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Sample records for radiotherapy fields based

  1. Conventional four field radiotherapy versus computed tomography-based treatment planning in cancer cervix: A dosimetric study

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    Abhishek Gulia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With advancements in imaging, wide variations in pelvic anatomy have been observed, thus raising doubts about adequate target volume coverage by conventional external radiotherapy fields based on bony landmarks. The present study evaluates the need for integrating computed tomography (CT-based planning in the treatment of carcinoma cervix. Aims: To estimate inadequacies in target volume coverage when using conventional planning based on bony landmarks. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 50 patients. Target volume delineation was done on planning CT scans, according to the guidelines given in literature. The volume of target receiving 95% of prescribed dose (V95 was calculated after superimposing a conventional four field box on digitally reconstructed radiograph. The geographic miss with conventional four field box technique was compared with the CT-based target volume delineation. Results: In 48 out of 50 patients, the conventional four field box failed to encompass the target volume. The areas of miss were at the superior and lateral borders of the anterior-posterior fields, and the anterior border of the lateral fields. The median V95 for conventional fields marked with bony landmarks was only 89.4% as compared to 93% for target delineation based on CT contouring. Conclusions: Our study shows inadequate target volume coverage with conventional four field box technique. We recommend routine use of CT-based planning for treatment with radiotherapy in carcinoma cervix.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of a compact microbeam radiotherapy system based on carbon nanotube field emission technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Eric C; Chang, Sha X

    2012-08-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiotherapy technique that has shown potent antitumor effects with minimal damage to normal tissue in animal studies. This unique form of radiation is currently only produced in a few large synchrotron accelerator research facilities in the world. To promote widespread translational research on this promising treatment technology we have proposed and are in the initial development stages of a compact MRT system that is based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. We report on a Monte Carlo based feasibility study of the compact MRT system design. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using EGSnrc-based codes. The proposed small animal research MRT device design includes carbon nanotube cathodes shaped to match the corresponding MRT collimator apertures, a common reflection anode with filter, and a MRT collimator. Each collimator aperture is sized to deliver a beam width ranging from 30 to 200 μm at 18.6 cm source-to-axis distance. Design parameters studied with Monte Carlo include electron energy, cathode design, anode angle, filtration, and collimator design. Calculations were performed for single and multibeam configurations. Increasing the energy from 100 kVp to 160 kVp increased the photon fluence through the collimator by a factor of 1.7. Both energies produced a largely uniform fluence along the long dimension of the microbeam, with 5% decreases in intensity near the edges. The isocentric dose rate for 160 kVp was calculated to be 700 Gy∕min∕A in the center of a 3 cm diameter target. Scatter contributions resulting from collimator size were found to produce only small (<7%) changes in the dose rate for field widths greater than 50 μm. Dose vs depth was weakly dependent on filtration material. The peak-to-valley ratio varied from 10 to 100 as the separation between adjacent microbeams varies from 150 to 1000 μm. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the proposed compact MRT system

  3. Dosimetry and microdosimetry using LET spectrometer based on the track-etch detector: radiotherapy Bremsstrahlung beam, onboard aircraft radiation field

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    Jadrnickova, I. [Dept. of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 180 86 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Dept. of Dosimetry and Application of Ionizing Radiation, Czech Technical University, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Spurny, F. [Dept. of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 180 86 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    The spectrometer of linear energy transfer (Let) based on the chemically etched poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (P.A.D.C.) track-etch detector was developed several years ago in our institute. This Let spectrometer enables determining Let of particles approximately from 10 to 700 keV/{mu}m. From the Let spectra, dose characteristics can be calculated. The contribution presents the Let spectra and other dosimetric characteristics obtained onboard a commercial aircraft during more than 6 months long exposure and in the 18 MV radiotherapy Bremsstrahlung beam. (authors)

  4. Out-of-field dose measurements in radiotherapy

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    Kaderka, Robert

    2011-07-13

    This thesis describes the results from measurements of the out-of-field dose in radiotherapy. The dose outside the treatment volume has been determined in a water phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. Measurements were performed with linac photons, passively delivered protons, scanned protons, passively delivered carbon ions as well as scanned carbon ions. It was found that the use of charged particles for radiotherapy reduces the out-of-field dose by up to three orders of magnitude compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons.

  5. Brain tumor delineation based on CT and MR imaging. Implications for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, M A; Wijrdeman, H K; Struikmans, H; Witkamp, T; Moerland, M A

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the impact MRI may have on radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumors. The authors analyzed differences in size and position of treatment fields as indicated by three observers (two radiotherapists and one neuroradiologist) using CT or MR based radiotherapy planning proced

  6. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  7. Dose profile analysis of small fields in intensity modulated radiotherapy

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    Medel B, E. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G.; Romero S, K., E-mail: romsakaren@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue.(Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Small field dosimetry is getting a very important worldwide task nowadays. The use of fields of few centimeters is more common with the introduction of sophisticated techniques of radiation therapy, as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). In our country the implementation of such techniques is just getting started and whit it the need of baseline data acquisition. The dosimetry under small field conditions represents a challenge for the physicists community. In this work, a dose profile analysis was done, using various types of dosimeters for further comparisons. This analysis includes the study of quality parameters as flatness, symmetry, penumbra, and other in-axis measurements. (Author)

  8. Clinical tolerance in large field radiotherapy--the knowledge gained over the last ten years.

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    Gocheva, Lilia B

    2010-01-01

    Malignant disorders are still far from being successfully managed in spite of the apparent progress achieved by surgical treatment, high energy radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CHT). They keep being the second most frequent cause of lethal outcomes both in Bulgaria and in most countries of the world. One of the promising approaches to increasing the efficaciousness of treatment is development and use of methods that are in full accord with the modern requirements of a complex therapy. Over the last fifty years, large field radiation techniques, applied as systemic therapy in oncology, have been investigated and established. These techniques show the transition in oncology to using actively various variants of large field radiotherapy (LFR), the "heavy artillery" of oncoradiologic practice, as an alternative or adjunct therapy to chemotherapy (CHT). In the present paper we review the current knowledge in the field and present the clinical experience accumulated over the last ten years with respect to clinical tolerance in the major large-field radiotherapy techniques--total body irradiation, half body irradiation, whole abdominal irradiation, total and partial lymphoid irradiation. Described in detail are the contemporary knowledge about clinical and hematologic tolerance in total body irradiation as part of the myelo- and nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens as well as in half body irradiation as a systemic therapy in oncology. We also present the amassed experience in clinical tolerance in partial body irradiation in the form of whole abdominal and total or partial lymphoid irradiation. Another point worth noting based again on the experience gained over the last ten years is that for LFR we need to develop a radiotherapy technique that is designed carefully to achieve an optimal therapeutic effect that should include the disease control, good clinical tolerance and reduction of post-radiotherapy sequelae.

  9. Auger Emitter Based Radiotherapy- A Possible New Treatment for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredericia, Pil; Groesser, Torsten; Severin, Gregory;

    2014-01-01

    damage produced by Low-LET radiation used in current radiotherapy (2-3) Considerable efforts have been made in the past twenty years to develop Auger emitter-based radiotherapy However, previous studies lack precise measurement of RBE, which is the fundamental factor defining the relationship between...

  10. Quality control of involved-field radiotherapy for patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma based on a central prospective review. Comparison of the results between two study generations of the German Hodgkin Study Group

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    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bangard, C. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Bongartz, R.; Baues, C.; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Based on experience in trials HD10 and HD11 (1998-2003), the radiotherapy reference center of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) continued their central prospective radiation oncological review in trials HD13 and HD14. The purpose of this analysis was to identify the impact of this procedure on radiotherapeutic management and to compare findings with former trials. Methods: Between 2003 and 2009, 1,710 patients were enrolled in the HD13 trial (early favorable stages) and 2,039 patients in the HD14 trial (early unfavorable stages). All patients received a total of 30 Gy involved-field (IF) radiotherapy within a combined modality approach. Results: For patients in HD13, there was a correction of disease involvement in 847/1,518 patients (56%), and for patients in HD14 in 1,370/1,905 patients (72%). Most discrepancies were observed in the lower mediastinum (19.2%), infraclavicular (31.7%), upper cervical (12.7%), and supraclavicular (10.8%) lymph nodes. This resulted in a change of disease stage in 241 (7%) patients and a shift into another study protocol in 66 (2%) patients. Due to the incorrect lymph node documentation of the participating study centers, the IF radiotherapy volume had to be enlarged in 1,063/3,423 patients (31%) and reduced in 244/3,423 patients (7.1%). These findings are comparable to the results of the quality control in the trials HD10 and HD11 (2,611 patients reviewed). Conclusion: Central review of the diagnostic imaging and clinical findings of Hodgkin's lymphoma patients shows a considerable number of discrepancies compared with the local evaluation. Thus, meticulous evaluation of all imaging information in close collaboration between the radiation oncologist and diagnostic radiologist is mandatory. (orig.)

  11. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy;

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  12. An assessment of radiotherapy dosimeters based on CVD grown diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Ramkumar, S; Conway, J; Whitehead, A J; Sussman, R S; Hill, G; Walker, S

    2001-01-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a dosimeter for radiotherapy. Its radiation hardness, the near tissue equivalence and chemical inertness are some of the characteristics of diamond, which make it well suited for its application as a dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology have resulted in the improvement in the quality of material and increased its suitability for radiotherapy applications. We report in this paper, the response of prototype dosimeters based on two different types (CVD1 and CVD2) of CVD diamond to X-rays. The diamond devices were assessed for sensitivity, dependence of response on dose and dose rate, and compared with a Scanditronix silicon photon diode and a PTW natural diamond dosimeter. The diamond devices of CVD1 type showed an initial increase in response with dose, which saturates after approx 6 Gy. The diamond devices of CVD2 type had a response at low fields (1162.8 V/cm), the CVD2-type devices show...

  13. Quantification of static magnetic field effects on radiotherapy ionization chambers

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    Agnew, J.; O’Grady, F.; Young, R.; Duane, S.; Budgell, G. J.

    2017-03-01

    Integrated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and radiotherapy (RT) delivery machines are currently being developed, with some already in clinical use. It is anticipated that the strong magnetic field used in some MR-RT designs will have a significant impact on routine measurements of dose in the MR-linac performed using ionization chambers, which provide traceability back to a primary standard definition of dose. In particular, the presence of small air gaps around ionization chambers may introduce unacceptably high uncertainty into these measurements. In this study, we investigate and quantify the variation attributable to air gaps for several routinely-used cylindrical ionization chambers in a magnetic field, as well as the effect of the magnetic field alone on the response of the chambers. The measurements were performed in a Co-60 beam, while the ionization chambers were positioned in custom-made Perspex phantoms between the poles of an electromagnet, which was capable of generating magnetic fields of up to 2 T field strength, although measurements were focused around 1.5 T. When an asymmetric air gap was rotated at cardinal angles around the ionization chambers investigated here, variation of up to 8.5  ±  0.2 percentage points (PTW 31006 chamber) was observed in an applied magnetic field of 1.5 T. The minimum peak-to-peak variation was 1.1  ±  0.1% (Exradin A1SL). When the same experiment was performed with a well-defined air gap of known position using the PTW 30013 chamber, a variation of 3.8  ±  0.2% was observed. When water was added to the phantom cavity to eliminate all air gaps, the variation for the PTW 30013 was reduced to 0.2  ±  0.01%.

  14. Late effects on human bone marrow after extended field radiotherapy

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    Parmentier, C.; Morardet, N.; Tubiana, M.

    1983-09-01

    Thirty-two patients with lymphoma were treated by extended radiotherapy (RT) at a dose of 40 Gy and were studied by ferrokinetic studies and surface counting at various times following irradiation. Loss of hematopoietic activity in the irradiated areas is compensated by increased activity in the non-irradiated areas. Despite the return of peripheral blood counts to normal, the hyperactivity of the non-irradiated bone marrow persists over up to 13 years after RT, while the hematopoietic activity of the irradiated areas remains depressed and is only slightly higher than immediately after RT. The hypoactivity persisted even when the hemopoietic tissues had been subjected to the intense stimulation provoked by an aplasia caused by chemotherapy. However, a recovery was observed for dose of 20 Gy or lower. The hemopoietic activity of the irradiated bone marrow appears to be related to the volume of the marrow irradiated and is higher after a mantle + inverted Y field than after a mantle field. Bone marrow scintigraphies with /sup 59/Fe in 7 out of 9 patients studied revealed an extension of hematopoiesis into a normally dormant area of the marrow, such as the femora. In 2 patients an erythropoietic activity was observed in spleens which had received a dose of 40 Gy, and extra medullary erythropoiesis was found in approximately two-thirds of the patients.

  15. Microdosimetric characterisation of radiation fields for modelling tissue response in radiotherapy

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    He Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Our overall goal is the development of an approach to model tissue response to radiotherapy in which a tissue is viewed as a statistical ensemble of interacting cells. This involves characterisation of radiation fields on the spatial scale of subcellular structures. On this scale, the spatial distribution of radiation energy imparted to tissue is highly non-uniform and should be characterised in statistical terms. Microdosimetry provides a formalism developed for that purpose. This study addresses limitations of the standard microdosimetric approach to modelling tissue response by introducing two new characteristics that include additional information in a form convenient for this application.Methods: The standard microdosimetric approach is based on the concept of a sensitive volume (SV representing a target volume in the cell. It is considered in isolation from other SVs, implying that energy depositions in different SVs are statistically independent and that individual cells respond to radiation independent of each other. In this study, we examined the latter approximation through analysis of correlation functions. All calculations were performed with Geant4-DNA Monte Carlo code. Results: We found that for some realistic scenarios, spatial correlations of deposited energy can be significant. Two new characteristics of radiation fields are proposed. The first is the specific energy-volume histogram (zVH, which is a microscopic analogue of the dose-volume histogram. The second describes the probability distribution of deposited energies in two SVs without assuming statistical independence between the SVs. Numerical examples for protons and carbon ions of therapeutic energies are presented and discussed.Conclusion: We extended the microdosimetric approach to modelling tissue response by including additional important characteristics and presented them in a more conventional radiotherapy format

  16. Methodology for determining doses to in-field, out-of-field and partially in-field organs for late effects studies in photon radiotherapy

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    Howell, Rebecca M; Scarboro, Sarah B; Kry, Stephen F; Newhauser, Wayne D [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Taddei, Phillip J [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Krishnan, Sunil, E-mail: rhowell@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Unit 97, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-12-07

    An important but little examined aspect of radiation dosimetry studies involving organs outside the treatment field is how to assess dose to organs that are partially within a treatment field; this question is particularly important for studies intended to measure total absorbed dose in order to predict the risk of radiogenic late effects, such as second cancers. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to establish a method to categorize organs as in-field, out-of-field or partially in-field that would be applicable to both conventional and modern radiotherapy techniques. In this study, we defined guidelines to categorize the organs based on isodose inclusion criteria, developed methods to assess doses to partially in-field organs, and then tested the methods by applying them to a case of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma based on actual patient data. For partially in-field organs, we recommend performing a sensitivity test to determine whether potential inaccuracies in low-dose regions of the DVH (from the treatment planning system) have a substantial effect on the mean organ dose, i.e. >5%. In such cases, we suggest supplementing calculated DVH data with measured dosimetric data using a volume-weighting technique to determine the mean dose.

  17. Methodology for determining doses to in-field, out-of-field and partially in-field organs for late effects studies in photon radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Scarboro, Sarah B.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Kry, Stephen F.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-12-01

    An important but little examined aspect of radiation dosimetry studies involving organs outside the treatment field is how to assess dose to organs that are partially within a treatment field; this question is particularly important for studies intended to measure total absorbed dose in order to predict the risk of radiogenic late effects, such as second cancers. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to establish a method to categorize organs as in-field, out-of-field or partially in-field that would be applicable to both conventional and modern radiotherapy techniques. In this study, we defined guidelines to categorize the organs based on isodose inclusion criteria, developed methods to assess doses to partially in-field organs, and then tested the methods by applying them to a case of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma based on actual patient data. For partially in-field organs, we recommend performing a sensitivity test to determine whether potential inaccuracies in low-dose regions of the DVH (from the treatment planning system) have a substantial effect on the mean organ dose, i.e. >5%. In such cases, we suggest supplementing calculated DVH data with measured dosimetric data using a volume-weighting technique to determine the mean dose.

  18. 3T MR-based treatment planning for radiotherapy of brain lesions:

    OpenAIRE

    Fallone, B Gino; Hans-Sonke, Jans; Stanescu, Teodor; Stavrev, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this work is to develop a complete treatment planning procedure for radiation therapy of intracranial lesions based solely on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), i.e. MRI simulation. Methods. The proposed 3T MR-based radiotherapy treatment planning procedure consists of converting the MR images into CT-like images by assigning electron density information (related to CT values) to organ structures. Firstly, the 3D distortion field present in the MR volumes is determined a...

  19. Determination of the optimal method for the field-in-field technique in breast tangential radiotherapy.

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    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-07-01

    Several studies have reported the usefulness of the field-in-field (FIF) technique in breast radiotherapy. However, the methods for the FIF technique used in these studies vary. These methods were classified into three categories. We simulated a radiotherapy plan with each method and analyzed the outcomes. In the first method, a pair of subfields was added to each main field: the single pair of subfields method (SSM). In the second method, three pairs of subfields were added to each main field: the multiple pairs of subfields method (MSM). In the third method, subfields were alternately added: the alternate subfields method (ASM). A total of 51 patients were enrolled in this study. The maximum dose to the planning target volume (PTV) (Dmax) and the volumes of the PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100%) were calculated. The thickness of the breast between the chest wall and skin surface was measured, and patients were divided into two groups according to the median. In the overall series, the average V100% with ASM (60.3%) was significantly higher than with SSM (52.6%) and MSM (48.7%). In the thin breast group as well, the average V100% with ASM (57.3%) and SSM (54.2%) was significantly higher than that with MSM (43.3%). In the thick breast group, the average V100% with ASM (63.4%) was significantly higher than that with SSM (51.0%) and MSM (54.4%). ASM resulted in better dose distribution, regardless of the breast size. Moreover, planning for ASM required a relatively short time. ASM was considered the most preferred method.

  20. Technical aspects of internet-based knowledge presentation in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütttgau, A; Bendl, R

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional radiotherapy planning is a complex and time-consuming optimization process which requires much experience. To simplify and to speed up the process of treatment planning as well as to exchange experience and therapeutic knowledge, the department of Medical Physics at the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) in Heidelberg is developing an Internet-based 3D Radiotherapy planning and Information System (IRIS). IRIS designed internet-based client-server application, implemented using Java, CORBA and PVM. The concept of IRIS combines the functionality of an interactive tutorial with a discussion forum, teleconferencing tool and an atlas of dose distributions. Furthermore an integral knowledge-based system provides automatically generated, preoptimized treatment plans. This paper explains the technical design of the system and gives an overview of experiences gained by the technical realization of a first prototype using currently available internet technology. The prototype is currently running for testing in the intranet of DKFZ.

  1. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  2. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

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    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van, E-mail: e.segarceanu@antoniusziekenhuis.nl [Department of Internal Medicine, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A. [Department of Neurology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Pillen, Sigrid [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Biesma, Douwe H. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vogels, Oscar J.M. [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Alfen, Nens van [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  3. Progressive muscle atrophy and weakness after treatment by mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; Pillen, Sigrid; Biesma, Douwe H; Vogels, Oscar J M; van Alfen, Nens

    2012-02-01

    To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimization of stereotactic radiotherapy treatment delivery technique for base-of-skull meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brenda G; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm3) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm3, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm3, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe.

  5. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Camille E; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J

    2014-01-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC(intraobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD(intraobserver) = 3.6mm ± 1.5, DC(interobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD(interobserver) = 3.2mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  6. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E.; Vasquez R, M. A. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G., E-mail: marcosalivasquez@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, α{sub s}pread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  7. Two Metachronous Neoplasms in the Radiotherapy Fields of a Young Man With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patrick A; Bhaijee, Feriyl; Rezeanu, Luminita; Hamilton, Robert D; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    It is recognized that various radiation-induced malignancies often follow childhood radiotherapy. Radiation-induced neoplasms have been shown to occur with increased frequency in syndromes due to mutated tumor suppressor genes. There exist no recommendations for the management of cancer patients with germline APC gene mutations. Preclinical data suggest that APC gene mutations cause enhanced radiosensitivity, but no clinical observations exist that show that patients with this mutation are at higher risk for radiation-induced malignancies. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with a genetic diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) who initially presented at age 10 with a medulloblastoma treated with radiotherapy and surgery. Radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinoma followed 13 years later. Finally, radiation-induced soft tissue osteosarcoma occurred with widespread metastasis 20 years thereafter. This is the first report of 2 malignancies in the prior radiotherapy fields of a patient with a genetic diagnosis of FAP. More important, this suggests that APC-defective cells are at an enhanced sensitivity to the carcinogenic effects of radiotherapy compared with APC-proficient cells. This could argue for genetic screening in affected members of these families and for creation of treatment recommendations to more seriously consider the risks of radiation therapy.

  8. Two Metachronous Neoplasms in the Radiotherapy Fields of a Young Man With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A. Williams BS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is recognized that various radiation-induced malignancies often follow childhood radiotherapy. Radiation-induced neoplasms have been shown to occur with increased frequency in syndromes due to mutated tumor suppressor genes. There exist no recommendations for the management of cancer patients with germline APC gene mutations. Preclinical data suggest that APC gene mutations cause enhanced radiosensitivity, but no clinical observations exist that show that patients with this mutation are at higher risk for radiation-induced malignancies. Results: We report the case of a 32-year-old man with a genetic diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP who initially presented at age 10 with a medulloblastoma treated with radiotherapy and surgery. Radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinoma followed 13 years later. Finally, radiation-induced soft tissue osteosarcoma occurred with widespread metastasis 20 years thereafter. Conclusions: This is the first report of 2 malignancies in the prior radiotherapy fields of a patient with a genetic diagnosis of FAP. More important, this suggests that APC-defective cells are at an enhanced sensitivity to the carcinogenic effects of radiotherapy compared with APC-proficient cells. This could argue for genetic screening in affected members of these families and for creation of treatment recommendations to more seriously consider the risks of radiation therapy.

  9. Left-sided breast cancer irradiation using rotational and fixed-field radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Liu, Tian X. [Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Liu, Arthur K.; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Hu, Y. Angie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique is the standard for breast cancer radiotherapy. During treatment planning, not only the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) but also the minimization of the dose to critical structures, such as the lung, heart, and contralateral breast tissue, need to be considered. Because of the complexity and variations of patient anatomy, more advanced radiotherapy techniques are sometimes desired to better meet the planning goals. In this study, we evaluated external-beam radiation treatment techniques for left breast cancer using various delivery platforms: fixed-field including TomoDirect (TD), static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and rotational radiotherapy including Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy helical (TH). A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer who did or did not have positive lymph nodes and were previously treated with 3DCRT/sIMRT to the entire breast were selected, their treatment was planned with Monaco VMAT, TD, and TH. Dosimetric parameters including PTV coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, dose-volume histograms, and target minimum/maximum/mean doses were evaluated. It is found that for plans providing comparable PTV coverage, the Elekta VMAT plans were generally more inhomogeneous than the TH and TD plans. For the cases with regional node involvement, the average mean doses administered to the heart were 9.2 (± 5.2) and 8.8 (± 3.0) Gy in the VMAT and TH plans compared with 11.9 (± 6.4) and 11.8 (± 9.2) Gy for the 3DCRT and TD plans, respectively, with slightly higher doses given to the contralateral lung or breast or both. On average, the total monitor units for VMAT plans are 11.6% of those TH plans. Our studies have shown that VMAT and TH plans offer certain dosimetric advantages over fixed-field IMRT plans for advanced breast cancer requiring regional nodal treatment. However, for early-stage breast cancer fixed-field

  10. A risk-adapted strategy of radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy in stage II seminoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domont, Julien; Massard, Christophe; Patrikidou, Anna; Bossi, Alberto; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Rose, Mathieu; Wibault, Pierre; Fizazi, Karim

    2013-07-01

    Indications for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage II seminoma are currently debated. Since 1980, the policy at Institut Gustave Roussy was to treat patients with stage IIA-B disease with external radiotherapy and patients with stage IIB-C with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In stage IIB disease, 3 cm was the usual tumor size threshold above which individual patients were considered for chemotherapy. During the period 1980-2001, 67 patients with stage II seminoma were treated: stage IIA (n = 5), stage IIB (n = 31), and stage IIC (n = 31). The median age was 40 years (range: 23-64). Among 37 patients who received radiotherapy, 5, 28, and 4 had a stage IIA, IIB, and IIC, respectively. Among 30 patients who received chemotherapy, 27 had a stage IIC. With a median follow-up of 9.4 years, 19 relapses (28%) occurred, including 11 and 8 cases treated with radiotherapy (30%) and chemotherapy (27%), respectively. The 5-year relapse-free survival was 71% (95% CI: 59-80). All but three relapses were salvaged with chemotherapy followed in selected cases by surgical resection of residual masses. Only 3 patients died of seminoma. The 5-year overall survival rate is 97% (95% CI: 89-99). Five patients subsequently developed a non-germ-cell second cancer, which occurred within the radiation field in 3 cases. With an overall survival rate of 97%, the overall outcome of patients with stage II seminoma managed according to this risk-adapted strategy is good. The possibility of extending the indications for chemotherapy to selected stage IIB seminoma patients needs to be further evaluated as potentially beneficial in terms of relapse risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RADIOTHERAPY VS NO RADIOTHERAPY BASED ON EARLY RESPONSE TO VAMP CHEMOTHERAPY AND SURVIVAL AMONG CHILDREN WITH FAVORABLE RISK HODGKIN LYMPHOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Monika L.; Weinstein, Howard J.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Billett, Amy L.; Larsen, Eric C.; Friedmann, Alison; Howard, Scott C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Kun, Larry E.; Marcus, Karen J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy; Billups, Catherine A.; Wu, Jianrong; Link, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Context Maintaining excellent cure rates in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma while minimizing toxicity. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of 4 cycles of vinblastine, Adriamycin, methotrexate, and prednisone (VAMP) in patients with favorable risk Hodgkin lymphoma who achieve a complete response after 2 cycles and do not receive radiotherapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Multi-institutional, unblinded, non-randomized single group phase II clinical trial to assess the need for radiotherapy based on early response to chemotherapy. Eighty-eight eligible patients with Hodgkin lymphoma stage I and II (< 3 nodal sites, no B symptoms, mediastinal bulk, or extranodal extension) enrolled between March 3, 2000 through December 9, 2008. Data frozen March 12, 2012. Interventions Patients who achieved a complete response (n=47) after 2 cycles received no radiotherapy, and those with less than complete response (n=41) were given 25.5 Gy involved field radiotherapy. Main Outcome Measures 2-year event-free survival was the primary outcome measure. A 2-year event-free survival of greater than 90% was desired, and 80% was considered to be unacceptably low. Results Two-year event-free survival was 90.8% (95% CI, 84.7% – 96.9%); for patients who did not require radiotherapy it was 89.4% (95% CI, 80.8% – 98%), compared with 92.5% (95% CI, 84.5% – 100%) for those who did (P=0.61). Most common acute side effects were neuropathic pain (2% of patients), nausea/vomiting (3% of patients), neutropenia (32% of cycles), and febrile neutropenia (2% of patients). Nine patients (10%) were hospitalized 11 times (3% of cycles) for febrile neutropenia or non-neutropenic infection. Long term side effects after radiotherapy were asymptomatic compensated hypothyroidism in 9 patients (10%), osteonecrosis and moderate osteopenia in 2 patients each, subclinical pulmonary dysfunction in 12 patients (26%) and asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction in 4 patients (5%). No second malignant neoplasms were

  12. Evaluation of the optimal field arrangement for conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mahmoud; K Elshahat; H. William; M.Barsum; Amr Gaber

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal field arrangement for conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: Thirty patients with prostate cancer of different grades and stages were treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy to minimize the dose to bladder, rectum and head of both femora using four fields (4F), five fields (5F), six fields (6F) and ARC techniques to minimize the risk of over dose to bladder, rectum and femoral heads. Patients received a total dose between 76 to 78 Gy given in 38 to 39 fractions over 7.5 to 8 weeks. Results: It was observed that V95, D95, D50 and D5 values for planning target volume (PTV) were comparatively higher when planned by 5 fields technique than when planned by fixed field technique (91%, 91%, 90% and 91.4% for skip-scan technique versus 85%, 87%, 86% and 88% by fixed field). The organs like rectum and urinary bladder get much higher dose when treated by fixed field techniques than rotation or 5 fields technique, when comparison was made for V95, V50 and DM values for rectum and urinary bladder obtained by 5 fields technique planning and 4/6 field planning, the value for 5 fields technique was found to be lower than 4/6 field technique (1%, 70% and 51% versus 13%, 91% and 55% for rectum and 4%, 25% and 51% versus 16%, 38% and 56% for urinary bladder respectively). Conclusion: Similarly for femoral heads, planning by full rotational technique had been observed to be beneficial as compared to when planning was done by fixed field technique (0%, 0% and 29% versus 0%, 1% and 28%).

  13. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Camille E.; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y.; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu

    2014-10-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC{sub intraobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD{sub intraobserver} = 3.6 mm ± 1.5, DC{sub interobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD{sub interobserver} = 3.2 mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4 mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  14. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  15. A population-based study of factors affecting the use of radiotherapy for endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, T P; Richardson, H; Peng, Y; Kong, W; Zhang-Salomons, J; Mackillop, W J

    2012-10-01

    To describe the use of adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial cancer in Ontario, and identify factors associated with its use, and to determine whether variation in the use of radiation is associated with differences in survival. This was a retrospective, population-based, cohort study of all patients who had a hysterectomy for endometrial cancer in Ontario between 1992 and 2003. We used multiple logistic regression to identify health system-related factors associated with the use of radiotherapy, while controlling for disease- and patient-related factors. Survival and cancer cause-specific survival were compared among regions of the province with higher and lower rates of use of radiotherapy. The study population included a total of 9411 women with a median age of 63 years. Overall, 26.2% received adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients living further from regional cancer centres were slightly less likely to receive radiation (P = 0.02). Patients who had their surgery during longer prevailing waiting times for radiotherapy were less likely to receive radiation (P = 0.04). The use of radiotherapy varied widely from 18.0 to 34.3% among the catchment areas of provincial radiotherapy centres (P radiotherapy. However, in the subgroup of cases with clear cell and serous carcinomas, both overall survival and cancer cause-specific survival were significantly lower in regions with lower rates of use of radiotherapy (P radiotherapy in Ontario. Lower rates of use of adjuvant radiotherapy are associated with lower rates of survival in patients with serous and clear cell carcinomas. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhood, B; Bahreyni Toossi, M T; Vosoughi, H; Khademi, S; Knaup, C

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient's setup, the technologists' experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient's setup time. Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient's setup, etc. could be considered.

  17. Partial differential equations-based segmentation for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibou, Frederic; Levy, Doron; Cardenas, Carlos; Liu, Pingyu; Boyer, Arthur

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop automatic algorithms for the segmentation phase of radiotherapy treatment planning. We develop new image processing techniques that are based on solving a partial diferential equation for the evolution of the curve that identifies the segmented organ. The velocity function is based on the piecewise Mumford-Shah functional. Our method incorporates information about the target organ into classical segmentation algorithms. This information, which is given in terms of a three- dimensional wireframe representation of the organ, serves as an initial guess for the segmentation algorithm. We check the performance of the new algorithm on eight data sets of three diferent organs: rectum, bladder, and kidney. The results of the automatic segmentation were compared with a manual seg- mentation of each data set by radiation oncology faculty and residents. The quality of the automatic segmentation was measured with the k-statistics", and with a count of over- and undersegmented frames, and was shown in most cases to be very close to the manual segmentation of the same data. A typical segmentation of an organ with sixty slices takes less than ten seconds on a Pentium IV laptop.

  18. A comparative study on the risk of second primary cancers in out-of-field organs associated with radiotherapy of localized prostate carcinoma using Monte Carlo-based accelerator and patient models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Athar, Basit; Xu, X. George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02108 and Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: A physician's decision regarding an ideal treatment approach (i.e., radiation, surgery, and/or hormonal) for prostate carcinoma is traditionally based on a variety of metrics. One of these metrics is the risk of radiation-induced second primary cancer following radiation treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of second cancer risks in out-of-field organs from 3D-CRT and IMRT treatments of prostate carcinoma compared to baseline cancer risks in these organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a detailed medical linear accelerator model and an anatomically realistic adult male whole-body phantom. A four-field box treatment, a four-field box treatment plus a six-field boost, and a seven-field IMRT treatment were simulated. Using BEIR VII risk models, the age-dependent lifetime attributable risks to various organs outside the primary beam with a known predilection for cancer were calculated using organ-averaged equivalent doses. Results: The four-field box treatment had the lowest treatment-related second primary cancer risks to organs outside the primary beam ranging from 7.3x10{sup -9} to 2.54x10{sup -5}%/MU depending on the patients age at exposure and second primary cancer site. The risks to organs outside the primary beam from the four-field box and six-field boost and the seven-field IMRT were nearly equivalent. The risks from the four-field box and six-field boost ranged from 1.39x10{sup -8} to 1.80x10{sup -5}%/MU, and from the seven-field IMRT ranged from 1.60x10{sup -9} to 1.35x10{sup -5}%/MU. The second cancer risks in all organs considered from each plan were below the baseline risks. Conclusions: The treatment-related second cancer risks in organs outside the primary beam due to 3D-CRT and IMRT is small. New risk assessment techniques need to be investigated to address the concern of radiation-induced second cancers from prostate treatments, particularly focusing on risks to organs inside the

  19. A comparative study on the risk of second primary cancers in out-of-field organs associated with radiotherapy of localized prostate carcinoma using Monte Carlo-based accelerator and patient models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Athar, Basit; Xu, X. George

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A physician’s decision regarding an ideal treatment approach (i.e., radiation, surgery, and∕or hormonal) for prostate carcinoma is traditionally based on a variety of metrics. One of these metrics is the risk of radiation-induced second primary cancer following radiation treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of second cancer risks in out-of-field organs from 3D-CRT and IMRT treatments of prostate carcinoma compared to baseline cancer risks in these organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a detailed medical linear accelerator model and an anatomically realistic adult male whole-body phantom. A four-field box treatment, a four-field box treatment plus a six-field boost, and a seven-field IMRT treatment were simulated. Using BEIR VII risk models, the age-dependent lifetime attributable risks to various organs outside the primary beam with a known predilection for cancer were calculated using organ-averaged equivalent doses. Results: The four-field box treatment had the lowest treatment-related second primary cancer risks to organs outside the primary beam ranging from 7.3×10−9 to 2.54×10−5%∕MU depending on the patients age at exposure and second primary cancer site. The risks to organs outside the primary beam from the four-field box and six-field boost and the seven-field IMRT were nearly equivalent. The risks from the four-field box and six-field boost ranged from 1.39×10−8 to 1.80×10−5%∕MU, and from the seven-field IMRT ranged from 1.60×10−9 to 1.35×10−5%∕MU. The second cancer risks in all organs considered from each plan were below the baseline risks. Conclusions: The treatment-related second cancer risks in organs outside the primary beam due to 3D-CRT and IMRT is small. New risk assessment techniques need to be investigated to address the concern of radiation-induced second cancers from prostate treatments, particularly focusing on risks to organs inside the primary beam

  20. Technical and Dosimetric Study of Four Facio-cervical Fields Conformal Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fang-zheng; FU Zhen-fu; WANG Lei; PIAO Yong-feng; HUA Yong-hong; CHEN Wei-jun; XU Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to establish the methods of four facio-cervical field's conformal radiotherapy (4F-CRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and to optimize the methods for clinical practiceMaterials and Methods:40 patients with untreated NPC of T1-T4 (1997 AJCC Staging System) were rolled into this study.Conventional and four facio-cervical fields conform plans were designed for each patient using Pinnacle 8.0 three-dimension treatment planning system (3D-TPS) as follows:1Improved plan, four facio-cervical field's conform plan, anterior, posterior facio-cervical and two lateral opposing facio-cervical fields; 2Conventional plan, two lateral opposing facio-cervical fields delivered to the target in each plan, only with the same dose dose volume histograms (DVHs) of the targets and normal organs, brain stem, spinal cord, parotid glands, and temporal mandibular joints (TMJs) were compared and the dose distribution were evaluatedResults: 1.The dose distribution of the improved plan could meet the requirements for the target volume2There was not any significant difference in the dose of spinal cord between the two plans.The mean doses of D max for brain stem in conventional plan were much lower than those in the improved plan, though both were within safety limits3Compared with the conventional plans, the improved plan significantly decreased the hotspot areas in the target volume and had better parotid glands and temporal mandibular joints sparing effectConclusion:Compared with the conventional plan, the improved plan provides satisfactory dose coverage to the tumor volume and better sparing of the parotid gland, TMJs and other normal tissues in external beam radiotherapy of NPC.

  1. Clinical significance of geographic miss when using conventional four field radiotherapy technique in treatment of locally advanced carcinoma cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gulia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although conventional four- field radiotherapy based on bony landmarks has been traditionally used, areas of geographical miss due to individual variation in pelvic anatomy have been identified with advanced imaging techniques. AIMS: The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the geographical miss in patientswhen using the conventional four-field planningplanning and to find out the impact of 3-D conformal CT based in patients with locally advanced carcinoma cervix.Materials and Methods: In 50 patients, target volume delineation was done on planning computed tomography (CT scans, according to guidelines by Taylor et al. Patients were treated with modified four field plan, except for the superior, where field border was kept at L4-L5 interspace A dosimetric comparison was done between the conventional four-field based on bony landmarks and the target volume delineated on computed tomography. The disease free survival, pelvic and para aortic nodal free survival, distant failures free survival were calculated using Kaplan Meir Product Limit Method. Results: Patients were followed-up for a median period of 11 months. The median V95 for conventional and modified extended four field plans were 89.4% and 91.3% respectively. Patients with V95 for modified extended pelvic fields less than 91.3% had a trend toward inferior disease free survival (mean DFS 9.8 vs. 13.9 months though the difference was not statistically significant log rank test.Conclusions: Our preliminary data shows trend toward lower DFS in patients with inadequate target volume coverage. We recommend routine use of CT based planning for four field technique.

  2. MedLinac2: a GEANT4 based software package for radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Caccia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dose distribution evaluation in oncological radiotherapy treatments is an outstanding problem that requires sophisticated computing technologies to optimize the clinical results (i.e. increase the dose to the tumour and reduce the dose to the healthy tissues. Nowdays, dose calculation algorithms based on the Monte Carlo method are generally regarded as the most accurate tools for radiotherapy. The flexibility of the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code allows a wide range of applications, from high-energy to medical physics. In order to disseminate and encourage the use of Monte Carlo method in oncological radiotherapy, a software package based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit has been developed. The developed package (MedLinac2 allows to simulate in an adequate flexible way a linear accelerator for radiotherapy and to evaluate the dose distributions.

  3. SU-E-T-17: A Comparison of Forward and Field in Field Intensity Modulation Radiotherapy Planning for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Sun, T; Chen, J; Zhang, G [shandong tumor hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference in forward intensity modulation radiotherapy(fIMRT) and field in field IMRT (FIF IMRT)planning for breast cancer. Methods: Ten patients received radiotherapy are selected.For each patient,two treatment plans(fIMRT and FIF IMRT) were designed with Varian Eclipse ver11.0 treatment planning system.Evaluate the dose parameters of targets, organs at risk (OAR), monitor units and treatment time, using dose-volume histogram (DVH). Results: There were no significant difference were found in conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of PTV,V5,V10,V20,V30,V40,V50 of heart, lung and monitor unit(MU)(P>0.05).The differences were significant in the treatment time(fIMRT=8.3min,FIF IMRT=2.5,p<0.05). Conclusion: FIF IMRT is equal to fIMRT in dosimetril evaluation. Due to much less delivery time,FIF IMRT is an efficient technique in treating patients by reduceing the uncomfortable influnce which could effect the treatment.

  4. Porcine acellular dermis-based breast reconstruction: complications and outcomes following adjuvant radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Cho Ee; Pieri, Andrew; Fasih, Tarannum

    2015-01-01

    Background Acellular dermal matrices (ADM) such as StratticeTM are increasingly used in UK during implant-based reconstruction. However, there are mixed opinions regarding the compatibility of radiotherapy treatment in pre- and post-reconstructed breasts. The aims of this study are to audit the rates of radiation induced complications in patients who underwent breast reconstruction using StratticeTM and establish whether there is an association between timing of radiotherapy and complication ...

  5. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhood B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8 in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered.

  6. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-02-21

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  7. Conformal fields in prostate radiotherapy: A comparison between measurement, calculation and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied R Mahdavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of a treatment planning system (TPS for calculating the dose distribution parameters in conformal fields (CF. Dosimetric parameters of CF′s were compared between measurement, Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP4C and TPS calculation. Materials and Methods: Field analyzer water phantom was used for obtaining percentage depth dose (PDD curves and beam profiles (BP of different conformal fields. MCNP4C was used to model conformal fields dose specification factors and head of linear accelerator varian model 2100C/D. Results: Results showed that the distance to agreement (DTA and dose difference (DD of our findings were well within the acceptance criteria of 3 mm and 3%, respectively. Conclusions: According to this study it can be revealed that TPS using equivalent tissue air ratio calculation method is still convenient for dose prediction in non small conformal fields normally used in prostate radiotherapy. It was also showed that, since there is a close correlation with Monte Carlo simulation, measurements and TPS, Monte Carlo can be further confirmed for implementation and calculation dose distribution in non standard and complex conformal irradiation field for treatment planning systems.

  8. Voxel-Based Dose Prediction with Multi-Patient Atlas Selection for Automated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Automating the radiotherapy treatment planning process is a technically challenging problem. The majority of automated approaches have focused on customizing and inferring dose volume objectives to used in plan optimization. In this work we outline a multi-patient atlas-based dose prediction approach that learns to predict the dose-per-voxel for a novel patient directly from the computed tomography (CT) planning scan without the requirement of specifying any objectives. Our method learns to automatically select the most effective atlases for a novel patient, and then map the dose from those atlases onto the novel patient. We extend our previous work to include a conditional random field for the optimization of a joint distribution prior that matches the complementary goals of an accurately spatially distributed dose distribution while still adhering to the desired dose volume histograms. The resulting distribution can then be used for inverse-planning with a new spatial dose objective, or to create typical do...

  9. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  10. Dosimetry and field matching for radiotherapy to the breast and superclavicular fossa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Elizabeth

    Radiotherapy for early breast cancer aims to achieve local disease control and decrease loco-regional recurrence rates. Treatment may be directed to breast or chest wall alone or, include regional lymph nodes. When using tangential fields to treat the breast a separate anterior field directed to the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (SCF) is needed to treat nodal areas. The complex geometry of this region necessitates matching of adjacent radiation fields in three dimensions. The potential exists for zones of overdosage or underdosage along the match line. Cosmetic results may be compromised if treatment fields are not accurately aligned. Techniques for field matching vary between centres in the UK. A study of dosimetry across the match line region using different techniques, as reported in the multi-centre START Trial Quality Assurance (QA) programme, was undertaken. A custom-made anthropomorphic phantom was designed to assess dose distribution in three dimensions using film dosimetry. Methods with varying degrees of complexity were employed to match tangential and SCF beams. Various techniques combined half beam blocking and machine rotations to achieve geometric alignment. Matching of asymmetric beams allowed a single isocentre technique to be used. Where field matching was not undertaken a gap between tangential and SCF fields was employed. Results demonstrated differences between techniques in addition to variations within the same technique between different centres. Geometric alignment techniques produced more homogenous dose distributions in the match region than gap techniques or those techniques not correcting for field divergence. For this multi-centre assessment of match plane techniques film dosimetry used in conjunction with a breast shaped phantom provided relative dose information. This study has highlighted the difficulties of matching treatment fields to achieve homogenous dose distribution through the region of the match plane and the degree of

  11. Radiation Field Design and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence Following Definitive Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Susie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Schuster, David M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Mister, Donna; Liu Tian; Godette, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Torres, Mylin A., E-mail: matorre@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. Methods and Materials: We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as {>=}95% of the LRR volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose to {>=}95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Results: Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Conclusions: Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer.

  12. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M V; Jørgensen, M; Brodin, N P;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of radiotherapy (RT) is debated for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) due to the late effects of treatment. Radiation doses to the thyroid, heart, lungs, and breasts are compared with the extensive mantle field (MF), Involved Field RT(IFRT), Modified IFRT (m...

  13. Less gastrointestinal toxicity after adjuvant radiotherapy on a small pelvic field compared to a standard pelvic field in patients with endometrial carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Renske A.; Pras, Elisabeth; Boezen, H. Marike; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Arts, Henriette J. G.; Aalders, Jan G.; Slot, Annerie; Timmer, Paul R.; Hollema, Harry; Nijman, Hans W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Radiotherapy is associated with short-term and long-term morbidity. This study compared toxicity rates among patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on a small pelvic field (SmPF) in comparison with a standard pelvic field (StP

  14. Nipple reconstruction after implant-based breast reconstruction: a "matched-pair" outcome analysis focusing on the effects of radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Arash; Ghaly, Mina; Gupta, Deepak; Gurtner, Geoffrey; Kahn, David M; Karanas, Yvonne L; Lee, Gordon K

    2013-09-01

    The major focus of research when addressing nipple reconstruction has been on developing new techniques to provide for long-lasting nipple projection. Rarely, has the outcome of nipple reconstruction as it relates to postoperative morbidity, particularly after implant-based breast reconstruction, been analyzed. A "matched-pair" study was designed to specifically answer the question whether a history of radiotherapy predisposes to a higher complication rate after nipple reconstruction in patients after implant-based breast reconstruction. Only patients with a history of unilateral radiotherapy who underwent bilateral mastectomy and implant-based breast reconstruction followed by bilateral nipple reconstruction were included in the study. A total of 17 patients (i.e. 34 nipple reconstructions) were identified who met inclusion criteria. The mean age of the study population was 43.5 years (range, 23-69). Complications were seen after a total of 8 nipple reconstructions (23.5 percent). Of these, 7 complications were seen on the irradiated side (41.2 percent) (p = 0.03). While nipple reconstruction is a safe procedure after implant-based breast reconstruction in patients without a history of radiotherapy the presence of an irradiated field converts it to a procedure with a significant increase in postoperative complication rate. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  16. [CUDA-based fast dose calculation in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianliang; Liu, Cao; Hou, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Dose calculation plays a key role in treatment planning of radiotherapy. Algorithms for dose calculation require high accuracy and computational efficiency. Finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is a method commonly adopted in the treatment planning system for radiotherapy. However, improvement on its computational efficiency is still desirable for such purpose as real time treatment planning. In this paper, we present an implementation of the FSPB, by which the most time-consuming parts in the algorithm are parallelized and ported on graphic processing unit (GPU). Compared with the FSPB completely running on central processing unit (CPU), the GPU-implemented FSPB can speed up the dose calculation for 25-35 times on a low price GPU (Geforce GT320) and for 55-100 times on a Tesla C1060, indicating that the GPU-implemented FSPB can provide fast enough dose calculations for real-time treatment planning.

  17. Postmastectomy radiotherapy of the chest wall. Comparison of electron-rotation technique and common tangential photon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehr, T.; Classen, J.; Huth, M.; Durst, I.; Bamberg, M.; Budach, W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Christ, G. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Univ. of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    either with the electron-rotation technique (LRC 92%) or with the photon-based technique (LRC 89%; p = 0.9). A subgroup analysis of tumors resected with ''close margins'' showed a higher LRF rate of 25% after electron-beam-rotation irradiation (n = 180) compared to an LRF of 13% with tangential opposed 6-MV photon fields (n = 107; p < 0.05). Large primary tumors of {>=} 5 cm developed LRF in 29% of patients treated with electron-beam-rotation irradiation and in 17% of patients with photon-based irradiation (p = 0.1). Conclusion: in locally advanced breast cancer, the LRC after postmastectomy irradiation with both techniques is comparable with published data from randomized studies. The tangential opposed photon field technique seems to be beneficial after marginal resection (histopathologic ''close margins'') of the primary tumor. (orig.)

  18. Automated Image-Based Procedures for Adaptive Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels

    -tissue complication probability (NTCP), margins used to account for interfraction and intrafraction anatomical changes and motion need to be reduced. This can only be achieved through proper treatment plan adaptations and intrafraction motion management. This thesis describes methods in support of image...... to encourage bone rigidity and local tissue volume change only in the gross tumour volume and the lungs. This is highly relevant in adaptive radiotherapy when modelling significant tumour volume changes. - It is described how cone beam CT reconstruction can be modelled as a deformation of a planning CT scan...

  19. Dosimetric comparison between coplanar and non coplanar field radiotherapy for ethmoid sinus cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serre Antoine

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare non coplanar field (NCF with coplanar field (CF -intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for ethmoid cancer. Methods Seven patients treated with NCF IMRT for ethmoid cancer were studied. A CF IMRT optimization was prepared with the same constraints as for the NCF treatment. The maximum point doses (D max obtained for the different optic pathway structures (OPS should differ no more than 3% from those achieved with the NCF IMRT plan. The distribution of the dose in the target volume and in the critical structures was compared between the two techniques, as well as the Conformity (CI and the Homogeneity Indexes (HI in the target volume. Results We noted no difference between the two techniques in the OPS for the D1, D2, and D5%, in the inner ear and controlateral lens for the average Dmax, in the temporo-mandibular joints for the average mean dose, in the cord and brainstem for the average D1%. The dose-volume histograms were slightly better with the NCF treatment plan for the planning target volume (PTV with a marginally better HI but no impact on CI. We found a great improvement in the PTV coverage with the CF treatment plan for two patients with T4 tumors. Conclusion IMRT is one of the treatment options for ethmoid cancer. The PTV coverage is optimal without compromising the protection of the OPS. The impact of non coplanar versus coplanar set up is very slight.

  20. SU-E-T-596: Axillary Nodes Radiotherapy Boost Field Dosimetric Impact Study: Oblique Field and Field Optimization in 3D Conventional Breast Cancer Radiation Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, M [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Elmhurst, NY (United States); Sura, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric impact of two axillary nodes (AX) boost techniques: (1) posterior-oblique optimized field boost (POB), (2) traditional posterior-anterior boost (PAB) with field optimization (O-PAB), for a postmastectomy breast patient with positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods: Five patients, 3 left and 2 right chest walls, were included in this study. All patients were simulated in 5mm CT slice thickness. Supraclavicular (SC) and level I/II/III AX were contoured based on the RTOG atlas guideline. Five treatment plans, (1) tangential chest wall, (2) oblique SC including AX, (3) PAB, O-PAB and POB, were created for each patient. Three plan sums (PS) were generated by sum one of (3) plan with plan (1) and (2). The field optimization was done through PS dose distribution, which included a field adjustment, a fractional dose, a calculation location and a gantry angle selection for POB. A dosimetric impact was evaluated by comparing a SC and AX coverage, a PS maximum dose, an irradiated area percentage volume received dose over 105% prescription dose (V105), an ipsi-laterial mean lung dose (MLD), an ipsi-laterial mean humeral head dose (MHHD), a mean heart dose (MHD) (for left case only) and their DVH amount these three technique. Results: O-PAB, POB and PAB dosimetric results showed that there was no significant different on SC and AX coverage (p>0.43) and MHD (p>0.16). The benefit of sparing lung irradiation from PAB to O-PAB to POB was significant (p<0.004). PAB showed a highest PS maximum dose (p<0.005), V105 (p<0.023) and MLD (compared with OPAB, p=0.055). MHHD showed very sensitive to the patient arm positioning and anatomy. O-PAB convinced a lower MHHD than PAB (p=0.03). Conclusion: 3D CT contouring plays main role in accuracy radiotherapy. Dosimetric advantage of POB and O-PAB was observed for a better normal tissue irradiation sparing.

  1. Radiotherapy for bone metastases - Practice in Norway 1997 - 2007. A national registry-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sande Laugsand, Tonje [European Palliative Care Research Centre (PRC), Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian Univ. of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)], e-mail: tonje.laugsand@ntnu.no; Kaasa, Stein; Lund, Jo-Aasmund [European Palliative Care Research Centre (PRC), Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian Univ. of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Univ. Hospital of Trondheim, Trondheim (Norway); Romundstad, Paal [Dept. of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian Univ. of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Johannesen, Tom Boerge [Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-08-15

    Numerous randomised clinical trials have shown that the efficacy of single fraction radiotherapy for metastatic bone pain corresponds to that of multiple fractions of radiotherapy for the majority of patients. It is not clear to which extent single fraction radiotherapy has been implemented into clinical practice. Material and methods: A Norwegian national registry based study was conducted, including all radiotherapy schedules of 8 Gy x 1 and 3 Gy x 10 delivered to bone metastases in 1997 - 2007. Binomial regression analyses were used to study whether treatment centre, primary diagnosis, anatomical region irradiated, age, sex, and travel distance, were associated with the choice of fractionation. Results: A total of 14 380 radiotherapy episodes were identified. During the period 31% of the treatments were delivered as 8 Gy x 1. The proportion of single fraction treatments increased from 16% in 1997 to 41% in 2007. There were substantial differences in the proportion of single fraction treatments between the treatment centres (range 25 - 54%). These differences persisted after adjustment for sex, age, primary diagnosis, anatomical region, and travel distance. Conclusions: The study demonstrates an under utilisation of single fraction treatment for bone metastases in Norway during the study period.

  2. The field size matters: low dose external beam radiotherapy for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis : Importance of field size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Bulling, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hermann, Robert Michael

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy (RT) for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (rhizarthrosis). The responses of 84 patients (n = 101 joints) were analyzed 3 months after therapy (n = 65) and at 12 months (n = 27). Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 1 Gy, two times a week, with a linear accelerator. At the end of therapy, about 70 % of patients reported a response (partial remission or complete remission), 3 months later about 60 %, and 1 year after treatment 70 %. In univariate regression analysis, higher patient age and field size greater than 6 × 4 cm were associated with response to treatment, while initial increase of pain under treatment was predictive for treatment failure. Duration of RT series (more than 18 days), gender, time of symptoms before RT, stress pain or rest pain, or prior ortheses use, injections, or surgery of the joint were not associated with treatment efficacy. In multivariate regression analysis, only field size and initial pain increase were highly correlated with treatment outcome. In conclusion, RT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from carpometacarpal osteoarthritis. In contrast to other benign indications, a larger field size (>6 × 4 cm) seems to be more effective than smaller fields and should be evaluated in further prospective studies.

  3. Conventional radiotherapy of localized right side breast cancer after radical mastectomy: development of innovative “field in field” technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Marošević

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this paper is to study the distribution of the therapy dosage applied by a modified conventional “field in field” technique and compare it to the distribution of the dosage applied by the standard conventional technique.Methods: The study included ten patients with right side breast cancer, after they were exposed to radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy dosage of TD 50 Gy in 25 fractions was applied to the anterolateral side of the right thoracic wall, with two opposite conventional tangential fields by the linear accelerator Elekta Synergy and the energy of 6 megavolts (MV. A delineation of the target volume (CTV – Clinical Target Volume was done within conventional fields. At the XiO system for planning we included additional fields within the existing conventional fields, which was the so called “field in field” technique. On the basis of CTV the Dose Volume  Histogram (DVH was calculated for conventional and “field in field” plans. VD90%, VD95%, VD107%, VD115%, CI and HI were calculated for both techniques. Means were pared with the paired Student's t-test. The results were considered significantly different if p<0.05.Results: VD90% and VD 95% were significantly higher for the “field in field” technique. Therefore, CI also favored the “field in field” technique (p=0.02. There was no difference in VD107% and VD115% between the compared groups. Consequently, there was no statistically significant difference in HI (1.13±0.03 vs.1.13±0.03, p=0.06.Conclusion: Conventional postoperative radiotherapy of localized right side breast cancer by “field in field” technique provides excellent coverage of the target volume by radiotherapy isodose.

  4. A patch-based pseudo-CT approach for MRI-only radiotherapy in the pelvis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Edmund, Jens M.

    2016-01-01

    In radiotherapy based only on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), knowledge about tissue electron densities must be derived from the MRI. This can be achieved by converting the MRI scan to the so-called pseudo-computed tomography (pCT). An obstacle is that the voxel intensities in conventional MRI ...

  5. Improving Feature-based Non-rigid Registration for Applications in Radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Vásquez Osorio (Eliana)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes the improvements of a feature-based non-rigid registration method that were essential for its application in radiotherapy. In addition, this thesis presents three practical applications of the improved method: 1) quantification of anatomical changes in 3D for head a

  6. International data-sharing for radiotherapy research: an open-source based infrastructure for multicentric clinical data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Erik; Dekker, André; Meldolesi, Elisa; van Stiphout, Ruud G P M; Valentini, Vincenzo; Lambin, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Extensive, multifactorial data sharing is a crucial prerequisite for current and future (radiotherapy) research. However, the cost, time and effort to achieve this are often a roadblock. We present an open-source based data-sharing infrastructure between two radiotherapy departments, allowing seamless exchange of de-identified, automatically translated clinical and biomedical treatment data.

  7. 2nd Tuebingen radiotherapy symposium: Whole body, large field and whole skin irradiation. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebener, K.H.; Frommhold, W.

    1987-04-01

    The symposium which took place on the 11th and 12th April 1986 set itself the task of discussing three different groups of radiotherapy topics. The chief issue was whole-body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplants, in which all the therapy centres in West Germany, Austria, East Germany and German-speaking Switzerland made clinical and radiophysical contributions. The second part of the Symposium consisted mainly of talks and discussions on large-field irradiation, more precisely half-body and sequential partial body irradiation. This topic was chosen because this type of therapy is scarcely practised at all, particularly in West Germany, whereas in the United States, East Germany, Switzerland and a number of other countries it has long since become one of the established methods. The last talk at the Symposium explained clinical and radiophysical aspects of whole-skin irradiation. Here too, one was impressed by the wide diversity of the equipment and methods of irradiation used which, nevertheless, all demonstrated satisfactory practical solutions in their common aim of distributing the dose as homogeneously as possible.

  8. Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease After Involved Node Radiotherapy Versus Mantle Field for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are known to have increased cardiac mortality and morbidity. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease after involved node radiotherapy (INRT) is currently unresolved, inasmuch as present clinical data are derived from patients treated with the outdated mantle field (MF) technique. Methods and Materials: We included all adolescents and young adults with supradiaphragmatic, clinical Stage I-II HL treated at our institution from 2006 to 2010 (29 patients). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and INRT to 30 to 36 Gy. We then simulated a MF plan for each patient with a prescribed dose of 36 Gy. A logistic dose-response curve for the 25-year absolute excess risk of cardiovascular disease was derived and applied to each patient using the individual dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean doses to the heart, four heart valves, and coronary arteries were significantly lower for INRT than for MF treatment. However, the range in doses with INRT treatment was substantial, and for a subgroup of patients, with lymphoma below the fourth thoracic vertebrae, we estimated a 25-year absolute excess risk of any cardiac event of as much as 5.1%. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a potential for individualizing treatment by selecting the patients for whom INRT provides sufficient cardiac protection for current technology; and a subgroup of patients, who still receive high cardiac doses, who would benefit from more advanced radiation technique.

  9. Radiation dose and cancer risk to out-of-field and partially in-field organs from radiotherapy for symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, Crete 71003 (Greece); Tzedakis, Antonis [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Iraklion, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece); Lyraraki, Efrossyni [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Iraklion, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are the most common benign tumors of the spine that may cause bone resorption. Megavoltage irradiation is usually the treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic VHs. The current study was conducted to estimate the risk for carcinogenesis from radiotherapy of this benign disease on the basis of the calculated radiation doses to healthy organs. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code was employed to simulate the irradiation with 6 MV x-rays of a VH presented in the cervical, upper thoracic, lower thoracic, and lumbar spine. The average radiation dose (D{sub av}) received by each critical organ located outside the primarily irradiated area was calculated. Three-dimensional treatment plans were also generated for the VHs occurring at the four different sites of the spinal cord based on patients’ computed tomography data. The organ equivalent dose (OED) to each radiosensitive structure, which was partly encompassed by the applied treatment fields, was calculated with the aid of differential dose–volume histograms. The D{sub av} and the OED values were combined with a linear-no-threshold model and a nonlinear mechanistic model, respectively, to estimate the organ-, age-, and gender-specific lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for cancer development. The estimated risks were compared with the respective nominal lifetime intrinsic risks (LIRs) for the unexposed population. Results: For a standard target dose of 34 Gy, the OED varied from 0.39–5.15 Gy by the organ of interest and the irradiation site. The D{sub av} range for the out-of-field organs was 4.9 × 10{sup −4} to 0.56 Gy. The LAR for the appearance of malignancies in the partially in-field organs after radiotherapy of male and female patients was (0.08%–1.8%) and (0.09%–1.9%), respectively. These risk values were 1.5–15.5 times lower when compared to the respective LIRs. The lifetime probability for out-of-field cancer induction in irradiated

  10. Dosimetric comparison of 3-dimensional conformal and field-in-field radiotherapy techniques for the adjuvant treatment of early stage endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Acar, Hilal; Buyukyoruk, Ahmet; Cobanoglu, Gokcen; Kerimoglu, Ozlem Secilmis; Yavas, Ozlem; Celik, Cetin

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare field-in-field radiotherapy (FIF) with conformal radiotherapy (CRT) in terms of dosimetric benefits for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Ten consecutive early stage endometrial cancer patients who underwent adjuvant external beam radiotherapy were included in the study. For each patient, two different treatment plans were created. FIF and CRT plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the organ at risk (OAR) volumes including rectum, bladder, bowel, bilateral femurs and bone marrow, the dose homogeneity index, and the monitor unit counts required for the treatment. The FIF technique significantly reduced the maximum dose of the PTV, rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow (p values were: 30 and >45 Gy were compared, the results were in favor of the FIF technique. The volumes of rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow receiving more than the prescription dose of 45 Gy were significantly reduced with FIF technique (p values were 0.016, 0.039, 0.01, 0.04, 0.037 and 0.01 respectively). The dose homogeneity index (DHI) was significantly improved with FIF technique (p radiotherapy for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coverage of axillary lymph nodes with high tangential fields in breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alço, G; Iğdem, S I; Ercan, T; Dinçer, M; Sentürk, R; Atilla, S; Oral Zengin, F; Okkan, S

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the coverage of axillary nodal volumes with high tangent fields (HTF) in breast radiotherapy and to determine the utility of customised blocking. The treatment plans of 30 consecutive patients with early breast cancer were evaluated. The prescription dose was 50 Gy to the whole breast. Axillary level I-II lymph node volumes were delineated and the cranial border of the tangential fields was set just below the humeral head to create HTF. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to calculate the doses received by axillary nodal volumes. In a second planning set, HTF were modified with multileaf collimators (MLC-HTF) to obtain an adequate dose coverage of axillary nodes. The mean doses of the axillary nodes, the ipsilateral lung and heart were compared between the two plans (HTF vs MLC-HTF) using a paired sample t-test. The doses received by 95% of the breast volumes were not significantly different for the two plans. The doses received by 95% of the level I and II axillary volumes were 16.79 Gy and 11.59 Gy, respectively, for HTF, increasing to 47.2 Gy and 45.03 Gy, respectively, for MLC-HTF. Mean lung doses and per cent volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy (V20) were also increased from 6.47 Gy and 10.47%, respectively, for HTF, to 9.56 Gy and 16.77%, respectively, for MLC-HTF. Our results suggest that HTF do not adequately cover the level I and II axillary lymph node regions. Modification of HTF with MLC is necessary to obtain an adequate coverage of axillary levels without compromising healthy tissue in the majority of the patients.

  12. A new method to estimate doses to the normal tissues after past extended and involved field radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Lundemann, Michael; Vogelius, Ivan R;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reconstruction of radiotherapy (RT) performed decades ago is challenging, but is necessary to address dose-response questions from epidemiological data and may be relevant in re-irradiation scenarios. Here, a novel method to reconstruct extended and involved field RT for patients...... with Hodgkin lymphoma was used. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 46 model patients, 29 organs at risk (OARs) were contoured and seven treatment fields reconstructed (mantle, mediastinal, right/left neck, right/left axillary, and spleen field). Extended and involved field RT were simulated by generating RT plans...... by superpositions of the seven individual fields. The mean (standard deviation) of the 46 individual mean organ doses were extracted as percent of prescribed dose for each field superposition. RESULTS: The estimated mean doses to the OARs from 17 field combinations were presented. The inter-patient variability...

  13. SU-E-T-98: Dependence of Radiotherapy Couch Transmission Factors On Field Size and Couch-Isocenter Distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhabib, S; Duan, J; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Shen, S; Huang, M; Popple, R; Brezovich, I [UniversityAlabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric effect of the treatment couch is non-negligible in today's radiotherapy treatment. To accurately include couch in dose calculation, we investigated the dependence of couch transmission factors on field size and couch-isocenter distance. Methods: Couch transmission factors for Varian Exact Couch were determined by taking the ratios of ionization of a posterior-anterior beam with and without the couch in the beam path. Measurements were performed at the isocenter using a PTW cylindrical ionization chamber (Model 31030) with an Aluminum buildup cap of 1.1 cm thick for the 6 MV photon beam. Ionization readings for beam sizes ranging from 2 × 2 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2 were taken. Transmission factors for couch-isocenter distances ranging from 3 cm to 20 cm were also investigated. Results: The couch transmission factors increased with the field size approximately in an exponential manner. For the field sizes that we tested, the transmission factor ranged from 0.976 to 0.992 for couch-isocenter distance of 3 cm. The transmission factor was also monotonically dependent on couch-isocenter separation distance, but in a lighter magnitude. For the tested couch heights, the transmission factor ranged from 0.974 – 0.972 for 2 × 2 cm2 field size and 0.992 – 0.986 for 40 × 40 cm2 field size. The dependence on couch-isocenter distance is stronger for larger field size. Conclusions: The transmission factor of a radiotherapy treatment couch increases with field size of the radiation beam and its distance from the isocenter. Such characterization of the couch transmission factor helps improve the accuracy of couch modeling for radiotherapy treatment planning.

  14. Initial management of primary mediastinal seminoma: radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Chevalier, T.; Ruffie, P.; Rixe, O. [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Wibault, P. [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Theodore, C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Terrier-Lacombe, M.-J. [Department of Pathology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Droz, J.-P.; Culine, S.; Fizazi, K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    1998-02-01

    Primary mediastinal seminoma is an uncommon neoplasm, the optimal management of which is still debated. Radiotherapy produces a 65% disease-free survival rate. We assess whether these results have been improved with the advent of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Data from 14 patients treated at the Institut Gustave-Roussy were reviewed. 9 had received cisplatin-based chemotherapy (Group 1): their outcome was compared with that of 5 patients treated with radiotherapy without chemotherapy (Group 2). We also reviewed data from the English literature using strict criteria, and report results concerning patients who received cisplatin-based chemotherapy and those who received radiotherapy. 8 of the 9 patients (89%) in Group 1 are long-term disease-free survivors and only 3 of 5 patients in Group 2. The patient who died in Group 1 was the only one who refused surgical resection of residual masses after chemotherapy. The review of the literature revealed that 59 of 68 (87%) patients initially managed with cisplatin- or carboplatin-based chemotherapy and for whom sufficient data are available, are long-term survivors and free of disease. Some of these patients had also received radiotherapy. Only 64 of 103 (62%) treated with thoracic radiotherapy without chemotherapy were long-term disease-free survivors. The disease-free survival rate of 51 patients who received cisplatin-based chemotherapy (excluding those who received carboplatin) was 86%. The difference in survival between patients administered cisplatin-based chemotherapy and those who underwent radiotherapy is apparently not due to unbalanced prognostic factors, the effect of time or non-specific medical management. We conclude that cisplatin-based chemotherapy allows long-term disease-free survival in approximately 85% of patients. These results seem to be higher than those obtained without cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, a randomised study is required for definitive conclusions, but it is very unlikely that

  15. A dosimetric analysis of volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy with jaw width restriction vs 7 field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for definitive treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B; Fang, Z; Huang, Y; Lin, P; Chen, Z

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning was performed to compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc™ v. 10; Varian® Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and 7-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7f-IMRT) in the definitive treatment of cervical cancer. 13 patients with cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. Planning target volume (PTV) 50 and PTV60 were prescribed at a dose of 50 and 60 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively. The dose to the PTV60 was delivered as a simultaneous integrated boost to the pelvic lymph nodes. Owing to the mechanical limitation of the multileaf collimator in which the maximum displacement was limited to 15 cm, two types of RapidArc with different jaw width restrictions (15 and 20-23 cm) were investigated to evaluate their dosimetric differences. The RapidArc plan type with dosimetric superiority was then compared against the 7f-IMRT on the target coverage, sparing of the organs at risk (OARs), monitor units, treatment time and delivery accuracy to determine whether RapidArc is beneficial for the treatment of cervical cancer. The 15-cm jaw width restriction had better performance compared with the restrictions that were longer than 15 cm in the sparing of the OARs. The 15-cm RapidArc spared the OARs, that is, the bladder, rectum, small intestine, femoral heads and bones, and improved treatment efficiency compared with 7f-IMRT. Both techniques delivered a high quality-assurance passing rate (>90%) according to the Γ3mm,3% criterion. RapidArc with a 15-cm jaw width restriction spares the OARs and improves treatment efficiency in cervical cancer compared with 7f-IMRT. This study describes the dosimetric superiority of RapidArc with a 15-cm jaw width restriction and explores the feasibility of using RapidArc for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer.

  16. Regional lymph node radiotherapy in breast cancer: single anterior supraclavicular field vs. two anterior and posterior opposed supraclavicular fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Mohammad; Kashi, Amir Shahram Yousefi; Varaki, Sakineh Soleimani; Rakhsha, Afshin; Blookat, Eftekhar Rajab

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of lymph nodes engaged in breast cancer with radiotherapy leads to improved locoregional control and enhanced survival rates in patients after surgery. The aim of this study was to compare two treatment techniques, namely single anterior posterior (AP) supraclavicular field with plan depth and two anterior and posterior opposed (AP/PA) supraclavicular fields. In the study, we also examined the relationships between the depth of supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLNs) and the diameter of the wall of the chest and body mass index (BMI). Forty patients with breast cancer were analyzed using computed tomography (CT) scans. In planning target volume (PTV), the SCLNs and axillary lymph nodes (AXLNs) were contoured, and, with the attention to PTV, supraclavicular (SC) depth was measured. The dosage that reached the aforementioned lymph nodes and the level of hot spots were investigated using two treatment methods, i.e., 1) AP/PA and 2) AP with three-dimensional (3D) planning. Each of these methods was analyzed using the program Isogray for the 6 MV compact accelerator, and the diameter of the wall of the chest was measured using the CT scan at the center of the SC field. Placing the plan such that 95% of the target volume with 95% or greater of the prescribed dose of 50 Gy (V95) had ≥95% concordance in both treatment techniques. According to the PTV, the depth of SCLNs and the diameter of the wall of the chest were 3-7 and 12-21cm, respectively. Regression analysis showed that the mean SC depth (the mean Plan depth) and the mean diameter of the wall of the chest were related directly to BMI (p<0.0001, adjusted R(2)=0.67) and (p<0.0001, adjusted R(2)=0.71), respectively. The AP/PA treatment technique was a more suitable choice of treatment than the AP field, especially for overweight and obese breast cancer patients. However, in the AP/PA technique, the use of a single-photon, low energy (6 MV) caused more hot spots than usual.

  17. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen BJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bing-Jie Shen,1 Shih-Chiang Lin,2 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,3 Yueh-Hung Chou,4 Li-Ming Tseng,5 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,6,71Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Anatomical Pathology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day. However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of

  18. Real-time verification of multileaf collimator-driven radiotherapy using a novel optical attenuation-based fluence monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-03-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC)-driven conformal radiotherapy modalities [e.g., such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy, and stereotactic body radiotherapy] are more subject to delivery errors and dose calculation inaccuracies than standard modalities. Fluence monitoring during treatment delivery could reduce such errors by allowing an independent interface to quantify and assess measured difference between the delivered and planned treatment administration. We developed an optical attenuation-based detector to monitor fluence for the on-line quality control of radiotherapy delivery. The purpose of the current study was to develop the theoretical background of the invention and to evaluate the detector's performance both statistically and in clinical situations. We aligned 60 27-cm scintillating fibers coupled to a photodetector via clear optical fibers in the direction of motion of each of the 60 leaf pairs of a 120 leaves Millenium MLC on a Varian Clinac iX. We developed a theoretical model to predict the intensity of light collected on each side of the scintillating fibers when placed under radiation fields of varying sizes, intensities, and positions. The model showed that both the central position of the radiation field on the fiber (x(c)) and the integral fluence passing through the fiber (phi(int)) could be assessed independently in a single measurement. We evaluated the performance of the prototype by (1) measuring the intrinsic variation of the measured values of x(c) and phi(int), (2) measuring the impact on the measured values of x(c) and phi(int) of random leaf positioning errors introduced into IMRT fields, and (3) comparing the predicted values of x(c) and phi(int) calculated with the treatment planning software to the measured values of x(c) and phi(int) in order to assess the predictive effectiveness of the developed theoretical model. We observed a very low intrinsic dispersion, dominated by Poisson statistics

  19. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, P. H., E-mail: p.charles@qut.edu.au; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001 (Australia); Cranmer-Sargison, G. [Department of Medical Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, 20 Campus Dr., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7L 3P6, Canada and Academic Unit of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, 8.001 Worsley Building, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kairn, T. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia and Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Knight, R. T. [Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Kenny, J. [The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085, Australia and Radiation Oncology Queensland, St Andrew' s Toowoomba Hospital, Toowoomba, QLD 4350 (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6

  20. Implementation of a risk assessment tool based on a probabilistic safety assessment developed for radiotherapy practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, A.; Godinez, V.; Lopez, R., E-mail: abpaz@cnsns.gob.m [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The present work describes the implementation process and main results of the risk assessment to the radiotherapy practices with Linear Accelerators (Linac), with cobalt 60, and with brachytherapy. These evaluations were made throughout the risk assessment tool for radiotherapy practices SEVRRA (risk evaluation system for radiotherapy), developed at the Mexican National Commission in Nuclear Safety and Safeguards derived from the outcome obtained with the Probabilistic Safety Analysis developed at the Ibero-American Regulators Forum for these radiotherapy facilities. The methodology used is supported by risk matrices method, a mathematical tool that estimates the risk to the patient, radiation workers and public from mechanical failures, mis calibration of the devices, human mistakes, and so. The initiating events are defined as those undesirable events that, together with other failures, can produce a delivery of an over-dose or an under-dose of the medical prescribed dose, to the planned target volume, or a significant dose to non prescribed human organs. Initiating events frequency and reducer of its frequency (actions intended to avoid the accident) are estimated as well as robustness of barriers to those actions, such as mechanical switches, which detect and prevent the accident from occurring. The spectrum of the consequences is parameterized, and the actions performed to reduce the consequences are identified. Based on this analysis, a software tool was developed in order to simplify the evaluations to radiotherapy installations and it has been applied as a first step forward to some Mexican installations, as part of a national implementation process, the final goal is evaluation of all Mexican facilities in the near future. The main target and benefits of the SEVRRA implementation are presented in this paper. (Author)

  1. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy isocentric field plans and field in field (FIF) forward plans in the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rahbi, Zakiya Salem; Al Mandhari, Zahid; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al-Kindi, Fatma; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Anthony; Bhasi, Saju; Satyapal, Namrata; Rajan, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed at comparing the planning and delivery efficiency between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), field-in-field, forward planned, intensity modulated radiotherapy (FIF-FP-IMRT), and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IP-IMRT). Treatment plans of 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer, 10 post-mastectomy treated to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy to the chest wall in 20 fractions, and 10 post-breast-conserving surgery to a prescribed dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast in 25 fractions, with 3D-CRT were selected. The FiF-FP-IMRT plans were created by combining two open fields with three to four segments in two tangential beam directions. Eight different beam directions were chosen to create IP-IMRT plans and were inversely optimized. The homogeneity of dose to planning target volume (PTV) and the dose delivered to heart and contralateral breast were compared among the techniques in all the 20 patients. All the three radiotherapy techniques achieved comparable radiation dose delivery to PTV-95% of the prescribed dose covering > 95% of the breast PTV. The mean volume of PTV receiving 105% (V105) of the prescribed dose was 1.7% (range 0-6.8%) for IP-IMRT, 1.9% for FP-IMRT, and 3.7% for 3D-CRT. The homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) were similar for 3D-CRT and FP-IMRT, whereas the IP-IMRT plans had better conformity index at the cost of less homogeneity. The 3D-CRT and FiF-FP-IMRT plans achieved similar sparing of critical organs. The low-dose volumes (V5Gy) in the heart and lungs were larger in IP-IMRT than in the other techniques. The value of the mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was higher for IP-IMRT than the values for with FiF-FP-IMRT and 3D-CRT. In the current study, the relative volume of contralateral breast receiving low doses (0.01, 0.6, 1, and 2Gy) was significantly lower for the FiF-FP-IMRT and 3D-CRT plans than for the IP-IMRT plan. Compared with 3D-CRT and IP-IMRT, FiF-FP-IMRT proved to be a

  2. Fully Automated Treatment Planning for Head and Neck Radiotherapy using a Voxel-Based Dose Prediction and Dose Mimicking Method

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Chris; McNiven, Andrea; Jaffray, David A; Purdie, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Recent works in automated radiotherapy treatment planning have used machine learning based on historical treatment plans to infer the spatial dose distribution for a novel patient directly from the planning image. We present an atlas-based approach which learns a dose prediction model for each patient (atlas) in a training database, and then learns to match novel patients to the most relevant atlases. The method creates a spatial dose objective, which specifies the desired dose-per-voxel, and therefore replaces any requirement for specifying dose-volume objectives for conveying the goals of treatment planning. A probabilistic dose distribution is inferred from the most relevant atlases, and is scalarized using a conditional random field to determine the most likely spatial distribution of dose to yield a specific dose prior (histogram) for relevant regions of interest. Voxel-based dose mimicking then converts the predicted dose distribution to a deliverable treatment plan dose distribution. In this study, we ...

  3. Dosimetric studies of cadmium free alloy used in compensator based intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sandeep; Punia, Rajesh; Tyagi, Atul; Singh, Mann P.

    2017-10-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate dosimetric properties of cadmium free alloy which is used in compensator based intensity modulated radiotherapy (cIMRT). A mixture of lead, bismuth and tin was used to prepare the alloy whose melting point is 90-95 °C. Slabs of different thicknesses ranging from 0.71 cm to 6.14 cm were prepared. Density of alloy was measured by Archimedes' principle using water. For six megavolt (6 MV) photon beam energy transmission, linear effective attenuation coefficient (μeff), tissue phantom ratio (TPR1020), beam hardening, surface dose (Ds), percentage depth dose (PDD) and effect of scatter has been measured and analyzed for different field sizes and different thickness of compensator. Effect of extended source to detector distance (SDD) on transmissions and μeff was measured. The density of alloy was found to be 9.5456 g/cm3. At SDD of 100 cm, μeff was observed 0.4253 cm-1 for a field size of 10×10 cm 2. Calculated TPR1020 was found to be within 3% of experimental TPR1020 . It was found to be increasing with increasing thickness of compensator. Ds was found to decrease with thickness of compensator and increase with wider collimator opening due to increased scattered dose. Compensator slabs of 1 cm, 1.98 cm and 4.16 cm decreased surface dose by 4.2%, 6.1% and 9.5% respectively for a field size of 10×10 cm2 at 100 cm SDD. For small field size of 3×3 cm2 and 5×5 cm2 PDDs are increased from 3.0% to 5.5% of open beam PDDs as compensator thickness increased from 1 cm to 6.14 cm at a depth of 10 cm in water while variation in PDD is insignificant in for larger field sizes 10×10 cm2 to 20×20 cm2. A high degree of intensity modulation is essential in cIMRT and it can be achieved with this compensator material. Dosimetric properties analyzed in this study establish this alloy as a reliable, reusable, optimally dense and cost effective compensator material.

  4. Out-of-field organ doses and associated radiogenic risks from para-aortic radiotherapy for testicular seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Berris, Theocharis; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Iraklion, 71110 Iraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to (a) calculate the radiation dose to out-of-field organs from radiotherapy for stage I testicular seminoma and (b) estimate the associated radiogenic risks. Methods: Monte Carlo methodology was employed to model radiation therapy with typical anteroposterior and posteroanterior para-aortic fields on an anthropomorphic phantom simulating an average adult. The radiation dose received by all main and remaining organs that defined by the ICRP publication 103 and excluded from the treatment volume was calculated. The effect of field dimensions on each organ dose was determined. Additional therapy simulations were generated by introducing shielding blocks to protect the kidneys from primary radiation. The gonadal dose was employed to assess the risk of heritable effects for irradiated male patients of reproductive potential. The lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of radiotherapy-induced cancer were estimated using gender- and organ-specific risk coefficients for patient ages of 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old. The risk values were compared with the respective nominal risks. Results: Para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 5.0–538.6 mGy. Blocked field treatment led to a dose change up to 28%. The mean organ dose variation by increasing or decreasing the applied field dimensions was 18.7% ± 3.9% and 20.8% ± 4.5%, respectively. The out-of-field photon doses increased the lifetime intrinsic risk of developing thyroid, lung, bladder, prostate, and esophageal cancer by (0.1–1.4)%, (0.4–1.1)%, (2.5–5.4)%, (0.2–0.4)%, and (6.4–9.2)%, respectively, depending upon the patient age at exposure and the field size employed. A low risk for heritable effects of less than 0.029% was found compared with the natural incidence of these defects. Conclusions: Testicular cancer survivors are subjected to an increased risk for the induction of bladder and esophageal cancer following para-aortic radiotherapy. The

  5. Quality control of involved field radiotherapy in the HD 13 and HD 14 trials. Report of the radiotherapy panel of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Baues, C. [University of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [University of Marburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Marburg (Germany); Herfarth, K. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Lukas, P. [University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Innsbruck (Austria); Pluetschow, A.; Fuchs, M.; Engert, A. [University of Cologne, Department of Internal Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Schmidberger, H. [University of Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Staar, S. [Bremen Mitte, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bremen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    As part of the foundation of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) in 1978, a central radiotherapy (RT) reference centre was established to evaluate and to improve the quality of treatment. During the study generations, the quality assurance programs (QAP) were continued and adapted to the demands of each study. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the results of the fifth study generation and to compare them to the previous findings. With the start of the fourth GHSG study generation (HD10-12), a central prospective review of all diagnostic images was established to create an individual treatment plan for each early stage study patient. The quality of involved field RT was retrospectively evaluated by an expert panel of radiation oncologists. In the fifth study generation (HD13-15), the retrospective review of radiotherapy performed was refined and the results were compared with the findings of the fourth generation. The expert panel analyzed the RT planning and application of 1037 (28 %) patients (HD13 n = 465, HD14 n = 572). Simulation films were available in 85 % of cases and verification films in 87 %. RT was assessed as major violation in 46 % (HD13 = 38 %, HD14 = 52 %), minor violation in 9 % (HD13 = 9 %, HD14 = 9 %) and according to the protocol in 45 % (HD13 = 52 %, HD14 = 38 %). The value for QAP of RT within the GHSG trials is well known. Still there were several protocol violations. In the future, the QAP program has to be adapted to the requirements of ''modern RT'' in malignant lymphoma. (orig.) [German] Seit Gruendung der German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) im Jahr 1978 wurde ein zentrales Qualitaetssicherungsprogramm (QAP) der Radiotherapie (RT) etabliert, um die Qualitaet der RT sicherzustellen. Waehrend der fortlaufenden Studiengenerationen wurde dieses QAP kontinuierlich weiterentwickelt. In dieser Auswertung werden die Ergebnisse der fuenften Studiengeneration (HD13-15) praesentiert und mit frueheren Ergebnissen

  6. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeeli, A. D., E-mail: ali-esmaeeli-d@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, 41476-54919 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, S. R. [Department of Medical Physics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pouladian, M.; Bagheri, S. [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 14778-93855 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Monfared, A. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25–1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%–58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%–38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%–77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  7. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townson, Reid W.; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Jiang Graves, Yan; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-06-01

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  8. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townson, Reid W; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Graves, Yan Jiang; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-06-21

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  9. The value of three-dimensional radiotherapy planning in advanced carcinoma of the urinary bladder based on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, L.E. [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology; Engelholm, S.A. [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    1994-12-31

    Since 1987, radiotherapy planning of advanced bladder cancer T3-T4 has been based on computed tomography (CT), and since 1989 we have used a three-dimensional (3-D) planning system. The treatment plans of 110 patients referred to our department in 1989-1991 have been evaluated. The field sizes used after CT-based treatment planning were compared with the field sizes that would have been used after conventional planning alone (cystogram). The changes of the treatment plans are described. In 62 (60%) cases the treatment plans were altered because of the CT-scans, mainly as an enlargement of the fields. The field enlargements were mostly in the dorsal and caudal direction. In 10 (10%) cases the CT-scans provided diagnostic information which contra-indicated the proposed radical irradiation. The 3-D dose planning system has been of great value, especially the beams-eye view presentation which is an efficient tool for adjusting the field size. (orig.).

  10. Stochastic method-based computational system for neutron/photon dosimetry applied to radiotherapy and radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Bruno Machado; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Program of Post-Graduation in Sciences and Nuclear Techniques

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present paper describes a procedure for conversion of computed tomography or magnetic resonance images into a three-dimensional voxel model for dosimetry purposes. Such model is a personalized representation of the patient that can be utilized in nuclear particle transport simulations by means of the MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code, reproducing the stochastic process of nuclear particles interaction with human tissues. Materials and Methods: The developed computational system - SISCODES - is a tool designed for 3D planning of radiotherapy or radiological procedures. Based on tomographic images of the patient, the treatment plan is modeled and simulated. Then, the absorbed doses are shown by means of isodose curves superimposed on the model. The SISCODES couples the three dimensional model with the MCNP5 code, simulating the protocol of exposure to ionizing radiation. Results: The SISCODES has been utilized by the NRI/CNPq in the creation of anthropomorphic and anthropometric voxel models which are coupled with the MCNP code for modeling brachytherapy and teletherapy applied to lung, pelvis, spine, head and neck tumors, among others. The current SISCODES modules are presented together with examples of cases of radiotherapy planning. Conclusion: The SISCODES provides a fast method to create personalized voxel models of any patient which can be used in stochastic simulations. The combination of the MCNP simulation with a personalized model of the patient increases the dosimetry accuracy in radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Novel radiotherapy techniques for involved-field and involved-node treatment of mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma. When should they be considered and which questions remain open

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohr, Frank; Koeck, Julia; Abo-Madyan, Yasser [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Georg, Dietmar; Knaeusl, Barbara; Dieckmann, Karin [Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Cozzi, Luca [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Muenster (Germany); Weber, Damien C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, University of Bern, Center for Proton Therapy, Bern (Switzerland); Fiandra, Christian; Ricardi, Umberto [University of Torino, Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, Turin (Italy); Mueller, Rolf-Peter [University of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Engert, Andreas [University of Cologne, Department of Medical Oncology, Cologne (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a highly curable disease. Reducing late complications and second malignancies has become increasingly important. Radiotherapy target paradigms are currently changing and radiotherapy techniques are evolving rapidly. This overview reports to what extent target volume reduction in involved-node (IN) and advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy-compared with involved-field (IF) and 3D radiotherapy (3D-RT)- can reduce high doses to organs at risk (OAR) and examines the issues that still remain open. Although no comparison of all available techniques on identical patient datasets exists, clear patterns emerge. Advanced dose-calculation algorithms (e.g., convolution-superposition/Monte Carlo) should be used in mediastinal HL. INRT consistently reduces treated volumes when compared with IFRT with the exact amount depending on the INRT definition. The number of patients that might significantly benefit from highly conformal techniques such as IMRT over 3D-RT regarding high-dose exposure to organs at risk (OAR) is smaller with INRT. The impact of larger volumes treated with low doses in advanced techniques is unclear. The type of IMRT used (static/rotational) is of minor importance. All advanced photon techniques result in similar potential benefits and disadvantages, therefore only the degree-of-modulation should be chosen based on individual treatment goals. Treatment in deep inspiration breath hold is being evaluated. Protons theoretically provide both excellent high-dose conformality and reduced integral dose. Further reduction of treated volumes most effectively reduces OAR dose, most likely without disadvantages if the excellent control rates achieved currently are maintained. For both IFRT and INRT, the benefits of advanced radiotherapy techniques depend on the individual patient/target geometry. Their use should therefore be decided case by case with comparative treatment planning

  12. Voxel-based dose prediction with multi-patient atlas selection for automated radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Chris; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2017-01-01

    Automating the radiotherapy treatment planning process is a technically challenging problem. The majority of automated approaches have focused on customizing and inferring dose volume objectives to be used in plan optimization. In this work we outline a multi-patient atlas-based dose prediction approach that learns to predict the dose-per-voxel for a novel patient directly from the computed tomography planning scan without the requirement of specifying any objectives. Our method learns to automatically select the most effective atlases for a novel patient, and then map the dose from those atlases onto the novel patient. We extend our previous work to include a conditional random field for the optimization of a joint distribution prior that matches the complementary goals of an accurately spatially distributed dose distribution while still adhering to the desired dose volume histograms. The resulting distribution can then be used for inverse-planning with a new spatial dose objective, or to create typical dose volume objectives for the canonical optimization pipeline. We investigated six treatment sites (633 patients for training and 113 patients for testing) and evaluated the mean absolute difference in all DVHs for the clinical and predicted dose distribution. The results on average are favorable in comparison to our previous approach (1.91 versus 2.57). Comparing our method with and without atlas-selection further validates that atlas-selection improved dose prediction on average in whole breast (0.64 versus 1.59), prostate (2.13 versus 4.07), and rectum (1.46 versus 3.29) while it is less important in breast cavity (0.79 versus 0.92) and lung (1.33 versus 1.27) for which there is high conformity and minimal dose shaping. In CNS brain, atlas-selection has the potential to be impactful (3.65 versus 5.09), but selecting the ideal atlas is the most challenging.

  13. [Endoscopic surgery and reconstruction for extensive osteoradionecrosis of skull base after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Qiu, Q H; Zhan, J B; Zhu, Z C; Peng, Y; Liu, H

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To investigate the clinical efficacy of endoscopic surgery for extensive osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of skull base in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after radiotherapy. Methods: Seventeen patients diagnosed as ORN of skull base after radiotherapy for NPC and underwent endoscopic surgery were retrospectively studied with their clinic data. Results: Based on the CT and endoscopic examination, all patients had large skull base defects with bone defects averaged 7.02 cm(2) (range, 3.60 - 14.19 cm(2)). Excepting for curetting the sequestra, endoscopic surgery was also used to repair the wound or to protect the internal carotid artery with flap in 12 patients. No bone reconstructions were conducted in all patients with the bone defects of skull base. CT examinations were taken after endoscopic surgery when required. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 8 months to 6 years (average, 14 months). Aside from 1 patient with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), others had no related complications. Conclusions: The patients with extensive ORN can be treated with endoscopic surgery to curette the necrotic bone of skull base, and endoscopic reconstruction provides an alternative technique. It may not be necessary to reconstruct the bone defects at skull base, however, the exposed important structures of skull base, such as internal carotid artery, need to repair with soft tissue such as flap.

  14. Preliminary study of the 270 Bloom Fricke xylenol gel phantom performance for 3D conformal radiotherapy using multiple radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavinato, Christianne C.; Campos, Leticia L., E-mail: ccavinato@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (DIRF/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes; Souza, Benedito H.; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Daros, Kellen A.C.; Medeiros, Regina B. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagens; Giordani, Adelmo J. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2011-07-01

    The complex cancer treatment techniques require rigorous quality control (QC). The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter has been studied to be applied as a three-dimensional (3D) dosimeter since it is possible to produce 3D FXG phantoms of various shapes and sizes. In this preliminary study, the performance of the FXG spherical phantom developed at IPEN, prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin from porcine skin made in Brazil, was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging technique, aiming to use this phantom to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with multiple radiation fields and clinical photon beams. The obtained results indicate that for all magnetic resonance images of the FXG phantom irradiated with 6 MV clinical photon beam can be observed clearly the target volume and, in the case of coronal image, can also be observed the radiation beam projection and the overlap of different radiation fields used. The Fricke xylenol gel phantom presented satisfactory results for 3DCRT and clinical photon beams in this preliminary study. These results encourage the additional tests using complex treatment techniques and indicate the viability of applying the phantom studied to routine quality control measurements and in 3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy treatment planning. (author)

  15. Targeting base excision repair as a sensitization strategy in radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vens, C.; Begg, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular DNA repair determines survival after ionizing radiation. Human tumors commonly exhibit aberrant DNA repair since they drive mutagenesis and chromosomal instability. Recent reports have shown alterations in the base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) pathways in huma

  16. Axillary Irradiation with High Tangent Fields for Clinically Node-Negative Breast Cancer: Can 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy with a Field-in-Field Technique Better Control the Axilla?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Amemiya, Atsushi; Ofuchi, Toru; Ono, Masato; Ogata, Haruki; Yamagami, Ryo; Hatayama, Jun; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-10-01

    The target volume for postoperative breast irradiation is the remaining breast tissue, and the axillary region is not an intentional target volume. Between 2001 and 2009, eligible women with pT1-2cN0/pN0(sn) breast cancer underwent breast-conserving therapy without axillary dissection. Treatment outcomes between 2 radiotherapy planning groups, high tangent fields with 2-dimensional (2-D) simulation-based planning and 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography-based planning with a field-in-field technique, were compared. The correlating factors for axillary failure were also calculated. In total, 678 patients were eligible. As of May 2009, the median follow-up times for the 2-D (n = 346) and 3-D (n = 332) groups were 94 and 52 months, respectively. Patient characteristics were balanced, except for a younger population in the 2-D group and more lymphovascular invasion in the 3-D group. On multivariate analysis, 2-D planning was the only risk factor for axillary failure. In the 2-D and 3-D groups, the 5-year cumulative incidences of axillary failure were 8 (3.1%) and 1 (0.3%) (log-rank p = 0.009), respectively. The respective 5-year overall survival rates were 97.4 and 98.4% (p = 0.4). High tangent irradiation with 3-D planning improved axillary control compared to that with 2-D planning, suggesting that optimizing axillary dose distribution may impact outcomes.

  17. Dosimetric and efficiency comparison of high-dose radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: volumetric modulated arc therapy versus fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-Y; Huang, W-Y; Jen, Y-M; Chen, C-M; Su, Y-F; Chao, H-L; Lin, C-S

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare high-dose volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ff-IMRT) plans for the treatment of patients with middle-thoracic esophageal cancer. Eight patients with cT2-3N0M0 middle-thoracic esophageal cancer were enrolled. The treatment planning system was the version 9 of the Pinnacle(3) with SmartArc (Philips Healthcare, Fitchburg, WI, USA). VMAT and ff-IMRT treatment plans were generated for each case, and both techniques were used to deliver 50 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV(50)) and then provided a 16-Gy boost (PTV(66)). The VMAT plans provided superior PTV(66) coverage compared with the ff-IMRT plans (P = 0.034), whereas the ff-IMRT plans provided more appropriate dose homogeneity to the PTV(50) (P = 0.017). In the lung, the V(5) and V(10) were lower for the ff-IMRT plans than for the VMAT plans, whereas the V(20) was lower for the VMAT plans. The delivery time was significantly shorter for the VMAT plans than for the ff-IMRT plans (P = 0.012). In addition, the VMAT plans delivered fewer monitor units. The VMAT technique required a shorter planning time than the ff-IMRT technique (3.8 ± 0.8 hours vs. 5.4 ± 0.6 hours, P = 0.011). The major advantages of VMAT plans are higher efficiency and an approximately 50% reduction in delivery time compared with the ff-IMRT plans, with comparable plan quality. Further clinical investigations to evaluate the use of high-dose VMAT for the treatment of esophageal cancer are warranted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  18. Field-based transformation optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Instead of common definition of the transformation-optics devices via the coordinate transformation we offer the approach founded on boundary conditions for the fields. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by two examples: two-shell cloak and concentrator of electric field. We believe...... that the field-based approach is quite important for effective field control....

  19. A prospective comparison of acute intestinal toxicity following whole pelvic versus small field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YJ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yeon Joo Kim, Jin-hong Park, In-Ha Yun, Young Seok KimDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul, Republic of KoreaPurpose: To compare the acute intestinal toxicity of whole pelvic (WP and small field (SF intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for prostate cancer using dosimetric and metabolic parameters as well as clinical findings.Methods: Patients who received IMRT in either a definitive or postoperative setting were prospectively enrolled. Target volume and organs at risk including intestinal cavity (IC were delineated in every patient by a single physician. The IC volume that received a 10–50 Gy dose at 5-Gy intervals (V10–V50 and the percentage of irradiated volume as a fraction of total IC volume were calculated. Plasma citrulline levels, as an objective biological marker, were checked at three time points: baseline and after exposure to 30 Gy and 60 Gy.Results: Of the 41 patients, only six experienced grade 1 acute intestinal toxicity. Although all dose–volume parameters were significantly worse following WP than SF IMRT, there was no statistically significant relationship between these dosimetric parameters and clinical symptoms. Plasma citrulline levels did not show a serial decrease by radiotherapy volume difference (WP versus SF and were not relevant to the irradiated doses.Conclusion: Given that WP had comparable acute intestinal toxicities to those associated with SF, WP IMRT appears to be a feasible approach for the treatment of prostate cancer despite dosimetric disadvantages.Keywords: prostate cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, intestinal toxicity, citrulline

  20. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: how much does it really cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Yolande; Obyn, Caroline; Mertens, Anne-Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Hulstaert, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Despite the lack of randomized evidence, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being accepted as superior to conventional radiotherapy for patients with T1-2N0 non-small-cell lung cancer in the periphery of the lung and unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. To introduce SBRT in a system of coverage with evidence development, a correct financing had to be determined. A time-driven activity-based costing model for radiotherapy was developed. Resource cost calculation of all radiotherapy treatments, standard and innovative, was conducted in 10 Belgian radiotherapy centers in the second half of 2012. The average cost of lung SBRT across the 10 centers (6221&OV0556;) is in the range of the average costs of standard fractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy (5919&OV0556;) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7379&OV0556;) for lung cancer. Hypofractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy schemes are less costly (3993&OV0556; respectively 4730&OV0556;). The SBRT cost increases with the number of fractions and is highly dependent of personnel and equipment use. SBRT cost varies more by centre than conventional radiotherapy cost, reflecting different technologies, stages in the learning curve and a lack of clear guidance in this field. Time-driven activity-based costing of radiotherapy is feasible in a multicentre setup, resulting in real-life resource costs that can form the basis for correct reimbursement schemes, supporting an early yet controlled introduction of innovative radiotherapy techniques in clinical practice.

  1. Development of Automated Image Analysis Tools for Verification of Radiotherapy Field Accuracy with AN Electronic Portal Imaging Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei

    1995-01-01

    The successful management of cancer with radiation relies on the accurate deposition of a prescribed dose to a prescribed anatomical volume within the patient. Treatment set-up errors are inevitable because the alignment of field shaping devices with the patient must be repeated daily up to eighty times during the course of a fractionated radiotherapy treatment. With the invention of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), patient's portal images can be visualized daily in real-time after only a small fraction of the radiation dose has been delivered to each treatment field. However, the accuracy of human visual evaluation of low-contrast portal images has been found to be inadequate. The goal of this research is to develop automated image analysis tools to detect both treatment field shape errors and patient anatomy placement errors with an EPID. A moments method has been developed to align treatment field images to compensate for lack of repositioning precision of the image detector. A figure of merit has also been established to verify the shape and rotation of the treatment fields. Following proper alignment of treatment field boundaries, a cross-correlation method has been developed to detect shifts of the patient's anatomy relative to the treatment field boundary. Phantom studies showed that the moments method aligned the radiation fields to within 0.5mm of translation and 0.5^ circ of rotation and that the cross-correlation method aligned anatomical structures inside the radiation field to within 1 mm of translation and 1^ circ of rotation. A new procedure of generating and using digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at megavoltage energies as reference images was also investigated. The procedure allowed a direct comparison between a designed treatment portal and the actual patient setup positions detected by an EPID. Phantom studies confirmed the feasibility of the methodology. Both the moments method and the cross -correlation technique were

  2. Measurement of magnetic fields produced by a "magnetic deflector" for the removal of electron contamination in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrongkijudom, N; Oborn, B; Butson, M; Rosenfeld, A

    2006-12-01

    Electron contamination generated from interactions of x-rays with components in a medical linear accelerator's head can increase damage to skin and subcutaneous tissue during radiotherapy through increased dose deposition. Skin and subcutaneous dose from high energy x-rays can be reduced using magnetic fields to sweep the electron contamination away from the radiation treatment field. This work is aimed at investigating the magnetic fields generated by an improved magnetic deflector which utilizes Nd2Fe14B magnets. Magnetic field strengths generated by the deflector have been simulated using Vizimag 3.0 magnetic modelling software. The improved deflector has a more uniform magnetic field strength than its predecessor and is optimised to easily fit on a clinical linear accelerator. Experimental measurements of the magnetic field strengths produced have also been performed for comparison. Results show a relatively good match to Vizimag modelling in the central regions of the deflector. Reductions of skin and subcutaneous dose up to 34% of original values were seen for a 20 x 20 cm2 field at 6MV x-ray energy.

  3. Evaluation of ECG changes after Radiotherapy of left chest wall by Electron in patients with left breast cancer who receive Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Emami

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular damage after Radiotherapy of left chest wall for left breast cancer is a potential fear, therefore studing both the possible causes of radiation-induced heart damage and preventive measures are crucial issues in radiation therapy of breast cancer. The present study investigates noninvasively the possible acute and chronic ECG changes and their incidences after Radiotherapy in patients with left sided breast cancer who have received 6-8 courses of Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy. Methods: 56 patients with breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma who had been undergone modified radical mastectomy, adjuvant Anthracycline based chemotherapy, and left sided chest wall electron therapy with direct field, have been evaluated. All patients investigated with physical examination and standard 12 leads ECG before, and immediately after completion of radiation therapy, and 6 months afterward. Results: New electrocardiographic changes after therapy were seen in 3 patients (5.35% and reduced to 2 cases (3.57% after 6 months. there was no significant difference in T wave findings before and after radiation therapy(P=0.521.Also there wasn’t any correlation between stage of cancer and any changes in ECG findings after radiation therapy (P=0.56. Conclusion: There were no clinical cardiac symptoms or signs after Radiotherapy. Most affected leads in ECG were V1-V4 and the main abnormality was Inverted T wave. This findings suggest that the most acute and chronic electrocardiographic effect of irradiation on heart is repolarization abnormality. This study suggests that there are no significant ECG changes after Radiotherapy of left chest wall by electron beam in patients with left sided breast cancer who has received Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy. Also Radiotherapy by electron doesn't induce any clinical cardiac symptoms and signs in these patients. Therefore, we recommend

  4. A prospective comparison of acute intestinal toxicity following whole pelvic versus small field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Park, Jin-hong; Yun, In-Ha; Kim, Young Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the acute intestinal toxicity of whole pelvic (WP) and small field (SF) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer using dosimetric and metabolic parameters as well as clinical findings. Methods Patients who received IMRT in either a definitive or postoperative setting were prospectively enrolled. Target volume and organs at risk including intestinal cavity (IC) were delineated in every patient by a single physician. The IC volume that received a 10–50 Gy dose at 5-Gy intervals (V10–V50) and the percentage of irradiated volume as a fraction of total IC volume were calculated. Plasma citrulline levels, as an objective biological marker, were checked at three time points: baseline and after exposure to 30 Gy and 60 Gy. Results Of the 41 patients, only six experienced grade 1 acute intestinal toxicity. Although all dose–volume parameters were significantly worse following WP than SF IMRT, there was no statistically significant relationship between these dosimetric parameters and clinical symptoms. Plasma citrulline levels did not show a serial decrease by radiotherapy volume difference (WP versus SF) and were not relevant to the irradiated doses. Conclusion Given that WP had comparable acute intestinal toxicities to those associated with SF, WP IMRT appears to be a feasible approach for the treatment of prostate cancer despite dosimetric disadvantages. PMID:27022287

  5. Feasibility study of a lead monoxide-based dosimeter for quality assurance in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. T.; Han, M. J.; Heo, Y. J.; Park, J. E.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. N.; Oh, K. M.; Cho, H. L.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Nam, S. H.; Park, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    Lately, cancer has been treated using high-energy radiation, and this requires highly reliable treatment plans. Therefore, a dosimeter with excellent performance, which is capable of precise dose measurement, is critical. In current clinical practices, an ionization chamber and diode utilizing the ionization reaction mechanism are widely used. Several studies have been carried out to determine optimal materials for the detector in a dosimeter to enable diagnostic imaging. Recently, studies with lead monoxide, which was shown to have low drift current and high resolving power at a high bias, were reported with the dosimeter exhibiting a fast response time against incident photons. This research aims to investigate the feasibility of a lead monoxide-based dosimeter for QA (quality assurance) in radiotherapy. In this paper, we report that the manufactured dosimeter shows similar linearity to a silicon diode and demonstrates similar characteristics in terms of PDD (percent depth dose) results for the thimble ionization chamber. Based on these results, it is demonstrated that the lead monoxide-based dosimeter complies with radiotherapy QA requirements, namely rapid response time, dose linearity, dose rate independence. Thus, we expect the lead monoxide-based dosimeter to be used commercially in the future.

  6. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} gemcitabine can be administered using limited-field radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hideya [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Nishiyama, Kinji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Eiichi [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ioka, Tatsuya; Uehara, Hiroyuki; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Nakaizumi, Akihiko [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Osamu [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Surgery

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of concurrent use of full-dose gemcitabine (GEM) and radiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Patient and Methods: 22 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were subjected to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (GEM 1,000 mg/m2 weekly, three times during 4 weeks). They received limited-field irradiation by three-dimensional radiotherapy planning. Results: Of the 22 patients, 16 (72%) completed the treatment (50 Gy irradiation and at least three times concurrent administration of 1 g/m{sup 2} GEM). One patient with unresectable tail cancer showed peritonitis carcinomatosa and both chemotherapy and radiotherapy had to be stopped. Dose reduction or omission of GEM was necessary in another four patients. In addition, radiotherapy was discontinued in one patient for fatigue. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was detected in eight patients (36%), and grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity (anorexia) in one patient (5%). In total, the response rate amounted to 32% (seven partial responses), and the median survival time (MST) was 16 months. Among the twelve patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, nine underwent surgery and showed a survival rate of 78% at 1 year. Another 13 patients without surgery showed 14 months of MST. No regional lymph node failure has appeared so far. Conclusion: Limited-field radiotherapy enables the safe concurrent administration of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} GEM.

  7. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials-Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bruner, Deborah [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Dignam, James [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); FitzGerald, T.J. [University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels (Belgium); Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Michalski, Jeff [University of Washington, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Simon, Richard [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ten Haken, Randal K. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Tunis, Sean [Center for Medical Technology Policy, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  8. Spiritual Well-Being for Increasing Life Expectancy in Palliative Radiotherapy Patients: A Questionnaire-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematti, Simin; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Khajooei-Fard, Rasha; Mohammadi-Bertiani, Zohreh

    2015-10-01

    Spiritual well-being in patients with an advanced cancer has been found to positively correlate with subjective well-being, lower pain levels, hope and positive mood states, high self-esteem, social competence, purpose in life, and overall quality of life. In this regard, Quran recitation is stated to be an efficient way to increase patient spirituality and also to handle life's everyday challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of listening, reading, and watching the text of the Holy Quran, called (in this study) Quran recitation, for increasing life expectancy (LE) in palliative radiotherapy patients admitted to Radiotherapy Department of Seyed alshohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A questionnaire-based study was carried out on a total of 89 palliative radiotherapy patients between March 2012 and June 2012. Informed consent was obtained. The patients were requested to complete a standardized questionnaire which was designed based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer C30 Scale Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC C30 Scale QLQ). A computer program (SPSS version 16.0, Chicago, IL, USA) was used, and data were analyzed by the Wilcoxon test and Spearman's rank correlation. All hypotheses were tested using a criterion level of P = 0.05. There was a significant difference for frequency and duration of Quran recitation among patients, before and after the diagnosis of their cancer (P = 0.03). Using the Spearman's rank correlation, it was found that there was a correlation between Quran recitation and subjective well-being (r = 0.352, P Quran recitation and increasing LE (r = 0.311, P Quran are useful for increasing LE in palliative radiotherapy patients admitted to Radiotherapy Department. In other words, a benefit of Quran recitation on outcome of radiotherapy for palliative radiotherapy patients was found.

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy for spinal intradural metastases developing within or adjacent to the previous irradiation field--report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Nakazawa, Hisato; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Tsugawa, Takahiko

    2013-08-01

    Results of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for spinal intradural metastases developing inside or adjacent to the previous external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) field are shown in 3 cases. One case of spinal intramedullary metastasis and two cases of intradural extramedullary metastases were treated using a Novalis shaped-beam SRT. Case 1 developed an intramedullary metastatic tumor in the C1 spinal medulla inside the previous whole brain EBRT field and another lesion adjacent to the field in the C2 spinal medulla. Case 2 developed intradural extramedullary metastasis around C6-8 inside the previous EBRT field for the primary lung adenocarcinoma. Case 3 developed multiple spinal intradural extramedullary metastatic deposits after surgical resection and following whole brain EBRT for brain metastasis. We delivered 24 to 36 Gy in 5 to 12 fractions. The treated tumors were stable or decreased in size until the patients' death from the primary cancer (10, 22, and 5 months). Neurological symptoms were stable or improved in all 3 patients. Palliative SRT using Novalis is expected to be safe and effective even if the patient develops spinal intradural metastases within or adjacent to the previous irradiation field.

  10. Paediatric Photon and Proton Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Based on Advanced Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.

    radiotherapy treatment planning in combination with the nuclear medicine imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET). Specifically, we investigate the potential impact on the radiotherapy treatment plans of modern radiotherapy modalities for paediatric and adolescent cancer patients, when adding...... of delivering adequate dose to the target volumes. For the studied group of patients, our results indicate that including PET in radiotherapy treatment planning and target volume delineation, will not systematically increase or decrease the longterm risks associated with radiotherapy. We investigated...... the radiotherapy treatment plans. We found that PET scanning can be added to the diagnostic scans used for radiotherapy treatment planning, with only a small increase of the diagnostic radiation dose and thus without considerably affecting the life expectancy of young cancer patients. We also found...

  11. A FAST MORPHING-BASED INTERPOLATION FOR MEDICAL IMAGES: APPLICATION TO CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Atoui

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented for fast interpolation between medical images. The method is intended for both slice and projective interpolation. It allows offline interpolation between neighboring slices in tomographic data. Spatial correspondence between adjacent images is established using a block matching algorithm. Interpolation of image intensities is then carried out by morphing between the images. The morphing-based method is compared to standard linear interpolation, block-matching-based interpolation and registrationbased interpolation in 3D tomographic data sets. Results show that the proposed method scored similar performance in comparison to registration-based interpolation, and significantly outperforms both linear and block-matching-based interpolation. This method is applied in the context of conformal radiotherapy for online projective interpolation between Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs.

  12. Retrieval with Clustering in a Case-Based Reasoning System for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khussainova, Gulmira; Petrovic, Sanja; Jagannathan, Rupa

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy treatment planning aims to deliver a sufficient radiation dose to cancerous tumour cells while sparing healthy organs in the tumour surrounding area. This is a trial and error process highly dependent on the medical staff's experience and knowledge. Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is an artificial intelligence tool that uses past experiences to solve new problems. A CBR system has been developed to facilitate radiotherapy treatment planning for brain cancer. Given a new patient case the existing CBR system retrieves a similar case from an archive of successfully treated patient cases with the suggested treatment plan. The next step requires adaptation of the retrieved treatment plan to meet the specific demands of the new case. The CBR system was tested by medical physicists for the new patient cases. It was discovered that some of the retrieved cases were not suitable and could not be adapted for the new cases. This motivated us to revise the retrieval mechanism of the existing CBR system by adding a clustering stage that clusters cases based on their tumour positions. A number of well-known clustering methods were investigated and employed in the retrieval mechanism. Results using real world brain cancer patient cases have shown that the success rate of the new CBR retrieval is higher than that of the original system.

  13. Improved normal tissue sparing in head and neck radiotherapy using biological cost function based-IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N; Lawford, C; Khoo, V; Rolfo, M; Joon, D L; Wada, M

    2011-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has reduced the impact of acute and late toxicities associated with head and neck radiotherapy. Treatment planning system (TPS) advances in biological cost function based optimization (BBO) and improved segmentation techniques have increased organ at risk (OAR) sparing compared to conventional dose-based optimization (DBO). A planning study was undertaken to compare OAR avoidance in DBO and BBO treatment planning. Simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were produced for 10 head and neck patients using both planning systems. Plans were compared for tar get coverage and OAR avoidance. Comparisons were made using the BBO TPS Monte Carlo dose engine to eliminate differences due to inherent algorithms. Target coverage (V95%) was maintained for both solutions. BBO produced lower OAR doses, with statistically significant improvement to left (12.3%, p = 0.005) and right parotid mean dose (16.9%, p = 0.004), larynx V50_Gy (71.0%, p = 0.005), spinal cord (21.9%, p < 0.001) and brain stem dose maximums (31.5%, p = 0.002). This study observed improved OAR avoidance with BBO planning. Further investigations will be undertaken to review any clinical benefit of this improved planned dosimetry.

  14. Feasibility of Tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the tolerance of patients with small cell lung cancer undergoing chemoradiation with tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT.Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the toxicity profile for nine patients with small cell lung cancer of the limited stage who underwent chemoradiation delivered with helical tomotherapy (HT has been conducted.Results: Acute grade 3-4 hematologic and esophagitis toxicities developed in two and three patients respectively. One patient developed a pulmonary embolism during radiotherapy. Seven patients had weight loss ranging from 0 to 30 pounds (median: 4 pounds. Three patients had treatment breaks ranging from 2 to 12 days. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range: 2-24 months, no patients developed any radiation related toxicities such as grade 3-4 pneumonitis or other long-term complications. The median survival was estimated to be 15 months. There were 2 local recurrences, 3 mediastinal recurrences, and six distant metastases.Conclusion: Grade 3-4 toxicities remained significant during chemoradiation when radiation was delivered with tomotherapy-based IGRT. However, the absence of grade 3-4 pneumonitis is promising and the use of HT needs to be investigated in future prospective studies.

  15. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  16. Optimum radiotherapy schedule for uterine cervical cancer based-on the detailed information of dose fractionation and radiotherapy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyun Chang; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-09-15

    The best dose-fractionation regimen of the definitive radiotherapy for cervix cancer remains to be clearly determined. It seems to be partially attributed to the complexity of the affecting factors and the lack of detailed information on external and intra-cavitary fractionation. To find optimal practice guidelines, our experiences of the combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) were reviewed with detailed information of the various treatment parameters obtained from a large cohort of women treated homogeneously at a single institute. The subjects were 743 cervical cancer patients (Stage IB 198, IIA 77, IIB 364, IIIA 7, IIIB 89 and IVA 8) treated by radiotherapy alone, between 1990 and 1996. A total external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose of 23.4 {approx} 59.4 Gy (Median 45.0) was delivered to the whole pelvis. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) was also performed using various fractionation schemes. A Midline block (MLB) was initiated after the delivery of 14.4{approx} 43.2 Gy (Median 36.0) of EBRT in 495 patients, while in the other 248 patients EBRT could not be used due to slow tumor regression or the huge initial bulk of tumor. The point A, actual bladder and rectal doses were individually assessed in all patients. The biologically effective dose (BED) to the tumor ({alpha} / {beta} = 10) and late-responding tissues ({alpha} /{beta} = 3) for both EBRT and HDR-ICBT were calculated. The total BED values to point A, the actual bladder and rectal reference points were the summation of the EBRT and HDR-ICBT. In addition to all the details on dose-fractionation, the other factors (i.e. the overall treatment time, physicians preference) that can affect the schedule of the definitive radiotherapy were also thoroughly analyzed. The association between MD-BED Gy{sub 3} and the risk of complication was assessed using serial multiple logistic regressions models. The associations between R

  17. Shielding considerations for an operating room based intraoperative electron radiotherapy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M D; Almond, P R; Boyer, A L; Ochran, T G; Madigan, W; Rich, T A; Dally, E B

    1990-05-01

    The leakage radiation characteristics of a dedicated intraoperative radiotherapy linear accelerator have been measured on a machine designed to minimize the shielding required to allow it to be placed in an operating room suite. The scattering foil design was optimized to produce a flat beam for the field sizes employed while generating minimal bremsstrahlung contamination over the available energy range. More lead shielding was used in the treatment head than is used in conventional accelerators. A small amount of borated polyethylene shielding was also employed since neutron production was present at measurable levels. The room shielding installed in the operating room was demonstrated to be adequate to treat at least 20 patients each month to an average dose of 20 Gy. The worst case exposure was found to be 73% maximum permissible exposure. Administrative control was required for adjoining areas when calibrations and maintenance were performed.

  18. Radical radiotherapy compared with surgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Marjan; Levendag, Peter C; de Bree, Remco R; Franssen, Jan Huib; Smeele, Ludwig E; Nijdam, Wideke M; Jansen, Peter P; Meeuwis, Cees A; Leemans, C René

    2004-01-01

    This study reports on T3/T4 base of tongue (BOT) tumors treated at the Erasmus MC (Rotterdam) with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (BT). Local control, survival, and functional outcome are compared to results obtained in similar patients treated at the Vrije University Medical Center (VUMC, Amsterdam) by surgery and postoperative RT (PORT). At Rotterdam 46/2 Gy was given to the primary and bilateral neck, followed by an implant using low-dose-rate (LDR 24-35 Gy; median 27 Gy), or fractionated high-dose-rate (fr. HDR 20-28 Gy; median 24 Gy). A neck dissection (ND) was performed in case of N+ disease. 67% of BOT tumors had a T4 cancer. At Amsterdam surgery (S) followed by PORT 40-70 Gy (median 60 Gy) was performed; 26% BOT tumors were T4. Sex, age and nodal distribution were similar. Actuarial local control and survival were computed. Performance Status Scale (PSS) scores were established. Xerostomis was determined on visual analog scales (VAS). Local failure at 5-years was 37% (Rotterdam) vs. 9% (Amsterdam) (p Rotterdam patients had more advanced BOT tumors (67% vs. 26% T4), explaining the higher local failure rate. Given the organ preservation properties of radiotherapy-only and the better PSS scores, the jury is still out on the optimal treatment for BOT tumors.

  19. Geometric-model-based segmentation of the prostate and surrounding structures for image-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Jeong, Yongwon; Radke, Richard J.; Chen, George T. Y.

    2004-01-01

    We present a computer vision tool to improve the clinical outcome of patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer by improving irradiation technique. While intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows one to irradiate a specific region in the body with high accuracy, it is still difficult to know exactly where to aim the radiation beam on every day of the 30~40 treatments that are necessary. This paper presents a geometric model-based technique to accurately segment the prostate and other surrounding structures in a daily serial CT image, compensating for daily motion and shape variation. We first acquire a collection of serial CT scans of patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy, and manual segmentation of the prostate and other nearby structures by radiation oncologists. Then we train shape and local appearance models for the structures of interest. When new images are available, an iterative algorithm is applied to locate the prostate and surrounding structures automatically. Our experimental results show that excellent matches can be given to the prostate and surrounding structure. Convergence is declared after 10 iterations. For 256 x 256 images, the mean distance between the hand-segmented contour and the automatically estimated contour is about 1.5 pixels (2.44 mm), with variance about 0.6 pixel (1.24 mm).

  20. Magnetic fields and beam optics studies of a 250 MeV superconducting proton radiotherapy cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Won [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu-dong, Koyang, Kyonggi (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jwkim@ncc.re.kr

    2007-11-21

    A 250 MeV superconducting cyclotron for the proton radiation therapy was designed at the Michigan State University (MSU) for use at the Paul Scherrer Institut. This work was based on the conceptual design carried out at the MSU in 1994. The previous design was refined to finalize the magnet configuration and to optimally arrange cyclotron elements for the actual construction. The spiral angle of the pole was reduced, the new hill-edges and valley shims being introduced. The magnetic fields were highly isochronized using a least square fitting routine involving a schematic shimming scheme. The resulting reference field was adequate for the elaborate study of beam optics. The optics simulation predicted that extraction efficiency of above 80% was achievable for a beam with the initial phase width of 20{sup o}. The vertical deflector was investigated located in the central region to control the beam intensity with tracking of beam phase spaces. Some measurement results for the constructed cyclotron were found in a good agreement with those of the optics study.

  1. Number and Location of Positive Nodes, Postoperative Radiotherapy, and Survival After Esophagectomy With Three-Field Lymph Node Dissection for Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Junqiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Pan Jianji, E-mail: panjianji@126.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Zheng Xiongwei [Department of Pathology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Zhu Kunshou [Department of Surgery, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Li Jiancheng; Chen Mingqiang; Wang Jiezhong [Department of Radiation Oncology, the Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze influences of the number and location of positive lymph nodes and postoperative radiotherapy on survival for patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TE-SCC) treated with radical esophagectomy with three-field lymphadenectomy. Methods and Materials: A total of 945 patients underwent radical esophagectomy plus three-field lymph node dissection for node-positive TE-SCC at Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital between January 1993 and March 2007. Five hundred ninety patients received surgery only (S group), and 355 patients received surgery, followed 3 to 4 weeks later by postoperative radiotherapy (S+R group) to a median total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. We assessed potential associations among patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors and overall survival. Results: Five-year overall survival rates were 32.8% for the entire group, 29.6% for the S group, and 38.0% for the S+R group (p = 0.001 for S vs. S+R). Treatment with postoperative radiotherapy was particularly beneficial for patients with {>=}3 positive nodes and for those with metastasis in the upper (supraclavicular and upper mediastinal) region or both the upper and lower (mediastinal and abdominal) regions (p < 0.05). Postoperative radiotherapy was also associated with lower recurrence rates in the supraclavicular and upper and middle mediastinal regions (p < 0.05). Sex, primary tumor length, number of positive nodes, pathological T category, and postoperative radiotherapy were all independent predictors of survival. Conclusions: Postoperative radiotherapy was associated with better survival for patients with node-positive TE-SCC, particularly those with three or more positive nodes and positive nodes in the supraclavicular and superior mediastinal regions.

  2. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M., E-mail: stefanic@cae.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Regional de Referencia con Patrones Secundarios para Dosimetria - CNEA, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon 15, B1802AYA Ezeiza (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  3. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D{sub clin} − D{sub pred}. The mean (〈δD{sub r}〉), standard deviation (σ{sub δD{sub r}}), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r{sub PTV}) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r{sub PTV} ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The

  4. Telematics-based online client-server/client collaborative environment for radiotherapy planning simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Oyeon

    2007-11-01

    Customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient is very useful for both a patient and a doctor because it provides the ability to deliver higher doses to a more accurately defined tumor and at the same time lower doses to organs at risk and normal tissues. This can be realized by building an accurate planning simulation system to provide better treatment strategies based on each patient's tomographic data such as CT, MRI, PET, or SPECT. In this study, we develop a real-time online client-server/client collaborative environment between the client (health care professionals or hospitals) and the server/client under a secure network using telematics (the integrated use of telecommunications and medical informatics). The implementation is based on a point-to-point communication scheme between client and server/client following the WYSIWIS (what you see is what I see) paradigm. After uploading the patient tomographic data, the client is able to collaborate with the server/client for treatment planning. Consequently, the level of health care services can be improved, specifically for small radiotherapy clinics in rural/remote-country areas that do not possess much experience or equipment such as a treatment planning simulator. The telematics service of the system can also be used to provide continued medical education in radiotherapy. Moreover, the system is easy to use. A client can use the system if s/he is familiar with the Windows(TM) operating system because it is designed and built based on a user-friendly concept. This system does not require the client to continue hardware and software maintenance and updates. These are performed automatically by the server.

  5. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Graves, Yan Jiang; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered to be the most accurate dose calculation method in radiotherapy. However, its efficiency still requires improvement for many routine clinical applications. In this paper, we present our recent progress towards the development a GPU-based MC dose calculation package, gDPM v2.0. It utilizes the parallel computation ability of a GPU to achieve high efficiency, while maintaining the same particle transport physics as in the original DPM code and hence the same level of simulation accuracy. In GPU computing, divergence of execution paths between threads can considerably reduce the efficiency. Since photons and electrons undergo different physics and hence attain different execution paths, we use a simulation scheme where photon transport and electron transport are separated to partially relieve the thread divergence issue. High performance random number generator and hardware linear interpolation are also utilized. We have also developed various components to hand...

  6. A new theoretical formula for fractionated radiotherapy based on a saturable cellular repair mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Reyes, A. (Servicio de Radioterapia, Hospital Clinico y Provincial de Barcelona (Spain)); Farrus, B. (Servicio de Radioterapia, Hospital Clinico y Provincial de Barcelona (Spain)); Biete, A. (Servicio de Radioterapia, Hospital Clinico y Provincial de Barcelona (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    Recently we have published a new model of survival cellular response to radiation based on the existence of a saturable cellular repair mechanism. In the present paper we extend the predictions of this model of calculating the change in total dose necessary to achieve an equal response in a tissue when the dose per fraction in a radiotherapy fractionation schedule is varied. The model provides a new explanation of the difference between late and early radiation reactions. Results obtained from the model for different tissues and standard fractionation schedules are approximately equal to those obtained by the L.Q. (linear-quadratic) model. The model is compatible with in vitro survival curves that are straight at high doses. (orig.).

  7. An analytical solution to patient prioritisation in radiotherapy based on utilitarian optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, M A; Li, W; Jennings, L

    2014-03-01

    The detrimental impact of a radiotherapy waiting list can in part be compensated by patient prioritisation. Such prioritisation is phrased as an optimisation problem where the probability of local control for the overall population is the objective to be maximised and a simple analytical solution derived. This solution is compared with a simulation of a waiting list for the same population of patients. It is found that the analytical solution can provide an optimal ordering of patients though cannot explicitly constrain optimal waiting times. The simulation-based solution was undertaken using both the analytical solution and a numerical optimisation routine for daily patient ordering. Both solutions provided very similar results with the analytical approach reducing the calculation time of the numerical solution by several orders of magnitude. It is suggested that treatment delays due to resource limitations and resulting waiting lists be incorporated into treatment optimisation and that the derived analytical solution provides a mechanism for this to occur.

  8. The Prediction of Radiotherapy Toxicity Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Models: A Step Toward Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Kerns (Sarah L.); S. Kundu (Suman); J.H. Oh (Jung Hun); S.K. Singhal (Sandeep K.); M. Janelsins (Michelle); L.B. Travis (Lois B.); J.O. Deasy (Joseph O.); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); H. Ostrer (Harry); M. Parliament (Matthew); N. Usmani (Nawaid); B.S. Rosenstein (Barry S.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is a mainstay of cancer treatment, used in either a curative or palliative manner to treat approximately 50% of patients with cancer. Normal tissue toxicity limits the doses used in standard radiation therapy protocols and impedes improvements in radiotherapy efficacy. Damag

  9. Quality assessment for VMAT prostate radiotherapy planning based on data envelopment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Min; Simpson, John; Sasso, Giuseppe; Raith, Andrea; Ehrgott, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    The majority of commercial radiotherapy treatment planning systems requires planners to iteratively adjust the plan parameters in order to find a satisfactory plan. This iterative trial-and-error nature of radiotherapy treatment planning results in an inefficient planning process and in order to reduce such inefficiency, plans can be accepted without achieving the best attainable quality. We propose a quality assessment method based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) to address this inefficiency. This method compares a plan of interest to a set of past delivered plans and searches for evidence of potential further improvement. With the assistance of DEA, planners will be able to make informed decisions on whether further planning is required and ensure that a plan is only accepted when the plan quality is close to the best attainable one. We apply the DEA method to 37 prostate plans using two assessment parameters: rectal generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) as the input and D95 (the minimum dose that is received by 95% volume of a structure) of the planning target volume (PTV) as the output. The percentage volume of rectum overlapping PTV is used to account for anatomical variations between patients and is included in the model as a non-discretionary output variable. Five plans that are considered of lesser quality by DEA are re-optimized with the goal to further improve rectal sparing. After re-optimization, all five plans improve in rectal gEUD without clinically considerable deterioration of the PTV D95 value. For the five re-optimized plans, the rectal gEUD is reduced by an average of 1.84 Gray (Gy) with only an average reduction of 0.07 Gy in PTV D95. The results demonstrate that DEA can correctly identify plans with potential improvements in terms of the chosen input and outputs.

  10. Automatic transperineal ultrasound probe positioning based on CT scan for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, S. M.; Verhaegen, F.; Paiva Fonesca, G.; de With, P. H. N.; Fontanarosa, D.

    2017-03-01

    Image interpretation is crucial during ultrasound image acquisition. A skilled operator is typically needed to verify if the correct anatomical structures are all visualized and with sufficient quality. The need for this operator is one of the major reasons why presently ultrasound is not widely used in radiotherapy workflows. To solve this issue, we introduce an algorithm that uses anatomical information derived from a CT scan to automatically provide the operator with a patient-specific ultrasound probe setup. The first application we investigated, for its relevance to radiotherapy, is 4D transperineal ultrasound image acquisition for prostate cancer patients. As initial test, the algorithm was applied on a CIRS multi-modality pelvic phantom. Probe setups were calculated in order to allow visualization of the prostate and adjacent edges of bladder and rectum, as clinically required. Five of the proposed setups were reproduced using a precision robotic arm and ultrasound volumes were acquired. A gel-filled probe cover was used to ensure proper acoustic coupling, while taking into account possible tilted positions of the probe with respect to the flat phantom surface. Visual inspection of the acquired volumes revealed that clinical requirements were fulfilled. Preliminary quantitative evaluation was also performed. The mean absolute distance (MAD) was calculated between actual anatomical structure positions and positions predicted by the CT-based algorithm. This resulted in a MAD of (2.8±0.4) mm for prostate, (2.5±0.6) mm for bladder and (2.8±0.6) mm for rectum. These results show that no significant systematic errors due to e.g. probe misplacement were introduced.

  11. Number and location of positive nodes, postoperative radiotherapy, and survival after esophagectomy with three-field lymph node dissection for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junqiang; Pan, Jianji; Zheng, Xiongwei; Zhu, Kunshou; Li, Jiancheng; Chen, Mingqiang; Wang, Jiezhong; Liao, Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    To analyze influences of the number and location of positive lymph nodes and postoperative radiotherapy on survival for patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TE-SCC) treated with radical esophagectomy with three-field lymphadenectomy. A total of 945 patients underwent radical esophagectomy plus three-field lymph node dissection for node-positive TE-SCC at Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital between January 1993 and March 2007. Five hundred ninety patients received surgery only (S group), and 355 patients received surgery, followed 3 to 4 weeks later by postoperative radiotherapy (S+R group) to a median total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. We assessed potential associations among patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors and overall survival. Five-year overall survival rates were 32.8% for the entire group, 29.6% for the S group, and 38.0% for the S+R group (p = 0.001 for S vs. S+R). Treatment with postoperative radiotherapy was particularly beneficial for patients with ≥3 positive nodes and for those with metastasis in the upper (supraclavicular and upper mediastinal) region or both the upper and lower (mediastinal and abdominal) regions (p supraclavicular and upper and middle mediastinal regions (p nodes, pathological T category, and postoperative radiotherapy were all independent predictors of survival. Postoperative radiotherapy was associated with better survival for patients with node-positive TE-SCC, particularly those with three or more positive nodes and positive nodes in the supraclavicular and superior mediastinal regions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose perturbations in rotational-type radiotherapy due to a transverse magnetic field: A tomotherapy investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y. M.; Geurts, M.; Smilowitz, J. B.; Bednarz, B. P., E-mail: bbednarz2@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States); Sterpin, E. [Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium 1348 (Belgium)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Several groups are exploring the integration of magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance with radiotherapy to reduce tumor position uncertainty during photon radiotherapy. The therapeutic gain from reducing tumor position uncertainty using intrafraction MR imaging during radiotherapy could be partially offset if the negative effects of magnetic field-induced dose perturbations are not appreciated or accounted for. The authors hypothesize that a more rotationally symmetric modality such as helical tomotherapy will permit a systematic mediation of these dose perturbations. This investigation offers a unique look at the dose perturbations due to homogeneous transverse magnetic field during the delivery of Tomotherapy{sup ®} Treatment System plans under varying degrees of rotational beamlet symmetry. Methods: The authors accurately reproduced treatment plan beamlet and patient configurations using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. This code has a thoroughly benchmarked electromagnetic particle transport physics package well-suited for the radiotherapy energy regime. The three approved clinical treatment plans for this study were for a prostate, head and neck, and lung treatment. The dose heterogeneity index metric was used to quantify the effect of the dose perturbations to the target volumes. Results: The authors demonstrate the ability to reproduce the clinical dose–volume histograms (DVH) to within 4% dose agreement at each DVH point for the target volumes and most planning structures, and therefore, are able to confidently examine the effects of transverse magnetic fields on the plans. The authors investigated field strengths of 0.35, 0.7, 1, 1.5, and 3 T. Changes to the dose heterogeneity index of 0.1% were seen in the prostate and head and neck case, reflecting negligible dose perturbations to the target volumes, a change from 5.5% to 20.1% was observed with the lung case. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the effect of external magnetic fields can

  13. ‘Inverted Y’ field radiotherapy planning with multi-leaf collimator: A single isocentric technique using multiple fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Sahai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study is to describe a planning technique using multi-leaf collimator and asymmetric fields for irradiating an ‘inverted Y’ shaped geometry in a patient with testicular seminoma. The entire target area covering the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal nodal regions was split into three fields. Single isocenter half-beam block technique was employed. The fields were planned with antero-posterior and postero-anterior portals with a differential weightage. The dose was prescribed at the respective reference points of the fields. A uniform dose distribution for the entire portal was achieved without any under- or over-dosing at the field junctions.  

  14. [The control of radiation protection in the field of radiotherapy by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, J-L

    2007-11-01

    During the last months, several incidents at radiotherapy services occurred in France; one of these accidents led to the death of several patients or required further heavy surgical acts. In this context, ASN (Autorité de sûreté nucléaire) issued an experimental guide for the notification of radiation protection events and achieved, in dialogue with professional organisations, a new scale intended to facilitate public information on radiotherapy incidents. ASN is also fully involved in the preparation of the action plan managed by the Health ministry in order to improve the safety of treatment in radiotherapy.

  15. Neutron spectral measurements in an intense photon field associated with a high-energy x-ray radiotherapy machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeman, G R; Price, K W; Friedman, L F; Nath, R

    1977-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines in the supermegavoltage region generate complex neutron energy spectra which make an exact evaluation of neutron shielding difficult. Fast neutrons resulting from photonuclear reactions in the x-ray target and collimators undergo successive collisions in the surrounding materials and are moderated by varying amounts. In order to examine the neutron radiation exposures quantitatively, the neutron energy spectra have been measured inside and outside the treatment room of a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (25-MV x rays) located at Yale-New Haven Hospital. The measurements were made using a Bonner spectrometer consisting of 2-, 3-, 5-, 8-, 10- and 12-in.-diameter polyethylene spheres with 6Li and 7Li thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips at the centers, in addition to bare and cadmium-covered chips. The individual TLD chips were calibrated for neutron and photon response. The spectrometer was calibrated using a known PuBe spectrum Spectrometer measurements were made at Yale Electron Accelerator Laboratory and results compared with a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer and an activation technique. The agreement between the results from these independent methods is found to be good, except for the measurements in the direct photon beam. Quality factors have been inferred for the neutron fields inside and outside the treatment room. Values of the inferred quality factors fall primarily between 4 and 8, depending on location.

  16. A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uilkema, Sander, E-mail: s.uilkema@nki.nl; Heide, Uulke van der; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Triest, Baukelien van; Nijkamp, Jasper [Department of Radiotherapy, NKI-AVL, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Moreau, Michel [RTP Research Group, Elekta, Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: MRI guidance during radiotherapy has the potential to enable more accurate dose delivery, optimizing the balance between local control and treatment related toxicity. However, the presence of a permanent magnetic field influences the dose delivery, especially around air cavities. Here, electrons are able to return to the surface through which they entered the air cavity (electron return effect, ERE) locally resulting in dose hot- and cold-spots. Where RT of rectal cancer patients might benefit from MRI guidance for margin reduction, air cavities in and around the target volume are frequently present. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact of the presence of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on dose delivery in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Ten patients treated with 5 × 5 Gy RT having large changes in pelvic air content were selected out of a cohort of 33 patients. On the planning CT, a 1.5 T, 6 MV, 7-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was created. This plan was subsequently recalculated on daily CT scans. For each daily CT, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} and bowel area V{sub 5Gy}, V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, and V{sub 25Gy} were calculated to evaluate the changes in dose distribution from fraction to fraction. For comparison, the authors repeated this procedure for the 0 T situation. To study the effect of changing air cavities separate from other anatomical changes, the authors also generated artificial air cavities in the CTV of one patient (2 and 5 cm diameter), in the high dose gradient region (2 cm), and in the low dose area (2 cm). Treatment plans were optimized without and with each simulated air cavity. For appearing and disappearing air cavities, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} were evaluated. The authors also evaluated the ERE separate from attenuation changes locally around appearing gas pockets. Results: For the ten patients, at 1.5 T, the V{sub 95%} was influenced by both appearing and

  17. Radiotherapy waiting times for women with breast cancer: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainsbury Richard

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Waiting times for cancer patients are a national priority in the UK. Previous studies have shown variation between cancer networks in the time between diagnosis and start of radiotherapy for all cancer patients. Studies of the relationship between delay in receiving treatment and survival of breast cancer patients have been inconsistent. This study aimed to examine factors associated with waiting times for radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. Methods 35,354 women resident in South East England and diagnosed with breast cancer between 1992 and 2001 who received radiotherapy within six months of diagnosis were identified from the Thames Cancer Registry. Time to radiotherapy was measured from either the date of diagnosis or the start of the previous treatment, whichever was shorter. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to examine whether patients received radiotherapy within 60 days of their diagnosis or previous treatment. Results The adjusted proportions of patients receiving radiotherapy within 60 days varied significantly between different cancer networks (range: 43% to 81%, and decreased from 68% in 1992 to 33% in 2001. After adjustment there was no association between deprivation of area of residence, age or stage and radiotherapy wait. Median time waited to radiotherapy increased over the study period whether measured from the start of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery or the date of diagnosis. Conclusion This study covered a period of time before the investment following the Cancer Plan of 2000. Results are consistent with other findings suggesting variation between cancer networks and increasing waits over time. Further studies should examine different methods of measuring waiting time, the causes and consequences of waits for radiotherapy and the effect of current initiatives and investments.

  18. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Zeidan, Amer M; Yu, James B; Soulos, Pamela R; Davidoff, Amy J; Gore, Steven D; Huntington, Scott F; Gross, Cary P; Ma, Xiaomei

    2017-04-01

    To understand the impact of radiotherapy on the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among elderly prostate cancer patients. We performed a retrospective cohort study of elderly prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1999-2011 by using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare linked database. Competing risk analyses adjusting for patient characteristics were conducted to assess the impact of radiotherapy on the development of subsequent MDS/AML, compared with surgery. Of 32,112 prostate cancer patients, 14,672 underwent radiotherapy, and 17,440 received surgery only. The median follow-up was 4.68 years. A total of 157 (0.47%) prostate cancer patients developed subsequent MDS or AML, and the median time to develop MDS/AML was 3.30 (range: 0.16-9.48) years. Compared with prostate cancer patients who received surgery only, patients who underwent radiotherapy had a significantly increased risk of developing MDS/AML (hazard ratio [HR] =1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-2.13). When radiotherapy was further categorized by modalities (brachytherapy, conventional conformal radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]), increased risk of second MDS/AML was only observed in the IMRT group (HR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.09-2.54). Our findings suggest that radiotherapy for prostate cancer increases the risk of MDS/AML, and the impact may differ by modality. Additional studies with longer follow-up are needed to further clarify the role of radiotherapy in the development of subsequent myeloid malignancies. A better understanding may help patients, physicians, and other stakeholders make more informed treatment decisions. Prostate 77:437-445, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Palliation of dysphagia with radiotherapy for exophytic base tongue metastases in a case of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabassum Wadasadawala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Base tongue involvement is a rare presentation of lingual metastases from renal cell carcinoma. A 48-year-old gentleman was treated with open radical nephrectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for Stage II Furhman grade I clear cell carcinoma of the left kidney at an outside hospital. He presented metachronously 5 years later with progressive dysphagia and change of voice. Clinicoradiological evaluation revealed a large exophytic mass in the oropharynx with epicenter in the right base of tongue. Metastatic workup revealed widespread dissemination to multiple organs and bone. In view of predominant symptom of dysphagia, base tongue metastasis was treated with protracted course of palliative radiotherapy to a dose of 50 Gy in conventional fractionation over 5 weeks. This resulted in excellent and durable response at the base tongue lesion (till the time of last follow-up. Radiation therapy is an acceptable palliative strategy for advanced lingual metastasis as it produces prompt relief of pain, bleeding, and dysphagia.

  20. Electronic Support for Retrospective Analysis in the Field of Radiation Oncology: Proof of Principle Using an Example of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of 251 Meningioma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rutzner, Sandra; Fietkau, Rainer; Ganslandt, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Lubgan, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to verify the possible benefit of a clinical data warehouse (DWH) for retrospective analysis in the field of radiation oncology. Material and methods We manually and electronically (using DWH) evaluated demographic, radiotherapy, and outcome data from 251 meningioma patients, who were irradiated from January 2002 to January 2015 at the Department of Radiation Oncology of the Erlangen University Hospital. Furthermore, we linked the Oncology ...

  1. Radiotherapy of esthesioneuroblastoma. Radiotherapie beim Aesthesioneuroblastom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, V. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Grabenbauer, G.G. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Dunst, J. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Sauer, R. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1994-02-01

    From 1985 through 1990, twelve patients with estehesioneuroblastoma have been treated at the Department of Radiotherapy at the University of Erlangen. Two had Kadish stage A, one stage B, and nine stage C. There were seven males and five females with a mean age of 43 years. Eleven patients had combined trancranial-transbasal surgery prior to radiotherapy (five R0-, four R1-, and two patients R2-resections) and one received radiotherapy only. The dose was 12 to 60 Gy (mean 54 Gy) in 1.8 Gy to 2 Gy per fraction. 8/12 patients (67%) were locally controlled. One had progressive disease during radiotherapy after partial resection and died. Three had local recurrences, one in-field and two marginal. One patient with a local recurrence developed cervical lymph node metastases, and one locally controlled patient developed bone metastases but is alive eight years after chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for metastatic disease. The five-year-overall and recurrence-free survival was 72% and 55%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  2. Determination of field size limitations in stereotactic and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J M; Ihnen, E; Eilf, K; Kimmig, B

    2003-12-01

    For dose measurement in small photon fields, different detectors are currently in use: TLD, semiconductor, diamond-detector, film, etc. But for absolute dosimetry, ionization chambers show the most advantages. To meet the basic dosimetrical requirements for lateral electron equilibrium the field size F must not remain under specified values: i.e. 5.2 x 5.2 cm2 for 15 MeV X-bremsstrahlung. As well as increasing the focus-chamber-distance, changing the physical density of the build-up material in the close vicinity of the chamber will be helpful to determine the output factor OF for smaller fields. By means of a correction factor, k(mat), this is taken into account. For a 6 MeV X and a 15 MeV X-bremsstrahlung of linear accelerators the lower limit of the field size F is determined: F > or = 0.8 cm. This value is mainly dependent on the diameter of the focal-spot (phi = 3 mm) of the treatment unit including design characteristics of the treatment head. Beside the dosimetrical aspects, some geometrical parameters have to be considered, when accuracy of dose application should remain on the same level as in medium and large field treatment (4 cm < or = F < or = F(max)). To keep dose-volume errors as low as +/- 10 % (diameter of PTV: 20 mm), the mean total error delta of CT-scanning (delta(p)), planning (delta(pl)), patient positioning (delta(x)), and treatment unit instabilities (delta(m)) should not exceed +/- 0.8 mm.

  3. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)]. e-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  4. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources

    CERN Document Server

    Townson, Reid; Tian, Zhen; Graves, Yan Jiang; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-01-01

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel strategy to pre-process patient-independent phase-spaces and bin particles by type, energy and position. Position bins l...

  5. Fast CPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenhein, Peter; Pirner, Sven; Ph Kamerling, Cornelis; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-08-07

    Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are considered to be the most accurate method for calculating dose distributions in radiotherapy. Its clinical application, however, still is limited by the long runtimes conventional implementations of MC algorithms require to deliver sufficiently accurate results on high resolution imaging data. In order to overcome this obstacle we developed the software-package PhiMC, which is capable of computing precise dose distributions in a sub-minute time-frame by leveraging the potential of modern many- and multi-core CPU-based computers. PhiMC is based on the well verified dose planning method (DPM). We could demonstrate that PhiMC delivers dose distributions which are in excellent agreement to DPM. The multi-core implementation of PhiMC scales well between different computer architectures and achieves a speed-up of up to 37[Formula: see text] compared to the original DPM code executed on a modern system. Furthermore, we could show that our CPU-based implementation on a modern workstation is between 1.25[Formula: see text] and 1.95[Formula: see text] faster than a well-known GPU implementation of the same simulation method on a NVIDIA Tesla C2050. Since CPUs work on several hundreds of GB RAM the typical GPU memory limitation does not apply for our implementation and high resolution clinical plans can be calculated.

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  7. A hybrid phase-space and histogram source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townson, Reid W.; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2014-12-01

    In GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations for radiotherapy dose calculation, source modelling from a phase-space source can be an efficiency bottleneck. Previously, this has been addressed using phase-space-let (PSL) sources, which provided significant efficiency enhancement. We propose that additional speed-up can be achieved through the use of a hybrid primary photon point source model combined with a secondary PSL source. A novel phase-space derived and histogram-based implementation of this model has been integrated into gDPM v3.0. Additionally, a simple method for approximately deriving target photon source characteristics from a phase-space that does not contain inheritable particle history variables (LATCH) has been demonstrated to succeed in selecting over 99% of the true target photons with only ~0.3% contamination (for a Varian 21EX 18 MV machine). The hybrid source model was tested using an array of open fields for various Varian 21EX and TrueBeam energies, and all cases achieved greater than 97% chi-test agreement (the mean was 99%) above the 2% isodose with 1% / 1 mm criteria. The root mean square deviations (RMSDs) were less than 1%, with a mean of 0.5%, and the source generation time was 4-5 times faster. A seven-field intensity modulated radiation therapy patient treatment achieved 95% chi-test agreement above the 10% isodose with 1% / 1 mm criteria, 99.8% for 2% / 2 mm, a RMSD of 0.8%, and source generation speed-up factor of 2.5. Presented as part of the International Workshop on Monte Carlo Techniques in Medical Physics

  8. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, M. T., E-mail: mariate9590@gmail.com; Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simón Bolívar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Sartenejas, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Dávila, J. [Física Médica C. A. and Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  9. Cause-specific effects of radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy in stage I-II endometrial cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mell, Loren K; Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Lu, Tina; Wu, John; Saenz, Cheryl C; Vaida, Florin

    2013-11-06

    Radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy have been associated with improved survival in population-based studies of endometrial cancer, which is in contrast with findings from randomized trials and meta-analyses. The primary study aim was to estimate the cause-specific effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy on competing causes of mortality. We analyzed Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data from 1988 to 2006. The sample comprised 58172 patients with stage I and II endometrial adenocarcinoma. Patients were risk stratified by stage, grade, and age. Cumulative incidences and cause-specific hazards of competing causes of mortality were estimated according to treatment. All statistical tests were two-sided. Pelvic radiotherapy was associated with statistically significantly increased endometrial cancer mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.52 to 1.82) in all stage I and II patients and decreased noncancer mortality in intermediate and high-risk stage I and II patients (HR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.77 to 0.89). Lymphadenectomy was associated with increased endometrial cancer mortality in stage I patients (HR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.39), decreased endometrial cancer mortality in stage II patients (HR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.52 to 0.72), and decreased noncancer mortality in both stage I and II patients (HR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.80 to 0.88). Effects of radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy on second cancer mortality varied according to risk strata. Radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy are associated with statistically significantly reduced noncancer mortality in stage I and II endometrial cancer. The improved overall survival associated with these treatments reported from SEER studies is largely attributable to their selective application in healthier patients rather than their effects on endometrial cancer.

  10. Paperless and paper-based processes in the modern radiotherapy department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, M. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North Street, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia)], E-mail: mark.middleton@roq.net.au; Bradford, C. [Harley St. Cancer Centre, London (United Kingdom); Frantzis, J. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North Street, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia); Ambler, A. [Harley St. Cancer Centre, London (United Kingdom); Sisson, T. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North Street, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia); Montgomerie, D. [Harley St. Cancer Centre, London (United Kingdom); Martin, J. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North Street, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the implications on workflow and efficiency in a paperless environment versus a traditional paper-based environment. This paper summarises the comparison of specific workflow practices conducted in a paperless and paper-based approach, comparing time taken, potential advantages and disadvantages of each approach, and the cost-effectiveness of a paperless approach. Methods and materials: A time study was undertaken on three specific workflow areas for 5 patients with breast and prostate cancer respectively, and comparison made between paperless and paper-based methodology. The workflow areas analysed were electronic treatment record (ETR) versus treatment sheet preparation, digital history check process versus paper-based and digital image and trend analysis versus paper-based. The cost-effectiveness of a paperless approach was then analysed. Additionally a staff questionnaire was undertaken, assessing Information Technology (IT) skills of staff and comfort levels pertaining to a paperless environment. Results: There was on average a 50% reduction in workload when comparing an ETR versus a paper-based treatment sheet, a 50% reduction in workload by utilising a paperless history check process and a 70% reduction in workload with a paperless image and trend analysis process. There was also significant cost savings by introducing a paperless workflow. The survey showed a higher level of comfort with information technology in the paperless environment, and less frustration with aspects of working in the paper-based centre. Conclusion: The digital radiotherapy department offers highly significant improvements in efficiency. These potentially translate into major financial savings and increased job satisfaction.

  11. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregni, M.; Paganelli, C.; Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Baroni, G.; Keall, P. J.; Riboldi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  12. [Role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer : Is MRI-based selection a future model?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulu, Y; Hackert, T; Debus, J; Weber, M-A; Büchler, M W; Ulrich, A

    2016-07-01

    Following the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) in the curative treatment of rectal cancer, the role of neoadjuvant therapy has evolved. By improving the surgical technique the local recurrence rate could be reduced by TME surgery alone to below 8 %. Even if local control was further improved by additional preoperative irradiation this did not lead to a general survival benefit. Guidelines advocate that all patients in UICC stage II and III should be pretreated; however, the stage-based indications for neoadjuvant therapy have limitations. This is mainly attributable to the facts that patients with T3 tumors comprise a very heterogeneous prognostic group and preoperative lymph node diagnostics lack accuracy. In contrast, in recent years the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has become an important prognostic parameter. Patients with tumors that are very close to or infiltrate the pelvic fascia (positive CRM) have a higher rate of local recurrence and poorer survival. With high-resolution pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in patients with rectal cancer, the preoperative CRM can be determined with a high sensitivity and specificity. Improved T staging and better prediction of the resection margins by pelvic MRI potentially facilitate the selection of patients for study-based treatment strategies omitting neoadjuvant radiotherapy.

  13. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregni, M; Paganelli, C; Lee, D; Greer, P B; Baroni, G; Keall, P J; Riboldi, M

    2016-01-21

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  14. Cetuximab with radiotherapy in patients with loco-regionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck unsuitable or ineligible for concurrent platinum-based chemo-radiotherapy: Ready for routine clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J P Agarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report outcomes of cetuximab concurrent with radiotherapy in advanced head-neck cancer unsuitable for platinum-based chemo-radiotherapy. Materials and Methods : Retrospective chart review of 37 patients treated with cetuximab and radiotherapy at a comprehensive cancer centre. Results : Median age of study cohort was 59 years. Thirty four (92% patients had advanced stage disease (stage III-IV. Reasons for ineligibility for platinum included impaired creatinine-clearance, old age, and/or co-morbidities. Thirty-two (86% patients completed planned radiotherapy without interruption; 29 (80% patients received ≥6 cycles of cetuximab. Fifteen patients (40.5% developed ≥grade 3 dermatitis; 9 patients (25% experienced ≥grade 3 mucositis. At a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year loco-regional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival was 35.5%, 29.5%, and 44.4% respectively. Stage grouping and severe dermatitis were significant predictors of outcome. Conclusions : Cetuximab concurrent with radiotherapy is a reasonable alternative in advanced head-neck cancer patients with acceptable compliance and outcomes, but higher skin toxicity.

  15. The development and implementation of MOSAIQ Integration Platform (MIP) based on the radiotherapy workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; He, Zhen-yu; Jiang, Xiao-bo; Lin, Mao-sheng; Zhong, Ning-shan; Hu, Jiang; Qi, Zhen-yu; Bao, Yong; Li, Qiao-qiao; Li, Bao-yue; Hu, Lian-ying; Lin, Cheng-guang; Gao, Yuan-hong; Liu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-yan; Deng, Xiao-wu; Xia, Yun-fei; Liu, Meng-zhong; Sun, Ying

    2017-03-01

    To meet the special demands in China and the particular needs for the radiotherapy department, a MOSAIQ Integration Platform CHN (MIP) based on the workflow of radiation therapy (RT) has been developed, as a supplement system to the Elekta MOSAIQ. The MIP adopts C/S (client-server) structure mode, and its database is based on the Treatment Planning System (TPS) and MOSAIQ SQL Server 2008, running on the hospital local network. Five network servers, as a core hardware, supply data storage and network service based on the cloud services. The core software, using C# programming language, is developed based on Microsoft Visual Studio Platform. The MIP server could offer network service, including entry, query, statistics and print information for about 200 workstations at the same time. The MIP was implemented in the past one and a half years, and some practical patient-oriented functions were developed. And now the MIP is almost covering the whole workflow of radiation therapy. There are 15 function modules, such as: Notice, Appointment, Billing, Document Management (application/execution), System Management, and so on. By June of 2016, recorded data in the MIP are as following: 13546 patients, 13533 plan application, 15475 RT records, 14656 RT summaries, 567048 billing records and 506612 workload records, etc. The MIP based on the RT workflow has been successfully developed and clinically implemented with real-time performance, data security, stable operation. And it is demonstrated to be user-friendly and is proven to significantly improve the efficiency of the department. It is a key to facilitate the information sharing and department management. More functions can be added or modified for further enhancement its potentials in research and clinical practice.

  16. Influence of segment width on plan quality for volumetric modulated arc based stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiyanantham, Karthikeyan; Kadirampatti Mani, Ganesh; Subramani, Vikraman; Karukkupalayam Palaniappan, Karrthick; Uthiran, Mohanraj; Vellengiri, Sennniandavar; Raju, Sambasivaselli; Supe, Sanjay S; Kataria, Tejinder

    2014-09-01

    To study the influence of segment width on plan quality for volumetric modulated arc based stereotactic body radiotherapy. The redundancy of modulation for regularly shaped small volume tumors results in creation of many small segments and an increase of monitor units, with a consequent prolongation of treatment and uncertainty in treatment delivery. Six cases each in lung, abdomen and liver were taken for the study. For each case, three VMAT SBRT plans were generated with different penalties on minimum segment width of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm. A comparison was made on the metrics of dose volume histogram, dosimetric indices, monitor units (MUs) and delivery accuracy. The mean reduction of total MUs when compared with 0.5 cm plan was observed as 12.7 ± 6.0% and 17.5 ± 7.2% for 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm of minimum segment width, respectively. The p value showed a significant degradation in dosimetric indices for 1.5 cm plans when compared with 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm plans. The average deviation of measured dose with TPS calculated was 3.0 ± 1.1%, 2.1 ± 0.84% and 1.8 ± 0.9% for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm, respectively. The calculated gamma index with pass criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement was 95.9 ± 2.8%, 96.5 ± 2.6% and 97.8 ± 1.6% as calculated for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm of penalties, respectively. In view of the trade off between delivery efficiency and plan quality, 1 cm minimum segment width plans showed an improvement. VMAT SBRT plans with increased optimal value of minimum segment width showed better plan quality and delivery efficiency for stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  17. Low-Dose Whole Brain Radiotherapy with Tumor Bed Boost after Methotrexate-Based Chemotherapy for Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kim, Il Han; Park, Sung-Hye; Park, Chul Kee; Jung, Hee Won; Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Se-Hoon; Heo, Dae Seog

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of low-dose whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with tumor bed boost after methotrexate-based chemotherapy in the management of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients with pathologically proven PCNSL between 2000 and 2011. Methotrexate-based chemotherapy with a median of five cycles was followed by radiotherapy to the whole brain and to the initial tumor bed. The me...

  18. Ozone treatment for radiotherapy skin reactions: is there an evidence base for practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Liz; Beaver, Kinta; Foy, Sharon

    2002-12-01

    Clinical staff and researchers working together can do much to bridge the gap between research and practice. This paper reports on the practice of treating severe radiotherapy skin reactions with ozone therapy; a practice that has been in place for a number of years at a specialist oncology hospital in England and perceived to be beneficial in terms of wound healing and pain relief. A multidisciplinary team of clinical staff and researchers questioned the evidence base for this practice and a literature search revealed little support for the effectiveness of this treatment in this particular context. The views of patients receiving ozone therapy were sought and assessment forms were completed to gain objective information on the progress (or otherwise) of wound healing. While patients perceived the ozone treatment to be beneficial in terms of pain relief, it was impossible to isolate the impact of ozone alone as other preparations and treatments were also being given. Patient reports and nursing assessments did not support that ozone was effective at wound healing. A more formal evaluation of this treatment is being planned, supported by the shared governance initiative at the study site and a continued collaboration between clinical staff and researchers.

  19. A systematic review of complications of implant-based breast reconstruction with prereconstruction and postreconstruction radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, Adeyiza O; Ahmed, Raouf; Kelley, Brian P; Aliu, Oluseyi; Kidwell, Kelley M; Kozlow, Jeffrey H; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess outcomes data on complications associated with implant-based breast reconstruction performed before or after chest wall radiation to assist in guiding the decision-making process for reconstruction of the irradiated breast. Studies from a PubMed search that met predetermined inclusion criteria were identified and included. Complications of interest were low- and high-grade capsular contractures, minor and major complications, reconstruction failure rates, and reconstruction completion rates. Pooled complication rates were calculated. A total of 26 articles were included in the study after screening 1,006 publications, with 14 studies presenting data on prereconstruction radiation and 23 studies presenting data on postreconstruction radiation. Complication rates evaluated in patients exposed to radiation before or after implant reconstruction were not significantly different. Reconstruction failure rates were similar at 19 and 20 % for pre- and postreconstruction radiation patients, respectively. Completion rates were similar at 83 and 80 % for pre- and postreconstruction radiation patients, respectively. Review of the current literature suggests similar overall success and failure rates with radiotherapy provided both before and after reconstruction. Failure rates in both groups of patients are clinically significant when considering implant reconstruction in the setting of radiation.

  20. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Cranial Base: Is Low-Dose Radiotherapy Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease of unknown etiology with different clinical features. A standardised treatment has not been established so far. Case Report. We report a case of a 28-year-old patient who initially presented with hypesthesia of the fifth cranial nerve and pain of the left ear. Diagnosis showed a tumour localised in the cranial base with a maximum diameter of 4.1 cm. The diagnosis of LCH was confirmed histologically by biopsy. Diagnostic workup verified the cranial lesion as the sole manifestation of LCH. A total dose of 9 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy was delivered. The symptoms dissolved completely within 6 months after radiation; repeated CT and MRI scans revealed a reduction in size of the lesion and a remineralisation of the bone. After a followup of 13 years the patient remains free of symptoms without relapse or any side effects from therapy. Discussion. Due to the indolent course of the disease with a high rate of spontaneous remissions the choice of treatment strongly depends on the individual clinical situation. In the presented case low-dose radiotherapy was sufficient to obtain long-term local control in a region with critical structures and tissues.

  1. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-07

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient's unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient's geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  2. A population-based model to describe geometrical uncertainties in radiotherapy: applied to prostate cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiarto, E.; Keijzer, M.; Storchi, P. R.; Hoogeman, M. S.; Bondar, L.; Mutanga, T. F.; de Boer, H. C. J.; Heemink, A. W.

    2011-02-01

    Local motions and deformations of organs between treatment fractions introduce geometrical uncertainties into radiotherapy. These uncertainties are generally taken into account in the treatment planning by enlarging the radiation target by a margin around the clinical target volume. However, a practical method to fully include these uncertainties is still lacking. This paper proposes a model based on the principal component analysis to describe the patient-specific local probability distributions of voxel motions so that the average values and variances of the dose distribution can be calculated and fully used later in inverse treatment planning. As usually only a very limited number of data for new patients is available; in this paper the analysis is extended to use population data. A basic assumption (which is justified retrospectively in this paper) is that general movements and deformations of a specific organ are similar despite variations in the shapes of the organ over the population. A proof of principle of the method for deformations of the prostate and the seminal vesicles is presented.

  3. A population-based model to describe geometrical uncertainties in radiotherapy: applied to prostate cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budiarto, E; Keijzer, M; Heemink, A W [Delft Institute of Applied Mathematics (DIAM), Technische Universiteit Delft, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Storchi, P R; Hoogeman, M S; Bondar, L; Mutanga, T F [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre. Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); De Boer, H C J, E-mail: e.budiarto@tudelft.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-02-21

    Local motions and deformations of organs between treatment fractions introduce geometrical uncertainties into radiotherapy. These uncertainties are generally taken into account in the treatment planning by enlarging the radiation target by a margin around the clinical target volume. However, a practical method to fully include these uncertainties is still lacking. This paper proposes a model based on the principal component analysis to describe the patient-specific local probability distributions of voxel motions so that the average values and variances of the dose distribution can be calculated and fully used later in inverse treatment planning. As usually only a very limited number of data for new patients is available; in this paper the analysis is extended to use population data. A basic assumption (which is justified retrospectively in this paper) is that general movements and deformations of a specific organ are similar despite variations in the shapes of the organ over the population. A proof of principle of the method for deformations of the prostate and the seminal vesicles is presented.

  4. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bing-Jie; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Chou, Yueh-Hung; Tseng, Li-Ming; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day). However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours) was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of pseudomembranous colitis following concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  5. Primary radiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Comparative analysis of inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selzer, Edgar; Grah, Anja [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Heiduschka, Gregor; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna, Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, Gabriela [Medical University of Vienna, Medicine I - Division of Clinical Oncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-13

    Inflammation-based scoring systems have potential value in evaluating the prognosis of cancer patients; however, detailed comparative analyses in well-characterized head and neck cancer patient collectives are missing. We analyzed overall survival (OS) in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who were treated with curative intent by primary radiotherapy (RT) alone, by RT in combination with cetuximab (RIT) or with cisplatin (RCHT), and by primary surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). The primary RT collective (N = 170) was analyzed separately from the surgery plus RT group (N = 148). OS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meyer method. Cox proportional-hazard regression models were applied to compare the risk of death among patients stratified according to risk factors and the inflammation-based Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), the modified GPS (mGPS), the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and the prognostic index (PI). A prognostic relevance of the scoring systems for OS was observed in the primarily irradiated, but not in the PORT collective. OS was 35.5, 18.8, and 15.4 months, respectively, according to GPS 0, 1, and 2. OS according to mGPS 0-2 was identical. The PLR scoring system was not of prognostic relevance, while OS was 27.3 months in the NLR 0 group and 17.3 months in the NLR 1 group. OS was 35.5 months in PI 0, 16.1 months in PI 1, and 22.6 months in PI 2. GPS/mGPS scoring systems are able to discriminate between three risk groups in primarily, but not postoperatively irradiated locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. (orig.) [German] Entzuendungsbasierte Bewertungssysteme haben eine potenzielle Bedeutung fuer die Beurteilung der Prognose von Krebspatienten. Derzeit fehlen jedoch ausreichend detailliert durchgefuehrte Analysen in Kollektiven von Patienten mit Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Untersucht wurde das Gesamtueberleben (''overall survival'', OS) von Patienten mit lokal

  6. The evidence base for the use of internal dosimetry in the clinical practice of molecular radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, Lidia [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Rome (Italy); Konijnenberg, Mark [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Chiesa, Carlo [Instituto Nazionale Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Bardies, Manuel [UMR 1037 INSERM / Universite Paul Sabatier, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Du, Yong [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, Sutton, London (United Kingdom); Gleisner, Katarina Sjoegreen [Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Lassmann, Michael [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Flux, Glenn [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Joint Department of Physics, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Molecular radiotherapy (MRT) has demonstrated unique therapeutic advantages in the treatment of an increasing number of cancers. As with other treatment modalities, there is related toxicity to a number of organs at risk. Despite the large number of clinical trials over the past several decades, considerable uncertainties still remain regarding the optimization of this therapeutic approach and one of the vital issues to be answered is whether an absorbed radiation dose-response exists that could be used to guide personalized treatment. There are only limited and sporadic data investigating MRT dosimetry. The determination of dose-effect relationships for MRT has yet to be the explicit aim of a clinical trial. The aim of this article was to collate and discuss the available evidence for an absorbed radiation dose-effect relationships in MRT through a review of published data. Based on a PubMed search, 92 papers were found. Out of 79 studies investigating dosimetry, an absorbed dose-effect correlation was found in 48. The application of radiobiological modelling to clinical data is of increasing importance and the limited published data on absorbed dose-effect relationships based on these models are also reviewed. Based on National Cancer Institute guideline definition, the studies had a moderate or low rate of clinical relevance due to the limited number of studies investigating overall survival and absorbed dose. Nevertheless, the evidence strongly implies a correlation between the absorbed doses delivered and the response and toxicity, indicating that dosimetry-based personalized treatments would improve outcome and increase survival. (orig.)

  7. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan are n...... on conventional T1-weighted MRI sequences and without deformable registrations. In our evaluations, the method performed better than existing voxel-based and atlas-based methods and showed a promising potential for RT of the brain based only on MRI....

  8. Radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for base of tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopherson, Kaitlin; Morris, Christopher G; Kirwan, Jessica M; Amdur, Robert J; Dziegielewski, Peter T; Boyce, Brian J; Mendenhall, William M

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the long-term disease control, survival, and complications after definitive radiotherapy (RT) alone or combined with adjuvant chemotherapy with or without planned neck dissection for base of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 467 patients treated at the University of Florida with definitive RT alone or combined with adjuvant chemotherapy between 1964 and 2011 for base of tongue SCC. Median follow-up was 5.6 years. Median total dose to the primary site was 74.4 Gy. Eighty-seven patients (19%) were treated with once-daily fractionation, and 380 (81%) received altered fractionation schedules. Intensity-modulated RT was used in 128 patients (27%). Chemotherapy was administered to 173 (37%) patients. Planned neck dissection after RT was performed in 226 patients (48%). Data regarding p16 pathway activation were available for 25 patients. At 5 years, the local, local-regional, and regional control rates were 85.5%, 80.0%, and 90.0%, respectively. The 5-year overall, cause-specific, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 59.1%, 71.5%, and 84.1%, respectively. Sixty-four patients (14%) developed one or more severe late complications. Fifty patients (11%) required late gastrostomy tube placement. This study supports the continued use of RT alone or combined with adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with base of tongue SCC, as this treatment yields high rates of cause-specific survival and disease control, with a relatively low rate of late complications. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:1589-1594, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Augmenting atlas-based liver segmentation for radiotherapy treatment planning by incorporating image features proximal to the atlas contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Chen, Jinhu; Li, Hongsheng; Yin, Yong; Ibragimov, Bulat; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Atlas-based segmentation utilizes a library of previously delineated contours of similar cases to facilitate automatic segmentation. The problem, however, remains challenging because of limited information carried by the contours in the library. In this studying, we developed a narrow-shell strategy to enhance the information of each contour in the library and to improve the accuracy of the exiting atlas-based approach. This study presented a new concept of atlas based segmentation method. Instead of using the complete volume of the target organs, only information along the organ contours from the atlas images was used for guiding segmentation of the new image. In setting up an atlas-based library, we included not only the coordinates of contour points, but also the image features adjacent to the contour. In this work, 139 CT images with normal appearing livers collected for radiotherapy treatment planning were used to construct the library. The CT images within the library were first registered to each other using affine registration. The nonlinear narrow shell was generated alongside the object contours of registered images. Matching voxels were selected inside common narrow shell image features of a library case and a new case using a speed-up robust features (SURF) strategy. A deformable registration was then performed using a thin plate splines (TPS) technique. The contour associated with the library case was propagated automatically onto the new image by exploiting the deformation field vectors. The liver contour was finally obtained by employing level set based energy optimization within the narrow shell. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by comparing quantitatively the auto-segmentation results with that delineated by physicians. A novel atlas-based segmentation technique with inclusion of neighborhood image features through the introduction of a narrow-shell surrounding the target objects was established. Application of the technique to

  10. SU-E-T-206: Comparison of EBT and EBT3 RadioChromic Films in Radiation Field of Parotid Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toosi, T Bahreyni; Mianaei, F Khorshidi; Ghorbani, M; Khabbaz Kazemi, N Mohammadian; Mohammadi, M [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the current study is to compare EBT and EBT3 RadioChromic films in dosimetry of radiotherapy fields for treatment of parotid cancer. Methods: The calibrations of EBT and EBT3 films were performed with the same setups for doses ranging from 0.2 Gy to 5 Gy using 6 MV photon beam of a Siemens Primus linac. These films were scanned in color mode (RGB) by a Microtek (1000XL) scanner and the red color channel data was extracted. Treatment planning for parotid cancer radiation therapy was performed on a RANDO phantom. Skin dose was measured at different points in the right anterior oblique (RAO) and right posterior oblique (RPO) fields by EBT and EBT3 films. Results: Dosimetry was performed with the same conditions for the two film types for calibration and in-phantom in parotid cancer radiotherapy. The measured net optical density (NOD) in EBT film was in some extent higher than that from EBT3 film. The minimum difference between these two films under calibration conditions was about 2.9% (for 0.2 Gy). However, the maximum difference was 35.5% (for 0.5 Gy). In the therapeutic fields of parotid cancer radiotherapy at different points, the measured dose from EBT film was higher than the EBT3 film. In these fields the minimum and maximum measured dose differences were 16.0% and 25.5%, respectively. Conclusion: With the same irradiation and reading conditions, EBT film demonstrates higher NOD than the EBT3 film. This effect may be related to the higher sensitivity of EBT film over EBT3 film. However, the obtained dose differences between these two films in low dose range can be due to the differences in fitting functions applied following the calibration process.

  11. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated, conformal, and four-field pelvic radiotherapy boost plans for gynecologic cancer: a retrospective planning study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins Gregory

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT as an alternative to conformal radiotherapy (CRT or 4-field box boost (4FB in women with gynecologic malignancies who are unsuitable for brachytherapy for technical or medical reasons. Methods Dosimetric and toxicity information was analyzed for 12 patients with cervical (8, endometrial (2 or vaginal (2 cancer previously treated with external beam pelvic radiotherapy and a CRT boost. Optimized IMRT boost treatment plans were then developed for each of the 12 patients and compared to CRT and 4FB plans. The plans were compared in terms of dose conformality and critical normal tissue avoidance. Results The median planning target volume (PTV was 151 cm3 (range 58–512 cm3. The median overlap of the contoured rectum with the PTV was 15 (1–56 %, and 11 (4–35 % for the bladder. Two of the 12 patients, both with large PTVs and large overlap of the contoured rectum and PTV, developed grade 3 rectal bleeding. The dose conformity was significantly improved with IMRT over CRT and 4FB (p ≤ 0.001 for both. IMRT also yielded an overall improvement in the rectal and bladder dose-volume distributions relative to CRT and 4FB. The volume of rectum that received the highest doses (>66% of the prescription was reduced by 22% (p Conclusion These results indicate that IMRT can improve target coverage and reduce dose to critical structures in gynecologic patients receiving an external beam radiotherapy boost. This dosimetric advantage will be integrated with other patient and treatment-specific factors, particularly internal tumor movement during fractionated radiotherapy, in the context of a future image-guided radiation therapy study.

  12. Simple diagrammatic method to delineate male urethra in prostate cancer radiotherapy: an MRI based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Tejinder; Gupta, Deepak; Goyal, Shikha; Bisht, Shyam S; Chaudhary, Ravi; Narang, Kushal; Banerjee, Susovan; Basu, Trinanjan; Abhishek, Ashu; Sambasivam, Sasikumar; Vishnu, Nisha T

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being increasingly utilized in the treatment of prostate cancer. With the advent of high-precision radiosurgery systems, it is possible to obtain dose distributions akin to high-dose rate brachytherapy with SBRT. However, urethral toxicity has a significant impact on the quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. Contouring the male urethra on a CT scan is difficult in the absence of an indwelling catheter. In this pictorial essay, we have used the MRI obtained for radiotherapy planning to aid in the delineation of the male urethra and have attempted to define guidelines for the same.

  13. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  14. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Lorraine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  15. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Graves, Yan Jiang; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-11-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered to be the most accurate dose calculation method in radiotherapy. However, its efficiency still requires improvement for many routine clinical applications. In this paper, we present our recent progress toward the development of a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation package, gDPM v2.0. It utilizes the parallel computation ability of a GPU to achieve high efficiency, while maintaining the same particle transport physics as in the original dose planning method (DPM) code and hence the same level of simulation accuracy. In GPU computing, divergence of execution paths between threads can considerably reduce the efficiency. Since photons and electrons undergo different physics and hence attain different execution paths, we use a simulation scheme where photon transport and electron transport are separated to partially relieve the thread divergence issue. A high-performance random number generator and a hardware linear interpolation are also utilized. We have also developed various components to handle the fluence map and linac geometry, so that gDPM can be used to compute dose distributions for realistic IMRT or VMAT treatment plans. Our gDPM package is tested for its accuracy and efficiency in both phantoms and realistic patient cases. In all cases, the average relative uncertainties are less than 1%. A statistical t-test is performed and the dose difference between the CPU and the GPU results is not found to be statistically significant in over 96% of the high dose region and over 97% of the entire region. Speed-up factors of 69.1 ∼ 87.2 have been observed using an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. For realistic IMRT and VMAT plans, MC dose calculation can be completed with less than 1% standard deviation in 36.1 ∼ 39.6 s using gDPM.

  16. Patient feature based dosimetric Pareto front prediction in esophageal cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Zhao, Kuaike; Peng, Jiayuan; Xie, Jiang; Chen, Junchao; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Weigang, E-mail: jackhuwg@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, China and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jin, Xiance [The 1st Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325000 (China); Studenski, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami-Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of the dosimetric Pareto front (PF) prediction based on patient’s anatomic and dosimetric parameters for esophageal cancer patients. Methods: Eighty esophagus patients in the authors’ institution were enrolled in this study. A total of 2928 intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were obtained and used to generate PF for each patient. On average, each patient had 36.6 plans. The anatomic and dosimetric features were extracted from these plans. The mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose (MHD), spinal cord max dose, and PTV homogeneity index were recorded for each plan. Principal component analysis was used to extract overlap volume histogram (OVH) features between PTV and other organs at risk. The full dataset was separated into two parts; a training dataset and a validation dataset. The prediction outcomes were the MHD and MLD. The spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between the anatomical features and dosimetric features. The stepwise multiple regression method was used to fit the PF. The cross validation method was used to evaluate the model. Results: With 1000 repetitions, the mean prediction error of the MHD was 469 cGy. The most correlated factor was the first principal components of the OVH between heart and PTV and the overlap between heart and PTV in Z-axis. The mean prediction error of the MLD was 284 cGy. The most correlated factors were the first principal components of the OVH between heart and PTV and the overlap between lung and PTV in Z-axis. Conclusions: It is feasible to use patients’ anatomic and dosimetric features to generate a predicted Pareto front. Additional samples and further studies are required improve the prediction model.

  17. Technical note: real-time web-based wireless visual guidance system for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Danny; Kim, Siyong; Palta, Jatinder R; Kim, Taeho

    2017-06-01

    Describe a Web-based wireless visual guidance system that mitigates issues associated with hard-wired audio-visual aided patient interactive motion management systems that are cumbersome to use in routine clinical practice. Web-based wireless visual display duplicates an existing visual display of a respiratory-motion management system for visual guidance. The visual display of the existing system is sent to legacy Web clients over a private wireless network, thereby allowing a wireless setting for real-time visual guidance. In this study, active breathing coordinator (ABC) trace was used as an input for visual display, which captured and transmitted to Web clients. Virtual reality goggles require two (left and right eye view) images for visual display. We investigated the performance of Web-based wireless visual guidance by quantifying (1) the network latency of visual displays between an ABC computer display and Web clients of a laptop, an iPad mini 2 and an iPhone 6, and (2) the frame rate of visual display on the Web clients in frames per second (fps). The network latency of visual display between the ABC computer and Web clients was about 100 ms and the frame rate was 14.0 fps (laptop), 9.2 fps (iPad mini 2) and 11.2 fps (iPhone 6). In addition, visual display for virtual reality goggles was successfully shown on the iPhone 6 with 100 ms and 11.2 fps. A high network security was maintained by utilizing the private network configuration. This study demonstrated that a Web-based wireless visual guidance can be a promising technique for clinical motion management systems, which require real-time visual display of their outputs. Based on the results of this study, our approach has the potential to reduce clutter associated with wired-systems, reduce space requirements, and extend the use of medical devices from static usage to interactive and dynamic usage in a radiotherapy treatment vault.

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of synthetic CT for magnetic resonance-only based radiotherapy planning of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hesheng; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias; Vahle, Thomas; Fenchel, Matthias; Das, Indra J

    2017-06-26

    Interest in MR-only treatment planning for radiation therapy is growing rapidly with the emergence of integrated MRI/linear accelerator technology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using synthetic CT images generated from conventional Dixon-based MRI scans for radiation treatment planning of lung cancer. Eleven patients who underwent whole-body PET/MR imaging following a PET/CT exam were randomly selected from an ongoing prospective IRB-approved study. Attenuation maps derived from the Dixon MR Images and atlas-based method was used to create CT data (synCT). Treatment planning for radiation treatment of lung cancer was optimized on the synCT and subsequently copied to the registered CT (planCT) for dose calculation. Planning target volumes (PTVs) with three sizes and four different locations in the lung were planned for irradiation. The dose-volume metrics comparison and 3D gamma analysis were performed to assess agreement between the synCT and CT calculated dose distributions. Mean differences between PTV doses on synCT and CT across all the plans were -0.1% ± 0.4%, 0.1% ± 0.5%, and 0.4% ± 0.5% for D95, D98 and D100, respectively. Difference in dose between the two datasets for organs at risk (OARs) had average differences of -0.14 ± 0.07 Gy, 0.0% ± 0.1%, and -0.1% ± 0.2% for maximum spinal cord, lung V20, and heart V40 respectively. In patient groups based on tumor size and location, no significant differences were observed in the PTV and OARs dose-volume metrics (p > 0.05), except for the maximum spinal-cord dose when the target volumes were located at the lung apex (p = 0.001). Gamma analysis revealed a pass rate of 99.3% ± 1.1% for 2%/2 mm (dose difference/distance to agreement) acceptance criteria in every plan. The synCT generated from Dixon-based MRI allows for dose calculation of comparable accuracy to the standard CT for lung cancer treatment planning. The dosimetric agreement

  19. A comparison of mantle versus involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: reduction in normal tissue dose and second cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tony

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL survivors who undergo radiotherapy experience increased risks of second cancers (SC and cardiac sequelae. To reduce such risks, extended-field radiotherapy (RT for HL has largely been replaced by involved field radiotherapy (IFRT. While it has generally been assumed that IFRT will reduce SC risks, there are few data that quantify the reduction in dose to normal tissues associated with modern RT practice for patients with mediastinal HL, and no estimates of the expected reduction in SC risk. Methods Organ-specific dose-volume histograms (DVH were generated for 41 patients receiving 35 Gy mantle RT, 35 Gy IFRT, or 20 Gy IFRT, and integrated organ mean doses were compared for the three protocols. Organ-specific SC risk estimates were estimated using a dosimetric risk-modeling approach, analyzing DVH data with quantitative, mechanistic models of radiation-induced cancer. Results Dose reductions resulted in corresponding reductions in predicted excess relative risks (ERR for SC induction. Moving from 35 Gy mantle RT to 35 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERR for female breast and lung cancer by approximately 65%, and for male lung cancer by approximately 35%; moving from 35 Gy IFRT to 20 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERRs approximately 40% more. The median reduction in integral dose to the whole heart with the transition to 35 Gy IFRT was 35%, with a smaller (2% reduction in dose to proximal coronary arteries. There was no significant reduction in thyroid dose. Conclusion The significant decreases estimated for radiation-induced SC risks associated with modern IFRT provide strong support for the use of IFRT to reduce the late effects of treatment. The approach employed here can provide new insight into the risks associated with contemporary IFRT for HL, and may facilitate the counseling of patients regarding the risks associated with this treatment.

  20. Validation of a personalized dosimetric evaluation tool (Oedipe) for targeted radiotherapy based on the Monte Carlo MCNPX code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavassa, S; Aubineau-Lanièce, I; Bitar, A; Lisbona, A; Barbet, J; Franck, D; Jourdain, J R; Bardiès, M

    2006-02-07

    Dosimetric studies are necessary for all patients treated with targeted radiotherapy. In order to attain the precision required, we have developed Oedipe, a dosimetric tool based on the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The anatomy of each patient is considered in the form of a voxel-based geometry created using computed tomography (CT) images or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Oedipe enables dosimetry studies to be carried out at the voxel scale. Validation of the results obtained by comparison with existing methods is complex because there are multiple sources of variation: calculation methods (different Monte Carlo codes, point kernel), patient representations (model or specific) and geometry definitions (mathematical or voxel-based). In this paper, we validate Oedipe by taking each of these parameters into account independently. Monte Carlo methodology requires long calculation times, particularly in the case of voxel-based geometries, and this is one of the limits of personalized dosimetric methods. However, our results show that the use of voxel-based geometry as opposed to a mathematically defined geometry decreases the calculation time two-fold, due to an optimization of the MCNPX2.5e code. It is therefore possible to envisage the use of Oedipe for personalized dosimetry in the clinical context of targeted radiotherapy.

  1. Solid Mesh Registration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for solid organ registration of pre-segmented data represented as tetrahedral meshes. Registration of the organ surface is driven by force terms based on a distance field representation of the source and reference shapes. Registration of internal morphology is achieved usi...... to complete. The proposed method has many potential uses in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) which relies on registration to account for organ deformation between treatment sessions....

  2. Assessment of dosimetric impact of system specific geometric distortion in an MRI only based radiotherapy workflow for prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, C.; Nordström, F.; Persson, E.; Brynolfsson, J.; Olsson, L. E.

    2017-04-01

    Dosimetric errors in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only radiotherapy workflow may be caused by system specific geometric distortion from MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on planned dose distribution and delineated structures for prostate patients, originating from this distortion. A method was developed, in which computer tomography (CT) images were distorted using the MRI distortion field. The displacement map for an optimized MRI treatment planning sequence was measured using a dedicated phantom in a 3 T MRI system. To simulate the distortion aspects of a synthetic CT (electron density derived from MR images), the displacement map was applied to CT images, referred to as distorted CT images. A volumetric modulated arc prostate treatment plan was applied to the original CT and the distorted CT, creating a reference and a distorted CT dose distribution. By applying the inverse of the displacement map to the distorted CT dose distribution, a dose distribution in the same geometry as the original CT images was created. For 10 prostate cancer patients, the dose difference between the reference dose distribution and inverse distorted CT dose distribution was analyzed in isodose level bins. The mean magnitude of the geometric distortion was 1.97 mm for the radial distance of 200–250 mm from isocenter. The mean percentage dose differences for all isodose level bins, were  ⩽0.02% and the radiotherapy structure mean volume deviations were  MRI system specific distortion in a prostate MRI only radiotherapy workflow, separated from dosimetric effects originating from synthetic CT generation. No clinically relevant dose difference or structure deformation was found when 3D distortion correction and high acquisition bandwidth was used. The method could be used for any MRI sequence together with any anatomy of interest.

  3. WE-E-17A-03: FDG-PET-Based Radiomics to Predict Local Control and Survival Following Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, J; Apte, A; Folkerts, M; Kohutek, Z; Wu, A; Rimmer, A; Lee, N; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: An exploding field in cancer research is “radiomics,” based on the hypothesis that there is statistical (hidden) information in medical images that is prognostic or predictive of outcomes. Our group has developed an efficient pipeline to extract and analyze quantitative image features from medical images as related to outcomes or diagnosis. In this work, we summarize our previous studies with positron emission tomography (PET) images and show the potential of the use of radiomics for outcomes research. Methods: We analyzed two cancer datasets, each consisting of pre-radiotherapy-treatment PET scans: 163 T1-2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and 174 head and neck (H and N) cancer patients with stage III–IV. The PET scans were converted to Computational Environment for Radiological Research (CERR) format, and CERR was used to generate 24 shape, texture, and intensity-histogram based image features. Data-mining and logistic regression methods were then used to model local failure (LF) and overall survival (OS). Unbiased estimates of performance were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). Results: For predicting LF, the models with biologically equivalent dose (BED) and TLG (metabolic tumor volume (MTV) x SUVmean) in NSCLC, and skewness and MTV in H and N, achieved the best performance with AUC=0.818 (p<0.0001) and AUC=0.826 (p=0.0002), respectively. For predicting OS, the models with kurtosis and volume in NSCLC and SUVmax and homogeneity in H and N achieved the best performance with AUC=0.706 (p<0.0001) and AUC=0.656 (p=0.0003), respectively. On LOOCV, all these models retained significant predictive power. Interestingly, MTV was highly correlated with LF in both sites. Conclusion: PET-based imaged features are promising tools for improving treatment management decision making. Much more research is needed to identify optimal radiomics metrics and to correlate imaging phenotype with other clinical or genomic information.

  4. Radiotherapy induced xerostomia: mechanisms, diagnostics, prevention and treatment--evidence based up to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużny, Jarosław; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Nogala, Hanna; Milecki, Piotr; Kopeć, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Definition and prevalence of xerostomia were shortly presented. Radiosensitivity of the salivary glands, mechanism, diagnostics, and possible prediction methods of the intensity of xerostomia in the pre-radiotherapy period are widely discussed. Prevention of xerostomia: salivary gland sparing radiotherapy, cytoprotective agents, preservation by stimulation with cholinergic muscarinic agonists, surgical transfer of submandibular glands according to ASCO Management Guidelines and Quality of Life Recommendations were cited. Oral Care Study Group (2010) therapeutic approaches for relieving xerostomia are referred. Current therapies, restricted to symptom relief such as oral hygiene with fluoride agents, antimicrobials to prevent dental caries, saliva substitutes to relieve symptoms, and sialogenic agents to stimulate saliva were also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  6. Prediction of outcome in buccal cancers treated with radical radiotherapy based on the early tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Giri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: Aim was to assess the clinical significance of the rate of tumor regression in carcinoma buccal mucosa undergoing radical radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Sixty six patients were enrolled in the study with proven buccal cancers requiring radical radiotherapy, from 1990 to 1996. Radiotherapy was delivered using a combination of external beam and brachytherapy with preloaded cesium 137 needles. The response to the radiation was assessed at the completion of external beam radiation and 6 weeks after brachytherapy. An analysis correlating various parameters influencing the long term disease free survival and overall survival was done. Results: Response assessed at the end of external beam radiation correlated strongly with the overall survival and the disease free interval (P=0.000. No other factor influenced the survival. Conclusion: The rate of the tumor regression can predict the overall outcome in patients with buccal cancers treated with radiation. Completion of the planned course of radiation in patients who do not show a substantial reduction in size by 4.5 weeks of conventional radiation does not improve the results.

  7. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  8. Radiotherapy alone for stage I-III low grade follicular lymphoma: long-term outcome and comparison of extended field and total nodal irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze long-term results of radiotherapy alone for stage I-III low grade follicular lymphoma and to compare outcome after extended field irradiation (EFI and total nodal irradiation (TNI. Methods and materials Between 1982 and 2007, 107 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone for low grade follicular lymphoma at Ann Arbor stage I (n = 50, II (n = 36 and III (n = 21; 48 and 59 patients were treated with EFI and TNI, respectively. The median total dose in the first treatment series of the diaphragmatic side with larger lymphoma burden was 38 Gy (25 Gy – 50 Gy and after an interval of median 30 days, a total dose of 28 Gy (12.6 Gy – 45 Gy was given in the second treatment series completing TNI. Results After a median follow-up of 14 years for living patients, 10-years and 15-years overall survival (OS were 64% and 50%, respectively. Survival was not significantly different between stages I, II and III. TNI and EFI resulted in 15-years OS of 65% and 34% but patients treated with TNI were younger, had better performance status and higher stage of disease compared to patients treated with EFI. In multivariate analysis, only age at diagnosis (p  Conclusions Radiotherapy alone for stage I and II follicular lymphoma resulted in long-term OS with high rates of disease control; no benefit of TNI over EFI was observed. For stage III follicular lymphoma, TNI achieved promising OS and FFP and should be considered as a potentially curative treatment option.

  9. Experimental determination of field factors ([Formula: see text]) for small radiotherapy beams using the daisy chain correction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel

    2015-08-07

    Recently, Alfonso et al proposed a new formalism for the dosimetry of small and non-standard fields. The proposed new formalism is strongly based on the calculation of detector-specific beam correction factors by Monte Carlo simulation methods, which accounts for the difference in the response of the detector between the small and the machine specific reference field. The correct calculation of the detector-specific beam correction factors demands an accurate knowledge of the linear accelerator, detector geometry and composition materials. The present work shows that the field factors in water may be determined experimentally using the daisy chain correction method down to a field size of 1 cm × 1 cm for a specific set of detectors. The detectors studied were: three mini-ionization chambers (PTW-31014, PTW-31006, IBA-CC01), three silicon-based diodes (PTW-60018, IBA-SFD and IBA-PFD) and one synthetic diamond detector (PTW-60019). Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements were performed for a 6 MV photon beam at 10 cm depth in water with a source-to-axis distance of 100 cm. The results show that the differences between the experimental and Monte Carlo calculated field factors are less than 0.5%-with the exception of the IBA-PFD-for field sizes between 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm and 5 cm × 5 cm. For the 1 cm × 1 cm field size, the differences are within 2%. By using the daisy chain correction method, it is possible to determine measured field factors in water. The results suggest that the daisy chain correction method is not suitable for measurements performed with the IBA-PFD detector. The latter is due to the presence of tungsten powder in the detector encapsulation material. The use of Monte Carlo calculated [Formula: see text] is encouraged for field sizes less than or equal to 1 cm × 1 cm for the dosimeters used in this work.

  10. Radiotherapy in Glioblastoma: the Past, the Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gzell, C; Back, M; Wheeler, H; Bailey, D; Foote, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the changing utility of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with glioblastoma over the past 60 years. Together with surgery, radiotherapy has always been the cornerstone of treatment of glioblastoma, but techniques have significantly advanced over this time. The exploration of early two-dimensional techniques, investigation of dose escalation, concomitant chemotherapy and modern techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy will be covered. In addition, current controversies including decreasing margin size, re-irradiation, treatment of elderly patients, and novel imaging tracers will be discussed. Future directions including immunotherapy and tumour treating fields are examined. Radiotherapy-based treatments cannot rely solely on advances in chemotherapy or immunotherapy to improve the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma. Radiation oncology needs to continue to develop and improve the delivery, target definition, and dose of radiotherapy to these patients to improve their survival and the toxicity associated with treatment.

  11. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H [IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  12. SU-E-T-469: Implementation of VAs Web-Based Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, R; Palta, J; Hagan, M [Veteran Health Administration, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Malik, G [TSG Innovations Inc. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This Web-based Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS) is a tool to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. This system is an important facet of continuing effort by our community to maintain and improve safety of radiotherapy.Material and Methods: VA’s National Radiation Oncology Program office has embarked on a program to electronically collect adverse events and good-catch data of radiation treatment of over 25,000 veterans treated with radiotherapy annually. This VA-Intranet based software design has made use of dataset taxonomies and data dictionaries defined in AAPM/ASTRO reports on error reporting. We used proven industrial and medical event reporting techniques to avoid several common problems faced in effective data collection such as incomplete data due to data entry fatigue by the reporters, missing data due to data difficult to obtain or not familiar to most reporters, missing reports due to fear of reprisal etc. This system encompasses the entire feedback loop of reporting an incident, analyzing it for salient details, and developing interventions to prevent it from happening again. The analysis reports with corrective, learning actions are shared with the reporter/facility and made public to the community (after deidentification) as part of the learning process. Results: Till date 50 incident/good catches have been reported in RIRAS and we have completed analysis on 100% of these reports. This is done due to the fact that each reported incidents is investigated and a complete analysis/patient-safety-work-product report is generated by radiation oncology domain-experts. Conclusions Because of the completeness of the data, the system has enabled us to analyze process steps and track trends of major errors which in the future will lead to implementing system wide process improvement steps and safe standard operating procedures for each radiotherapy treatment modality/technique and fulfills our goal of

  13. The effect of antiemetics and reduced radiation fields on acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy in Stage I seminoma of the testis: a randomized pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, V.S.; Rainford, K.; Horwich, A.; Dearnaley, D.P. [Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for Stage I seminoma of the testis. Ten Stage I patients receiving para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodal (dog-leg) RT provided a toxicity baseline (group A). Twenty Stage I patients randomized to dog-let RT or para-aortic RT (10 per group) were further randomized to received prophylactic ondansetron or expectant therapy with metoclopramide (group B). Daily patient-completed questionnaires evaluated acute toxicity. Dog-leg RT for Stage I seminomas is associated with readily demonstrable gastrointestinal tract (GIT) toxicity. The number of patients in this study is too small to produce definitive results, but there appears to be reduced GIT toxicity with prophylactic antiemetics. The effect of reduced RT fields has been assessed further in the MRC randomized tiral of field sizes (TE10). (Author).

  14. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the skull base: Differential diagnosis and radiotherapy. Two case reports and a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuvret, Loic; Noel, Georges; Calugaru, Valentin [Inst. Curie, Orsay (France). Centre de protontherapie d' Orsay; Terrier, Philippe; Habrand, Jean-Louis [Inst. Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2005-09-01

    Chondromyxoid fibromas are uncommon tumours mostly arising in long bones of young males. Involvement of the skull base is extremely rare. We describe two new cases of base of the skull chondromyxoid fibromas. The tumours were incompletely excised and irradiated with protons because of the high risk of complications of another surgical procedure. The rationale for proton therapy was based on the intimate relations between the tumour and the organs at risk. Skull base chondromyxoid fibroma is a very rare, slowly growing benign tumour that can cause severe disabilities due to tumour compression of critical structures. Only surgical resection has been shown to be relatively effective. We report two cases of incompletely excised lesions treated by postoperative high-dose radiation including proton therapy with no active disease and complication. Our review of the literature allows us to conclude that histological diagnosis of lesions in this site is a trap for pathologists and that radiotherapy is not contraindicated.

  15. Impact of Including Peritumoral Edema in Radiotherapy Target Volume on Patterns of Failure in Glioblastoma following Temozolomide-based Chemoradiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seo Hee; Kim, Jun Won; Chang, Jee Suk; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Se Hoon; Chang, Jong Hee; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the impact of including peritumoral edema in radiotherapy volumes on recurrence patterns among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with standard chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 167 patients with histologically confirmed GBM who received temozolomide (TMZ)-based CRT between May 2006 and November 2012. The study cohort was divided into edema (+) (n = 130) and edema (−) (n = 37) groups, according to whether the entire peritumoral edema was included. At a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 2–99 months), 118 patients (71%) experienced progression/recurrence (infield: 69%; marginal: 26%; outfield: 16%; CSF seeding: 12%). The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 20 months and 15 months, respectively. The marginal failure rate was significantly greater in the edema (−) group (37% vs. 22%, p = 0.050). Among 33 patients who had a favorable prognosis (total resection and MGMT-methylation), the difference in the marginal failure rates was increased (40% vs. 14%, p = 0.138). Meanwhile, treatment of edema did not significantly increase the incidence of pseudoprogression/radiation necrosis (edema (−) 49% vs. (+) 37%, p = 0.253). Inclusion of peritumoral edema in the radiotherapy volume can reduce marginal failures following TMZ-based CRT without increasing pseudoprogression/radiation necrosis. PMID:28176884

  16. Markerless gating for lung cancer radiotherapy based on machine learning techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Tong; Li Ruijiang; Tang Xiaoli; Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Dy, Jennifer G [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: sbjiang@ucsd.edu

    2009-03-21

    In lung cancer radiotherapy, radiation to a mobile target can be delivered by respiratory gating, for which we need to know whether the target is inside or outside a predefined gating window at any time point during the treatment. This can be achieved by tracking one or more fiducial markers implanted inside or near the target, either fluoroscopically or electromagnetically. However, the clinical implementation of marker tracking is limited for lung cancer radiotherapy mainly due to the risk of pneumothorax. Therefore, gating without implanted fiducial markers is a promising clinical direction. We have developed several template-matching methods for fluoroscopic marker-less gating. Recently, we have modeled the gating problem as a binary pattern classification problem, in which principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) are combined to perform the classification task. Following the same framework, we investigated different combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques (PCA and four nonlinear manifold learning methods) and two machine learning classification methods (artificial neural networks-ANN and SVM). Performance was evaluated on ten fluoroscopic image sequences of nine lung cancer patients. We found that among all combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques and classification methods, PCA combined with either ANN or SVM achieved a better performance than the other nonlinear manifold learning methods. ANN when combined with PCA achieves a better performance than SVM in terms of classification accuracy and recall rate, although the target coverage is similar for the two classification methods. Furthermore, the running time for both ANN and SVM with PCA is within tolerance for real-time applications. Overall, ANN combined with PCA is a better candidate than other combinations we investigated in this work for real-time gated radiotherapy.

  17. Metrological legal frame in the field of the photon dosimetry of radiotherapy in Cuba; Marco metrologico legal en el campo de la dosimetria fotonica de radioterapia en Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walwyn S, G.; Gutierrez L, S.; Gonzalez R, N. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41 y 47, Playa C.P. 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: gonzalo@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The Clinical Dosimetry in the planning of the doses to administer to patients under radiant treatment is of great importance. At the moment the clinical dosemeters its are manufactured with a high technology but errors of production or manipulation cannot be discarded that lead to errors in this planning. It also exists, a group of metrological and of operation parameters that are not checked in a routine calibration, and for those that are checked, legal base that restricts its use in cases of bad operation doesn't exist. This motivated to the Cuban standard elaboration NC 352:2005, for the verification of reference dosemeters of radiotherapy, process that trafficked for an exhaustive search and study of standards and international technical reports, selecting as base document, the standard IEC 60731:1997, for essays of approval of model of clinical dosemeters used in radiotherapy. The present article shows the main technical aspects considered and the requirements and verification methods for the declaration of aptitude of the dosemeters. This document constitutes the scientific base for the implementation from a verification service to national level and an important contribution to the standardization of the metrology of ionizing radiations of Cuba. (Author)

  18. Assessment of pulmonary toxicities in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy- a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramita Saha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthracycline based regiments and/or taxanes and adjuvant radiotherapy; the main modalities of treatment for breast cancers are associated with deterioration of pulmonary functions and progressive pulmonary toxicities. Aim: Assessment of pulmonary toxicities and impact on pulmonary functions mainly in terms of decline of forced vital capacity (FVC and the ratio of forced expiratory volume (FEV in 1 Second and FEV1/FVC ratio with different treatment times and follow ups in carcinoma breast patients receiving anthracycline and/or taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A prospective single institutional cohort study was performed with 58 breast cancer patients between January 2011 to July 2012 who received either anthracycline based (37 patients received 6 cycles FAC= 5 FU, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide regime and radiotherapy or anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy (21 patients received 4cycles AC= Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide; followed by 4 cycles of T=Taxane and radiotherapy. Assessment of pulmonary symptoms and signs, chest x-ray and pulmonary function tests were performed at baseline, midcycle, at end of chemotherapy, at end radiotherapy, at 1 and 6 months follow ups and compared. By means of a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA model, the course of lung parameters across the time points was compared. Results and Conclusion: Analysis of mean forced vital capacities at different points of study times showed definitive declining pattern, which is at statistically significant level at the end of 6th month of follow up (p=0.032 .The FEV1/FVC ratio (in percentage also revealed a definite decreasing pattern over different treatment times and at statistically significant level at 6th month follow up with p value 0.003. Separate analysis of mean FEV1/FVC ratios over time in anthracycline based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group as well as anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group

  19. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Multivariate analysis for the estimation of target localization errors in fiducial marker-based radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Masanori [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan and Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: m-nkmr@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Akimoto, Mami; Ueki, Nami; Yamada, Masahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Tanabe, Hiroaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe 650-0047, Japan and Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Itoh, Akio [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    calculated from the MRA ({sup MRA}TLE) increased as |TMD| and |aRM| increased and adversely decreased with each increment of n. The median 3D {sup MRA}TLE was 2.0 mm (range, 0.6–4.3 mm) for n = 1, 1.8 mm (range, 0.4–4.0 mm) for n = 2, and 1.6 mm (range, 0.3–3.7 mm) for n = 3. Although statistical significance between n = 1 and n = 3 was observed in all directions, the absolute average difference and the standard deviation of the {sup MRA}TLE between n = 1 and n = 3 were 0.5 and 0.2 mm, respectively. Conclusions: A large |TMD| and |aRM| increased the differences in TLE between each n; however, the difference in 3D {sup MRA}TLEs was, at most, 0.6 mm. Thus, the authors conclude that it is acceptable to continue fiducial marker-based radiotherapy as long as |TMD| is maintained at ≤58.7 mm for a 3D |aRM|  ≥  10 mm.

  1. Radiogenomics and radiotherapy response modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam; Kerns, Sarah L.; Coates, James; Luo, Yi; Speers, Corey; West, Catharine M. L.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in patient-specific information and biotechnology have contributed to a new era of computational medicine. Radiogenomics has emerged as a new field that investigates the role of genetics in treatment response to radiation therapy. Radiation oncology is currently attempting to embrace these recent advances and add to its rich history by maintaining its prominent role as a quantitative leader in oncologic response modeling. Here, we provide an overview of radiogenomics starting with genotyping, data aggregation, and application of different modeling approaches based on modifying traditional radiobiological methods or application of advanced machine learning techniques. We highlight the current status and potential for this new field to reshape the landscape of outcome modeling in radiotherapy and drive future advances in computational oncology.

  2. [Current status and perspectives of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S X; Wang, L H

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in China. More than 80% of esophageal cancer patients are diagnosed at a late stage and are not eligible for surgery. Radiotherapy is one of the most important modalities in esophageal cancer treatment. Here we reviewed the advances in esophageal cancer radiotherapy and radiotherapy-based combined-modality therapy, such as optimization of radiation dose and target volume, application of precise radiotherapy technique and the integration of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  3. A Device for a Proton Beam Energy Control for Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Agapov, A V; Molokanov, A G; Shvidkii, S V

    2004-01-01

    A Medical-Technical Facility for hadron radiotherapy based on DLNP JINR phasotron has been constructed and put into operation. Upgrading of methods, hardware and software for radiotherapy is one of the main tasks for further development of the Facility. This article concerns one of the fields of this work, that is the development of equipment for dynamic irradiation of deep lying target - the construction of a device for the proton beam energy control and measurement of its depth-dose curve in a treatment room.

  4. Randomized control trial: evaluating aluminum-based antiperspirant use, axilla skin toxicity, and reported quality of life in women receiving external beam radiotherapy for treatment of Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Linda C; Gies, Donna; Thompson, Emmanuel; Thomas, Bejoy

    2012-05-01

    Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using antiperspirants during their treatment

  5. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Linda C., E-mail: Linda.watson@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Interdisciplinary Practice, Community Oncology, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Gies, Donna [Department of Radiation Oncology Nursing, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thompson, Emmanuel [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary Faculty of Science, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thomas, Bejoy [Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Department of Psychosocial Oncology, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from

  6. MO-E-18C-01: Open Access Web-Based Peer-To-Peer Training and Education in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlicki, T [UC San Diego Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States); Brown, D; Dunscombe, P [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Current training and education delivery models have limitations which result in gaps in clinical proficiency with equipment, procedures, and techniques. Educational and training opportunities offered by vendors and professional societies are by their nature not available at point of need or for the life of clinical systems. The objective of this work is to leverage modern communications technology to provide peer-to-peer training and education for radiotherapy professionals, in the clinic and on demand, as they undertake their clinical duties. Methods: We have developed a free of charge web site ( https://i.treatsafely.org ) using the Google App Engine and datastore (NDB, GQL), Python with AJAX-RPC, and Javascript. The site is a radiotherapy-specific hosting service to which user-created videos illustrating clinical or physics processes and other relevant educational material can be uploaded. Efficient navigation to the material of interest is provided through several RT specific search tools and videos can be scored by users, thus providing comprehensive peer review of the site content. The site also supports multilingual narration\\translation of videos, a quiz function for competence assessment and a library function allowing groups or institutions to define their standard operating procedures based on the video content. Results: The website went live in August 2013 and currently has over 680 registered users from 55 countries; 27.2% from the United States, 9.8% from India, 8.3% from the United Kingdom, 7.3% from Brazil, and 47.5% from other countries. The users include physicists (57.4%), Oncologists (12.5%), therapists (8.2%) and dosimetrists (4.8%). There are 75 videos to date including English, Portuguese, Mandarin, and Thai. Conclusion: Based on the initial acceptance of the site, we conclude that this open access web-based peer-to-peer tool is fulfilling an important need in radiotherapy training and education. Site functionality should expand in

  7. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-07

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose-the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher-Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm(-1). It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm(-1). The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a

  8. Automated algorithm for CBCT-based dose calculations of prostate radiotherapy with bilateral hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatani, Turki; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Lewis, Ryan D; Barley, Susan E; Edwards, Mark A

    2016-10-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) images contain more scatter than a conventional CT image and therefore provide inaccurate Hounsfield units (HUs). Consequently, CBCT images cannot be used directly for radiotherapy dose calculation. The aim of this study is to enable dose calculations to be performed with the use of CBCT images taken during radiotherapy and evaluate the necessity of replanning. A patient with prostate cancer with bilateral metallic prosthetic hip replacements was imaged using both CT and CBCT. The multilevel threshold (MLT) algorithm was used to categorize pixel values in the CBCT images into segments of homogeneous HU. The variation in HU with position in the CBCT images was taken into consideration. This segmentation method relies on the operator dividing the CBCT data into a set of volumes where the variation in the relationship between pixel values and HUs is small. An automated MLT algorithm was developed to reduce the operator time associated with the process. An intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan was generated from CT images of the patient. The plan was then copied to the segmented CBCT (sCBCT) data sets with identical settings, and the doses were recalculated and compared. Gamma evaluation showed that the percentage of points in the rectum with γ algorithms, respectively. Compared with the planning CT (pCT) plan, the MLT algorithm showed -0.46% dose difference with 8 h operator time while the automated MLT algorithm showed -1.3%, which are both considered to be clinically acceptable, when using collapsed cone algorithm. The segmentation of CBCT images using the method in this study can be used for dose calculation. For a patient with prostate cancer with bilateral hip prostheses and the associated issues with CT imaging, the MLT algorithms achieved a sufficient dose calculation accuracy that is clinically acceptable. The automated MLT algorithm reduced the operator time associated with implementing the MLT algorithm to achieve clinically

  9. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose—the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher-Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm-1. It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm-1. The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a continuous

  10. Estimation of Secondary Skin Cancer Risk Due To Electron Contamination in 18-MV LINAC-Based Prostate Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Ghavami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Accurate estimation of the skin-absorbed dose in external radiation therapy is essential to estimating the probability of secondary carcinogenesis induction Materials and Methods Electron contamination in prostate radiotherapy was investigated using the Monte Carlo (MC code calculation. In addition, field size dependence of the skin dose was assessed. Excess cancer risk induced by electron contamination was determined for the skin, surface dose, and prostate dose-volume histogram (DVH using MC calculation and analytical methods. Results MC calculations indicated that up to 80% of total electron contamination fluence was produced in the linear accelerator. At 5 mm below the skin surface, surface dose was estimated at 6%, 13%, 27%, and 38% for 5×5 cm2, 10×10 cm2, 20×20 cm2, and 40×40 cm2 field sizes, respectively. Relative dose at Dmax was calculated at 0.92% and 5.42% of the maximum dose for 5×5 cm2 and 40×40 cm2 field sizes, respectively. Excess absolute skin cancer risk was obtained at 2.96×10-4 (PY -1 for total 72 Gy. Differences in prostate and skin DVHs were 1.01% and 1.38%, respectively. Conclusion According to the results of this study, non-negligible doses are absorbed from contaminant electrons by the skin, which is associated with an excess risk of cancer induction.

  11. Paediatric Photon and Proton Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Based on Advanced Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.

    -up and medication, and may have a considerable impact on the quality of life of the childhood cancer survivor. The major challenge in modern paediatric cancer therapy is therefore to reduce the incidence of treatment-related toxicities, while maintaining or improving the high cure-rates. In this thesis, we study...... the diagnostic information from PET. In PET imaging, the patient is administered a radioactive isotope intravenously, which adds to the diagnostic radiation dose burden of the patient. The application of PET for paediatric patients may therefore be regarded as controversial, considering the long expected overall...... of patients, we found that although radiotherapy with protons instead of photons may provide several benefits in terms of reduced irradiated volumes of healthy tissue and lower doses to organs near the tumour, these benefits cannot be taken for granted. If proton therapy requires slightly larger safety...

  12. Helical tomotherapy based intensity modulated radiotherapy for the management of difficult clinical situations in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Saha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helical tomotherapy (HT can achieve a homogenous dose distribution in the planning target volume while minimizing the dose to the organ at risk. Tomotherapy has been used for complex breast cancer radiotherapy including bilateral breast irradiation, pectus excavatum, and internal mammary chain (IMC nodal irradiation. This report details our experience of using HT in breast cancers in newer clinical indications. Three patients with SCF nodal involvement (case 1, high level III axillary node recurrence (case 2, and composite irradiation of SCF, IMC, and whole breast (case 3 were treated using brachial plexus sparing HT. It was possible to boost the SCF, reirradiate the high level III axillary nodal recurrence and treat complex volume of breast, SCF, and IMC with acceptable and safe dose volume histogram constraints and with good homogeneity and conformity indices. The treatment was successful in controlling disease locoregionally at a 15 months follow-up. No patients reported symptoms suggestive of brachial plexopathy

  13. Multi-Kinect v2 Camera Based Monitoring System for Radiotherapy Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Anand P; Min, Yugang; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    3D kinect camera systems are essential for real-time imaging of 3D treatment space that consists of both the patient anatomy as well as the treatment equipment setup. In this paper, we present the technical details of a 3D treatment room monitoring system that employs a scalable number of calibrated and coregistered Kinect v2 cameras. The monitoring system tracks radiation gantry and treatment couch positions, and tracks the patient and immobilization accessories. The number and positions of the cameras were selected to avoid line-of-sight issues and to adequately cover the treatment setup. The cameras were calibrated with a calibration error of 0.1 mm. Our tracking system evaluation show that both gantry and patient motion could be acquired at a rate of 30 frames per second. The transformations between the cameras yielded a 3D treatment space accuracy of < 2 mm error in a radiotherapy setup within 500mm around the isocenter.

  14. 10 year survival after breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer in the Netherlands: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaren, M.C. van; Munck, L.; Bock, G.H. de; Jobsen, J.J.; Dalen, T. van; Linn, S.C.; Poortmans, P.; Strobbe, L.J.A.; Siesling, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Investigators of registry-based studies report improved survival for breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer. As these studies did not present long-term overall and breast cancer-specific survival, the effect of breast-conserving

  15. 10 year survival after breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer in the Netherlands : a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maaren, Marissa C.; de Munck, Linda; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Jobsen, Jan J.; van Dalen, Thijs; Linn, Sabine C.; Poortmans, Philip; Strobbe, Luc J. A.; Siesling, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigators of registry-based studies report improved survival for breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer. As these studies did not present long-term overall and breast cancer-specific survival, the effect of breast-conserving surgery

  16. Impact of Introducing Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer : A Population-Based Time-Trend Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palma, David; Visser, Otto; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Belderbos, Jose; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with high local control rates. The impact of introducing SBRT in patients 75 years of age or older was studied using a population-based cancer registry. Methods The Amsterdam Cancer Registry wa

  17. Evaluation of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT radiotherapy plans for left breast cancer based on clinical dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyun; Chen, Xinde; He, Zhijian; Li, Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to compare dosimetric differences based on three types of radiotherapy plans for postoperative left breast cancer. In particular, based on a clinical dosimetric study, the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity- modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and VMAT plans were implemented on 15 cases of postoperative patients with left breast cancer with prescription doses of 5000cGy. Dose volume histogram (DVH) was used to analyze each evaluation index of clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Except for homogeneous index (HI), D2, each CTV evaluation index of 3D-CRT plan was inferior to IMRT and VMAT plans (Pplans, IMRT has a statistical significance only in Dmean, V95 (Pplan is much closer to the prescription dose with a V95 coverage rate as high as 97.44%. For the infected lung, V5, V10 of 3D-CRT were the lowest (Pplans. Here, the V5, V10 of infected lung were slightly higher (Pplans. Each evaluation index of the contralateral lung and heart in 3D-CRT was the lowest (Pplans, which were 1770.89±121.16cGy and 1839.92±92.77cGy, respectively. While D1 of the spinal cord in IMRT and VMAT plans was higher, which were 1990.12±61.52cGy and 1927.38±43.67cGy, respectively. When the radiation dose of 500-1500cGy was delivered to the normal tissues, 3D-CRT significantly shows the lowest volume, VMAT is relatively higher. Monitor Units (MU) and treatment time (T) of VMAT were the least, only 49.33% and 55.86% of those of IMRT. The three types of plans can meet the clinical dosimetry demands of postoperative radiotherapy for left breast cancer. The target of IMRT and VMAT plans has a better conformity, and the VMAT plan takes the advantages of less MU and treatment time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SU-E-J-171: Surface Imaging Based Intrafraction Motion Assessments for Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiant, D; Vanderstraeten, C; Maurer, J; Pursley, J; Terrell, J; Sintay, B [Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify and characterize intrafraction motion for whole brain radiotherapy treatments in open face masks using 3D surface imaging. Methods: Fifteen whole brain patients were monitored with 3D surface imaging over a total of 202 monitoring sessions. Mean translations and rotations were calculated over each minute, each session, and over all sessions combined. The percentage of each session that the root mean square (RMS) of the linear translations were outside of 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm were determined for each patient. Correlations between mean translations per minute and time and between standard deviation per minute and time were evaluated using Pearson's r value. Results: The mean RMS translation averaged over all patients was 1.45 mm +/− 1.52 mm. The patients spent an average of 18%, 10%, 6%, and 3% of the monitoring time outside of 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm RMS tolerances, respectively. The RMS values averaged over all patients were 1.31 mm +/− 0.98 mm, 1.52 +/- 1.04, and 1.30 mm +/− 0.71 mm over the 1th, 5th, and 10th minutes of monitoring, respectively. Neither, the RMS values (p = 0.15) or the standard deviations of the RMS values (p = 0.16) showed significant correlations with time. Conclusion: The patients were positioned within 2 mm of isocenter, which was the initial set-up tolerance, for the majority of their treatments. The average position changed by < 0.3 mm over 10 minutes of monitoring. Short term movements, reflected by the standard deviations, where on the order of 1 mm. This immobilization system provides adequate immobilization over a course of treatment for whole brain radiotherapy. This system may also be suitable for head and neck or stereotactic radiosurgery treatments as well.

  19. The European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-European Institute of Radiotherapy (ESTRO-EIR) report on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance systems: a practical and technical review and guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine; Rasch, Coen; McNair, Helen

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has provided many technological advances in radiotherapy. The European Institute of Radiotherapy (EIR) was established by the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) to provide current consensus statement with evidence-based and pragmatic guidelines on topics...

  20. Cell Based Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET after Radiotherapy in a Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumana Premkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is the primary form of treatment in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. However for residual disease in the form of the persistent lymph nodes, surgery or chemotherapy is recommended. As surgery is not acceptable by every patient and chemotherapy has associated side effects, we hereby report the positive outcome of in vitro expanded natural killer cell and activated T lymphocyte based autologous immune enhancement therapy (AIET for the residual lymphadenopathy in a patient with locally advanced cervical cancer after radiation. After six transfusions of AIET, there was complete resolution of residual lymph nodes and there was no evidence of local lesion. The patient also reported improvement in quality of life. As AIET has been reported as the least toxic among the available therapies for cancer, combining AIET with conventional forms of therapy in similar patients might not only improve the outcome but may also help the patients achieve a good quality of life.

  1. Practical recommendations for breathing-adapted radiotherapy; Bonnes pratiques pour la radiotherapie asservie a la respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, L.; Giraud, P.; Rosenwald, J.C. [Institut Curie, Dept. d' Oncologie-radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Dumas, J.L.; Lorchel, F. [CHU de Besancon, Hopital Jean-Minjoz, Service Radiotherapie, 25 - Besancon (France); Marre, D. [Institut Claudius-Regaud, Dept. des Radiations, 31 - Toulouse (France); Dupont, S. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' Oncoradiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Varmenot, N. [Centre Henri-Becquerel, UnitE de Physique Medicale, 76 - Rouen (France); Ginestet, C. [Centre Leon-Berard, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 69 - Lyon (France); Caron, J. [Institut Bergonie, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Marchesi, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Ferreira, I. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Dept. d' Oncologie Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Garcia, R. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Service de Radiotherapie, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2007-06-15

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath-hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active techniques, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily holds his/her breath. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. This work summarizes the different experiences of the centers of the STIC 2003 project. It describes the different techniques, gives an overview of the literature and proposes a practice based on our experience. (authors)

  2. The European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-European Institute of Radiotherapy (ESTRO-EIR) report on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance systems: a practical and technical review and guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korreman, Stine; Rasch, Coen; McNair, Helen; Verellen, Dirk; Oelfke, Uwe; Maingon, Philippe; Mijnheer, Ben; Khoo, Vincent

    2010-02-01

    The past decade has provided many technological advances in radiotherapy. The European Institute of Radiotherapy (EIR) was established by the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) to provide current consensus statement with evidence-based and pragmatic guidelines on topics of practical relevance for radiation oncology. This report focuses primarily on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance (3DCT-IGRT) systems. It will provide an overview and current standing of 3DCT-IGRT systems addressing the rationale, objectives, principles, applications, and process pathways, both clinical and technical for treatment delivery and quality assurance. These are reviewed for four categories of solutions; kV CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) as well as MV CT and MV CBCT. It will also provide a framework and checklist to consider the capability and functionality of these systems as well as the resources needed for implementation. Two different but typical clinical cases (tonsillar and prostate cancer) using 3DCT-IGRT are illustrated with workflow processes via feedback questionnaires from several large clinical centres currently utilizing these systems. The feedback from these clinical centres demonstrates a wide variability based on local practices. This report whilst comprehensive is not exhaustive as this area of development remains a very active field for research and development. However, it should serve as a practical guide and framework for all professional groups within the field, focussed on clinicians, physicists and radiation therapy technologists interested in IGRT.

  3. Early prediction of radiotherapy-induced parotid shrinkage and toxicity based on CT radiomics and fuzzy classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pota, Marco; Scalco, Elisa; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Farneti, Alessia; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Rizzo, Giovanna; Esposito, Massimo

    2017-03-18

    Patients under radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer often suffer of long-term xerostomia, and/or consistent shrinkage of parotid glands. In order to avoid these drawbacks, adaptive therapy can be planned for patients at risk, if the prediction is obtained timely, before or during the early phase of treatment. Artificial intelligence can address the problem, by learning from examples and building classification models. In particular, fuzzy logic has shown its suitability for medical applications, in order to manage uncertain data, and to build transparent rule-based classifiers. In previous works, clinical, dosimetric and image-based features were considered separately, to find different possible predictors of parotid shrinkage. On the other hand, a few works reported possible image-based predictors of xerostomia, while the combination of different types of features has been little addressed. This paper proposes the application of a novel machine learning approach, based on both statistics and fuzzy logic, aimed at the classification of patients at risk of i) parotid gland shrinkage and ii) 12-months xerostomia. Both problems are addressed with the aim of individuating predictors and models to classify respective outcomes. Knowledge is extracted from a real dataset of radiotherapy patients, by means of a recently developed method named Likelihood-Fuzzy Analysis, based on the representation of statistical information by fuzzy rule-based models. This method enables to manage heterogeneous variables and missing data, and to obtain interpretable fuzzy models presenting good generalization power (thus high performance), and to measure classification confidence. Numerous features are extracted to characterize patients, coming from different sources, i.e. clinical features, dosimetric parameters, and radiomics-based measures obtained by texture analysis of Computed Tomography images. A learning approach based on the composition of simple models in a more complicated one

  4. Contribution of 18F-Fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography to Target Volume Delineation in Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Malignant Cranial Base Tumours: First Clinical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Graf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased amino acid uptake has been demonstrated in intracerebral tumours and head and neck carcinomas of squamous cell origin. We investigated the potential impact of using 18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (18F-FET-PET/CT in addition to conventional imaging for gross tumour volume (GTV delineation in stereotactic radiotherapy of skull base tumours. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive patients with cranial base tumours (10 with squamous cell histology, 4 others. All patients underwent a FET-PET/CT examination in addition to contrast-enhanced CT and 11 patients underwent MRI. All tumours and histologic types showed increased FET uptake. The GTV was defined by all voxels showing hyperintensity in MRI or CT (GTVMRI/CT or enhancement in PET (GTVPET, forming a GTVcomposite that was used for the initial treatment fields. An additional volume of infiltrative growth outside the GTVMRI/CT of about 1.0 ± 2 cm3 (5% of the conventional volume was demonstrated by FET-PET only (GTVPETplus with significant enlargement (>10% of GTVMRI/CT in three patients. From existing data, we found correlation between cellular density and the standardized uptake value (SUV of FET. We were able to substantially reduce the volume of escalated radiation dose (GTVboost by 11 ± 2 cm3 (24% of the conventional volume.

  5. SU-D-BRD-02: A Web-Based Image Processing and Plan Evaluation Platform (WIPPEP) for Future Cloud-Based Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, X; Liu, L; Xing, L [Stanford UniversitySchool of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Visualization and processing of medical images and radiation treatment plan evaluation have traditionally been constrained to local workstations with limited computation power and ability of data sharing and software update. We present a web-based image processing and planning evaluation platform (WIPPEP) for radiotherapy applications with high efficiency, ubiquitous web access, and real-time data sharing. Methods: This software platform consists of three parts: web server, image server and computation server. Each independent server communicates with each other through HTTP requests. The web server is the key component that provides visualizations and user interface through front-end web browsers and relay information to the backend to process user requests. The image server serves as a PACS system. The computation server performs the actual image processing and dose calculation. The web server backend is developed using Java Servlets and the frontend is developed using HTML5, Javascript, and jQuery. The image server is based on open source DCME4CHEE PACS system. The computation server can be written in any programming language as long as it can send/receive HTTP requests. Our computation server was implemented in Delphi, Python and PHP, which can process data directly or via a C++ program DLL. Results: This software platform is running on a 32-core CPU server virtually hosting the web server, image server, and computation servers separately. Users can visit our internal website with Chrome browser, select a specific patient, visualize image and RT structures belonging to this patient and perform image segmentation running Delphi computation server and Monte Carlo dose calculation on Python or PHP computation server. Conclusion: We have developed a webbased image processing and plan evaluation platform prototype for radiotherapy. This system has clearly demonstrated the feasibility of performing image processing and plan evaluation platform through a web

  6. Accelerated gradient-based free form deformable registration for online adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gang; Liang, Yueqiang; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Yin, Yong; Li, Dengwang

    2015-04-01

    The registration of planning fan-beam computed tomography (FBCT) and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. The current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as Demons, may fail when they are used to register FBCT and CBCT, because the CT numbers in CBCT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. In this paper, we investigated the effects of CBCT intensity inaccuracy on the registration accuracy and developed an accurate gradient-based free form deformation algorithm (GFFD). GFFD distinguishes itself from other free form deformable registration algorithms by (a) measuring the similarity using the 3D gradient vector fields to avoid the effect of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities; (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using the local polynomial approximation-intersection of confidence intervals (LPA-ICI) algorithm to ensure a smooth and continuous displacement field; and (c) introducing a ‘bi-directional’ force along with an adaptive force strength adjustment to accelerate the convergence process. It is expected that such a strategy can decrease the effect of the inconsistent intensities between the two modalities, thus improving the registration accuracy and robustness. Moreover, for clinical application, the algorithm was implemented by graphics processing units (GPU) through OpenCL framework. The registration time of the GFFD algorithm for each set of CT data ranges from 8 to 13 s. The applications of on-line adaptive image-guided radiation therapy, including auto-propagation of contours, aperture-optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) in the course of radiation therapy were also studied by in-house-developed software.

  7. The Impact of Hypofractionated Whole Breast Radiotherapy on Local Relapse in Patients With Grade 3 Early Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Weir, Lorna [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Grade 3 early breast cancer have an inferior rate of local disease control at 10 years with hypofractionated radiotherapy compared with more conventionally fractionated schedules. Methods and Materials: Local relapse rates were compared between patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy or conventionally fractionated radiotherapy to the whole breast in a population-based cohort of women with early-stage (T1-T2, N0, M0) Grade 3 breast cancers diagnosed between 1990 and 2000 and referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Cumulative rates of local relapse were estimated using a competing risk method, and factors significant on univariate analysis were included with fractionation group in a multivariate model. The primary end point was local control at 10 years. Results: A total of 1,335 patients with Grade 3 tumors were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, 252 with conventional fractionation, and 1,083 with a hypofractionated schedule. The 10-year cumulative incidence of local relapse was 6.9% in the hypofractionated group and 6.2% in the conventionally fractionated group (p = 0.99). Conclusions: There is no evidence that hypofractionation is inferior to conventional fractionation for breast conserving therapy in patients with Grade 3 breast cancer in this large population-based series after 10 years of follow-up.

  8. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  9. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  10. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between (99m)Tc and HDR (192)Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with (99m)Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) (192)Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Simulations of implants with (99m)Tc-filled and HDR (192)Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. The (99m)Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h(-1).mCi(-1) and 0.190 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1) at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1), respectively, for the HDR (192)Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the (99m)Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR (192)Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Temporary (99m)Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR (192)Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  11. Assessment of accuracy and efficiency of atlas-based autosegmentation for prostate radiotherapy in a variety of clinical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmat, I. [Medical Univ. Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria). Div. of Medical Radiation Physics; Georg, P.; Georg, D.; Goldner, G.; Stock, M. [Medical Univ. Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria). Div. of Medical Radiation Physics; Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology; Birkfellner, W. [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering; Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2012-09-15

    Background and purpose: The goal of the current study was to evaluate the commercially available atlas-based autosegmentation software for clinical use in prostate radiotherapy. The accuracy was benchmarked against interobserver variability. Material and methods: A total of 20 planning computed tomographs (CTs) and 10 cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) were selected for prostate, rectum, and bladder delineation. The images varied regarding to individual (age, body mass index) and setup parameters (contrast agent, rectal balloon, implanted markers). Automatically created contours with ABAS {sup registered} and iPlan {sup registered} were compared to an expert's delineation by calculating the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and conformity index. Results: Demo-atlases of both systems showed different results for bladder (DSC{sub ABAS} 0.86 {+-} 0.17, DSC{sub iPlan} 0.51 {+-} 0.30) and prostate (DSC{sub ABAS} 0.71 {+-} 0.14, DSC{sub iPlan} 0.57 {+-} 0.19). Rectum delineation (DSC{sub ABAS} 0.78 {+-} 0.11, DSC{sub iPlan} 0.84 {+-} 0.08) demonstrated differences between the systems but better correlation of the automatically drawn volumes. ABAS {sup registered} was closest to the interobserver benchmark. Autosegmentation with iPlan {sup registered}, ABAS {sup registered} and manual segmentation took 0.5, 4 and 15-20 min, respectively. Automatic contouring on CBCT showed high dependence on image quality (DSC bladder 0.54, rectum 0.42, prostate 0.34). Conclusion: For clinical routine, efforts are still necessary to either redesign algorithms implemented in autosegmentation or to optimize image quality for CBCT to guarantee required accuracy and time savings for adaptive radiotherapy. (orig.)

  12. Knowledge-based flow field zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards easing the three-dimensional grid generation bottleneck in computational fluid dynamics. A knowledge based approach works well, but certain aspects of flow field zoning make the use of such an approach challenging. A knowledge based flow field zoner, called EZGrid, was implemented and tested on representative two-dimensional aerodynamic configurations. Results are shown which illustrate the way in which EZGrid incorporates the effects of physics, shape description, position, and user bias in a flow field zoning.

  13. Propensity Score-based Comparison of Long-term Outcomes With 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Steven H., E-mail: SHLin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang Lu [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thall, Peter F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is the worldwide standard for the treatment of esophageal cancer, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose conformality and reduces the radiation exposure to normal tissues. We hypothesized that the dosimetric advantages of IMRT should translate to substantive benefits in clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: An analysis was performed of 676 nonrandomized patients (3D-CRT, n=413; IMRT, n=263) with stage Ib-IVa (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) esophageal cancers treated with chemoradiotherapy at a single institution from 1998-2008. An inverse probability of treatment weighting and inclusion of propensity score (treatment probability) as a covariate were used to compare overall survival time, interval to local failure, and interval to distant metastasis, while accounting for the effects of other clinically relevant covariates. The propensity scores were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results: A fitted multivariate inverse probability weighted-adjusted Cox model showed that the overall survival time was significantly associated with several well-known prognostic factors, along with the treatment modality (IMRT vs 3D-CRT, hazard ratio 0.72, P<.001). Compared with IMRT, 3D-CRT patients had a significantly greater risk of dying (72.6% vs 52.9%, inverse probability of treatment weighting, log-rank test, P<.0001) and of locoregional recurrence (P=.0038). No difference was seen in cancer-specific mortality (Gray's test, P=.86) or distant metastasis (P=.99) between the 2 groups. An increased cumulative incidence of cardiac death was seen in the 3D-CRT group (P=.049), but most deaths were undocumented (5-year estimate, 11.7% in 3D-CRT vs 5.4% in IMRT group, Gray's test, P=.0029). Conclusions: Overall survival, locoregional control, and noncancer-related death were significantly better after IMRT than after 3D-CRT. Although these results need

  14. Optimal usage of cone beam computed tomography system with different field of views in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Venkata Naga Madhusudhana Sresty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find methods for optimal usage of XVI (X-ray volume imaging system in Elekta synergy linear accelerator with different field of views for same lesion in order to minimize patient dose due to imaging.Methods: 20 scans of 2 individual patients with ca sigmoid colon and ca lung were used in this study. Kilo voltage collimators with medium field of view were used as per the preset information. Images were reconstructed for another collimator with small field of view. The set up errors were evaluated with XVI software. Shift results of both methods were compared. Results: Variation in treatment set up errors with M20 and S20 collimators were ≤ 0.2 mm in translational and 0.30 in rotational shifts. Results showed almost equal translational and rotational shifts in both medium and small field of views with different collimators in all the scans. Visualization of target and surrounding structures were good enough and sufficient for XVI auto matching.Conclusion: Imaging with small field of view results less patient dose compared with medium or large field of views. It is Suggestible to use collimators with small field of view wherever possible. In this study, collimators with small field of view were sufficient for both patients though the preset information indicated medium field of view. But, it always depends on the area required for matching purpose. So, individual selection is important than preset information in the XVI system.

  15. Real-time volumetric image reconstruction and 3D tumor localization based on a single x-ray projection image for lung cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H; Gu, Xuejun; Folkerts, Michael; Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an algorithm for real-time volumetric image reconstruction and 3D tumor localization based on a single x-ray projection image for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Given a set of volumetric images of a patient at N breathing phases as the training data, we perform deformable image registration between a reference phase and the other N-1 phases, resulting in N-1 deformation vector fields (DVFs). These DVFs can be represented efficiently by a few eigenvectors and coefficients obtained from principal component analysis (PCA). By varying the PCA coefficients, we can generate new DVFs, which, when applied on the reference image, lead to new volumetric images. We then can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single projection image by optimizing the PCA coefficients such that its computed projection matches the measured one. The 3D location of the tumor can be derived by applying the inverted DVF on its position in the reference image. Our algorithm was implemented on graphics processing units...

  16. Tissue interfaces dosimetry in small field radiotherapy with alanine/EPR mini dosimeters and Monte Carlo-Penelope simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega R, J. L.; Nicolucci, P.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, FFCLRP, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Bairro Monte Alegre, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Chen, F. [Universidade Federale do ABC, CCNH, Rua Santa Adelia 166, Bangu, 09210-170 Santo Andre, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Apaza V, D. G., E-mail: josevegaramirez@yahoo.es [Universidad Nacional de San Agustin de Arequipa, Departamento de Fisica, Arequipa (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The dosimetry system based on alanine mini dosimeters plus K-Band EPR spectrometer was tested in the tissue-interface dosimetry through the percentage depth-dose (Pdd) determination for 3 x 3 cm{sup 2} and 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} radiation fields sizes. The alanine mini dosimeters were produced by mechanical pressure from a mixture of 95% L-alanine and 5% polyvinyl alcohol (Pva) acting as binder. Nominal dimensions of these mini dosimeters were 1 mm diameter and 3 mm length as well as 3 - 4 mg mass. The EPR spectra of the mini dosimeters were registered using a K-Band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer. The mini dosimeters were placed in a nonhomogeneous phantom and irradiated with 20 Gy in a 6 MV PRIMUS Siemens linear accelerator, with a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm using the small fields previously mentioned. The cylindrical non-homogeneous phantom was comprised of several disk-shaped plates of different materials in the sequence acrylic-bone cork-bone-acrylic, with dimensions 15 cm diameter and 1 cm thick. The plates were placed in descending order, starting from top with four acrylic plates followed by two bone plates plus eight cork plates plus two bone plates and finally, four acrylic plates (4-2-8-2-4). Pdd curves from the treatment planning system and from Monte Carlo simulation with Penelope code were determined. Mini dosimeters Pdd results show good agreement with Penelope, better than 95% for the cork homogeneous region and 97.7% in the bone heterogeneous region. In the first interface region, between acrylic and bone, it can see a dose increment of 0.6% for mini dosimeters compared to Penelope. At the second interface, between bone and cork, there is 9.1% of dose increment for mini dosimeter relative to Penelope. For the third (cork-bone) and fourth (bone-acrylic) interfaces, the dose increment for mini dosimeters compared to Penelope was 4.1% both. (Author)

  17. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fatyga, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  18. Imaging of moving fiducial markers during radiotherapy using a fast, efficient active pixel sensor based EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmond, John P. F.; Zin, Hafiz M.; Harris, Emma J.; Lupica, Giovanni; Allinson, Nigel M.; Evans, Philip M. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Lincoln School of Computer Science, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the use of an experimental complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) for tracking of moving fiducial markers during radiotherapy. Methods: The APS has an active area of 5.4 x 5.4 cm and maximum full frame read-out rate of 20 frame s{sup -1}, with the option to read out a region-of-interest (ROI) at an increased rate. It was coupled to a 4 mm thick ZnWO4 scintillator which provided a quantum efficiency (QE) of 8% for a 6 MV x-ray treatment beam. The APS was compared with a standard iViewGT flat panel amorphous Silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device (EPID), with a QE of 0.34% and a frame-rate of 2.5 frame s{sup -1}. To investigate the ability of the two systems to image markers, four gold cylinders of length 8 mm and diameter 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 mm were placed on a motion-platform. Images of the stationary markers were acquired using the APS at a frame-rate of 20 frame s{sup -1}, and a dose-rate of 143 MU min{sup -1} to avoid saturation. EPID images were acquired at the maximum frame-rate of 2.5 frame s{sup -1}, and a reduced dose-rate of 19 MU min{sup -1} to provide a similar dose per frame to the APS. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the background signal and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the marker signal relative to the background were evaluated for both imagers at doses of 0.125 to 2 MU. Results: Image quality and marker visibility was found to be greater in the APS with SNR {approx}5 times greater than in the EPID and CNR up to an order of magnitude greater for all four markers. To investigate the ability to image and track moving markers the motion-platform was moved to simulate a breathing cycle with period 6 s, amplitude 20 mm and maximum speed 13.2 mm s{sup -1}. At the minimum integration time of 50 ms a tracking algorithm applied to the APS data found all four markers with a success rate of {>=}92% and positional error {<=}90 {mu}m. At an integration time of 400

  19. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  20. Predictive factors for gastroduodenal toxicity based on endoscopy following radiotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, H. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Health Sciences and Technology; Oh, D.; Park, H.C.; Han, Y.; Lim, D.H. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kang, S.W. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiologic Science; Paik, S.W. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to determine predictive factors for gastroduodenal (GD) toxicity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Patients and methods: A total of 90 HCC patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) before and after RT were enrolled. RT was delivered as 30-50 Gy (median 37.5 Gy) in 2-5 Gy (median 3.5 Gy) per fraction. All endoscopic findings were reviewed and GD toxicities related to RT were graded by the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The predictive factors for the {>=} grade 2 GD toxicity were investigated. Results: Endoscopic findings showed erosive gastritis in 14 patients (16 %), gastric ulcers in 8 patients (9 %), erosive duodenitis in 15 patients (17 %), and duodenal ulcers in 14 patients (16 %). Grade 2 toxicity developed in 19 patients (21 %) and grade 3 toxicity developed in 8 patients (9 %). V{sub 25} for stomach and V{sub 35} for duodenum (volume receiving a RT dose of more than x Gy) were the most predictive factors for {>=} grade 2 toxicity. The gastric toxicity rate at 6 months was 2.9 % for V{sub 25} {<=} 6.3 % and 57.1 % for V{sub 25} > 6.3 %. The duodenal toxicity rate at 6 months was 9.4 % for V{sub 35} > 5.4 % and 45.9 % for V{sub 35} > 5.4 %. By multivariate analysis including the clinical factors, V{sub 25} for stomach and V{sub 35} for duodenum were the significant factors. Conclusion: EGD revealed that GD toxicity is common following RT for HCC. V{sub 25} for the stomach and V{sub 35} for the duodenum were the significant factors to predict {>=} grade 2 GD toxicity. (orig.)

  1. SU-E-J-83: CBCT Based Rectum and Bladder Dose Tracking in the Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z; Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to monitor the volume changes of bladder and rectum and evaluate the dosimetric changes of bladder and rectum using daily cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy. Methods: The data of this study were obtained from 12 patients, totally 222 CBCTs. All the volume of the bladder and the rectum on the CBCT were normalized to the bladder and the rectum on their own original CT to monitory the volume changes. To evaluate dose delivered to the OARs, volumes that receive 70Gy (V70Gy), 60Gy, 50Gy, 40Gy and 30Gy are calculated for the bladder and the rectum, V20Gy and V10Gy for rectum additionally. And the deviation of the mean dose to the bladder and the rectum are also chosen as the evaluation parameter. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify the mean dose change of the volume change using SPSS 19. Results: The results show that the variances of the normalize volume of the bladder and the rectum are 0.15–0.58 and 0.13–0.50. The variances of V70Gy, V60Gy, V50Gy, V40Gy and V30Gy of bladder are bigger than rectum for 11 patients. The linear regression analysis indicated a negative correlation between the volume and the mean dose of the bladder (p < 0.05). A 10% increase in bladder volume will cause 5.1% (±4.3%) reduction in mean dose. Conclusion: The bladder volume change is more significant than that for rectum for the prostate cancer patient. The volume changes of rectum are not significant except air gap in the rectum. Bladder volume varies will cause significant dose change. The bladder volume monitoring before fractional treatment delivery would be crucial for accuracy dose delivery.

  2. Deep architecture neural network-based real-time image processing for image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro

    2017-08-01

    To develop real-time image processing for image-guided radiotherapy, we evaluated several neural network models for use with different imaging modalities, including X-ray fluoroscopic image denoising. Setup images of prostate cancer patients were acquired with two oblique X-ray fluoroscopic units. Two types of residual network were designed: a convolutional autoencoder (rCAE) and a convolutional neural network (rCNN). We changed the convolutional kernel size and number of convolutional layers for both networks, and the number of pooling and upsampling layers for rCAE. The ground-truth image was applied to the contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) method of image processing. Network models were trained to keep the quality of the output image close to that of the ground-truth image from the input image without image processing. For image denoising evaluation, noisy input images were used for the training. More than 6 convolutional layers with convolutional kernels >5×5 improved image quality. However, this did not allow real-time imaging. After applying a pair of pooling and upsampling layers to both networks, rCAEs with >3 convolutions each and rCNNs with >12 convolutions with a pair of pooling and upsampling layers achieved real-time processing at 30 frames per second (fps) with acceptable image quality. Use of our suggested network achieved real-time image processing for contrast enhancement and image denoising by the use of a conventional modern personal computer. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Poster — Thur Eve — 52: A Web-based Platform for Collaborative Document Management in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kildea, J.; Joseph, A. [Dept. of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    We describe DepDocs, a web-based platform that we have developed to manage the committee meetings, policies, procedures and other documents within our otherwise paperless radiotherapy clinic. DepDocs is essentially a document management system based on the popular Drupal content management software. For security and confidentiality, it is hosted on a linux server internal to our hospital network such that documents are never sent to the cloud or outside of the hospital firewall. We used Drupal's in-built role-based user rights management system to assign a role, and associated document editing rights, to each user. Documents are accessed for viewing using either a simple Google-like search or by generating a list of related documents from a taxonomy of categorization terms. Our system provides document revision tracking and an document review and approval mechanism for all official policies and procedures. Committee meeting schedules, agendas and minutes are maintained by committee chairs and are restricted to committee members. DepDocs has been operational within our department for over six months and has already 45 unique users and an archive of over 1000 documents, mostly policies and procedures. Documents are easily retrievable from the system using any web browser within our hospital's network.

  4. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for high risk prostate cancer based on sentinel node SPECT imaging for target volume definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiadis Aristotelis

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RTOG 94-13 trial has provided evidence that patients with high risk prostate cancer benefit from an additional radiotherapy to the pelvic nodes combined with concomitant hormonal ablation. Since lymphatic drainage of the prostate is highly variable, the optimal target volume definition for the pelvic lymph nodes is problematic. To overcome this limitation, we tested the feasibility of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT protocol, taking under consideration the individual pelvic sentinel node drainage pattern by SPECT functional imaging. Methods Patients with high risk prostate cancer were included. Sentinel nodes (SN were localised 1.5–3 hours after injection of 250 MBq 99mTc-Nanocoll using a double-headed gamma camera with an integrated X-Ray device. All sentinel node localisations were included into the pelvic clinical target volume (CTV. Dose prescriptions were 50.4 Gy (5 × 1.8 Gy / week to the pelvis and 70.0 Gy (5 × 2.0 Gy / week to the prostate including the base of seminal vesicles or whole seminal vesicles. Patients were treated with IMRT. Furthermore a theoretical comparison between IMRT and a three-dimensional conformal technique was performed. Results Since 08/2003 6 patients were treated with this protocol. All patients had detectable sentinel lymph nodes (total 29. 4 of 6 patients showed sentinel node localisations (total 10, that would not have been treated adequately with CT-based planning ('geographical miss' only. The most common localisation for a probable geographical miss was the perirectal area. The comparison between dose-volume-histograms of IMRT- and conventional CT-planning demonstrated clear superiority of IMRT when all sentinel lymph nodes were included. IMRT allowed a significantly better sparing of normal tissue and reduced volumes of small bowel, large bowel and rectum irradiated with critical doses. No gastrointestinal or genitourinary acute toxicity Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG

  5. Wave Superposition Based Sound Field Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-qing; CHEN Jin; YANG Chao

    2008-01-01

    In order to overcome the obstacle of singular integral in boundary element method (BEM), wepresented an efficient sound field reconstruction technique based on the wave superposition method (WSM). Itsprinciple includes three steps: first, the sound pressure field of an arbitrary shaped radiator is measured witha microphone array; then, the exterior sound field of the radiator is computed backward and forward using theWSM; at last, the final results are visualized in terms of sound pressure contours or animations. With thesevisualized contours or animations, noise sources can be easily located and quantified; also noise transmissionpath can be found out. By numerical simulation and experimental results, we proved that the technique aresuitable and accurate for sound field reconstruction. In addition, we presented a sound field reconstruction sys-tem prototype on the basis of this technique. It makes a foundation for the application of wave superpositionin the sound field reconstruction in industry situations.

  6. A comparative study based on image quality and clinical task performance for CT reconstruction algorithms in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Dolly, Steven; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Anastasio, Mark A; Low, Daniel A; Li, Harold H; Michalski, Jeff M; Thorstad, Wade L; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-07-01

    CT image reconstruction is typically evaluated based on the ability to reduce the radiation dose to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) while maintaining acceptable image quality. However, the determination of common image quality metrics, such as noise, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio, is often insufficient for describing clinical radiotherapy task performance. In this study we designed and implemented a new comparative analysis method associating image quality, radiation dose, and patient size with radiotherapy task performance, with the purpose of guiding the clinical radiotherapy usage of CT reconstruction algorithms. The iDose4iterative reconstruction algorithm was selected as the target for comparison, wherein filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was regarded as the baseline. Both phantom and patient images were analyzed. A layer-adjustable anthropomorphic pelvis phantom capable of mimicking 38-58 cm lateral diameter-sized patients was imaged and reconstructed by the FBP and iDose4 algorithms with varying noise-reduction-levels, respectively. The resulting image sets were quantitatively assessed by two image quality indices, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio, and two clinical task-based indices, target CT Hounsfield number (for electron density determination) and structure contouring accuracy (for dose-volume calculations). Additionally, CT images of 34 patients reconstructed with iDose4 with six noise reduction levels were qualitatively evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point scoring mechanism. For the phantom experiments, iDose4 achieved noise reduction up to 66.1% and CNR improvement up to 53.2%, compared to FBP without considering the changes of spatial resolution among images and the clinical acceptance of reconstructed images. Such improvements consistently appeared across different iDose4 noise reduction levels, exhibiting limited interlevel noise (<5 HU) and target CT number variations (<1 HU). The radiation

  7. A comparative study based on image quality and clinical task performance for CT reconstruction algorithms in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Dolly, Steven; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Anastasio, Mark A; Low, Daniel A; Li, Harold H; Michalski, Jeff M; Thorstad, Wade L; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-07-08

    CT image reconstruction is typically evaluated based on the ability to reduce the radiation dose to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) while maintaining acceptable image quality. However, the determination of common image quality metrics, such as noise, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio, is often insufficient for describing clinical radiotherapy task performance. In this study we designed and implemented a new comparative analysis method associating image quality, radiation dose, and patient size with radiotherapy task performance, with the purpose of guiding the clinical radiotherapy usage of CT reconstruction algorithms. The iDose4 iterative reconstruction algorithm was selected as the target for comparison, wherein filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was regarded as the baseline. Both phantom and patient images were analyzed. A layer-adjustable anthropomorphic pelvis phantom capable of mimicking 38-58 cm lateral diameter-sized patients was imaged and reconstructed by the FBP and iDose4 algorithms with varying noise-reduction-levels, respectively. The resulting image sets were quantitatively assessed by two image quality indices, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio, and two clinical task-based indices, target CT Hounsfield number (for electron density determination) and structure contouring accuracy (for dose-volume calculations). Additionally, CT images of 34 patients reconstructed with iDose4 with six noise reduction levels were qualitatively evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point scoring mechanism. For the phantom experiments, iDose4 achieved noise reduction up to 66.1% and CNR improvement up to 53.2%, compared to FBP without considering the changes of spatial resolution among images and the clinical acceptance of reconstructed images. Such improvements consistently appeared across different iDose4 noise reduction levels, exhibiting limited interlevel noise (< 5 HU) and target CT number variations (< 1 HU). The radiation

  8. Reference dosimetry and small-field dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy: Results from a Danish intercomparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, Claus F.; Sibolt, Patrik

    methods was performed by DTU Nutech at six Danish clinics. The first part of the intercompa-rison regarded the consistency of reference dosimetry. Absorbed dose to water under reference conditions was measured using a Farmer ionization chamber, and was found to agree within 1 % with the daily dose checks......-mators and the measured field sizes, although one clinic showed field dimensions that were down to 21 ± 3 % smaller than expected. Small-field correction factors were estimated for a PinPoint cham-ber and a diamond detector using a fibre-coupled organic scintilla-tor as reference, after correcting for volume averaging...

  9. Clinical research of extensive regional field radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer%局部晚期食管癌扩大野同期放化疗的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周超; 杨海华; 胡炜; 柯文婷; 王碧云; 孔敏; 朱成楚

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨局部晚期食管癌扩大野同期放化疗的疗效及不良反应.方法 101例局部晚期食管癌初治患者入组,其中常规野放疗44例、常规野放化疗29例、扩大野放化疗28例,放疗总剂量60 Gy.常规野临床靶体积(CTV)包括大体肿瘤体积(GTV)外扩0.8 cm、食管原发灶上下各扩3 ~5 cm.扩大野第1阶段CTV包括全食管、GTV外扩0.8cm及淋巴引流区、双侧锁骨上区、胃左淋巴引流区,第2阶段CTV包括GTV外扩0.8 cm、食管原发灶上下各扩3~5 cm,缩野避脊髓.同期化疗包括TP及NP方案.结果 90.1%患者完成放疗计划,同期放化疗患者均完成l周期以上化疗.随访率为99.0%,单纯放疗、同期放化疗的随访时间满2年者分别为24、42例.常规野放疗、常规野放化疗、扩大野放化疗的中位生存时间分别为13、21、19个月,2年总生存率分别为15%、48%、46%,同期放化疗能提高生存率(x2=6.83,P=0.033).同期放化疗3~4级骨髓抑制较单纯放疗发生率高(53%:0%,x2=32.94,P=0.000),其余不良反应(急性放射性肺炎、急性放射性食管炎、食管纤维化、晚期放射性肺损伤)均相似(x2=5.56、6.70、2.39、0.42,P=0.235、0.349、0.881、0.981).结论 同期放化疗能提高局部晚期食管癌的生存率,扩大野放化疗是安全的,但是否能提高局部晚期生存率需进一步研究.%Objective To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of extensive regional field radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer.Methods Of the 101 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer patients,44 patients were treated by involved field radiotherapy alone,29 patients treated by involved field radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy,and 28 patients received extensive regional field radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy,the total dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy.The clinical target volume (CTV) of involved field included the gross tumor volume

  10. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Daniel, E-mail: dana@dtu.dk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby 2800, Denmark and Department of Oncology, Radiotherapy Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev 2730 (Denmark); Van Leemput, Koen [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby 2800, Denmark and A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Hansen, Rasmus H. [Department of Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev 2730 (Denmark); Andersen, Jon A. L.; Edmund, Jens M. [Department of Oncology, Radiotherapy Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev 2730 (Denmark)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan are not uniquely related to electron density. To solve the task, voxel-based or atlas-based models have typically been used. The voxel-based models require a specialized dual ultrashort echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization and the atlas-based models require deformable registrations of conventional MRI scans. In this study, we investigate the potential of a patch-based method for creating a pCT based on conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans without using deformable registrations. We compare this method against two state-of-the-art methods within the voxel-based and atlas-based categories. Methods: The data consisted of CT and MRI scans of five cranial RT patients. To compare the performance of the different methods, a nested cross validation was done to find optimal model parameters for all the methods. Voxel-wise and geometric evaluations of the pCTs were done. Furthermore, a radiologic evaluation based on water equivalent path lengths was carried out, comparing the upper hemisphere of the head in the pCT and the real CT. Finally, the dosimetric accuracy was tested and compared for a photon treatment plan. Results: The pCTs produced with the patch-based method had the best voxel-wise, geometric, and radiologic agreement with the real CT, closely followed by the atlas-based method. In terms of the dosimetric accuracy, the patch-based method had average deviations of less than 0.5% in measures related to target coverage. Conclusions: We showed that a patch-based method could generate an accurate pCT based on conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI sequences and without deformable registrations. In our evaluations, the method performed better than existing voxel-based and

  11. Testis cancer: role of radiotherapy in 2003; Cancer du testicule: place de la radiotherapie en 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clippe, S. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 69 - Lyon (France); Flechon, A.; Droz, J.P. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, Dept. de Cancerologie Medicale, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2003-11-01

    Germ-cell minors of the testis are rare tumors of the young adult. Half of them are seminoma. The majority of patients have disease limited to the testis. Radiotherapy still remains the standard treatment of these patients. Almost all patients are cured by orchidectomy and radiotherapy on the lomboaortic area extended to homolateral iliac area. The dose is 24 to 30 Gy in a standard fractionation. Different studies are ongoing to reduce the irradiation field (omission of the pelvic irradiation), to decrease irradiation dose (to 20 Gy). Other treatment options are strict surveillance and adjuvant carbo-platin based chemotherapy. None of these options are standard treatments. A strict attention must be directed on controlateral germ-cell tumors and second cancers. (author)

  12. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Meiberdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  13. Integrating multimedia with problem-based learning in teaching of oncology radiotherapy%多媒体结合以问题为基础的学习在肿瘤放射治疗学教学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦颂兵; 周菊英; 徐晓婷; 李明

    2012-01-01

    肿瘤放射治疗学授课内容涵盖放射学基础和临床肿瘤学等多方面,传统的以教师讲授为主的模式已经不能适应肿瘤放射治疗学课程教学需要.苏州大学附属第一医院在肿瘤放射治疗学教学实践中,充分利用计算机多媒体教学加强学生对基本理论的理解,结合以问题为基础的学习,切实提高教学质量和学生的创新能力及自学能力.%The curriculum of oncology radiotherapy covers basic radiology,clinical oncology and other aspects.With the development of new radiation therapy technology and the extensive application of computer technology in the field of radiotherapy,the traditional lecture-based teaching model has not adapted to the rapid development of the needs of oncology radiotherapy any more.Teachers in the first affiliated hospital of Soochow university integrated computer multimedia with problem-based learning in the teaching of oncology radiotherapy.With those innovations,the quality of teaching as well as the creative and self-learning abilities of students have been enhanced.

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gaya, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collecting the key information in this burgeoning field into a single volume, this handbook for clinical oncology trainees and consultants covers all of the basic aspects of stereotactic radiotherapy systems and treatment and includes plenty of case studies.

  15. Brief chemotherapy associated with extended field radiotherapy in Hodgkins disease. Long-term results in a series of 102 patients with clinical stages I-IIIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Largarde, P.; Eghbali, H.; Bonichon, F.; Mascarel, I. de; Chauvergne, J.; Hoerni, B.

    1988-07-01

    From 1972 to 1976, 102 patients with stages I-IIIA Hodgkin's disease (HD) were treated by chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vinblastine, procarbazine and prednisone (CVPP: two courses) associated with extended field radiotherapy. Staging included neither laparotomy nor splenectomy (clinical staging). Treatment included neither splenic irradiation nor maintenance therapy. Complete remission was achieved for 98 patients and 11 of them recurred up to 94 months after treatment. Median follow-up of this controlled study is 13 years. Disease free survival (DFS) is 87% at 6 years and 84% at 10 and 15 years. Overall survival is 77% at 10 and 74% at 15 years. Disease specific survival is better (91% at 10 and 87% at 15 years) since only 38% (10/26) deaths were due to HD. The other deaths (16/26) with no evidence of HD were due to second cancer and intercurrent disease. Prognostic analysis of DFS by log-rank test gives significance to the following factors: contiguous extra-nodal involvement (P = 0.008), more than 3 involved sites (P 0.01), signs of compression (P = 0.02), clinical stage IIIA (P = 0.03), infradiaphragmatic stages I-II (P 0.04). The potential risk of secondary cancer is difficult to assess.

  16. SU-E-T-332: Dosimetric Impact of Photon Energy and Treatment Technique When Knowledge Based Auto-Planning Is Implemented in Radiotherapy of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Grow, A; Hayes, C; Balamucki, C [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Salmon, H; Thompson, M [Lake City Cancer Center, Lake City, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of the combination of photon energy and treatment technique on radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer when knowledge based planning was used. Methods: A total of 16 patients with localized prostate cancer were retrospectively retrieved from database and used for this study. For each patient, four types of treatment plans with different combinations of photon energy (6X and 10X) and treatment techniques (7-field IMRT and 2-arc VMAT) were created using a prostate DVH estimation model in RapidPlan™ and Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical System). For any beam arrangement, DVH objectives and weighting priorities were generated based on the geometric relationship between the OAR and PTV. Photon optimization algorithm was used for plan optimization and AAA algorithm was used for final dose calculation. Plans were evaluated in terms of the pre-defined dosimetric endpoints for PTV, rectum, bladder, penile bulb, and femur heads. A Student’s paired t-test was used for statistical analysis and p > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For PTV, V95 was statistically similar among all four types of plans, though the mean dose of 10X plans was higher than that of 6X plans. VMAT plans showed higher heterogeneity index than IMRT plans. No statistically significant difference in dosimetry metrics was observed for rectum, bladder, and penile bulb among plan types. For left and right femur, VMAT plans had a higher mean dose than IMRT plans regardless of photon energy, whereas the maximum dose was similar. Conclusion: Overall, the dosimetric endpoints were similar regardless of photon energy and treatment techniques when knowledge based auto planning was used. Given the similarity in dosimetry metrics of rectum, bladder, and penile bulb, the genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities should be comparable among the selections of photon energy and treatment techniques.

  17. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Wavelet-Based Quantum Field Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Altaisky

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The Euclidean quantum field theory for the fields $phi_{Delta x}(x$, which depend on both the position $x$ and the resolution $Delta x$, constructed in SIGMA 2 (2006, 046, on the base of the continuous wavelet transform, is considered. The Feynman diagrams in such a theory become finite under the assumption there should be no scales in internal lines smaller than the minimal of scales of external lines. This regularisation agrees with the existing calculations of radiative corrections to the electron magnetic moment. The transition from the newly constructed theory to a standard Euclidean field theory is achieved by integration over the scale arguments.

  19. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xuejun; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at developing an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on GPU. This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework [Gu et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97, 2009]. Dosimetric evaluations against MCSIM Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on 10 IMRT treatment plans with heterogeneous treatment regions (5 head-and-neck cases and 5 lung cases). For head and neck cases, when cavities exist near the target, the improvement with the 3D-density correction over the conventional FSPB algorithm is significant. However, when there are high-density dental filling materials in beam paths, the improvement is small and the accuracy of the new algorithm is still unsatisfactory. On the other hand, significant improvement of dose calculation accuracy is observed in all lung cases. Especially when the target is in the m...

  20. Feasibility Study of Automated Framework for Estimating Lung Tumor Locations for Target-Based Patient Positioning in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yoshidome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the feasibility of an automated framework for estimating the lung tumor locations for tumor-based patient positioning with megavolt-cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. Methods. A lung screening phantom and ten lung cancer cases with solid lung tumors, who were treated with SBRT, were employed to this study. The locations of tumors in MV-CBCT images were estimated using a tumor-template matching technique between a tumor template and the MV-CBCT. Tumor templates were produced by cropping the gross tumor volume (GTV regions, which were enhanced by a Sobel filter or a blob structure enhancement (BSE filter. Reference tumor locations (grand truth were determined based on a consensus between a radiation oncologist and a medical physicist. Results. According to the results of the phantom study, the average Euclidean distances of the location errors in the original, Sobel-filtered, and BSE-filtered images were 2.0 ± 4.1 mm, 12.8 ± 9.4 mm, and 0.4 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. For clinical cases, these were 3.4 ± 7.1 mm, 7.2 ± 11.6 mm, and 1.6 ± 1.2 mm, respectively. Conclusion. The feasibility study suggests that our proposed framework based on the BSE filter may be a useful tool for tumor-based patient positioning in SBRT.

  1. Electronic Support for Retrospective Analysis in the Field of Radiation Oncology: Proof of Principle Using an Example of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of 251 Meningioma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutzner, Sandra; Fietkau, Rainer; Ganslandt, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Lubgan, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the possible benefit of a clinical data warehouse (DWH) for retrospective analysis in the field of radiation oncology. We manually and electronically (using DWH) evaluated demographic, radiotherapy, and outcome data from 251 meningioma patients, who were irradiated from January 2002 to January 2015 at the Department of Radiation Oncology of the Erlangen University Hospital. Furthermore, we linked the Oncology Information System (OIS) MOSAIQ(®) to the DWH in order to gain access to irradiation data. We compared the manual and electronic data retrieval method in terms of congruence of data, corresponding time, and personal requirements (physician, physicist, scientific associate). The electronically supported data retrieval (DWH) showed an average of 93.9% correct data and significantly (p = 0.009) better result compared to manual data retrieval (91.2%). Utilizing a DWH enables the user to replace large amounts of manual activities (668 h), offers the ability to significantly reduce data collection time and labor demand (35 h), while simultaneously improving data quality. In our case, work time for manually data retrieval was 637 h for the scientific assistant, 26 h for the medical physicist, and 5 h for the physician (total 668 h). Our study shows that a DWH is particularly useful for retrospective analysis in the radiation oncology field. Routine clinical data for a large patient group can be provided ready for analysis to the scientist and data collection time can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, linking multiple data sources in a DWH offers the ability to improve data quality for retrospective analysis, and future research can be simplified.

  2. Dose response relationship in local radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Chul; Seong, Jin Sil; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Moon, Young Myoung; Song, Jae Seok; Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether dose response relation existed or not in local radiotherapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma. From January 1992 to March 2000, 158 patients were included in present study. Exclusion criteria included the presence of extrahepatic metastasis, liver cirrhosis of Child's class C, tumors occupying more than two thirds of the entire liver, and performance status on the ECOG scale of more than 3. Radiotherapy was given to the field including tumor with generous margin using 6, 10-MV X-ray. Mean tumor dose was 48.2{+-}7.9 Gy in daily 1.8 Gy fractions. Tumor response was based on diagnostic radiologic examinations such as CT scan, MR imaging, hepatic artery angiography at 4-8 weeks following completion of treatment. Statistical analysis was done to investigate the existence of dose response relationship of local radiotherapy when it was applied to the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. An objective response was observed in 106 of 158 patients, giving a response rate of 67. 1%. Statistical analysis revealed that total dose was the most significant factor in relation to tumor response when local radiotherapy was applied to the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Only 29.2% showed objective response in patients treated with dose less than 40 Gy, while 68.6% and 77.1 % showed major response in patients with 40-50 Gy and more than 50 Gy, respectively. Child-Pugh classification was significant factor in the development of ascites, overt radiation induced liver disease and gastroenteritis. Radiation dose was an important factor for development of radiation induced gastroduodenal ulcer. Present study showed the existence of dose response relationship in local radiotherapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Only radiotherapy dose was a significant factor to predict the objective response. Further study is required to predict the maximal tolerance dose in consideration of liver function and non

  3. Electron Conformal Radiotherapy for Post-Mastectomy Irradiation: A Bolus-Free, Multi-Energy, Multi-Segmented Field Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    The radiation oncologist outlines the PTV, which is the target area that will be treated with electrons . Figure 2 .2 shows a clinica l example of...post-mastectomy clinica l cases. These particular cases were previously treated using bolus ECT . After the segmented-field ECT plans were developed...size. This data was collected by the medica l physics staff at M . D. Anderson during the machine commissioning proces s for a linear accelerator . 19 3

  4. Fully automated treatment planning for head and neck radiotherapy using a voxel-based dose prediction and dose mimicking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Chris; Welch, Mattea; McNiven, Andrea; Jaffray, David A.; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2017-08-01

    Recent works in automated radiotherapy treatment planning have used machine learning based on historical treatment plans to infer the spatial dose distribution for a novel patient directly from the planning image. We present a probabilistic, atlas-based approach which predicts the dose for novel patients using a set of automatically selected most similar patients (atlases). The output is a spatial dose objective, which specifies the desired dose-per-voxel, and therefore replaces the need to specify and tune dose-volume objectives. Voxel-based dose mimicking optimization then converts the predicted dose distribution to a complete treatment plan with dose calculation using a collapsed cone convolution dose engine. In this study, we investigated automated planning for right-sided oropharaynx head and neck patients treated with IMRT and VMAT. We compare four versions of our dose prediction pipeline using a database of 54 training and 12 independent testing patients by evaluating 14 clinical dose evaluation criteria. Our preliminary results are promising and demonstrate that automated methods can generate comparable dose distributions to clinical. Overall, automated plans achieved an average of 0.6% higher dose for target coverage evaluation criteria, and 2.4% lower dose at the organs at risk criteria levels evaluated compared with clinical. There was no statistically significant difference detected in high-dose conformity between automated and clinical plans as measured by the conformation number. Automated plans achieved nine more unique criteria than clinical across the 12 patients tested and automated plans scored a significantly higher dose at the evaluation limit for two high-risk target coverage criteria and a significantly lower dose in one critical organ maximum dose. The novel dose prediction method with dose mimicking can generate complete treatment plans in 12-13 min without user interaction. It is a promising approach for fully automated treatment

  5. Less increase of CT-based calcium scores of the coronary arteries : Effect three years after breast-conserving radiotherapy using breath-hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, M E; Heijenbrok, M W; van Kempen-Harteveld, M L; Petoukhova, A L; Scholten, A N; Wolterbeek, R; Schreur, J H M; Struikmans, H

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores determined before the start of whole breast irradiation with those determined 3 years afterwards. Changes in CAC scores were analysed in 99 breast cancer patients. Three groups were compared: patients receiving left- and right-sided radiotherapy, and those receiving left-sided radiotherapy with breath-hold. We analysed overall CAC scores and left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) CAC scores. Between the three groups, changes of the value of the LAD minus the RCA CAC scores of each individual patient were also compared. Three years after breath-hold-based whole breast irradiation, a less pronounced increase of CAC scores was noted. Furthermore, LAD minus RCA scores in patients treated for left-sided breast cancer without breath-hold were higher when compared to LAD minus RCA scores of patients with right-sided breast cancers and those with left-sided breast cancer treated with breath-hold. Breath-hold in breast-conserving radiotherapy leads to a less pronounced increase of CT-based CAC scores. Therefore, breath-hold probably prevents the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. However, the sample size of this study is limited and the follow-up period relatively short.

  6. Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease after Involved Node Radiotherapy versus Mantle Field for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan Storgaard; Aznar, Marianne C; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per;

    2012-01-01

    mantle field (MF) technique. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We included all adolescents and young adults with supradiaphragmatic, clinical Stage I-II HL treated at our institution from 2006 to 2010 (29 patients). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and INRT to 30 to 36 Gy. We then simulated a MF plan...... were significantly lower for INRT than for MF treatment. However, the range in doses with INRT treatment was substantial, and for a subgroup of patients, with lymphoma below the fourth thoracic vertebrae, we estimated a 25-year absolute excess risk of any cardiac event of as much as 5.1%. CONCLUSIONS...

  7. SU-E-J-39: Dosimetric Benefit of Implanted Marker-Based CBCT Setup for Definitive Prostatic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, H; Wu, Z; Bluemenfeld, P; Chu, J; Wang, D [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Daily setup for definitive prostatic radiotherapy is challenged by suboptimal visibility of the prostate boundary and daily variation of rectum shape and position. For patients with improved bowel preparation, we conducted a dosimetric comparison between prostate implanted marker (IM)-based daily setup and anterior rectal wall (ARW)-based setup, with the hypothesis that the former leads to adequate target coverage with better rectal sparing. Methods Five IMRT/VMAT prostate cases with implanted markers were selected for analysis. Daily CBCT showed improvement of the rectal volume compared to planning CT. For each patient, the prostate and rectum were contoured on three CBCT images (fraction 5/15/25) with subsequent physician review. The CBCTs were then registered to a planning CT using IM-based registration. The deviation of ARW positions from planning CT to CBCT were analyzed at various sup-inf levels (−1.8 cm to 1.8 cm from level of prostate center). To estimate the potential dosimetric impact from ARW-based setup, the treatment plans were recalculated using A-P shifts ranging from −1mm to +6mm. Clinically important rectum DVH values including Dmax, D3cc and Dmean were computed. Results For the studied patients, we observed on average 32% rectum volume reduction from planning CT to CBCT. As a Results, the ARW on average shifts posteriorly by −1mm to +5mm, depending on the sup-inf level of observation, with larger shifts observed at more superior levels. Recalculation shows that when ARW shifts 1mm posteriorly, ARW-based CBCT setup leads to a 1.0%, 4.2%, and 3.2% increase in rectum Dmax, D3cc, and Dmean, respectively, compared to IM-based setup. The dosimetric deviations increase to 4.7%, 25.8% and 24.7% when ARW shifts 6mm posteriorly. No significant prostate-only dose difference was observed. Conclusion For patients with improved bowel preparation, IM-based CBCT setup leads to accurate prostate coverage along with significantly lower rectal dose

  8. SU-E-T-206: Improving Radiotherapy Toxicity Based On Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Daniel D; Wernicke, A Gabriella; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, KSC; Parashar, Bhupesh; Chang, Jenghwa [Weill Cornell Medical College, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study is to build the estimator of toxicity using artificial neural network (ANN) for head and neck cancer patients Materials/Methods: An ANN can combine variables into a predictive model during training and considered all possible correlations of variables. We constructed an ANN based on the data from 73 patients with advanced H and N cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy at our institution. For the toxicity estimator we defined input data including age, sex, site, stage, pathology, status of chemo, technique of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), length of treatment, dose of EBRT, status of post operation, length of follow-up, the status of local recurrences and distant metastasis. These data were digitized based on the significance and fed to the ANN as input nodes. We used 20 hidden nodes (for the 13 input nodes) to take care of the correlations of input nodes. For training ANN, we divided data into three subsets such as training set, validation set and test set. Finally, we built the estimator for the toxicity from ANN output. Results: We used 13 input variables including the status of local recurrences and distant metastasis and 20 hidden nodes for correlations. 59 patients for training set, 7 patients for validation set and 7 patients for test set and fed the inputs to Matlab neural network fitting tool. We trained the data within 15% of errors of outcome. In the end we have the toxicity estimation with 74% of accuracy. Conclusion: We proved in principle that ANN can be a very useful tool for predicting the RT outcomes for high risk H and N patients. Currently we are improving the results using cross validation.

  9. Adjuvant therapy after resection of brain metastases. Frameless image-guided LINAC-based radiosurgery and stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemme, J.; Aebersold, D.M.; Pica, A. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Abu-Isa, J.; Beck, J.; Raabe, A. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Neurosurgery; Kottke, R.; Wiest, R. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Neuroradiology; Malthaner, M.; Schmidhalter, D. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Medical Radiation Physics

    2013-09-15

    Background: Tumor bed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after resection of brain metastases is a new strategy to delay or avoid whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) and its associated toxicities. This retrospective study analyzes results of frameless image-guided linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS and stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy (SHRT) as adjuvant treatment without WBRT. Materials and methods: Between March 2009 and February 2012, 44 resection cavities in 42 patients were treated with SRS (23 cavities) or SHRT (21 cavities). All treatments were delivered using a stereotactic LINAC. All cavities were expanded by {>=} 2 mm in all directions to create the clinical target volume (CTV). Results: The median planning target volume (PTV) for SRS was 11.1 cm{sup 3}. The median dose prescribed to the PTV margin for SRS was 17 Gy. Median PTV for SHRT was 22.3 cm{sup 3}. The fractionation schemes applied were: 4 fractions of 6 Gy (5 patients), 6 fractions of 4 Gy (6 patients) and 10 fractions of 4 Gy (10 patients). Median follow-up was 9.6 months. Local control (LC) rates after 6 and 12 months were 91 and 77 %, respectively. No statistically significant differences in LC rates between SRS and SHRT treatments were observed. Distant brain control (DBC) rates at 6 and 12 months were 61 and 33 %, respectively. Overall survival (OS) at 6 and 12 months was 87 and 63.5 %, respectively, with a median OS of 15.9 months. One patient treated by SRS showed symptoms of radionecrosis, which was confirmed histologically. Conclusion: Frameless image-guided LINAC-based adjuvant SRS and SHRT are effective and well tolerated local treatment strategies after resection of brain metastases in patients with oligometastatic disease. (orig.)

  10. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [German] Das Potenzial der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) soll im Rahmen der FDG-PET basierten Bestrahlungsplanung des lokal fortgeschrittenen nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (LA-NSCLC) fuer 2 Zielvolumenansaetze (Involved-Field-Bestrahlung, IF) sowie elektive Nodalbestrahlung (ENI) geprueft und mit der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3-D

  11. Grounded theory for radiotherapy practitioners: Informing clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, N.A., E-mail: Nadia.Walsh@gstt.nhs.u [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Radiotherapy practitioners may be best placed to undertake qualitative research within the context of cancer, due to specialist knowledge of radiation treatment and sensitivity to radiotherapy patient's needs. The grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis is a unique method of identifying a theory directly based on data collected within a clinical context. Research for radiotherapy practitioners is integral to role expansion within the government's directive for evidence-based practice. Due to the paucity of information on qualitative research undertaken by radiotherapy radiographers, this article aims to assess the potential impact of qualitative research on radiotherapy patient and service outcomes.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of standard radiotherapy field borders in patients with uterine cervix cancer;Ressonancia magnetica para avaliacao dos limites dos campos classicos de radioterapia em pacientes portadoras de neoplasia maligna de colo uterino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Geison Moreira; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo, E-mail: segreto.dmed@epm.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil). Unit of Radioterapy; Ribalta, Julisa Chamorro Lascasas [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Gynecology

    2010-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate, by means of magnetic resonance imaging, the standardized field borders in radiotherapy for malignant neoplasm of uterine cervix, and to determine the role of this method in the reduction of possible planning errors related to the conventional technique. Materials and methods: magnetic resonance imaging studies for planning of treatment of 51 patients with uterine cervix cancer were retrospectively analyzed. The parameters assessed were the anterior and posterior field borders on sagittal section. Results: The anterior field border was inappropriate in 20 (39.2%) patients and geographic miss was observed in 37.3% of cases in the posterior border. The inappropriateness of both field borders did not correlate with clinical parameters such as patients' age, tumor staging, histological type and degree. Conclusion: the evaluation of standardized field borders with the use of magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated high indices of inappropriateness of the lateral field borders, as well as the relevant role of magnetic resonance imaging in the radiotherapy planning for patients with uterine cervix cancer with a view to reduce the occurrence of geographic miss of the target volume. (author)

  13. Magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087244; Arpaia, Pasquale

    This thesis presents a magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils. The requirements, the architecture, the conceptual design, and the prototype for straight magnets were shown. The proposed system is made up of a rotating coil transducer and a train-like system for longitudinal motion and positioning inside magnet bore. The mapper allows a localized measurement of magnetic fields and the variation of the harmonic multipole content in the magnet ends. The proof-of-principle demonstration and the experimental characterization of the rotating-coil transducer specifically conceived for mapping validated the main objective of satisfying the magnetic measurement needs of the next generation of compact accelerators.

  14. Integrating geriatric assessment into decision-making after prostatectomy: adjuvant radiotherapy, salvage radiotherapy, or none?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore eGoineau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite current advancements in the field, management of older prostate cancer patients still remains a big challenge for Geriatric Oncology. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (ISGO has recently updated its recommendations in this area, and these have been widely adopted, notably by the European Association of Urology. This article outlines the principles which should be observed in the management of elderly patients who have recently undergone prostatectomy for malignancy or with a biochemical relapse following prostatectomy. Further therapeutic intervention should not be considered in those patients who are classified as frail in the geriatric assessment. In patients presenting better health conditions, salvage radiotherapy is to be preferred to adjuvant radiotherapy, which is only indicated in certain exceptional cases. Radiotherapy of the operative bed presents a higher risk to the elderly. Additionally, hormone therapy clearly shows higher side effects in older patients and therefore it should not be administered to asymptomatic patients. We propose a decision tree based on the ISGO recommendations, with specific modifications for patients in biochemical relapse.

  15. Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy versus exclusive radiotherapy in high-risk cervical cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng XY

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Yu Meng,1,* Yi Liao,2,* Xiao-Ping Liu,3 Sheng Li,1 Ming-Jun Shi,4 Xian-Tao Zeng11Center for Evidence-Based and Translational Medicine, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, GuangZhou Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Hematology and Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China; 4Institut Curie, Paris Sciences et Lettres Research University, Le Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Les Unités Mixtes de Recherche 144, F-75005, Paris, France*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (DDP-CCRT in patients with high-risk cervical carcinoma (CC compared with exclusive radiotherapy (RT.Materials and methods: Databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs and cohort studies comparing DDP-CCRT with RT alone. Risk of bias assessment for RCTs was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool, and the Newcastle–Ottawa quality scale was used to perform quality assessment for cohort studies. Meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5 and Stata 12.0 software.Results: Finally, eight RCTs and three cohort studies containing 2,130 subjects were included. Analysis on total failures revealed a statistically significant difference in favor of DDP-CCRT (risk ratio =0.77, 95% confidence intervals [CIs]: 0.67–0.89. No significant heterogeneity was detected for pooled analysis concerning overall survival; the result of which demonstrated the superiority of DDP-CCRT over RT alone (hazard ratio =0.68, 95% CI: 0.57–0.80, and stable and established accumulative effects were observed in cumulative meta-analysis. Similar results were observed for progression-free survival (hazard ratio =0.63, 95% CI: 0.50–0.76. In terms of

  16. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for skull base tumors: analysis of treatment accuracy using a stereotactic mask fixation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagnoli Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT using a stereotactic mask fixation system. Patients and Methods Sixteen patients treated with FSRT were involved in the study. A commercial stereotactic mask fixation system (BrainLAB AG was used for patient immobilization. Serial CT scans obtained before and during FSRT were used to assess the accuracy of patient immobilization by comparing the isocenter position. Daily portal imaging were acquired to establish day to day patient position variation. Displacement errors along the different directions were calculated as combination of systematic and random errors. Results The mean isocenter displacements based on localization and verification CT imaging were 0.1 mm (SD 0.3 mm in the lateral direction, 0.1 mm (SD 0.4 mm in the anteroposterior, and 0.3 mm (SD 0.4 mm in craniocaudal direction. The mean 3D displacement was 0.5 mm (SD 0.4 mm, being maximum 1.4 mm. No significant differences were found during the treatment (P = 0.4. The overall isocenter displacement as calculated by 456 anterior and lateral portal images were 0.3 mm (SD 0.9 mm in the mediolateral direction, -0.2 mm (SD 1 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 0.2 mm (SD 1.1 mm in the craniocaudal direction. The largest displacement of 2.7 mm was seen in the cranio-caudal direction, with 95% of displacements Conclusions The results indicate that the setup error of the presented mask system evaluated by CT verification scans and portal imaging are minimal. Reproducibility of the isocenter position is in the best range of positioning reproducibility reported for other stereotactic systems.

  17. Repeatability of dose painting by numbers treatment planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Marcel A.; Steenbergen, Peter; Viet Dinh, Cuong; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; van Houdt, Petra J.; Pos, Floris J.; Heijmink, Stijn W. T. J. P.; van der Poel, Henk G.; Renisch, Steffen; Vik, Torbjørn; van der Heide, Uulke A.

    2017-07-01

    Dose painting by numbers (DPBN) refers to a voxel-wise prescription of radiation dose modelled from functional image characteristics, in contrast to dose painting by contours which requires delineations to define the target for dose escalation. The direct relation between functional imaging characteristics and DPBN implies that random variations in images may propagate into the dose distribution. The stability of MR-only prostate cancer treatment planning based on DPBN with respect to these variations is as yet unknown. We conducted a test-retest study to investigate the stability of DPBN for prostate cancer in a semi-automated MR-only treatment planning workflow. Twelve patients received a multiparametric MRI on two separate days prior to prostatectomy. The tumor probability (TP) within the prostate was derived from image features with a logistic regression model. Dose mapping functions were applied to acquire a DPBN prescription map that served to generate an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan. Dose calculations were done on a pseudo-CT derived from the MRI. The TP and DPBN map and the IMRT dose distribution were compared between both MRI sessions, using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) to quantify repeatability of the planning pipeline. The quality of each treatment plan was measured with a quality factor (QF). Median ICC values for the TP and DPBN map and the IMRT dose distribution were 0.82, 0.82 and 0.88, respectively, for linear dose mapping and 0.82, 0.84 and 0.94 for square root dose mapping. A median QF of 3.4% was found among all treatment plans. We demonstrated the stability of DPBN radiotherapy treatment planning in prostate cancer, with excellent overall repeatability and acceptable treatment plan quality. Using validated tumor probability modelling and simple dose mapping techniques it was shown that despite day-to-day variations in imaging data still consistent treatment plans were obtained.

  18. Incorporating GSA-SPECT into CT-based dose-volume histograms for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shintaro; Shirai; Morio; Sato; Yasutaka; Noda; Yoshitaka; Kumayama; Noritaka; Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography-based three-dimensional radiotherapy(SPECT-B-3DCRT), im-ages of Tc-99 m galactosyl human serum albumin(GSA), which bind to receptors on functional liver cells, are merged with the computed tomography simulation im-ages. Functional liver is defined as the area of normal liver where GSA accumulation exceeds that of hepato-cellular carcinoma(HCC). In cirrhotic patients with a gigantic, proton-beam-untreatable HCC of ≥ 14 cm in diameter, the use of SPECT-B-3DCRT in combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization achieved a 2-year local tumor control rate of 78.6% and a 2-year survival rate of 33.3%. SPECT-B-3DCRT was applied to HCC to preserve as much functional liver as possible. Sixty-four patients with HCC, including 30 with Child B liver cirrhosis, received SPECT-B-3DCRT and none ex-perienced fatal radiation-induced liver disease(RILD). The Child-Pugh score deteriorated by 1 or 2 in > 20% of functional liver volume that was irradiated with ≥ 20 Gy. The deterioration in the Child-Pugh score decreased when the radiation plan was designed to irradiate ≤ 20% of the functional liver volume in patients givendoses of ≥ 20 Gy(FLV20Gy). Therefore, FLV20 Gy ≤ 20% may represent a safety index to prevent RILD during 3DCRT for HCC. To supplement FLV20 Gy as a qualitative index, we propose a quantitative indicator, F 20 Gy, which was calculated as F 20 Gy = 100% ×(the GSA count in the area irradiated with ≥ 20 Gy)/(the GSA count in the whole liver).

  19. A study of image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer based on lipiodol injection in the bladder wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soendergaard, Jimmi; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Elstroem, Ulrik Vindelev; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)), E-mail: jimmsoen@rm.dk; Oerding Olsen, Kasper (Dept. of Urology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    Purpose. We have tested a procedure of focal injection of the contrast medium Lipiodol as a fiducial marker for image-guided boost of the tumor in bladder cancer radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we have evaluated the feasibility and the safety of the method as well as the inter- and intra-fraction shift of the bladder tumor. Materials and methods. Five patients with muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer were included in the study. Lipiodol was injected during flexible cystoscopy into the submucosa of the bladder wall at the periphery of the tumor or the post resection tumor-bed. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired daily throughout the course of RT. Results. Lipiodol demarcation of the bladder tumor was feasible and safe with only a minimum of side effects related to the procedure. The Lipiodol spots were visible on CT and CBCT scans for the duration of the RT course. More than half of all the treatment fractions required a geometric shift of 5 mm or more to match on the Lipiodol spots. The mean intra-fraction shift (3D) of the tumor was 3 mm, largest in the anterior-posterior and cranial-caudal directions. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that Lipiodol can be injected into the bladder mucosa and subsequently visualized on CT and CBCT as a fiducial marker. The relatively large inter-fraction shifts in the positions of Lipiodol spots compared to the intra-fraction movement indicates that image-guided RT based on radio-opaque markers is important for RT of the bladder cancer tumor.

  20. Validation of fully automated VMAT plan generation for library-based plan-of-the-day cervical cancer radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W.M. Sharfo (Abdul Wahab M.); S. Breedveld (Sebastiaan); P.W.J. Voet (Peter W.J.); S.T. Heijkoop (Sabrina); J.W.M. Mens (Jan); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa); B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To develop and validate fully automated generation of VMAT plan-libraries for plan-of-the-day adaptive radiotherapy in locally-advanced cervical cancer. Material and Methods: Our framework for fully automated treatment plan generation (Erasmus-iCycle) was adapted to create dual-

  1. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  2. Outcome of radiotherapy in T1 glottic carcinoma: A population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.V. Sjögren (Elisabeth); R.G.J. Wiggenraad (Ruud); S. le Cessie (Saskia); S. Snijder (Simone); J. Pomp (Jaqueline); R.J.B. de Jong

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe evaluated the radiation outcome and prognostic factors in a population-based study of early (T1N0M0) glottic carcinoma. Survival parameters and prognostic factors were evaluated by uni- and multivariate analysis in 316 consecutive irradiated patients with T1 glottic carcinoma in the C

  3. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena [Rigshospitalet Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Depts. of Oncology and Haematology; Yahalom, Joachim (eds.) [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  4. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.

    2008-01-01

    distortion within radial distances below 12 cm (2% are observed in low dose areas. Monte Carlo simulations with 4 MV photons show large deviations in dose (>2%) just behind the skull if bone is not segmented. Conclusions: It is feasible to use an MR...... patients with brain tumours are both CT and MR scanned and the defined tumour volumes are compared. Image distortions and dose calculations based on CT density correction, MR unit density and MR bulk density, bone segmentation are performed. Monte Carlo simulations using 4 and 8 MV beams on homogeneous...... and bone segmented mediums are performed. Results: Mean MR and CT tumour volumes of approximately the same size ((V-MR) over bar = 55 +/- 34 cm(3) and (V-CT) over bar = 51 +/- 32 cm(3)) are observed, but for individual patients, small intersection volumes are observed. The MR images show negligible...

  5. Development and evaluation of a clinical model for lung cancer patients using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) within a knowledge-based algorithm for treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Karen Chin; Kim, Jinkoo; Reding, Anne; Fraser, Corey; Gordon, James; Ajlouni, Munther; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J

    2016-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development of a clinical model for lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) within a knowledge-based algorithm for treatment planning, and to evaluate the model performance and applicability to different planning techniques, tumor locations, and beam arrangements. 105 SBRT plans for lung cancer patients previously treated at our institution were included in the development of the knowledge-based model (KBM). The KBM was trained with a combination of IMRT, VMAT, and 3D CRT techniques. Model performance was validated with 25 cases, for both IMRT and VMAT. The full KBM encompassed lesions located centrally vs. peripherally (43:62), upper vs. lower (62:43), and anterior vs. posterior (60:45). Four separate sub-KBMs were created based on tumor location. Results were compared with the full KBM to evaluate its robustness. Beam templates were used in conjunction with the optimizer to evaluate the model's ability to handle suboptimal beam placements. Dose differences to organs-at-risk (OAR) were evaluated between the plans gener-ated by each KBM. Knowledge-based plans (KBPs) were comparable to clinical plans with respect to target conformity and OAR doses. The KBPs resulted in a lower maximum spinal cord dose by 1.0 ± 1.6 Gy compared to clinical plans, p = 0.007. Sub-KBMs split according to tumor location did not produce significantly better DVH estimates compared to the full KBM. For central lesions, compared to the full KBM, the peripheral sub-KBM resulted in lower dose to 0.035 cc and 5 cc of the esophagus, both by 0.4Gy ± 0.8Gy, p = 0.025. For all lesions, compared to the full KBM, the posterior sub-KBM resulted in higher dose to 0.035 cc, 0.35 cc, and 1.2 cc of the spinal cord by 0.2 ± 0.4Gy, p = 0.01. Plans using template beam arrangements met target and OAR criteria, with an increase noted in maximum heart dose (1.2 ± 2.2Gy, p = 0.01) and GI (0.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.01) for the nine-field

  6. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  7. Uniformity of Dose Distribution in Target Volume in Radiotherapy Techniques for Breast after Mastectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Pashton shayesteh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Radiotherapy has a very special significance in the treatment of cancer. Beam radiation therapy using photons and electrons produced by a linear accelerator is used extensively in the treatment of breast Cancer. In this article, In addition to providing a description of three techniques of radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer, has been Evaluating the effectiveness of this method in the base of uniformity of the dose distribution in the target volume in breast cancer as an important factor in the effectiveness of treatment by radiation.Materials & Methods: Photon, electron and arc Techniques in radiotherapy have been implemented practically using phantom trunk and EDRII films. At the time of practical Techniques, films were placed between the slice of the phantom and were irradiated under selected conditions and the data of these images are analyzed by MATLAB software.Results: Studies show that as a result of using adjacent fields in whole radiotherapy techniques, Parts of the target volume received dose twice or more than the prescribed dose. Meanwhile, by the photon dose technique, rate of receiving dose is more uniform and closer to the prescribed dose.Conclusion: According to scientific studies done by different protocols in breast radiotherapy, tangential photon technique has very less overlap of the field by comparison to other methods and more uniform dose distribution than the prescribed dose .In The base of this research results can be announced the photon techniques in breast cancer treatment was preferred over other methods.

  8. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU's shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  9. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU’s shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  10. SU-E-J-154: Deformable Image Registration Based Delivered Dose Estimation for Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Chetvertkov, M; Gordon, J; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I; Kim, J [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate the accumulated dose to targets and organs at risk (OAR) for head and neck (H'N) radiotherapy using 3 deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: Five H'N patients, who had daily CBCTs taken during the course of treatment, were retrospectively studied. All plans had 5 mm CTV-to-PTV expansions. To overcome the small field of view (FOV) limitations and HU uncertainties of CBCTs, CT images were deformably registered using a parameter-optimized B-spline DIR algorithm (Elastix, elastix.isi.uu.nl) and resampled onto each CBCT with a 4 cm uniform FOV expansion. The dose of the day was calculated on these resampled CT images. Calculated daily dose matrices were warped and accumulated to the planning CT using 3 DIR algorithms; SmartAdapt (Eclipse/Varian), Velocity (Velocity Medical Solutions), and Elastix. Dosimetric indices for targets and OARs were determined from the DVHs and compared with corresponding planned quantities. Results: The cumulative dose deviation was less than 2%, on average, for PTVs from the corresponding plan dose, for all algorithms/patients. However, the parotids show as much as a 37% deviation from the intended dose, possibly due to significant patient weight loss during the first 3 weeks of treatment (15.3 lbs in this case). The mean(±SD) cumulative dose deviations of the 5 patients estimated using the 3 algorithms (SmartAdapt, Velocity, and Elastix) were (0.8±0.9%, 0.5±0.9%, 0.6±1.3%) for PTVs, (1.6±1.9%, 1.4±2.0%, 1.7±1.9%) for GTVs, (10.4±12.1%, 10.7±10.6%, 6.5±10.1%) for parotid glands, and (4.5±4.6%, 3.4±5.7%, 3.9±5.7%) for mucosa, respectively. The differences among the three DIR algorithms in the estimated cumulative mean doses (1SD (in Gy)) were: 0.1 for PTVs, 0.1 for GTVs, 1.9 for parotid glands, and 0.4 for mucosa. Conclusion: Results of this study are suggestive that more frequent plan adaptation for organs, such as the parotid glands, might be beneficial during the course of H

  11. Wide tangential fields including the internal mammary lymph nodes in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Influence of respiratory-controlled radiotherapy (4D-CT) on cardiac exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stranzl, Heidi; Zurl, Brigitte; Langsenlehner, Tanja; Kapp, Karin S. [University Medical School, Graz (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiotherapy and Oncology

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of wide-tangent fields including the internal mammary chain during deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy in patients with left-sided breast cancer on cardiac exposure. Patients and Methods: Eleven patients with left-sided breast cancer were irradiated postoperatively and underwent CT scans during free breathing and DIBH. For scientific interest only, treatment plans were calculated consisting of wide tangents including the ipsilateral mammary lymph nodes using both, the free breathing and respiratory-controlled CT scan. The resulting dose-volume histograms were compared for irradiated volumes and doses to organs at risk. Results: The mean patient age was 51 years (range: 37-65 years). Radiotherapy using wide tangents with DIBH as compared to free breathing led to a significantly lower cardiac exposure. Mean irradiated heart volumes ({>=} 20 Gy) were 14 cm{sup 3} (range: 0-51.3 cm{sup 3}) versus 35 cm{sup 3} (range: 2.1-78.7 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.01). For eight patients, DIBH reduced irradiated relative lung volume, while in three patients, the lung volume slightly increased. Conclusion: Radiation exposure of organs at risk can significantly be reduced for breast cancer patients using the DIBH technique. If radiotherapy of the internal mammary lymph nodes is considered necessary, DIBH may be the preferable technique. (orig.)

  12. A GEM-based dose imaging detector with optical readout for proton radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyachko, A.V., E-mail: aklyachk@indiana.edu [Indiana University Cyclotron Operations, Indiana University Integrated Science and Accelerator Technology Hall, 2401 Milo. B. Sampson Ln., Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Moskvin, V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Nichiporov, D.F.; Solberg, K.A. [Indiana University Cyclotron Operations, Indiana University Integrated Science and Accelerator Technology Hall, 2401 Milo. B. Sampson Ln., Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    New techniques in proton radiation therapy and advances in beam delivery systems design such as beam scanning require accurate 2D dosimetry systems to verify the delivered dose distribution. Dose imaging detectors based on gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are capable of providing high sensitivity, improved dose measurement linearity, position resolution, fast response and accurate characterization of depth-dose distributions. In this work, we report on the development of a GEM-based dose imaging detector with optical readout using a CCD camera. A 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} detector has been tested in a 205 MeV proton beam in single- and double-GEM configurations. The detector demonstrates linearity in dose rate up to 100 Gy/min and position resolution ({sigma}) of 0.42 mm. Transverse non-uniformity of the detector response is {<=}10% before correction and the stability of the detector output throughout the day is within {+-}1%, with day-to-day reproducibility of about 10%. The depth-dose response of the detector is close to that of a wide-aperture air-filled ionization chamber and is in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Atlas-based segmentation in breast cancer radiotherapy: Evaluation of specific and generic-purpose atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardo, Delia; Gerardi, Marianna Alessandra; Vigorito, Sabrina; Morra, Anna; Dell'acqua, Veronica; Diaz, Federico Javier; Cattani, Federica; Zaffino, Paolo; Ricotti, Rosalinda; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Riboldi, Marco; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2017-04-01

    Atlas-based automatic segmentation (ABAS) addresses the challenges of accuracy and reliability in manual segmentation. We aim to evaluate the contribution of specific-purpose in ABAS of breast cancer (BC) patients with respect to generic-purpose libraries. One generic-purpose and 9 specific-purpose libraries, stratified according to type of surgery and size of thorax circumference, were obtained from the computed tomography of 200 BC patients. Keywords about contralateral breast volume and presence of breast expander/prostheses were recorded. ABAS was validated on 47 independent patients, considering manual segmentation from scratch as reference. Five ABAS datasets were obtained, testing single-ABAS and multi-ABAS with simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Center of mass distance (CMD), average Hausdorff distance (AHD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between corresponding ABAS and manual structures were evaluated and statistically significant differences between different surgeries, structures and ABAS strategies were investigated. Statistically significant differences between patients who underwent different surgery were found, with superior results for conservative-surgery group, and between different structures were observed: ABAS of heart, lungs, kidneys and liver was satisfactory (median values: CMDbreast and spinal cord obtained moderate performance (median values: 2 mm ≤ CMDbreast ABAS. The homogeneity in the selection of atlases based on multiple anatomical and clinical features and the use of specific-purpose libraries can improve ABAS performance with respect to generic-purpose libraries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 鼻咽癌常规放疗面颈联合野照射的剂量学研究%Dose evaluation of conventional radiotherapy using facial-cervical fields in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦新; 李素艳; 罗京伟; 章众; 徐国镇; 高黎; 戴建荣; 易俊林; 黄晓东; 肖建平

    2009-01-01

    carcinoma were treated by conventional radiotherapy as their primary treatment. All patients were simulated by the conventional simulator and the field borders were marked with thin lead wires on the mask. Then the patients were scanned by the CT-sim with the same immobilization. The planning CT images were transferred to the TPS and the field borders were copied on the DRR, and then GTV and the cranial base were contoured on the coronal CT slices. Two isoeenters were chosen, including one in front of the 1 st cervical vertebra to measeure the depth of the nasopharynx and the other in front of the 3rd cervical vertebra to measure the depth of the upper neck. The prescription dose of 36 Gy was given in 18 fractions. Dose distributions of GTV and the cranial base were calculated with TPS. Results The actual dose of 95% volume of GTV was 33.31 -35.54 Gy (median 34.83 Gy) and 31.43 -33.36 Gy (median 32.44 Gy) when the isoeenters were set in the nasopharynx and the superior neck, respectively. The corre-sponding actual dose of 95% volume of the cranial base was 17.76 - 34.60 Gy ( median 30.28 Gy ) and 16.52 -32.60 Gy (median 28.52 Gy), respectively. Conclusions For NPC patients treated with conven-tional radiotherapy using facial-cervical fields, the actual dose of GTV and the cranial base is lower than the prescribed dose whenever the isocenter is set in the nasopharynx or the upper neck,which is more significant in the latter. The isocenter should be set in the nasopharynx when the conventional radiotherapy is applied and a boost of 4- 8 Gy should be given when the cranial base is involved.

  15. A moment-based approach for DVH-guided radiotherapy treatment plan optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarepisheh, M.; Shakourifar, M.; Trigila, G.; Ghomi, P. S.; Couzens, S.; Abebe, A.; Noreña, L.; Shang, W.; Jiang, Steve B.; Zinchenko, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The dose-volume histogram (DVH) is a clinically relevant criterion to evaluate the quality of a treatment plan. It is hence desirable to incorporate DVH constraints into treatment plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Yet, the direct inclusion of the DVH constraints into a treatment plan optimization model typically leads to great computational difficulties due to the non-convex nature of these constraints. To overcome this critical limitation, we propose a new convex-moment-based optimization approach. Our main idea is to replace the non-convex DVH constraints by a set of convex moment constraints. In turn, the proposed approach is able to generate a Pareto-optimal plan whose DVHs are close to, or if possible even outperform, the desired DVHs. In particular, our experiment on a prostate cancer patient case demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach by employing two and three moment formulations to approximate the desired DVHs.

  16. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: Improving target volume delineation

    CERN Document Server

    Unkelbach, Jan; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma are known to infiltrate the brain parenchyma instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In clinical practice, a uniform margin is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth: Anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain...

  17. Assessment of target volume doses in radiotherapy based on the standard and measured calibration curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Fallah Mohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In radiation treatments, estimation of the dose distribution in the target volume is one of the main components of the treatment planning procedure. To estimate the dose distribution, the information of electron densities is necessary. The standard curves determined by computed tomography (CT scanner that may be different from that of other oncology centers. In this study, the changes of dose calculation due to the different calibration curves (HU-ρel were investigated. Materials and Methods: Dose values were calculated based on the standard calibration curve that was predefined for the treatment planning system (TPS. The calibration curve was also extracted from the CT images of the phantom, and dose values were calculated based on this curve. The percentage errors of the calculated values were determined. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analyses of the mean differences were performed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for both of the calibration curves. Results and Discussion: The results show no significant difference for both of the measured and standard calibration curves (HU-ρel in 6, 15, and 18 MeV energies. In Wilcoxon ranked sum nonparametric test for independent samples with P < 0.05, the equality of monitor units for both of the curves to transfer 200 cGy doses to reference points was resulted. The percentage errors of the calculated values were lower than 2% and 1.5% in 6 and 15 MeV, respectively. Conclusion: From the results, it could be concluded that the standard calibration curve could be used in TPS dose calculation accurately.

  18. SU-F-BRB-10: A Statistical Voxel Based Normal Organ Dose Prediction Model for Coplanar and Non-Coplanar Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, A; Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Woods, K; Low, D; Sheng, K [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Knowledge learned from previous plans can be used to guide future treatment planning. Existing knowledge-based treatment planning methods study the correlation between organ geometry and dose volume histogram (DVH), which is a lossy representation of the complete dose distribution. A statistical voxel dose learning (SVDL) model was developed that includes the complete dose volume information. Its accuracy of predicting volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and non-coplanar 4π radiotherapy was quantified. SVDL provided more isotropic dose gradients and may improve knowledge-based planning. Methods: 12 prostate SBRT patients originally treated using two full-arc VMAT techniques were re-planned with 4π using 20 intensity-modulated non-coplanar fields to a prescription dose of 40 Gy. The bladder and rectum voxels were binned based on their distances to the PTV. The dose distribution in each bin was resampled by convolving to a Gaussian kernel, resulting in 1000 data points in each bin that predicted the statistical dose information of a voxel with unknown dose in a new patient without triaging information that may be collectively important to a particular patient. We used this method to predict the DVHs, mean and max doses in a leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) test and compared its performance against lossy estimators including mean, median, mode, Poisson and Rayleigh of the voxelized dose distributions. Results: SVDL predicted the bladder and rectum doses more accurately than other estimators, giving mean percentile errors ranging from 13.35–19.46%, 4.81–19.47%, 22.49–28.69%, 23.35–30.5%, 21.05–53.93% for predicting mean, max dose, V20, V35, and V40 respectively, to OARs in both planning techniques. The prediction errors were generally lower for 4π than VMAT. Conclusion: By employing all dose volume information in the SVDL model, the OAR doses were more accurately predicted. 4π plans are better suited for knowledge-based planning than

  19. SU-E-T-592: Relationship Between Dose of Distribution and Area of Segment Fields Among Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R; Wang, Y; Cao, Y; Zhang, R; Shang, K; Chi, Z [Hebei Medical University Fourth Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In premise of uninfluenced to dose distribution of tumor target and organ at risk(OAR) in cervical cancer,area of segment fields was changed to increase efficacy and optimize treatment method by designing different plan of intensity modulated radiotherapy(IMRT). Methods: 12 cases of cervical cancer were confirmed in pathology and treated with step and shoot IMRT. Dose of PTV was 50Gy/25fractions. Every patient was designed 9 treatment plans of IMRT by Pinnacle 8.0m planning system,each plan was used with 9 beams of uniform distribution and fixing incidence direction(200°,240°,280°,320°,0°,40°,80°,120°and 160°respectively),and designed for delivery on Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. All plans were optimized with the direct machine parameter optimization(DMPO) algorithm using the same set of optimization objectives. Number of maximum segment field was defined at 80 and minimum MU in each segment was 5MU,and minimal segment area was 2*1cm{sup 2},2*2cm{sup 2},3*3cm{sup 2},4*4cm{sup 2},5*5cm{sup 2},6*6cm{sup 2},7*7cm{sup 2},8*8cm{sup 2}and 9*9cm{sup 2},respectively.Coverage,homogeneity and conformity of PTV,sparing of OAR, MU and number of segment were compared. Results: In this group, mean volume of PTV was 916.8±228.7 cm{sup 3}. Compared with the area of minimal segment field increased from 2*1cm{sup 2} to 9*9 cm{sup 2},the number of mean MU was decreased from 1405±170 to 490±47 and the number of segment field was reduced from 76±4 to 39±7 respectively(p<0.05). When the limit of minimal segment area was increased from 2*1cm{sup 2} to 7*7 cm{sup 2},dose distribution of PTV,OAR,CI,HI and V{sub 2} {sub 3} were not different (p>0.05),but when the minimal segment area was 8*8 cm{sup 2} and 9*9 cm{sup 2},they were changed compared with 7*7 cm{sup 2} and below(p<0.05). Conclusion: The minimal segment field of IMRT plan designed by Pinnacle 8.0m planning system in cervical carcinoma should be enlarge reasonably and minimal segment area of 7*7 cm

  20. Radiotherapy and Male Breast Cancer: A Population-based Registry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Nicholas A; Macdonald, Orlan K; Call, Jason A; Schomas, David A; Lee, Christopher M; Patel, Shilpen

    2016-10-01

    The local-regional management of female breast cancer has been extensively investigated worldwide. The optimal approach for males diagnosed with breast cancer is less clear. We have analyzed the treatment of male breast cancer using a population-based national registry to determine the impact of surgery and radiation therapy on survival. The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was queried to identify males with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast who underwent primary surgical resection (radical mastectomy, modified radical mastectomy, total mastectomy, or segmental) for the years 1983 to 2002. Demographic, clinical, and pathologic data were culled and analyzed to determine the impact of radiation therapy (RT) following resection. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and significance was determined using the log-rank test (Pmales with breast cancer. A statistically nonsignificant improvement with postoperative RT was observed in men with lymph node involvement, larger tumor size, or higher stage. When controlled for age, stage, and grade in multivariate analysis, postoperative RT predicted for improved OS but not CSS. These data suggest a beneficial effect of RT in the postoperative setting. A prospective study is necessary to further elucidate appropriate treatment strategies for men with breast cancer.

  1. Increased cardiovascular mortality more than fifteen years after radiotherapy for breast cancer: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darby Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast radiotherapy as practised in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in significant myocardial exposure, and this was higher when the left breast was treated. It has been proposed that this difference might result in greater cardiovascular mortality following irradiation of the left breast when compared with the right. Methods All cases of female breast cancer diagnosed between 1971 and 1988 and recorded on the Thames Cancer Registry database were followed up to the end of 2003 to identify cases who had died from ischaemic heart disease (IHD or any cardiovascular disease (CVD. A proportional hazards regression analysis was performed, stratified by time since diagnosis, using as the baseline group those women with right-sided disease who did not receive radiotherapy, and adjusting for age at diagnosis. Results A total of 20,871 women with breast cancer were included in the analysis, of which 51% had left-sided disease. Mortality at 15+ years after diagnosis was increased in recipients of left-breast radiotherapy compared to non-irradiated women with right-sided breast cancer, both for IHD (hazard ratio 1.59; 95% confidence interval 1.21–2.08; p = 0.001 and all CVD (hazard ratio 1.27; 95% confidence interval 1.07–1.51; p = 0.006. When irradiated women with left-sided breast cancer were compared with irradiated women with right-sided breast cancer, cardiovascular mortality at 15+ years after diagnosis was raised by around 25% (IHD: hazard ratio 1.23; 95% confidence interval 0.95–1.60; p = 0.114; CVD: hazard ratio 1.25; 95% confidence interval 1.05–1.49; p = 0.014. Conclusion We have found an elevation in cardiovascular mortality more than 15 years after breast radiotherapy in women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1971 and 1988. The risk was greater following irradiation of the left breast compared with the right. This confirms that radiotherapy as practised in the 1970s and 1980s has resulted in significant long

  2. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A; Palma, David A; Haasbeek, Cornelis J A; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D

    2014-03-01

    Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2-5 month and 5-8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2-5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79-0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%-77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively. Texture measures of the GGO appearance

  3. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattonen, Sarah A. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Palma, David A. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands); Ward, Aaron D., E-mail: aaron.ward@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. Methods: A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). Results: For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2–5 month and 5–8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2–5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79–0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%–77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively

  4. New light field camera based on physical based rendering tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ming-Han; Chang, Shan-Ching; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Even though light field technology was first invented more than 50 years ago, it did not gain popularity due to the limitation imposed by the computation technology. With the rapid advancement of computer technology over the last decade, the limitation has been uplifted and the light field technology quickly returns to the spotlight of the research stage. In this paper, PBRT (Physical Based Rendering Tracing) was introduced to overcome the limitation of using traditional optical simulation approach to study the light field camera technology. More specifically, traditional optical simulation approach can only present light energy distribution but typically lack the capability to present the pictures in realistic scenes. By using PBRT, which was developed to create virtual scenes, 4D light field information was obtained to conduct initial data analysis and calculation. This PBRT approach was also used to explore the light field data calculation potential in creating realistic photos. Furthermore, we integrated the optical experimental measurement results with PBRT in order to place the real measurement results into the virtually created scenes. In other words, our approach provided us with a way to establish a link of virtual scene with the real measurement results. Several images developed based on the above-mentioned approaches were analyzed and discussed to verify the pros and cons of the newly developed PBRT based light field camera technology. It will be shown that this newly developed light field camera approach can circumvent the loss of spatial resolution associated with adopting a micro-lens array in front of the image sensors. Detailed operational constraint, performance metrics, computation resources needed, etc. associated with this newly developed light field camera technique were presented in detail.

  5. ELECTRIC FIELD SENSORS BASED ON MEMS TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Chao; Xia Shanhong; Deng Kai; Bai Qiang; Chen Shaofeng

    2005-01-01

    The design and optimization of two types of novel miniature vibrating Electric Field Sensors (EFSs) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology are presented.They have different structures and vibrating modes. The volume is much smaller than other types of charge-induced EFSs such as field-mills. As miniaturizing, the induced signal is reduced enormously and a high sensitive circuit is needed to detect it. Elaborately designed electrodes can increase the amplitude of the output current, making the detecting circuit simplified and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Computer simulations for different structural parameters of the EFSs and vibrating methods have been carried out by Finite Element Method (FEM). It is proved that the new structures are realizable and the output signals are detectable.

  6. Laboratory and field based evaluation of chromatography ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) is an on-line ion-chromatography-based instrument designed for speciation of the inorganic gas and aerosol ammonium-nitrate-sulfate system. Previous work to characterize the performance of the MARGA has been primarily based on field comparison to other measurement methods to evaluate accuracy. While such studies are useful, the underlying reasons for disagreement among methods are not always clear. This study examines aspects of MARGA accuracy and precision specifically related to automated chromatography analysis. Using laboratory standards, analytical accuracy, precision, and method detection limits derived from the MARGA chromatography software are compared to an alternative software package (Chromeleon, Thermo Scientific Dionex). Field measurements are used to further evaluate instrument performance, including the MARGA’s use of an internal LiBr standard to control accuracy. Using gas/aerosol ratios and aerosol neutralization state as a case study, the impact of chromatography on measurement error is assessed. The new generation of on-line chromatography-based gas and particle measurement systems have many advantages, including simultaneous analysis of multiple pollutants. The Monitor for Aerosols and Gases in Ambient Air (MARGA) is such an instrument that is used in North America, Europe, and Asia for atmospheric process studies as well as routine monitoring. While the instrument has been evaluat

  7. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a whole-ventricular irradiation: A planning comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakanaka, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mizowaki, Takashi, E-mail: mizo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Sato, Sayaka; Ogura, Kengo; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the dosimetric difference between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (cIMRT) in whole-ventricular irradiation. Computed tomography simulation data for 13 patients were acquired to create plans for VMAT and cIMRT. In both plans, the same median dose (100% = 24 Gy) was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV), which comprised a tumor bed and whole ventricles. During optimization, doses to the normal brain and body were reduced, provided that the dose constraints of the target coverage were satisfied. The dose-volume indices of the PTV, normal brain, and body as well as monitor units were compared between the 2 techniques by using paired t-tests. The results showed no significant difference in the homogeneity index (0.064 vs 0.065; p = 0.824) of the PTV and conformation number (0.78 vs 0.77; p = 0.065) between the 2 techniques. In the normal brain and body, the dose-volume indices showed no significant difference between the 2 techniques, except for an increase in the volume receiving a low dose in VMAT; the absolute volume of the normal brain and body receiving 1 Gy of radiation significantly increased in VMAT by 1.6% and 8.3%, respectively, compared with that in cIMRT (1044 vs 1028 mL for the normal brain and 3079.2 vs 2823.3 mL for the body; p<0.001). The number of monitor units to deliver a 2.0-Gy fraction was significantly reduced in VMAT compared with that in cIMRT (354 vs 873, respectively; p<0.001). In conclusion, VMAT delivers IMRT to complex target volumes such as whole ventricles with fewer monitor units, while maintaining target coverage and conformal isodose distribution comparable to cIMRT; however, in addition to those characteristics, the fact that the volume of the normal brain and body receiving a low dose would increase in VMAT should be considered.

  8. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS FOR PRIMARY CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM LYMPHOMAS TREATED WITH HIGH-DOSE METHOTREXATE-BASED CHEMO-RADIOTHERAPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagane, Motoo; Lee, Jeunghun; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Suzuki, Kaori; Shimizu, Saki; Umino, Michiru; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) followed by whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is a conventional approach to treat primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL), but some tumors relapse early leading to unfavorable outcome. Several biomarkers have been identified as prognostic factors in PCNSL, however, the correlation of both clinical factors including those related to MTX metabolism and B-cell differentiation and oncogenic biomarkers with response to and outcome by therapy is yet unclear. METHODS: We investigated 32 immunocompetent patients (19 males, 13 females) with PCNSL (all diffuse large B-cell type) treated with HD-MTX based therapy with or without WBRT since 2000 in our institution. Paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tumor tissue sections were stained immunohistochemically with antibodies against following factors: B-cell differentiation markers (CD10, Bcl-6, Mum-1, CD138); MTX metabolism-related (MRP family, LRP, DHFR); cell cycle-related (p27KIP1, MIB-1); drug resistance-related (MGMT, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2); and oncogenes (Myc, Bcl-2). Correlation between positivity of these factors and clinical outcomes were evaluated using logrank test and cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Among these factors, complete response to HD-MTX was significantly associated with longer progression-free survival (PFS)(P = 0.0012), while Bcl-6 expression as well as histological subtype (non-germinal center B-cell, non-GCB) was closely correlated with shorter PFS. Age (>60) (P = 0.006) and MSH2 expression (P = 0.017) were found to be better predictor for overall survival (OS), but in multivariate analysis, they were no longer significant. Other factors involved in MTX metabolism, DNA repair enzymes, and oncogenes did not affect outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Non-GCB subtype and Bcl-6 expression may be associated with worse outcome in patients with PCNSL treated with HD-MTX, while MTX-metabolism related factors did not influence prognosis. Further

  9. Quantification and Assessment of Interfraction Setup Errors Based on Cone Beam CT and Determination of Safety Margins for Radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Cubillos Mesías

    Full Text Available To quantify interfraction patient setup-errors for radiotherapy based on cone-beam computed tomography and suggest safety margins accordingly.Positioning vectors of pre-treatment cone-beam computed tomography for different treatment sites were collected (n = 9504. For each patient group the total average and standard deviation were calculated and the overall mean, systematic and random errors as well as safety margins were determined.The systematic (and random errors in the superior-inferior, left-right and anterior-posterior directions were: for prostate, 2.5(3.0, 2.6(3.9 and 2.9(3.9mm; for prostate bed, 1.7(2.0, 2.2(3.6 and 2.6(3.1mm; for cervix, 2.8(3.4, 2.3(4.6 and 3.2(3.9mm; for rectum, 1.6(3.1, 2.1(2.9 and 2.5(3.8mm; for anal, 1.7(3.7, 2.1(5.1 and 2.5(4.8mm; for head and neck, 1.9(2.3, 1.4(2.0 and 1.7(2.2mm; for brain, 1.0(1.5, 1.1(1.4 and 1.0(1.1mm; and for mediastinum, 3.3(4.6, 2.6(3.7 and 3.5(4.0mm. The CTV-to-PTV margins had the smallest value for brain (3.6, 3.7 and 3.3mm and the largest for mediastinum (11.5, 9.1 and 11.6mm. For pelvic treatments the means (and standard deviations were 7.3 (1.6, 8.5 (0.8 and 9.6 (0.8mm.Systematic and random setup-errors were smaller than 5mm. The largest errors were found for organs with higher motion probability. The suggested safety margins were comparable to published values in previous but often smaller studies.

  10. SU-E-T-562: Motion Tracking Optimization for Conformal Arc Radiotherapy Plans: A QUASAR Phantom Based Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z; Wang, I; Yao, R; Podgorsak, M [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to use plan parameters optimization (Dose rate, collimator angle, couch angle, initial starting phase) to improve the performance of conformal arc radiotherapy plans with motion tracking by increasing the plan performance score (PPS). Methods: Two types of 3D conformal arc plans were created based on QUASAR respiratory motion phantom with spherical and cylindrical targets. Sinusoidal model was applied to the MLC leaves to generate motion tracking plans. A MATLAB program was developed to calculate PPS of each plan (ranges from 0–1) and optimize plan parameters. We first selected the dose rate for motion tracking plans and then used simulated annealing algorithm to search for the combination of the other parameters that resulted in the plan of the maximal PPS. The optimized motion tracking plan was delivered by Varian Truebeam Linac. In-room cameras and stopwatch were used for starting phase selection and synchronization between phantom motion and plan delivery. Gaf-EBT2 dosimetry films were used to measure the dose delivered to the target in QUASAR phantom. Dose profiles and Truebeam trajectory log files were used for plan delivery performance evaluation. Results: For spherical target, the maximal PPS (PPSsph) of the optimized plan was 0.79: (Dose rate: 500MU/min, Collimator: 90°, Couch: +10°, starting phase: 0.83π). For cylindrical target, the maximal PPScyl was 0.75 (Dose rate: 300MU/min, Collimator: 87°, starting phase: 0.97π) with couch at 0°. Differences of dose profiles between motion tracking plans (with the maximal and the minimal PPS) and 3D conformal plans were as follows: PPSsph=0.79: %ΔFWHM: 8.9%, %Dmax: 3.1%; PPSsph=0.52: %ΔFWHM: 10.4%, %Dmax: 6.1%. PPScyl=0.75: %ΔFWHM: 4.7%, %Dmax: 3.6%; PPScyl=0.42: %ΔFWHM: 12.5%, %Dmax: 9.6%. Conclusion: By achieving high plan performance score through parameters optimization, we can improve target dose conformity of motion tracking plan by decreasing total MLC leaf travel distance

  11. Dosimetric analysis of tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy with and without bone marrow sparing for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuli Zhang; Jianping Chen; Heliang He; Weidong Xu; Huayong Jiang; Yadi Wang ; Junmao Gao; Qingzhi Liu; Na Lu; Diandian Chen; Bo Yao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare tomotherapy-based bone marrow-sparing intensity-mod-ulated radiotherapy (BMS-IMRT) with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) without entering the pelvic bone marrow as a planning constraint in the treatment of cervical cancer after hysterectomy. Methods BMS-IMRT and IMRT plans were designed for a cohort of nine patients. The prescribed dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions, and 95% of the planned target volume received this dose. The doses were computed using a commercial y available treatment planning system with the convolution/superposi-tion algorithm. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of planning target volume homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as wel as organ at risk dose and volume parameters. Results BMS-IMRT had advantages over IMRT in terms of CI, but was equivalent to the latter in HI. V5, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of pelvic bone marrow in BMS-IMRT decreased by 0.06%, 17.33%, 22.19%, 13.85%, and 16.46%, respectively, compared with IMRT. Except for V30 of the smal bowel and V30 and V40 of the bladder, no statistical y significant dif erences were found between BMS-IMRT and IMRT in the smal bowel, bladder, and rectum. Conclusion For cervical cancer patients receiving tomotherapy-based radiotherapy after hysterectomy, BMS-IMRT reduced pelvic bone marrow volume receiving low-dose radiation, and it may be conducive to preventing acute hematologic toxicity.

  12. Problem-based, interdisciplinary field-based courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Trevor; Birch-Thomsen, Torben; Traynor, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Student field courses at Universities are increasingly incorporating problem-based interdisciplinary approaches to enhance learning opportunities. This paper reports upon seven field-based, problem-oriented, interdisciplinary courses held within southern Africa concerning natural resource managem...... in a positive manner and a strong respectful working relationship from the staff. We advocate this process as worthwhile as classroom theory becomes real in all applied and complex environment....... management and sustainable land use. The SLUSE (Sustainable Land Use and Natural Resource Management) project, under which these courses were devised, is introduced and the process of field-course implementation is described. The SLUSE approach is discussed in terms of management issues, levels...... of responsibility, staff and student development and the benefits to rural host communities. The courses are very intense experiences and Students encounter difficulties working across traditional academic disciplines and in cross-cultural groups. Through critical thinking and self-reflection students understand...

  13. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for skull-base and non-skull-base head and neck cancer: a treatment planning comparison with fixed Beam IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Mok, E; Wang, L; Chen, C; Le, Q-T

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the dose distribution, monitor units (MUs) and radiation delivery time between volumetric-modulated arc (VMAT) and fix-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (FB-IMRT) in skull-base and non-skull-base head and neck cancer (HNC). CT datasets of 8 skull-base and 7 non-skull-base HNC were identified. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated. The prescription dose ranged 45-70 Gy (1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction). The VMAT delivery time was measured when these plans were delivered to the patients. The FB-IMRT delivery time was generated on a phantom. Comparison of dose-volume histogram data, MUs, and delivery times was performed using T-test. Our results show that both plans yield similar target volume coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. In skull-base cases, compared to FB-IMRT, VMAT generated significantly smaller hot-spot inside PTV (2.0% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.031), lower maximum chiasm dose (32 ± 11 Gy vs. 41 ± 15 Gy, p = 0.026), lower ipsilateral temporal-mandibular joint dose (D33: 41.4 Gy vs. 46.1 Gy, p = 0.016), lower mean ipsilateral middle ear dose (43 ± 9 Gy vs. 38 ± 10 Gy, p = 0.020) and a trend for lower optic nerve, temporal lobe, parotid, and oral cavity dose. In non-skull-base cases, doses to normal tissues were similar between the two plans. There was a reduction of 70% in MUs (486 ± 95 vs. 1614 ± 493, p delivery time.

  14. Less increase of CT-based calcium scores of the coronary arteries. Effect three years after breast-conserving radiotherapy using breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, M.E.; Kempen-Harteveld, M.L. van; Petoukhova, A.L. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Heijenbrok, M.W. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Scholten, A.N. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wolterbeek, R. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden (Netherlands); Schreur, J.H.M. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores determined before the start of whole breast irradiation with those determined 3 years afterwards. Changes in CAC scores were analysed in 99 breast cancer patients. Three groups were compared: patients receiving left- and right-sided radiotherapy, and those receiving left-sided radiotherapy with breath-hold. We analysed overall CAC scores and left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) CAC scores. Between the three groups, changes of the value of the LAD minus the RCA CAC scores of each individual patient were also compared. Three years after breath-hold-based whole breast irradiation, a less pronounced increase of CAC scores was noted. Furthermore, LAD minus RCA scores in patients treated for left-sided breast cancer without breath-hold were higher when compared to LAD minus RCA scores of patients with right-sided breast cancers and those with left-sided breast cancer treated with breath-hold. Breath-hold in breast-conserving radiotherapy leads to a less pronounced increase of CT-based CAC scores. Therefore, breath-hold probably prevents the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. However, the sample size of this study is limited and the follow-up period relatively short. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser prospektiven Langzeitstudie war der Vergleich der Coronary-Artery-Calcium-(CAC-)Werte vor Beginn der Brustbestrahlung mit den Werten nach 3 Jahren. Aenderungen der CAC-Werte wurden bei 99 Brustkrebspatienten analysiert. Drei Gruppen wurden untersucht: Patienten nach links- und rechtsseitiger Strahlentherapie sowie mit Bestrahlung unter Atemanhalt. Wir analysierten die Gesamt-CAC-Werte sowie die CAC-Werte der vorderen linken absteigenden (''left anterior descending'', LAD) und der rechten Koronararterie (''right coronary artery'', RCA). Zwischen den drei Gruppen wurden auch die Veraenderungen

  15. Proposal of procedures to prevent errors in radiotherapy based in learned lessons of accidental expositions; Proposta de procedimentos para evitar erros em radioterapia baseados em licoes aprendidas de exposicoes acidentais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Giselle Oliveira Vieira

    2007-07-01

    In order to consider some procedures to prevent errors in radiotherapy based in learned lessons of accidental expositions and in accordance with information contained in international reports elaborated by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and of the data base availability by the European group Radiation Oncology Safety Information System (ROSIS) on the events, a research of the occurred errors was performed. For the evaluation of the incidents a data base based in the ROSIS and added plus a parameter was created 'type of error'. All the stored data make possible the evaluation of the 839 incidents in terms of frequency of the type of error, the process of detention, the number of reached patients and the degree of severity. Of the 50 types of found errors, the type of error more frequently was 'incorrect treatment coordinate', confirmed with the data of literature and representing 28,96 por cent of the total of the incidents. The results showed 44,44 por cent are discovered at the moment of the treatment and that the process of verification of the fiche or clinical revision of the patient is a verification more occurred insurance and in 43,33 por cent of the searched events. The results indicated that more than 50 por cent of the incidents the severity degree are void and approximately 62 por cent a patient are affected during the accomplishment of the radiotherapy. This work showed that to analyze the data base according to methodology proposal for Klein et al.; for Reason, and Dunscombe et al. is interesting to insert more characteristic detailed in the data base such as: the number of fractions for affected patient, number of fields of treatment for fraction that was affected, shunting line of the prescribed dose and shunting line of the volume prescribed in all the registered in cadastral map events. Some causes exist that can lead the errors when patient they are submitted to the radiotherapy. Some measures can be taken so that

  16. SU-E-T-412: Evaluation of Tungsten-Based Functional Paper for Attenuation Device in Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamomae, T; Monzen, H; Okudaira, K; Miyake, Y; Oguchi, H; Komori, M; Kawamura, M; Itoh, Y; Kikumori, T; Naganawa, S [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with an electron beam is one of the accelerated partial breast irradiation methods that have recently been used in early-stage breast cancer. A protective acrylic resin-copper disk is inserted between the breast tissue and the pectoralis muscle to minimize the dose received by the posterior structures. However, a problem with this protective disk is that the surgical incision must be larger than the field size because the disk is manufactured from stiff and unyielding materials. The purpose of this study was to assess the applicability of a new tungsten-based functional paper (TFP) as an alternative to the existing protective disk in IORT. Methods: The newly introduced TFP (Toppan Printing Co., Ltd., Tokyo, JP) is anticipated to become a useful device that is lead-free, light, flexible, and easily processed. The radiation shielding performance of TFP was verified by experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using PHITS code. The doses transmitted through the protective disk or TFP were measured on a Mobetron mobile accelerator. The same geometries were then reproduced, and the dose distributions were simulated by the MC method. Results: The percentages of transmitted dose relative to the absence of the existing protective disk were lower than 2% in both the measurements and MC simulations. In the experimental measurements, the percentages of transmitted dose for a 9 MeV electron beam were 48.1, 2.3, and 0.6% with TFP thicknesses of 1.9, 3.7, and 7.4 mm, respectively. The percentages for a 12 MeV were 76.0, 49.3, 20.0, and 5.5% with TFP thicknesses of 1.9, 3.7, 7.4, and 14.8 mm, respectively. The results of the MC simulation showed a slight dose increase at the incident surface of the TFP caused by backscattered radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate that a small-incision procedure may be possible by the use of TFP.

  17. Dosimetric comparison between conventional and conformal radiotherapy for carcinoma cervix: Are we treating the right volumes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotirup Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Conventional portals, based on bony anatomy, for external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer have been repeatedly demonstrated as inadequate. Conversely, with image-based conformal radiotherapy, better target coverage may be offset by the greater toxicities and poorer compliance associated with treating larger volumes. This study was meant to dosimetrically compare conformal and conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Five patients of carcinoma cervix underwent planning CT scan with IV contrast and targets, and organs at risk (OAR were contoured. Two sets of plans-conventional and conformal were generated for each patient. Field sizes were recorded, and dose volume histograms of both sets of plans were generated and compared on the basis of target coverage and OAR sparing. Results: Target coverage was significantly improved with conformal plans though field sizes required were significantly larger. On the other hand, dose homogeneity was not significantly improved. Doses to the OARs (rectum, urinary bladder, and small bowel were not significantly different across the 2 arms. Conclusion: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy gives significantly better target coverage, which may translate into better local control and survival. On the other hand, it also requires significantly larger field sizes though doses to the OARs are not significantly increased.

  18. Evaluation of a Water-based Bolus Device for Radiotherapy to the Extremities in Kaposi's Sarcoma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Seung Kwon; Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    We designed a water-based bolus device for radiation therapy in Kaposi's sarcoma. This study evaluated the usefulness of this new device and compared it with the currently used rice-based bolus. Materials and Methods: We fashioned a polystyrene box and cut a hole in order to insert patient's extremities while the patient was in the supine position. We used a vacuum-vinyl based polymer to reduce water leakage. Next, we eliminated air using a vacuum pump and a vacuum valve to reduce the air gap between the water and extremities in the vacuum-vinyl box. We performed CT scans to evaluate the density difference of the fabricated water-based bolus device when the device in which the rice-based bolus was placed directly, the rice-based bolus with polymer-vinyl packed rice, and the water were all put in. We analyzed the density change with the air gap volume using a planning system. In addition, we measured the homogeneity and dose in the low-extremities phantom, attached to six TLD, and wrapped film exposed in parallel-opposite fields with the LINAC under the same conditions as the set-up of the CT-simulator. Results: The density value of the rice-based bolus with the rice put in directly was 14% lower than that of the water-based bolus. Moreover, the value of the other experiments in the rice-based bolus with the polymer-vinyl packed rice showed an 18% reduction in density. The analysis of the EDR2 film revealed that the water-based bolus shows a more homogeneous dose plan, which was superior by 4.0-4.4% to the rice-base bolus. The mean TLD readings of the rice-based bolus, with the rice put directly into the polystyrene box had a 3.4% higher density value. Moreover, the density value in the case of the rice-based bolus with polymer-vinyl packed rice had a 4.3% higher reading compared to the water-based bolus. Conclusion: Our custom-made water-based bolus device increases the accuracy of the set-up by confirming the treatment field. It also improves the

  19. SU-E-P-58: Dosimetric Study of Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy for Postoperation of Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Provice (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of the target volume and organs at risk(OARs) between conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy(C-IMRT) and knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) plans for cervix cancer. Methods: 39 patients with cervical cancer after surgery were randomly selected, 20 patient plans were used to create the model, the other 19 cases used for comparative evaluation. All plans were designed in Eclipse system. The prescription dose was 30.6Gy, 17 fractions, OARs dose satisfied to the clinical requirement. A paired t test was used to evaluate the differences of dose-volume histograms (DVH). Results: Comparaed to C-IMRT plan, the KBRT plan target can achieve the similar target dose coverage, D98,D95,D2,HI and CI had no difference (P≥0.05). The dose of rectum, bladder and femoral heads had no significant differences(P≥0.05). The time was used to design treatment plan was significant reduced. Conclusion: This study shows that postoperative radiotherapy of cervical KBRT plans can achieve the similar target and OARs dose, but the shorter designing time.

  20. The impact of cancer incidence and stage on optimal utilization of radiotherapy: Methodology of a population based analysis by the ESTRO-HERO project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borras, Josep M; Barton, Michael; Grau, Cai; Corral, Julieta; Verhoeven, Rob; Lemmens, Valery; van Eycken, Liesbet; Henau, Kris; Primic-Zakelj, Maja; Strojan, Primoz; Trojanowski, Maciej; Dyzmann-Sroka, Agnieszka; Kubiak, Anna; Gasparotto, Chiara; Defourny, Noemie; Malicki, Julian; Dunscombe, Peter; Coffey, Mary; Lievens, Yolande

    2015-07-01

    The impact of differences in the distribution of major cancer sites and stages at diagnosis among 4 European countries on the optimal utilization proportion (OUP) of patients who should receive external beam radiotherapy was assessed within the framework of the ESTRO-HERO project. Data from Australian Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CCORE) were used. Population based stages at diagnosis from the cancer registries of Belgium, Slovenia, the Greater Poland region of Poland, and The Netherlands were used to assess the OUP for each country. A sensitivity analysis was carried out. The overall OUP by country varied from the lowest of 48.3% in Australia to the highest of 53.4% in Poland; among European countries the variation was limited to 3%. Cancer site specific OUPs showed differences according to the variability in stage at diagnosis across countries. The most important impact on the OUP by country was due to changes in relative frequency of tumours rather than stage at diagnosis. This methodology can be adapted using European data, thus facilitating the planning of resources required to cope with the demand for radiotherapy in Europe, taking into account the national variability in cancer incidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of MRI-based HDR brachytherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with advanced cervical cancer: A virtual brachytherapy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otahal, Bretislav; Dolezel, Martin; Cvek, Jakub; Simetka, Ondrej; Klat, Jaroslav; Knybel, Lukas; Molenda, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Hlavka, Ales; Feltl, David

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the treatment plans of 3D image-guided brachytherapy (BT) and stereotactic robotic radiotherapy with online image guidance – CyberKnife (CK) in patients with locally advanced cervix cancer. Methods and materials Ten pairs of plans for patients with locally advanced inoperable cervical cancer were created using MR based 3D brachytherapy and stereotaxis CK. The dose that covers 98% of the target volume (HR CTV D98) was taken as a reference and other parameters were compared. Results Of the ten studied cases, the dose from D100 GTV was comparable for both devices, on average, the BT GTV D90 was 10–20% higher than for CK. The HR CTV D90 was higher for CK with an average difference of 10–20%, but only fifteen percent of HR CTV (the peripheral part) received a higher dose from CK, while 85% of the target volume received higher doses from BT. We found a significant organ-sparing effect of CK compared to brachytherapy (20–30% lower doses in 0.1 cm3, 1 cm3, and 2 cm3). Conclusion BT remains to be the best method for dose escalation. Due to the significant organ-sparing effect of CK, patients that are not candidates for BT could benefit from stereotaxis more than from classical external beam radiotherapy. PMID:25337413

  2. Targeted tumor radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unak Perihan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted tumor radiotherapy is selectively delivery of curative doses of radiation to malignant sites. The aim of the targeted tumor radiotherapy is to use the radionuclides which have high LET particle emissions conjugated to appropriate carrier molecules. The radionuclides are selectively collected by tumor cells, depositing lethal doses to tumor cells while no admission occur to normal cells. In theory, targeted radiotherapy has several advantages over conventional radiotherapy since it allows a high radiation dose to be administered without causing normal tissue toxicity, although there are some limitations in the availability of appropriate targeting agents and in the calculations of administered doses. Therefore, for routine clinical applications more progress is still needed. In this article, the potential use of targeted tumor radiotherapy is briefly reviewed. More general aspects and considerations, such as potential radionuclides, mechanisms of tumor targeting was also outlined.

  3. A dual model HU conversion from MRI intensity values within and outside of bone segment for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korhonen, Juha, E-mail: juha.p.korhonen@hus.fi [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Kapanen, Mika [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Medical Physics, Tampere University Hospital, POB-2000, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Keyriläinen, Jani; Seppälä, Tiina; Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The lack of electron density information in magnetic resonance images (MRI) poses a major challenge for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). In this study the authors convert MRI intensity values into Hounsfield units (HUs) in the male pelvis and thus enable accurate MRI-based RTP for prostate cancer patients with varying tissue anatomy and body fat contents. Methods: T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}*-weighted MRI intensity values and standard computed tomography (CT) image HUs in the male pelvis were analyzed using image data of 10 prostate cancer patients. The collected data were utilized to generate a dual model HU conversion technique from MRI intensity values of the single image set separately within and outside of contoured pelvic bones. Within the bone segment local MRI intensity values were converted to HUs by applying a second-order polynomial model. This model was tuned for each patient by two patient-specific adjustments: MR signal normalization to correct shifts in absolute intensity level and application of a cutoff value to accurately represent low density bony tissue HUs. For soft tissues, such as fat and muscle, located outside of the bone contours, a threshold-based segmentation method without requirements for any patient-specific adjustments was introduced to convert MRI intensity values into HUs. The dual model HU conversion technique was implemented by constructing pseudo-CT images for 10 other prostate cancer patients. The feasibility of these images for RTP was evaluated by comparing HUs in the generated pseudo-CT images with those in standard CT images, and by determining deviations in MRI-based dose distributions compared to those in CT images with 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the anisotropic analytical algorithm and 360° volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with the Voxel Monte Carlo algorithm. Results: The average HU differences between the constructed pseudo-CT images and standard CT images of each

  4. Stage IVB endometrial cancer confined to the abdomen: is chemotherapy superior to radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirik, D Akdag; Karalok, A; Ureyen, I; Tasci, T; Koc, S; Turan, T; Tulunay, G

    2016-01-01

    To determine the impact of clinical variables and adjuvant therapy on survival in patients with Stage IVB endometrial cancer (EC) confined to abdomen. A total of 65 patients were included. Curative chemotherapy was defined as using only chemotherapy (platin based) or sandwich therapy. Patients receiving only radiotherapy had standard pelvic radiotherapy and extended-field radiotherapy when necessary. The optimal cytoreduction was achieved in 89.3% of patients. With a median follow-up of 18 months, two-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated as 33.4% and 42.2%, respectively. Optimal cytoreduction provided more longer PFS and OS compared to suboptimal cytoreduction. In univariate analysis, curative chemotherapy instead of radiotherapy improved the two-year PFS and two-year OS. Type of adjuvant therapy, tumor grade, and peritoneal cytology were found as the independent prognostic factors for PFS. Peritoneal cytology, adnexal involvement, and adjuvant therapy were independent prognostic factor for OS. Curative chemotherapy significantly improved both two-year PFS and OS in patients with Stage IVB endometrial disease confined to abdomen over only radiotherapy.

  5. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  6. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  7. Inverse field-based approach for simultaneous B₁ mapping at high fields - a phantom based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Liu, Feng; Zuo, Zhentao; Xue, Rong; Li, Mingyan; Li, Yu; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-04-01

    Based on computational electromagnetics and multi-level optimization, an inverse approach of attaining accurate mapping of both transmit and receive sensitivity of radiofrequency coils is presented. This paper extends our previous study of inverse methods of receptivity mapping at low fields, to allow accurate mapping of RF magnetic fields (B(1)) for high-field applications. Accurate receive sensitivity mapping is essential to image domain parallel imaging methods, such as sensitivity encoding (SENSE), to reconstruct high quality images. Accurate transmit sensitivity mapping will facilitate RF-shimming and parallel transmission techniques that directly address the RF inhomogeneity issue, arguably the most challenging issue of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The inverse field-based approach proposed herein is based on computational electromagnetics and iterative optimization. It fits an experimental image to the numerically calculated signal intensity by iteratively optimizing the coil-subject geometry to better resemble the experiments. Accurate transmit and receive sensitivities are derived as intermediate results of the optimization process. The method is validated by imaging studies using homogeneous saline phantom at 7T. A simulation study at 300MHz demonstrates that the proposed method is able to obtain receptivity mapping with errors an order of magnitude less than that of the conventional method. The more accurate receptivity mapping and simultaneously obtained transmit sensitivity mapping could enable artefact-reduced and intensity-corrected image reconstructions. It is hoped that by providing an approach to the accurate mapping of both transmit and receive sensitivity, the proposed method will facilitate a range of applications in high-field MRI and parallel imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Selection and delineation of lymph node target volume for lung cancer conformal radiotherapy. Proposal for standardizing terminology based on surgical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiricuta, I.C. [Inst. of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincenz Hospital, Limburg/Lahn (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Purpose: To select and delineate the target volumes for definitive or postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The lymphatics of the lung and the dissemination of tumor cells to the intra- and extrathoracic lymph nodes are described. The incidence of involvement of the different lymph node sites in the chest is analyzed. The involvement of the contralateral hilar and/or supraclavicular lymph nodes and the consequences for target volume selection for curative radiotherapy are discussed. CT-based nodal classification and distribution of lymph nodes in the chest in CT-axial slices are presented. The sentinel node concept (SNC) and the preliminary data available for lung cancer are described. Results: A critical review of the current TNM classification for lung cancer and the implications for target volume selection is given. The individual target volume selection and delineation have to be based on clinical and pathological data from large surgical studies and upon the individual pathological and diagnostic patient data. The selection and delineation of the clinical target volumes for definitive and for postoperative radiotherapy, dependent on the lymph node involvement, are presented. Conclusions: Criteria for the selection and delineation of the clinical target volumes for definitive and for postoperative conformal radiotherapy in axial CT slices under consideration of site, size and stage of the lung cancer are described. Recommendations for target volume selection for definitive or postoperative radiotherapy are presented. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Selektion und Bestimmung der klinischen Zielvolumina fuer die alleinige oder postoperative Strahlentherapie beim Bronchialkarzinom. Material und Methode: Die Lymphabflusswege der Lunge und das Verteilungsmuster der Tumorzellen in den regionalen Lymphknoten werden beschrieben. Die CT-Klassifikation und die Verteilung der intrathorakalen Lymphknoten werden vorgestellt. Der Befall der einzelnen

  9. Segmentation of biological target volumes on multi-tracer PET images based on information fusion for achieving dose painting in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelandais, Benoît; Gardin, Isabelle; Mouchard, Laurent; Vera, Pierre; Ruan, Su

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging plays an important role in radiotherapy. Dose painting consists in the application of a nonuniform dose prescription on a tumoral region, and is based on an efficient segmentation of biological target volumes (BTV). It is derived from PET images, that highlight tumoral regions of enhanced glucose metabolism (FDG), cell proliferation (FLT) and hypoxia (FMiso). In this paper, a framework based on Belief Function Theory is proposed for BTV segmentation and for creating 3D parametric images for dose painting. We propose to take advantage of neighboring voxels for BTV segmentation, and also multi-tracer PET images using information fusion to create parametric images. The performances of BTV segmentation was evaluated on an anthropomorphic phantom and compared with two other methods. Quantitative results show the good performances of our method. It has been applied to data of five patients suffering from lung cancer. Parametric images show promising results by highlighting areas where a high frequency or dose escalation could be planned.

  10. Convection-enhancement delivery of platinum-based drugs and Lipoplatin™ to optimize the concomitant effect with radiotherapy in F98 glioma rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minghan; Fortin, David; Sanche, Léon; Paquette, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with glioblastoma remains poor with current treatments. Although platinum based drugs are sometimes offered at relapse, their efficacy in this setting is still disputed. In this study, we use convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to deliver the platinum-based drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin, and Lipoplatin™-liposomal formulation of cisplatin) directly into the tumor of F98 glioma-bearing rats that were subsequently treated with γ radiation (15 Gy). CED increased by factors varying between 17 and 111, the concentration of these platinum-based drugs in the brain tumor compared to intra-venous (i.v.) administration, and by 9- to 34-fold, when compared to intra-arterial (i.a.) administration. Furthermore, CED resulted in a better systemic tolerance to platinum drugs compared to their i.a. injection. Among the drugs tested, carboplatin showed the highest maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Treatment with carboplatin resulted in the best median survival time (MeST) (38.5 days), which was further increased by the addition of radiotherapy (54.0 days). Although the DNA-bound platinum adduct were higher at 4 h after CED than 24 h for carboplatin group, combination with radiotherapy led to similar improvement of median survival time. However, less toxicity was observed in animals irradiated 24 h after CED-based chemotherapy. In conclusion, CED increased the accumulation of platinum drugs in tumor, reduced the toxicity, and resulted in a higher median survival time. The best treatment was obtained in animals treated with carboplatin and irradiated 24 h later. PMID:25784204

  11. Convection-enhancement delivery of platinum-based drugs and Lipoplatin(TM) to optimize the concomitant effect with radiotherapy in F98 glioma rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minghan; Fortin, David; Sanche, Léon; Paquette, Benoit

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis for patients with glioblastoma remains poor with current treatments. Although platinum-based drugs are sometimes offered at relapse, their efficacy in this setting is still disputed. In this study, we use convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to deliver the platinum-based drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin, and Lipoplatin(TM) - liposomal formulation of cisplatin) directly into the tumor of F98 glioma-bearing rats that were subsequently treated with γ radiation (15 Gy). CED increased by factors varying between 17 and 111, the concentration of these platinum-based drugs in the brain tumor compared to intra-venous (i.v.) administration, and by 9- to 34-fold, when compared to intra-arterial (i.a.) administration. Furthermore, CED resulted in a better systemic tolerance to platinum drugs compared to their i.a. injection. Among the drugs tested, carboplatin showed the highest maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Treatment with carboplatin resulted in the best median survival time (MeST) (38.5 days), which was further increased by the addition of radiotherapy (54.0 days). Although the DNA-bound platinum adduct were higher at 4 h after CED than 24 h for carboplatin group, combination with radiotherapy led to similar improvement of median survival time. However, less toxicity was observed in animals irradiated 24 h after CED-based chemotherapy. In conclusion, CED increased the accumulation of platinum drugs in tumor, reduced the toxicity, and resulted in a higher median survival time. The best treatment was obtained in animals treated with carboplatin and irradiated 24 h later.

  12. TH-E-BRF-05: Comparison of Survival-Time Prediction Models After Radiotherapy for High-Grade Glioma Patients Based On Clinical and DVH Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magome, T; Haga, A; Igaki, H; Sekiya, N; Masutani, Y; Sakumi, A; Mukasa, A; Nakagawa, K [The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, JP (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although many outcome prediction models based on dose-volume information have been proposed, it is well known that the prognosis may be affected also by multiple clinical factors. The purpose of this study is to predict the survival time after radiotherapy for high-grade glioma patients based on features including clinical and dose-volume histogram (DVH) information. Methods: A total of 35 patients with high-grade glioma (oligodendroglioma: 2, anaplastic astrocytoma: 3, glioblastoma: 30) were selected in this study. All patients were treated with prescribed dose of 30–80 Gy after surgical resection or biopsy from 2006 to 2013 at The University of Tokyo Hospital. All cases were randomly separated into training dataset (30 cases) and test dataset (5 cases). The survival time after radiotherapy was predicted based on a multiple linear regression analysis and artificial neural network (ANN) by using 204 candidate features. The candidate features included the 12 clinical features (tumor location, extent of surgical resection, treatment duration of radiotherapy, etc.), and the 192 DVH features (maximum dose, minimum dose, D95, V60, etc.). The effective features for the prediction were selected according to a step-wise method by using 30 training cases. The prediction accuracy was evaluated by a coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) between the predicted and actual survival time for the training and test dataset. Results: In the multiple regression analysis, the value of R{sup 2} between the predicted and actual survival time was 0.460 for the training dataset and 0.375 for the test dataset. On the other hand, in the ANN analysis, the value of R{sup 2} was 0.806 for the training dataset and 0.811 for the test dataset. Conclusion: Although a large number of patients would be needed for more accurate and robust prediction, our preliminary Result showed the potential to predict the outcome in the patients with high-grade glioma. This work was partly supported by

  13. Pulse-resolved radiotherapy dosimetry using fiber-coupled organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravnsborg Beierholm, A.

    2011-05-15

    This PhD project pertains to the development and adaptation of a dosimetry system that can be used to verify the delivery of radiation in modern radiotherapy modalities involving small radiation fields and dynamic radiation delivery. The dosimetry system is based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators and can be perceived as a well characterized, independent alternative to the methods that are in clinical use today. The dosimeter itself does not require a voltage supply, and is composed of water equivalent materials. The dosimeter can be fabricated with a sensitive volume smaller than a cubic millimeter, which is small enough to resolve the small radiation fields encountered in modern radiotherapy. The fast readout of the dosimeter enables measurements on the same time scale as the pulsed radiation delivery from the medical linear accelerators used for treatment. The dosimetry system, comprising fiber-coupled organic scintillators and data acquisition hardware, was developed at the Radiation Research Division at Risoe DTU and tested using clinical x-ray beams at hospitals in Denmark and abroad. Measurements of output factors and percentage depth dose were performed and compared with reference values and Monte Carlo simulations for static square radiation fields for standard (4 cm x 4 cm to 20 cm x 20 cm) and small (down to 0.6 cm x 0.6 cm) field sizes. The accuracy of most of the obtained measurements was good, agreeing with reference and simulated dose values to within 2 % standard deviation for both standard and small fields. This thesis concludes that the new pulse-resolved dosimetry system holds great potential for modern radiotherapy applications, such as stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. (Author)

  14. Explosive Field Visualization Based on Image Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-yao; JIANG Ling-shuang

    2009-01-01

    m the composite sequence. Experimental results show that the new images integrate the advantages of sources, effectively improve the visualization, and disclose more information about explosive field.

  15. Chemotherapy combined with involved-field radiotherapy for 177 children with Hodgkin's disease treated in 1983-1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balwierz, W.; Armata, J.; Moryl-Bujakowska, A. (Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Cracow (Poland). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1991-12-01

    During the period from 1983 through 1987, a total of 177 children with biopsy proven Hodgkin's disease have undergone chemotherapy combined with local irradiation. The patients were divided into low, middle, and high stage groups. MVPP chemotherapy, consisting of mechlorethamine, vinblastine, procarbazine, and prednisone, was given as the basic treatment. B-DOPA chemotherapy, consisting of bleomycin, dacarbazine, vincristine, prednisone, and adriamycin, was given to some children. Irradiation was limited to involved regions by cobalt therapy for 114 patients and by conventional radiotherapy for 56 patients. In the remaining 7 patients, radiotherapy was given to peripheral lymph nodes and cobalt therapy to mediastinal tumor and/or abdomen. Irradiation doses ranged from 30 to 40 Gy in most of the patients. One hundred and seventy five patients (98.9%) had complete remission (CR). The probability for 5-year disease-free survival and survival was 0.91 and 0.98, respectively. The most common hematological complication was leukopenia. Relapse occurred in a total of 15 patients (8.5%) within 4-48 months after establishing the first CR: it was the most frequent in the middle stage group (8 patients). Seven patients died: 4 died as a result of complications and the other 3 died during the first CR. (N.K.).

  16. Monte Carlo-Based Dose Calculation in Postprostatectomy Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Rankine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Step-and-shoot (S&S intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT using the XiO treatment planning system (TPS has been routinely used for patients receiving postprostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT. After installing the Monaco, a pilot study was undertaken with five patients to compare XiO with Monaco (V2.03 TPS for PPRT with respect to plan quality for S&S as well as volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT. Monaco S&S showed higher mean clinical target volume (CTV coverage (99.85% than both XiO S&S (97.98%, P = 0.04 and Monaco VMAT (99.44, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volumes were lower for Monaco S&S compared to XiO (46.36% versus 58.06%, P = 0.001 and Monaco VMAT (46.36% versus 54.66%, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volume was lowest for Monaco S&S and superior to XiO (mean 19.89% versus 31.25%, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volumes were lower for Monaco VMAT compared to XiO (21.09% versus 31.25%, P = 0.02. Other organ-at-risk (OAR parameters were comparable between TPSs. Compared to XiO S&S, Monaco S&S plans had fewer segments (78.6 versus 116.8 segments, P = 0.02, lower total monitor units (MU (677.6 MU versus 770.7 MU, P = 0.01, and shorter beam-on times (5.7 min versus 7.6 min, P = 0.03. This pilot study suggests that Monaco S&S improves CTV coverage, OAR doses, and planning and treatment times for PPRT.

  17. Theintensity-modulated radiation therapy of five radiotherapy fields on nasopharyngeal carcinoma%鼻咽癌五野调强放射治疗方案的实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 何海

    2015-01-01

    目的:在满足靶区及危及器官剂量要求的前提下,该研究以5个射野来进行调强放射治疗(IM RI )计划制订,从而达到以尽可能少的射野数目进行鼻咽癌的IM RI。方法通过对本院鼻咽癌患者放疗计划的对比分析,以0°、75°、125°、225°、285°方案进行布野,并以该布野方案同前五野、后五野、五野均分3种方案进行比较,对最终结果进行统计学分析。结果在靶区最大剂量(Dmax )和最小剂量(Dmin )上,4种布野方案差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);在靶区D95、平均剂量(Dmean )及危及器官的剂量上,4种布野方案差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论综合比较4种布野方案在靶区、危及器官剂量分布,以0°、75°、125°、225°、285°方案布野时,能够得出更优的结果,该布野方案可实现本地区鼻咽癌患者的IM RI。%Objective Under the requirements of dose distribution in target and normal tissue ,five radiotherapy fields are de‐voted to making Intensity‐modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan ,thus the IMRT radiotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC) could be underway with the radiotherapy field as few as possible .Methods Through the comparison of the NPC patients′IMRT plans in our hospital ,the angle of fields have been make out with 0° ,75° ,125° ,225°and 285° .At the same time ,this field scheme is compared with projects of front five fields ,behind five fields and share five fields .The result was statistically analyzed . Results In these four field schemes ,the maximum and minimum dose in the target area showed no statistically difference (P>0 . 05) ,while in the average dose ,D95 and normal tissue dose have statistical difference (P<0 .05) .Conclusion Comprehensive com‐parison of the dose distribution in the target and normal tissue in these four field schemes showed that the field scheme with the an‐gles of 0° ,75° ,125° ,225

  18. Evaluation of neutron doses received at different organs in radiotherapy treatments using the UAB PADC based dosemeters in an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K.; Castelo, J. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Servicio de Radiofisica, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    The NEUTOR project was set up to study radiotherapy patient exposures to the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photon radiation above approx8 MeV. These neutrons may reach the patient directly, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well. A miniaturised version of the UAB PADC based neutron dosemeter is used, together with thermoluminescence Li-6/Li-7 pairs, in several positions inside an anthropomorphic female phantom to determine doses received by the patient at several organs or tissues. Irradiations were made at a 15 MV LINAC (Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla, Spain), an 18 MV LINAC (Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Spain) and a 23 MV LINAC (Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany). Preliminary patient dose maps obtained from the UAB PADC dosemeter measurements (considering an average calibration factor for all neutron energies) are reported in this work.

  19. A semi-automated 2D/3D marker-based registration algorithm modelling prostate shrinkage during radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiharto, Tom; Slagmolen, Pieter; Hermans, Jeroen; Maes, Frederik; Verstraete, Jan; Heuvel, Frank Van den; Depuydt, Tom; Oyen, Raymond; Haustermans, Karin

    2009-03-01

    Currently, most available patient alignment tools based on implanted markers use manual marker matching and rigid registration transformations to measure the needed translational shifts. To quantify the particular effect of prostate gland shrinkage, implanted gold markers were tracked during a course of radiotherapy including an isotropic scaling factor to model prostate shrinkage. Eight patients with prostate cancer had gold markers implanted transrectally and seven were treated with (neo) adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. After patient alignment to skin tattoos, orthogonal electronic portal images (EPIs) were taken. A semi-automated 2D/3D marker-based registration was performed to calculate the necessary couch shifts. The registration consists of a rigid transformation combined with an isotropic scaling to model prostate shrinkage. The inclusion of an isotropic shrinkage model in the registration algorithm cancelled the corresponding increase in registration error. The mean scaling factor was 0.89+/-0.09. For all but two patients, a decrease of the isotropic scaling factor during treatment was observed. However, there was almost no difference in the translation offset between the manual matching of the EPIs to the digitally reconstructed radiographs and the semi-automated 2D/3D registration. A decrease in the intermarker distance was found correlating with prostate shrinkage rather than with random marker migration. Inclusion of shrinkage in the registration process reduces registration errors during a course of radiotherapy. Nevertheless, this did not lead to a clinically significant change in the proposed table translations when compared to translations obtained with manual marker matching without a scaling correction.

  20. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging of Residual Skull Base Chordoma Before Radiotherapy Using Fluoromisonidazole and Fluorodeoxyglucose: Potential Consequences for Dose Painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammar, Hamid, E-mail: hamid.mammar@unice.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Antoine Lacassagne Center, Nice (France); CNRS-UMR 6543, Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Kerrou, Khaldoun; Nataf, Valerie [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Tenon Hospital, and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Pontvert, Dominique [Proton Therapy Center of Orsay, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Clemenceau, Stephane [Department of Neurosurgery, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Lot, Guillaume [Department of Neurosurgery, Adolph De Rothschild Foundation, Paris (France); George, Bernard [Department of Neurosurgery, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Polivka, Marc [Department of Pathology, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Mokhtari, Karima [Department of Pathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Ferrand, Regis; Feuvret, Loiec; Habrand, Jean-louis [Proton Therapy Center of Orsay, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Pouyssegur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie [CNRS-UMR 6543, Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Talbot, Jean-Noeel [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Tenon Hospital, and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To detect the presence of hypoxic tissue, which is known to increase the radioresistant phenotype, by its uptake of fluoromisonidazole (18F) (FMISO) using hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, and to compare it with the glucose-avid tumor tissue imaged with fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) (FDG), in residual postsurgical skull base chordoma scheduled for radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seven patients with incompletely resected skull base chordomas were planned for high-dose radiotherapy (dose {>=}70 Gy). All 7 patients underwent FDG and FMISO PET/CT. Images were analyzed qualitatively by visual examination and semiquantitatively by computing the ratio of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the tumor and cerebellum (T/C R), with delineation of lesions on conventional imaging. Results: Of the eight lesion sites imaged with FDG PET/CT, only one was visible, whereas seven of nine lesions were visible on FMISO PET/CT. The median SUVmax in the tumor area was 2.8 g/mL (minimum 2.1; maximum 3.5) for FDG and 0.83 g/mL (minimum 0.3; maximum 1.2) for FMISO. The T/C R values ranged between 0.30 and 0.63 for FDG (median, 0.41) and between 0.75 and 2.20 for FMISO (median,1.59). FMISO T/C R >1 in six lesions suggested the presence of hypoxic tissue. There was no correlation between FMISO and FDG uptake in individual chordomas (r = 0.18, p = 0.7). Conclusion: FMISO PET/CT enables imaging of the hypoxic component in residual chordomas. In the future, it could help to better define boosted volumes for irradiation and to overcome the radioresistance of these lesions. No relationship was founded between hypoxia and glucose metabolism in these tumors after initial surgery.

  1. An overview of Monte Carlo treatment planning for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezi, Emiliano; Lewis, Geraint

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms in clinical radiotherapy treatment planning systems has been anticipated for many years. Despite a continuous increase of interest in Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP), its introduction into clinical practice has been delayed by the extent of calculation time required. The development of newer and faster MC codes is behind the commercialisation of the first MC-based treatment planning systems. The intended scope of this article is to provide the reader with a compact 'primer' on different approaches to MCTP with particular attention to the latest developments in the field.

  2. Comparison of long-term survival between temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone for patients with low-grade gliomas after surgical resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai XJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Xiu-juan Gai,1,2 Yu-mei Wei,2 Heng-min Tao,1,2 Dian-zheng An,2 Jia-teng Sun,1,2 Bao-sheng Li2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology VI, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Purpose: This study was designed to compare the survival outcomes of temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy (TMZ + RT vs radiotherapy alone (RT-alone for low-grade gliomas (LGGs after surgical resection. Patients and methods: In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed postoperative records of 69 patients with LGGs treated with TMZ + RT (n=31 and RT-alone (n=38 at the Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University between June 2011 and December 2013. Patients in the TMZ + RT group were administered 50–100 mg oral TMZ every day until the radiotherapy regimen was completed. Results: The median follow-up since surgery was 33 months and showed no significant intergroup differences (P=0.06. There were statistically significant intergroup differences in the progression-free survival rate (P=0.037, with 83.9% for TMZ-RT group and 60.5% for RT-alone group. The overall 2-year overall survival (OS rate was 89.86%. Age distribution (≥45 years and <45 years and resection margin (complete resection or not were significantly associated with OS (P=0.03 and P=0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Although no differences were found in the 2-year OS between the TMZ + RT and RT-alone groups, there was a trend toward increased 2-year progression-free survival in the TMZ + RT group. With better tolerability, concurrent TMZ chemoradiotherapy may be beneficial for postoperative patients with LGGs. Age distribution and surgical margin are likely potential indicators of disease prognosis. The possible differences in long-term survival between the two groups and the links between

  3. Quality and safety in radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The first text to focus solely on quality and safety in radiotherapy, this work encompasses not only traditional, more technically oriented, quality assurance activities, but also general approaches of quality and safety. It includes contributions from experts both inside and outside the field to present a global view. The task of assuring quality is no longer viewed solely as a technical, equipment-dependent endeavor. Instead, it is now recognized as depending on both the processes and the people delivering the service. Divided into seven broad categories, the text covers: Quality Management

  4. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies.

  5. Single- versus multiple-fraction radiotherapy in patients with painful bone metastases: cost-utility analysis based on a randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, W.B. van den; Linden, Y.J.M. van der; Steenland, E.; Wiggenraad, R.G.; Kievit, J.; Haes, J.C.J.M. de; Leer, J.W.H.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is an effective palliative treatment for cancer patients with painful bone metastases. Although single- and multiple-fraction radiotherapy are thought to provide equal palliation, which treatment schedule provides better value for the money is unknown. We compared quality-ad

  6. Planning a Radiotherapy Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, D

    2017-02-01

    The master planning of new radiotherapy facilities requires the input and engagement of a range of highly specialised professionals, both in the construction and health sector. Although radiation protection and safety aspects of radiotherapy services are universal, low and middle income countries are often presented with unique challenges that also need to be considered, e.g. competing needs within the health sector, lack of financial and human resources, environmental factors like poor provision of transport or electrical power, inadequate regulatory infrastructure, etc. Efforts to establish, upgrade or expand radiotherapy services should therefore not only focus on the technology that is appropriate and sustainable, but also be mindful of the need for quality, safety and optimal utilisation of technology. The workflow in a radiotherapy department can be facilitated by strategic placement of the main functional areas into the concept design. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Indoor field strength prediction based on FMM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-bin; ZHANG Ye-rong

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the fast multipole method (FMM) is applied to analyze the field strength of an ultra-wideband (UWB)signal. Small coverage of UWB communication systems and high efficiency of the algorithm make it possible to calculate the amplitude of electric field accurately. A homogeneous dielectric body and a multilayered dielectric object are studied. The computational results obtained by applying the FMM agree well with those obtained by applying the method of moments (MoM).

  8. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza Helal

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... showed the best dose homogeneity and conformity and lowest max dose to PTV and to the ... nique, size of treatment field, total dose and dose/fraction.6,7 ..... Cooperative Group: the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of.

  9. Development of a computational system based in the code GEANT4 for dosimetric evaluation in radiotherapy; Desenvolvimento de um sistema computacional baseado no Codigo GEANT4 para avaliacoes dosimetricas em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Alex Cristovao Holanda de

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cancer has grown in Brazil, as well as around the world, following the change in the age profile of the population. One of the most important techniques and commonly used in cancer treatment is radiotherapy. Around 60% of new cases of cancer use radiation in at least one phase of treatment. The most used equipment for radiotherapy is a linear accelerator (Linac) which produces electron or X-ray beams in energy range from 5 to 30 MeV. The most appropriate way to irradiate a patient is determined during treatment planning. Currently, treatment planning system (TPS) is the main and the most important tool in the process of planning for radiotherapy. The main objective of this work is to develop a computational system based on the MC code Geant4 for dose evaluations in photon beam radiotherapy. In addition to treatment planning, these dose evaluations can be performed for research and quality control of equipment and TPSs. The computer system, called Quimera, consists of a graphical user interface (qGUI) and three MC applications (qLinacs, qMATphantoms and qNCTphantoms). The qGUI has the function of interface for the MC applications, by creating or editing the input files, running simulations and analyzing the results. The qLinacs is used for modeling and generation of Linac beams (phase space). The qMATphantoms and qNCTphantoms are used for dose calculations in virtual models of physical phantoms and computed tomography (CT) images, respectively. From manufacturer's data, models of a Varian Linac photon beam and a Varian multileaf collimator (MLC) were simulated in the qLinacs. The Linac and MLC modelling were validated using experimental data. qMATphamtoms and qNCTphantoms were validated using IAEA phase spaces. In this first version, the Quimera can be used for research, radiotherapy planning of simple treatments and quality control in photon beam radiotherapy. The MC applications work independent of the qGUI and the qGUI can be used for

  10. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  11. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor%基因治疗联合放射治疗恶性肿瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耀文; 曹永珍; 李进; 王芹

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research.Nowadays,a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research,and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy,suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy,antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features.This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism.%肿瘤治疗是目前医学研究的重点之一,基因治疗与放射治疗方法的结合倍受重视,根据技术特点这种联合治疗方法主要有:免疫基因治疗联合放疗、直接杀伤或抑制肿瘤细胞的基因治疗联合放疗、抗肿瘤血管生成的基因治疗联合放疗以及辐射保护性基因治疗.综述了近年来基因治疗联合放射治疗恶性肿瘤的研究现状以及可能的作用机制.

  12. Correlation of pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET tumor textural features with gene expression in pharyngeal cancer and implications for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shang-Wen [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University, School of Medicine, Taichung (China); Taipei Medical University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); China Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); Shen, Wei-Chih [China Medical University, Cancer Center and Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung (China); Asia University, Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, Taichung (China); Lin, Ying-Chun [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung (China); China Medical University and Academia Sinica, The Ph.D. Program for Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, Taichung (China); Chen, Rui-Yun [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Taichung (China); Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yen, Kuo-Yang [China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Kao, Chia-Hung [China Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taichung (China); China Medical University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Taichung (China); Asia University, Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Taichung (China)

    2017-04-15

    This study investigated the correlation of the matrix heterogeneity of tumors on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with gene-expression profiling in patients with pharyngeal cancer and determined the prognostic factors for radiotherapy-based treatment outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 57 patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer who had completed definitive therapy. Four groups of the textural features as well as 31 indices were studied in addition to maximum standard uptake value, metastatic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis. Immunohistochemical data from pretreatment biopsy specimens (Glut1, CAIX, VEGF, HIF-1α, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, CLAUDIN-4, YAP-1, c-Met, and p16) were analyzed. The relationships between the indices and genomic expression were studied, and the robustness of various textural features relative to cause-specific survival and primary relapse-free survival was analyzed. The overexpression of VEGF was positively associated with the increased values of the matrix heterogeneity obtained using gray-level nonuniformity for zone (GLNUz) and run-length nonuniformity (RLNU). Advanced T stage (p = 0.01, hazard ratio [HR] = 3.38), a VEGF immunoreactive score of >2 (p = 0.03, HR = 2.79), and a higher GLNUz value (p = 0.04, HR = 2.51) were prognostic factors for low cause-specific survival, whereas advanced T stage, a HIF-1α staining percentage of ≥80%, and a higher GLNUz value were prognostic factors for low primary-relapse free survival. The overexpression of VEGF was associated with the increased matrix index of GLNUz and RLNU. For patients with pharyngeal cancer requiring radiotherapy, the treatment outcome can be stratified according to the textural features, T stage, and biomarkers. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of long-term survival between temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone for patients with low-grade gliomas after surgical resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Xiu-juan; Wei, Yu-mei; Tao, Heng-min; An, Dian-zheng; Sun, Jia-teng; Li, Bao-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the survival outcomes of temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy (TMZ + RT) vs radiotherapy alone (RT-alone) for low-grade gliomas (LGGs) after surgical resection. Patients and methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed postoperative records of 69 patients with LGGs treated with TMZ + RT (n=31) and RT-alone (n=38) at the Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University between June 2011 and December 2013. Patients in the TMZ + RT group were administered 50–100 mg oral TMZ every day until the radiotherapy regimen was completed. Results The median follow-up since surgery was 33 months and showed no significant intergroup differences (P=0.06). There were statistically significant intergroup differences in the progression-free survival rate (P=0.037), with 83.9% for TMZ-RT group and 60.5% for RT-alone group. The overall 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 89.86%. Age distribution (≥45 years and <45 years) and resection margin (complete resection or not) were significantly associated with OS (P=0.03 and P=0.004, respectively). Conclusion Although no differences were found in the 2-year OS between the TMZ + RT and RT-alone groups, there was a trend toward increased 2-year progression-free survival in the TMZ + RT group. With better tolerability, concurrent TMZ chemoradiotherapy may be beneficial for postoperative patients with LGGs. Age distribution and surgical margin are likely potential indicators of disease prognosis. The possible differences in long-term survival between the two groups and the links between prognostic factors and long-term survival may be worthy of further investigation. PMID:27574452

  14. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Immanuel eBittner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  15. Definitive salvage for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer: the impact of modern intensity-modulated-radiotherapy with image-based HDR brachytherapy and the interplay of the PORTEC 1 risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, John A; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J; Berhane, Hebist; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P; Comerci, John T; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-10-01

    Data for salvage radiotherapy for recurrent endometrial cancer are limited especially in the era of modern radiotherapy including IMRT and 3-dimensional image-based HDR brachytherapy. Theoretically, modern radiotherapy reduces the dose to critical organs-at-risk and maximizes dose to the target volume, possibly decreasing morbidity and increasing tumor control. Forty-one patients completing definitive salvage radiotherapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer from June 2004 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. HDR Brachytherapy was completed using image-based planning with contouring/optimization with each fraction to a median dose of 23.75 Gy in 5 fractions. HDR brachytherapy was preceded by external beam radiotherapy predominately using an IMRT technique (90%) to a median dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Toxicity was reported according to CTCAEv4. At a median follow-up of 18 months (range: 3-78), the clinical complete response rate was 95%. The 3-year local control, distant control, recurrence free survival, and overall survival were 95%, 61%, 68%, and 67%. Significant predictors of both distant failure and overall survival were primary prognostic factors of depth of myometrial invasion, FIGO stage, and FIGO grade. There was no grade 3+ acute toxicity; the 3-year rate of grade 3+ late toxicity was 8%. Salvage IMRT plus 3-dimensional image-based HDR brachytherapy shows excellent tumor control and minimal morbidity for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Anticipated salvage rates must be taken in the context of primary risk factors including depth of myometrial invasion, FIGO stage, and FIGO grade. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mappings of Fields Based on Nominations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Graphical representations of nominations and citations of colleagues in seven scientific fields--information science, human systems management, future studies, general systems, topology and differential geometry, and polymer chemistry--are presented. Conomination analysis and cocitation analysis are compared as techniques to study structure of…

  17. The place radiotherapy alone with respect to surgery and radiotherapy in locally advanced vulva cancers; Place de la radiotherapie seule par rapport a la chirurgie et la radiotherapie dans les cancers vulvaires localement evolues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansouri, S.; Naim, A.; Moukhlissi, M.; Tawfik, N.; Bouchbika, Z.; Benchekroun, N.; Jouhadi, H.; Sahraoui, S.; Benider, A. [Centre de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier universitaire, Ibn-Rochd, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2011-10-15

    The author report a study which aimed at evaluating the place or radiotherapy associated with surgery and of radiotherapy without surgery when taking into care locally advanced vulva cancers. The study is based on 46 cases. After 24 months, different aspects, such as recurrence and survival, have been assessed. It appears that there is no survival difference without recurrences between both sets. Short communication

  18. Dosimetric Comparison of Two Craniospinal Radiotherapy Techniques for Treatment Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Baghani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orthogonal radial fields are those in which the central axes are perpendicular to each other. An example of these orthogonal fields is the set of craniospinal orthogonal fields that are used for radiotherapy of medulloblastoma. Craniospinal radial fields consist of two parallel-opposed fields for brain exposure and one or two posterior spinal fields for spinal cord exposure. The main problem in using these combinative fields is the overlap of radial fields, where they adjoin. Therefore, adjusting radial fields in craniospinal radiotherapy is of remarkable significance and can outstandingly affect the reduction of the side effects due to radiotherapy. In doing so, two different setups were used for craniospinal radiotherapy, and by using dosimetry in each adjustment in the junction region between brain and upper spine fields and in organs at risk, the results of the two adjustments were compared. Materials and Methods: Each one of these two setups was separately performed on a Rando phantom. In the first setup, the arrangement of radial fields was performed without the rotation of the treatment bed and the collimators of the brain fields. In the second setup, the arrangement of radial fields was performed using the rotation of the treatment bed and the collimators of brain fields. For dosimetry, GR-200 TLDs were used. For radiotherapy, a varian linac (2100 C/D Model was used. Results: The results of dosimetry in the brain CTV, junction of brain and upper spine fields, thyroid and heart in the first setup were equal to 105, 168, 46 and 44 cGy, respectively, and in second setup, 106, 140, 48 and 44 cGy, respectively. Absorbed dose to the testes in both setups was negligible.  Discussion and Conclusion: The results of dosimetry in both setups showed that angling the bed and the collimators for the brain fields prevents the overlap of radial fields and reduces the side effects due to radiotherapy.

  19. Accelerated Deformable Registration of Repetitive MRI during Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Kiritsis, Christian;

    2006-01-01

    Tumour regression and organ deformations during radiotherapy (RT) of cervical cancer represent major challenges regarding accurate conformation and calculation of dose when using image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. Deformable registration algorithms are able to handle organ deformations, which can...... be useful with advanced tools such as auto segmentation of organs and dynamic adaptation of radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to accelerate and validate deformable registration in MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer.    ...

  20. Radiotherapy dose led to a substantial prolongation of survival in patients with locally advanced rectosigmoid junction cancer: a large population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xu; Jiang, Zheng; Ma, Tianyi; Liu, Zheng; Hu, Hanqing; Zhao, Zhixun; Song, Dawei; Chen, Yinggang; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Xishan

    2016-05-10

    Radiotherapy is widely applied for locally advanced rectal cancer (RC) to improve both local control and long-term outcomes. However, the efficacy of radiotherapy for rectosigmoid junction cancer (RSC) is still undetermined. Here, we identified 10074 patients who were diagnosed with locally advanced RSC from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results (SEER) cancer registry. These patients were divided into three subgroups according to different therapy strategies, including surgery alone, surgery plus preoperative radiotherapy and surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy. 5-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were obtained. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression models were used to estimate the correlations between prognostic factors and survival outcomes.The 5-year CSSs for RSC patients treated with pre- and postoperative radiotherapy were 72.3% and 72.2%, which were significantly higher than surgery alone (64.8%). The 5-year OSs for RSC patients treated with pre- and postoperative radiotherapy were 71.6% and 71.2%, which were higher than surgery alone (64.0%). In the separate analyses of stage II and III RSC patients, the similar trends were also obtained. In addition, pre- and postoperative radiotherapy were equally identified as valuable prognostic factors for better survival outcomes in RSC patients. Furthermore, the results following propensity score matching also confirmed that the long-term survivals of RSC patients were improved following radiotherapy. In conclusion, locally advanced RSCpatients could obtain potential long-term survival benefits from radiotherapy. A prospective randomized control trial should be performed to further validate the strength of evidence in current study.

  1. Adjuvant temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in patients with WHO III astrocytoma. The Mainz experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Arnulf; Schwanbeck, Carina; Stockinger, Marcus; Vaupel, Peter; Schmidberger, Heinz [University Medical Center, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Mainz (Germany); Sommer, Clemens [University Medical Center, Department of Neuropathology, Mainz (Germany); Giese, Alf; Renovanz, Mirjam [University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    It is currently unclear whether adjuvant therapy for WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytomas (AA) should be carried out as combined chemoradiotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) - analogous to the approach for glioblastoma multiforme - or as radiotherapy (RT) alone. A retrospective analysis of data from 90 patients with AA, who were treated between November 1997 and February 2014. Assessment of overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was performed according to treatment categories: (1) 50 %, RT + TMZ according to protocol, (2) 11 %, RT + TMZ with dose reduction, (3) 26 %, RT alone, and (4) 13 %, individualized, primarily palliative therapy. No dose reduction was necessary in the RT alone group. Median OS was 85, 69, and 43 months for treatment categories 1/2, 3, and 4, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. PFS was 35, 29, 48, and 33 months for categories 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively; again without significant differences between categories. In a subgroup of 39 patients with known IDH1 R132H status, the presence of this mutation correlated with significantly longer OS (p = 0.01) and PFS (p = 0.002). Complete or partial tumor resection and younger age also correlated with a significantly better prognosis, and this influence persisted in multivariate analysis. In the IDH1 R132H subgroup analysis, only this marker retained an independent prognostic value. A general superiority of combined chemoradiotherapy compared to RT alone could not be demonstrated. Biomarkers for predicting the benefits of combination therapy using RT and TMZ are needed for patients with AA. (orig.) [German] Es ist derzeit unklar, ob bei anaplastischen Astrozytomen (AA) vom WHO-Grad III eine adjuvante Therapie analog zur Therapiestrategie beim Glioblastoma multiforme als kombinierte Radiochemotherapie mit Temozolomid (TMZ) oder als alleinige Radiotherapie (RT) durchgefuehrt werden sollte. Retrospektiv wurden die Daten von 90 Patienten mit AA, die zwischen November

  2. Validation of an amino-acid-based radionuclide therapy plus external beam radiotherapy in heterotopic glioblastoma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, Ina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, D-97080 Wuerzburg (Germany); Blass, Georg [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg (Germany); Reiners, Christoph [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, D-97080 Wuerzburg (Germany); Samnick, Samuel, E-mail: samnick_s@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.d [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, D-97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Background and purpose: Malignant gliomas represent a major therapeutic challenge because no efficient treatment is currently available. p-[{sup 131}I]iodo-L-phenylalanine ([{sup 131}I]IPA) is a glioma avid radiopharmaceutical that demonstrated antiproliferative and tumoricidal effects in gliomas. The present study validated the therapeutic efficiency of [{sup 131}I]IPA combined with external beam radiotherapy in experimental gliomas. Materials and methods: Glioma cells derived from the primary human A1207, T5135, Tx3868 and M059K glioblastoma cell lines or rat F98 glioma cell line were treated with various doses of [{sup 131}I]IPA, external photon irradiation (RT) or combined [{sup 131}I]IPA/RT treatment. Responsiveness of glioma cells to the different therapy modalities was investigated at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatments by trypan blue, WST-1 assay, propidium iodide and bisbenzimide staining as well as by clonogenic assay. In addition, the therapy-induced DNA damage and repair were evaluated using phosphorylated histone H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX). In vivo, the effectiveness of the combination treatment was validated in human Tx3868 and A1207 glioblastoma xenografts in CD1 nu/nu mice and RNU rats. Results: In vitro, the combination treatment resulted in a greater than additive increase in cytotoxic effect in glioma cell lines. Cell survival rate following a treatment with 1.0 {mu}Ci (37 kBq) of [{sup 131}I]IPA amounted to 70%{+-}15% and 60%{+-}10% after 48 and 72 h, respectively, and decreased under 20% after additional RT with 5 Gy. At higher RT doses, cell survival rate decreased below 5%. As a measure of DNA double-strand break, nuclear {gamma}-H2AX foci were determined as a function of time. Within 24 h, the number of {gamma}-H2AX foci per cell was significantly greater after combined modality compared with the individual treatments. In vivo, when combined with RT, the radionuclide therapy with [{sup 131}I]IPA resulted in an extended tumor growth delay, a reduction

  3. Risk of myeloid neoplasms after radiotherapy among older women with localized breast cancer: A population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jessica B.; Wang, Rong; Hu, Xin; Yu, James B.; Huntington, Scott F.; Abel, Gregory A.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Podoltsev, Nikolai A.; Gore, Steven D.; Gross, Cary P.; Ma, Xiaomei; Davidoff, Amy J.

    2017-01-01

    Background There are inconsistent and limited data regarding the risk of myeloid neoplasms (MN) among breast cancer survivors who received radiotherapy (RT) in the absence of chemotherapy. Concern about subsequent MN might influence the decision to use adjuvant RT for women with localized disease. As patients with therapy-related MN have generally poor outcomes, the presumption of subsequent MN being therapy-related could affect treatment recommendations. Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database to study older women with in-situ or stage 1–3 breast cancer diagnosed 2001–2009 who received surgery. Chemotherapy and RT were ascertained using Medicare claims, and new MN diagnoses were captured using both SEER registry and Medicare claims. We excluded women who received chemotherapy for initial treatment, and censored at receipt of subsequent chemotherapy. Competing-risk survival analysis was used to assess the association between RT and risk of subsequent MN adjusting for relevant characteristics. Results Median follow-up for 60,426 eligible patients was 68 months (interquartile range, 46 to 92 months), with 47.6% receiving RT. In total, 316 patients (0.52%) were diagnosed with MN; the cumulative incidence per 10,000 person-years was 10.6 vs 9.0 among RT-treated vs non-RT-treated women, respectively (p = .004); the increased risk of subsequent MN persisted in the adjusted analysis (hazard ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.80). The results were consistent in multiple sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Our data suggest that RT is associated with a significant risk of subsequent MN among older breast cancer survivors, though the absolute risk increase is very small. These findings suggest the benefits of RT outweigh the risks of development of subsequent MN. PMID:28902882

  4. Interobserver comparison of CT and MRI-based prostate apex definition. Clinical relevance for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, S.; Wachter-Gerstner, N.; Goldner, G.; Poetter, R. [University Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology; Bock, T. [University Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology; University Hospital Kiel (Germany). Interdisziplinary Center of Brachytherapy; Kovacs, G. [University Hospital Kiel (Germany). Interdisziplinary Center of Brachytherapy; Fransson, A. [University Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology; Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Hospital

    2002-05-01

    Background: CT is widely used for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate carcinoma. Its limitations are especially at the prostatic apex which cannot be separated from the urogenital diaphragm. The aim of this study was to compare the localization of the prostatic apex in CT and axial MRI to the sagittal MRI in an interobserver analysis. Patients and Methods: 22 patients with pathologically proven prostatic carcinoma were included in the analysis. In all patients sagittal and axial T2-weighted MRI and conventional CT were performed. The position of the MRI and CT apices were localized independently by three observers in relation to the intertrochanteric line. Additional subjective judgement of the ability to define the apical border of the prostatic gland was performed by a five-scaled score. Results: The apex of the prostate could be discriminated statistically significant (p<0.001) better in the MRI as compared to CT with best judgement for the sagittal MRI. The interobserver variation for the definition of the prostatic apex was statistically significant (p=0.009) smaller for the sagittal MRI compared to axial MRI and CT. On the average the apex as determined by sagittal MRI, axial MRI and CT was located 29 mm, 27 mm and 24 mm above the intertrochanteric line. The apex defined by CT would have led to an additional treatment of 6-13 mm in 10/22 patients compared to the sagittal MRI, defined by axial MRI only in five patients. Conclusion: Additional MRI provides a superior anatomic information especially in the apical portion of the prostate. It should be recommended for every single patient in the treatment planning process. It helps to avoid an unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissue and could lead to a decrease of anal side effects and radiation-induced impotency due to a reduction of the extent of irradiated penile structures. (orig.)

  5. A Review on RF Field Exposure from Cellular Base Stations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amar Renke; Mahesh Chavan

    2014-01-01

      This review paper, takes into account previously published papers based on human exposure to electromagnetic fields which is radiated from cellular base stations and its corresponding adverse effects on human beings...

  6. The safety and efficacy of EGF-based cream for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced skin injury: results from a multicenter observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Cheol [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seung Do [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min Kyu [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, eungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Huasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topically applied recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) for the prevention of radiation-induced dermatitis in cancer patients. From December 2010 to April 2012, a total of 1,172 cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) of more than 50 Gy were prospectively enrolled and treated with EGF-based cream. An acute skin reaction classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 6-point rating scale was the primary end point and we also assessed the occurrence of edema, dry skin, or pruritus. The percentage of radiation dermatitis with maximum grade 0 and grade 1 was 19% and 58% at the time of 50 Gy, and it became 29% and 47% after completion of planned RT. This increment was observed only in breast cancer patients (from 18%/62% to 32%/49%). Adverse events related to the EGF-based cream developed in 49 patients (4%) with mild erythema the most common. Skin toxicity grade >2 was observed in 5% of the patients. Edema, dry skin, and pruritus grade > or =3 developed in 9%, 9%, and 1% of the patients, respectively. Prophylactic use of an EGF-based cream is effective in preventing radiation dermatitis with tolerable toxicity. Further studies comparing EGF cream with other topical agents may be necessary.

  7. Radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis: Organ equivalent dose to partially in-field structures and second cancer risk estimates on the basis of a mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to (a) calculate the organ equivalent dose (OED) and (b) estimate the associated second cancer risk to partially in-field critical structures from adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis on the basis of three different nonlinear risk models. Three-dimensional plans were created for twelve patients who underwent a treatment planning computed tomography of the abdomen. The plans for irradiation of seminoma consisted of para-aortic anteroposterior and posteroanterior fields giving 20 Gy to the target site with 6 MV photons. The OED of stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidneys, that were partially included in the treatment volume, was calculated using differential dose-volume histograms. The mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau models were employed for these calculations provided that organ-specific parameters were available for the subsequent assessment of the excess absolute risk (EAR) for second cancer development. The estimated organ-specific lifetime risks were compared with the respective nominal intrinsic probabilities for cancer induction. The mean OED, which was calculated from the patients' treatment plans, varied from 0.54 to 6.61 Gy by the partially in-field organ of interest and the model used for dosimetric calculations. The difference between the OED of liver derived from the mechanistic model with those from the bell-shaped and plateau models was less than 1.8%. An even smaller deviation of 1.0% was observed for colon. For the rest organs of interest, the differences between the OED values obtained by the examined models varied from 8.6% to 50.0%. The EAR for stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney cancer induction at an age of 70 yr because of treatment of a typical 39-yr-old individual was up to 4.24, 11.39, 0.91, 3.04, and 0.14 per 10 000 persons-yr, respectively. Patient's irradiation was found to elevate the lifetime intrinsic risks by 8.3%-63.0% depending upon the organ of interest and the

  8. Radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis: Organ equivalent dose to partially in-field structures and second cancer risk estimates on the basis of a mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, Crete 71003 (Greece); Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Iraklion, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of the current study was to (a) calculate the organ equivalent dose (OED) and (b) estimate the associated second cancer risk to partially in-field critical structures from adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis on the basis of three different nonlinear risk models. Methods: Three-dimensional plans were created for twelve patients who underwent a treatment planning computed tomography of the abdomen. The plans for irradiation of seminoma consisted of para-aortic anteroposterior and posteroanterior fields giving 20 Gy to the target site with 6 MV photons. The OED of stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidneys, that were partially included in the treatment volume, was calculated using differential dose–volume histograms. The mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau models were employed for these calculations provided that organ-specific parameters were available for the subsequent assessment of the excess absolute risk (EAR) for second cancer development. The estimated organ-specific lifetime risks were compared with the respective nominal intrinsic probabilities for cancer induction. Results: The mean OED, which was calculated from the patients’ treatment plans, varied from 0.54 to 6.61 Gy by the partially in-field organ of interest and the model used for dosimetric calculations. The difference between the OED of liver derived from the mechanistic model with those from the bell-shaped and plateau models was less than 1.8%. An even smaller deviation of 1.0% was observed for colon. For the rest organs of interest, the differences between the OED values obtained by the examined models varied from 8.6% to 50.0%. The EAR for stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney cancer induction at an age of 70 yr because of treatment of a typical 39-yr-old individual was up to 4.24, 11.39, 0.91, 3.04, and 0.14 per 10 000 persons-yr, respectively. Patient’s irradiation was found to elevate the lifetime intrinsic risks by 8.3%–63.0% depending

  9. MRI-Only Based Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for the Rat Brain on a Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandra Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is the standard imaging modality in radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP. However, magnetic resonance (MR imaging provides superior soft tissue contrast, increasing the precision of target volume selection. We present MR-only based RTP for a rat brain on a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP using probabilistic voxel classification with multiple MR sequences. Six rat heads were imaged, each with one CT and five MR sequences. The MR sequences were: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, zero-echo time (ZTE, and two ultra-short echo time sequences with 20 μs (UTE1 and 2 ms (UTE2 echo times. CT data were manually segmented into air, soft tissue, and bone to obtain the RTP reference. Bias field corrected MR images were automatically segmented into the same tissue classes using a fuzzy c-means segmentation algorithm with multiple images as input. Similarities between segmented CT and automatic segmented MR (ASMR images were evaluated using Dice coefficient. Three ASMR images with high similarity index were used for further RTP. Three beam arrangements were investigated. Dose distributions were compared by analysing dose volume histograms. The highest Dice coefficients were obtained for the ZTE-UTE2 combination and for the T1-UTE1-T2 combination when ZTE was unavailable. Both combinations, along with UTE1-UTE2, often used to generate ASMR images, were used for further RTP. Using 1 beam, MR based RTP underestimated the dose to be delivered to the target (range: 1.4%-7.6%. When more complex beam configurations were used, the calculated dose using the ZTE-UTE2 combination was the most accurate, with 0.7% deviation from CT, compared to 0.8% for T1-UTE1-T2 and 1.7% for UTE1-UTE2. The presented MR-only based workflow for RTP on a SARRP enables both accurate organ delineation and dose calculations using multiple MR sequences. This method can be useful in longitudinal studies where CT's cumulative radiation dose might contribute

  10. MRI-Only Based Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for the Rat Brain on a Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Shandra; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the standard imaging modality in radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP). However, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides superior soft tissue contrast, increasing the precision of target volume selection. We present MR-only based RTP for a rat brain on a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) using probabilistic voxel classification with multiple MR sequences. Six rat heads were imaged, each with one CT and five MR sequences. The MR sequences were: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, zero-echo time (ZTE), and two ultra-short echo time sequences with 20 μs (UTE1) and 2 ms (UTE2) echo times. CT data were manually segmented into air, soft tissue, and bone to obtain the RTP reference. Bias field corrected MR images were automatically segmented into the same tissue classes using a fuzzy c-means segmentation algorithm with multiple images as input. Similarities between segmented CT and automatic segmented MR (ASMR) images were evaluated using Dice coefficient. Three ASMR images with high similarity index were used for further RTP. Three beam arrangements were investigated. Dose distributions were compared by analysing dose volume histograms. The highest Dice coefficients were obtained for the ZTE-UTE2 combination and for the T1-UTE1-T2 combination when ZTE was unavailable. Both combinations, along with UTE1-UTE2, often used to generate ASMR images, were used for further RTP. Using 1 beam, MR based RTP underestimated the dose to be delivered to the target (range: 1.4%-7.6%). When more complex beam configurations were used, the calculated dose using the ZTE-UTE2 combination was the most accurate, with 0.7% deviation from CT, compared to 0.8% for T1-UTE1-T2 and 1.7% for UTE1-UTE2. The presented MR-only based workflow for RTP on a SARRP enables both accurate organ delineation and dose calculations using multiple MR sequences. This method can be useful in longitudinal studies where CT's cumulative radiation dose might contribute to the total

  11. Geothermal emissions data base, Wairakei geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, S.R. (comp.)

    1978-04-01

    A database subset on the gaseous emissions from the Wairakei geothermal field is presented. Properties and states of the reservoir fluid such as flow rates, wellhead pressure, and enthalpy are included in the file along with the well name and constituent measurement. This subset is the result of an initial screening of the data covering 1965 to 1971, and new additions will be appended periodically to the file. The data is accessed by a database management system as are all other subsets in the file. Thereby, one may search the database for specific data requirements and print selective output. For example, one may wish to locate reservoir conditions for cases only when the level of the constituent exceeded a designated value. Data output is available in the form of numerical compilations such as the attached, or graphical displays disposed to paper, film or magnetic tape.

  12. Sorafenib and radiotherapy association for hepatocellular carcinoma; Sorafenib et radiotherapie dans le carcinome hepatocellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, N. [Service de pneumologie, hopital Louis-Pradel, hospices Civils de Lyon, 28, avenue du Doyen-Jean-Lepine, 69500 Bron (France); UMR 754, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Mornex, F. [UMR 754, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Benite cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Conformal radiotherapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), producing local control rates above 90% within the radiation beam. However, survival after radiotherapy remains limited by the high frequency of intra- and extra-hepatic recurrences, which occurs in 40-50 and 20-30% of cases, respectively. Sorafenib (BAY43-9006, Nexavar; Bayer, West Haven, CT) is a small molecule inhibitor that demonstrated potent activity to target v-raf murine sarcoma oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF) and VEGFR tyrosine kinases. Sorafenib is the only drug that demonstrated effectiveness to increase overall survival in advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. The rationale to combine radiotherapy with sorafenib is the following: (1) targeting RAS-RAF-MAPK and VEGFR signaling pathways, which are specifically activated after exposure to radiation, and responsible for radio-resistance phenomenon; (2) enhancing the oxygen effect through normalization of the surviving tumor vasculature; and (3) synchronization of the cell cycle. Sorafenib and radiotherapy represent complementary strategies, as radiotherapy may be useful to prolong the effect of sorafenib through control of the macroscopic disease, when sorafenib may target latent microscopic disease. Sorafenib and radiotherapy associations are thus based on a relevant biological and clinical rationale and are being evaluated in ongoing phase I-II trials. (authors)

  13. The reasonable timing of the adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of uterine carcinosarcoma according to the surgical intent: suggestion based on progression patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Oh, Dong Ryul; Bae, Duk Soo [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We designed this study to identify and suggest the reasonable timing of adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of uterine carcinosarcoma according to the surgical intent and patterns of progression. We retrospectively analyzed a total of 50 carcinosarcoma patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2010. Among these 50 patients, 32 underwent curative surgery and 13 underwent maximal tumor debulking surgery. The remaining five patients underwent biopsy only. Twenty-six patients received chemotherapy, and 15 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. The median follow-up period was 17.3 months. Curative resection (p < 0.001) and stage (p < 0.001) were statistically significant factors affecting survival. During follow-up, 30 patients showed progression. Among these, eight patients (16.0%) had loco-regional progression only. The patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy did not show loco-regional progression, and radiotherapy was a significant negative risk factor for loco-regional progression (p = 0.01). The time to loco-regional progression was much earlier for non-curative than curative resection (range, 0.7 to 7.6 months vs. 7.5 to 39.0 months). Adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of carcinosarcoma might be related to a low loco-regional progression rate. Radiotherapy should be considered in non-curatively resected patients as soon as possible.

  14. Skin treatment with bepanthen cream versus no cream during radiotherapy. A randomized controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loekkevik, E. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Oncology; Skovlund, E. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Oncology]|[Oslo Univ. (Norway). Section of Medical Statistics; Reitan, J.B. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Oncology]|[Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oslo (Norway). Radiation Medicine Dept.; Hannisdal, E. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Oncology; Tanum, G. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Oncology

    1996-12-31

    In several radiotherapy departments, dexpanthenol cream (Bepanthen `Roche`) has been used extensively to ameliorate acute radiotherapy skin reactions. The evidence base for this practice is obscure as no randomized trials have been performed. In the present clinical prospective study of 86 patients we have compared Bepanthen cream with no topical ointment at all. The cream was applied on randomly selected parts of treatment fields in laryngeal and breast cancer patients, and so each patient acted as his own control. Seven patients were widthdrawn from analysis. Scoring of skin reactions in 16 laryngeal and 63 breast cancer patients was performed without knowledge of which are that had been given cream or not. Endpoints were a modified skin reaction grading according to EORTC/RTOG, and itching/apin in treated fields. The study did not indicate any clinically important benefits of using Bepanthen cream for ameliorating radiogenic skin reactions under the conditions applied. (orig.).

  15. Skin treatment with bepanthen cream versus no cream during radiotherapy--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løkkevik, E; Skovlund, E; Reitan, J B; Hannisdal, E; Tanum, G

    1996-01-01

    In several radiotherapy departments, dexpanthenol cream (Bepanthen 'Roche') has been used extensively to ameliorate acute radiotherapy skin reactions. The evidence base for this practice is obscure as no randomized trials have been performed. In the present clinical prospective study of 86 patients we have compared Bepanthen cream with no topical ointment at all. The cream was applied on randomly selected parts of treatment fields in laryngeal and breast cancer patients, and so each patient acted as his own control. Seven patients were withdrawn from analysis. Scoring of skin reactions in 16 laryngeal and 63 breast cancer patients was performed without knowledge of which area that had been given cream or not. Endpoints were a modified skin reaction grading according to EORTC/RTOG, and itching/pain in treated fields. The study did not indicate any clinically important benefits of using Bepanthen cream for ameliorating radiogenic skin reactions under the conditions applied.

  16. Radiotherapy for the medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Imanaka, Kazufumi (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-08-01

    Eighteen patients with medulloblastoma, treated between 1972 and 1981, at Kobe University School of Medicine, were retrospectively studied. Of those completing post operative irradiation, 50% have survived for 2 years, 15% for 5 years and mean survival periods was 22.2 months. 13 out of 18 patients developed local recurrence and spinal dissemination. The mean time from the initial radiotherapy to recurrence was 8.5 months. It was suggested that posterior fossa should recieve 5,000 rad, the spine should 2,000 rad and recurrences should be treated by the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  17. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  18. Radiotherapy-induced hypopituitarism: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Dixit, Sanjay

    2012-05-01

    Hypopituitarism is a disorder caused by impaired hormonal secretions from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Radiotherapy is the most common cause of iatrogenic hypopituitarism. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis inadvertently gets irradiated in patients receiving prophylactic cranial radiotherapy for leukemia, total body irradiation and radiotherapy for intracranial, base skull, sinonasal and nasopharyngeal tumors. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism (RIH) is insidious, progressive and largely nonreversible. Mostly, RIH involves one hypothalamic-pituitary axis; however, multiple hormonal axes deficiency starts developing at higher doses. Although the clinical effects of the hypopituitarism are more profound in children and young adults, its implications in older adults are being increasingly recognized. The risk continues to persist or increase up to 10 years following radiation exposure. The clinical management of hypopituitarism is challenging both for the patients and healthcare providers. Here we have reviewed the scale of the problem, the risk factors and the management of RIH.

  19. Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest terms, doctoral dissertation entitled "Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy" is part of the supporting research background in the development of the ambitious proton radiotherapy project currently under way at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN in Krak\\'ow. Another broad motivation was the desire to become directly involved in research on a topical and challenging subject of possibly developing a therapy planning system for carbon beam radiotherapy, based in its radiobiological part on the Track Structure model developed by prof. Robert Katz over 50 years ago. Thus, the general aim of this work was, firstly, to recapitulate the Track Structure model and to propose an updated and complete formulation of this model by incorporating advances made by several authors who had contributed to its development in the past. Secondly, the updated and amended (if necessary) formulation of the model was presented in a form applicable for use in computer codes which would constitute the "radiobio...

  20. Radiofrequency fields: Bases for exposure limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paolo Vecchia [Department of Technologies and Health National Institute of Health, Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Several biological effects have been reported at exposure levels below the threshold for thermal effects, but most of them require independent confirmation before being accepted as established. However, no seems to have relevant implications for human health. Precautionary measures should be based on a cost/benefit analysis, and be proportionate on one side to the risk they aim at preventing and on the other side to actions taken in other areas to prevent comparable risks. (N.C.)

  1. Intensified autophagy compromises the efficacy of radiotherapy against prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukourakis, Michael I., E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 68100 (Greece); Kalamida, Dimitra; Mitrakas, Achilleas; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Kalamida, Sofia [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 68100 (Greece); Sivridis, Efthimios; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 68100 (Greece)

    2015-05-29

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an equivalent alternative or complement to radical prostatectomy, with high therapeutic efficacy. High risk patients, however, experience high relapse rates, so that research on radio-sensitization is the most evident route to improve curability of this common disease. Materials and methods: In the current study we investigated the autophagic activity in a series of patients with localized prostate tumors treated with radical radiotherapy, using the LC3A and the LAMP2a proteins as markers of autophagosome and lysosome cellular content, respectively. The role of autophagy on prostate cancer cell line resistance to radiation was also examined. Results: Using confocal microscopy on tissue biopsies, we showed that prostate cancer cells have, overall, high levels of LC3A and low levels of LAMP2a compared to normal prostate glands. Tumors with a ‘highLC3A/lowLAMP2a’ phenotype, suggestive of intensified lysosomal consumption, had a significantly poorer biochemical relapse free survival. The PC3 radioresistant cell line sustained remarkably its autophagic flux ability after radiation, while the DU145 radiosensitive one experiences a prolonged blockage of the autophagic process. This was assessed with aggresome accumulation detection and LC3A/LAMP2a double immunofluorescence, as well as with sequestrosome/p62 protein detection. By silencing the LC3A or LAMP2a expression, both cell lines became more sensitive to escalated doses of radiation. Conclusions: High base line autophagy activity and cell ability to sustain functional autophagy define resistance of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy. This can be reversed by blocking up-regulated components of the autophagy pathway, which may prove of importance in the field of clinical radiotherapy. - Highlights: • High LC3A and low LAMP2a levels is a frequent expression pattern of prostate carcinoma. • This pattern of intensified autophagic flux relates with high relapse rates after

  2. [Recent developments in radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jinsil

    2004-12-01

    With the accumulation of clinical experiences, the efficacy of radiotherapy has been recognized in management scheme for HCC. While hepatologists are beginning to show less reluctance for applying radiotherapy to the treatment of HCC, it is necessary that the hepatologists be informed of the rapid developments in technical strategy for radiation oncology. Recent advances in several technologies have opened a new era in radiation oncology. Modern imaging technologies can provide a 3-dimensional model of patient's anatomy, and this allows radiation oncologists to identify accurate tumor volumes as well as the tumors' relationship with the adjacent normal tissues. Moreover, the development of the computer-controlled multileaf collimator systems now enables physicians to perform precise beam shaping and to modulate the radiation dose distribution. A combination of these systems, 3-DCRT, is rapidly replacing the more conventional 2-D radiotherapy. 3-DCRT has evolved into a more sophisticated technology, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In IMRT, with the powerful computer-aided optimization process, the radiation dose can be delivered to the target using highly complex isodose profiles. This new technology has been further developed into IGRT, which combines the CT-images scanning system and radiation equipments into one hardware package, and this system is currently ready for clinical application. In parallel with the radiation technologies described above, the strategy of stereotactic radiation has evolved from the conventional linear accelerator-based system to a gammaknife, and more recently, to a cyberknife. These systems are primarily based on the concept of radiosurgery. Currently, various radiation technologies have been adopted for the radiotherapy of HCC. In this article, each strategy will be discussed as well as the indications for radiotherapy and the radiation-related complications.

  3. A rare case of unusual gingival enlargement post radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral changes following radiotherapy are not uncommon. Oral mucositis, alteration in salivary gland function, radiation caries, and gingival changes have all been reported following radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The gingival changes seen after radiotherapy may be unusual and often cause diagnostic dilemma. Metastasis to the gingiva has also to be ruled out in these cases. A 30-year-old female patient presented with enlargement of the gingiva of 6 months′ duration and lower lip swelling of 7 months′ duration. She was a known case of carcinoma of nasopharynx and had received radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Based on the history, the clinical appearance of the gingiva, and the other oral changes we considered both post-radiotherapy gingival enlargement and secondary metastasis to gingiva as possibilities. An incisional biopsy was performed (internal bevel gingivectomy. The histopathological report did not reveal any metastatic changes. Thus, we diagnosed post-radiotherapy gingival enlargement. For the multiple carious teeth, extraction and root canal treatment was carried out as necessary. The patient was referred to the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery for management of swelling of the lips, which was diagnosed as lymphedema of the lip. Gingival enlargement is rare post radiotherapy. Such nonplaque-associated gingival enlargement in a patient who has undergone radiotherapy should be subjected to biopsy and histopathological examination to distinguish between secondary metastasis and post-radiation changes.

  4. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  5. Implementation of a new system of radiotherapy by image-guided based on structures light; Implantacion de un nuevo sistema de radioterapia guiada por la imagen basdo en luz estructurada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brualla Gonzalez, L.; Granero Cabanero, D.; Gonzalez Sanchis, A.; Vicedo Gonzalez, A.; Garcia Hernandez, M. T.; Almendros Blanco, P.; Gordo Partearroyo, J. C.; Pastor Peidro, J. R.; Parreno Romeu, L.; Rosello Ferrando, J.

    2013-07-01

    It has acquired in our facility, a new system of image guided radiotherapy. This equipment is based on Imaging using visible light, a pattern that is known about the surface of the patient. For a particular case have been established as secondary objectives variations of volume control during treatment and its ability to allow the location of the tumor bed within the breast volume. Finally, discusses the possibilities of the system for monitoring the position of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  6. Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based Auto-contouring Software Tool for Gross Tumour Delineation in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, T; Wilson, C; Paterson, C; Lamb, C; James, A; MacKenzie, K; Soraghan, J; Petropoulakis, L; Di Caterina, G; Grose, D

    2017-01-01

    To carry out statistical validation of a newly developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) auto-contouring software tool for gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation in head and neck tumours to assist in radiotherapy planning. Axial MRI baseline scans were obtained for 10 oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancer patients. GTV was present on 102 axial slices and auto-contoured using the modified fuzzy c-means clustering integrated with the level set method (FCLSM). Peer-reviewed (C-gold) manual contours were used as the reference standard to validate auto-contoured GTVs (C-auto) and mean manual contours (C-manual) from two expert clinicians (C1 and C2). Multiple geometric metrics, including the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), were used for quantitative validation. A DSC≥0.7 was deemed acceptable. Inter- and intra-variabilities among the manual contours were also validated. The two-dimensional contours were then reconstructed in three dimensions for GTV volume calculation, comparison and three-dimensional visualisation. The mean DSC between C-gold and C-auto was 0.79. The mean DSC between C-gold and C-manual was 0.79 and that between C1 and C2 was 0.80. The average time for GTV auto-contouring per patient was 8 min (range 6-13 min; mean 45 s per axial slice) compared with 15 min (range 6-23 min; mean 88 s per axial slice) for C1. The average volume concordance between C-gold and C-auto volumes was 86.51% compared with 74.16% between C-gold and C-manual. The average volume concordance between C1 and C2 volumes was 86.82%. This newly designed MRI-based auto-contouring software tool shows initial acceptable results in GTV delineation of oropharyngeal and laryngeal tumours using FCLSM. This auto-contouring software tool may help reduce inter- and intra-variability and can assist clinical oncologists with time-consuming, complex radiotherapy planning. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for bilateral breast: a treatment planning and dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc and fixed field intensity modulated therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A study was performed comparing dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) on patients with bilateral breast carcinoma. Materials and methods Plans for IMRT and RA, were optimised for 10 patients prescribing 50 Gy to the breast (PTVII, 2.0 Gy/fraction) and 60 Gy to the tumour bed (PTVI, 2.4 Gy/fraction). Objectives were: for PTVs V90%>95%, Dmax<107%; Mean lung dose MLD<15 Gy, V20 Gy<22%; heart involvement was to be minimised. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment dosimetry was performed using EPID and a 2D-array based methods. Results For PTVII minus PTVI, V90% was 97.8 ± 3.4% for RA and 94.0 ± 3.5% for IMRT (findings are reported as mean ± 1 standard deviation); D5%-D95% (homogeneity) was 7.3 ± 1.4 Gy (RA) and 11.0 ± 1.1 Gy (IMRT). Conformity index (V95%/VPTVII) was 1.10 ± 0.06 (RA) and 1.14 ± 0.09 (IMRT). MLD was <9.5 Gy for all cases on each lung, V20 Gy was 9.7 ± 1.3% (RA) and 12.8 ± 2.5% (IMRT) on left lung, similar for right lung. Mean dose to heart was 6.0 ± 2.7 Gy (RA) and 7.4 ± 2.5 Gy (IMRT). MU resulted in 796 ± 121 (RA) and 1398 ± 301 (IMRT); the average measured treatment time was 3.0 ± 0.1 minutes (RA) and 11.5 ± 2.0 (IMRT). From pre-treatment dosimetry, % of field area with γ <1 resulted 98.8 ± 1.3% and 99.1 ± 1.5% for RA and IMRT respectively with EPID and 99.1 ± 1.8% and 99.5 ± 1.3% with 2D-array (ΔD = 3% and DTA = 3 mm). Conclusion RapidArc showed dosimetric improvements with respect to IMRT, delivery parameters confirmed its logistical advantages, pre-treatment dosimetry proved its reliability. PMID:19630947

  8. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  9. Modeling of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Volume Changes during CT-Based Image Guided Radiotherapy: Patterns Observed and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram A. Gay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To characterize the lung tumor volume response during conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT based on diagnostic quality CT images prior to each treatment fraction. Methods. Out of 26 consecutive patients who had received CT-on-rails IGRT to the lung from 2004 to 2008, 18 were selected because they had lung lesions that could be easily distinguished. The time course of the tumor volume for each patient was individually analyzed using a computer program. Results. The model fits of group L (conventional fractionation patients were very close to experimental data, with a median Δ% (average percent difference between data and fit of 5.1% (range 3.5–10.2%. The fits obtained in group S (hypofractionation patients were generally good, with a median Δ% of 7.2% (range 3.7–23.9% for the best fitting model. Four types of tumor responses were observed—Type A: “high” kill and “slow” dying rate; Type B: “high” kill and “fast” dying rate; Type C: “low” kill and “slow” dying rate; and Type D: “low” kill and “fast” dying rate. Conclusions. The models used in this study performed well in fitting the available dataset. The models provided useful insights into the possible underlying mechanisms responsible for the RT tumor volume response.

  10. Population-based outcomes after whole brain radiotherapy and re-irradiation in patients with metastatic breast cancer in the trastuzumab era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Irene

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This study examined the population-based use and outcomes of brain radiotherapy (BRT for brain metastases (BM from breast cancer with a focus on repeat BRT in the trastuzumab era. Methods and materials All women with breast cancer diagnosed from 2000-2007 and treated with BRT were retrospectively identified from a provincial database. Results A total of 441 women with BM from breast cancer were identified. The median age was 55 years and 40% (176/441 had human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 positive disease. The median survival (MS from the initial BRT for all 441 women was 4.5 months. The MS by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA class was: 1 (14.5 months, 2 (6.4 months and 3 (1.8 months. For the 37 cases receiving repeat BRT, 27% (10/37 had stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and 70% (26/37 had HER2 positive disease, of which, 81% (21/26 received trastuzumab in the metastatic setting. For repeat BRT, the median survival by RPA class was: 1 (9.8 months, 2 (7.4 months and 3 (2.0 months. For RPA class 1 and 2, the one-year overall survival (OS was 45%. Conclusion The proportion of cases with HER2 positive disease was increased at repeat BRT compared to initial BRT. RPA class 1 and 2 patients should be considered for repeat BRT.

  11. Radiotherapy for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Fersht, Naomi; Brada, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of multidisciplinary management of patients with incompletely resected and recurrent craniopharyngioma. Advances in imaging and radiotherapy technology offer new alternatives with the principal aim of improving the accuracy of treatment and reducing the volume of normal brain receiving significant radiation doses. We review the available technologies, their technical advantages and disadvantages and the published clinical results. Fractionated high precision conformal radiotherapy with image guidance remains the gold standard; the results of single fraction treatment are disappointing and hypofractionation should be used with caution as long term results are not available. There is insufficient data on the use of protons to assess the comparative efficacy and toxicity. The precision of treatment delivery needs to be coupled with experienced infrastructure and more intensive quality assurance to ensure best treatment outcome and this should be carried out within multidisciplinary teams experienced in the management of craniopharyngioma. The advantages of the combined skills and expertise of the team members may outweigh the largely undefined clinical gain from novel radiotherapy technologies.

  12. MRI-detected skull-base invasion. Prognostic value and therapeutic implication in intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yi-Kan; Jiang, Ning; Yue, Dan; Tang, Ling-Long; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Li; Liu, Xu; Chen, Lei; Ma, Jun [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Li-Zhi [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-10-15

    With advances in imaging and radiotherapy, the prognostic value of skull-base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) needs to be reassessed. We aimed to define a classification system and evaluate the prognostic value of the classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected skull-base invasion in NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed 749 patients who underwent MRI and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated NPC and treated with IMRT. MRI-detected skull-base invasion was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), or disease-free survival (DFS; p > 0.05 for all). Skull-base invasion was classified according to the incidence of each site (type I sites inside pharyngobasilar fascia and clivus vs. type II sites outside pharyngobasilar fascia). The 5-year OS, DMFS, LRFS, and DFS rates in the classification of skull-base invasion in NPC were 83 vs. 67 %, 85 vs.75 %, 95 vs. 88 %, and 76 vs. 62 %, respectively (p < 0.05 for all). Multivariate analysis indicated the classification of skull-base invasion was an independent prognostic factor. MRI-detected skull-base invasion is not an independent prognostic factor in patients with NPC treated with IMRT. However, classification according to the site of invasion has prognostic value. Therefore, patients with various subclassifications of stage T3 disease may receive treatment with different intensities; however, further studies are warranted to prove this. (orig.) [German] Aufgrund der Fortschritte der bildgebenden Verfahren und der Strahlentherapie muss der prognostische Wert der Invasion des nasopharyngealen Karzinoms (NPC) in die Schaedelbasis erneut bewertet werden. Unser Ziel ist die Definition eines Klassifikationssystems und die Untersuchung des prognostischen Werts der Klassifikation der MRT-ermittelten Invasion des mit

  13. Cultivating Kuumba: Applying Art Based Strategies to Any Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Auburn Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    There are many contemporary issues to address in adult education. This paper explores art-based strategies and the utilization of creativity (Kuumba) to expand learning for global communities in any field of practice. Benefits of culturally grounded approaches to adult education are discussed. Images from ongoing field research can be viewed at…

  14. Fingerprint Matching Based on Local Relative Orientation Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU En; YIN Jian-ping; ZHANG Guo-min

    2004-01-01

    A fingerprint matching method based on local relative orientation field is proposed. It extracts local relative orientation field around each minutia for minutiae matching. Local orientation features are also used to sorting minutiae in order to speed up searching a minutia when pairing minutiae. The experimental result reveals that this method achieves improved recognition accuracy.

  15. Near-Field Nanolasers based on Nonradiating Anapole Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Gongora, J. S. Totero

    2016-05-31

    By employing ab-initio simulations of Maxwell-Bloch equations with a source of quantum noise, we study a new laser concept based on photonic dark-matter nanostructures that emit only in the near-field, with no far-field radiation pattern.

  16. U.S.-Portuguese Relations and Lajes Field Air Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    distribution is unlimited U.S.–PORTUGUESE RELATIONS AND LAJES FIELD AIR BASE Rui F. Amaral Captain, United States Air Force B.S., Park University ...by Manuel Martins entitled Base Aerea das Lajes (contribuicao para a sua historia ) Lajes Air Base11 specifically deals with the historical events...11 Manuel Martins, Base Aerea das Lajes (Contribuição Para a Sua Historia ) [Lajes Air Base (Contribution to its History)] (Azores

  17. Graphene-based field-effect transistor biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen; , Junhong; Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua

    2017-06-14

    The disclosure provides a field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensor and uses thereof. In particular, to FET-based biosensors using thermally reduced graphene-based sheets as a conducting channel decorated with nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates. The present disclosure also relates to FET-based biosensors using metal nitride/graphene hybrid sheets. The disclosure provides a method for detecting a target biomolecule in a sample using the FET-based biosensor described herein.

  18. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III - radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F.; Fussl, C. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, M.D. [Helios-Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Wuppertal (Germany); Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: ''breast cancer'', ''radiotherapy'', ''regional node irradiation''. Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data

  19. Graphene-based field effect transistors for radiation-induced field sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gaspare, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.digaspare@lnf.infn.it [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Valletta, Antonio [CNR-Istituto per la Microelettronica e i Microsistemi, TorVergata, Rome (Italy); Fortunato, Guglielmo [CNR-Istituto per la Microelettronica e i Microsistemi, TorVergata, Rome (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Larciprete, Rosanna [CNR-Istituto di Sistemi Complessi, TorVergata, Rome (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Mariucci, Luigi [CNR-Istituto per la Microelettronica e i Microsistemi, TorVergata, Rome (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Notargiacomo, Andrea [CNR-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, Rome (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Cimino, Roberto [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-07-11

    We propose the implementation of graphene-based field effect transistor (FET) as radiation sensor. In the proposed detector, graphene obtained via chemical vapor deposition is integrated into a Si-based field effect device as the gate readout electrode, able to sense any change in the field distribution induced by ionization in the underneath absorber, because of the strong variation in the graphene conductivity close to the charge neutrality point. Different 2-dimensional layered materials can be envisaged in this kind of device.

  20. Comparative Study of L-Asparaginase-Based LOP Regimen Over CHOP Regimen Before Radiotherapy for Stage IIE Extranodal Nasal Type NK/T Cell Lymphoma: A Study of 2 Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Limin; Yuan, Bin; Wu, Haixia; Chu, Hongliang; Liu, Yayun; Wu, Shuang; Li, Hong; Lu, He; Chen, Hui

    2017-03-01

    In this study we evaluated the efficacy of an L-asparaginase-based LOP (L-asparaginase, vincristine, and dexamethasone) regimen in extranodal Natural Killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) patients in the Guizhou province of China. Forty-eight patients were treated with the LOP (L-asparaginase, vincristine and dexamethasone) regimen chemotherapy (CT) and 32 patients with the CHOP (cyclophosphamide, tetrahydropyanyl adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone) regimen. These patients then received involved-field radiotherapy (RT) with the doses of DT = 49-59 Gy. A significant improvement of clinical end points with the LOP regimen was noticed compared with the CHOP regimen: 33 (68.8%) versus 16 (50.0%) for complete responses; 10 (20.8%) versus 5 (15.6%) for partial responses. There were statistical differences in objective response rates (43 [89.6%] for LOP vs. 21 [65.6%] for CHOP; P = .009), 3 years of overall survival (42 [87.5%] for LOP vs. 20 [62.5%] for CHOP; P = .006) and progression-free survival (32 [79.2%] for LOP vs. 16 [50.0%] for CHOP; P = .007). The results showed that the LOP regimen is safe and much more efficient than the CHOP regimen for stage IIE ENKTL patients. They indicate that the LOP regimen is a satisfying alternative protocol among the other L-asparaginase-based regimens reported so far, such as SMILE (dexamethasone, methotrexate, ifosfamide, L-asparaginase, and etoposide), GELOX (gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and L-asparaginase), CHOP-L, and sandwich (CT, then RT, then CT). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A reference dosimetric system for dose interval of radiotherapy based on alanine/RPE; Um sistema dosimetrico de referencia para o intervalo de doses da radioterapia baseado na alanina/RPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues Junior, Orlando; Galante, Ocimar L.; Campos, Leticia L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: rodrijr@net.ipen.br

    2001-07-01

    This work describes the development of a reference dosimetric system based on alanine/EPR for radiotherapy dose levels. Currently the IPEN is concluding a similar system for the dose range used for irradiation of products, 10-10{sup 5} Gy. The objective of this work is to present the efforts towards to improve the measure accuracy for doses in the range between 1-10 Gy. This system could be used as reference by radiotherapy services, as much in the quality control of the equipment, as for routine accompaniment of more complex handling where the total doses can reach some grays. The system uses alanine as detector and electronic paramagnetic resonance - EPR as measure technique. To reach accuracy better than 5% mathematical studies on the best optimization of the EPR spectrometer parameters and methods for the handling of the EPR sign are discussed. (author)

  2. NEAR-FIELD ACOUSTIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR SEMI-FREE ACOUSTIC FIELD BASED ON WAVE SUPERPOSITION APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Weibing; CHEN Jian; YU Fei; CHEN Xinzhao

    2006-01-01

    In the semi-free acoustic field, the actual acoustic pressure at any point is composed of two parts: The direct acoustic pressure and the reflected acoustic pressure. The general acoustic holographic theories and algorithms request that there is only the direct acoustic pressure contained in the pressure at any point on the hologram surface, consequently, they cannot be used to reconstruct acoustic source and predict acoustic field directly. To take the reflected pressure into consideration, near-field acoustic holography for semi-free acoustic field based on wave superposition approach is proposed to realize the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field, and the wave superposition approach is adopted as a holographic transform algorithm. The proposed theory and algorithm are realized and verified with a numerical example,and the drawbacks of the general theories and algorithms in the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field are also demonstrated by this numerical example.

  3. [Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnt, T; Müller, A C; Janich, M; Gerlach, R; Hädecke, J; Duncker, G I W; Dunst, J

    2004-11-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder of the thyroid, whereas the precise pathogenesis still remains unclear. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis the occurrence of proptosis is an extremely rare event. The therapy for middle and severe courses of GO shows in partly disappointing results, although several therapy modalities are possible (glucocorticoid therapy, radiotherapy, antithyroid drug treatment, surgery). All these therapies lead in only 40 - 70 % to an improvement of the pathogenic symptoms. An intensive interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to satisfy the requirements for the treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy. As a consequence of the very different results of the few of clinical studies that were accomplished with reference to this topic, treatment by radiotherapy in the management of the disease is presently controversially discussed. In the German-speaking countries the radiotherapy is, however, firmly established as a therapy option in the treatment of the moderate disease classes (class 2-5 according to NO SPECS), especially if diplopia is present. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. Altogether, radiotherapy is assessed as an effective and sure method. The administration of glucocorticoids can take place before the beginning of or during the radiotherapy. For the success of treatment the correct selection of patients who may possibly profit from a radiotherapy is absolutely essential. By realising that GO proceeds normally over a period of 2-5 years, which is followed by a period of fibrotic alteration, the application of the radiotherapy in the early, active phase is indispensable. A precise explanation for the effects of radiotherapy in treatment of the GO does not exist at present. The determination of the most effective irradiation doses was made from retrospectively evaluated

  4. A novel paediatric game-based visual-fields assessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Tariq M; Rahman, Waheeda; Henson, David; Khaw, Peng T

    2011-07-01

    To determine the feasibility of using a computer game to measure visual fields in children. The authors describe the development and assessment of a novel computer-game apparatus to measure visual fields in children. It is based upon a computer game visible on a monitor, housed in an interactive model-castle structure. The authors conducted a total of 25 field tests with the final apparatus, in 25 eyes of 19 children, aged 4-14 years. On two occasions children failed to complete the exam, owing to hardware and software defects that were subsequently rectified. For the 23 completed fields, the median time for completion of the full test was 4.5 min. 16 out of 18 clinically normal patients showed normal fields; the only failures were in two 4-year-old children who still managed to complete fields, but with generalised reduced responses that were deemed abnormal by our predetermined criteria. For the five eyes with expected glaucomatous loss, all five visual fields measured were completed and showed abnormal fields consistent with their medical condition. Positive feedback was given from all children about their testing experience. It is feasible to develop a computer-game-based system to measure fields in children in a non-invasive, affordable and entertaining way.

  5. Multi-objective optimization of inverse planning for accurate radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹瑞芬; 吴宜灿; 裴曦; 景佳; 李国丽; 程梦云; 李贵; 胡丽琴

    2011-01-01

    The multi-objective optimization of inverse planning based on the Pareto solution set, according to the multi-objective character of inverse planning in accurate radiotherapy, was studied in this paper. Firstly, the clinical requirements of a treatment pl

  6. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  7. Therapeutic Response in Patients with Advanced Malignancies Treated with Combined Dendritic Cell–Activated T Cell Based Immunotherapy and Intensity–Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasumi, Kenichiro; Aoki, Yukimasa; Watanabe, Ryuko [Hasumi International Research Foundation, Tokyo Research Center, 1-44-6 Asagaya-kita, Suginami- ku, Tokyo 166-0001 (Japan); Hankey, Kim G.; Mann, Dean L., E-mail: dmann001@umaryland.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, MSTF Room 700, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21040 (United States)

    2011-04-28

    Successful cancer immunotherapy is confounded by the magnitude of the tumor burden and the presence of immunoregulatory elements that suppress an immune response. To approach these issues, 26 patients with advanced treatment refractory cancer were enrolled in a safety/feasibility study wherein a conventional treatment modality, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), was combined with dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. We hypothesized that radiation would lower the tumor burdens, decrease the number/function of regulatory cells in the tumor environment, and release products of tumor cells that could be acquired by intratumoral injected immature dendritic cells (iDC). Metastatic lesions identified by CT (computed tomography) were injected with autologous iDC combined with a cytokine-based adjuvant and KLH (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), followed 24 h later by IV-infused T-cells expanded with anti-CD3 and IL-2 (AT). After three to five days, each of the injected lesions was treated with fractionated doses of IMRT followed by another injection of intratumoral iDC and IV-infused AT. No toxicity was observed with cell infusion while radiation-related toxicity was observed in seven patients. Five patients had progressive disease, eight demonstrated complete resolution at treated sites but developed recurrent disease at other sites, and 13 showed complete response at various follow-up times with an overall estimated Kaplan-Meier disease-free survival of 345 days. Most patients developed KLH antibodies supporting our hypothesis that the co-injected iDC are functional with the capacity to acquire antigens from their environment and generate an adaptive immune response. These results demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of this multimodality strategy combining immunotherapy and IMRT in patients with advanced malignancies.

  8. Simulational study of a dosimetric comparison between a Gamma Knife treatment plan and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan for skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Komori, Masataka; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Chisa; Uchiyama, Yukio; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is performed with a linear accelerator-based system such as Novalis. Recently, Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) featured the Extend system with relocatable fixation devices available for SRT. In this study, the dosimetric results of these two modalities were compared from the viewpoint of conformity, heterogeneity and gradient in target covering. A total of 14 patients with skull base tumors were treated with Novalis intensity-modulated (IM)-SRT. Treatment was planned on an iPlan workstation. Five- to seven-beam IM-SRT was performed in 14-18 fractions with a fraction dose of 2.5 or 3 Gy. With these patients' data, additional treatment planning was simulated using a GammaPlan workstation for PFX-SRT. Reference CT images with planning structure contour sets on iPlan, including the planning target volume (PTV, 1.1-102.2 ml) and organs at risk, were exported to GammaPlan in DICOM-RT format. Dosimetric results for Novalis IM-SRT and PFX-SRT were evaluated in the same prescription doses. The isocenter number of PFX was between 12 and 50 at the isodose contour of 50-60%. The PTV coverage was 95-99% for Novalis and 94-98% for PFX. The conformity index (CI) was 1.11-1.61 and 1.04-1.15, the homogeneity index (HI) was 1.1-3.62 and 2.3-3.25, and the gradient index (GI) was 3.72-7.97 and 2.54-3.39 for Novalis and PFX, respectively. PTV coverage by Novalis and PFX was almost equivalent. PFX was superior in CI and GI, and Novalis was better in HI. Better conformality would be achieved by PFX, when the homogeneity inside tumors is less important.

  9. Anisotropy in wavelet-based phase field models

    KAUST Repository

    Korzec, Maciek

    2016-04-01

    When describing the anisotropic evolution of microstructures in solids using phase-field models, the anisotropy of the crystalline phases is usually introduced into the interfacial energy by directional dependencies of the gradient energy coefficients. We consider an alternative approach based on a wavelet analogue of the Laplace operator that is intrinsically anisotropic and linear. The paper focuses on the classical coupled temperature/Ginzburg--Landau type phase-field model for dendritic growth. For the model based on the wavelet analogue, existence, uniqueness and continuous dependence on initial data are proved for weak solutions. Numerical studies of the wavelet based phase-field model show dendritic growth similar to the results obtained for classical phase-field models.

  10. Radiotherapy of cutaneous lymphomas; Radiotherapie des lymphomes cutanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirova, Y.M.; Piedbois, Y.; Pan, Q.; Guo, J.P.; Le Bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France). Dept. de cancerologie

    1999-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cutaneous lymphomas. In the treatment of Mycosis fungoides, total skin electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited and superficial forms of the disease. Radiotherapy is also efficient for the locally advanced forms of non-epidermo-tropic lymphomas. The palliative radiotherapy is indicated for advanced, nodular and treatment resistant forms of cutaneous lymphomas and for voluminous lymphadenopathies. (authors)

  11. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoos, T.; Nilsson, P. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Anders, A. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam`s eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam`s eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment.

  12. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, M.L., E-mail: m.bondar@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ahmad, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Programme of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia); Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    bladder and rectum inside the PTV (0% to 10% and -1% to 9%; p < 0.004) and the CTV-to-PTV volume (4-96 ml). Conclusions: Compared with population-based margins, an individualized PTV results in better organ-at-risk sparing. Online-adaptive radiotherapy further improves organ-at-risk sparing.

  13. Normal Bases and Their Dual-Bases over Finite Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Ying LIAO; Qi SUN

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we prove the following results: 1) A normal basis N over a finite field is equivalent to its dual basis if and only if the multiplication table of N is symmetric; 2) The normal basis N is self-dual if and only if its multiplication table is symmetric and Tr(α2) = 1, where α generates N; 3) An optimal normal basis N is self-dual if and only if AT is a type-Ⅰ optimal normal basis with q = n = 2 or N is a type-Ⅱ optimal normal basis.

  14. Updated Hungarian Gravity Field Solution Based on Fifth Generation GOCE Gravity Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Gyula; Foldvary, Lorant

    2015-03-01

    With the completion of the ESA's GOCE satellite's mission fifth generation gravity field models are available from the ESA's GOCE High Processing Facility. Our contribution is an updated gravity field solution for Hungary using the latest DIR R05 GOCE gravity field model. The solution methodology is least squares gravity field parameter estimation using Spherical Radial Base Functions (SRBF). Regional datasets include deflections of the vertical (DOV), gravity anomalies and quasigeoid heights by GPS/levelling. The GOCE DIR R05 model has been combined with the EGM20008 model and has been evaluated in comparison with the EGM2008 and EIGEN-6C3stat models to assess the performance of our regional gravity field solution.

  15. Radiotherapy of hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauwerky, F.

    1982-10-11

    The findings about the regular, spontaneous and complete regression of cavernous skin hemangiomas occurring in infants and those findings about the damaging effects due to ionising radiation - here particularly local growth disturbances - led to the development of very cautious diagnostic methods and to a considerate individual dosage and radiotherapy, which always takes into consideration the spontaneous regression tendency of the hemangiomas. However, a function-impairing localisation at the orifices, fulminant macrosomia, tendency to hemorrhages and poly-infection with superficial ulceration and even thrombopenic syndromes of the Kasabach-Merritt type may become necessary, urgent and also vital indications for a particular radiotherapy. For the sake of the patients, irradiation methods, which do not provoke any risk of radiation hazards, have to be preserved and applied in practice. Certainly further research and the nosologic nature of hemangiomas is required. A general non-treatment of hemangiomas is refused.

  16. A voxel-based investigation for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain using ultra short echo times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Kjer, Hans Martin; Van Leemput, Koen;

    2014-01-01

    , however, need to be assigned to the MRI images for dose calculation and patient setup based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Here, we investigate the geometric and dosimetric performance for a number of popular voxel-based methods to generate a so-called pseudo CT (pCT). Five patients...... receiving cranial irradiation, each containing a co-registered MRI and CT scan, were included. An ultra short echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization was used. Six methods were investigated for three popular types of voxel-based approaches; (1) threshold-based segmentation, (2) Bayesian segmentation...... including or excluding additional spatial information. Approach 3 used a statistical regression correlating MRI voxels with their corresponding CT voxels. A similar photon and proton treatment plan was generated for a target positioned between the nasal cavity and the brainstem for all patients. The CT...

  17. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumarasiri, Akila, E-mail: akumara1@hfhs.org; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  18. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasiri, Akila; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H&N) adaptive radiotherapy. Ten H&N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3-4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm(3). Organs with volumes <3 cm(3) and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼ 0.5-0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm(3)), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was "clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours." Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine

  19. Melanoma: Last call for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma is traditionally considered to be a radioresistant tumor. However, radiotherapy and immunotherapy latest developments might upset this radiobiological dogma. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows high dose per fraction delivery, with high dose rate. More DNA lethal damages, less sublethal damages reparation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and finally clonogenic cell dysfunction are produced, resulting in improved local control. Radiotherapy can also enhance immune responses, inducing neoantigens formation, tumor antigen presentation, and cytokines release. A synergic effect of radiotherapy with immunotherapy is expected, and might lead to abscopal effects. If hadrontherapy biological properties seem able to suppress hypoxia-induced radioresistance and increase biological efficacy, ballistic advantages over photon radiations might also improve radiotherapy outcomes on usually poor prognosis locations. The present review addresses biological and clinical effects of high fraction dose, bystander effect, abscopal effect, and hadrontherapy features in melanoma. Clinical trials results are warranted to establish indications of innovative radiotherapy in melanoma.

  20. Ultra-Sensitivity Glucose Sensor Based on Field Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yinglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new glucose sensor based on field emitter of ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNA was fabricated. This new type of ZNA field emitter-based sensor shows high sensitivity with experimental limit of detection of 1 nM glucose solution and a detection range from 1 nM to 50 μM in air at room temperature, which is lower than that of glucose sensors based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, fluorescence signal transmission, and electrochemical signal transduction. The new glucose sensor provides a key technique for promising consuming application in biological system for detecting low levels of glucose on single cells or bacterial cultures.

  1. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo [Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Medical Univ., School of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.).

  2. Radiobiological rationale and clinical implications of hypo-fractionated radiation therapy; Bases radiobiologiques et applications cliniques de la radiotherapie hypofractionnee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, E.C.; Forsythe, K.; Buckstein, M.; Kao, J.; Rosenstein, B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1236, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Recent clinical trials of hypo-fractionated radiation treatment have provided critical insights into the safety and efficacy of hypo-fractionation. However, there remains much controversy in the field, both at the level of clinical practice and in our understanding of the underlying radiobiological mechanisms. In this article, we review the clinical literature on hypo-fractionated radiation treatment for breast, prostate, and other malignancies. We highlight several ongoing clinical trials that compare outcomes of a hypo-fractionated approach versus those obtained with a conventional approach. Lastly, we outline some of the preclinical and clinical evidence that argue in favor of differential radiobiological mechanisms underlying hypo-fractionated radiation treatment. Emerging data from the ongoing studies will help to better define and guide the rational use of hypo-fractionation in future years. (authors)

  3. Investigation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization with gEUD-based objectives by means of simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Matthias; Bogner, Ludwig

    2008-05-01

    Inverse treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is complicated by several sources of error, which can cause deviations of optimized plans from the true optimal solution. These errors include the systematic and convergence error, the local minima error, and the optimizer convergence error. We minimize these errors by developing an inverse IMRT treatment planning system with a Monte Carlo based dose engine and a simulated annealing search engine as well as a deterministic search engine. In addition, different generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD)-based and hybrid objective functions were implemented and investigated with simulated annealing. By means of a head-and-neck IMRT case we have analyzed the properties of these gEUD-based objective functions, including its search space and the existence of local optima errors. We found evidence that the use of a previously published investigation of a gEUD-based objective function results in an uncommon search space with a golf hole structure. This special search space structure leads to trapping in local minima, making it extremely difficult to identify the true global minimum, even when using stochastic search engines. Moreover, for the same IMRT case several local optima have been detected by comparing the solutions of 100 different trials using a gradient optimization algorithm with the global optimum computed by simulated annealing. We have demonstrated that the hybrid objective function, which includes dose-based objectives for the target and gEUD-based objectives for normal tissue, results in equally good sparing of the critical structures as for the pure gEUD objective function and lower target dose maxima.

  4. SU-F-BRB-12: A Novel Haar Wavelet Based Approach to Deliver Non-Coplanar Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using Sparse Orthogonal Collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D; Ruan, D; Low, D; Sheng, K [Deparment of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); O’Connor, D [Deparment of Mathematics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Boucher, S [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Existing efforts to replace complex multileaf collimator (MLC) by simple jaws for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) resulted in unacceptable compromise in plan quality and delivery efficiency. We introduce a novel fluence map segmentation method based on compressed sensing for plan delivery using a simplified sparse orthogonal collimator (SOC) on the 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy platform. Methods: 4π plans with varying prescription doses were first created by automatically selecting and optimizing 20 non-coplanar beams for 2 GBM, 2 head & neck, and 2 lung patients. To create deliverable 4π plans using SOC, which are two pairs of orthogonal collimators with 1 to 4 leaves in each collimator bank, a Haar Fluence Optimization (HFO) method was used to regulate the number of Haar wavelet coefficients while maximizing the dose fidelity to the ideal prescription. The plans were directly stratified utilizing the optimized Haar wavelet rectangular basis. A matching number of deliverable segments were stratified for the MLC-based plans. Results: Compared to the MLC-based 4π plans, the SOC-based 4π plans increased the average PTV dose homogeneity from 0.811 to 0.913. PTV D98 and D99 were improved by 3.53% and 5.60% of the corresponding prescription doses. The aver