150 patients with metastatic prostate cancer was conducted to determine whether early detection with MRI spine and treatment of clinically occult spinal cord compromise (SCC) facilitate preservation of neurologic function. Our results suggest that prophylactic radiotherapy for patients with back pain or radiological SCC without neurologic deficit may facilitate preservation of neurologic function. Thus MRI surveillance for SCC may be important for prostate cancer patients with bone metastases

  7. Definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy concurrent with systemic therapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: Outcomes from an integrated regional Australian cancer centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahbari, Reza M.; McKay, Michael; Dwyer, Patrick; Winkley, Lauren; Hill, Jacques; Last, Andrew; Tahir, Abdul R.M.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) incidence has increased over the past two decades largely because of an increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-related OPSCC. We report here outcomes of definitive radiation therapy for OPSCC with simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a regional Australian cancer centre. We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records (EMR) of all patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer. We included patients who received a curative intent IMRT for OPSCC (2010–2014). Of 61 patients, 80% were men, and the median age was 57 years. Ninety percent of our patients received concurrent systemic therapy, and 68% were p16 positive. The median radiotherapy dose received was 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The median follow up for surviving patients was 22 months. Twenty-four month actuarial data show that the loco-regional recurrence free, metastasis-free MFS, cancer-specific (CaSS) and overall survival percentages were 98.3%, 92.6%, 91% and 90.3%, respectively. We did not observe grades 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities, and 10 patients (16.2%) exhibited persistent grade 3 toxicity 6 months after completing the treatment. The results from curative IMRTs for OPSCC delivered in a regional cancer centre are comparable with results published by tertiary referral centres. A long-term follow up of this patient cohort will continue for further analyses and comparisons with tertiary centres.

  8. Treatment outcome and risk analysis for cataract after radiotherapy of localized ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Hyun; Lee, Sea Won; Sung, Soo Yoon; Choi, Byung Oak [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    We retrospectively reviewed the results of radiotherapy for localized ocular adnexal MALT lymphoma (OAML) to investigate the risk factors of cataract. Sixty-seven patients with stage IE OAML treated with radiotherapy at Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital from 2001 to 2016 were included. Median treatment dose was 30 Gy. Lens protection was done in 52 (76%) patients. Radiation therapy (RT) extent was as follows: superficial (82.1%), tumor mass (4.5%), and entire orbital socket (13.4%). The risk factors for symptomatic cataract were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Median follow-up time was 50.9 months (range, 1.9 to 149.4 months). All patients were alive at the time of analysis. There were 7 recurrences and there was no local recurrence. Median time to recurrence was 40.4 months. There were 14 cases of symptomatic cataract. Dose >30 Gy had hazard ratio of 3.47 for cataract (p = 0.026). Omitting lens protection showed hazard ratio of 4.10 (p = 0.008). RT achieves excellent local control of ocular MALT lymphoma. Consideration of RT-related factors such as lens protection and radiation dose at the stage of RT planning may reduce the risk of RT-induced cataract after radiotherapy.

  9. Conducting Accessible Research: Including People With Disabilities in Public Health, Epidemiological, and Outcomes Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Dianne; Magasi, Susan; Novak, Catherine; Harniss, Mark

    2016-12-01

    People with disabilities are largely absent from mainstream health research. Exclusion of people with disabilities may be explicit, attributable to poorly justified exclusion criteria, or implicit, attributable to inaccessible study documents, interventions, or research measures. Meanwhile, people with disabilities experience poorer health, greater incidence of chronic conditions, and higher health care expenditure than people without disabilities. We outline our approach to "accessible research design"-research accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. We describe a model that includes 3 tiers: universal design, accommodations, and modifications. Through our work on several large-scale research studies, we provide pragmatic examples of accessible research design. Making efforts to include people with disabilities in public health, epidemiological, and outcomes studies will enhance the interpretability of findings for a significant patient population.

  10. Propensity Score-based Comparison of Long-term Outcomes With 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Steven H.; Wang Lu; Myles, Bevan; Thall, Peter F.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Although 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is the worldwide standard for the treatment of esophageal cancer, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose conformality and reduces the radiation exposure to normal tissues. We hypothesized that the dosimetric advantages of IMRT should translate to substantive benefits in clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: An analysis was performed of 676 nonrandomized patients (3D-CRT, n=413; IMRT, n=263) with stage Ib-IVa (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) esophageal cancers treated with chemoradiotherapy at a single institution from 1998-2008. An inverse probability of treatment weighting and inclusion of propensity score (treatment probability) as a covariate were used to compare overall survival time, interval to local failure, and interval to distant metastasis, while accounting for the effects of other clinically relevant covariates. The propensity scores were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results: A fitted multivariate inverse probability weighted-adjusted Cox model showed that the overall survival time was significantly associated with several well-known prognostic factors, along with the treatment modality (IMRT vs 3D-CRT, hazard ratio 0.72, P<.001). Compared with IMRT, 3D-CRT patients had a significantly greater risk of dying (72.6% vs 52.9%, inverse probability of treatment weighting, log-rank test, P<.0001) and of locoregional recurrence (P=.0038). No difference was seen in cancer-specific mortality (Gray's test, P=.86) or distant metastasis (P=.99) between the 2 groups. An increased cumulative incidence of cardiac death was seen in the 3D-CRT group (P=.049), but most deaths were undocumented (5-year estimate, 11.7% in 3D-CRT vs 5.4% in IMRT group, Gray's test, P=.0029). Conclusions: Overall survival, locoregional control, and noncancer-related death were significantly better after IMRT than after 3D-CRT. Although these results need

  11. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Azusa; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with max ]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D max ) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D 2 ) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON

  12. Evidence-based review of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: An ASTRO outcomes initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, David E.; Emami, Bahman; Mauch, Peter M.; Konski, Andre A.; Tao, May L.; Ng, Andrea K.; Klein, Eric A.; Mohideen, Najeeb; Hurwitz, Mark D.; Fraas, Bendick A.; Roach, Mack; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the evidence to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer; provide a clear presentation of the key clinical outcome questions related to the use of 3D-CRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer that may be answered by a formal literature review; and provide concise information on whether 3D-CRT improves the clinical outcomes in the treatment of localized prostate cancer compared with conventional RT. Methods and Materials: We performed a systematic review of the literature through a structured process developed by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's Outcomes Committee that involved the creation of a multidisciplinary task force, development of clinical outcome questions, a formal literature review and data abstraction, data review, and outside peer review. Results: Seven key clinical questions were identified. The results and task force conclusions of the literature review for each question are reported. Conclusion: The technological goals of reducing morbidity with 3D-CRT have been achieved. Randomized trials and follow-up of completed trials remain necessary to address these clinical outcomes specifically with regard to patient subsets and the use of hormonal therapy

  13. Satisfactory patient-based outcomes after surgical treatment for idiopathic clubfoot: includes surgeon's individualized technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Susan T; Spencer, Samantha A; Kasser, James R

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of idiopathic clubfoot has shifted towards Ponseti technique, but previously surgical management was standard. Outcomes of surgery have varied, with many authors reporting discouraging results. Our purpose was to evaluate a single surgeon's series of children with idiopathic clubfoot treated with a la carte posteromedial and lateral releases using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. A total of 148 patients with idiopathic clubfoot treated surgically by a single surgeon over 15 years were identified, and mailed PODCI questionnaires. Fifty percent of the patients were located and responded, resulting in 74 complete questionnaires. Median age at surgery was 10 months (range, 5.3 to 84.7 mo), male sex 53/74 (71.6%), bilateral surgery 31/74 (41.9%), and average follow-up of 9.7 years. PODCI responses were compared with previously published normal healthy controls using t test for each separate category. Included in the methods is the individual surgeon's operative technique. In PODCIs where a parent reports for their child or adolescent, there was no difference between our data and the healthy controls in any of the 5 categories. In PODCI where an adolescent self-reports, there was no difference in 4 of 5 categories; significant difference was only found between our data (mean = 95.2; SD = 7.427) and normal controls (mean = 86.3; SD = 12.5) in Happiness Scale (P = 0.0031). In this group of idiopathic clubfoot patients, treated with judicious posteromedial release by a single surgeon, primarily when surgery was treatment of choice for clubfoot, patient-based outcomes are not different from their normal healthy peers through childhood and adolescence. While Ponseti treatment has since become the treatment of choice for clubfoot, surgical treatment, in some hands, has led to satisfactory results. Level III.

  14. Four R's of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, H.R.

    1975-01-01

    Radiotherapy given as multiple doses can be effective in sterilizing cancers, but the processes whereby the neoplasm is eradicated and the normal tissues are preserved are not fully understood. The differential between normal tissue and tumor response is enhanced by dose fractionation, single doses resulting in severe normal tissue injury when the dose is sufficient to control a proportion of treated tumors. Data are reviewed from radiobiological studies on laboratory animals and cultured cells that have thrown some light on four of the phenomena that influence the outcome of fractionated-dose radiotherapy, one or more of which may account for the relative sparing of normal tissues. These are repair of sublethal injury in normal and neoplastic cells, reoxygenation of the tumor, redistribution through the division cycle, and regeneration of surviving normal and malignant cells between dose fractions. These have been called the four R's of fractionated radiotherapy. Other factors are involved in the outcome of multifraction radiotherapy, including maintenance of the architectural integrity of the normal tissues, the volume of tissue irradi []ted, the tumor bed, and the immunocompetence of the host. (90 references) (CH)

  15. Measuring Outcomes in Adult Weight Loss Studies That Include Diet and Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Millstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Measuring success of obesity interventions is critical. Several methods measure weight loss outcomes but there is no consensus on best practices. This systematic review evaluates relevant outcomes (weight loss, BMI, % body fat, and fat mass to determine which might be the best indicator(s of success. Methods. Eligible articles described adult weight loss interventions that included diet and physical activity and a measure of weight or BMI change and body composition change. Results. 28 full-text articles met inclusion criteria. Subjects, settings, intervention lengths, and intensities varied. All studies measured body weight (−2.9 to −17.3 kg, 9 studies measured BMI (−1.1 to −5.1 kg/m2, 20 studies measured % body fat (−0.7 to −10.2%, and 22 studies measured fat mass (−0.9 to −14.9 kg. All studies found agreement between weight or BMI and body fat mass or body fat % decreases, though there were discrepancies in degree of significance between measures. Conclusions. Nearly all weight or BMI and body composition measures agreed. Since body fat is the most metabolically harmful tissue type, it may be a more meaningful measure of health change. Future studies should consider primarily measuring % body fat, rather than or in addition to weight or BMI.

  16. Outcomes of Acellular Dermal Matrix for Immediate Tissue Expander Reconstruction with Radiotherapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Elizabeth S; Clemens, Mark W; Koshy, John C; Wren, James; Hong, Zhang; Butler, Charles; Garvey, Patrick; Selber, Jesse; Kronowitz, Steven

    2018-05-24

    Despite increasing literature support for the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in expander-based breast reconstruction, the effect of ADM on clinical outcomes in the presence of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has not been well described. To analyze the impact ADM plays on clinical outcomes on immediate tissue expander (ITE) reconstruction undergoing PMRT. We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent ITE breast reconstruction from 2004 to 2014 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Patients were categorized into four cohorts: ADM, ADM with PMRT, non-ADM, and non-ADM with PMRT. Outcomes and complications were compared between cohorts. Over ten years, 957 patients underwent ITE reconstruction (683 non-ADM, 113 non-ADM with PMRT, 486 ADM, and 88 ADM with PMRT) with 1,370 reconstructions. Overall complication rates for the ADM and non-ADM cohorts were 39.0 and 16.7%, respectively (p <0.001). Within both cohorts, mastectomy skin flap necrosis (MSFN) was the most common complication, followed by infection. ADM use was associated with a significantly higher rate of infections and seromas in both radiated and non-radiated groups; however, when comparing radiated cohorts, the incidence of explantation was significantly lower with the use of ADM. The decision to use ADM for expander-based breast reconstruction should be performed with caution, given higher overall rates of complications, including infections and seromas. There may, however, be a role for ADM in cases requiring PMRT, as the overall incidence of implant failure is lower than non-ADM cases.

  17. Difference in target definition using three different methods to include respiratory motion in radiotherapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth Møller, Ditte; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Nyeng, Tine Bisballe

    2017-01-01

    : PTVσ yields the smallest volumes but does not ensure coverage of tumor during the full respiratory motion due to tumor deformation. Incorporating the respiratory motion in the delineation (PTVdel) takes into account the entire respiratory cycle including deformation, but at the cost, however, of larger...

  18. Outcome after salvage radiotherapy (brachytherapy +/- external) in patients with a vaginal recurrence from endometrial carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasbini, Ali; Haie-Meder, Christine; Morice, Philippe; Chirat, Eric; Duvillard, Pierre; Lhomme, Catherine; Delapierre, Monique; Gerbaulet, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: The vagina is the site most commonly affected by loco-regional failure in endometrial carcinoma (EC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vaginal brachytherapy (BT) combined or not with whole pelvic external radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of patients with vaginal recurrences from endometrial cancer. Patients and methods: Between 1986 and 1999 25 women were treated at the Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR) for a vaginal relapse (VR) from EC. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 65 years (range 43-84), histologic type: adenocarcinoma (21 patients); endometrioid carcinoma (three patients); adenoacanthoma (one patient); FIGO staging for initial disease: Ia, three; Ib, eight; Ic, four; II, seven; IIIa, two; IVa, one. The initial tumor was treated by surgery alone in 18 patients, or surgery combined with RT and/or BT in seven patients. A VR occurred in a median interval of 21 months (range 2-89); 10/25 (40%) occurred within the first year following initial treatment. The recurrence was exclusively in the vagina in 18 patients and was associated with parametrial and or nodal involvement in seven patients; it was localized in the upper 1/3 of the vagina in nine patients, in the upper 2/3 or the entire vagina in 11 patients or in the lower 1/3 in five patients. The largest tumor diameter ranged from 10 to 70 mm (median: 25 mm). The treatment of the VR included low-dose rate endocavitary BT in all cases: three patients received endocavitary BT alone, or it was associated with external RT in 22 patients or delivered after surgical removal of the lesion in nine patients. Seven patients were submitted to further irradiation combining endocavitary and interstitial BT. Results: Local control was achieved in 23 patients (92%). With a follow-up ranging from 4 to 154 months, 13 patients have died (ten due to metastasis, two of intercurrent disease and two due to local tumor progression) and ten patients are alive and disease

  19. A retrospective study of 5-year outcomes of radiotherapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Seiichiro; Oda, Ichiro; Inaba, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The favorable response rate of radiotherapy for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication has been demonstrated. However, there are limited data available on the long-term outcomes. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of radiotherapy for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication. Thirty-four consecutive patients with localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma that were refractory to eradication were treated with radiotherapy (a total dose of 30 Gy). The response and adverse events of radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed as short-term outcomes, and recurrence-free, overall and disease-specific survival rates were calculated as long-term outcomes. Thirty-three (97.1%) patients achieved complete remission and radiotherapy was well tolerated. One patient underwent emergency gastrectomy due to severe hematemesis. Of the 34 patients during the median follow-up period of 7.5 (1.2-13.0) years, one patient had local recurrence after 8.8 years, one patient underwent surgery for bowel obstruction secondary to small bowel metastasis after 5.1 years and one patient had pulmonary metastasis after 10.9 years. Pathologically, all three recurrences revealed mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma without any transformation to high-grade lymphoma. None died of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 97.0%. The 5-year overall survival rates and disease-specific survival rates were 97.0 and 100%, respectively. Radiotherapy in patients with localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication can achieve excellent overall survival. However, long-term surveillance is necessary to identify late recurrences. (author)

  20. A retrospective study of 5-year outcomes of radiotherapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Seiichiro; Oda, Ichiro; Inaba, Koji; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Nonaka, Satoru; Morota, Madoka; Murakami, Naoya; Itami, Jun; Kobayashi, Yukio; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Saito, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    The favorable response rate of radiotherapy for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication has been demonstrated. However, there are limited data available on the long-term outcomes. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of radiotherapy for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication. Thirty-four consecutive patients with localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma that were refractory to eradication were treated with radiotherapy (a total dose of 30 Gy). The response and adverse events of radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed as short-term outcomes, and recurrence-free, overall and disease-specific survival rates were calculated as long-term outcomes. Thirty-three (97.1%) patients achieved complete remission and radiotherapy was well tolerated. One patient underwent emergency gastrectomy due to severe hematemesis. Of the 34 patients during the median follow-up period of 7.5 (1.2-13.0) years, one patient had local recurrence after 8.8 years, one patient underwent surgery for bowel obstruction secondary to small bowel metastasis after 5.1 years and one patient had pulmonary metastasis after 10.9 years. Pathologically, all three recurrences revealed mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma without any transformation to high-grade lymphoma. None died of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 97.0%. The 5-year overall survival rates and disease-specific survival rates were 97.0 and 100%, respectively. Radiotherapy in patients with localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma refractory to Helicobacter pylori eradication can achieve excellent overall survival. However, long-term surveillance is necessary to identify late recurrences.

  1. Breast cancer in patients carrying a germ-line CHEK2 mutation: Outcome after breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Women carrying mutations in the CHEK2 gene are at an increased breast cancer risk. Data about outcome and prognosis for these patients after standard multimodality treatment are scarce at present. Materials and methods: One-hundred and fifty (150) patients with non-metastasized early-stage breast cancer (T1-2) receiving postoperative radiotherapy following breast-conservative surgery at our department were included in this analysis. Carriers were identified using mutation-specific restriction enzyme-based screening assays in previous investigations. Twenty-five breast cancer patients were heterozygous for one of three CHEK2 gene mutations (I157T, n = 13; 1100delC, n = 10; IVS2+1G > A, n = 2). The comparison group consisted of 125 early-stage breast cancer patients without a CHEK2 gene mutation (non-carriers). Median follow-up was 87 months for the total cohort of patients. Results: Local recurrences occurred in 13 patients (carriers, 3 (12%); non-carriers, 10 (8%)) and distant metastases occurred in 27 patients (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 19 (15%)). Twenty-five patients had deceased (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 17 (14%)) with all but 3 deaths related to breast cancer. Actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival was 86% in carriers versus 90% in non-carriers (p = 0.48). Actuarial metastasis-free, disease-free and overall survival at 7 years were 64% vs. 84% (p = 0.045), 59% vs. 78% (p = 0.07) and 69% vs. 87% (p = 0.10), respectively. In a multivariate step-wise Cox regression analysis presence of a CHEK2 mutation remained a borderline significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival (p = 0.048; OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-1.0) next to T-stage (p = 0.001; OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.6). Conclusions: Heterozygosity for a germline CHEK2 mutation appears to represent an adverse prognostic factor in patients with early-stage breast cancer. If confirmed in larger studies these data may serve as a basis for future surveillance and treatment

  2. The outcome of the postoperative radiotherapy of autonomic nerve preserving operation for lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Keiichi; Mori, Takeo; Yasuno, Masamichi

    1997-01-01

    It is unclear whether adjuvant radiotherapy before or after surgery is effective for locally advanced, resectable lower rectal cancer. This study consists of a prospective randomized trial of postoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced curatively resected lower rectal carcinoma. We divided patients into two groups, one with postoperative 50 Gy radiation therapy to pelvic wall (N=64), and the other with no radiation therapy (N=46). The 5 year disease-free rate was 61.8% in the radiation group and 70.6% in the no radiation group. There was statistically no significant difference between these two groups. The local recurrence rate was 2.7% (radiation therapy group: 1.6%, no radiation therapy group: 4.3%). This local recurrence rate was very low. These results made us suspect that postoperative radiation therapy was not always necessary to prevent local recurrence. Postoperative complications had a higher incidence in the radiation therapy group than in the no-radiation therapy group. In the radiation therapy group, 35.5% of the patients suffered from diarrhea or frequent defecation, and 10.8% from severe abdominal pain. We operated on 4 cases of radiation-induced ileal stenosis and ileus. Postoperative radiation therapy did not help prevent local recurrence even though many complications resulted. (author)

  3. Dose-Escalated Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Carcinoma of the Prostate: Outcome and Late Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Thomson

    2012-01-01

    Results. Median followup was 84 months. Five-year overall survival (OS was 83% and biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS was 50% for 57 Gy. Five-year OS was 75% and bPFS 58% for 60 Gy. At 7 years, toxicity by RTOG criteria was acceptable with no grade 3 or above toxicity. Compared with baseline, there was no significant change in urinary symptoms at 2 or 7 years. Bowel symptoms were stable between 2 and 7 years. All patients continued to have significant sexual dysfunction. Conclusion. In high-risk prostate cancer, dose-escalated hypofractionated radiotherapy using IMRT results in encouraging outcomes and acceptable late toxicity.

  4. Outcome impact and cost-effectiveness of quality assurance for radiotherapy planned for the EORTC 22071-24071 prospective study for head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Damien C.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Melidis, Christos; Budach, Wilfried; Langendijk, Johannes H.; Peters, Lester J.; Gregoire, Vincent; Maingon, Philippe; Combescure, Christophe

    Introduction: One of the goals of Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy (QART) is to reduce the variability and uncertainties related to treatment planning and beam delivery. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome impact and cost-effectiveness (CE) of various QART levels for a head and neck

  5. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicity of Salvage Brachytherapy for Local Failure After Initial Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burri, Ryan J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Unger, Pam; Stock, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term outcomes and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) for local failure after initial radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2008, 37 men with local failure after initial prostate radiotherapy (32 external-beam radiation therapy [EBRT] and 5 BT) underwent salvage BT with 103 Pd or 125 I. Estimates of freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF, Phoenix definition) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicities were graded using CTCv3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 86 months (range, 2-156). The median dose to 90% of the prostate volume was 122 Gy (range, 67-166). The 10-year FFbF and CSS were 54% and 96%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >10 ng/mL at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with FFbF (p = 0.01), and there were trends for both age <70 years (p = 0.08) and PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.08) at the time of salvage BT. On multivariate analysis, only presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.046) was significantly associated with improved FFbF. There were three Grade 3 toxicities and one Grade 4 toxicity. Pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT was the only variable significantly associated with Grade ≥2 toxicity (p = 0.03). Conclusion: With a median follow-up of 86 months, salvage prostate BT was associated with a 10-year FFbF of 54% and CSS of 96%. Improved FFbF was associated with a presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL. Toxicity was worse in patients who had undergone pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT. Careful patient selection for salvage BT may result in improved outcomes and reduced toxicity.

  6. Outcomes of Risk-Adapted Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: High local control rates can be achieved using stereotactic radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but reports have suggested that toxicity may be of concern. We evaluated early clinical outcomes of 'risk-adapted' fractionation schemes in patients treated in a single institution. Methods and Materials: Of 206 patients with Stage I NSCLC, 81% were unfit to undergo surgery and the rest refused surgery. Pathologic confirmation of malignancy was obtained in 31% of patients. All other patients had new or growing 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography positive lesions with radiologic characteristics of malignancy. Planning four-dimensional computed tomography scans were performed and fractionation schemes used (3 x 20 Gy, 5 x 12 Gy, and 8 x 7.5 Gy) were determined by T stage and risk of normal tissue toxicity. Results: Median overall survival was 34 months, with 1- and 2-year survivals of 81% and 64%, respectively. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 1 and 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively, and DFS correlated with T stage (p = 0.002). Local failure was observed in 7 patients (3%). The crude regional failure rate was 9%; isolated regional recurrence was observed in 4%. The distant progression-free survival at 1 and 2 years was 85% and 77%, respectively. SRT was well tolerated and severe late toxicity was observed in less than 3% of patients. Conclusions: SRT is well tolerated in patients with extensive comorbidity with high local control rates and minimal toxicity. Early outcomes are not inferior to those reported for conventional radiotherapy. In view of patient convenience, such risk-adapted SRT schedules should be considered treatment of choice in patients presenting with medically inoperable Stage I NSCLC

  7. Outcomes of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of multiple synchronous and recurrent lung nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, Dawn; Olivier, Kenneth R; Mayo, Charles S; Miller, Robert C; Nelson, Kathryn; Bauer, Heather; Brown, Paul D; Park, Sean S; Ma, Daniel J; Garces, Yolanda I

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is evolving into a standard of care for unresectable lung nodules. Local control has been shown to be in excess of 90% at 3 years. However, some patients present with synchronous lung nodules in the ipsilateral or contralateral lobe or metasynchronous disease. In these cases, patients may receive multiple courses of lung SBRT or a single course for synchronous nodules. The toxicity of such treatment is currently unknown. Between 2006 and 2012, 63 subjects with 128 metasynchronous and synchronous lung nodules were treated at the Mayo Clinic with SBRT. Demographic patient data and dosimetric data regarding SBRT treatments were collected. Acute toxicity (defined as toxicity < 90 days) and late toxicity (defined as toxicity > = 90 days) were reported and graded as per standardized CTCAE 4.0 criteria. Local control, progression free survival and overall survival were also described. The median age of patients treated was 73 years. Sixty five percent were primary or recurrent lung cancers with the remainder metastatic lung nodules of varying histologies. Of 63 patients, 18 had prior high dose external beam radiation to the mediastinum or chest. Dose and fractionation varied but the most common prescriptions were 48 Gy/4 fractions, 54 Gy/3 fractions, and 50 Gy/5 fractions. Only 6 patients demonstrated local recurrence. With a median follow up of 12.6 months, median SBRT specific overall survival and progression free survival were 35.7 months and 10.7 months respectively. Fifty one percent (32/63 patients) experienced acute toxicity, predominantly grade 1 and 2 fatigue. One patient developed acute grade 3 radiation pneumonitis at 75 days. Forty six percent (29/63 patients) developed late effects. Most were grade 1 dyspnea. There was one patient with grade 5 pneumonitis. Multiple courses of SBRT and SBRT delivery after external beam radiotherapy appear to be feasible and safe. Most toxicity was grade 1 and 2 but the risk was

  8. Clinical outcome and cosmetics in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rongqing; Jin Yening; Wang Yajie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness and the cosmetics result of radiotherapy after conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Methods: Altogether 109 patients were treated by post-operative whole-breast irradiation and a tumor bed boost from May, 1995 to December, 2002. Among them 79 cases received a brachytherapy boost ( 192 Ir HDR implant Nucletron ) of 10-12 Gy(DB) by single plan of implantation with 1.5 cm between the needles for T1 and double plan for T2-4 tumors, and 30 cases received an electron beam boost with 15 Gy. External beam irradiation was applied to the whole breast with 45-52 Gy(mean 48.6 Gy) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks followed or concurrently with chemotherapy (CMF or CEF) and hormonotherapy. The cosmetic result was scored by a doctor and patients via questionnaire. Results: The median follow-up time was 52 months. The actuarial 5-year overall survival rate was 93.8% using Kaplan-Meier method and the within breast recurrence rate was 6.5%. No radiation- induced ulcer in the breast occurred except acute inflammation of skin around the pinholes in 5 patients. Cosmetic results were scored to be good by patients and the doctor (81% and 87%, respectively) for 75 followed-up cases, and good cosmetic rate was reported by the doctor for 82% (39/48) of the cases treated with brachytherapy boost and 85.2%(23/27) for those treated with external beam boost. There was no difference in cosmetic results between these two groups(P>0.05). Conclusion: In patients at high risk for local recurrence, tumor-bed boost with brachytherapy or electron beam carried out after limited surgery and external radiotherapy can provide satisfactory local control without morbidity. Cosmetic result may not be influenced by the boost technique. (authors)

  9. Theoretical Framework to Extend Adverse Outcome Pathways to Include Pharmacokinetic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) have generated intense interest for their utility in linking known population outcomes to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using in vitro methods. While there are tens of thousands of chemicals in commercial use, biology h...

  10. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Henrique Lima, E-mail: enriquecouto@hotmail.com [Santa Fe Women' s and Maternity Hospital, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital Geral; Ramires, Leandro Cruz; Castilho, Marcus Simoes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Dominguez, Lorena Lima Coto [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, EJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  11. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Henrique Lima; Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  12. Treatment outcome, body image, and sexual functioning after orchiectomy and radiotherapy for Stage I-II testicular seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incrocci, Luca; Hop, Wim C.J.; Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Slob, A. Koos

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Orchiectomy followed by infradiaphragmatic irradiation is the standard treatment for Stage I-II testicular seminoma in The Netherlands. Because body image and sexual functioning can be affected by treatment, a retrospective study was carried out to assess treatment outcome, body image, and changes in sexuality after orchiectomy and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The medical charts of 166 patients with Stage I-II testicular seminoma were reviewed. A questionnaire on body image and current sexual functioning regarding the frequency and quality of erections, sexual activity, significance of sex, and changes in sexuality was sent to 157 patients (at a mean of 51 months after treatment). Results: Seventy-eight percent (n=123, mean age 42 years) completed the questionnaire. During irradiation, almost half of patients experienced nausea and 19% nausea and vomiting. Only 3 patients had disease relapse. After treatment, about 20% reported less interest and pleasure in sex and less sexual activity. Interest in sex, erectile difficulties, and satisfaction with sexual life did not differ from age-matched healthy controls. At the time of the survey, 17% of patients had erectile difficulties, a figure that was significantly higher than before treatment, but which correlated also with age. Twenty percent expressed concerns about fertility, and 52% found their body had changed after treatment. Cancer treatment had negatively influenced sexual life in 32% of the patients. Conclusions: Orchiectomy with radiotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for Stage I-II testicular seminoma. Treatment-induced changes in body image and concerns about fertility were detected, but the sexual problems encountered did not seem to differ from those of healthy controls, although baseline data are lacking

  13. SU-E-T-368: Evaluating Dosimetric Outcome of Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) Optimization for Head and Neck Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, P; Villarreal-Barajas, JE; Khan, R [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Zinchenko, Y [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric outcome of optimized treatment plans obtained by modulating the photon beamlet energy and fluence on a small cohort of four Head and Neck (H and N) patients was investigated. This novel optimization technique is denoted XMRT for modulated photon radiotherapy. The dosimetric plans from XMRT for H and N treatment were compared to conventional, 6 MV intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization plans. Methods: An arrangement of two non-coplanar and five coplanar beams was used for all four H and N patients. Both XMRT and IMRT were subject to the same optimization algorithm, with XMRT optimization allowing both 6 and 18 MV beamlets while IMRT was restricted to 6 MV only. The optimization algorithm was based on a linear programming approach with partial-volume constraints implemented via the conditional value-at-risk method. H and N constraints were based off of those mentioned in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1016 protocol. XMRT and IMRT solutions were assessed using metrics suggested by International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report 83. The Gurobi solver was used in conjunction with the CVX package to solve each optimization problem. Dose calculations and analysis were done in CERR using Monte Carlo dose calculation with VMC{sub ++}. Results: Both XMRT and IMRT solutions met all clinical criteria. Trade-offs were observed between improved dose uniformity to the primary target volume (PTV1) and increased dose to some of the surrounding healthy organs for XMRT compared to IMRT. On average, IMRT improved dose to the contralateral parotid gland and spinal cord while XMRT improved dose to the brainstem and mandible. Conclusion: Bi-energy XMRT optimization for H and N patients provides benefits in terms of improved dose uniformity to the primary target and reduced dose to some healthy structures, at the expense of increased dose to other healthy structures when compared with IMRT.

  14. Algorithm development and simulation outcomes for hypoxic head and neck cancer radiotherapy using a Monte Carlo cell division model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harriss, W.M.; Bezak, E.; Yeoh, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A temporal Monte Carlo tumour model, 'Hyp-RT'. sim ulating hypoxic head and neck cancer has been updated and extended to model radiothcrapy. The aim is to providc a convenient radiobio logical tool for clinicians to evaluate radiotherapy treatment schedules based on many individual tumour properties including oxygenation. FORTRAN95 and JA YA havc been utilised to develop the efficient algorithm, which can propagate 108 cells. Epithelial cell kill is affected by dose, oxygenation and proliferativc status. Accelerated repopulation (AR) has been modelled by increasing the symmetrical stem cell division probability, and reoxygenation (ROx) has been modelled using random incremental boosts of oxygen to the cell po ulation throughout therapy. Results The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia dominate tumour growth rate. For conventional radiotherapy. 15-25% more dose was required for a hypox ic versus oxic tumours, depending on the time of AR onset (0-3 weeks after thc start of treatment). ROx of hypoxic tumours resulted in tumoUJ: sensitisation and therefore a dose reduction, of up to 35%, varying with the time of onset. Fig. I shows results for all combinations of AR and ROx onset times for the moderate hypoxia case. Conclusions In hypoxic tumours, accelerated repopulation and reoxy genation affect ccll kill in the same manner as when the effects are modelled individually. however the degree of the effect is altered and therefore the combined result is difficult to predict. providing evidence for the usefulness of computer models. Simulations have quantitatively

  15. Prognostic role of tumor volume for radiotherapy outcome in patient with T2 laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.; Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Hejduk, B.; Kolosza, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tumor volume (TV) is recognized as a prognostic factor of treatment outcome for head and neck tumors but is not routinely included in the treatment decision-making process. The purpose of the study was to define its prognostic role for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. Material and methods: TV of 160 patients who underwent RT between 2002 and 2006 for T2 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. The tumor was located in the glottis and epiglottis in 82 (51 %) and 78 (49 %) patients, respectively. TV was manually contoured on pretreatment, planning, contrast-enhanced CT scans and the volumetric measurement (cm 3 ) was calculated by the volume algorithm. Results: The median TV value was 2.01 cm 3 (range 0.15-21.68 cm 3 ). The median TV was significantly lower in patients with glottic tumors (p < 0.0001), N0 (p < 0.001), or well histopatologically differentiated tumors (p = 0.01). A significant correlation between TV, hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), and total dose (TD; p < 0.001) was observed. On univariate analyses, TV influenced local control (LC; p = 0.02) and overall survival (OS, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, both age (HR 1.038, p = 0.03) and TV (HR = 1.075, p = 0.01) remained significantly related to LC and OS (age: HR 1.038, p = 0.005; TV: HR 1.097, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Large TV worsen prognosis of patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. A large TV is more common for supraglottic, poorly differentiated tumors and may suggest higher risk of nodal spread. The routine estimation of TV prior to therapy may be essential in order to select the best treatment option for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. (orig.)

  16. Outcome of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for 90 Patients With Locally Persistent and Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaoxiong; Chua, Daniel T.T.; Deng Meiling; Zhao Chong; Li Fengyan; Sham, Jonathan S.T.; Wang Hanyu; Bao Yong; Gao Yuanhong; Zeng Zhifan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence remains one of the major causes of failure in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) have recently evolved as a salvage option of NPC. This study was conducted to review the treatment outcome after FSRT for NPC. Methods and Materials: Between September 1999 and December 2005, 90 patients with persistent (Group 1: n = 34, relapse within 6 months of RT) or recurrent (Group 2: n = 56, relapse beyond 6 months) NPC received FSRT using multiple noncoplanar arcs of 8-MV photon to the target. Median FSRT dose was 18 Gy in three fractions (Group 1) or 48 Gy in six fractions (Group 2). Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Results: Complete response rate after FSRT was 66% for Group 1 and 63% for Group 2. One-, 2-, and 3-year disease-specific survival (DSS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for all patients were 82.6%, 74.8%, 57.5%, and 72.9%, 60.4%, 54.5%, respectively. Three-year local failure-free survival, DSS, and PFS rates were 89.4%, 80.7%, and 72.3% for Group 1, and 75.1%, 45.9%, and 42.9% for Group 2, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that recurrent disease and large tumor volume were independent factors that predicted poorer DSS and PFS. Seventeen patients developed late complications, including 2 with fatal hemorrhage. Conclusions: Our results indicate that FSRT is effective for patients with persistent and recurrent NPC. Compared with reported results of radiosurgery, FSRT provides satisfactory tumor control and survival with a lower risk of complications and it may be a better treatment for local failures of NPC

  17. Long term outcome of adolescent and adult patients with pineal parenchymal tumors treated with fractionated radiotherapy between 1982 and 2003 -- a single institution's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoiber, Eva Maria; Schaible, Benjamin; Herfarth, Klaus; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E; Debus, Jürgen; Oertel, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effectivity of fractionated radiotherapy in adolescent and adult patients with pineal parenchymal tumors (PPT). Between 1982 and 2003, 14 patients with PPTs were treated with fractionated radiotherapy. 4 patients had a pineocytoma (PC), one a PPT with intermediate differentiation (PPTID) and 9 patients a pineoblastoma (PB), 2 of which were recurrences. All patients underwent radiotherapy on the primary tumor site with a median total dose of 54 Gy. In 9 patients with primary PB treatment included whole brain irradiation (3 patients) or irradiation of the craniospinal axis (6 patients) with a median total dose of 35 Gy. Median follow-up was 123 months in the PC patients and 109 months in the patients with primary PB. 7 patients were free from relapse at the end of follow-up. One PC patient died from spinal seeding. Among 5 PB patients treated with radiotherapy without chemotherapy, 3 developed local or spinal tumor recurrence. Both patients treated for PB recurrences died. The patient with PPTID is free of disease 7 years after radiotherapy. Local radiotherapy seems to be effective in patients with PC and some PPTIDs. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with more aggressive variants of PPTIDs as well as treatment of PB needs to be further improved, since local and spinal failure even despite craniospinal irradiation (CSI) is common. As PPT are very rare tumors, treatment within multi-institutional trials remains necessary

  18. Outcomes of WHO Grade I Meningiomas Receiving Definitive or Postoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzler, Emily; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Amdur, Robert J.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed long-term local control and complications in patients with either pathologically confirmed or clinical World Health Organization Grade I meningiomas treated with definitive or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Methods: Between 1984 and 2006, 146 patients were treated with definitive (n = 88) or postoperative RT after subtotal resection (n = 57) or gross total resection (n = 1). Patients were treated with conventional (n = 41), stereotactic (n = 103), or intensity-modulated RT (n = 2) to a median dose of 52.7 Gy and followed for a median of 7.3 years (range, 0.6-22.0 years) Results: The local control rates at 5 and 10 years were as follows: definitive RT, 99% and 99%; postoperative RT, 96% and 93%; and overall, 97% and 96%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were as follows: definitive RT 94% and 94%, postoperative RT, 100% and 96%; and overall, 96% and 95%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were as follows: definitive RT, 81% and 75%; postoperative RT, 96% and 85%; and overall, 87% and 79%, respectively. Severe RT complications occurred in 6.8% of patients; severe surgery-related complications occurred in 10 (17%) of 58 patients treated surgically. Conclusions: The likelihood of cure after definitive RT or following subtotal resection is excellent. However, a small population of patients experience severe complications, even at the moderate dose used for this disease.

  19. Can relaxation interventions reduce anxiety in patients receiving radiotherapy? outcomes and study validity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elith, C.A.; Perkins, B.A.; Johnson, L.S.; Skelly, M.H.; Dempsey, S.

    2001-01-01

    This study piloted the use of three relaxation interventions in an attempt to reduce levels of anxiety in patients who are immobilised for radiotherapy treatment of head and neck cancers, as well as trying to validate the study methodology. In addition to receiving normal radiation therapy treatment, 14 patients were assigned to either a control group not receiving the relaxation intervention or one of three validated relaxation intervention techniques; music therapy, aromatherapy or guided imagery. Patients in the intervention groups underwent the relaxation technique daily for the first seven days of treatment. On days 1, 3, 5 and 7 of treatment patients were required to complete the State Anxiety Inventory survey. While caution should be taken in accepting the results due to the small numbers of patients involved in the study and the non-randomised assignment of patients within the study, the results of the study demonstrate a clinically significant reduction in anxiety levels in each of the three relaxation interventions compared to the control group. The study demonstrated good study validity due to the ease of implementation, the unambiguous results generated, and the use of already validated anxiety intersections and measurement tools. Copyright (2001) Australian Institute of Radiography

  20. Outcome of four-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy for centrally located lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuyttens, Joost J.; Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Praag, John; Aluwini, Shafak; Klaveren, Rob J. van; Verhoef, Cornelis; Pattynama, Peter M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess local control, overall survival, and toxicity of four-dimensional, risk-adapted stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered while tracking respiratory motion in patients with primary and metastatic lung cancer located in the central chest. Methods: Fifty-eight central lesions of 56 patients (39 with primary, 17 with metastatic tumors) were treated. Fifteen tumors located near the esophagus were treated with 6 fractions of 8 Gy. Other tumors were treated according to the following dose escalation scheme: 5 fractions of 9 Gy (n = 6), then 5 fractions of 10 Gy (n = 15), and finally 5 fractions of 12 Gy (n = 22). Results: Dose constraints for critical structures were generally achieved; in 21 patients the coverage of the PTV was reduced below 95% to protect adjacent organs at risk. At a median follow-up of 23 months, the actuarial 2-years local tumor control was 85% for tumors treated with a BED >100 Gy compared to 60% for tumors treated with a BED ⩽100 Gy. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 1–2 esophagitis was observed in 11% of patients. Conclusion: SBRT of central lung lesions can be safely delivered, with promising early tumor control in patients many of whom have severe comorbid conditions.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy using simultaneous-integrated boost for definitive treatment of locally advanced mucosal head and neck cancer: outcomes from a single-institution series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Meredith; Guo, Linxin; Hanna, Catherine; Back, Michael; Guminski, Alex; Lee, Adrian; Eade, Thomas; Veivers, David; Wignall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to report outcomes for patients treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous-integrated boost and weekly cisplatin for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III/IV mucosal head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Records for 67 patients treated definitively with IMRT for HNSCC were reviewed. By including only those treated with weekly cisplatin, 45 patients were eligible for analysis. Treatment outcomes, effect of patient, tumour and treatment characteristics on disease recurrence were analysed. All patients completed IMRT to 7000cGy in 35 fractions, with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40mg/m 2 (median 6 cycles). Median follow-up was 28 months for living patients. Two-year loco-regional recurrence-free, metastasis-free and overall survival were 85.4, 81.0 and 87.4%, respectively. Local recurrence occurred in three patients, and distant recurrence in eight patients. Our results show efficacy of IMRT and weekly cisplatin in the treatment of stage III/IV HNSCC at our institution with respect to loco-regional control.

  2. Clinical outcomes of a phase I/II study of 48 Gy of stereotactic body radiotherapy in 4 fractions for primary lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mitsumori, Michihide; Shibuya, Keiko; Araki, Norio; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of 48 Gy of three-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy in four fractions for treating Stage I lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients who were treated between September 1998 and February 2004 were included in this study. Thirty-two patients had Stage IA lung cancer, and the other 13 had Stage IB lung cancer where tumor size was less than 4 cm in diameter. Three-dimensional treatment planning using 6-10 noncoplanar beams was performed to maintain the target dose homogeneity and to decrease the irradiated lung volume >20 Gy. All patients were irradiated using a stereotactic body frame and received four single 12 Gy high doses of radiation at the isocenter over 5-13 (median = 12) days. Results: Seven tumors (16%) completely disappeared after treatment (CR) and 38 tumors (84%) decreased in size by 30% or more (PR). Therefore, all tumors showed local response. During the follow-up of 6-71 (median = 30) months, no pulmonary complications greater than an National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria of Grade 3 were noted. No other vascular, cardiac, esophageal, or neurologic toxicities were encountered. Forty-four (98%) of 45 tumors were locally controlled during the follow-up period. However, regional recurrences and distant metastases occurred in 3 and 5 of T1 patients and zero and 4 of T2 patients, respectively. For Stage IA lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates after 1 and 3 years were 80% and 72%, and 92% and 83%, respectively, whereas for Stage IB lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 92% and 71%, and 82% and 72%, respectively. Conclusion: Forty-eight Gy of 3D stereotactic radiotherapy in 4 fractions using a stereotactic body frame is useful for the treatment of Stage I lung tumors

  3. Definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy concurrent with systemic therapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: Outcomes from an integrated regional Australian cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud Rahbari, Reza; Winkley, Lauren; Hill, Jacques; Tahir, Abdul Rahim Mohammed; McKay, Michael; Last, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Dwyer, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) incidence has increased over the past two decades largely because of an increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-related OPSCC. We report here outcomes of definitive radiation therapy for OPSCC with simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a regional Australian cancer centre. We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records (EMR) of all patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer. We included patients who received a curative intent IMRT for OPSCC (2010-2014). Of 61 patients, 80% were men, and the median age was 57 years. Ninety percent of our patients received concurrent systemic therapy, and 68% were p16 positive. The median radiotherapy dose received was 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The median follow up for surviving patients was 22 months. Twenty-four month actuarial data show that the loco-regional recurrence free, metastasis-free MFS, cancer-specific (CaSS) and overall survival percentages were 98.3%, 92.6%, 91% and 90.3%, respectively. We did not observe grades 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities, and 10 patients (16.2%) exhibited persistent grade 3 toxicity 6 months after completing the treatment. The results from curative IMRTs for OPSCC delivered in a regional cancer centre are comparable with results published by tertiary referral centres. A long-term follow up of this patient cohort will continue for further analyses and comparisons with tertiary centres. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Expression of Bcl-2, p53, and MDM2 in Localized Prostate Cancer With Respect to the Outcome of Radical Radiotherapy Dose Escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergis, Roy; Corbishley, Catherine M.; Thomas, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Established prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer explain only a moderate proportion of variation in outcome. We analyzed tumor expression of apoptotic markers with respect to outcome in men with localized prostate cancer in two randomized controlled trials of radiotherapy dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2001, 308 patients with localized prostate cancer received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy at our institution in one of two dose-escalation trials. The biopsy specimens in 201 cases were used to make a biopsy tissue microarray. We evaluated tumor expression of Bcl-2, p53, and MDM2 by immunohistochemistry with respect to outcome. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years, and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) was 70.4% (95% CI, 63.5-76.3%). On univariate analysis, expression of Bcl-2 (p < 0.001) and p53 (p = 0.017), but not MDM2 (p = 0.224), was significantly associated with FFBF. Expression of Bcl-2 remained significantly associated with FFBF (p = 0.001) on multivariate analysis, independently of T stage, Gleason score, initial prostate-specific antigen level, and radiotherapy dose. Seven-year biochemical control was 61% vs. 41% (p = 0.0122) for 74 Gy vs. 64 Gy, respectively, among patients with Bcl-2-positive tumors and 87% vs. 81% (p = 0.423) for 74 Gy vs. 64 Gy, respectively, among patients with Bcl-2-negative tumors. There was no statistically significant interaction between dose and Bcl-2 expression. Conclusions: Bcl-2 expression was a significant, independent determinant of biochemical control after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer. These data generate the hypothesis that Bcl-2 expression could be used to inform the choice of radiotherapy dose in individual patients.

  5. Cytoreductive prostate radiotherapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer: a single centre analysis of toxicity and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giulia; Marvaso, Giulia; Augugliaro, Matteo; Zerini, Dario; Fodor, Cristiana; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2017-01-01

    The current standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) at diagnosis is androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with or without anti-androgen and chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to define the role of a local radiotherapy (RT) treatment in the mPCa setting. We retrospectively reviewed data of patients with PCa and bone oligometastases at diagnosis treated in our institution with ADT followed by cytoreductive prostate-RT with or without RT on metastases. Biochemical and clinical failure (BF, CF), overall survival (OS) and RT-toxicity were assessed. We identified 22 patients treated with ADT and external-beam RT on primary between June 2008 and March 2016. All of them but four were also treated for bone metastases. RT on primary with moderately and extremely hypofractionated regimes started after 10.3 months (3.9-51.7) from ADT. After a median follow-up of 26.4 months (10.3-55.5), 20 patients are alive. Twelve patients showed BF after a median time of 23 months (14.5-104) and CF after a median of 23.6 months (15.3-106.1) from the start of ADT. Three patients became castration resistant, starting a new therapy; median time to castration resistance was 31.03 months (range: 29.9-31.5 months). According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC), only one patient developed acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. No late grade >2 adverse events were observed. Prostate RT in oligometastatic patients is safe and offers long-lasting local control. When compared to ADT alone, RT on primary seems to improve biochemical control and long-term survival; however, this hypothesis should be investigated in prospective studies. Further research is warranted.

  6. Predictability of psychic outcome for exercise training and exercise training including relaxation therapy after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J. van Dixhoorn (J.)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Predictability of the psychic outcome for two cardiac rehabilitation programmes was investigated in 119 myocardial infarction patients. They were randomly assigned to either a five-week daily exercise training or to an identical training in combination with six sessions

  7. Clinical Outcomes for Patients with Gleason Score 9-10 Prostate Adenocarcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy or Radical Prostatectomy: A Multi-institutional Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishan, Amar U; Shaikh, Talha; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Reiter, Robert E; Said, Jonathan; Raghavan, Govind; Nickols, Nicholas G; Aronson, William J; Sadeghi, Ahmad; Kamrava, Mitchell; Demanes, David Jeffrey; Steinberg, Michael L; Horwitz, Eric M; Kupelian, Patrick A; King, Christopher R

    2017-05-01

    The long natural history of prostate cancer (CaP) limits comparisons of efficacy between radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), since patients treated years ago received treatments considered suboptimal by modern standards (particularly with regards to androgen deprivation therapy [ADT] and radiotherapy dose-escalation]. Gleason score (GS) 9-10 CaP is particularly aggressive, and clinically-relevant endpoints occur early, facilitating meaningful comparisons. To compare outcomes of patients with GS 9-10 CaP following EBRT, extremely-dose escalated radiotherapy (as exemplified by EBRT+brachytherapy [EBRT+BT]), and RP. Retrospective analysis of 487 patients with biopsy GS 9-10 CaP treated between 2000 and 2013 (230 with EBRT, 87 with EBRT+BT, and 170 with RP). Most radiotherapy patients received ADT and dose-escalated radiotherapy. Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox regression estimated and compared 5-yr and 10-yr rates of distant metastasis-free survival, cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). The median follow-up was 4.6 yr. Local salvage and systemic salvage were performed more frequently in RP patients (49.0% and 30.1%) when compared with either EBRT patients (0.9% and 19.7%) or EBRT+BT patients (1.2% and 16.1%, pRadiotherapy and RP provide equivalent CSS and OS. Extremely dose-escalated radiotherapy with ADT in particular offers improved systemic control when compared with either EBRT or RP. These data suggest that extremely dose-escalated radiotherapy with ADT might be the optimal upfront treatment for patients with biopsy GS 9-10 CaP. While some prostate cancers are slow-growing requiring many years, sometimes decades, of follow-up in order to compare between radiation and surgery, high-risk and very aggressive cancers follow a much shorter time course allowing such comparisons to be made and updated as treatments, especially radiation, rapidly evolve. We showed that radiation-based treatments and surgery

  8. Functional outcome and survival after radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in patients with cancer of unknown primary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Fehlauer, Fabian; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Basic, Hiba; Hoskin, Peter J.; Rudat, Volker; Karstens, Johann H.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) account for about 10% of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This study aims to define the appropriate radiation regimen for these patients. Methods and Materials: Data of 143 CUP patients irradiated for MSCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course radiotherapy (RT) (1x8 Gy, 5x4 Gy, n = 68) and long-course RT (10x3 Gy, 15x2.5 Gy, 20x2 Gy, n = 75) plus 8 further potential prognostic factors (age, gender, performance status, visceral metastases, other bone metastases, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits before RT) were compared for functional outcome and survival. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 10% of patients, no further progression of motor deficits in 57%, and deterioration in 33%. On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was positively associated with slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.008) and other bone metastases (p = 0.027), and ambulatory status (p = 0.054), not with the radiation regimen (p = 0.74). Recurrence of MSCC in the irradiated region occurred in 7 patients after median 6 months. Median survival was 4 months. On multivariate analysis, better survival was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), absence of other bone metastases (p = 0.005), ambulatory status (p = 0.001), and slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.030). Conclusions: For MSCC treatment in patients with CUP, no significant difference was observed between short-course and long-course RT regarding functional outcome and survival. Short-course RT appears preferable, at least for patients with a poor predicted survival, as it is more patient convenient and more cost-effective

  9. Prepectoral Implant-Based Breast Reconstruction and Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: Short-Term Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Sigalove, MD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions:. Immediate implant-based prepectoral breast reconstruction followed by PMRT appears to be well tolerated, with no excess risk of adverse outcomes, at least in the short term. Longer follow-up is needed to better understand the risk of PMRT in prepectorally reconstructed breasts.

  10. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Michael H.; Fierke, Kerry K.; Sucher, Brandon J.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI exper...

  11. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  12. Fatal outcome of pelvic radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivotto, I.A.; Fairey, R.N.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver; Gillies, J.H.; Stein, H.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver

    1989-01-01

    Although there is an impression that patients with connective tissue disorders tolerate radiotherapy less well than other patients, this is not well documented. The authors present the case of a patient with a 7-year history of systemic lupus erythematosis who developed fatal pelvic necrosis as an unexpectedly severe complication after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix. (author)

  13. Fatal outcome of pelvic radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivotto, I A; Fairey, R N; Gillies, J H; Stein, H

    1989-01-01

    Although there is an impression that patients with connective tissue disorders tolerate radiotherapy less well than other patients, this is not well documented. The authors present the case of a patient with a 7-year history of systemic lupus erythematosis who developed fatal pelvic necrosis as an unexpectedly severe complication after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix.

  14. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.-F.; Tseng, C.-J.; Tseng, C.-C.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chen, W.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m 2 ) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT

  15. Outcomes following definitive stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with Child-Pugh B or C hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culleton, Shaelyn; Jiang, Haiyan; Haddad, Carol R.; Kim, John; Brierley, Jim; Brade, Anthony; Ringash, Jolie; Dawson, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in patients with Child-Pugh B or C (CP B/C) hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and materials: A prospective study of SBRT was developed for patients with CP B7 or B8 unresectable HCC, <10 cm. Selected ineligible patients (e.g. CP > B8, >10 cm) treated off-study from 2004 to July 2012 were also reviewed. Patients were excluded if they were treated as a bridge-to-liver-transplant. Results: 29 patients with CP B/C HCC were treated with SBRT (median dose 30 Gy in 6 fractions) from 2004 to December 2012. The majority had CP B7 liver function (69%) and portal vein tumor thrombosis (76%). The median survival was 7.9 months (95% CI: 2.8–15.1). Survival was significantly better in patients with CP = B7 and AFP ⩽ 4491 ng/mL. Of 16 evaluable patients, 63% had a decline in CP score by ⩾2 points at 3 months. Conclusion: SBRT is a treatment option for selected HCC patients with small HCCs and modestly impaired (CP B7) liver function

  16. Outcome of Elderly Patients with Meningioma after Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy: A Study of 100 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kaul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Incidence of meningioma increases with age. Surgery has been the mainstay treatment. Elderly patients, however, are at risk of severe morbidity. Therefore, we conducted this study to analyze long-term outcomes of linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT for older adults (aged ≥65 years with meningioma and determine prognostic factors. Materials and Methods. Between October 1998 and March 2009, 100 patients (≥65, median age, 71 years were treated with FSRT for meningioma. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Eight patients each had grade I and grade II meningiomas, and five patients had grade III meningiomas. The histology was unknown in 77 cases (grade 0. Results. The median follow-up was 37 months, and 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS rates were 93.7%, 91.1%, and 82%. Patients with grade 0/I meningioma showed 3- and 5-year PFS rates of 98.4% and 95.6%. Patients with grade II or III meningiomas showed 3-year PFS rates of 36%. 93.8% of patients showed local tumor control. Multivariate analysis did not indicate any significant prognostic factors. Conclusion. FSRT may play an important role as a noninvasive and safe method in the clinical management of older patients with meningioma.

  17. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, David; Lagerwaard, Frank; Rodrigues, George; Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of ≤40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high (≥89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79–95% at 1 year and 43–70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45–86% at 1 year and 31–66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  18. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  19. A retrospective analysis of survival outcomes for two different radiotherapy fractionation schedules given in the same overall time for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettington, Catherine S.; Bryant, Guy; Hickey, Brigid; Tripcony, Lee; Pratt, Gary; Fay, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To compare survival outcomes for two fractionation schedules of thoracic radiotherapy, both given over 3 weeks, in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). At Radiation Oncology Mater Centre (ROMC) and the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), patients with LS-SCLC treated with curative intent are given radiotherapy (with concurrent chemotherapy) to a dose of either 40Gy in 15 fractions ('the 40Gy/15⧣group') or 45Gy in 30 fractions ('the 45Gy/30⧣group'). The choice largely depends on institutional preference. Both these schedules are given over 3 weeks, using daily and twice-daily fractionation respectively. The records of all such patients treated from January 2000 to July 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and survival outcomes between the two groups compared. Of 118 eligible patients, there were 38 patients in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 41 patients in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The median relapse-free survival time was 12 months in both groups. Median overall survival was 21 months (95% CI 2–37 months) in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 26 months (95% CI 1–48 months) in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The 5-year overall survival rates were 20% and 25%, respectively (P=0.24). On multivariate analysis, factors influencing overall survival were: whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was given (P=0.01) and whether salvage chemotherapy was given at the time of relapse (P=0.057). Given the small sample size, the potential for selection bias and the retrospective nature of our study it is not possible to draw firm conclusions regarding the efficacy of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy compared with hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy however hypofractionated radiotherapy may result in equivalent relapse-free survival.

  20. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  1. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, Shannon; Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3–110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p 3 . Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  2. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Shannon, E-mail: shannonkahn@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). The HIV-positive men experienced an average decline in CD4 count of 193 cells/mm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  3. Impact of Radiotherapy on Fertility, Pregnancy, and Neonatal Outcomes in Female Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation has many potential long-term effects on cancer survivors. Female cancer patients may experience decreased fertility depending on the site irradiated. Oncologists should be aware of these consequences and discuss options for fertility preservation before initiating therapy. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive review of the existing literature was conducted. Studies reporting the outcomes for female patients treated with cranio-spinal, abdominal, or pelvic radiation reporting fertility, pregnancy, or neonatal-related outcomes were reviewed. Results: Cranio-spinal irradiation elicited significant hormonal changes in women that affected their ability to become pregnant later in life. Women treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation have an increased rate of uterine dysfunction leading to miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and placental abnormalities. Early menopause results from low-dose ovarian radiation. Ovarian transposition may decrease the rates of ovarian dysfunction. Conclusions: There is a dose-dependent relationship between ovarian radiation therapy (RT) and premature menopause. Patients treated with RT must be aware of the impact of treatment on fertility and explore appropriate options.

  4. Hemoglobin levels do not predict biochemical outcome for localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy and external-beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, Howard Huaihan; Ludgate, Charles; Pickles, Tom; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Agranovich, Alex; Berthelet, Eric; Duncan, Graeme; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Kwan, Winkle; Lim, Jan; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether hemoglobin (Hb) levels affect outcome in men with localized prostate adenocarcinoma (LPA) treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy (NAST) and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 563 men with LPA treated with NAST (median: 5.3 months) and EBRT who had Hb levels during treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including the following Hb variables, were subjected to univariate and multivariable analyses to identify factors that predict biochemical control (bNED) and overall survival (OS): pre-EBRT Hb, Hb nadir during EBRT, and change in Hb from pre-EBRT to nadir during EBRT. Results: Median PSA follow-up was 4.25 years. Forty-nine percent of men were anemic during EBRT, with a median Hb of 13.4 g/dL, and 68% experienced a decline in Hb from pre-EBRT to during EBRT of median 0.6 g/dL. Five-year Nadir + 2 bNED and OS rates were similar for anemic and nonanemic patients during EBRT. High percent-positive biopsies, PSA and Gleason score, and use of AA monotherapy predicted worse bNED. High stage and age predicted worse OS. Hb variables were not predictive of bNED or OS. Conclusions: Anemia is a common side effect of NAST and is usually mild. Hb levels, however, do not predict biochemical control or survival

  5. Long-Term Outcomes of Early-Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Alone

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    Su Shengfa [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Oncology, GuiYang Medical College Hospital, Guiyang, Guizhou (China); Han Fei; Zhao Chong; Chen Chunyan; Xiao Weiwei; Li Jiaxin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lu Taixiang, E-mail: ssf2010@sina.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Reports of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) have been limited. The present study evaluated the long-term survival outcomes and toxicity of early-stage NPC patients treated with IMRT alone. Methods and Materials: Between February 2001 and January 2008, 198 early-stage (T1-T2bN0-N1M0) NPC patients had undergone IMRT alone. The data from these patients were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were treated to 68 Gy at 2.27 Gy/fraction prescribed to the planning target volume of the primary nasopharygeal gross tumor volume. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system was used to assess the toxicity. Results: At a median follow-up of 50.9 months (range, 12-104), the 5-year estimated disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rate was 97.3%, 97.7%, and 97.8%, respectively. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rate was 100% for those with Stage T1 and T2a and 94.2% for those with Stage T2b lesions (p = 0.252). The 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate for Stage T1N0, T2N0, T1N1, and T2N1 patients was 100%, 98.8%, 100%, and 93.8%, respectively (p = .073). All local recurrence occurred in patients with T2b lesions. Five patients developed distant metastasis. Of these 5 patients, 4 had had Stage T2bN1 disease and 1 had had Stage T2bN0 disease with retropharyngeal lymph node involvement. The most common acute toxicities were mainly Grade 1 or 2. At 24 months after IMRT, no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia had developed, and 62 (96.9%) of 64 evaluated patients were free of trismus; only 2 patients (3.1%) had Grade 1 trismus. Radiation encephalopathy and cranial nerve injury were not observed. Conclusions: IMRT alone for Stage T1N0, T2N0, T1N1, and T2N1 yielded satisfactory survival outcomes with acceptable toxicity, and no differences were found in survival outcomes among these four subgroups. Patients with Stage T2b lesions might have relatively

  6. Childhood optic chiasm gliomas: radiographic response following radiotherapy and long-term clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, May L.; Barnes, Patrick D.; Billett, Amy L.; Leong, Traci; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Scott, R. Michael; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: In children with chiasmal gliomas, radiation therapy can arrest progressive visual and neurologic impairment. We examined the radiographic response and clinical outcomes after irradiation. Methods and Materials: Forty-two children (median age at diagnosis, 6.6 years) with chiasmal gliomas were managed as follows: 11 asymptomatic patients with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) were observed only; 2 patients, less than 3 years old, underwent surgery and chemotherapy to delay irradiation; and 29 patients with progressive disease received radiation with or without prior surgery or chemotherapy. Time to radiographic response, long-term tumor control and late sequelae were reviewed for the 29 irradiated patients. Results: The probability of at least 50% radiographic response at 24 months after irradiation was 18.1% and increased to 38.2% by 48 months and 45.9% by 60 months. By actuarial analysis, the median time for such radiographic response was 62 months. For the 29 irradiated patients, the 10-year freedom from progression and overall survival rates were 100% and 89%, respectively (median follow-up for surviving patients, 108 months). Stabilization or improvement in vision occurred in 81% of 26 evaluable irradiated patients. Conclusions: Notable radiographic response may be observed years after irradiation. Radiation therapy provides excellent long-term tumor control and vision preservation or improvement in the majority of patients with progressive chiasmal gliomas

  7. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Saito, Naoko [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Qureshi, Muhammad M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ozonoff, Al [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Romesser, Paul B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  8. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6–44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0–2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0–2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  9. Improved Biochemical Outcomes With Statin Use in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Katz, Matthew S.; Mak, Kimberley; Yamada, Yoshiya; Feder, David J.; Zhang Zhigang; Jia Xiaoyu; Shi Weiji; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and biochemical and survival outcomes after high-dose radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1711 men with clinical stage T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT to a median dose of 81 Gy during 1995-2007. Preradiotherapy medication data were available for 1681 patients. Three hundred eighty-two patients (23%) were taking a statin medication at diagnosis and throughout RT. Nine hundred forty-seven patients received a short-course of neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with RT. The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Results: The 5- and 8-year PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) rates for statin patients were 89% and 80%, compared with 83% and 74% for those not taking statins (p = 0.002). In a multivariate analysis, statin use (hazard ratio [HR] 0.69, p = 0.03), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) low-risk group, and ADT use were associated with improved PRFS. Only high-risk patients in the statin group demonstrated improvement in PRFS (HR 0.52, p = 0.02). Across all groups, statin use was not associated with improved distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.51). On multivariate analysis, lower NCCN risk group (p = 0.01) and ADT use (p = 0.005) predicted improved DMFS. Conclusions: Statin use during high-dose RT for clinically localized prostate cancer was associated with a significant improvement in PRFS in high-risk patients. These data suggest that statins have anticancer activity and possibly provide radiosensitization when used in conjunction with RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  10. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  11. Re-Examination of the BEST Trial Using Composite Outcomes, Including Emergency Department Visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Li; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Mogensen, Ulrik M.

    2017-01-01

    that included emergency department (ED) visits. We also undertook an analysis of recurrent events primarily using the Lin, Wei, Ying, and Yang model. Results Overall, 448 (33%) patients on placebo and 411 (30%) patients on bucindolol died (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78 to 1.02; p...... = 0.11). A total of 730 (54%) patients experienced CVD/HFH on placebo and 624 (46%) on bucindolol (HR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.72 to 0.89; p 0.90; p

  12. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Risk-modifying factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Ruediger; Hillemanns, Peter; Vaske, Bernhard; Bremer, Michael; Henkenberens, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters. (orig.) [de

  13. The impact of positron emission tomography on primary tumour delineation and dosimetric outcome in intensity modulated radiotherapy of early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Vincent W. C.; Leung, Wan-shun; Wong, Kwun-lam; Chan, Ying-kit; Law, Wing-lam; Leung, Wing-kwan; Yu, Yat-long

    2016-01-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), accurate delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is important. Image registration of CT and MRI has been routinely used in treatment planning. With recent development of positron emission tomography (PET), the aims of this study were to evaluate the impact of PET on GTV delineation and dosimetric outcome in IMRT of early stage NPC patients. Twenty NPC patients with T1 or T2 disease treated by IMRT were recruited. For each patient, 2 sets of NP GTVs were delineated separately, in which one set was performed using CT and MRI registration only (GTV CM ), while the other set was carried out using PET, CT and MRI information (GTV CMP ). A 9-field IMRT plan was computed based on the target volumes generated from CT and MRI (PTV CM ). To assess the geometric difference between the GTV CM and GTV CMP , GTV volumes and DICE similarity coefficient (DSC), which measured the geometrical similarity between the two GTVs, were recorded. To evaluate the dosimetric impact, the D max , D min , D mean and D 95 of PTVs were obtained from their dose volume histograms generated by the treatment planning system. The overall mean volume of GTV CMP was greater than GTV CM by 4.4 %, in which GTV CMP was slightly greater in the T1 group but lower in the T2 group. The mean DSC of the whole group was 0.79 ± 0.05. Similar mean DSC values were also obtained from the T1 and T2 groups separately. The dosimetric parameters of PTV CM fulfilled the planning requirements. When applying this plan to the PTV CMP , the average D min (56.9 Gy) and D 95 (68.6 Gy) of PTV CMP failed to meet the dose requirements and demonstrated significant differences from the PTV CM (p = 0.001 and 0.016 respectively), whereas the doses to GTV CMP did not show significant difference with the GTV CM . In IMRT of early stage NPC, PET was an important imaging modality in radiotherapy planning so as to avoid underdosing the PTV, although its

  14. The impact of positron emission tomography on primary tumour delineation and dosimetric outcome in intensity modulated radiotherapy of early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Vincent W C; Leung, Wan-Shun; Wong, Kwun-Lam; Chan, Ying-Kit; Law, Wing-Lam; Leung, Wing-Kwan; Yu, Yat-Long

    2016-08-24

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), accurate delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is important. Image registration of CT and MRI has been routinely used in treatment planning. With recent development of positron emission tomography (PET), the aims of this study were to evaluate the impact of PET on GTV delineation and dosimetric outcome in IMRT of early stage NPC patients. Twenty NPC patients with T1 or T2 disease treated by IMRT were recruited. For each patient, 2 sets of NP GTVs were delineated separately, in which one set was performed using CT and MRI registration only (GTVCM), while the other set was carried out using PET, CT and MRI information (GTVCMP). A 9-field IMRT plan was computed based on the target volumes generated from CT and MRI (PTVCM). To assess the geometric difference between the GTVCM and GTVCMP, GTV volumes and DICE similarity coefficient (DSC), which measured the geometrical similarity between the two GTVs, were recorded. To evaluate the dosimetric impact, the Dmax, Dmin, Dmean and D95 of PTVs were obtained from their dose volume histograms generated by the treatment planning system. The overall mean volume of GTVCMP was greater than GTVCM by 4.4 %, in which GTVCMP was slightly greater in the T1 group but lower in the T2 group. The mean DSC of the whole group was 0.79 ± 0.05. Similar mean DSC values were also obtained from the T1 and T2 groups separately. The dosimetric parameters of PTVCM fulfilled the planning requirements. When applying this plan to the PTVCMP, the average Dmin (56.9 Gy) and D95 (68.6 Gy) of PTVCMP failed to meet the dose requirements and demonstrated significant differences from the PTVCM (p = 0.001 and 0.016 respectively), whereas the doses to GTVCMP did not show significant difference with the GTVCM. In IMRT of early stage NPC, PET was an important imaging modality in radiotherapy planning so as to avoid underdosing the PTV, although its effect on GTV

  15. Impact of HPV-associated p16-expression on radiotherapy outcome in advanced oropharynx and non-oropharynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassen, Pernille; Primdahl, Hanne; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus A.; Andersen, Elo; Andersen, Lisbeth J.; Evensen, Jan F.; Eriksen, Jesper G.; Overgaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: HPV is found in head and neck cancer from all sites with a higher prevalence in oropharynx cancer (OPC) compared to non-OPC. HPV/p16-status has a significant impact on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in advanced OPC, but less is known about the influence in non-OPC. We analyzed HPV-associated p16-expression in a cohort of patients with stage III–IV pharynx and larynx cancer treated with primary, curatively intended (chemo-)RT, aiming to test the hypothesis that the impact of HPV/p16 also extends to tumors of non-oropharyngeal origin. Material and methods: 1294 patients enrolled in previously conducted DAHANCA-trials between 1992 and 2012 were identified. Tumors were evaluated by p16-immunohistochemistry and classified as positive in case of staining in >70% of tumors cells. Results: Thirty-eight percent (490/1294) of the tumors were p16-positive with a significantly higher frequency in OPC (425/815) than in non-OPC (65/479), p < .0001. In OPC p16-positivity significantly improved loco-regional control (LRC) (adjusted HR [95% CI]: 0.43 [0.32–0.57]), event-free survival (EFS) (HR 0.44 [0.35–0.56]), and overall survival (OS) (HR: 0.38 [0.29–0.49]), respectively, compared with p16-negativity. In non-OPC no prognostic impact of p16-status was found for either endpoint: LRC (HR: 1.13 [0.75–1.70]), EFS (HR: 1.06 [0.76–1.47]), and OS (HR: 0.82 [0.59–1.16]). Conclusions: The independent influence of HPV-associated p16-expression in advanced OPC treated with primary RT was confirmed. However, RT-outcome in the group of non-OPC did not differ by tumor p16-status, indicating that the prognostic impact may be restricted to OPC only

  16. Long-term Treatment Response and Patient Outcomes for Vestibular Schwannoma Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira A. Patel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe aim of this study is to evaluate long-term treatment outcome and toxicities among vestibular schwannoma (VS patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT.Methods383 patients with unilateral VS treated with HSRT (25 Gy, five fractions between 1995 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Treatment failure was defined as requiring salvage microsurgery. Posttreatment new/progressive clinical symptoms or increases in baseline tumor volume (BTV due to treatment effect or progression were noted. Symptom outcomes were reported as baseline and posttreatment ± improvement, respectively. Symptoms were grouped by cranial nerve (CN VII or CNVIII. Audiometry was assessed baseline and posttreatment hearing. Patients were grouped as having greater than serviceable hearing [Gardner Robertson (GR score 1–2] or less than non-serviceable hearing (GR score 3–5 by audiometry.ResultsMedian follow-up was 72.0 months. Nine (2.3% experienced treatment failure. At last follow-up, 74 (19.3% had new/progressive symptoms and were categorized as radiologic non-responders, whereas 300 (78.3% had no tumor progression and were grouped as radiologic responders. Average pretreatment BTV for treatment failures, radiologic non-responders, and radiologic responders was 2.11, 0.44, and 1.87 cm3, respectively. Pretreatment CNVII and CNVIII symptoms were present in 9.4 and 93.4% of patients, respectively. Eight (24% with pre-HSRT CNVII and 37 (10% with pre-HSRT CNVIII symptoms recovered CN function post-HSRT. Thirty-five (9% and 36 (9.4% experienced new CNVII and CNVIII deficit, respectively, after HSRT. Of these, 20 (57% and 18 (50% recovered CNVII and CNVIII function, respectively, after HSRT. Evaluable audiograms were available in 199 patients. At baseline and at last follow-up, 65.8 and 36.2% had serviceable hearing, respectively. Fifty-one percent had preservation of serviceable hearing at last follow-up.ConclusionTreatment of VS

  17. Outcomes after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for perineural spread of head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Timothy A; Panizza, Benedict; Porceddu, Sandro V; Gandhi, Mitesh; Patel, Parag; Wood, Martin; Nagle, Christina M; Redmond, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Queensland, Australia, has the highest rates of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Perineural invasion (PNI) is associated with reduced local control and survival. A retrospective review of a prospective database of patients with clinical PNI from cutaneous SCC of the head and neck (SCCHN) treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) between 2000 and 2011 and a minimum of 24 months follow-up. Patients were excluded if immunosuppressed, had non-SCC histology, or were treated palliatively. Fifty patients (mean age, 60 years) with median follow-up of 50 months were included in this study. A total of 54.8% of known primary tumors had incidental PNI. Ten percent had nodal disease at presentation. MRI neurogram was positive in 95.8%. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) at 5-years was 62%. Five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were 75% and 64%, respectively. There were no perioperative deaths. This report demonstrates that long-term survival is achievable in patients with clinical PNI from cutaneous SCCHN after surgery and PORT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 824-831, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  19. The outcome of a multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer TROG 10.01 BOLART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Rolfo, Aldo; Bressel, Mathias; Tang, Colin I.; Tan, Alex; Turner, Sandra; Hruby, George; Williams, Stephen; Hayne, Dickon; Lehman, Margot; Skala, Marketa; Jose, Chakiath C.; Gogna, Kumar; Kron, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is feasible across multiple Radiation Oncology departments using different imaging, delivery and recording technology. Materials and methods: A multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy, using a choice of three “plan of the day”, was conducted at 12 departments. Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Departments were activated if part of the pilot study or after a site-credentialing visit. There was real time review of the first two cases from each department. Results: 54 patients were recruited, with 50 proceeding to radiotherapy. There were 43 males and 7 females with a mean age of 78 years. The tumour stages treated included T1 (1 patient), T2 (35), T3 (10) and T4 (4). One patient died of an unrelated cause during radiotherapy. The three adaptive plans were created before the 10th fraction in all cases. In 8 (16%) of the patients, a conventional plan using a ‘standard’ CTV to PTV margin of 1.5 cm was used for one or more fractions where the pre-treatment bladder CTV was larger than any of the three adaptive plans. The bladder CTV extended beyond the PTV on post treatment imaging in 9 (18%) of the 49 patients. Conclusions: From a technical perspective an online adaptive radiotherapy technique can be instituted in a multi-centre setting. However, without further bladder filling control or imaging, a CTV to PTV margin of 7 mm is insufficient

  20. Clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and oligometastatic lung tumors: a single institutional study with almost uniform dose with different five treatment schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Ono, Shuichi; Tsushima, Eiki; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized primary and oligometastatic lung tumors by assessing efficacy and safety of 5 regimens of varying fraction size and number. One-hundred patients with primary lung cancer (n = 69) or oligometastatic lung tumors (n = 31), who underwent SBRT between May 2003 and August 2010, were included. The median age was 75 years (range, 45–88). Of them, 98 were judged to have medically inoperable disease, predominantly due to chronic illness or advanced age. SBRT was performed using 3 coplanar and 3 non-coplanar fixed beams with a standard linear accelerator. Fraction sizes were escalated by 1 Gy, and number of fractions given was decreased by 1 for every 20 included patients. Total target doses were between 50 and 56 Gy, administered as 5–9 fractions. The prescribed dose was defined at the isocenter, and median overall treatment duration was 10 days (range, 5–22). The median follow-up was 51.1 months for survivors. The 3-year local recurrence rates for primary lung cancer and oligometastasis was 6 % and 3 %, respectively. The 3-year local recurrence rates for tumor sizes ≤3 cm and >3 cm were 3 % and 14 %, respectively (p = 0.124). Additionally, other factors (fraction size, total target dose, and BED 10 ) were not significant predictors of local control. Radiation pneumonia (≥ grade 2) was observed in 2 patients. Radiation-induced rib fractures were observed in 22 patients. Other late adverse events of greater than grade 2 were not observed. Within this dataset, we did not observe a dose response in BED 10 values between 86.4 and 102.6 Gy. SBRT with doses between 50 and 56 Gy, administered over 5–9 fractions achieved acceptable tumor control without severe complications

  1. Influence of more extensive radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy on long-term outcome of early-stage Hodgkin's disease: a meta-analysis of 23 randomized trials involving 3,888 patients. International Hodgkin's Disease Collaborative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Gray, R.G.; Clarke, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the effect of more extensive radiotherapy and of adjuvant combination chemotherapy on long-term outcome of early-stage Hodgkin's disease. METHODS: In a collaborative worldwide systematic overview, individual patient data were centrally reviewed on 1,974 patients in eight.......7%; P counterbalanced by a nonsignificant excess of deaths from other...... causes (12.4% v 10.0% 10-year risk). CONCLUSION: More extensive radiotherapy fields or the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy in the initial treatment of early-stage Hodgkin's disease had a large effect on disease control, but only a small effect on overall survival. Recurrences could be prevented...

  2. Low-dose external beam radiotherapy for greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Target volume definition and treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hinsche, Tanja; Nitsche, Mirko; Hermann, Robert Michael

    2017-01-01

    Low-dose external beam radiotherapy (ED-EBRT) is frequently used in the therapy of refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). As studies reporting treatment results are scarce, we retrospectively analyzed our own patient collectives. In all, 60 patients (74 hips) received LD-EBRT (6 x 0.5 Gy in 29 hips, 6 x 1 Gy in 45). The endpoint was the patient's reported subjective response to treatment. The influence of different patient and treatment characteristics on treatment outcome was investigated. At the end of LD-EBRT, 69% reported partial remission, 4% complete remission, no change 28%. A total of 3 months later (n = 52 hips), the results were 37, 33, and 30% and 18 months after LD-EBRT (n = 47) 21, 51, and 28%. In univariate analysis ''inclusion of the total femoral head into the PTV'' and ''night pain before LD-EBRT'' were correlated with symptom remission at the end of LD-EBRT, while ''initial increase in pain during LD-EBRT'' was significantly associated with treatment failure. In multivariable modeling ''initial increase in pain'' was identified as a risk factor for treatment failure (p = 0.007; odds ratio [OR] 0.209; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.048-0.957), while ''night pain'' was an independent factor for remission (p = 0.038; OR 3.484; 95% CI 1.004-12.6). Three months after LD-EBRT ''night pain'' and ''inclusion of the complete femoral neck circumference into the PTV'' were predictive for remission. LD-EBRT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from GTPS. Three months after therapy two-thirds of the patients reported a partial or complete symptom remission. Especially patients who suffered from nocturnal pain seemed to benefit. Treatment appeared to be more effective when the entire circumference of the femoral neck was encompassed. (orig.) [de

  3. Merkel cell carcinoma: Outcome and role of radiotherapy; Carcinome a cellules de Merkel: prise en charge et place de la radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador Alonso, R.; Lahbabi, I.; Ben Hassel, M.; Boisselier, P.; Crevoisier, R. de [Centre Eugene-Marquis, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 35 - Rennes (France); Chaari, N. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Lesimple, T. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, Dept. d' Oncologie Medicale, 35 - Rennes (France); Chevrier, S. [Centre Hospitalier Prive de Saint-Gregoire, Dept. de Chirurgie Plastique, 35 - Saint-Gregoire (France)

    2008-09-15

    Merkel cell carcinoma (M.C.C.) are rare neuroendocrine malignant tumor of the skin, occurring in elderly patients. It affects primarily the sun-exposed areas of the skin, with approximately 50% of all tumors occurring in the face and neck and 40% in the extremities. Immunohistochemical markers (C.K.20+, C.K.7- and T.T.F.1-) are used to distinguish between M.C.C. and other tumors. M.C.C. have a tendency to rapid local progression, frequent spread to regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. Due to the rarity of the disease, the optimal treatment has not been fully defined. Localized stages (stages I and II) are treated by surgical excision of the primary tumor (with 2 to 3 cm margin) and lymphadenectomy in case of node-positive disease, followed by external beam radiotherapy (E.B.R.T.) to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy in the tumor bed. Adjuvant E.B.R.T. has been shown to decrease markedly locoregional recurrences and to increase survival in recent studies. Treatment of lymph nodes area is more controversial. Chemotherapy is recommended only for metastatic disease. (authors)

  4. MVP expression in the prediction of clinical outcome of locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Moreno, Mercedes; Rey, Agustín; Lloret, Marta; Lara, Pedro C

    2012-08-29

    To explore the role of Major Vault Protein (MVP) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients. 131 consecutive patients suffering from oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma were included in the study. In the whole series, the mean follow-up for survivors was 123.11 ± 40.36 months. Patients in tumour stages I and II were referred to surgery; patients in stage III-IV to postoperative radiotherapy (mean dose = 62.13 ± 7.74 Gy in 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). MVP expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tumour tissue. MVP expression was positive in 112 patients (85.5%) and no relation was found with clinic pathological variables. MVP overexpression (those tumours with moderate or strong expression of the protein) was related to insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R) expression (P = 0.014). Tumour stage of the disease was the most important prognostic factor related to survival. Tumours overexpressing MVP and IGF-1R were strongly related to poor disease-free survival (P = 0.008, Exp(B) = 2.730, CI95% (1.302-5.724)) and cause-specific survival (P = 0.014, Exp(B) = 2.570, CI95% (1.215-5.437)) in patients achieving tumour stages III-IV, in multivariate analysis. MVP and IGF-1R expression were related in oral squamous cell carcinoma and conferred reduced long-term survival in patients suffering from advanced stages of the disease.

  5. MVP expression in the prediction of clinical outcome of locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henríquez-Hernández Luis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To explore the role of Major Vault Protein (MVP in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients. Subjects and Methods 131 consecutive patients suffering from oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma were included in the study. In the whole series, the mean follow-up for survivors was 123.11 ± 40.36 months. Patients in tumour stages I and II were referred to surgery; patients in stage III-IV to postoperative radiotherapy (mean dose = 62.13 ± 7.74 Gy in 1.8–2 Gy/fraction. MVP expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tumour tissue. Results MVP expression was positive in 112 patients (85.5% and no relation was found with clinic pathological variables. MVP overexpression (those tumours with moderate or strong expression of the protein was related to insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R expression (P = 0.014. Tumour stage of the disease was the most important prognostic factor related to survival. Tumours overexpressing MVP and IGF-1R were strongly related to poor disease-free survival (P = 0.008, Exp(B = 2.730, CI95% (1.302-5.724 and cause-specific survival (P = 0.014, Exp(B = 2.570, CI95% (1.215-5.437 in patients achieving tumour stages III-IV, in multivariate analysis. Conclusions MVP and IGF-1R expression were related in oral squamous cell carcinoma and conferred reduced long-term survival in patients suffering from advanced stages of the disease.

  6. MVP expression in the prediction of clinical outcome of locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Moreno, Mercedes; Rey, Agustín; Lloret, Marta; Lara, Pedro C

    2012-01-01

    To explore the role of Major Vault Protein (MVP) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients. 131 consecutive patients suffering from oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma were included in the study. In the whole series, the mean follow-up for survivors was 123.11 ± 40.36 months. Patients in tumour stages I and II were referred to surgery; patients in stage III-IV to postoperative radiotherapy (mean dose = 62.13 ± 7.74 Gy in 1.8–2 Gy/fraction). MVP expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tumour tissue. MVP expression was positive in 112 patients (85.5%) and no relation was found with clinic pathological variables. MVP overexpression (those tumours with moderate or strong expression of the protein) was related to insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R) expression (P = 0.014). Tumour stage of the disease was the most important prognostic factor related to survival. Tumours overexpressing MVP and IGF-1R were strongly related to poor disease-free survival (P = 0.008, Exp(B) = 2.730, CI95% (1.302-5.724)) and cause-specific survival (P = 0.014, Exp(B) = 2.570, CI95% (1.215-5.437)) in patients achieving tumour stages III-IV, in multivariate analysis. MVP and IGF-1R expression were related in oral squamous cell carcinoma and conferred reduced long-term survival in patients suffering from advanced stages of the disease

  7. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Zhiqin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Yang Kunyu [Cancer Centre, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu Guangying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beiijng Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing (China); Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Charles [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  8. Clinical outcome after high-precision radiotherapy for skull base meningiomas: Pooled data from three large German centers for radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Farzin, Mostafa; Boehmer, Julia; Oehlke, Oliver; Molls, Michael; Debus, Jürgen; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate outcome in patients with base of skull meningiomas treated with modern high precision radiation therapy (RT) techniques. 927 patients from three centers were treated with either radiosurgery or fractionated high-precision RT for meningiomas. Treatment planning was based on CT and MRI following institutional guidelines. For radiosurgery, a median dose of 13 Gy was applied, for fractionated treatments, a median dose of 54 Gy in 1.8 Gy single fractions was prescribed. Follow-up included a clinical examination as well as contrast-enhanced imaging. All patients were followed up prospectively after radiotherapy in the three departments within a strict follow-up regimen. The median follow-up time was 81 months (range 1-348 months). Median local control was 79 months (range 1-348 months). Local control (LC) was 98% at 1 year, 94% at 3 years, 92% at 5 years and 86% at 10 years. There was no difference between radiosurgery and fractionated RT. We analyzed the influence of higher doses on LC and could show that dose did not impact LC. Moreover, there was no difference between 54 Gy and 57.6 Gy in the fractionated group. Side effects were below 5% in both groups without any severe treatment-related complications. Based on the pooled data analysis this manuscript provides a large series of meningiomas of the skull base treated with modern high precision RT demonstrating excellent local control and low rates of side effects. Such data support the recommendation of RT for skull base meningiomas in the interdisciplinary tumor board discussions. The strong role of RT must influence treatment recommendations keeping in mind the individual risk-benefit profile of treatment alternatives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rütten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Rooijakkers, Antoinette F.; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence–free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  10. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  11. (18)F-FDG PET during stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung tumours cannot predict outcome : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, Erwin M.; Pruim, Jan; Ubbels, Jan F.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Widder, Joachim

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) has been used to assess metabolic response several months after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, whether a metabolic response can be observed already during treatment and thus

  12. Outcome after PSMA PET/CT based radiotherapy in patients with biochemical persistence or recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Ilhan, Harun; Herlemann, Annika; Buchner, Alexander; Stief, Christian; Eze, Chukwuka; Rogowski, Paul; Li, Minglun; Bartenstein, Peter; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus

    2018-03-02

    PSMA PET/CT visualises prostate cancer residual disease or recurrence at lower PSA levels compared to conventional imaging and results in a change of treatment in a remarkable high number of patients. Radiotherapy with dose escalation to the former prostate bed has been associated with improved biochemical recurrence-free survival. Thus, it can be hypothesised that PSMA PET/CT-based radiotherapy might improve the prognosis of these patients. One hundred twenty-nine patients underwent PSMA PET/CT due to biochemical persistence (52%) or recurrence (48%) after radical prostatectomy without evidence of distant metastases (February 2014-May 2017) and received PSMA PET/CT-based radiotherapy. Biochemical recurrence free survival (PSA ≤ 0.2 ng/ml) was defined as the study endpoint. Patients with biochemical persistence were significantly more often high-risk patients with significantly shorter time interval before PSMA PET/CT than patients with biochemical recurrence. Patients with biochemical recurrence had significantly more often no evidence of disease or local recurrence only in PSMA PET/CT, whereas patients with biochemical persistence had significantly more often lymph node involvement. Seventy-three patients were started on antiandrogen therapy prior to radiotherapy due to macroscopic disease in PSMA PET/CT. Cumulatively, 70 (66-70.6) Gy was delivered to local macroscopic tumor, 66 (63-66) Gy to the prostate fossa, 61.6 (53.2-66) Gy to PET-positive lymph nodes and 50.4 (45-52.3) Gy to lymphatic pathways. Median PSA after radiotherapy was 0.07 ng/ml with 74% of patients having a PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/ml. After a median follow-up of 20 months, median PSA was 0.07 ng/ml with ongoing antiandrogen therapy in 30 patients. PET-positive patients without antiandrogen therapy at last follow-up (45 patients) had a median PSA of 0.05 ng/ml with 89% of all patients, 94% of patients with biochemical recurrence and 82% of patients with biochemical persistence having a

  13. Radical radiotherapy treatment (EBRT + HDR-ICRT of carcinoma of the uterine cervix: Outcome in patients treated at a rural center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vandana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the outcome of carcinoma of the uterine cervix patients treated radically by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT. Materials and Methods: Between January 1997 to December 2001, a total of 550 newly diagnosed cases of carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reported in the department. All cases were staged according to the International Federation of Gynecologists and Oncologists (FIGO staging system, but for analytical convenience, the staging was limited to stages I, II, III, and IV. Out of the 550 cases, 214 completed radical radiotherapy (EBRT + HDR-ICRT and were retrospectively analyzed for presence of local residual disease, local recurrence, distant metastases, radiation reactions, and disease-free survival. Results: There were 7 (3.27%, 88 (41.1%, 101 (47.1%, and 18 (8.4% patients in stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The median follow-up time for all patients was 43 months (range: 3-93 months and for patients who were disease free till the last follow-up it was 59 months (range: 24-93 months. The overall treatment time (OTT ranged from 52 to 73 days (median 61 days. The 5-year disease-free mean survival rate was 58%, 44%, 33%, and 15%, with 95% confidence interval of 48 to 68, 37 to 51, 24 to 35, and 6 to 24 for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. There were 62 (28.97% cases with local residual disease, 35 (16.3% developed local recurrence/distant metastases, 17 (7.9% developed distant metastases, and 9 (4.2% had local recurrence as well. Discussion and Conclusion: The overall outcome was poor in advanced stage disease, but might be improved by increasing the total dose, decreasing overall duration of treatment, and by adding chemotherapy in patients with disease limited to the pelvis.

  14. Long-Term Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Malignant Meningiomas—Clinical Results in 85 Patients Treated in a Single Institution Leading to Optimized Guidelines for Early Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeberg, Sebastian; Hartmann, Christian; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Deimling, Andreas von; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previously, we could show that the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of meningiomas significantly correlated with outcome in patients with atypical and anaplastic histology. In the present work, we analyzed our long-term experience in radiotherapy for atypical and malignant meningioma diagnosed according to the most recent WHO categorization system. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with atypical and 23 patients with malignant meningioma have been treated with radiotherapy. Sixty percent of all patients received radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection, 19% at disease progression and 8.3% as a primary treatment. Radiation was applied using different techniques including fractionated stereotactic RT (FSRT), intensity-modulated RT, and combination treatment with carbon ions. The median PTV was 156.0 mL. An average dose of 57.6 Gy (range, 30–68.4 Gy) in 1.8–3 Gy fractions was applied. All patients were followed regularly including clinical-neurological follow-up as well as computed tomographies or magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Overall survival was impacted significantly by histological grade, with 81% and 53% at 5 years for atypical or anaplastic meningiomas, respectively. This difference was significant at p = 0.022. Eighteen patients died of tumor progression during follow-up. Progression-free survival was 95% and 50% for atypical, and 63% and 13% for anaplastic histology at 2 and 5 years. This difference was significant at p = 0.017. Despite histology, we could not observe any prognostic factors including age, resection status, or Karnofsky performance score. However, preexisting clinical symptoms observed in 63 patients improved in 29.3% of these patients. Conclusion: RT resulted in improvement of preexisting clinical symptoms; outcome is comparable to other series reported in the literature. RT should be offered after surgical resection after initial diagnosis to increase progression-free survival as well as overall

  15. p16INK4A, p53, EGFR expression and KRAS mutation status in squamous cell cancers of the anus: Correlation with outcomes following chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, Duncan C; Williams, Anthony; Allan, Kimberley; Stokoe, Joanna; Jackson, Tim; Linsdall, Suzanne; Bailey, Charles MH; Summers, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Squamous cell carcinomas of the anal canal are associated with infection with Human Papilloma Viruses (HPVs). Chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) gives 70% 3-year relapse-free survival. Improved predictive markers and therapeutic options are required. Methods: Tumours from 153 patients treated with radical chemo-radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 with concurrent Mitomycin and 5-Fluorouracil between 2004 and 2009) were retrieved and immunohistochemistry performed for p16 INK4A , p53 and EGFR and correlated with outcome. Primary and relapsed samples were analysed for mutations in KRAS. Results: 137/153 (89.5%) stained moderately or strongly for p16 INK4A . p16 INK4A correlated strongly with outcome. 37/137 patients demonstrating moderate/strong p16 INK4A expression relapsed (27.0%), as opposed to 10/16 (62.5%) with absent/weak staining (log rank test p INK4A negative tumours were more frequent in men. p16 INK4A negative patients had significantly worse overall survival (p INK4A is strongly associated with relapse in SCC of the anus and identifies patients with very poor rates of relapse-free and overall survival. Primary and recurrent anal cancer expresses wild type KRAS, unaffected by treatment, supporting trials targeting EGFR in poor risk/recurrent anal cancer

  16. The result of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Yang, K. M.; Suh, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors for disease-free survival and long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The study involved a retrospective review of outcome in a series of 27 patients with pituitary adenoma, between 1984 and 1995 at Paik hospital. The study included 20 patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and 7 with radiotherapy alone. The patients were followed for 12-146 months (median: 97 months). Seventeen were men and 10 were women. The numbers of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenoma were 22 and 5 respectively and those of microadenoma and macroadenoma were 4 and 23 respectively. The radiation doses of 5040-5580cGy(median: 5040cGy) were delivered over 5-7 weeks, using 4MV LINAC. The prognostic factors were analyzed by log-rank test. For radiation therapy alone, the 5 YSR was 100% and progression free survival rate was 85.8%. The tumor was controlled in 6/7 (85.8%). For surgery and postoperative radiotherapy , the 5YSR, progression free survival rate and local control rate were 95%, 84.8%, and 89.5% respectively. The parameters of tumor size, hormone secretion, radiation dose, radiotherapy field size were evaluated in a uni- and multivariate analysis and all the factors were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Eleven of 12 (92%) with visual field defect experienced normalization or improvement, and 5 for 7 evaluable patients with hyperprolactinoma achieved normalization in 4 and decrement in 5 patients. Only 2 patients developed mild degree of panhypopituitarism. The radiotherapy appears to be effective in controlling clinical symptoms and signs resulting from pituitary adenoma. Local control rate with radiotherapy alone or with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was comparable. There was a trend toward high recurrence rate in patients with nonfunctioning or prolactin secreting tumor and larger radiation field sizes. (author)

  17. The result of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. J.; Yang, K. M.; Suh, S. H. [Inje Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Cho, H. L.; Shon, S. C. [Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors for disease-free survival and long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The study involved a retrospective review of outcome in a series of 27 patients with pituitary adenoma, between 1984 and 1995 at Paik hospital. The study included 20 patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and 7 with radiotherapy alone. The patients were followed for 12-146 months (median: 97 months). Seventeen were men and 10 were women. The numbers of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenoma were 22 and 5 respectively and those of microadenoma and macroadenoma were 4 and 23 respectively. The radiation doses of 5040-5580cGy(median: 5040cGy) were delivered over 5-7 weeks, using 4MV LINAC. The prognostic factors were analyzed by log-rank test. For radiation therapy alone, the 5 YSR was 100% and progression free survival rate was 85.8%. The tumor was controlled in 6/7 (85.8%). For surgery and postoperative radiotherapy , the 5YSR, progression free survival rate and local control rate were 95%, 84.8%, and 89.5% respectively. The parameters of tumor size, hormone secretion, radiation dose, radiotherapy field size were evaluated in a uni- and multivariate analysis and all the factors were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Eleven of 12 (92%) with visual field defect experienced normalization or improvement, and 5 for 7 evaluable patients with hyperprolactinoma achieved normalization in 4 and decrement in 5 patients. Only 2 patients developed mild degree of panhypopituitarism. The radiotherapy appears to be effective in controlling clinical symptoms and signs resulting from pituitary adenoma. Local control rate with radiotherapy alone or with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was comparable. There was a trend toward high recurrence rate in patients with nonfunctioning or prolactin secreting tumor and larger radiation field sizes. (author).

  18. A randomized controlled trial of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for perfectionism including an investigation of outcome predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Alexander; Shafran, Roz; Wade, Tracey; Egan, Sarah; Nordgren, Lise Bergman; Carlbring, Per; Landström, Andreas; Roos, Stina; Skoglund, Malin; Thelander, Elisabet; Trosell, Linnéa; Örtenholm, Alexander; Andersson, Gerhard

    2017-08-01

    Being highly attentive to details can be a positive feature. However, for some individuals, perfectionism can lead to distress and is associated with many psychiatric disorders. Cognitive behavior therapy has been shown to yield many benefits for those experiencing problems with perfectionism, but the access to evidence-based care is limited. The current study investigated the efficacy of guided Internet-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy (ICBT) and predictors of treatment outcome. In total, 156 individuals were included and randomized to an eight-week treatment or wait-list control. Self-report measures of perfectionism, depression, anxiety, self-criticism, self-compassion, and quality of life were distributed during screening and at post-treatment. Intention-to-treat were used for all statistical analyses. Moderate to large between-group effect sizes were obtained for the primary outcome measures, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, subscales Concerns over Mistakes and Personal Standards, Cohen's d = 0.68-1.00, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [0.36-1.33], with 35 (44.9%) of the patients in treatment being improved. Predictors were also explored, but none were related to treatment outcome. In sum, guided ICBT can be helpful for addressing problems with clinical perfectionism, but research of its long-term benefits is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcomes of Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With Bexxar With or Without External-Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Kristy; Byer, Gracie; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Lightsey, Judith; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Lynch, James; Olivier, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy and toxicity of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to sites of bulky lymphadenopathy in patients with chemotherapy-refractory low-grade non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) immediately before receiving Bexxar (tositumomab and 131 I) vs. in patients receiving Bexxar alone for nonbulky disease. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with chemotherapy-refractory NHL were treated with Bexxar at our institution (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL) from 2005 to 2008. Seventeen patients had Grade 1–2 follicular lymphoma. Ten patients received a median of 20 Gy in 10 fractions to the areas of clinical involvement, immediately followed by Bexxar (EBRT + Bexxar); 9 patients received Bexxar alone. The median tumor sizes before EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone were 4.8 cm and 3.3 cm, respectively. All 5 patients with a tumor diameter >5 cm were treated with EBRT + Bexxar. A univariate analysis of prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 2.3 years for all patients and 3.1 years for 12 patients alive at last follow-up. Of all patients, 79% had a partial or complete response; 4 of the 8 responders in the EBRT + Bexxar group achieved a durable response of over 2 years, including 3 of the 5 with tumors >5 cm. Three of 9 patients treated with Bexxar alone achieved a durable response over 2 years. Actuarial estimates of 3-year overall survival and PFS for EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone were 69% and 38% and 62% and 33%, respectively. The median time to recurrence after EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone was 9 months. Having fewer than 4 involved lymph-node regions was associated with superior PFS at 3 years (63% vs. 18%). There was no Grade 4 or 5 complications. Conclusions: Adding EBRT immediately before Bexxar produced PFS equivalent to that with Bexxar alone, despite bulkier disease. Hematologic toxicity was not worsened. EBRT combined with Bexxar adds a safe and effective therapeutic

  20. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Risk-modifying factors

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    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Ruediger; Hillemanns, Peter [Hannover Medical School, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hannover (Germany); Vaske, Bernhard [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Medical Biometry and Informatics, Hannover (Germany); Bremer, Michael; Henkenberens, Christoph [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, Parameter zu identifizieren, die Spaetschaeden nach Radiotherapie, ein unguenstiges

  1. Effect of smoking on oxygen delivery and outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma – A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molich Hoff, Camilla; Grau, Cai; Overgaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer patients with high hemoglobin respond better to irradiation compared to patients with low hemoglobin possibly due to hypoxia induced radioresistance. The hemoglobin level is, however, a crude indicator of the amount of oxygen available to the tissue and may be influenced by a number of factors, smoking being of potential importance. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of smoking on available oxygen to tumors and the effect on outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy in a prospective study. Materials and methods: A total of 232 consecutive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity completed questionnaires on smoking habits prior to treatment. Venous blood samples were collected before and/or during treatment to determine the hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin level. Patients were treated with primary curative radiotherapy 62–68 Gy, 2 Gy/fx, 5 fx/week. Results: All but 12 patients had a history of smoking, 35 were long term quitters, 23 recent quitters, 54 moderate smokers and 108 heavy smokers (>1 pack/day). There was no relationship between total hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin, but effective hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin were linearly correlated. The amount of carboxyhemoglobin increased with increasing smoking status. Actuarial 5-year univariate analysis showed that heavy smokers had a significantly reduced probability of loco-regional control (44% vs. 65%, p = 0.001), disease-specific (56% vs. 77%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (39% vs. 66%, p = 0.0004) compared to non-smoking patients. Multivariate analyses showed that patients characterized as non-smokers, with low T and N classifications and high hemoglobin level had the best outcome measurements. A rise in carboxyhemoglobin significantly decreased the probability of loco-regional control and each additional pack year increased the risk of death. Smokers and former smokers develop secondary

  2. Comparing Outcomes and Cost of 3 Surgical Treatments for Sagittal Synostosis: A Retrospective Study Including Procedure-Related Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Sarah T; Karsy, Michael; Kestle, John R W; Siddiqi, Faizi; Spanos, Stephen P; Riva-Cambrin, Jay

    2017-10-01

    Neurosurgical techniques for repair of sagittal synostosis include total cranial vault (TCV) reconstruction, open sagittal strip (OSS) craniectomy, and endoscopic strip (ES) craniectomy. To evaluate outcomes and cost associated with these 3 techniques. Via retrospective chart review with waiver of informed consent, the last consecutive 100 patients with sagittal synostosis who underwent each of the 3 surgical correction techniques before June 30, 2013, were identified. Clinical, operative, and process of care variables and their associated specific charges were analyzed along with overall charge. The study included 300 total patients. ES patients had fewer transfusion requirements (13% vs 83%, P cost savings compared with the TCV reconstruction. The charges were similar to those incurred with OSS craniectomy, but patients had a shorter length of stay and fewer revisions. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  3. An easy irradiation technique (partial half-beam) to reduce renal dose in radiotherapy of cervical cancer including paraaortic lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, H.; Wagner, D.; Christiansen, H.; Hess, C.F.; Hermann, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: for radiation treatment of patients with cervical cancer and a high risk for paraaortic lymph node involvement, an easy three-dimensional (3-D) conformal irradiation technique (partial half-beam [PHB]) for protection of organs at risk, especially of renal tissue, was developed. Patients and methods: in five consecutive female patients a computed tomography scan was performed. Dose-volume histograms of the renal tissue and other organs at risk were analyzed for PHB, three other 3-D conformal techniques, and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Results: the PHB technique reduced the renal volume and volumes of other organs at risk exposed to radiation doses when comparing all patients to the other 3-D conformal techniques. With use of the IMRT technique more renal tissue volume received very low radiation doses (≤ 6.8 Gy) whereas the D 10 was lower than with the PHB technique. Conclusion: in female patients with cervical cancer and high risk for paraaortic lymph node involvement, the use of the PHB technique is recommended to reduce renal radiation exposure, if no IMRT technique should be applied. The PHB technique is very easily and fast applicable. (orig.)

  4. Health-related quality of life and treatment outcomes for men with prostate cancer treated by combined external-beam radiotherapy and hormone therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Azuma, Kouji; Koizumi, Takahiro; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru

    2005-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) is important when considering the treatment options for prostate cancer. From 1992 to 1998, 57 patients were treated by radiotherapy plus hormone therapy (median age, 79 years; median prostate-specific antigen concentration, 15.0 ng/ml; median radiotherapy dosage, 60 Gy). General HR-QOL was measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Prostate Cancer QOL Questionnaire, and a newly developed disease-specific QOL survey was used to assess urinary and bowel functions. QOL was also measured in a control group of patients admitted for prostate biopsy. The general HR-QOL scores in the radiation group ranged from 70.0 to 91.3, with sexual problems showing the lowest (i.e., worst) score (38.5). Compared with the control group, the scores in the radiation group were worse for physical function and sexual problems. For disease-specific QOL, the radiation group had worse urinary function than controls, but were more satisfied with their urinary function. There was no difference between the radiation group and controls in satisfaction with bowel function. When the control group was subdivided at into two groups: age 75 years or less, and age over 75 years, the QOL score in the radiation group was the same as that in the subgroup aged over 75 years. In subgroups of the radiation patients, according to survey period, there was no difference between the first and last surveys in longitudinal HR-QOL evaluations. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 67.6% and 41.6%, respectively, and the 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were 97.9% and 94.7%. The combination of radiotherapy and hormone therapy has a good outcome and patients do not experience poor HR-QOL, except for sexual problems. Moreover, the disease-specific QOL is good, especially for urinary bother. (author)

  5. The role of overall treatment time in the outcome of radiotherapy of prostate cancer: An analysis of biochemical failure in 4839 men treated between 1987 and 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, Howard D.; Kuban, Deborah; Levy, Larry B.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Kupelian, Patrick; Martinez, Alvaro; Michalski, Jeffrey; Pisansky, Thomas; Sandler, Howard; Shipley, William; Zelefsky, Michael; Zietman, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Assess the importance of overall time (OT) and dose for biochemical failure (BF) after external-beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer in a retrospective analysis of a nine-institution database with 4839 patients. Patients and methods: Relevant baseline factors (T stage, Gleason score, initial PSA) were available for 4338 men. Cox models were used to estimate the effects of dose and OT corrected for baseline factors, treatment year, institution and interactions, and differences in post-treatment PSA-measurement intervals. After exclusion of very short and long intervals, patient numbers were 1445 events/3426 at risk (endpoint all BFs), and 1177 events/3354 at risk (endpoint exclusion of BFs that were likely distant failures). Separate analyses were carried out by risk group for men who received <70 Gy and ≥70 Gy. Results: Neither dose nor OT was significant when the analysis was restricted to doses <70 Gy, while for patients treated to 70 Gy or higher there were significant influences of both dose and OT on outcome in low- and intermediate-risk patients. These effects were quantified as a relative increase after 5 years followup of 6% in BFs for a 1-week increase in OT, a relative decrease of 15% in BFs for a 6-Gy increase in dose, and a dose equivalent of proliferation of 0.24 Gy/day. As the dose per fraction was nearly constant, the data contain no information on the α/β ratio. Conclusion: The results show that OT and dose are significant determinants of outcome of radiotherapy in low- and intermediate-risk patients treated to 70 Gy or higher, and suggest that meaningful improvements in outcome may be targeted by modest increases in total dose and decreases in OT.

  6. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Christopher R.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 ± 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%–102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  7. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C. [Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  8. Implementation of an image guided intensity-modulated protocol for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy: planning data and acute toxicity outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, Benjamin; Min, Myo; Wood, Maree; Edwards, Sarah; Hoffmann, Matthew; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; McKay, Michael J.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial interest in implementation of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in the post-prostatectomy setting. We describe our implementation of IG-IMRT, and examine how often published organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints were met. Furthermore, we evaluate the incidence of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities when patients were treated according to our protocol. Patients were eligible if they received post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT). Planning data were collected prospectively, and toxicity assessments were collected before, during and after treatment. Seventy-five eligible patients received either 64Gy (19%) or 66Gy (81%) in a single phase to the prostate bed. Suggested rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy<60% and V60Gy<40% were met in 64 (85%) and 75 (100%) patients, respectively. IMRT-specific rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy<35% and V65Gy<17% were achieved in 5 (7%) and 57 (76%) of patients. Bladder dose-constraint (V50Gy<50%) was met in 58 (77%) patients. Two patients (3%) experienced new grade 3 genitourinary toxicity and one patient (1%) experienced new grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. All grade 3 toxicities had improved by 3-month review. Overall deterioration in urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in 33 (44%) and 35 (47%) of patients respectively. We report on our implementation of PPRT which takes into account nationally adopted guidelines, with a margin reduction supported by use of daily image guidance. Non-IMRT OAR constraints were met in most cases. IMRT-specific constraints were less often achieved despite margin reductions, suggesting the need for review of guidelines. Severe toxicity was rare, and most patients did not experience deterioration in urinary or bowel function attributable to radiotherapy.

  9. Implementation of an image guided intensity-modulated protocol for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy: planning data and acute toxicity outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Benjamin; Min, Myo; Wood, Maree; Edwards, Sarah; Hoffmann, Matthew; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-08-01

    There is substantial interest in implementation of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in the post-prostatectomy setting. We describe our implementation of IG-IMRT, and examine how often published organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints were met. Furthermore, we evaluate the incidence of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities when patients were treated according to our protocol. Patients were eligible if they received post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT). Planning data were collected prospectively, and toxicity assessments were collected before, during and after treatment. Seventy-five eligible patients received either 64 Gy (19%) or 66 Gy (81%) in a single phase to the prostate bed. Suggested rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 60% and V60Gy < 40% were met in 64 (85%) and 75 (100%) patients, respectively. IMRT-specific rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 35% and V65Gy < 17% were achieved in 5 (7%) and 57 (76%) of patients. Bladder dose-constraint (V50Gy < 50%) was met in 58 (77%) patients. Two patients (3%) experienced new grade 3 genitourinary toxicity and one patient (1%) experienced new grade 3 gastroinestinal toxicity. All grade 3 toxicities had improved by 3-month review. Overall deterioration in urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in 33 (44%) and 35 (47%) of patients respectively. We report on our implementation of PPRT which takes into account nationally adopted guidelines, with a margin reduction supported by use of daily image guidance. Non-IMRT OAR constraints were met in most cases. IMRT-specific constraints were less often achieved despite margin reductions, suggesting the need for review of guidelines. Severe toxicity was rare, and most patients did not experience deterioration in urinary or bowel function attributable to radiotherapy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  10. Preoperative intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost in locally advanced rectal cancer: Report on late toxicity and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Benedikt; Platteaux, Nele; Van den Begin, Robbe; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The addition of chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has been established as the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. As an alternative strategy, we explored intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT–IGRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in a prospective phase II study. Here, we report outcome and late toxicity after a median follow-up of 54 months. Methods and materials: A total of 108 patients were treated preoperatively with IMRT–IGRT, delivering a dose of 46 Gy in fractions of 2 Gy. Patients (n = 57) displaying an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm based on magnetic resonance imaging received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Results: The absolute incidence of grade ⩾3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity was 9% and 4%, respectively, with a 13% rate of any grade ⩾3 late toxicity. The actuarial 5-year local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 97%, 57%, and 68%. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection and pN2 disease were associated with significantly impaired OS. Conclusions: The use of preoperative IMRT–IGRT with a SIB resulted in a high 5-year LC rate and non-negligible late toxicity

  11. Clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy of 54 Gy in nine fractions for patients with localized lung tumor using a custom-made immobilization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Abe, Yoshinao; Kondo, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 54 Gy in nine fractions for patients with localized lung tumor using a custom-made immobilization system. The subjects were 19 patients who had localized lung tumor (11 primaries, 8 metastases) between May 2003 and October 2005. Treatment was conducted on 19 lung tumors by fixed multiple noncoplanar conformal beams with a standard linear accelerator. The isocentric dose was 54 Gy in nine fractions. The median overall treatment time was 15 days (range 11-22 days). All patients were immobilized by a thermo-shell and a custom-made headrest during the treatment. The crude local tumor control rate was 95% during the follow-up of 9.4-39.5 (median 17.7) months. In-field recurrence was noted in only one patient at the last follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate at 2 years was 89.5%. Grade 1 radiation pneumonia and grade 1 radiation fibrosis were observed in 12 of the 19 patients. Treatment-related severe early and late complications were not observed in this series. The stereotactic body radiotherapy of 54 Gy in nine fractions achieved acceptable tumor control without any severe complications. The results suggest that SBRT can be one of the alternatives for patients with localized lung tumors. (author)

  12. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Wu, Bosco; de Campos Silva, Thomaz; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Dose-escalated (DE) radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) and ADT. Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2.1% and 3.4%, respectively. No grade 3 or 4 late toxicities were reported. Pretreatment prostate specific antigen (P=0.001) and Gleason score (P=0.03) were significant in predicting biochemical failure on multivariate analysis. There is a high probability of tumor control with DE IG-IMRT combined with androgen deprivation, and this is a technique with a low probability of significant late toxicity. Our long term results corroborate the safety and efficacy of treating with IG-IMRT to high doses and compares favorably with published series for

  13. Dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy and irradiation of subventricular zones in relation to tumor control outcomes of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusumawidjaja G

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Grace Kusumawidjaja,1 Patricia Zhun Hong Gan,1 Whee Sze Ong,2 Achiraya Teyateeti,3 Pittaya Dankulchai,3 Daniel Yat Harn Tan,1 Eu Tiong Chua,1 Kevin Lee Min Chua,1 Chee Kian Tham,4 Fuh Yong Wong,1 Melvin Lee Kiang Chua1,5 1Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 2Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 3Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand; 4Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 5Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with high relapse rate. In this study, we aimed to determine if dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy improved tumor control and survival in GBM patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 49 and 23 newly-diagnosed histology-proven GBM patients, treated with DE radiotherapy delivered in 70 Gy (2.33 Gy per fraction and conventional doses (60 Gy, respectively, between 2007 and 2013. Clinical target volumes for 70 and 60 Gy were defined by 0.5 and 2.0 cm expansion of magnetic resonance imaging T1-gadolinium-enhanced tumor/surgical cavity, respectively. Bilateral subventricular zones (SVZ were contoured on a co-registered pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging and planning computed tomography dataset as a 5 mm wide structure along the lateral margins of the lateral ventricles. Survival outcomes of both cohorts were compared using log-rank test. Radiation dose to SVZ in the DE cohort was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up was 13.6 and 15.1 months for the DE- and conventionally-treated cohorts, respectively. Median overall survival (OS of patients who received DE radiotherapy was 15.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] =11.0–18.6, while median OS of the latter cohort was 18.4 months (95% CI =12.5–31.4, P=0.253. Univariate analyses of

  14. External radiotherapy of pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zierhut, Dietmar; Flentje, Michael; Adolph, Juergen; Erdmann, Johannes; Raue, Friedhelm; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate therapeutic outcome and side effects of radiotherapy in pituitary adenomas as sole or combined treatment. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 138 patients (74 male, 64 female) irradiated for pituitary adenoma from 1972 to 1991 was performed. Mean age was 49.7 years (15-80 years). Regular follow-up (in the mean 6.53 ± 3.99 years) included radiodiagnostical [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), x-ray], endocrinological, and ophthalmological examinations. Seventy patients suffered from nonfunctional pituitary adenoma, 50 patients suffered from growth-hormone producing adenomas, 11 had prolactinomas, and 7 patients had adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) producing pituitary adenomas. In 99 patients surgery was followed by radiotherapy in case of suspected remaining tumor (invasive growth of the adenoma, assessment of the surgeon, pathologic CT after surgery, persisting hormonal overproduction). Twenty-three patients were treated for recurrence of disease after surgery and 16 patients received radiation as primary treatment. Total doses from 40-60 Gy (mean: 45.5 Gy) were given with single doses of 2 Gy 4 to five times a week. Results: Tumor control was achieved in 131 patients (94.9%). In seven patients, recurrence of disease was diagnosed in the mean 2.9 years (9-98 months) after radiotherapy and salvaged by surgery. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found in favor of doses ≥ 45 Gy. Ninety percent of the patients with hormonally active pituitary adenomas had a benefit from radiotherapy in means of complete termination (38%) or at least reduction (52%) of hormonal overproduction. Partial or complete hypopituitarism after radiotherapy developed, depending on hormonal axis, in 12 (prolactin) to 27% (follicle-stimulating hormone FSH) of patients who had not already had hypopituitarism prior to radiation. Two out of 138 patients suffered reduction of visual acuity, which was, in part

  15. Low-dose external beam radiotherapy for greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Target volume definition and treatment outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander [Federal Armed Forces Hospital Westerstede, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Westerstede (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Core Facility Quality Management and Health Technology Assessment in Transplantation, Integrated Research and Treatment Center Transplantation (IFB-Tx), Hannover (Germany); Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hinsche, Tanja [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); University of Schleswig Holstein, Campus Kiel, Department of Radiotherapy, Karl-Lennert Cancer Center, Kiel (Germany); Hermann, Robert Michael [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Low-dose external beam radiotherapy (ED-EBRT) is frequently used in the therapy of refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). As studies reporting treatment results are scarce, we retrospectively analyzed our own patient collectives. In all, 60 patients (74 hips) received LD-EBRT (6 x 0.5 Gy in 29 hips, 6 x 1 Gy in 45). The endpoint was the patient's reported subjective response to treatment. The influence of different patient and treatment characteristics on treatment outcome was investigated. At the end of LD-EBRT, 69% reported partial remission, 4% complete remission, no change 28%. A total of 3 months later (n = 52 hips), the results were 37, 33, and 30% and 18 months after LD-EBRT (n = 47) 21, 51, and 28%. In univariate analysis ''inclusion of the total femoral head into the PTV'' and ''night pain before LD-EBRT'' were correlated with symptom remission at the end of LD-EBRT, while ''initial increase in pain during LD-EBRT'' was significantly associated with treatment failure. In multivariable modeling ''initial increase in pain'' was identified as a risk factor for treatment failure (p = 0.007; odds ratio [OR] 0.209; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.048-0.957), while ''night pain'' was an independent factor for remission (p = 0.038; OR 3.484; 95% CI 1.004-12.6). Three months after LD-EBRT ''night pain'' and ''inclusion of the complete femoral neck circumference into the PTV'' were predictive for remission. LD-EBRT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from GTPS. Three months after therapy two-thirds of the patients reported a partial or complete symptom remission. Especially patients who suffered from nocturnal pain seemed to benefit. Treatment appeared to be more effective when the entire circumference of the femoral neck was encompassed. (orig.) [German] In der Behandlung des

  16. Clinical outcomes of radiotherapy as initial local therapy for Graves’ ophthalmopathy and predictors of the need for post-radiotherapy decompressive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Roshan S; Liebman, Lang; Wojno, Ted; Hayek, Brent; Hall, William A; Crocker, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The optimal initial local treatment for patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO) is not fully characterized. The purpose of this retrospective study is to describe the clinical outcomes of RT as initial local therapy for GO and define predictors of the need for post-RT salvage bony decompressive surgery. 91 patients with active GO and without prior surgery were treated with RT as initial local therapy between 01/1999 and 12/2010, with a median follow-up period of 18.3 months (range 3.7 - 142 months). RT dose was 24 Gy in 12 fractions. 44 patients (48.4%) had prior use of steroids, with 31 (34.1%) being on steroids at the initiation of RT. The most common presenting symptoms were diplopia (79%), proptosis (71%) and soft tissue signs (62%). 84 patients (92.3%) experienced stabilization or improvement of GO symptoms. 58 patients (64%) experienced improvement in their symptoms. 19 patients (20.9%) underwent salvage post-RT bony decompressive surgery. Smoking status and total symptom score at 4 months were independent predictors of post-RT bony decompression with odds ratios of 3.23 (95% CI 1.03 – 10.2) and 1.59 (95% CI 1.06 – 2.4), respectively. Persistent objective vision loss at 4 months post-RT was the most important symptom type in predicting salvage decompression. Chronic dry eye occurred in 9 patients (9.9%) and cataracts developed in 4 patients (4.4%). RT is effective and well tolerated as initial local therapy for active GO, with only 21% of patients requiring decompressive surgery post RT. Most patients experience stabilization or improvement of GO symptoms, but moderate to significant response occurs in the minority of patients. Smoking status and total symptom severity at 4 months, primarily persistent objective vision loss, are the primary determinants of the need for post-RT salvage bony decompression. Patients who smoke or present with predominantly vision loss symptoms should be advised as to their lower likelihood of symptomatic response to RT

  17. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  18. Gender, renal function, and outcomes on the liver transplant waiting list: assessment of revised MELD including estimated glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Robert P; Shaheen, Abdel Aziz M; Aspinall, Alexander I; Quinn, Robert R; Burak, Kelly W

    2011-03-01

    The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) allocation system for liver transplantation (LT) may present a disadvantage for women by including serum creatinine, which is typically lower in females. Our objectives were to investigate gender disparities in outcomes among LT candidates and to assess a revised MELD, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), for predicting waiting list mortality. Adults registered for LT between 2002 and 2007 were identified using the UNOS database. We compared components of MELD, MDRD-derived eGFR, and the 3-month probability of LT and death between genders. Discrimination of MELD, MELDNa, and revised models including eGFR for mortality were compared using c-statistics. A total of 40,393 patients (36% female) met the inclusion criteria; 9% died and 24% underwent LT within 3 months of listing. Compared with men, women had lower median serum creatinine (0.9 vs. 1.0 mg/dl), eGFR (72 vs. 83 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), and mean MELD (16.5 vs. 17.2; all p discrimination for 3-month mortality (c-statistics: MELD 0.896, MELD-eGFR 0.894, MELDNa 0.911, MELDNa-eGFR 0.905). Women are disadvantaged under MELD potentially due to its inclusion of creatinine. However, since including eGFR in MELD does not improve mortality prediction, alternative refinements are necessary. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-Term Outcome and Quality of Life of Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma Treated With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy in the Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma 1 (PORTEC-1) Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nout, Remi A.; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V.; Lybeert, Marnix L. M.; Warlam-Rodenhuis, Carla C.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Lutgens, Ludy C. H. W.; Pras, Betty; van Putten, Wim L. J.; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the long-term outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) treated with or without pelvic radiotherapy in the Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma 1 (PORTEC-1) trial. Patients and Methods Between 1990 and

  20. Cancer of the larynx: the outcomes of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in prospective and retrospective studies. Is the meaning of conventionality the same?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hliniak, A.; Michalski, W.; Kraszewska, E.; Szutkowski, Z.; Jarzabski, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two studies on the radiotherapy of laryngeal cancer were completed at the Radiotherapy Department of the Cancer Center Warsaw at the end of 1999. One of them was a multicenter randomized clinical trial, and the second one - a retrospective study on patients treated between years 1989 and 1995. An opinion exists that the trial outcomes of the conventional arm correspond to the outcomes of everyday practice. The subject of the study was to evaluate this thesis, and to find out, whether the outcomes of prospective and retrospective studies following the same treatment protocol are comparable. Selection criteria were - age ≤75, WHO 0-1, T1, T2, T3, N0, M0 stage of glottic and supraglottic laryngeal cancer. The treatment was: 66 Gy/2 Gy/33 fraction/45 days. The prospective group had - 199 patients, and the retrospective group: 150 patients. The two groups were comparable according to the age, site, sex and mean hemoglobin level. There was a significant difference in T-stage and performance status between the two groups. Overall survival, local control and CR-response were analyzed. To eliminate the influence of the differences in T=stage and performance status, regression models were applied - Cox's for survival and local control, logit for CR-response endpoint. The protocol compliance (prospective, retrospective) was as follows - total dose: (88%, 49%), treatment time: (47%, 11%) respectively. Three-year survival for the prospective and the retrospective groups were 89% and 74%, respectively (p=0.035), CR-response rates were 96% and 75%, respectively (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in probability of local recurrence in CR patients. A better outcome of treatment was observed in the prospective study group. It is probably due to a certain 'over-selection' of patients for the prospective study and many deviations from the therapeutic protocol in the historical group. 'Conventional treatment' has the same meaning in the prospective and retrospective

  1. Improved Correlation of the Neuropathologic Classification According to Adapted World Health Organization Classification and Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Anaplastic Meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Debus, Jürgen; Deimling, Andreas von; Hartmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between the 1993 and 2000/2007 World Health Organization (WHO) classification with the outcome in patients with high-grade meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Between 1985 and 2004, 73 patients diagnosed with atypical or anaplastic meningiomas were treated with radiotherapy. Sections from the paraffin-embedded tumor material from 66 patients (90%) from 13 different pathology departments were re-evaluated according to the first revised WHO classification from 1993 and the revised classifications from 2000/2007. In 4 cases, the initial diagnosis meningioma was not reproducible (5%). Therefore, 62 patients with meningiomas were analyzed. Results: All 62 tumors were reclassified according to the 1993 and 2000/2007 WHO classification systems. Using the 1993 system, 7 patients were diagnosed with WHO grade I meningioma (11%), 23 with WHO grade II (37%), and 32 with WHO grade III meningioma (52%). After scoring using the 2000/2007 system, we found 17 WHO grade I meningiomas (27%), 32 WHO grade II meningiomas (52%), and 13 WHO grade III meningiomas (21%). According to the 1993 classification, the difference in overall survival was not statistically significant among the histologic subgroups (p = .96). Using the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, the difference in overall survival became significant (p = .02). Of the 62 reclassified patients 29 developed tumor progression (47%). No difference in progression-free survival was observed among the histologic subgroups (p = .44). After grading according to the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, significant differences in progression-free survival were observed among the three histologic groups (p = .005). Conclusion: The new 2000/2007 WHO classification for meningiomas showed an improved correlation between the histologic grade and outcome. This classification therefore provides a useful basis to determine the postoperative indication for radiotherapy. According to our results, a comparison of the

  2. Comparison of toxicity and outcomes of concurrent radiotherapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel or cisplatin/etoposide in stage III non–small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, Mun Sem; Sia, Joseph; Starmans, Maud H W; Tafreshi, Ali; Harris, Sam; Feigen, Malcolm; White, Shane; Zimet, Allan; Lambin, Philippe; Boutros, Paul C; Mitchell, Paul; John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has become the standard of care for patients with unresectable stage III non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The comparative merits of two widely used regimens: carboplatin/paclitaxel (PC) and cisplatin/etoposide (PE), each with concurrent radiotherapy, remain largely undefined. Records for consecutive patients with stage III NSCLC treated with PC or PE and ≥60 Gy chest radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed for outcomes and toxicity. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox modeling with the Wald test. Comparison across groups was done using the student's t and chi-squared tests. Seventy-five (PC: 44, PE: 31) patients were analyzed. PC patients were older (median 71 vs. 63 years; P = 0.0006). Other characteristics were comparable between groups. With PE, there was significantly increased grade ≥3 neutropenia (39% vs. 14%, P = 0.024) and thrombocytopenia (10% vs. 0%, P = 0.039). Radiation pneumonitis was more common with PC (66% vs. 38%, P = 0.033). Five treatment-related deaths occurred (PC: 3 vs. PE: 2, P = 1.000). With a median follow-up of 51.6 months, there were no significant differences in relapse-free survival (median PC 12.0 vs. PE 11.5 months, P = 0.700) or overall survival (median PC 20.7 vs. PE 13.7 months; P = 0.989). In multivariate analyses, no factors predicted for improved survival for either regimen. PC was more likely to be used in elderly patients. Despite this, PC resulted in significantly less hematological toxicity but achieved similar survival outcomes as PE. PC is an acceptable CCRT regimen, especially in older patients with multiple comorbidities

  3. Impact of viral E2-gene status on outcome after radiotherapy for patients with human papillomavirus 16-positive cancer of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindel, Katja; Villiers, Ethel-Michele de; Burri, Philipp; Studer, Ueli; Altermatt, Hans J.; Greiner, Richard H.; Gruber, Guenther

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Integration of high-risk papillomavirus DNA has been considered an important step in oncogenic progression to cervical carcinoma. Disruption of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome within the E2 gene is frequently a consequence. This study investigated the influence of episomal viral DNA on outcome in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded biopsies of 82 women with locally advanced cervical cancer could be analyzed for HPV infection by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by use of SPF1/2 primers. E2-gene intactness of HPV-16-positive samples was analyzed in 3 separate amplification reactions by use of the E2A, E2B, E2C primers. Statistical analyses (Kaplan-Meier method; log-rank test) were performed for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS). Results: Sixty-one (75%) of 82 carcinomas were HPV positive, 44 of them for HPV-16 (72%). Seventeen of the 44 HPV-16-positive tumors (39%) had an intact E2 gene. Patients with a HPV-16-positive tumor and an intact E2 gene showed a trend for a better DFS (58% vs. 38%, p = 0.06) compared with those with a disrupted E2 gene. A nonsignificant difference occurred regarding OS (87% vs. 66%, p = 0.16) and DMFS (57% vs. 48%, p = 0.15). Conclusion: E2-gene status may be a promising new target, but more studies are required to elucidate the effect of the viral E2 gene on outcome after radiotherapy in HPV-positive tumors

  4. Correlation of pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET tumor textural features with gene expression in pharyngeal cancer and implications for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shang-Wen [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University, School of Medicine, Taichung (China); Taipei Medical University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); China Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); Shen, Wei-Chih [China Medical University, Cancer Center and Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung (China); Asia University, Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, Taichung (China); Lin, Ying-Chun [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University and Academia Sinica, The Ph.D. Program for Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, Taichung (China); Chen, Rui-Yun [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Taichung (China); Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yen, Kuo-Yang [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Kao, Chia-Hung [China Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); Asia University, Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Taichung (China)

    2017-04-15

    This study investigated the correlation of the matrix heterogeneity of tumors on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with gene-expression profiling in patients with pharyngeal cancer and determined the prognostic factors for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 57 patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer who had completed definitive therapy. Four groups of the textural features as well as 31 indices were studied in addition to maximum standard uptake value, metastatic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis. Immunohistochemical data from pretreatment biopsy specimens (Glut1, CAIX, VEGF, HIF-1α, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, CLAUDIN-4, YAP-1, c-Met, and p16) were analyzed. The relationships between the indices and genomic expression were studied, and the robustness of various textural features relative to cause-specific survival and primary relapse-free survival was analyzed. The overexpression of VEGF was positively associated with the increased values of the matrix heterogeneity obtained using gray-level nonuniformity for zone (GLNUz) and run-length nonuniformity (RLNU). Advanced T stage (p = 0.01, hazard ratio [HR] = 3.38), a VEGF immunoreactive score of >2 (p = 0.03, HR = 2.79), and a higher GLNUz value (p = 0.04, HR = 2.51) were prognostic factors for low cause-specific survival, whereas advanced T stage, a HIF-1α staining percentage of ≥80%, and a higher GLNUz value were prognostic factors for low primary-relapse free survival. The overexpression of VEGF was associated with the increased matrix index of GLNUz and RLNU. For patients with pharyngeal cancer requiring radiotherapy, the treatment outcome can be stratified according to the textural features, T stage, and biomarkers. (orig.)

  5. PET/CT Staging Followed by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Improves Treatment Outcome of Locally Advanced Pharyngeal Carcinoma: a matched-pair comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, Sacha; Studer, Gabriela; Seifert, Burkhardt; Huguenin, Pia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Davis, J Bernard; Lütolf, Urs M; Hany, Thomas F; Ciernik, I Frank

    2007-01-01

    Impact of non-pharmacological innovations on cancer cure rates is difficult to assess. It remains unclear, whether outcome improves with 2- [18-F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and integrated computer tomography (PET/CT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for curative treatment of advanced pharyngeal carcinoma. Forty five patients with stage IVA oro- or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were staged with an integrated PET/CT and treated with definitive chemoradiation with IMRT from 2002 until 2005. To estimate the impact of PET/CT with IMRT on outcome, a case-control analysis on all patients with PET/CT and IMRT was done after matching with eighty six patients treated between 1991 and 2001 without PET/CT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy with respect to gender, age, stage, grade, and tumor location with a ratio of 1:2. Median follow-up was eighteen months (range, 6–49 months) for the PET/CT-IMRT group and twenty eight months (range, 1–168 months) for the controls. PET/CT and treatment with IMRT improved cure rates compared to patients without PET/CT and IMRT. Overall survival of patients with PET/CT and IMRT was 97% and 91% at 1 and 2 years respectively, compared to 74% and 54% for patients without PET/CT or IMRT (p = 0.002). The event-free survival rate of PET/CT-IMRT group was 90% and 80% at 1 and 2 years respectively, compared to 72% and 56% in the control group (p = 0.005). PET/CT in combination with IMRT and chemotherapy for pharyngeal carcinoma improve oncological therapy of pharyngeal carcinomas. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these findings

  6. Correlation of pretreatment 18F-FDG PET tumor textural features with gene expression in pharyngeal cancer and implications for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Shen, Wei-Chih; Lin, Ying-Chun; Chen, Rui-Yun; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the correlation of the matrix heterogeneity of tumors on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with gene-expression profiling in patients with pharyngeal cancer and determined the prognostic factors for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 57 patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer who had completed definitive therapy. Four groups of the textural features as well as 31 indices were studied in addition to maximum standard uptake value, metastatic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis. Immunohistochemical data from pretreatment biopsy specimens (Glut1, CAIX, VEGF, HIF-1α, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, CLAUDIN-4, YAP-1, c-Met, and p16) were analyzed. The relationships between the indices and genomic expression were studied, and the robustness of various textural features relative to cause-specific survival and primary relapse-free survival was analyzed. The overexpression of VEGF was positively associated with the increased values of the matrix heterogeneity obtained using gray-level nonuniformity for zone (GLNUz) and run-length nonuniformity (RLNU). Advanced T stage (p = 0.01, hazard ratio [HR] = 3.38), a VEGF immunoreactive score of >2 (p = 0.03, HR = 2.79), and a higher GLNUz value (p = 0.04, HR = 2.51) were prognostic factors for low cause-specific survival, whereas advanced T stage, a HIF-1α staining percentage of ≥80%, and a higher GLNUz value were prognostic factors for low primary-relapse free survival. The overexpression of VEGF was associated with the increased matrix index of GLNUz and RLNU. For patients with pharyngeal cancer requiring radiotherapy, the treatment outcome can be stratified according to the textural features, T stage, and biomarkers.

  7. Improved Correlation of the Neuropathologic Classification According to Adapted World Health Organization Classification and Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Anaplastic Meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Schulz-Ertner, Daniela [Radiologisches Institut, Markuskrankenhaus Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Deimling, Andreas von; Hartmann, Christian [Department of Neuropathology, Institute for Pathology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Neuropathology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between the 1993 and 2000/2007 World Health Organization (WHO) classification with the outcome in patients with high-grade meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Between 1985 and 2004, 73 patients diagnosed with atypical or anaplastic meningiomas were treated with radiotherapy. Sections from the paraffin-embedded tumor material from 66 patients (90%) from 13 different pathology departments were re-evaluated according to the first revised WHO classification from 1993 and the revised classifications from 2000/2007. In 4 cases, the initial diagnosis meningioma was not reproducible (5%). Therefore, 62 patients with meningiomas were analyzed. Results: All 62 tumors were reclassified according to the 1993 and 2000/2007 WHO classification systems. Using the 1993 system, 7 patients were diagnosed with WHO grade I meningioma (11%), 23 with WHO grade II (37%), and 32 with WHO grade III meningioma (52%). After scoring using the 2000/2007 system, we found 17 WHO grade I meningiomas (27%), 32 WHO grade II meningiomas (52%), and 13 WHO grade III meningiomas (21%). According to the 1993 classification, the difference in overall survival was not statistically significant among the histologic subgroups (p = .96). Using the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, the difference in overall survival became significant (p = .02). Of the 62 reclassified patients 29 developed tumor progression (47%). No difference in progression-free survival was observed among the histologic subgroups (p = .44). After grading according to the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, significant differences in progression-free survival were observed among the three histologic groups (p = .005). Conclusion: The new 2000/2007 WHO classification for meningiomas showed an improved correlation between the histologic grade and outcome. This classification therefore provides a useful basis to determine the postoperative indication for radiotherapy. According to our results, a comparison of the

  8. Radiotherapy injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalifa, G.; Bennet, J.; Couanet, D.; Masselot, J.

    1985-01-01

    Side effects of radiotherapy in pediatrics are reviewed including bone injuries and radio-induced bone tumors; nervous system injuries with emphasis on hypothalamus, pituitary gland, brain and spinal cord; lung, digestive system and urinary tract injuries [fr

  9. Long-term Outcomes and Quality of Life of 186 Patients With Primary Parotid Carcinoma Treated With Surgery and Radiotherapy at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.al-mamgani@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter van [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Verduijn, Gerda M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Meeuwis, Cees A. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcomes, toxicity, and quality of life (QOL) of patients with primary parotid carcinoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2010, 186 patients with parotid carcinoma were treated with parotidectomy with or without neck dissection, followed by radiotherapy. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) was applied to high-risk, node-negative disease. End points were locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS), late toxicity, and QOL. Results: After a median follow-up of 58 months (range, 4-172 months), the 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for LRC, DFS, CSS, and OS were 89%, 83%, 80%, and 68%, respectively. Forty-five events were reported: 24 distant metastases (DM) and 21 locoregional failures (LRF). Event-free survival rates by histological types were 89%, 78%, 76%, 74%, and 70% for acinic cell, mucoepidermoid, adenoid cystic, adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. More LRF were reported in patients with squamous cell and high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma (21% and 19%, respectively) than in patients with other histological types (p = 0.04) and more DM in patients with adenoid cystic and adenocarcinoma (20% and 19%, respectively) than in patients with other types (p = 0.03). None of the high-risk node-negative patients who received ENI developed regional failure. On multivariate analysis, T stage, N stage, grade, and presence of perineural invasion and facial paralysis correlated significantly with DFS. The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 8%. QOL scores deteriorate during and shortly after treatment but returned in almost all scales to baseline scores within 6 months. Conclusions: Of the entire group, surgery and postoperative radiotherapy resulted in excellent outcomes with minimal side effects and preservation of good QOL scores. However, in

  10. Long-term Outcomes and Quality of Life of 186 Patients With Primary Parotid Carcinoma Treated With Surgery and Radiotherapy at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Rooij, Peter van; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Meeuwis, Cees A.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcomes, toxicity, and quality of life (QOL) of patients with primary parotid carcinoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2010, 186 patients with parotid carcinoma were treated with parotidectomy with or without neck dissection, followed by radiotherapy. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) was applied to high-risk, node-negative disease. End points were locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS), late toxicity, and QOL. Results: After a median follow-up of 58 months (range, 4–172 months), the 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for LRC, DFS, CSS, and OS were 89%, 83%, 80%, and 68%, respectively. Forty-five events were reported: 24 distant metastases (DM) and 21 locoregional failures (LRF). Event-free survival rates by histological types were 89%, 78%, 76%, 74%, and 70% for acinic cell, mucoepidermoid, adenoid cystic, adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. More LRF were reported in patients with squamous cell and high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma (21% and 19%, respectively) than in patients with other histological types (p = 0.04) and more DM in patients with adenoid cystic and adenocarcinoma (20% and 19%, respectively) than in patients with other types (p = 0.03). None of the high-risk node-negative patients who received ENI developed regional failure. On multivariate analysis, T stage, N stage, grade, and presence of perineural invasion and facial paralysis correlated significantly with DFS. The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade ≥2 late toxicity was 8%. QOL scores deteriorate during and shortly after treatment but returned in almost all scales to baseline scores within 6 months. Conclusions: Of the entire group, surgery and postoperative radiotherapy resulted in excellent outcomes with minimal side effects and preservation of good QOL scores. However, in

  11. Nodal parameters of FDG PET/CT performed during radiotherapy for locally advanced mucosal primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma can predict treatment outcomes: SUVmean and response rate are useful imaging biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Peter [Liverpool Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Liverpool BC, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Min, Myo; Forstner, Dion [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lee, Mark [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Holloway, Lois [University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Bray, Victoria; Fowler, Allan [Liverpool Hospital, Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, NSW (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic utility of nodal metabolic parameters derived from FDG PET/CT performed before radiotherapy (prePET) and during the third week of radiotherapy (iPET) in patients with mucosal primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (MPHNSCC). This analysis included 75 patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced node-positive MPHNSCC treated with radical radiotherapy and concurrent systemic therapy who underwent prePET and iPET: N1 11 patients, N2a 38, N2b 12, N2c 9, N3 5. The median follow-up was 28 months (9 - 70 months). The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesional glycolysis (TLG) of the index lymph node (node with the highest TLG) and the combined total lymph nodes, and their percentage reductions on iPET were determined, and the results were correlated with 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional, regional and distant metastatic failure-free survival (FFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Optimal cut-off values were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves. Cox regression univariate and multivariate analyses with clinical covariates were performed. Based on assessment of residual nodal metabolic burden during treatment, the iPET index node SUVmean (optimal cut-off value 2.95 g/ml) and the total node SUVmean (optimal cut-off value 3.25) were the best independent predictors of outcome in the multivariate analysis: index node SUVmean for DFS and OS p = 0.033 and 0.003, respectively, and the total node SUVmean for locoregional FFS, DFS and OS p = 0.028, 0.025 and 0.014, respectively. Based on the assessment of response rates during treatment, a reduction of more than 50 % in the total node TLG was the best biomarker for locoregional and regional FFS, DFS and OS in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.001, 0.016, 0.001 and 0.004, respectively), and reduction in the total node MTV for locoregional FFS, DFS and OS (p = 0.026, 0.003 and 0

  12. Correlation of clinical and pathologic features with outcome in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Neesha; Carter, Darryl; Dillon, Deborah; Parisot, Nicole; Choi, Doo Ho; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Although breast-conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) has become a standard treatment option for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast, risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) in these patients remain an active area of investigation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of clinical and pathologic features on long-term outcome in a cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery plus RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1973 and 1998, 230 patients with DCIS were treated with breast-conserving surgery plus RT at our institution. All patients were treated by local excision followed by RT to the breast to a total median tumor bed dose of 64 Gy. Adjuvant hormonal therapy was used in only 20 patients (9%). All available clinical, pathologic, and outcome data, including ipsilateral and contralateral events, were entered into a computerized database. The clinical and pathologic variables evaluated included detection method, mammographic appearance, age, family history, histologic subtype, presence of necrosis, nuclear grade, final margin status, and use of adjuvant hormonal therapy. Results: As of December 15, 2000, with a median follow-up of 8.2 years, 17 patients had developed a recurrence in the ipsilateral breast, resulting in a 5- and 10-year IBTR rate of 5% and 13%, respectively. Contralateral breast cancer developed in 8 patients, resulting in a 10-year contralateral recurrence rate of 5%. Patient age, family history, histologic subtype, margin status, and tumor grade were not significantly associated with recurrence on univariate analysis. A significantly higher rate of local relapse was observed in patients with the presence of necrosis. The 10-year relapse rate was 22% in 88 patients with necrosis compared with 7% in 142 patients without necrosis (p <0.01). In multivariate analysis, the presence of necrosis remained a significant predictor of local relapse. No breast relapses

  13. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  14. Long-Term Outcomes With Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Component of Treatment for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, Brandon M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10–20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20–62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Results: Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11–203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence.

  15. Tumor Epression of Major Vault Protein is an Adverse Prognostic Factor for Radiotherapy Outcome in Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Priyamal; West, Catharine M.; Slevin, Nick F.R.C.R.; Valentine, Helen; Ryder, W. David J. Grad. I.S.; Hampson, Lynne; Bibi, Rufzan; Sloan, Philip; Thakker, Nalin; Homer, Jarrod; Hampson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Vaults are multi-subunit structures that may be involved in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, with the major vault protein (MVP or lung resistance-related protein [LRP]) being the main component. The MVP gene is located on chromosome 16 close to the multidrug resistance-associated protein and protein kinase c-β genes. The role of MVP in cancer drug resistance has been demonstrated in various cell lines as well as in ovarian carcinomas and acute myeloid leukemia, but nothing is known about its possible role in radiation resistance. Our aim was to examine this in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Archived biopsy material was obtained for 78 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who received primary radiotherapy with curative intent. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect MVP expression. Locoregional failure and cancer-specific survival were estimated using cumulative incidence and Cox multivariate analyses. Results: In a univariate and multivariate analysis, MVP expression was strongly associated with both locoregional failure and cancer-specific survival. After adjustment for disease site, stage, grade, anemia, smoking, alcohol, gender, and age, the estimated hazard ratio for high MVP (2/3) compared with low (0/1) was 4.98 (95% confidence interval, 2.17-11.42; p 0.0002) for locoregional failure and 4.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.85-9.95; p = 0.001) for cancer-specific mortality. Conclusion: These data are the first to show that MVP may be a useful prognostic marker associated with radiotherapy resistance in a subgroup of patients with HNSCC

  16. Long-Term Outcomes With Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Component of Treatment for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, Brandon M., E-mail: barney.brandon@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N. [Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20-62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Results: Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11-203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence.

  17. Method of tumor volume evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging for outcome prediction in cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To evaluate the patterns of tumor shape and to compare tumor volume derived from simple diameter-based ellipsoid measurement with that derived from tracing the entire tumor contour using region of interest (ROI)-based 3D volumetry with respect to the prediction outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 98 patients with cervical cancer (stage IB-IIIB). The tumor shape was classified into two categories: ellipsoid and non-ellipsoid shape. ROI-based volumetry was derived from each magnetic resonance slice on the work station. For the diameter-based surrogate 'ellipsoid volume,' the three orthogonal diameters were measured to calculate volume as an ellipsoid. The more than half of tumor (55.1%) had a non-ellipsoid configuration. The predictions for outcome were consistent between two volume groups, with overall survival of 93.6% and 87.7% for small tumor (<20 mL), 62.9% and 69.1% for intermediate-size tumor (20-39 mL), and 14.5% and 16.7% for large tumors ({>=}40 mL) using ROI and diameter based measurement, respectively. Disease-free survival was 93.8% and 90.6% for small tumor, 54.3% and 62.7% for intermediate-size tumor, and 13.7% and 10.3% for large tumor using ROI and diameter based method, respectively. Differences in outcome between size groups were statistically significant, and the differences in outcome predicted by the tumor volume by two different methods. Our data suggested that large numbers of cervical cancers are not ellipsoid. However, simple diameter-based tumor volume measurement appears to be useful in comparison with ROI-based volumetry for predicting outcome in cervical cancer patients.

  18. Method of tumor volume evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging for outcome prediction in cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of tumor shape and to compare tumor volume derived from simple diameter-based ellipsoid measurement with that derived from tracing the entire tumor contour using region of interest (ROI)-based 3D volumetry with respect to the prediction outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 98 patients with cervical cancer (stage IB-IIIB). The tumor shape was classified into two categories: ellipsoid and non-ellipsoid shape. ROI-based volumetry was derived from each magnetic resonance slice on the work station. For the diameter-based surrogate 'ellipsoid volume,' the three orthogonal diameters were measured to calculate volume as an ellipsoid. The more than half of tumor (55.1%) had a non-ellipsoid configuration. The predictions for outcome were consistent between two volume groups, with overall survival of 93.6% and 87.7% for small tumor (<20 mL), 62.9% and 69.1% for intermediate-size tumor (20-39 mL), and 14.5% and 16.7% for large tumors (≥40 mL) using ROI and diameter based measurement, respectively. Disease-free survival was 93.8% and 90.6% for small tumor, 54.3% and 62.7% for intermediate-size tumor, and 13.7% and 10.3% for large tumor using ROI and diameter based method, respectively. Differences in outcome between size groups were statistically significant, and the differences in outcome predicted by the tumor volume by two different methods. Our data suggested that large numbers of cervical cancers are not ellipsoid. However, simple diameter-based tumor volume measurement appears to be useful in comparison with ROI-based volumetry for predicting outcome in cervical cancer patients.

  19. Radiotherapy indications - rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    This document is addressed to oncologists radiotherapists and to any health professional concerned by rectum cancer treatment. Rectum cancer therapy is based on various technical procedures including surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments defined for each patient according to his clinical situation. This document precises the specific situations where radiotherapy can be employed. However, the radiotherapy decision must be taken with respect to other therapeutic alternatives. Such a decision must be validated and must be the object of a discussion in the framework of a pluri-disciplinary consultation. (J.S.)

  20. Survey indicated that core outcome set development is increasingly including patients, being conducted internationally and using Delphi surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggane, Alice M; Brading, Lucy; Ravaud, Philippe; Young, Bridget; Williamson, Paula R

    2018-02-17

    There are numerous challenges in including patients in a core outcome set (COS) study, these can vary depending on the patient group. This study describes current efforts to include patients in the development of COS, with the aim of identifying areas for further improvement and study. Using the COMET database, corresponding authors of COS projects registered or published from 1 January 2013 to 2 February 2017 were invited via a personalised email to participate in a short online survey. The survey and emails were constructed to maximise the response rate by following the academic literature on enhancing survey responses. Personalised reminder emails were sent to non-responders. This survey explored the frequency of patient input in COS studies, who was involved, what methods were used and whether or not the COS development was international. One hundred and ninety-two COS developers were sent the survey. Responses were collected from 21 February 2017 until 7 May 2017. One hundred and forty-six unique developers responded, yielding a 76% response rate and data in relation to 195 unique COSs (as some developers had worked on multiple COSs). Of focus here are their responses regarding 162 COSs at the published, completed or ongoing stages of development. Inclusion of patient participants was indicated in 87% (141/162) of COSs in the published completed or ongoing stages and over 94% (65/69) of ongoing COS projects. Nearly half (65/135) of COSs included patient participants from two or more countries and 22% (30/135) included patient participants from five or more countries. The Delphi survey was reported as being used singularly or in combination with other methods in 85% (119/140) of projects. Almost a quarter (16/65) of ongoing studies reported using a combination of qualitative interviews, Delphi survey and consensus meeting. These findings indicated that the Delphi survey is the most popular method of facilitating patient participation, while the combination of

  1. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox SW

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shea W Wilcox,1,4 Noel J Aherne,2,4 Linus C Benjamin,1 Bosco Wu,1 Thomaz de Campos Silva,3 Craig S McLachlan,4 Michael J McKay,3,5 Andrew J Last,1 Thomas P Shakespeare1–4 1North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia; 2North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia; 3North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 4The University of New South Wales, Rural Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: Dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT and ADT. Methods and materials: Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results: Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2

  2. Treatment outcome of high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using intra-prostate fiducial markers for localized prostate cancer at a single institute in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Ken; Shimizu, Eiji; Abe, Keiko; Shirata, Yuko; Ishikawa, Yohjiro

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have confirmed the advantages of delivering high doses of external beam radiotherapy to achieve optimal tumor-control outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer. We evaluated the medium-term treatment outcome after high-dose, image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using intra-prostate fiducial markers for clinically localized prostate cancer. In total, 141 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with image-guided IMRT (76 Gy in 13 patients and 80 Gy in 128 patients) between 2003 and 2008 were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-defined risk groups. Thirty-six intermediate-risk patients and 105 high-risk patients were included. Androgen-deprivation therapy was performed in 124 patients (88%) for a median of 11 months (range: 2–88 months). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse was defined according to the Phoenix-definition (i.e., an absolute nadir plus 2 ng/ml dated at the call). The 5-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival, the 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), the 5-year overall survival (OS) outcomes and the acute and late toxicities were analyzed. The toxicity data were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year PSA relapse-free survival rates were 100% for the intermediate-risk patients and 82.2% for the high-risk patients; the 5-year actuarial distant metastasis-free survival rates were 100% and 95% for the intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively; the 5-year CSS rates were 100% for both patient subsets; and the 5-year OS rates were 100% and 91.7% for the intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively. The Gleason score (<8 vs. ≥8) was significant for the 5-year PSA relapse-free survival on multivariate analysis (p = 0.044). There was no grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity. The incidence of

  3. IMRT vs. 2D-radiotherapy or 3D-conformal radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Survival outcome in a Korean multi-institutional retrospective study (KROG 11-06)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Ho; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Geol; Keum, Ki Chang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon-Sil [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Jin Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan; Oh, Dongryul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon [The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Paldal-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    We compared treatment outcomes of two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In total, 1237 patients with cT1-4N0-3M0 NPC were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, 350, 390, and 497 were treated with 2D-RT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT, respectively. 3D-CRT and IMRT showed better 5-year overall survival (OS) rates (73.6 and 76.7 %, respectively) than did 2D-RT (5-year OS of 59.7 %, all p < 0.001). In T3-4 subgroup, IMRT was associated with a significantly better 5-year OS than was 2D-RT (70.7 vs. 50.4 %, respectively; p ≤ 0.001) and 3D-CRT (70.7 vs. 57.8 %, respectively; p = 0.011); however, the difference between the 2D-RT and 3D-CRT groups did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.063). In multivariate analyses of all patients, IMRT was a predictive factor for OS when compared with 2D-RT or 3D-CRT, as was 3D-CRT when compared with 2D-RT. Our study showed that 3D-CRT and IMRT were associated with a better local progression-free survival and OS than was 2D-RT in NPC. IMRT was significantly superior in terms of OS for advanced primary tumors (T3-4). (orig.) [German] Wir verglichen die Behandlungsergebnisse von zweidimensionaler Strahlentherapie (2D-RT), dreidimensionaler konformer Strahlentherapie (3D-CRT) und intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IMRT) bei Patienten mit Nasopharynxkarzinom (NPC). Insgesamt 1237 Patienten mit NPC im Stadium cT1-4/N0-3/M0 wurden rueckwirkend analysiert. Von diesen wurden jeweils 350, 390 und 497 mit 2D-RT, 3D-CRT und IMRT behandelt. 3D-CRT und IMRT zeigten eine bessere 5-Jahres-Gesamtueberlebensrate (5y-OS; jeweils 73,6 und 76,7%) als 2D-RT (59,7%; alle p < 0,001). In der Untergruppe T3-4 war die IMRT mit einer erheblich besseren 5y-OS verbunden als 2D-RT (jeweils 70,7 vs. 50,4%; p ≤ 0,001) und 3D-CRT (jeweils 70,7 vs. 57,8%; p = 0,011); jedoch gab es keinen Unterschied zwischen den Gruppen 2D

  4. Radiotherapy alone for stage I-III low grade follicular lymphoma: long-term outcome and comparison of extended field and total nodal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Alexandrow, Nikolaus; Flentje, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To analyze long-term results of radiotherapy alone for stage I-III low grade follicular lymphoma and to compare outcome after extended field irradiation (EFI) and total nodal irradiation (TNI). Between 1982 and 2007, 107 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone for low grade follicular lymphoma at Ann Arbor stage I (n = 50), II (n = 36) and III (n = 21); 48 and 59 patients were treated with EFI and TNI, respectively. The median total dose in the first treatment series of the diaphragmatic side with larger lymphoma burden was 38 Gy (25 Gy – 50 Gy) and after an interval of median 30 days, a total dose of 28 Gy (12.6 Gy – 45 Gy) was given in the second treatment series completing TNI. After a median follow-up of 14 years for living patients, 10-years and 15-years overall survival (OS) were 64% and 50%, respectively. Survival was not significantly different between stages I, II and III. TNI and EFI resulted in 15-years OS of 65% and 34% but patients treated with TNI were younger, had better performance status and higher stage of disease compared to patients treated with EFI. In multivariate analysis, only age at diagnosis (p < 0.001, relative risk [RR] 1.06) and Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.04, RR = 0.96) were significantly correlated with OS. Freedom from progression (FFP) was 58% and 56% after 10-years and 15-years, respectively. Recurrences outside the irradiated volume were significantly reduced after TNI compared to EFI; however, increased rates of in-field recurrences and extra-nodal out-of-field recurrence counterbalanced this effect resulting in no significant difference in FFP between TNI and EFI. In univariate analysis, FFP was significantly improved in stage I compared to stage II but no differences were observed between stages I/II and stage III. In multivariate analysis no patient or treatment parameter was correlated with FFP. Acute toxicity was significantly increased after TNI compared to EFI with a trend to increased late toxicity as

  5. An instrument dedicated for modelling of pulmonary radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niezink, Anne G.H.; Dollekamp, Nienke J.; Elzinga, Harriet J.; Borger, Denise; Boer, Eduard J.H.; Ubbels, Jan F.; Woltman-van Iersel, Marleen; Leest, Annija H.D. van der; Beijert, Max; Groen, Harry J.M.; Kraan, Jan; Hiltermann, Thijo J.N.; Wekken, Anthonie J. van der; Putten, John W.G. van; Rutgers, Steven R.; Pieterman, Remge M.; Hosson, Sander M. de; Roenhorst, Anke W.J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Widder, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in lung cancer treatment. Selection of patients for new (radio)therapeutic options aiming at improving outcomes requires reliable and validated prediction models. We present the implementation of a prospective platform for evaluation and development of lung radiotherapy (proPED-LUNG) as an instrument enabling multidimensional predictive modelling. Materials and methods: ProPED-LUNG was designed to comprise relevant baseline and follow up data of patients receiving pulmonary radiotherapy with curative intent. Patient characteristics, diagnostic and staging information, treatment parameters including full dose–volume-histograms, tumour control, survival, and toxicity are scored. Besides physician-rated data, a range of patient-rated data regarding symptoms and health-related quality-of-life are collected. Results: After 18 months of accrual, 315 patients have been included (accrual rate, 18 per month). Of the first hundred patients included, 70 received conformal (chemo)radiotherapy and 30 underwent stereotactic radiotherapy. Compliance at 3 and 6 months follow-up was 96–100% for patient-rated, and 81–94% for physician-rated assessments. For data collection, 0.4 FTE were allocated in a 183 FTE department (0.2%). Conclusions: ProPED-LUNG is feasible with high compliance rates and yields a large amount of high quality prospective disease-related, treatment-related, patient- and physician-rated data which can be used to evaluate new developments in pulmonary radiotherapy

  6. Long-term outcomes in patients with early stage nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek A Solanki

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radiation therapy (RT is commonly used as definitive treatment for early-stage nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma (NLPHL. We evaluated the cause-specific survival (CSS, overall survival (OS, and second malignancy (SM rates in patients with early-stage NLPHL treated with RT. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients with stage I-II NLPHL between 1988 and 2009 who underwent RT were selected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. Univariate analysis (UVA for CSS and Os was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and included age, gender, involved site, year of diagnosis, presence of B-symptoms, and extranodal involvement (ENI. Multivariable analysis (MVA was performed using Cox Proportional Hazards modeling and included the above clinical variables. SM were classified as RT-related or non-RT-related. Freedom from SM and freedom from RT-related SM were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: The study cohort included 469 patients. Median age was 37 years. The most common involved sites were the head and neck (36%, axilla/arm (26%, and multiple lymph node regions (18%. Sixty-eight percent had stage I disease, 70% were male, 4% had ENI, and 7% had B-symptoms. Median follow-up was 6 years. Ten-year CSS and Os were 98% and 88%, respectively. On UVA, none of the covariates was associated with CSS. Increasing age (p<0.01 and female gender (p<0.01 were associated with worse Os. On MVA, older age (p<0.01, female gender (p=0.04, multiple regions of involvement (p=0.03, stage I disease (p=0.02, and presence of B-symptoms (p=0.02 were associated with worse Os. Ten-year freedom from SM and freedom from RT-related SM were 89% and 99%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest series to evaluate the outcomes of stage I-II NLPHL patients treated with RT and found that this patient population has an excellent long-term prognosis and a low rate of RT-related second malignancies.

  7. Bcl-2 and bax expression and prostate cancer outcome in men treated with radiotherapy in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 86-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khor, L.-Y.; De Silvio, Michelle; Li, Rile; McDonnell, Timothy J.; Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Sause, William T.; Pilepich, Miljenko V.; Okunieff, Paul; Sandler, Howard M.; Pollack, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Bcl-2 and bax are proteins with opposing roles in apoptosis regulation; yet abnormal expression of either has been associated with failure after radiotherapy (RT). In this study we examined bcl-2 and bax expression as predictive markers in men treated with radiotherapy ± androgen deprivation on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 86-10. Experimental Design: Suitable archival diagnostic tissue was obtained from 119 (26%) patients for bcl-2 analysis and 104 (23%) patients for bax analysis. Cox proportional hazards multivariate analysis was used to determine the relationship of abnormal bcl-2 and bax expression to the end points of local failure, distant metastasis, cause-specific mortality, and overall mortality. Bcl-2 overexpression was classified as any tumor cell cytoplasmic staining and altered bax expression was classified as greater or lesser cytoplasmic staining intensity of tumor cells as compared with adjacent normal prostate epithelium. Results: The study cohort exhibited bcl-2 overexpression in 26% (n = 30) of cases and abnormal bax expression in 47% (n = 49) of cases. A borderline significant relationship was observed between abnormal bax expression and higher Gleason score (p = 0.08). In univariate and multivariate analyses, there was no statistically significant relationship seen between abnormal bcl-2 or bax expression and outcome. Conclusions: Abnormal bcl-2 and bax expression were not related to any of the end points tested. The cohort examined was comprised of patients with locally advanced disease and it is possible that these markers may be of greater value in men with earlier-stage prostate cancer

  8. 3D Radiotherapy Can Be Safely Combined With Sandwich Systemic Gemcitabine Chemotherapy in the Management of Pancreatic Cancer: Factors Influencing Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spry, Nigel; Harvey, Jennifer; MacLeod, Craig; Borg, Martin; Ngan, Samuel Y.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Graham, Peter; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Kneebone, Andrew; Carroll, Susan; Davies, Terri; Reece, William H.H.; Iacopetta, Barry; Goldstein, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this Phase II study was to examine whether concurrent continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (CI 5FU) plus three-dimensional conformal planning radiotherapy sandwiched between gemcitabine chemotherapy is effective, tolerable, and safe in the management of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients were enrolled in two strata: (1) resected pancreatic cancer at high risk of local relapse (postsurgery arm, n = 22) or (2) inoperable pancreatic cancer in head or body without metastases (locally advanced arm, n = 41). Gemcitabine was given at 1,000 mg/m 2 weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week rest then 5-6 weeks of radiotherapy and concurrent CI 5FU (200 mg/m 2 /day). After 4 weeks' rest, gemcitabine treatment was reinitiated for 12 weeks. Results: For the two arms combined, treatment-related Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were reported by 25 (39.7%) and 7 (11.1%) patients, respectively. No significant late renal or hepatic toxicity was observed. In the postsurgery arm (R1 54.5%), median time to progressive disease from surgery was 11.0 months, median time to failure of local control was 32.9 months, and median survival time was 15.6 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 63.6% and 31.8%. No significant associations between outcome and mutations in K-ras or TP53 or microsatellite instability were identified. Post hoc investigation of cancer antigen 19-9 levels found baseline levels and increases postbaseline were associated with shorter survival (p = 0.0061 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions: This three-dimensional chemoradiotherapy regimen is safe and promising, with encouraging local control for a substantial proportion of patients, and merits testing in a randomized trial

  9. Fractionated vs. single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation and patients' self-reported outcome based on an established questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Fischer, Hanna; Vogel, Marco M.E.; Combs, Stephanie E.; Oechsner, Markus; Bier, Henning; Meyer, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) has been established as a valid treatment alternative in patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimal fractionation. Hearing preservation may be the primary goal for patients with VS, followed by maintenance of quality of life (QoL). From 2002 to 2015, 184 patients with VS were treated with radiosurgery (RS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). A survey on current symptoms and QoL was conducted between February and June 2016. Median follow-up after RT was 7.5 years (range 0-14.4 years). Mean overall survival (OS) after RT was 31.1 years, with 94 and 87% survival at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 13.3 years, with 5- and 10-year PFS of 92%. Hearing could be preserved in RS patients for a median of 36.3 months (range 2.3-13.7 years). Hearing worsened in 17 (30%) cases. Median hearing preservation for FSRT was 48.7 months (range 0.0-13.8 years); 29 (23%) showed hearing deterioration. The difference in hearing preservation was not significant between RS and FSRT (p = 0.3). A total of 123/162 patients participated in the patient survey (return rate 76%). The results correlate well with the information documented in the patient files for tinnitus and facial and trigeminal nerve toxicity. Significant differences appeared regarding hearing impairment, gait uncertainty, and imbalance. These data confirm that RS and FSRT are comparable in terms of local control for VS. RS should be reserved for smaller lesions, while FSRT can be offered independently of tumor size. Patient self-reported outcome during follow-up is of high value. The established questionnaire could be validated in the independent cohort. (orig.) [de

  10. Comparing treatment outcomes of different chemotherapy sequences during intensity modulated radiotherapy for advanced N-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xueming; Zeng, Lei; Chen, Chunyan; Huang, Ying; Han, Fei; Xiao, Weiwei; Liu, Shuai; Lu, Taixiang

    2013-01-01

    N-stage is related to distant metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We performed this study to compare the efficacy of different chemotherapy sequences in advanced N-stage (N2 and N3) NPC patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2001 to 2008, 198 advanced N-stage NPC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-three patients received IMRT alone. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was delivered to 72 patients, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) + CCRT to 82 patients and CCRT + adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) to 11 patients. The 5-year overall survival rate, recurrence-free survival rate, distant metastasis-free survival rate and progress-free survival rate were 47.7% and 73.1%(p<0.001), 74.5% and 91.3% (p = 0.004), 49.2% and 68.5% (p = 0.018), 37.5% and 63.8% (p<0.001) in IMRT alone and chemoradiotherapy group. Subgroup analyses indicated that there were no significant differences among the survival curves of CCRT, NACT + CCRT and CCRT + AC groups. The survival benefit mainly came from CCRT. However, there was only an improvement attendency in distant metastasis-free survival rate of CCRT group (p = 0.107) when compared with RT alone group, and NACT + CCRT could significantly improve distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.017). For advanced N-stage NPC patients, NACT + CCRT might be a reasonable treatment strategy

  11. Factors influencing the outcome of radiotherapy in malignant mesothelioma of the pleura - a single-institution experience with 189 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf-Strukowska, Lucyna de; Zee, Jacoba van der; Putten, Wim van; Senan, Suresh

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors influencing the response to palliative radiotherapy (RT) in malignant mesothelioma of the pleura (MM). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of all patients with mesothelioma who were referred to our institution between 1979 and 1996. A total of 227 RT series were administered to 189 patients with MM. Of these, 21 patients with chest wall nodules also received concomitant local hyperthermia. Results: The median survival was 5 months from the start of RT and only 17% of patients were alive at 1 year after treatment. Chest pain and painful chest wall metastases were the main indications for RT. A higher local response rate was seen for patients treated with a 4-Gy per fraction scheme, vs. those receiving fractions of less than 4 Gy (50% vs. 39%). Pain recurrence occurred predominantly within the previous RT field, and pain recurred after a median of 69 days (range 32-363) in the group treated using 4-Gy fractions. When compared with a matched group, patients treated with combined RT and hyperthermia had higher response rates and fewer in-field recurrences. Conclusions: RT provides local palliation in at least 50% of patients with MM who were treated using a 4-Gy/fraction scheme to a median dose of 36 Gy. The low response rates with RT alone suggest that combined RT and local hyperthemia should be further evaluated in MM

  12. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual dysfunction in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Tine; Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality...... of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. METHODS: An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological...... and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. RESULTS...

  13. Neurological outcome after emergency radiotherapy in MSCC of patients with non-small cell lung cancer - a prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rief, Harald; Heinhold, Rita C; Petersen, Lina C; Rieken, Stefan; Bruckner, Thomas; Moghaddam-Alvandi, Arash; Debus, Jürgen; Sterzing, Florian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to investigate neurological outcome after emergency RT in MSCC of NSCLC patients with acute neurological deficit. This pilot trial was prospective, non-randomized, and monocentre, ten patients were treated from July 2012 until June 2013. After onset of neurological symptoms RT was started within 12 hours. The neurological outcome was assessed at baseline, and six weeks after RT using the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS). The results showed an improved neurological outcome in one patient (10%), one patient (10%) had a decreased, and five patients (50%) a constant outcome after six weeks. Three patients (30%) died within the first six weeks following RT, additional 4 patients (40%) died within 4 month due to tumor progression. In this group of NSCLC patients we were able to show that emergency RT in MSCC with acute neurological deficit had no considerable benefit in neurological outcome. Therefore, short-course regime or best supportive care due to poor survival should be considered for these patients with additional distant metastases. Patients with favorable prognosis may be candidates for long-course RT

  14. Fractionated vs. single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation and patients' self-reported outcome based on an established questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Fischer, Hanna; Vogel, Marco M.E.; Combs, Stephanie E. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Neuherberg (Germany); Oechsner, Markus [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Bier, Henning [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Munich (Germany); Meyer, Bernhard [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) has been established as a valid treatment alternative in patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimal fractionation. Hearing preservation may be the primary goal for patients with VS, followed by maintenance of quality of life (QoL). From 2002 to 2015, 184 patients with VS were treated with radiosurgery (RS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). A survey on current symptoms and QoL was conducted between February and June 2016. Median follow-up after RT was 7.5 years (range 0-14.4 years). Mean overall survival (OS) after RT was 31.1 years, with 94 and 87% survival at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 13.3 years, with 5- and 10-year PFS of 92%. Hearing could be preserved in RS patients for a median of 36.3 months (range 2.3-13.7 years). Hearing worsened in 17 (30%) cases. Median hearing preservation for FSRT was 48.7 months (range 0.0-13.8 years); 29 (23%) showed hearing deterioration. The difference in hearing preservation was not significant between RS and FSRT (p = 0.3). A total of 123/162 patients participated in the patient survey (return rate 76%). The results correlate well with the information documented in the patient files for tinnitus and facial and trigeminal nerve toxicity. Significant differences appeared regarding hearing impairment, gait uncertainty, and imbalance. These data confirm that RS and FSRT are comparable in terms of local control for VS. RS should be reserved for smaller lesions, while FSRT can be offered independently of tumor size. Patient self-reported outcome during follow-up is of high value. The established questionnaire could be validated in the independent cohort. (orig.) [German] Die stereotaktische Radiotherapie (RT) wurde als gueltige Behandlungsalternative bei Patienten mit Vestibularisschwannom (VS) etabliert. Diskussionen ueber die optimale Fraktionierung laufen jedoch. Der Erhalt von Hoervermoegen

  15. Late Outcomes Following Hypofractionated Conformal Radiotherapy vs. Standard Fractionation for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Nonrandomized Contemporary Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leborgne, Felix; Fowler, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study retrospectively late complications and biochemical control in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer administered using hypofractionation vs. a standard fractionation regimen. The hypofractionation regimen (Hypo) was designed to avoid more late rectal reactions and to be done in half as many treatment sessions. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine nonrandomized patients chose Hypo delivered in 20 fractions of 3 Gy (n = 52) or 3.15 Gy (n = 37) for a median overall treatment time of 33 days. One hundred thirty comparable patients were contemporaneously treated with standard fractionation to a median dose of 78 Gy delivered over 55 days. The median follow-up time was 49 months (range, 24-73 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 96%, 84%, and 85% for low-, medium-, and high-risk disease in the Hypo group, respectively. The respective rates in the standard fractionation group were 98%, 84%, and 87%, with no statistical difference between the two groups. The rate of rectal Grade 2-4 complications was 5.5% in both treatment groups and of urinary Grade 2-4 complications was 5.6% in the Hypo and 3% in the standard group (p = 0.36). Similarly, there were no statistical differences in the rate of late complications between patients treated with 3 Gy/fraction vs. 3.15 Gy/fraction. Conclusions: Our preliminary results showed that the Hypo regimen is feasible and does not reduce biochemical control compared with standard fractionation. The incidence of late complications was not increased when the tumor normalized total doses at 2Gy/fraction was increased from 77.1 to 83.7 Gy in patients treated with either 3 or 3.15 Gy/fraction in the Hypo group, respectively.

  16. Clinical outcome of extended-field irradiation vs. pelvic irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yi; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Kai; Cao, Xinping; Zeng, Yiming

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the distinctions in survival and toxicity between patients with cervical cancer with common iliac node or para-aortic node involvement, who were treated with extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) and patients with or without lower involved pelvic nodes, who were treated with pelvic IMRT. A total of 55 patients treated with EF-IMRT and 52 patients treated with pelvic IMRT at the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center (Guangzhou, China) were retrospectively analyzed. Patients treated with EF-IMRT had the highest level of lymph node involvement to the para-aortic or common iliac nodes, while patients treated with pelvic IMRT had no para-aortic or common iliac nodes involved (Pirradiation was a protective prognostic factor for OS and DFS. A total of 16 patients in the EF-IMRT group and 13 patients in the pelvic IMRT group experienced treatment failure (P=0.67), with the patterns of failure being the same for the two groups (P=0.88). The cumulative incidence of grade 3 and 4 acute toxicities in the EF-IMRT group was 34.5%, in comparison with 19.2% in the pelvic group (P=0.048). The results of the present study suggest that patients with cervical cancer with grossly involved common iliac or para-aortic nodes should be electively subjected to EF irradiation to improve the survival and alter patterns of recurrence. Notably, EF irradiation delivered via IMRT exhibits an increased toxicity incidence, however, this remains within an acceptable range.

  17. Pharmacokinetic analysis and k-means clustering of DCEMR images for radiotherapy outcome prediction of advanced cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Erlend K F; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCEMRI) allows for quantitative characterization of vascular properties of tumors. The aim of this study is twofold, first to determine if tumor regions with similar vascularization could be labeled by clustering methods, second to determine if the identified regions can be associated with local cancer relapse. Eighty-one patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy underwent DCEMRI with Gd-DTPA prior to external beam radiotherapy. The median follow-up time after treatment was four years, in which nine patients had primary tumor relapse. By fitting a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model function to the temporal contrast enhancement in the tumor, two pharmacokinetic parameters, K(trans) and ύ(e), were estimated voxel by voxel from the DCEMR-images. Intratumoral regions with similar vascularization were identified by k-means clustering of the two pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over all patients. The volume fraction of each cluster was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the clusters. Three clusters provided a sufficient reduction of the cluster variance to label different vascular properties within the tumors. The corresponding median volume fraction of each cluster was 38%, 46% and 10%. The second cluster was significantly associated with primary tumor control in a log-rank survival test (p-value: 0.042), showing a decreased risk of treatment failure for patients with high volume fraction of voxels. Intratumoral regions showing similar vascular properties could successfully be labeled in three distinct clusters and the volume fraction of one cluster region was associated with primary tumor control.

  18. Pharmacokinetic analysis and k-means clustering of DCEMR images for radiotherapy outcome prediction of advanced cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Erlend K. F.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCEMRI) allows for quantitative characterization of vascular properties of tumors. The aim of this study is twofold, first to determine if tumor regions with similar vascularization could be labeled by clustering methods, second to determine if the identified regions can be associated with local cancer relapse. Materials and methods. Eighty-one patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy underwent DCEMRI with Gd-DTPA prior to external beam radiotherapy. The median follow-up time after treatment was four years, in which nine patients had primary tumor relapse. By fitting a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model function to the temporal contrast enhancement in the tumor, two pharmacokinetic parameters, K trans and u e , were estimated voxel by voxel from the DCEMR-images. Intratumoral regions with similar vascularization were identified by k-means clustering of the two pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over all patients. The volume fraction of each cluster was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the clusters. Results. Three clusters provided a sufficient reduction of the cluster variance to label different vascular properties within the tumors. The corresponding median volume fraction of each cluster was 38%, 46% and 10%. The second cluster was significantly associated with primary tumor control in a log-rank survival test (p-value: 0.042), showing a decreased risk of treatment failure for patients with high volume fraction of voxels. Conclusions. Intratumoral regions showing similar vascular properties could successfully be labeled in three distinct clusters and the volume fraction of one cluster region was associated with primary tumor control

  19. Pharmacokinetic analysis and k-means clustering of DCEMR images for radiotherapy outcome prediction of advanced cervical cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Erlend K. F. (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)), e-mail: eirik.malinen@fys.uio.no; Kristensen, Gunnar B. (Section for Gynaecological Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Lyng, Heidi (Dept. of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway))

    2011-08-15

    Introduction. Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCEMRI) allows for quantitative characterization of vascular properties of tumors. The aim of this study is twofold, first to determine if tumor regions with similar vascularization could be labeled by clustering methods, second to determine if the identified regions can be associated with local cancer relapse. Materials and methods. Eighty-one patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy underwent DCEMRI with Gd-DTPA prior to external beam radiotherapy. The median follow-up time after treatment was four years, in which nine patients had primary tumor relapse. By fitting a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model function to the temporal contrast enhancement in the tumor, two pharmacokinetic parameters, Ktrans and u{sub e}, were estimated voxel by voxel from the DCEMR-images. Intratumoral regions with similar vascularization were identified by k-means clustering of the two pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over all patients. The volume fraction of each cluster was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the clusters. Results. Three clusters provided a sufficient reduction of the cluster variance to label different vascular properties within the tumors. The corresponding median volume fraction of each cluster was 38%, 46% and 10%. The second cluster was significantly associated with primary tumor control in a log-rank survival test (p-value: 0.042), showing a decreased risk of treatment failure for patients with high volume fraction of voxels. Conclusions. Intratumoral regions showing similar vascular properties could successfully be labeled in three distinct clusters and the volume fraction of one cluster region was associated with primary tumor control

  20. Center-size as a predictor of weight-loss outcome in multicenter trials including a low-calorie diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasteyger, Christoph Rolf; Christensen, Robin; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2010-01-01

    weight loss. This is a post hoc analysis of an existing database: 701 obese subjects (77% women, 23% men, mean BMI: 38.9 kg/m(2)) were enrolled at 22 sites (4-85 subjects/site) in five countries to follow a LCD providing 800-1,000 kcal/day during 8 weeks. The main outcome measure was the percentage...

  1. Learning Process and Learning Outcomes of Video Podcasts Including the Instructor and PPT Slides: A Chinese Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Zhongling; Hong, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Video podcasts have become one of the fastest developing trends in learning and teaching. The study explored the effect of the presenting mode of educational video podcasts on the learning process and learning outcomes. Prior to viewing a video podcast, the 94 Chinese undergraduates participating in the study completed a demographic questionnaire…

  2. Changing prostate-specific antigen outcome after surgery or radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer during the prostate-specific antigen era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Chen, M.-H.; Oh-Ung, Jean; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Cote, Kerri; Loffredo, Marian; Richie, Jerome P.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the change in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), controlling for follow-up during the PSA era. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 1440 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with RP (n=1059) or EBRT (n=381) between 1989 and 2000. A single genitourinary pathologist reviewed all pathology specimens. For patients with a 2-year minimal follow-up, the 2-year actual PSA outcome stratified by risk group (low vs. high) was calculated for three periods (January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1992; January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1996; and January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2000) and compared for each treatment modality. PSA failure was defined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition for all patients, and comparisons were made using a chi-square metric. Results: During the study period, the proportion of patients treated with RP and EBRT with low-risk disease increased significantly (p <0.0001) from 60% to 89% and from 26% to 76%, respectively. In addition, the 2-year actual PSA outcome also improved from 60% to 82% (RP: p<0.0001) and from 67% to 91% (RT: p=0.0008). The 2-year actual PSA outcome was not significantly different in the low-risk patients but improved during the three periods in the high-risk patients treated with RP (from 20% to 39% to 75%, p=0.0004) or EBRT (from 50% to 59% to 83%, p=0.01). This improvement in PSA outcome could be explained by a shift toward a more favorable PSA level (RP: p=0.0002; RT: p=0.006) and clinical T stage (RP: p=0.0008, RT: p<0.0001) distribution for patients with biopsy Gleason score ≥7 disease. Conclusion: Improved PSA outcome during the PSA era after RP or EBRT has resulted from a shift in presentation toward low-risk disease and earlier detection of high-grade disease

  3. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  4. Outcome impact and cost-effectiveness of quality assurance for radiotherapy planned for the EORTC 22071–24071 prospective study for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Melidis, Christos; Budach, Wilfried; Langendijk, Johannes H.; Peters, Lester J.; Grégoire, Vincent; Maingon, Philippe; Combescure, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the goals of Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy (QART) is to reduce the variability and uncertainties related to treatment planning and beam delivery. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome impact and cost-effectiveness (CE) of various QART levels for a head and neck (H and N) cancer study. Materials and methods: QART levels were defined as: basic QART with a dummy run (level 2), level 2 plus prospective Individual Case Reviews (ICRs) for 15% of patients (level 3) and level 2 plus prospective ICRs for all patients (level 4). The follow-up of patients was modeled using a multi-state model with parameters derived from EORTC, TROG and RTOG prospective studies. Individual patient data, linking QART results with outcome, were retrieved from the TROG database. Results for each QART level were expressed as percentage of mortality and local failure at 5 years. Results: Quality-of-life-adjusted and recurrence-free survival increased with increasing QART levels. The increase of all these metrics was more sizeable with an increased QART level from 2 or 3 to 4. The estimated quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) for an increase of QART levels of 3–4 and 2–4 were 0.09 and 0.15, respectively. The incremental CE ratio was €5525 and €3659 Euros per QALY for these QART levels. Compared to QART level 2 or 3, level 4 was cost-effective. Conclusions: Increasing QART levels resulted in better patient outcome in this simulated study. The increased complexity of the QART program was also cost-effective

  5. A national cohort study of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in primary fixed rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.; Jensen, L.H.; Altaf, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Preoperative radiotherapy has been shown to enable a fixed rectal cancer to become resectable which in turn may result in long-time survival. In this study, we analysed the outcome of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in fixed rectal cancer in a national cohort including all Danish...... patients registered with primary inoperable rectal cancer and treated in the period May 2001 to December 2005. METHOD: The study was based on surgical and demographic data from a continuously updated and validated national database. In addition, retrospective data were retrieved from all departments...... of radiotherapy concerning technique of radiotherapy, dose and fractionation and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Outcome was determined by actuarial analysis of local control, disease-free survival and overall survival. RESULTS: A total of 258 patients with fixed rectal cancer received long-course radiotherapy...

  6. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  7. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using charged particle or photon radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Demizu, Yusuke; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Ogita, Mikio; Himei, Kengo; Nakamura, Satoaki; Suzuki, Gen; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Oh, Ryoongjin

    2017-07-01

    To examine the outcomes of reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using different modalities. This retrospective study included 26 patients who received charged particle radiotherapy (CP) and 150 who received photon radiotherapy (117 CyberKnife radiotherapy [CK] and 36 intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) involving propensity scores was used to reduce background selection bias. Higher prescribed doses were used in CP than photon radiotherapy. The 1‑year overall survival (OS) rates were 67.9% for CP and 54.1% for photon radiotherapy (p = 0.15; 55% for CK and 51% for IMRT). In multivariate Cox regression, the significant prognostic factors for better survival were nasopharyngeal cancer, higher prescribed dose, and lower tumor volume. IPTW showed a statistically significant difference between CP and photon radiotherapy (p = 0.04). The local control rates for patients treated with CP and photon radiotherapy at 1 year were 66.9% (range 46.3-87.5%) and 67.1% (range 58.3-75.9%), respectively. A total of 48 patients (27%) experienced toxicity grade ≥3 (24% in the photon radiotherapy group and 46% in the CP group), including 17 patients with grade 5 toxicity. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age and a larger planning target volume (PTV) were significant risk factors for grade 3 or worse toxicity. CP provided superior survival outcome compared to photon radiotherapy. Tumor volume, primary site (nasopharyngeal), and prescribed dose were identified as survival factors. Younger patients with a larger PTV experienced toxicity grade ≥3.

  8. Effect of radiotherapy on the natural killer (NK)-cell activity of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnes, K.; Florence, J.; Penny, R.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radiotherapy on peripheral blood natural killer (NK)-cell number and activity in 15 patients with cancer, prior to the commencement and at the completion of radiotherapy. The following observations were made. Prior to radiotherapy NK activity could not be correlated with the stage of malignancy. In all patients with advanced disease and with subnormal baseline NK activity, the outcome of radiotherapy was unfavorable. Following radiotherapy to sites including the mediastinum, patients had decreased NK activity compared with those receiving treatment to other sites. This decrease was not related to the dose of radiotherapy or stage of malignancy. The tumor response was favorable in most patients whose NK activity decreased as a result of radiotherapy. The decrease in NK activity may be associated with a decrease in the percentage of NK (N901) cells in the peripheral blood. The reduction in NK activity in those patients receiving mediastinal irradiation may be due to the large volume of blood which transits the field, so that the NK cells, or their more radiosensitive precursors, may be damaged and/or differentiation inhibited. Thus, these new observations show that radiotherapy does indeed affect the NK activity in cancer patients predominantly when the irradiation site includes the mediastinum

  9. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D.I.; Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

    1996-01-01

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  10. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  11. Focal salvage iodine-125 brachytherapy for prostate cancer recurrences after primary radiotherapy: A retrospective study regarding toxicity, biochemical outcome and quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Max; Maenhout, Metha; Voort van Zyp, Jochem R.N. van der; Moerland, Marinus A.; Moman, Maaike R.; Steuten, Lotte M.G.; Deursen, Marijke J.H. van; Vulpen, Marco van

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-gland salvage for recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) shows high failure and toxicity rates. Early and adequate localization of recurrences enables focal salvage, thereby potentially improving functional outcomes, while maintaining cancer control. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis yielded 20 focal salvage I125 brachytherapy patients for locally recurrent PCa after primary radiotherapy. Tumor was defined by multiparametric MRI and correspondence with transrectal biopsies. Dose data were obtained intra-operatively. The tumor was prescribed ⩾144 Gy. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4 (CTCAE-4). Biochemical failure (BF) was defined using the Phoenix criteria (PSA-nadir + 2.0 ng/ml). Quality of life (QoL) was measured by SF-36 Health Survey and European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) C30+3 and PR25 questionnaires. Results: With a median follow-up of 36 months (range 10–45), six patients experienced BF, of which three had no initial response. Grade 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurred in one patient (a urethral stricture). The five previously potent patients retained erectile function. QoL remained decreased with regard to urinary symptoms. Conclusion: Focal salvage I125 brachytherapy showed one grade 3 GU toxicity in the 20 treated patients. Biochemical response and QoL were acceptable

  12. Impact of a rectal and bladder preparation protocol on prostate cancer outcome in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, A.; Bresciani, S.; Di Dia, A.; Miranti, A.; Poli, M.; Stasi, M. [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Medical Physic Department, Candiolo (Italy); Gabriele, D. [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Radiotherapy Department, Candiolo (Italy); University of Sassari, Division of Radiation Oncology, Sassari (Italy); Garibaldi, E.; Delmastro, E.; Gabriele, P. [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Radiotherapy Department, Candiolo (Italy); Varetto, T. [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine Department, Candiolo (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that a rectal and bladder preparation protocol is associated with an increase in prostate cancer specific survival (PCSS), clinical disease free survival (CDFS) and biochemical disease free survival (BDFS). From 1999 to 2012, 1080 prostate cancer (PCa) patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Of these patients, 761 were treated with an empty rectum and comfortably full bladder (RBP) preparation protocol, while for 319 patients no rectal/bladder preparation (NRBP) protocol was adopted. Compared with NRBP patients, patients with RBP had significantly higher BDFS (64% vs 48% at 10 years, respectively), CDFS (81% vs 70.5% at 10 years, respectively) and PCSS (95% vs 88% at 10 years, respectively) (log-rank test p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis (MVA) indicated for all treated patients and intermediate high-risk patients that the Gleason score (GS) and the rectal and bladder preparation were the most important prognostic factors for PCSS, CDFS and BDFS. With regard to high- and very high-risk patients, GS, RBP, prostate cancer staging and RT dose were predictors of PCSS, CDFS and BDFS in univariate analysis (UVA). We found strong evidence that rectal and bladder preparation significantly decreases biochemical and clinical failures and the probability of death from PCa in patients treated without daily image-guided prostate localization, presumably since patients with RBP are able to maintain a reproducibly empty rectum and comfortably full bladder across the whole treatment compared with NRPB patients. (orig.) [German] Pruefung der Hypothese, dass ein Rektum-Blasen-Vorbereitungsprotokoll mit einer Zunahme des prostatakarzinomspezifischen Ueberlebens (PCSS), des klinisch krankheitsfreien Ueberlebens (CDFS) und des biochemisch krankheitsfreien Ueberlebens (BDFS) verbunden ist. Von 1999 bis 2012 erhielten 1080 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom eine 3-dimensional geplante Strahlentherapie. Bei 761 Patienten wurde ein

  13. Three-year outcomes of a once daily fractionation scheme for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Sharad; Daroui, Parima; Khan, Atif J; Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie; Haffty, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report 3-year outcomes of toxicity, cosmesis, and local control using a once daily fractionation scheme (49.95 Gy in 3.33 Gy once daily fractions) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between July 2008 and August 2010, women aged ≥40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer ≤3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study. Women were treated with APBI using 3–5 photon beams, delivering 49.95 Gy over 15 once daily fractions over 3 weeks. Patients were assessed for toxicities, cosmesis, and local control rates before APBI and at specified time points. Thirty-four patients (mean age 60 years) with Tis 0 (n = 9) and T1N0 (n = 25) breast cancer were treated and followed up for an average of 39 months. Only 3% (1/34) patients experienced a grade 3 subcutaneous fibrosis and breast edema and 97% of the patients had good/excellent cosmetic outcome at 3 years. The 3-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was 0% while the rate of contralateral breast events was 6%. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was 94%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Our novel accelerated partial breast fractionation scheme of 15 once daily fractions of 3.33 Gy (49.95 Gy total) is a remarkably well-tolerated regimen of 3D-CRT-based APBI. A larger cohort of patients is needed to further ascertain the toxicity of this accelerated partial breast regimen

  14. Outcome of Children With Metastatic Medulloblastoma Treated With Carboplatin During Craniospinal Radiotherapy: A Children's Oncology Group Phase I/II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakacki, Regina I.; Burger, Peter C.; Zhou, Tianni; Holmes, Emiko J.; Kocak, Mehmet; Onar, Arzu; Goldwein, Joel; Mehta, Minesh; Packer, Roger J.; Tarbell, Nancy; Fitz, Charles; Vezina, Gilbert; Hilden, Joanne; Pollack, Ian F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the feasibility of administering carboplatin as a radiosensitizer during craniospinal radiation therapy (CSRT) to patients with high-risk medulloblastomas (MBs) and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and we report the outcome in the subset with metastatic (M+) MB. Patients and Methods After surgery, patients received 36 Gy CSRT with boosts to sites of disease. During radiation, patients received 15 to 30 doses of carboplatin (30-45 mg/m2/dose), along with vincristine (VCR) once per week for 6 weeks. Patients on regimen A received 6 months of maintenance chemotherapy (MC) with cyclophosphamide and VCR. Once the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of carboplatin was determined, cisplatin was added to the MC (regimen B). Results In all, 161 eligible patients (median age, 8.7 years; range, 3.1 to 21.6 years) were enrolled. Myelosuppression was dose limiting and 35 mg/m2/dose × 30 was determined to be the RP2D of carboplatin. Twenty-nine (36%) of 81 patients with M+ MB had diffuse anaplasia. Four patients were taken off study within 11 months of completing radiotherapy for presumed metastatic progression and are long-term survivors following palliative chemotherapy. Excluding these four patients, 5-year overall survival ± SE and progression-free survival ± SE for M+ patients treated at the RP2D on regimen A was 82% ± 9% and 71% ± 11% versus 68% ± 10% and 59% ± 10% on regimen B (P = .36). There was no difference in survival by M stage. Anaplasia was a negative predictor of outcome. Conclusion The use of carboplatin as a radiosensitizer is a promising strategy for patients with M+ MB. Early progression should be confirmed by biopsy. PMID:22665539

  15. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria; Verona, Chiara; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Chiara, Anna; Perna, Lucia; Villa, Eugenio; Reni, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapse were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses ≥40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose ≥40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.

  16. Reporting combined outcomes with Trifecta and survival, continence, and potency (SCP) classification in 337 patients with prostate cancer treated with image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Zerini, Dario; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Maucieri, Andrea; Gerardi, Marianna A; Vischioni, Barbara; Cambria, Raffaella; Garibaldi, Cristina; Cattani, Federica; Vavassori, Andrea; Matei, Deliu V; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    To report the image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy (hypo-IGRT) outcome for patients with localised prostate cancer according to the new outcome models Trifecta (cancer control, urinary continence, and sexual potency) and SCP (failure-free survival, continence and potency). Between August 2006 and January 2011, 337 patients with cT1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer (median age 73 years) were eligible for a prospective longitudinal study on hypo-IGRT (70.2 Gy/26 fractions) in our Department. Patients completed four questionnaires before treatment, and during follow-up: the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5), the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer prostate-cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaires (QLQ) QLQ-PR25 and QLQ-C30. Baseline and follow-up patient data were analysed according to the Trifecta and SCP outcome models. Cancer control, continence and potency were defined respectively as no evidence of disease, score 1 or 2 for item 36 of the QLQ-PR25 questionnaire, and total score of >16 on the IIEF-5 questionnaire. Patients receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) at any time were excluded. Trifecta criteria at baseline were met in 72 patients (42% of all ADT-free patients with completed questionnaires). Both at 12 and 24 months after hypo-IGRT, 57% of the Trifecta patients at baseline were still meeting the Trifecta criteria (both oncological and functional success according to the SCP model). The main reason for failing the Trifecta criteria during follow-up was erectile dysfunction: in 18 patients after 6 months follow-up, in 12 patients after 12 months follow-up, and in eight patients after 24 months. Actuarial 2-year Trifecta failure-free survival rate was 44% (95% confidence interval 27-60%). In multivariate analysis no predictors of Trifecta failure were identified. Missing questionnaires was the main limitation of the study. The Trifecta and SCP

  17. Including a range of outcome targets offers a broader view of fibromyalgia treatment outcome: results from a retrospective review of multidisciplinary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Haq, Adeel; Breuer, Paula

    2014-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with substantial functional disability. Current drug and non-drug treatments result in statistically significant but numerically small improvements in typical numeric measures of pain severity and fibromyalgia impact. The aim of the present study was to evaluate additional measures of pain severity and functional outcome that might be affected by fibromyalgia treatment. This retrospective review evaluated outcomes from 274 adults with fibromyalgia who participated in a six-week, multidisciplinary treatment programme. Pain and function were evaluated on the first and final treatment visit. Pain was evaluated using an 11-point numerical scale to determine clinically meaningful pain reduction (decrease ≥ 2 points) and from a pain drawing. Function was evaluated by measuring active range of motion (ROM), walking distance and speed, upper extremity exercise repetitions, and self-reports of daily activities. Numerical rating scores for pain decreased by 10-13% (p Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores decreased by 20% (p fibromyalgia treatment effectiveness. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  19. Effect of pelvic radiotherapy for prostrate cancer on bowel, bladder and sexual functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif-ur-Rahman; Ali, N.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer on sexual, bowel and urinary functions. Study Design: a prospective cohort study. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital, Lahore from July 1998 to January 2000. Patients and Method: This study included 52 patients with diagnosis of prostate cancer who were given external beam pelvic radiotherapy. The effects of pelvic radiotherapy on their sexual, bowel and bladder functions were calculated at 6, 12 and 18 months and mean composite scores for each entity were examined. Results: Decrease in sexual function (up to 35%) was most significant observation followed by bowel dysfunction (10-12%). Bladder function deranged early during radiotherapy but there was no remarkable bladder dysfunction, overall a good proportion of patients (70 - 72%) felt satisfied with their treatment by external beam radiotherapy. By lapse of time there was gradual worsening of erectile function especially after a couple of months of pelvic radiotherapy, while bowel and bladder functions improved 8-12 months post radiotherapy. Conclusion: Proper counselling of patients regarding potential side effects of pelvic radiotherapy can make them understand the outcome of treatment. (author)

  20. Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery - a comparative effectiveness research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Stefanie; Niyazi, Maximilian; Niemoeller, Olivier M; Li, Minglun; Roeder, Falk; Eckel, Renate; Schubert-Fritschle, Gabriele; Scheithauer, Heike R; Harbeck, Nadia; Engel, Jutta; Belka, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective outcome study was to validate the effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy in breast conserving therapy (BCT) and to evaluate possible causes for omission of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS) in a non-trial population. Data were provided by the population-based Munich Cancer Registry. The study included epidemiological data of 30.811 patients diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 to 2012. The effect of omitting radiotherapy was analysed using Kaplan-Meier-estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression. Variables predicting omission of radiotherapy were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Use of postoperative radiotherapy after BCS was associated with significant improvements in local control and survival. 10-year loco-regional recurrence-free-survival was 90.8% with postoperative radiotherapy vs. 77.6% with surgery alone (pstudy shows a decrease in local control and a survival disadvantage if postoperative radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery is omitted in an unselected cohort of primary breast cancer patients. Due to its epidemiological nature, it cannot answer the question in whom postoperative radiotherapy can be safely omitted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Does transfusion improve the outcome for HNSCC patients treated with radiotherapy? - Results from the randomized DAHANCA 5 and 7 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Camilla Molich; Lassen, Pernille; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2011-01-01

    of transfusion by the results from the randomized DAHANCA 5 trial, including 414 patients in the analysis. Aim of the current analysis was to gain additional power by adding patients from the continued subrandomization in the DAHANCA 7 trial, now including a total of almost 1200 patients. Material and methods...

  2. Risk of second non-breast cancer among patients treated with and without postoperative radiotherapy for primary breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies including 522,739 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grantzau, Trine; Overgaard, Jens

    2016-01-01

    -irradiated women. Irradiated patients had an overall increased risk of second non-breast cancer, with a SIR of 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-1.36). For non-irradiated patients the SIR was 1.08 (95% CI, 1.03-1.13). For irradiated patients the incidence of second cancers including the lung, esophagus......, thyroid and connective tissues progressively increased over time, peaking at 10-15years following breast cancer diagnosis. Summary estimates at ⩾15years after breast cancer irradiation were 1.91 for lung, 2.71 for esophagus, 3.15 for thyroid and 6.54 at ⩾10years for second sarcomas. Non......-irradiated patients had no increased risk of second lung or esophagus cancer, neither overall nor over time. For non-irradiated patients' risk of second thyroid cancer (SIR 1.21) and sarcomas (SIR 1.42) were increased overall, but with no remaining risk ⩾10 after breast cancer. CONCLUSION: Radiotherapy for breast...

  3. A reanalysis of a behavioral intervention to prevent incident HIV infections: Including indirect effects in modeling outcomes of Project EXPLORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Lisa A.; Kalichman, Seth C.; Kenny, David A.; Harel, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Background Project EXPLORE -- a large-scale, behavioral intervention tested among men who have sex with men (MSM) at-risk for HIV infection --was generally deemed as ineffective in reducing HIV incidence. Using novel and more precise data analytic techniques we reanalyzed Project EXPLORE by including both direct and indirect paths of intervention effects. Methods Data from 4,296 HIV negative MSM who participated in Project EXPLORE, which included ten sessions of behavioral risk reduction counseling completed from 1999-2005, were included in the analysis. We reanalyzed the data to include parameters that estimate the overtime effects of the intervention on unprotected anal sex and the over-time effects of the intervention on HIV status mediated by unprotected anal sex simultaneously in a single model. Results We found the indirect effect of intervention on HIV infection through unprotected anal sex to be statistically significant up through 12 months post-intervention, OR=.83, 95% CI=.72-.95. Furthermore, the intervention significantly reduced unprotected anal sex up through 18 months post-intervention, OR=.79, 95% CI=.63-.99. Discussion Our results reveal effects not tested in the original model that offer new insight into the effectiveness of a behavioral intervention for reducing HIV incidence. Project EXPLORE demonstrated that when tested against an evidence-based, effective control condition can result in reductions in rates of HIV acquisition at one year follow-up. Findings highlight the critical role of addressing behavioral risk reduction counseling in HIV prevention. PMID:23245226

  4. Physical status of human papillomavirus integration in cervical cancer is associated with treatment outcome of the patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV DNA into the host genome is a critical aetiological event in the progression from normal cervix to intraepithelial neoplasm, and finally to invasive cervical cancer. However, there has been little work on how HPV integration status relates to treatment outcome for cervical carcinomas. In the current study, HPV E2 and E6 gene copy numbers were measured in 111 cervical cancer tissues using real-time QPCR. Integration patterns were divided into four groups: single copy-integrated with episomal components (group 1, single copy-integrated without episomal components (group 2, multicopy tandem repetition-integrated (group 3, and low HPV (group 4 groups. A relapse-predicting model was constructed using multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to classify patients into different risk groups for disease-free survival (DFS. The model was internally validated using bootstrap resampling. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed to evaluate gene expression patterns in relation to the different integration groups. DFS rate was inferior in the order of the patients in group 4, group 2/3, and group 1. Multivariate analysis showed that histologic grade, clinical stage group, and integration pattern were significant prognostic factors for poor DFS. The current prognostic model accurately predicted the risk of relapse, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.74 (bootstrap corrected, 0.71. In conclusion, these data suggest that HPV integration pattern is a potent prognostic factor for tailored treatment of cervical cancer.

  5. Comparing survival outcomes of gross total resection and subtotal resection with radiotherapy for craniopharyngioma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Feng, Mengzhao; Guo, Fuyou

    2018-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that subtotal resection (STR) followed by radiation therapy (RT) is an appealing alternative to gross total resection (GTR) for craniopharyngioma, but it remains controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine whether GTR is superior to STR with RT for craniopharyngioma. A systematic search was performed for articles published until October 2017 in the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central databases. The endpoints of interest are overall survival and progression-free survival. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed or random-effects model. The data were analyzed using Review Manager 5.3 software. A total of 744 patients (seven cohort studies) were enrolled for analyses. There were no significant differences between the GTR and STR with RT groups when the authors compared the pooled HRs at the end of the follow-up period. Overall survival (pooled HR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.46-1.25, P = 0.28) and progression-free survival (pooled HR = 1.52, 95% CI: 0.42-5.44, P = 0.52) were similar between the two groups. The current meta-analysis suggests that GTR and STR with RT have the similar survival outcomes for craniopharyngioma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy with real-time tumor tracking for non-small cell lung cancer: Clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Prevost, Jean-Briac; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Praag, John; Holt, Bronno van der; Levendag, Peter C.; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Pattynama, Peter; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of treatment using real-time tumor tracking for 70 patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Seventy inoperable patients with peripherally located early-stage NSCLC were treated with 45 or 60 Gy in three fractions using CyberKnife. Pathology was available in 51% of patients. Thirty-nine patients had a T1-tumor and 31 had a T2-tumor. Markers were placed using the vascular, percutaneous intra-, or extra-pulmonary approach, depending on the risk of pneumothorax. Results: The actuarial 2-year local control rate for patients treated with 60 Gy was 96%, compared to 78% for patients treated with a total dose of 45 Gy (p = 0.197). All local recurrences (n = 4) occurred in patients with T2-tumors. Overall survival for the whole group at two years was 62% and the cause specific survival was 85%. The median follow-up was 15 months. Grade 3 toxicity occurred in two patients (3%) after marker placement. Treatment-related late grade 3 toxicity occurred in 7 patients (10%). No grade ≥4 toxicity occurred. Conclusion: Excellent local control of 96% at 1- and 2-years was achieved using 60 Gy in three fractions for NSCLC patients treated with the real-time tumor tracking. Toxicity was low.

  7. Does transfusion improve the outcome for HNSCC patients treated with radiotherapy? - results from the randomized DAHANCA 5 and 7 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Camilla; Lassen, Pernille; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2011-01-01

    Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and a low level of hemoglobin often have a poor response to radiation that may be related to hypoxia-induced radioresistance. We have previously published the importance of hemoglobin level and the effect of transfusion by the results fr...... the randomized DAHANCA 5 trial, including 414 patients in the analysis. Aim of the current analysis was to gain additional power by adding patients from the continued subrandomization in the DAHANCA 7 trial, now including a total of almost 1200 patients....

  8. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Rhein, Bernhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate outcome and toxicity after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with craniopharyngiomas were treated with FSRT between May 1989 and February 2001. Median age was 33.5 years (range: 5-57 years). Nine patients received FSRT after surgery as primary treatment, and 17 patients were irradiated for recurrent tumor or progressive growth after initial surgery. Median target dose was 52.2 Gy (range: 50.0-57.6 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Follow-up included MRI and neurologic, ophthalmologic, and endocrinologic examinations. Results: The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 7-143 months). The actuarial local control rate and actuarial overall survival rates were 100% and 100%, respectively, at 5 years and 100% and 83%, respectively, at 10 years. Four patients showed complete response, 14 patients showed partial response, and 8 patients remained stable. In 5 patients, vision improved after radiation therapy. Acute toxicity was mild. One patient required cyst drainage 3 months after radiotherapy. Late toxicity after radiotherapy included impairment of hormone function in 3 out of 18 patients at risk. We did not observe any vision impairment, radionecrosis, or secondary malignancies. Conclusions: FSRT is effective and safe in the treatment of cystic craniopharyngiomas. Toxicity is extremely low using this conformal technique

  9. Outcome for esophageal cancer following treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy but not esophagectomy: nonsurgical treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Zingg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Urs Zingg1,2, Dennis DiValentino1, Alexander McQuinn1, Ahmad Mardzuki1, Sarah K Thompson2,  Christos S Karapetis1,3, David I Watson11Flinders University Department of Surgery, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia; 2Discipline of Surgery, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 3Department of Medical Oncology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: More than 50% of patients with esophageal cancer are not suitable for surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of patients undergoing standard nonsurgical treatment.Methods: Data of all patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment for esophageal cancer were identified from a prospective database.Results: Seventy-five patients were treated for localized disease, and 52 for metastatic disease at diagnosis. Except for age, which was higher in patients without metastases, there were no significant differences between the patients with vs. without metastatic disease. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed a median survival of 10.8 months for all patients. There was a significant difference in survival (p < 0.001 between the groups with versus without metastases, with median survival in the patients without metastases 13.6 months versus 6.5 months in patients with metastases. Patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment for localized disease had a five-year survival of 12%. No significant difference between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was identified. Subanalysis of patients who received chemoradiotherapy revealed similar results to the overall group of patients.Conclusion: In patients with localized disease at diagnosis, long-term survival can be achieved in some patients, whereas five-year survival is rare in patients who present with metastatic disease.Keywords: nonsurgical treatment, esophageal cancer, chemoradiotherapy, metastases, survival

  10. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination genes and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yin

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (i.e., RAD51 -135G>C/rs1801320 and -172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794 and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS and radiation pneumonitis (RP in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 -135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG. We also found that RAD51 -135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14-2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02-2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 -135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  11. Plasma uric acid and tumor volume are highly predictive of outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hui; Lin, Huan-Xin; Ge, Nan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Sun, Rui; Hu, Wei-Han

    2013-01-01

    The combined predictive value of plasma uric acid and primary tumor volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has not yet been determined. In this retrospective study, plasma uric acid level was measured after treatment in 130 histologically-proven NPC patients treated with IMRT. Tumor volume was calculated from treatment planning CT scans. Overall (OS), progression-free (PFS) and distant metastasis-free (DMFS) survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log rank test, and Cox multivariate and univariate regression models were created. Patients with a small tumor volume (<27 mL) had a significantly better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a large tumor volume. Patients with a high post-treatment plasma uric acid level (>301 μmol/L) had a better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a low post-treatment plasma uric acid level. Patients with a small tumor volume and high post-treatment plasma uric acid level had a favorable prognosis compared to patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level (7-year overall OS, 100% vs. 48.7%, P <0.001 and PFS, 100% vs. 69.5%, P <0.001). Post-treatment plasma uric acid level and pre-treatment tumor volume have predictive value for outcome in NPC patients receiving IMRT. NPC patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level may benefit from additional aggressive treatment after IMRT

  12. Later Outcomes and Alpha/Beta Estimate From Hypofractionated Conformal Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Versus Standard Fractionation for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leborgne, Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Italiano, Montevideo (Uruguay); Fowler, Jack, E-mail: jackfowlersbox@gmail.com [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Leborgne, Jose H.; Mezzera, Julieta [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Italiano, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Now that the follow-up time has exceeded 5 years, an estimate of the {alpha}/{beta} ratio can be presented. The additional late outcomes in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer using a hypofractionated vs. a standard fractionation regimen are reported from this prospective nonrandomized contemporary comparison. Methods and Materials: A total of 114 nonrandomized patients chose hypofractionation delivered in 20 fractions of 3 Gy or 3.15 Gy (mean 3.06 Gy) for localized prostate cancer within a median overall time of 32 days (range, 29-49) using four fractions weekly. A total of 160 comparable patients were contemporarily treated within a median of 55 days (range 49-66). The median follow-up was 66 months (range, 24-95) for the hypofractionated arm and 63 months (range, 36-92) for the standard arm. The percentage of patients in the low-, medium-, and high-risk groups was 36%, 46%, and 18% in the hypofractionated arm and 44%, 50%, and 6% in standard arm (2 Gy), respectively. Results: The 5-year actuarial biochemical absence of disease (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL) and disease-free survival rate was the same at 89% in both arms, making the {alpha}/{beta} calculation unambiguous. The point ratio of {alpha}/{beta} was 1.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.7-5.1 Gy). The 95% confidence interval was determined entirely by the binomial confidence limits in the numbers of patients. Rectal reactions of grade 3 and 4 occurred in 1 of 114 (hypofractionated) and 2 of 160 (standard) patients. Conclusions: The presented three-dimensional conformal regimen was acceptable, and the {alpha}/{beta} value was 1.8, in agreement with other very recent low meta-analyses (reviewed in the '' section).

  13. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wan-Yu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Sung-Hsin [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Oncology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ruey-Long [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ya-Fang [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping [Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chong, Fok-Ching [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Wei, E-mail: cwwang@ntuh.gov.tw [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6-33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  14. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason; Hong, Ruey-Long; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping; Chong, Fok-Ching; Wang, Chun-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6–33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  15. Comparison of the outcome and morbidity for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer treated by high-dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) versus EBRT alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Fumin; Wang Yuming; Wang Chongjong; Huang Hsuanying; Chiang Pohui

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the survival, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer treated by high-dose-rate-brachytherapy (HDR-BT) plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) versus EBRT alone at a single institute in Taiwan. Eighty-eight patients with T1c-T3b prostate cancer consecutively treated by EBRT alone (33 patients) or HDR-BT+EBRT (55 patients) were studied. The median dose of EBRT was 70.2 Gy in the EBRT group and 50.4 Gy in the HDR-BT group. HDR-BT was performed 2-3 weeks before EBRT, with 12.6 Gy in three fractions over 24 h. Five patients (15.2%) in the EBRT group and seven (12.7%) in the HDR-BT group developed a biochemical relapse. The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates were 65.0% in the EBRT group and 66.7% in the HDR-BT group (P=0.76). The 5-year actuarial likelihood of late ≥Grade 2 and ≥Grade 3 GI toxicity in the EBRT versus HDR-BT group was 62.8 versus 7.7% (P<0.001) and 19.6 versus 0% (P=0.001), respectively. In a multivariate analysis, the only predictor for late GI toxicity was the mode of RT. The 5-year actuarial likelihood of late ≥Grade 2 and ≥Grade 3 GU toxicity in the EBRT versus HDR-BT group was 14.8 versus 15.9% (P=0.86) and 3.6 versus 8.5% (P=0.40), respectively. The addition of HDR-BT before EBRT with a reduced dose from the EBRT produces a comparable survival outcome and GU toxicity but a significantly less GI toxicity for prostate cancer patients. (author)

  16. A prospective study: current problems in radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in yogyakarta, indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Sharon D; Wildeman, Maarten A; Fles, Renske; Indrasari, Sagung R; Herdini, Camelia; Wildeman, Pieter L; van Diessen, Judi N A; Tjokronagoro, Maesadji; Tan, I Bing

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has a high incidence in Indonesia. Previous study in Yogyakarta revealed a complete response of 29% and a median overall survival of less than 2 years. These poor treatment outcome are influenced by the long diagnose-to-treatment interval to radiotherapy (DTI) and the extended overall treatment time of radiotherapy (OTT). This study reveals insight why the OTT and DTI are prolonged. All patients treated with curative intent radiotherapy for NPC between July 2011 until October 2012 were included. During radiotherapy a daily diary was kept, containing information on DTI, missed radiotherapy days, the reason for missing and length of OTT. Sixty-eight patients were included. The median DTI was 106 days (95% CI: 98-170). Fifty-nine patients (87%) finished the treatment. The median OTT for radiotherapy was 57 days (95% CI: 57-65). The main reason for missing days was an inoperative radiotherapy machine (36%). Other reasons were patient's poor condition (21%), public holidays (14%), adjustment of the radiation field (7%), power blackout (3%), inoperative treatment planning system (2%) and patient related reasons (9%). Patient's insurance type was correlated to DTI in disadvantage for poor people. Yogyakarta has a lack of sufficient radiotherapy units which causes a delay of 3-4 months, besides the OTT is extended by 10-12 days. This influences treatment outcome to a great extend. The best solution would be creating sufficient radiotherapy units and better management in health care for poor patients. The growing economy in Indonesia will expectantly in time enable these solutions, but in the meantime solutions are needed. Solutions can consist of radiation outside office hours, better maintenance of the facilities and more effort from patient, doctor and nurse to finish treatment in time. These results are valuable when improving cancer care in low and middle income countries.

  17. A prospective study: current problems in radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in yogyakarta, indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon D Stoker

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC has a high incidence in Indonesia. Previous study in Yogyakarta revealed a complete response of 29% and a median overall survival of less than 2 years. These poor treatment outcome are influenced by the long diagnose-to-treatment interval to radiotherapy (DTI and the extended overall treatment time of radiotherapy (OTT. This study reveals insight why the OTT and DTI are prolonged. METHOD: All patients treated with curative intent radiotherapy for NPC between July 2011 until October 2012 were included. During radiotherapy a daily diary was kept, containing information on DTI, missed radiotherapy days, the reason for missing and length of OTT. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients were included. The median DTI was 106 days (95% CI: 98-170. Fifty-nine patients (87% finished the treatment. The median OTT for radiotherapy was 57 days (95% CI: 57-65. The main reason for missing days was an inoperative radiotherapy machine (36%. Other reasons were patient's poor condition (21%, public holidays (14%, adjustment of the radiation field (7%, power blackout (3%, inoperative treatment planning system (2% and patient related reasons (9%. Patient's insurance type was correlated to DTI in disadvantage for poor people. CONCLUSION: Yogyakarta has a lack of sufficient radiotherapy units which causes a delay of 3-4 months, besides the OTT is extended by 10-12 days. This influences treatment outcome to a great extend. The best solution would be creating sufficient radiotherapy units and better management in health care for poor patients. The growing economy in Indonesia will expectantly in time enable these solutions, but in the meantime solutions are needed. Solutions can consist of radiation outside office hours, better maintenance of the facilities and more effort from patient, doctor and nurse to finish treatment in time. These results are valuable when improving cancer care in low and middle income countries.

  18. Radiotherapy for esthesioneuroblastoma: is elective nodal irradiation warranted in the multimodality treatment approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, O Kyu; Lee, Sang-wook; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Sung Bae; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Chang Jin; Jo, Kyung Ja; Choi, Eun Kyung; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do

    2011-02-01

    The role of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in radiotherapy for esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) has not been clearly defined. We analyzed treatment outcomes of patients with ENB and the frequency of cervical nodal failure in the absence of ENI. Between August 1996 and December 2007, we consulted with 19 patients with ENB regarding radiotherapy. Initial treatment consisted of surgery alone in 2 patients; surgery and postoperative radiotherapy in 4; surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy in 1; surgery, postoperative radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in 3; and chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy in 5. Five patients did not receive planned radiotherapy because of disease progression. Including 2 patients who received salvage radiotherapy, 14 patients were treated with radiotherapy. Elective nodal irradiation was performed in 4 patients with high-risk factors, including 3 with cervical lymph node metastasis at presentation. Fourteen patients were analyzable, with a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 7-64 months). The overall 3-year survival rate was 73.4%. Local failure occurred in 3 patients (21.4%), regional cervical failure in 3 (21.4%), and distant failure in 2 (14.3%). No cervical nodal failure occurred in patients treated with combined systemic chemotherapy regardless of ENI. Three cervical failures occurred in the 4 patients treated with ENI or neck dissection (75%), none of whom received systemic chemotherapy. ENI during radiotherapy for ENB seems to play a limited role in preventing cervical nodal failure. Omitting ENI may be an option if patients are treated with a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiotherapy for Esthesioneuroblastoma: Is Elective Nodal Irradiation Warranted in the Multimodality Treatment Approach?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, O Kyu; Lee, Sang-wook; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Sung Bae; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Chang Jin; Jo, Kyung Ja; Choi, Eun Kyung; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The role of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in radiotherapy for esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) has not been clearly defined. We analyzed treatment outcomes of patients with ENB and the frequency of cervical nodal failure in the absence of ENI. Methods and Materials: Between August 1996 and December 2007, we consulted with 19 patients with ENB regarding radiotherapy. Initial treatment consisted of surgery alone in 2 patients; surgery and postoperative radiotherapy in 4; surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy in 1; surgery, postoperative radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in 3; and chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy in 5. Five patients did not receive planned radiotherapy because of disease progression. Including 2 patients who received salvage radiotherapy, 14 patients were treated with radiotherapy. Elective nodal irradiation was performed in 4 patients with high-risk factors, including 3 with cervical lymph node metastasis at presentation. Results: Fourteen patients were analyzable, with a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 7-64 months). The overall 3-year survival rate was 73.4%. Local failure occurred in 3 patients (21.4%), regional cervical failure in 3 (21.4%), and distant failure in 2 (14.3%). No cervical nodal failure occurred in patients treated with combined systemic chemotherapy regardless of ENI. Three cervical failures occurred in the 4 patients treated with ENI or neck dissection (75%), none of whom received systemic chemotherapy. Conclusions: ENI during radiotherapy for ENB seems to play a limited role in preventing cervical nodal failure. Omitting ENI may be an option if patients are treated with a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  20. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, P.F.; Holden, D.; Carr, N.D. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK))

    1983-06-01

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery.

  1. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  2. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  3. Radiotherapy apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.M.; Webb, H.P.J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to apparatus for applying intracavitary radiotherapy. In previously-known systems radioactive material is conveyed to a desired location within a patient by transporting a chain of balls pneumatically to and from an appropriately inserted applicator. According to this invention a ball chain for such a purpose comprises several radioactive balls separated by non-radioactive tracer balls of radiographically transparent material of lower density and surface hardness than the radioactive balls. The invention also extends to radiotherapy treatment apparatus comprising a storage, sorting and assembly system

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy in salivary ductal carcinoma: a single institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Mi Sun; Choi, Seo Hee; Suh, Yang Gun; Koh, Yoon Woo; Kim, Se Hun; Choi, Eun Chang; Keum, Ki Chang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We reviewed treatment outcomes and prognostic factors for patients with salivary ductal carcinoma (SDC) treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy from 2005 to 2012. A total of 16 patients were identified and 15 eligible patients were included in analysis. Median age was 61 years (range, 40 to 71 years) and 12 patients (80%) were men. Twelve patients (80%) had a tumor in the parotid gland, 9 (60%) had T3 or T4 disease, and 9 (60%) had positive nodal disease. All patients underwent surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant failure-free survival (DFFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences in survival based on risk factors were tested using a log-rank test. Median total radiotherapy dose was 60 Gy (range, 52.5 to 63.6 Gy). Four patients received concurrent weekly chemotherapy with cisplatin. Among 10 patients who underwent surgery with neck dissection, 7 received modified radical neck dissection. With a median follow-up time of 38 months (range, 24 to 105 months), 4-year rates were 86% for LRFFS, 51% for DFFS, 46% for PFS, and 93% for OS. Local failure was observed in 2 patients (13%), and distant failure was observed in 7 (47%). The lung was the most common involved site of distant metastasis. Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy in SDC patients resulted in good local control, but high distant metastasis remained a major challenge.

  5. The biological basis of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.; Adams, G.E.; Horwich, A.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of this book is the biological basis of radiotherapy. The papers presented include: Temporal stages of radiation action:free radical processes; The molecular basis of radiosensitivity; and Radiation damage to early-reacting normal tissue

  6. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  7. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Guillermina; Villarreal, Jose E.; Garcia, Laura; Tendilla, Jose I.; Paredes, Lydia; Murphy, Consuelo A.; Pedraza, Martha

    2001-01-01

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry

  8. The rank-heat plot is a novel way to present the results from a network meta-analysis including multiple outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroniki, Areti Angeliki; Straus, Sharon E; Fyraridis, Alexandros; Tricco, Andrea C

    2016-08-01

    To present a novel and simple graphical approach to improve the presentation of the treatment ranking in a network meta-analysis (NMA) including multiple outcomes. NMA simultaneously compares many relevant interventions for a clinical condition from a network of trials, and allows ranking of the effectiveness and/or safety of each intervention. There are numerous ways to present the NMA results, which can challenge their interpretation by research users. The rank-heat plot is a novel graph that can be used to quickly recognize which interventions are most likely the best or worst interventions with respect to their effectiveness and/or safety for a single or multiple outcome(s) and may increase interpretability. Using empirical NMAs, we show that the need for a concise and informative presentation of results is imperative, particularly as the number of competing treatments and outcomes in an NMA increases. The rank-heat plot is an efficient way to present the results of ranking statistics, particularly when a large amount of data is available, and it is targeted to users from various backgrounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical outcomes for T1-2N0-1 oral tongue cancer patients underwent surgery with and without postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Eun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the results of curative surgery with and without radiotherapy in patients with T1-2N0-1 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and to evaluate survival and prognostic factors. Methods Retrospective analysis of 86 patients with T1-2N0-1 OSCC who received surgery between January 2000 and December 2006. Fourteen patients (16.3% received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT. Patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, treatment modality, failure patterns, and survival rates were analyzed. Results The median follow-up was 45 months. The five-year overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates were 80.8% and 80.2%, respectively. Higher tumor grade and invasion depth ≥ 0.5 cm were the significant prognostic factors affecting five-year OS and DFS (OS rate; 65% vs. 91%, p = 0.001 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.01 for invasion depth: DFS rate; 69% vs. 88%, p = 0.005 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.013 for invasion depth. In the risk group, there was no local failure in patients with postoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions In T1-2N0-1 OSCC, factors that affected prognosis after primary surgery were higher tumor grade and deep invasion depth over 0.5 cm. Postoperative radiotherapy should be considered in early oral tongue cancer patients with these high-risk pathologic features.

  10. Clinical outcomes for T1-2N0-1 oral tongue cancer patients underwent surgery with and without postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Su Jung; Cha, Jihye; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Gwi Eon; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Eun Chang; Keum, Ki Chang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of curative surgery with and without radiotherapy in patients with T 1-2 N 0-1 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to evaluate survival and prognostic factors. Retrospective analysis of 86 patients with T 1-2 N 0-1 OSCC who received surgery between January 2000 and December 2006. Fourteen patients (16.3%) received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). Patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, treatment modality, failure patterns, and survival rates were analyzed. The median follow-up was 45 months. The five-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 80.8% and 80.2%, respectively. Higher tumor grade and invasion depth ≥ 0.5 cm were the significant prognostic factors affecting five-year OS and DFS (OS rate; 65% vs. 91%, p = 0.001 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.01 for invasion depth: DFS rate; 69% vs. 88%, p = 0.005 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.013 for invasion depth). In the risk group, there was no local failure in patients with postoperative radiotherapy. In T 1-2 N 0-1 OSCC, factors that affected prognosis after primary surgery were higher tumor grade and deep invasion depth over 0.5 cm. Postoperative radiotherapy should be considered in early oral tongue cancer patients with these high-risk pathologic features

  11. Radiotherapy, the experience of the patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verres, R.; Klusmann, D.

    1998-01-01

    For the patient, a radiotherapy means heavy physical and mental strain. Just like any other medical therapy, radiotherapy demands active cooperation of the patient based on mutual exchange between the patient and the doctor who, in addition to his medical responsibilities, has to develop awareness of the patient's mental condition and the suitable response. This emphatic relationship may in turn and at times mean a heavy burden for the medical staff. The authors have evaluated for this book a great number of records, protocols and questionnaires accumulated in the course of their work with patients of the radiotherapy department. The book is intended as a source of reference and guidance and a help for all persons and staff involved, who have to cope with the situations encountered in daily work in the clinical departments. The book presents experience and information on a wide range of aspects and problems involved, as e.g.: Interpersonal relations, the patient's feeling of being in the hands of technology, the difficulty to keep the delicate balance between confidence and non-confidence, the significance of good relations in the clinic for a successful outcome of the therapy, the ways how mental crises can be handled. The material also includes information on a variety of accompanying therapies, both for the actual treatment periods as well as for post-treatment periods where they may be late effects to be mastered. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Interstitial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, P.T.; Bretas, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors now have 20 years of experience with modern techniques of brachytherapy. The large number of patients treated in medical centers around the world and the widespread use of this type of radiotherapy have provided us with substantial information about the indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, pitfalls and complications, as well as the results of these techniques. Although the focus of this review is the experience at Baylor using the combined technique of gold seed implantation plus external beam irradiation, the alternative forms of brachytherapy will be described and compared. The authors' intention is to provide the busy clinician with a succinct and informative review indicating the status of modern interstitial radiotherapy and describing day-to-day approach and results

  13. Retrospective analysis of factors associated with outcome of proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis in 82 horses including Warmblood and Thoroughbred sport horses and Quarter Horses (1992-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herthel, T D; Rick, M C; Judy, C E; Cohen, N D; Herthel, D J

    2016-09-01

    Outcomes associated with arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint in Quarter Horses used for Western performance activities are well documented but little is known regarding outcomes for other types of horses. To identify factors associated with outcomes, including breed and activity, after arthrodesis of the PIP joint in Warmbloods, Thoroughbreds and Quarter Horses. Retrospective case series. Surgical case records of 82 Quarter Horses principally engaged in Western performance and Thoroughbred or Warmblood breeds principally engaged in showing, showjumping and dressage, with arthrodesis of the PIP joint were reviewed. Arthrodesis was performed with either 3 transarticular cortex bone screws placed in lag fashion, a dynamic compression plate (DCP) with 2 transarticular cortex bone screws placed in lag fashion, or a locking compression plate (LCP) with 2 transarticular cortex bone screws placed in lag fashion. Demographic data, clinical presentation, radiographic findings, surgical technique, post operative treatment and complications were recorded. Long-term follow-up was obtained for all 82 horses. Osteoarthritis of the PIP joint was the most common presenting condition requiring arthrodesis, which was performed with either the 3 screw technique (n = 41), DCP fixation (n = 22), or LCP fixation (n = 19). Post operatively, 23/31 (74%) Warmbloods/Thoroughbreds and 44/51 (87%) Quarter Horses achieved successful outcomes. Thirteen of 23 (57%) Warmbloods/Thoroughbreds and 24 of 38 (63%) Quarter Horses, used for athletic performance, returned to successful competition. Within this subgroup of horses engaged in high-level activity, regardless of breed type, horses undergoing hindlimb arthrodesis were significantly more likely to return to successful competition (73%; 33/45) than those with forelimb arthrodesis (25%; 4/16, P = 0.002). Arthrodesis of the PIP joint in Warmbloods/Thoroughbreds and Quarter Horses results in a favourable outcome for return to

  14. Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, J.

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  15. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Weis, Nina; Madsen, Hans O

    2002-01-01

    for pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role......Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor...

  16. Primary radiotherapy in progressive optic nerve sheath meningiomas: a long-term follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, P.; Blank, L.; Selva, D.; Wolbers, J.G.; Nowak, P.J.C.M.; Geskus, R.B.; Weis, E.; Mourits, M.P.; Rootman, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background/aims To report the outcome of primary radiotherapy in patients with progressive optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods The clinical records of all patients were reviewed in a retrospective, observational, multicentre study. Results Thirty-four consecutive patients were included.

  17. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  18. Regression and local control rates after radiotherapy for jugulotympanic paragangliomas: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulsteijn, Leonie T. van; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Coremans, Ida E.M.; Smit, Johannes W.A.; Jansen, Jeroen C.; Dekkers, Olaf M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary treatment goal of radiotherapy for paragangliomas of the head and neck region (HNPGLs) is local control of the tumor, i.e. stabilization of tumor volume. Interestingly, regression of tumor volume has also been reported. Up to the present, no meta-analysis has been performed giving an overview of regression rates after radiotherapy in HNPGLs. The main objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess regression of tumor volume in HNPGL-patients after radiotherapy. A second outcome was local tumor control. Design of the study is systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier and references of key articles were searched in March 2012 to identify potentially relevant studies. Considering the indolent course of HNPGLs, only studies with ⩾12 months follow-up were eligible. Main outcomes were the pooled proportions of regression and local control after radiotherapy as initial, combined (i.e. directly post-operatively or post-embolization) or salvage treatment (i.e. after initial treatment has failed) for HNPGLs. A meta-analysis was performed with an exact likelihood approach using a logistic regression with a random effect at the study level. Pooled proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Fifteen studies were included, concerning a total of 283 jugulotympanic HNPGLs in 276 patients. Pooled regression proportions for initial, combined and salvage treatment were respectively 21%, 33% and 52% in radiosurgery studies and 4%, 0% and 64% in external beam radiotherapy studies. Pooled local control proportions for radiotherapy as initial, combined and salvage treatment ranged from 79% to 100%. Radiotherapy for jugulotympanic paragangliomas results in excellent local tumor control and therefore is a valuable treatment for these types of tumors. The effects of radiotherapy on regression of tumor volume remain ambiguous, although the data suggest that regression can

  19. Quality assurance in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    Good radiotherapy results and safety of treatment require the radiation to be optimally applied to a specified target area and the correct dose. According to international recommendations, the average uncertainty in therapeutic dose should not exceed 5%. The need for high precision in therapeutic dose requires quality assurance covering the entire radiotherapy process. Besides the physical and technical characteristics of the therapy equipment, quality assurance must include all radiotherapy equipment and procedures that are significant for the correct magnitude and precision of application of the therapeutic dose. The duties and responsibilities pertaining to various stages of treatment must also be precisely defined. These requirements may be best implemented through a quality system. The general requirements for supervision and quality assurance of medical radiation apparatus are prescribed in section 40 of the Radiation Act (592/1991, amendment 1142/1998) and in sections 18 and 32 of the Decree of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health on the medical use of radiation (423/2000). Guide ST 2.2 imposes requirements on structural radiation shielding of radiotherapy equipment and the premises in which it is used, and on warning and safety arrangements. Guide ST 1.1 sets out the general safety principles for radiation practices and regulatory control procedure for the use of radiation. Guide ST 1.6 provides general requirements for operational measures in the use of radiation. This Guide sets out the duties of responsible parties (the party running a radiation practice) in respect of arranging and maintaining radiotherapy quality assurance. The principles set out in this Guide and Guide ST 6.3 may be applied to radionuclide therapy

  20. Prone Whole-Breast Irradiation Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Women Undergoing Breast Conservation for Early Disease Yields High Rates of Excellent to Good Cosmetic Outcomes in Patients With Large and/or Pendulous Breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy; Morrow, Natalya; Wilson, J. Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Walker, Alonzo [Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Xiang Qun; Ahn, Kwang Woo [Division of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); White, Julia, E-mail: jwhite@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our institution's experience using prone positioning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation (WBI) in a cohort of women with large and/or pendulous breasts, to determine the rate of acute and late toxicities and, more specifically, cosmetic outcomes. We hypothesized that using 3D-CRT for WBI in the prone position would reduce or eliminate patient and breast size as negative prognostic indicators for toxicities associated with WBI. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 110 cases were treated with prone WBI using 3D-CRT. The lumpectomy, breast target volumes, heart, and lung were contoured on all computed tomography scans. A dose of 45-50 Gy was prescribed to the breast volume using standard fractionation schemes. The planning goals were {>=}95% of prescription to 95% of the breast volume, and 100% of boost dose to 95% of lumpectomy planning target volume. Toxicities and cosmesis were prospectively scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects Version 3.0 and the Harvard Scale. The median follow-up was 40 months. Results: The median body mass index (BMI) was 33.6 kg/m{sup 2}, and median breast volume was 1396 cm{sup 3}. The worst toxicity encountered during radiation was Grade 3 dermatitis in 5% of our patient population. Moist desquamation occurred in 16% of patients, with only 2% of patients with moist desquamation outside the inframammary/axillary folds. Eleven percent of patients had Grade {>=}2 late toxicities, including Grade 3 induration/fibrosis in 2%. Excellent to good cosmesis was achieved in 89%. Higher BMI was associated with moist desquamation and breast pain, but BMI and breast volume did not impact fibrosis or excellent to good cosmesis. Conclusion: In patients with higher BMI and/or large-pendulous breasts, delivering prone WBI using 3D-CRT results in favorable toxicity profiles and high excellent to good cosmesis rates. Higher BMI was

  1. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  2. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy in supratentorial gliomas. A study of 821 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesters, M.; Molenaar, W.; Go, G.K.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the results of radiotherapy in a large group of cerebral gliomas with identification of prognostic factors and the outcome with respect to different decades of treatment. Patients and Methods: Two decades (1979-1999) of radiotherapy in supratentorial astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors (n = 821) at the University Hospital Groningen were retrospectively evaluated. Prognostic factors for survival were analyzed. Two decades of radiotherapy treatment were compared with respect to radiotherapy dose and treatment-field design. Results: Glioblastoma multiforme, including gliosarcoma, was the most frequent supratentorial glioma (n = 442) with a poor survival, i.e., median survival time (MST) 7 months, especially in patients > 50 years of age and with poor performance. Patients with good performance were selected for radiotherapy with an optimum dose of 60 Gy local-field irradiation. However, in patients with poor prognosis, no radiotherapy was applied or a shorter treatment scheme was given. Anaplastic astrocytomas (n = 131) were treated in the same way as glioblastoma multiforme. Over time, a decrease in radiation dose (from 60 to 45 Gy) and from whole brain irradiation to local-field treatment was observed, following the literature. In low-grade gliomas, prognostic factors for survival were age, performance, and extent of resection. Gemistocytic astrocytoma (n = 15) had an inferior survival compared to astrocytoma (MST 46 vs. 54 months), but a superior survival compared to anaplastic astrocytoma (MST 10 months). The presence of an oligodendroglial component in a glioma implied a superior survival compared to the astrocytic gliomas. The inherent biology of the glioma is reflected by the study of recurrent tumors with progression to higher grades of malignancy in 32-40% and by the histology of recurrent oligodendroglial tumors. In comparing two decades of radiotherapy in gliomas, no differences in survival were observed despite the technological

  4. Radiotherapy in supratentorial gliomas. A study of 821 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heesters, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Molenaar, W. [Dept. of Pathology, Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Go, G.K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands)

    2003-09-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the results of radiotherapy in a large group of cerebral gliomas with identification of prognostic factors and the outcome with respect to different decades of treatment. Patients and Methods: Two decades (1979-1999) of radiotherapy in supratentorial astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors (n = 821) at the University Hospital Groningen were retrospectively evaluated. Prognostic factors for survival were analyzed. Two decades of