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Sample records for radiosensitive cancer patients

  1. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRobbie, M.L.; Riches, A.; Baxby, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from prostate cancer patients is being investigated using the G2 assay and the Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus(CBMN)assay. The G2 assay evaluates chromosomal damage caused by irradiating cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. The CBMN assay quantifies the post mitotic micronuclei, which are the expression of damage incurred during G0. An association between hypersensitivity to the chromosome damaging effects of ionising radiation and cancer predispostion has been demonstrated in a number of heritable conditions by using the aforementioned techniques. Recently, increased chromosomal radiosensitivity has been demonstrated in a significant proportion of patients with no obvious family history of malignancy. The aim of this study is to establish whether a group of prostatic carcinoma patients exists and if so whether there are any correlations between their G2 and G0 sensitivities. The study has shown there is no correlation between G2 and G0 sensitivity, confirming the general trend that individuals exhibiting chromosomal radiosensitivity are defective in only one mechanism and G2 and G0 sensitivity are largely independent. Current data indicates that there is an identifiable group of men within the prostate cancer population with increased chromosomal radiosensitivity. Using the G2 assay and the 90th percentile of the controls as a cut off point for sensitivity, no significant difference between the controls and the patient population has been found. However, using the CBMN assay and again the 90th percentile, approximately 11% of the control group are sensitive compared with approximately 40% of the carcinoma cases. The implications of this increased radiosensitivity are as yet unclear, but it is indicative of increased chromosomal fragility and therefore, possibly associated with malignant transformation. Hence, it may prove a useful tool in identifying individuals at increased risk of developing

  2. ATM induction insufficiency in a radiosensitive breast-cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.A.; Fang, Z.H.; Marr, P.J.; Kearsley, J.H.; Papadatos, G.; Lee, C.S.; University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW

    2002-01-01

    ATM induction insufficiency in a radiosensitive breast-cancer patient The ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) gene (ATM) is a dominant breast cancer gene with tumour suppressor activity. ATM also regulates cellular sensitivity to ionising radiation (IR) presumably through its role as a facilitator of DNA repair. In normal cells and tissues the ATM protein is rapidly induced by IR to threshold/maximum levels. The kinase function of the ATM protein is also rapidly activated in response to IR. The fact that women carriers of ATM mutations can have an increased risk of developing breast cancer and that many sporadic breast tumours have reduced levels of the ATM protein broadens the scope of ATM's tumour suppressor within the breast. This report describes the downregulation of ATM protein levels in a radiosensitive breast cancer patient. Postinduction ATM levels were up to tenfold lower in the patient's fresh tissues compared to normal controls. These results might indicate a much broader role for ATM anomalies in breast cancer aetiology. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Correlating telomere length and radiosensitivity in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, C.N.; Davey, D.S.P.; McKay, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Approximately three percent of cancer patients suffer from significant side effects in normal tissue exposed to ionising radiation during radiotherapy (RT). Although RT is an effective therapy for cancer treatment, the treatment dose intensity is generally restricted to minimize the incidence of these severe reactions. This imposes tumour control limitations on most patients. A major goal of radiation biology research is to develop efficient predictive assays that could identify these hyper-radiosensitive (hRS) individuals prior to treatment. This predictive ability would enable the individualisation of RT doses, which should result in improvement of tumour control rates and a reduction in the incidence of RT side effects. Recent studies have reported a correlation between cellular and organismal RS and shortened telomeres. Interestingly, a number of DNA repair proteins have been found to be associated with telomeres. Additionally, individuals with cancer-proneness and RS syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia and Fanconi anemia, have shortened telomeres. In animal models, mutations in DNA repair genes such as Ku, has resulted in shortened telomeres. We have a unique bank of blood samples and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from over 50 hRS patients. We have used traditional methods of telomere length assessment and a clinically relevant method, flow cytometry fluorescence in situ hybridisation (flow-FISH) to determine the telomere length in both LCLs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the hRS patients. Results from the screening of these samples will be presented. If clinical hRS can be correlated with shortened telomeres in some patients, flow-FISH may have utility as part of a pre-treatment hRS assay for use in the clinic

  4. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients and BRCA1 and 2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vral, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity is observed in significant proportions of cancer patients. In breast cancer patients, this elevated sensitivity is confirmed in several independent studies with the G2 assay as well as with the GO micronucleus (MN) assay for peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity is a common feature of sporadic breast cancer patients as well as breast cancer patients with a family history of the disease. Segregation analysis showed Mendelian heritability of chromosomal radiosensitivity. As mutations in the highly penetrant breast cancer predisposing genes, BRCA1 and 2, are only present in about 3-5 % of familial breast cancer patients, they cannot solely account for the high proportion of radiosensitive cases found among all breast cancer patients. A review on chromosomal radiosensitivity in BRCA1 and 2 mutation carriers shows that breast cancer patients with a BRCAl or 2 mutation are on the average more radiosensitive than healthy individuals, but not different from breast cancer patients without a BRCA mutation. The radiation response of healthy BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, on the contrary, is not significantly different from controls. Most studies performed on wild type and BRCA +/- EBV lymphoblastoid cell lines also could not demonstrate any differences in MN response between both groups. These findings suggest that mutations in BRCA 1 and 2 are not playing a major role in chromosomal radiosensitivity as measured by G2 and MN assay. The enhanced sensitivity observed in a substantial proportion of breast cancer patients, irrespective of a BRCA1/2 mutation or not, suggests that this feature may be related to the presence of other mutations in low penetrance breast cancer predisposing genes, which may be involved in the process of DNA damage. (author)

  5. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-01-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  6. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baeyens, A

    2002-12-02

    The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75-78%).

  7. Cytogenetic radiosensitivity of G0-lymphocytes of breast and esophageal cancer patients as determined by micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozdarani, H.; Mansouri, Z.; Haeri, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity is a feature of many cancer predisposition conditions, indicative of the important role of chromosomal alterations in carcinogenesis. In this study the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleous assay was used to compare the radiosensitivity of blood lymphocytes obtained from Iranian breast or esophageal cancer patients (n=50, n=16; respectively) with that of control individuals (n=40). For each sample, one thousand binucleate lymphocytes were analyzed before and after in vitro exposure to 3 Gy of γ rays. The radiation-induced frequency of micronucleus was significantly higher in the breast cancer group (261/1,000 binucleated cells) than in esophageal cancer group (241/1,000 binucleated cells, P<0.01) or in the control group (240/1,000 binucleated cells, P<0.01). The results indicate that breast cancer patients are more radiosensitive compared to normal healthy individuals or esophageal cancer patients. Increased radiosensitivity could be due to defects in DNA repair genes involved in breast cancer formation. Since patients with esophageal cancer did not show elevated radiosensitivity, it is assumed that the contribution of radiosensitivity-related genes to the development of esophageal cancer may be smaller than the contribution of those genes to breast cancer. (author)

  8. Individual radiosensitivity measured with lymphocytes can be used to predict the risk of fibrosis after radiotherapy of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeller, U.; Borgmann, K.; Alberti, W.; Dikomey, E.

    2003-01-01

    To analyse the relationship of individual cellular radiosensitivity and fibrosis after breast conserving therapy. A new model was used describing the percentage of patients developing fibrosis per year per patients at risk . In a retrospective study, 86 patients were included, who had undergone breast conserving surgery and irradiation of the breast with a median dose of 55 Gy (54-55Gy), 2.5 Gy/fraction (n=57) or 2 Gy/fraction (n=29). Median age was 62 years (range: 44-86) and median follow up was 7.5 years (range 5-16). Patients were examined for fibrosis according to the LENT/SOMA score. For analysis, fibrosis was classified as none (G0-1) or present (G2-3). The time to complete development of fibrosis was determined by analysis of yearly mammograms. Individual cellular radiosensitivity was determined by scoring lethal chromosomal aberrations in in vitro irradiated (6 Gy) lymphocytes using metaphase technique. Patients with low/intermediate cellular radiosensitivity were compared with patients with high cellular radiosensitivity with actuarial methods. Ten patients developed fibrosis at 1-8 years after radiotherapy. Individual cellular radiosensitivity was described by normal distribution of lethal chromosomal aberrations, average 5.47 lethal aberrations per cell (standard deviation 0.71). Cellular radiosensitivity was defined as low/intermediate (le 6.18 lethal aberrations) in 73 patients and as high (> 6.18 lethal aberrations ) in 13 patients. In both groups the actuarial rate of fibrosis-free patients declined exponentially with time after radiotherapy. Patients with high cellular radiosensitivity showed a 2.3 fold higher annual rate for fibrosis than patients with intermediate and low radiosensitivity (3.6±0.1 vs. 1.6±0.3). In breast cancer patients, high individual cellular radiosensitivity as determined by the number of lethal chromosome aberrations in in vitro irradiated lymphocytes was correlated with an enhanced annual rate of fibrosis

  9. The impact of complex chromosomal rearrangements on the detection of radiosensitivity in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, Susann; Dunst, Juergen; Gebhart, Erich

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Lymphocytes of a small fraction of cancer patients responded to in vitro irradiation with an extreme chromosomal reaction. A large portion of the observed chromosome aberrations were complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR). The present study is an attempt to define the impact of CCR on the predictive detection of an intrinsic clinical radiosensitivity in cancer patients in more detail. Materials and methods: A three-colour 'FISH-painting' technique (chromosome in situ suppression (CISS) hybridization) was used for the detection of chromosomal rearrangements, induced by in vitro irradiation, in 81 samples of peripheral blood lymphocytes from 66 cancer patients. Thirty-three of those were assigned for radiation therapy, the others having just undergone radiation therapy. Seven healthy individuals served as controls. Results: CCRs are a very rare event in non-irradiated cells. Lymphocytes of patients who had just undergone therapeutic irradiation, however, not only exhibited high basic frequencies of CCR but also responded to in vitro irradiation with a more drastic increase of CCR than did the lymphocytes of non-exposed patients. A high inter-individual variability of the reaction to in vitro irradiation could be generally stated. The lymphocytes of patients with clinical signs of an outstanding radiosensitivity responded with an unusually high frequency of CCR. The total number of CCRs detected by CISS was found to be dependent on the interval from a previous radiation therapy and was slightly influenced by previous cytostatic therapy. Irrespective of these influences, patients with clinically defined radiation hypersensitivity were those with the highest radiosensitivity also in cytogenetic terms (including CCR). Conclusion: The successful use of FISH-painting for the detection of CCR, in addition to the general breakage frequency, highlights its suitability in the identification of individual hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. The

  10. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in Breast Cancer Patients with Different Tumor size: In vitro and In vivo Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Habit, O.H.

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal radiosensitivity of normal tissues from breast cancer patients has been used for detection of cancer prone individuals. Interindividual variation among breast cancer patients and cancer-prone individuals is, however, not satisfactorily explained. In this study the type of tumor and its degree of progression is addressed to find out its effect on the variability produced. Three groups of breast cancer patients with different tumor sizes; I, II and III were used in this investigation. The first group of 12 patients with tumor grade I, the second group comprised 15 patients of tumor grade II and a third group of 13 patients of tumor grade III. A fourth control group of 14 normal healthy individuals of the same age group were also used. Blood samples were withdrawn before starting radiotherapy treatment. In vitro irradiation of blood with 2.0, 4.0 or 6.0 Gy, and blood culture was set up at 37 0C for 54 hr. Different types of chromosomal aberrations (dicentrics, rings, breaks, fragments and gaps) were scored. Another set of irradiated cultures were set up for assay of micronucleated binucleate lymphocytes treated with cytochalasin B. Blood samples were also obtained from breast cancer patients 24 hr

  11. Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, William A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Geara, Fady B.; Wike, Jennifer; Peters, Lester J.; Turesson, Ingela; Nyman, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In the 1970s, a series of breast cancer patients was treated at the Department of Oncology in Gothenburg, Sweden with postoperative irradiation to the parasternal region. Patients were treated bilaterally using different fractionation schedules and doses to the right and left fields. Peak acute reactions were scored on a six-point scale, and skin erythema was measured by reflectance spectrophotometry. Telangiectasia was graded over time on a six-point scale. In April 1992, two small skin biopsies were obtained from 22 patients in two treatment groups (i.e., four dose-fractionation schedules) and, using either delayed or immediate plating, fibroblast radiosensitivity was measured in early passage cultures by clonogenic survival, after high and low dose-rate irradiations. Survival at 2.0 Gy (SF2) was calculated from complete survival curves. Results: To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediate plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when

  12. Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, W.A.; Wike, J.; Tucker, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediated plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when averaged high dose-rate SF2 values and telangiectasia scores were compared. There was no significant correlation between average SF2 values and acute responses or between individual SF2 measurements and either the acute or late clinical response. The results of this study suggest that the degree of late telangiectasia is at least partially dependent upon the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity of normal fibroblasts, but the relationship is not clear cut. Multiple replicate assays are necessary to obtain reliable estimates of fibroblast SF2 values using current techniques. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Validation of a radiosensitivity molecular signature in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Eschrich (Steven); C. Fulp (Carl); Y. Pawitan (Yudi); J.A. Foekens (John); M. Smid (Marcel); J.W.M. Martens (John); M. Echevarria (Michelle); P.S. Kamath (Patrick); J.-H. Lee (Ji-Hyun); E.E. Harris (Eleanor); J. Bergh (Jonas); J.F. Torres-Roca (Javier)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Previously, we developed a radiosensitivity molecular signature [radiosensitivity index (RSI)] that was clinically validated in 3 independent datasets (rectal, esophageal, and head and neck) in 118 patients. Here, we test RSI in radiotherapy (RT)-treated breast cancer patients.

  14. Assessment of individual radiosensitivity in human lymphocytes of cancer patients and its correlation with adverse side effects to radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giorgio, M; Busto, E; Mairal, L; Menendez, P; Roth, B; Sardi, M; Taja, M R; Vallerga, M B

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Individual radiosensitivity is an inherent characteristic, associated with an increased reaction to ionizing radiation on the human body. Biological endpoints such as clonogenic survival, chromosome aberration formation and repair capacity of radiation-induced damage have been applied to evaluate individual radiosensitivity in vitro. 5%-7% of cancer patients develop adverse side effects to radiation therapy in normal tissues within the treatment field, which are referred as 'clinical radiation reactions' and include acute effects, late effects and cancer induction. It has been hypothesized that the occurrence and severity of these reactions are mainly influenced by genetic susceptibility to radiation. Additionally, the nature of the genetic disorders associated with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy suggests that DNA repair mechanisms are involved. Consequently, the characterization of DNA repair in lymphocytes through cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) and alkaline single-cell micro...

  15. Assessment of individual radiosensitivity in human lymphocytes of cancer patients and its correlation with adverse side effects to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Taja, Maria R.; Sardi, M.; Busto, E.; Roth, B.; Menendez, P.; Bonomi, M.; Mairal, L.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Individual radiosensitivity is an inherent characteristic, associated with an increased reaction to ionizing radiation on the human body. Biological endpoints such as clonogenic survival, chromosome aberration formation and repair capacity of radiation-induced damage have been applied to evaluate individual radiosensitivity in vitro. 5%-7% of cancer patients develop adverse side effects to radiation therapy in normal tissues within the treatment field, which are referred as 'clinical radiation reactions' and include acute effects, late effects and cancer induction. It has been hypothesized that the occurrence and severity of these reactions are mainly influenced by genetic susceptibility to radiation. Additionally, the nature of the genetic disorders associated with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy suggests that DNA repair mechanisms are involved. Consequently, the characterization of DNA repair in lymphocytes through cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) and alkaline single-cell micro gel electrophoresis (comet) assays could be suitable approaches to evaluate individual radiosensitivity in vitro. The MN assay is an established cytogenetic technique to evaluate intrinsic cell radiosensitivity in tumor cells and lymphocytes; comet assay is a sensitive and rapid method for measuring DNA damage and repair in individual cells. The aims of this study were: 1) To assess the in vitro radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from two groups of cancer patients (retrospectively and prospectively studied), using MN and comet assays, in comparison with the observed clinical response; and 2) To test the predictive potential of both techniques. Materials and methods: 38 cancer patients receiving radiation therapy were enrolled in this study. The tumor sites were: head and neck (n 25) and cervix (n = 13). Nineteen patients were evaluated about 6-18 month after radiotherapy (retrospective group) and 19 patients were evaluated prior, mid-way and on

  16. Clinical studies on radiosensitization of cervical cancer by cisplatinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shiying; Chen Yuan; Xu Zhiqiang

    1993-01-01

    A prospective randomized clinical trial on the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatinum was carried out in 60 patients with cervical cancer, of whom 30 were given cisplatinum in combination with radiotherapy (radiosensitizing group) and the remaining 30 radiotherapy alone (control group). The results showed that the length of time of immediate CR and PR was shorter in the radiosensitizing group than in the control group. The sensitive enhancement ratio was 1.846. No toxicity was observed in the radiosensitizing group, and the treatment was well tolerated by the patients

  17. Predisposition to cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichierri, P.; Franchitto, A.; Palitti, F.

    2000-01-01

    Many cancer-prone diseases have been shown to be radiosensitive. The radiosensitivity has been attributed to pitfalls in the mechanisms of repair of induced DNA lesions or to an impaired cell cycle checkpoint response. Although discrepancies exist in the results obtained by various authors on the radiosensitivity of individuals affected by the same disease, these can be attributed to the large variability observed already in the response to radiation of normal individuals. To date three test are commonly used to assess radiosensitivity in human cells: survival, micronucleus and G 2 chromosomal assay. The three tests may be performed using either fibroblasts or peripheral blood lymphocytes and all the three tests share large interindividual variability. In this regard a new approach to the G 2 chromosomal assay which takes into account the eventual differences in cell cycle progression among individuals has been developed. This new approach is based on the analysis of G 2 homogeneous cell populations. Cells irradiated are immediately challenged with medium containing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU rd). Then cells are sampled at different post-irradiation times and BrdU rd incorporation detected on metaphases spread and the scoring is done only at time points showing similar incidence of labelled cells among the different donors. Using this approach it has been possible to reduce the interindividual variability of the G 2 chromosomal assay. (author)

  18. Normal tissue adverse side effects in radiotherapy cancer patients and applicability of predictive radiosensitivity tests for new radiation treatment decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Radl, Analia; Sardi, Mabel

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Around 5 % -7 % of cancer patients develop adverse side effects, which include acute effects, late effects and cancer induction to radiation therapy in normal tissues in the treatment field. Such effects are of particular interest as the cancer patient population that reaches prolonged survival has increased with the improvements in cancer therapy and health care. These adverse reactions are mainly influenced by deficiencies in DNA repair pathways. However, tissue response to IR could be modified by several treatment- and patient- related factors. Numerous studies have been carried out to evaluate the correlation between clinical and cellular radiosensitivity, by in vitro tests. Previous own studies, characterizing DNA repair capacity in peripheral lymphocytes of cancer patients through cytokinesis blocked micronucleus test and alkaline single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet), indicated that such assays correlated with the clinical radiation signs of radiosensitivity and showed the predictive potential of both techniques in the identification of radiosensitivity subgroups. In this paper, retrospective studies are conducted in 10 representative cases, which had developed acute or late toxicity in previous treatments and at present require new radiation treatments due to secondary malignancies or recurrence. Samples were in vitro irradiated with 2 Gy. MN data were analyzed comparing expected MN frequencies with values observed after in vitro irradiation. DNA repair capacity was evaluated through comet assay for initial damage and after specific times of repair (0-120 minutes). Captured images were analyzed by CASP image analysis software. Repair capacity was quantified by the Olive tail moment. Weibull alpha parameter was applied to describe DNA damage at the different evaluated repair times after in vitro irradiation and fitted by a mono-exponential model to describe the kinetic profile. In every evaluated patient a correlation between mean half

  19. Normal tissue adverse side effects in radiotherapy cancer patients and applicability of predictive radiosensitivity tests for new radiation treatment decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Radl, A.; Sardi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Around 5%-7% of cancer patients develop adverse side effects, which include acute effects, late effects and cancer induction to radiation therapy in normal tissues in the treatment field. Such effects are of particular interest as the cancer patient population that reaches prolonged survival has increased with the improvements in cancer therapy and health care. These adverse reactions are mainly influenced by deficiencies in DNA repair pathways. However, tissue response to IR could be modified by several treatment- and patient- related factors. Numerous studies have been carried out to evaluate the correlation between clinical and cellular radiosensitivity, by in vitro tests. Previous own studies, characterizing DNA repair capacity in peripheral lymphocytes of cancer patients through cytokinesis blocked micronucleus test and alkaline single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet), indicated that such assays correlated with the clinical radiation signs of radiosensitivity and showed the predictive potential of both techniques in the identification of radiosensitivity subgroups. In this paper, retrospective studies are conducted in 10 representative cases, which had developed acute or late toxicity in previous treatments and at present require new radiation treatments due to secondary malignancies or recurrence. Samples were in vitro irradiated with 2 Gy. MN data were analyzed comparing expected MN frequencies with values observed after in vitro irradiation. DNA repair capacity was evaluated through comet assay for initial damage and after specific times of repair (0-120 minutes). Captured images were analyzed by CASP image analysis software. Repair capacity was quantified by the Olive tail moment. Weibull alpha parameter was applied to describe DNA damage at the different evaluated repair times after in vitro irradiation and fitted by a mono-exponential model to describe the kinetic profile. In every evaluated patient a correlation between mean half-time (T1/2) and

  20. The development of genes associated with radiosensitivity of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyan; Chen Zhihua; He Guifang

    2007-01-01

    It has a good application prospect to predict effects of radiotherapy by examining radiosensitivity of patients with cervical cancers before their radiotherapy. Prediction of tumor cell radiosensitivity according to their level of gene expression and gene therapy to reverse radio-resistance prior to radiation on cervical cancers are heated researches on tumor therapy. The expression of some proliferation-related genes, apoptosis-related genes and hypoxia-related genes can inerease the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer. Microarray technology may have more direct applications to the study of biological pathway contributing to radiation resistance and may lead to development of alternative treatment modalities. (authors)

  1. Development of novel radiosensitizers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Akamatsu, K

    2002-01-01

    The novel radiosensitizers for cancer therapy, which have some atoms with large X-ray absorption cross sections, were synthesized. The chemical and radiation (X-rays, W target, 100kVp) toxicities and the radiosensitivities to LS-180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were also evaluated. 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylalcohol (PBBA) derivatives were not radiosensitive even around the maximum concentration. On the other hand, the hydrophilic sodium 2,4,6-triiodobenzoate (STIB) indicated meaningful radiosensitivity to the cells. Moreover, the membrane-specific radiosensitizers, cetyl fluorescein isthiocyanate (cetyl FITC), cetyl eosin isothiocyanate (cetyl br-FITC), cetyl erythrosin isothiocyanate (cetyl I-FITC), which aim for the membrane damage by X-ray photoabsorption on the target atoms, were localized in the plasma membrane. As the results of the colony formation assay, it was found that both cetyl FITC are similarly radiosensitive. In this report, we demonstrate the synthetic methods of the radiosensitizers, the...

  2. In vitro radiosensitivity of primary human fibroblasts. Lack of correlation with acute radiation toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Dietz, Andreas; Conradt, Christian; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Flentje, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is a considerable hope among clinicians and radiobiologists to detect genetically radiosensitive patients prior to radiotherapy. A predictive assay would enable adjustment of the total irradiation dose to the individual at a constant risk of normal tissue complications. In this prospective study, the clonogenic survival assay for primary human fibroblasts to determine radiosensitivity in vitro was evaluated and then correlated with clinically observed acute radiation reactions. Materials and methods: One hundred twenty-five independent survival experiments with primary fibroblasts derived from 63 biopsies from 55 cancer and non-cancer patients were performed. Results: A wide variation of cell survival between biopsies was detected. Statistical analysis revealed a highly significantly larger interindividual than intraindividual variation of SF2 values. However, a considerable scatter of SF2 values in repeated experiments was observed in individual cases. Age, gender, disease status (cancer patient, non-cancer patient) and origin of fibroblasts (skin, periodontal tissue) were demonstrated not to be statistically significant confounding factors on the intrinsic radiosensitivity in vitro. In a prospective study, no correlation of the SF2 and acute reactions in 25 patients with head and neck cancer treated with a primary accelerated radiochemotherapy was detected. Conclusion: Our data show that the clonogenic assay is able to distinguish between intrinsic radiosensitivities of primary human fibroblasts if a statistical approach is used but does not predict acute radiation toxicity

  3. Radiosensitizers in cervical cancer. Cisplatin and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelaria, Myrna; Garcia-Arias, Alicia; Cetina, Lucely; Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be a significant health burden worldwide. Globally, the majority of cancers are locally advanced at diagnosis; hence, radiation remains the most frequently used therapeutical modality. Currently, the value of adding cisplatin or cisplatin-based chemotherapy to radiation for treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer is strongly supported by randomized studies and meta-analyses. Nevertheless, despite these significant achievements, therapeutic results are far from optimal; thus, novel therapies need to be assayed. A strategy currently being investigated is the use of newer radiosensitizers alone or in combination with platinum compounds. In the present work, we present preclinical information on known and newer cytotoxic agents as radiosensitizers on cervical cancer models, as well as the clinical information emanating from early phase trials that incorporate them to the cervical cancer management. In addition, we present the perspectives on the combined approach of radiation therapy and molecular target-based drugs with proven radiosensitizing capacity

  4. Lethal outcome after pelvic salvage radiotherapy in a patient with prostate cancer due to increased radiosensitivity. Case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrig, Antje; Koch, T.; Lenhart, M.; Rieckmann, P.; Fietkau, R.; Distel, Luitpold; Schuster, B.

    2018-01-01

    In general, late side effects after salvage radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer are below 10%. Patients with impaired DNA repair ability and genetic instability can have significantly increased reactions after RT. We present a patient who experienced severe side effects after additive RT for prostate cancer and died from the complications 25 months after RT. Imaging (MR) is shown as well as three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. The blood sample testing revealed that radiosensitivity was increased by 35-55%. We undertook a review of the literature to give an overview over the tests established that are currently considered useful. This case highlights that the identification of patients with increased radiosensitivity is an important task in radiation protection. Groups of patients who should be screened have to be found and corresponding research facilities have to be set up. (orig.) [de

  5. Breast-conservation treatment without any surgical procedure using new enzyme-targeting radiosensitization treatment for aged and/or op. refused patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Kei; Miyatake, Kana

    2008-01-01

    We developed a new radiosensitizer containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate for topical tumor injection for various types of tumors, and the method was named KORTUC II (Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II). KORTUC II trial was accepted by our local ethical committee concerning of the injection for advanced skin cancer, advanced bone/soft tissue malignant neoplasms, breast cancer of op refused or aged patients, and metastatic lymph nodes. Concerning breast cancer, ten patients were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial upon fully informed consent. All of them showed clinically complete response by the new enzyme-targeting radiosensitization treatment (KORTUC II) without any severe complications excluding mild dermatitis (grade I). Nine of the 10 patients have so far shown neither local recurrence nor distant metastasis, and the mean follow-up period at the end of December 2007 was still short and approximately 12 months. Especially for patients with breast cancer, breast-conservation treatment without any surgical procedure can be performed by using our new radiosensitizer for topical injection into the tumor tissue. (author)

  6. Radiosensitivity in Fanconi's anemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alter, Blanche P.

    2002-01-01

    The risks of radiation therapy in patients with Fanconi's anemia who have cancer are not clear. Possible toxicity was reported in six of 14 patients: 1/1 with vaginal cancer, 4/10 with head and neck or esophageal cancer, and 1/3 with oral cancer following bone marrow transplant

  7. Liposome based radiosensitizer cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourhassan, Houman

    Liposome-encapsulated chemotherapeutics have been used in the treatment of a variety of cancers and are feasible for use as mono-therapeutics as well as for combination therapy in conjunction with other modalities. Despite widespread use of liposomal drugs in cancer patient care, insufficient drug...... biomolecules. By modulating the liposomal membrane, liposomes can become sensitive towards enzymatically-driven destabilization and/or functionalization, thereby allowing control of the release of encapsulated therapeutics within the diseased tissue upon intrinsic stimulation from tumor-associated enzymes...... in tumor-bearing mice.The safety and efficacy of sPLA2-sensitive liposomal L-OHP was assessed in sPLA2-deficient FaDu hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and sPLA2-expressing Colo205 colorectal adenocarcinoma. Also, the feasibility of multimodal cancer therapy employing L-OHP encapsulated in MMP...

  8. Studies of metronidazole radiosensitizing effect in radiation treatment of patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, P.Yu.; Daryalova, S.L.; Pelevina, I.I.; Karakulov, R.K.; Zel'vin, B.M.; Kiseleva, E.S.; Kvasov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical observations of 26 patients with tongue, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer receiving telegammatherapy by dynamic dose fractionation scheme in combination with metronidazole (MZ), and of 38 patients from the control group treated using the identical schedule without MZ suggest that MZ favors increasing radiation damage in tumors in those sites without changing the character or intensifying early radiation reactions. After oral administration of MZ in single doses of 5-6 g/m 2 it reached its maximum in the blood serum within 2-4 h. When the total dose of 30-60 g of MZ was used, a marked toxic effect manifest in gastrointestinal symptoms was observed in 33.3% of patients. MZ has a negative effect on liver functions; however, changes in biochemical tests were reversible and within normal values. Simultaneous studies of biopsy material from 22 patients (11 from each group) in terms of proliferation activity showed that oral cavity tumors contain a significant portion of proliferating cells which notably decrease in the course of radiation therapy. The decrease is marked to a greater extent after irradiation in combination with MZ. (author)

  9. Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity Is Not a Common Effect in Normal Asynchronous and G2-Phase Fibroblasts of Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Słonina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Janecka, Anna; Kabat, Damian; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Gasińska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In our previous study, using the micronucleus assay, a low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS)-like phenomenon was observed for normal fibroblasts of 2 of the 40 cancer patients investigated. In this article we report, for the first time, the survival response of primary fibroblasts from 25 of these patients to low-dose irradiation and answer the question regarding the effect of G2-phase enrichment on HRS elicitation. Methods and Materials: The clonogenic survival of asynchronous as well as G2-phase enriched fibroblast populations was measured. Separation of G2-phase cells and precise cell counting was performed using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Sorted and plated cells were irradiated with single doses (0.1-4 Gy) of 6-MV x-rays. For each patient, at least 4 independent experiments were performed, and the induced-repair model was fitted over the whole data set to confirm the presence of HRS effect. Results: The HRS response was demonstrated for the asynchronous and G2-phase enriched cell populations of 4 patients. For the rest of patients, HRS was not defined in either of the 2 fibroblast populations. Thus, G2-phase enrichment had no effect on HRS elicitation. Conclusions: The fact that low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity is not a common effect in normal human fibroblasts implies that HRS may be of little consequence in late-responding connective tissues with regard to radiation fibrosis

  10. Normal cellular radiosensitivity in an adult Fanconi anaemia patient with marked clinical radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcou, Yiola; D'Andrea, Andrew; Jeggo, Penelope A.; Plowman, Piers N.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Fanconi anaemia is a rare disease associated with cellular sensitivity to chemicals (e.g. mitomycin C and diepoxybutane); variable but mild cellular radiosensitivity has also been reported. Materials and methods: A 32-year-old patient with Fanconi anaemia and tonsillar carcinoma, treated by radiotherapy, was found to exhibit profound clinical radiosensitivity. Confluent, ulcerating oropharyngeal mucositis developed after a conventionally fractionated dose of 34 Gy and healing was incomplete by 2 months after cessation of therapy. Results: Cellular radiosensitivity assays and RPLD studies from this patient did not suggest any major detectable radiosensitivity. Conclusion: There is a discrepancy between the observed clinical radiosensitivity and the usual 'predictive' radiosensitivity assays in this patient with Fanconi anaemia

  11. Targeting Mcl-1 for Radiosensitization of Pancreatic Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Wei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify targets whose inhibition may enhance the efficacy of chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer, we previously conducted an RNAi library screen of 8,800 genes. We identified Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1, an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, as a target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to chemoradiation. In the present study we investigated Mcl-1 inhibition by either genetic or pharmacological approaches as a radiosensitizing strategy in pancreatic cancer cells. Mcl-1 depletion by siRNA produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells in association with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage, but only minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. We next tested the ability of the recently identified, selective, small molecule inhibitor of Mcl-1, UMI77, to radiosensitize in pancreatic cancer cells. UMI77 caused dissociation of Mcl-1 from the pro-apoptotic protein Bak and produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells, but minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Radiosensitization by UMI77 was associated with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Importantly, UMI77 did not radiosensitize normal small intestinal cells. In contrast, ABT-737, an established inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w, failed to radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells suggesting the unique importance of Mcl-1 relative to other Bcl-2 family members to radiation survival in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these results validate Mcl-1 as a target for radiosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells and demonstrate the ability of small molecules which bind the canonical BH3 groove of Mcl-1, causing displacement of Mcl-1 from Bak, to selectively radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells.

  12. Lung cancer radiosensitization by CMNa in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xia; Ouyang Xienong; Ji Hongbing; Chen Zhonghua; Yang Rujun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To probe into the radiosensitization effect of CMNa on lung tumor cell lines after γ-irradiation combined with γ-knife to treat patients suffering from lung cancer. Methods: 1. Cells of small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446 and non-small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H596 irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays combined with or without CMNa were counted using trypan blue exclusion methods, and cell survival rate curves were depicted. 2. Patients suffering from lung cancer at different clinical stages were treated using γ-knife combined with or without CMNa, and the curative effect was evaluated 6 weeks after one cycle of treatment. Results: CMNa could significantly increase the sensitivity of lung cancer cell lines to γ-irradiation. Curative effect increased significantly by γ-knife treatment combined with CMNa i. e., the CR+PR rates for these two groups were 47.22% and 37.67% separately (P 0.05). Conclusion: CMNa could significantly increase the radiation sensitivity of lung cancer cell line cells in vitro and tumors in vivo, therefore, it could be used as a radiosensitization agent in clinical treatment of lung cancer. (authors)

  13. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Voronova, Natalia V.; Chistiakov, Pavel A.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  14. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A. (Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US)); Voronova, Natalia V. (Dept. of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, Moscow (RU)); Chistiakov, Pavel A. (Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Center, Moscow (RU))

    2008-06-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  15. Non-Surgical Breast-Conserving Treatment (KORTUC-BCT Using a New Radiosensitization Method (KORTUC II for Patients with Stage I or II Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conserving treatment (BCT using KORTUC II radiosensitization treatment. A new radiosensitizing agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (a CD44 ligand has been developed for intra-tumoral injection into various tumors. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for the treatment of breast cancer and metastatic lymph nodes. A total of 72 early-stage breast cancer patients (stage 0, 1 patient; stage I, 23; stage II, 48 were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial after providing fully informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 59.7 years. A maximum of 6 mL (usually 3 mL for tumors of less than approximately 3 cm in diameter of the agent was injected into breast tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. For radiotherapy, hypofraction radiotherapy was administered using a tangential fields approach including an ipsilateral axillary region and field-in-field method; the energy level was 4 MV, and the total radiation dose was 44 Gy administered as 2.75 Gy/fraction. An electron boost of 3 Gy was added three times. Treatment was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects in all 72 patients. No patients showed any significant complications other than mild dermatitis. A total of 24 patients under 75 years old with stage II breast cancer underwent induction chemotherapy (EC and/or taxane prior to KORTUC II treatment, and 58 patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors also received hormonal therapy following KORTUC II. The mean duration of follow-up as of the end of September 2014 was 51.1 months, at which time 68 patients were alive without any distant metastases. Only one patient had local recurrence and died of cardiac failure at 6.5 years. Another one patient had bone metastases. For two of the 72 patients, follow-up ended after several months following KORTUC II treatment. In conclusion, non

  16. Lethal outcome after pelvic salvage radiotherapy in a patient with prostate cancer due to increased radiosensitivity. Case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrig, Antje; Koch, T. [Klinikum Bamberg, Sozialstiftung Bamberg, Klinik und Praxis fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Bamberg (Germany); Lenhart, M. [Klinikum Bamberg, Sozialstiftung Bamberg, Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Bamberg (Germany); Rieckmann, P. [Klinikum Bamberg, Sozialstiftung Bamberg, Neurologische Klinik, Bamberg (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Distel, Luitpold; Schuster, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Strahlenklinik, Erlangen (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    In general, late side effects after salvage radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer are below 10%. Patients with impaired DNA repair ability and genetic instability can have significantly increased reactions after RT. We present a patient who experienced severe side effects after additive RT for prostate cancer and died from the complications 25 months after RT. Imaging (MR) is shown as well as three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. The blood sample testing revealed that radiosensitivity was increased by 35-55%. We undertook a review of the literature to give an overview over the tests established that are currently considered useful. This case highlights that the identification of patients with increased radiosensitivity is an important task in radiation protection. Groups of patients who should be screened have to be found and corresponding research facilities have to be set up. (orig.) [German] Generell sind spaete Nebenwirkungen nach additiver Radiotherapie (RT) beim Prostatakarzinom mit deutlich unter 10 % selten. Allerdings haben Patienten mit eingeschraenkter DNA-Reparatur-Kapazitaet und genetischer Instabilitaet ein signifikant erhoehtes Nebenwirkungsrisiko. In diesem Fallbeispiel stellen wir einen Patienten vor, der nach additiver RT wegen Prostatakarzinom massive Nebenwirkungen erlitt und 25 Monate nach der RT daran verstarb. Wir zeigen die Ergebnisse der konsekutiven MR-Untersuchungen und 3-Farben-Fluoreszenz-in-situ-Hybridisierung. Die Blutuntersuchung ergab eine um 35-55 % erhoehte Strahlenempfindlichkeit. Eine aktuelle Literaturrecherche ergab, dass mittlerweile verschiedene Testverfahren zur Untersuchung der Strahlenempfindlichkeit etabliert sind. Das Fallbeispiel zeigt, dass die Identifikation besonders strahlenempfindlicher Patienten ein wichtiges Arbeitsziel im Strahlenschutz ist. Patientenparameter fuer eine erforderliche Testung ueber die bekannten Syndrome hinaus sollten identifizierbar werden. Entsprechende Forschungseinrichtungen sind

  17. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia; Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Groudeva, Violeta; Hadjidekova, Savina; Domínguez, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  18. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milenkova, Maria; Milanov, Ivan; Kmetska, Ksenia [III Neurological Clinic, University Hospital Saint Naum, Sofia (Bulgaria); Deleva, Sofia; Popova, Ljubomira; Hadjidekova, Valeria [Laboratory of Radiation Genetics, NCRRP, Sofia (Bulgaria); Groudeva, Violeta [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University Hospital St. Ekaterina, Sofia (Bulgaria); Hadjidekova, Savina [Department of Medical Genetics, Medical University, Sofia (Bulgaria); Domínguez, Inmaculada, E-mail: idomin@us.es [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Seville, Avda. Reina Mercedes 6, 41012 (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We studied radiosensitivity to in vitro γ-irradiated lymphocytes from MS patients. • Immunotherapy in RRMS patients reduced the yield of radiation induced MN. • The group of treated RRMS accounts for the low radiosensitivity in MS patients. • Spontaneous yield of MN was similar in treated and untreated RRMS patients. - Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease leading to severe neurological disability. Although during the last years many disease-modifying agents as treatment options for multiple sclerosis have been made available, their mechanisms of action are still not fully determined. In the present study radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and healthy controls was investigated. Whole blood cultures from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls were used to analyze the spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes. A subgroup of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis was treated with immunomodulatory agents, interferon β or glatiramer acetate. The secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients group was not receiving any treatment. Our results reveal that the basal DNA damage was not different between relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls. No differences between gamma-irradiation induced micronuclei frequencies in binucleated cells from relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, and healthy controls were found either. Nevertheless, when we compared the radiation induced DNA damage in binucleated cells from healthy individuals with the whole group of patients, a reduction in the frequency of micronuclei was obtained in the patients group. Induced micronuclei yield was significantly lower in the irradiated samples from treated relapsing–remitting multiple

  19. Validation of a Radiosensitivity Molecular Signature in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschrich, Steven A.; Fulp, William J.; Pawitan, Yudi; Foekens, John A.; Smid, Marcel; Martens, John W. M.; Echevarria, Michelle; Kamath, Vidya; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Harris, Eleanor E.; Bergh, Jonas; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previously, we developed a radiosensitivity molecular signature (RSI) that was clinically-validated in three independent datasets (rectal, esophageal, head and neck) in 118 patients. Here, we test RSI in radiotherapy (RT) treated breast cancer patients. Experimental Design RSI was tested in two previously published breast cancer datasets. Patients were treated at the Karolinska University Hospital (n=159) and Erasmus Medical Center (n=344). RSI was applied as previously described. Results We tested RSI in RT-treated patients (Karolinska). Patients predicted to be radiosensitive (RS) had an improved 5 yr relapse-free survival when compared with radioresistant (RR) patients (95% vs. 75%, p=0.0212) but there was no difference between RS/RR patients treated without RT (71% vs. 77%, p=0.6744), consistent with RSI being RT-specific (interaction term RSIxRT, p=0.05). Similarly, in the Erasmus dataset RT-treated RS patients had an improved 5-year distant-metastasis-free survival over RR patients (77% vs. 64%, p=0.0409) but no difference was observed in patients treated without RT (RS vs. RR, 80% vs. 81%, p=0.9425). Multivariable analysis showed RSI is the strongest variable in RT-treated patients (Karolinska, HR=5.53, p=0.0987, Erasmus, HR=1.64, p=0.0758) and in backward selection (removal alpha of 0.10) RSI was the only variable remaining in the final model. Finally, RSI is an independent predictor of outcome in RT-treated ER+ patients (Erasmus, multivariable analysis, HR=2.64, p=0.0085). Conclusions RSI is validated in two independent breast cancer datasets totaling 503 patients. Including prior data, RSI is validated in five independent cohorts (621 patients) and represents, to our knowledge, the most extensively validated molecular signature in radiation oncology. PMID:22832933

  20. Chromosomal radiosensitivity, cancer predisposition and response to radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, D. [Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom). Paterson Inst. for Cancer Research

    2000-05-01

    Aim: This paper briefly summarizes the research on this topic, undertaken in the Department of Cancer Genetics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, England, over the previous 6 years. We have investigated the possible role of radiosensitivity as a marker of cancer predisposition and response to radiotherapy in the general population. Results: We found that 42% (57/135) of breast cancer patients exhibit chromosomal radiosensitivity when lymphocytes are irradiated in the G{sub 2} phase of the cell cycle, compared with 6% (6/105) of healthy controls. These figures are much higher than the estimated frequencies of carriers of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene (heterozygotes) amongst breast cancer patients (<5%) and control (0.5%). We have also obtained evidence of heritability of G{sub 2} sensitivity by studying relatives of breast cancer cases. The pattern of inheritance is relatively simple and attributable to 1 or 2 genes segregating in each family. In a prospective study of 123 breast cancer patients, 9 (7%) had severe acute reactions to radiotherapy and their mean G{sub 2} sensitivity was significantly greater (p=0.001) than that of the remaining patients. In 16 patients with adverse acute reactions we found no mutations of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene (ATM). Using another chromosomal assay (micronucleus induction in G{sub 0} lymphocytes) we found that the mean radiosensitivity of patients with severe late reactions was higher than that of normal reactors. For example, 8 patients with severe fibrosis were more sensitive (p=0.055) than 39 patients with a normal response. However, the discriminatory power of these chromosomal assays is too low for them to be used alone in a clinical setting. Conclusion: Our results provide good evidence that genes other than ATM, that confer chromosomal radiosensitivity, are involved in low penetrance predisposition to breast cancer in a high proportion of cases and contribute to adverse reactions after radiotherapy

  1. The potential role of G2- but not of G0-radiosensitivity for predisposition of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgmann, Kerstin; Raabe, Annette; Reuther, Sebastian; Szymczak, Silke; Schlomm, Thorsten; Isbarn, Hendrik; Gomolka, Maria; Busjahn, Andreas; Bonin, Michael; Ziegler, Andreas; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Comparing the chromosomal radiosensitivity of prostate cancer patients with that of healthy donors. Materials and methods: The study was performed on 81 prostate cancer patients characterised by a clinical stage of predominantly pT2c or pT3a and a median age of 67 years. As healthy donors 60 male monozygotic twin pairs were recruited with a median age of 28 years. Chromosomal radiosensitivity was measured using both G0- and G2-assay. Results: No difference between healthy donors and prostate cancer patients was detected concerning G0-radiosensitivity, since medians were similar (Hodges-Lehmann estimate: -0.05, 95% CI: -0.18-0.08, p = 0.4167). However, a pronounced difference was determined for G2-radiosensitivity with prostate cancer patients showing a significantly higher sensitivity compared to healthy donors (Hodges-Lehmann estimate: -0.41, 95% CI: -0.53 to -0.30, p = 1.75 -9 ). Using the 90% quantile of G2-radiosensitivity in healthy donors as a threshold for discrimination the fraction of prostate cancer patients with elevated radiosensitivity increased to 49%. Conclusion: G2-, but not G0-radiosensitivity is a promising marker for predisposition of prostate cancer.

  2. Clinical and Functional Assays of Radiosensitivity and Radiation-Induced Second Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Habash

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the near instantaneous physical interaction of radiation energy with living cells leaves little opportunity for inter-individual variation in the initial yield of DNA damage, all the downstream processes in how damage is recognized, repaired or resolved and therefore the ultimate fate of cells can vary across the population. In the clinic, this variability is observed most readily as rare extreme sensitivity to radiotherapy with acute and late tissue toxic reactions. Though some radiosensitivity can be anticipated in individuals with known genetic predispositions manifest through recognizable phenotypes and clinical presentations, others exhibit unexpected radiosensitivity which nevertheless has an underlying genetic cause. Currently, functional assays for cellular radiosensitivity represent a strategy to identify patients with potential radiosensitivity before radiotherapy begins, without needing to discover or evaluate the impact of the precise genetic determinants. Yet, some of the genes responsible for extreme radiosensitivity would also be expected to confer susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer, which can be considered another late adverse event associated with radiotherapy. Here, the utility of functional assays of radiosensitivity for identifying individuals susceptible to radiotherapy-induced second cancer is discussed, considering both the common mechanisms and important differences between stochastic radiation carcinogenesis and the range of deterministic acute and late toxic effects of radiotherapy.

  3. Correlation between residual level of DNA double-strand breaks and the radiosensitivity of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jianxiang; Sun Weijian; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To understand the variation of the DNA double-strand break rejoining capacity among different cultured cancer cell lines and the primary cancer cells from brain cancer patients, and to explore the predictor of radiotherapy responses of cancers. Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were induced by 60 Co γ-irradiation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the initial production and rejoining of DNA DSBs. Radiosensitivity was determined by in vitro assay of clonogenic-forming capacity. Results: A wide variation of radiosensitivity, e.g. the survival parameter of Do varied from 0.65 to 2.15 Gy, was displayed among the eight cell lines derived from different type of cancers. Although differential level of initial DNA DSBs induced by 20 Gy γ-rays was observed among various cell lines, it was not correlated with the radiosensitivity. The deficiency of DNA DSB rejoining in radiosensitive cell lines was shown either in the early rapid-rejoining phase (SX-10 cells) or in the late slow-rejoining phase (A2780 cells). A significant relationship was observed between the residual level of DNA DSBs measured at 2 h post-20 Gy irradiation and the cellular radiosensitivity (D 0 or SF 2 ). The kinetic curves of rejoining DNA DSBs in the primary human brain tumor cells indicated a variation on DSB rejoining capacity among different individual tumor. The residual level of DNA DSBs after 2 h of rejoining post 20 Gy irradiation in primary human brain tumor cells is compatible to the results obtained in vitro culture cancer cell lines. Conclusions: The residual level of DNA DSBs is correlated with radioresistance of cancer cells, and the residual DNA damage is a useful parameter in predicting the response of tumor tissue to radiotherapy. (authors)

  4. Identification of a radiosensitivity signature using integrative metaanalysis of published microarray data for NCI-60 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Han

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenome era, a prediction of response to treatment could lead to better dose selection for patients in radiotherapy. To identify a radiosensitive gene signature and elucidate related signaling pathways, four different microarray experiments were reanalyzed before radiotherapy. Results Radiosensitivity profiling data using clonogenic assay and gene expression profiling data from four published microarray platforms applied to NCI-60 cancer cell panel were used. The survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2, range from 0 to 1 was calculated as a measure of radiosensitivity and a linear regression model was applied to identify genes or a gene set with a correlation between expression and radiosensitivity (SF2. Radiosensitivity signature genes were identified using significant analysis of microarrays (SAM and gene set analysis was performed using a global test using linear regression model. Using the radiation-related signaling pathway and identified genes, a genetic network was generated. According to SAM, 31 genes were identified as common to all the microarray platforms and therefore a common radiosensitivity signature. In gene set analysis, functions in the cell cycle, DNA replication, and cell junction, including adherence and gap junctions were related to radiosensitivity. The integrin, VEGF, MAPK, p53, JAK-STAT and Wnt signaling pathways were overrepresented in radiosensitivity. Significant genes including ACTN1, CCND1, HCLS1, ITGB5, PFN2, PTPRC, RAB13, and WAS, which are adhesion-related molecules that were identified by both SAM and gene set analysis, and showed interaction in the genetic network with the integrin signaling pathway. Conclusions Integration of four different microarray experiments and gene selection using gene set analysis discovered possible target genes and pathways relevant to radiosensitivity. Our results suggested that the identified genes are candidates for radiosensitivity biomarkers and that

  5. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms in the XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, GSTM1, GSTT1, MSH2, MLH1, MSH3, and MGMT Genes and Radiosensitivity in Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangoni, Monica; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carozzi, Francesca; Sani, Cristina; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo; Barletta, Emanuela; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical radiosensitivity varies considerably among patients, and radiation-induced side effects developing in normal tissue can be therapy limiting. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to correlate with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy. We conducted a prospective study of 87 female patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast surgery. We evaluated the association between acute skin reaction following radiotherapy and 11 genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes: XRCC1 (Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln), MSH2 (gIVS12-6T>C), MLH1 (Ile219Val), MSH3 (Ala1045Thr), MGMT (Leu84Phe), and in damage-detoxification GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes (allele deletion). Methods and Materials: Individual genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and single nucleotide primer extension for single nucleotide polymorphisms or by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for deletion polymorphisms. The development of severe acute skin reaction (moist desquamation or interruption of radiotherapy due to toxicity) associated with genetic polymorphisms was modeled using Cox proportional hazards, accounting for cumulative biologically effective radiation dose. Results: Radiosensitivity developed in eight patients and was increased in carriers of variants XRCC3-241Met allele (hazard ratio [HR] unquantifiably high), MSH2 gIVS12-6nt-C allele (HR = 53.36; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 3.56-798.98), and MSH3-1045Ala allele (HR unquantifiably high). Carriers of XRCC1-Arg194Trp variant allele in combination with XRCC1-Arg399Gln wild-type allele had a significant risk of radiosensitivity (HR = 38.26; 95% CI, 1.19-1232.52). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report to find an association between MSH2 and MSH3 genetic variants and the development of radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that mismatch repair mechanisms may be

  6. Phytochemicals radiosensitize cancer cells by inhibiting DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rana P.

    2017-01-01

    Solid tumors are mostly treated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is toxic to normal tissues and also promote the invasiveness and radioresistance in cancer cells. The resistance against radiotherapy and adverse effects to normal cells reduce the overall therapeutic effects of the treatment. Radiosensitizing agents usually show limited success during clinical trials. Therefore, the search and development of new radiosensitizers showing selective response to only cancer cells is desirable. We analyzed the radiosensitizing effects including cell death effect of silibinin, a phytochemical on prostate cancer cells. Silibinin enhanced gamma radiation (2.5-10 Gy) induced inhibition in colony formation selectively in prostate cancer cells. In cell cycle progression, G2/M phase is the most sensitive phase for radiation-induced damage which was delayed by the compound treatment in radiation exposed cells. The lower concentrations of silibinin substantially enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. A prolonged reactive oxygen species production was also observed in these treatments EGFR signaling pathway can contribute to radiation-induced pro-survival mechanisms and to the therapeutic resistance. Agent treatment reduced the IR-induced EGFR phosphorylation and consequently reversed the resistance mediating mechanisms within the cancer cell. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair in cancer cells would enhance therapeutic response of radiation in cancer cells. Silibinin affected the localization of EGFR and DNA-dependent protein kinase, the DNA-PK is known to be an important mediator of DSB repair in human cells, and showed increased number of pH2AX (ser139) foci, and thus indicating lower DNA repair in these cancer cells. This was also confirmed in the tumor xenograft study. Our findings suggest that a combination of silibinin with radiation could be an effective treatment of radioresistant human prostate cancer and warrants further investigation. (author)

  7. Review of our histological criteria for the radiosensitivity of uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Yoshiharu; Shiozawa, Kyuyo; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Sonehara, Morio; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The determination of radiosensitiveness based on 111 operated specimens after test irradiation of 1000R was compared with that based on 64 specimens which had received biopsies seven days after irradiation. It was concluded that the determination of radiosensitiveness by local biopsy could be applied to practical use. The results of this study are listed as follows: (1) Radiosensitivity exists within tumor cells themselves before irradiation, while radiosensitiveness is a complicated change in which some reaction on the host side added to degenerated tumor cells. (2) In the determination of radio-sensitiveness, there was a good accordance of 85% between biopsies and removed specimens. (3) The followings are findings of favorable radiosensitiveness based on the removed specimens; (a) neutrocyte infiltration within cancer nests, (b) lysis of cancer nests, (c) destruction of fundus of cancer nests, (d) damages of advanced sites of cancer infiltration, (e) damages of chromatin. As unfavorable findings, (f) mitosis, (g) abundant viable cells. (4) Various histological findings within cancer nests and variation of radiosensitiveness according to various regions of the tumor often cause a discord with biopsies. (5) Many specimens which show the intermediate histological type in maturation before irradiation indicate favorable radiosensitiveness. Even if they belong to the intermediate type, the specimens in which the issued histological findings are mixed show mostly unfavorable radiosensitiveness. (6) Removed specimens can be expressed in indices of radiosensitiveness. (Ichikawa, K.)

  8. Radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer by kaempferol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Yuan-Chung; Wu, His-Chin; Ho, Yung-Jen; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Yao, Chen-Han; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether kaempferol has a radiosensitization potential for lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro radio-sensitization activity of kaempferol was elucidated in A-549 lung cancer cells by using an MTT (3-(4 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-25-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay, cell cycle analysis and clonogenic assay. The in vivo activity was evaluated in the BALB/c nude mouse xenograft model of A-549 cells by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry, and the tumor volume was recorded. Protein levels of the apoptotic pathway were detected by western blot analysis. Treatment with kaempferol inhibited the growth of A-549 cells through activation of apoptotic pathway. However, the same doses did not affect HFL1 normal lung cell growth. Kaempferol induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and the enhancement of radiation-induced death and clonogenic survival inhibition. The in vivo data showed that kaempferol increased tumor cell apoptosis and killing of radiation. In conclusion, the findings demonstrated that kaempferol increased tumor cell killing by radiation in vitro and in vivo through inhibition of the AKT/PI3K and ERK pathways and activation of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway. The results of the present study provided solid evidence that kaempferol is a safe and potential radiosensitizer.

  9. Study of radiosensitization of chloroquine on esophageal cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Xiaoli; Li Tao; Huang Jianming; Zha Xiao; Deng Bifang; Lang Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possibility of chloroquine radiosensitization of esophageal cancer cell line TE-1 and its further mechanism. Methods: Effect of chloroquine on cell viability of TE-1 cells was determined by MTT method. Expression of LC3, Beclin-1 and formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) were determined by Western blot, and fluorescence staining with Lyso-Tracker Red DND-99, respectively. Clonogenic survival of TE-1 cells was examined by clonogenic forming assay. Results: Chloroquine showed dose-dependent inhibition of TE-1 cell growth, and its values of IC_5_0 and IC_1_0 were (72.33±5.28) and (15.42±3.33) μmol/L, respectively. The expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/I markedly increased in irradiated TE-1 cells. The addition of chloroquine with IC_1_0 concentration significantly reduced the fluorescence and intensity of AVOs accumulation in the cytoplasm of TE-1 cells. Clonogenic survival fraction decreased obviously in TE-1 cells with addition of chloroquine after radiation and the value of SERD0 was 1.439. Conclusions: Chloroquine could radiosensitize esophageal cancer cells by blocking autophagy-lysosomal pathway and be used as a potential radiosensitizing strategy. (authors)

  10. Electron microscopic study on radiosensitivity of uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, S; Shiozawa, K; Tsukamoto, T; Noguchi, H; Tsukahara, Y [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1974-11-01

    The effects of 1000 R of tele-cobalt upon the changes in the primary lesions of uterine cervical cancer with time were studied with an electron microscope. In addition, twenty cases which were proven to have cancer tissues (10 cases of IInd stage of cancer, 8 cases of IIIrd stage of cancer and 2 cases of IVth stage of cancer) were studied. Four cases were favourably sensitive, 7 cases moderately sensitive and 9 cases unfavourably sensitive to radiation. In favourably radio-sensitive cases, the changes in the cancer cells first appeared in the nucleus. There were other changes such as local clumping of chromatin and, specifically, vacuolization of the nucleus. The changes in the endoplasmic reticulum appeared somewhat late. In addition, the disturbance of mitochondria and the decrease or disappearance of ribosomes were specifically due to radiation injury. From the point of view of changes with time, Golgi's apparatus was enlarged and the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum was degenerated at the 1st day. At the 3rd day, vacuolization of the nucleus appeared, the nuclear corpuscles were increased, the nucleoplasm became thin, and mitochondria was enlarged and degenerated. At the 5th day, the nuclear membrane disappeared, the nucleus was destroyed, large vacuolization of the endoplasmic reticulum was seen, free ribosomes were decreased, and changes around the endoplasmic reticulum were observed. At the 7th day, collagen around the endoplasmic reticulum appeared. In favourably radiosensitive cases, individual tumor cells showed the same degeneration, which fairly corresponded to that evaluated by the histological observation. The disturbance of the cells was caused by radiation, so-called ''burning'' of the cells. Radiation protection of the cells against burning was considered in terms of their radiosensitivity.

  11. Non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) using a new image-guided, enzyme-targeted, and breast cancer stem cell targeted radiosensitization treatment (KORTUC II) for patients with stage I or II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Kei; Tadokoro, Michiko

    2012-01-01

    Tumor tissue can be re-oxygenated by inactivating peroxidase/catalase in the tumor tissue through application of hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide in turn is then degraded to produce oxygen. In this way, low-LET (linear energy transfer) radioresistant tumors can be transformed into radiosensitive ones (Ogawa Y, et al: Int J Mol Med 12: 453-458, 845-850, 2003, Ogawa Y, et al: Int J Mol Med 14: 397-403, 2004, Kariya S, et al: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 75: 449-454, 2009). The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) by utilizing a novel Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II) radiosensitization treatment. KORTUC I was shown to remarkably enhance radiotherapeutic effects in various types of superficially exposed and locally advanced neoplasms (Ogawa Y, et al: Oncol Rep 19: 1389-1394, 2008). Based on clinical experiences using KORTUC I, a new radiosensitizing agent containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate has been developed for intra-tumoral injection in various tumors which are not superficially exposed. The agent is composed of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (CD44 molecule). Sodium hyaluronate mixed with hydrogen peroxide attaches to CD44-positive tumor cells, which are generally reported to be breast cancer stem cells. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for treatment of advanced skin cancer (including malignant melanoma), bone/soft tissue malignant neoplasm, breast cancer and metastatic lymph node. A total of 39 early stage breast cancer patients (stage I: 12 patients and stage II: 27) were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial upon fully informed consent. Mean age of the patients was 61.1 years old. All 39 patients were unable or unwilling to undergo surgery and therefore undertook non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) by KORTUC II. A maximum of 6 ml of the agent was

  12. G{sub 2} radiosensitivity of cells derived from cancer-prone individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darroudi, F.; Vyas, R.C.; Vermeulen, S.; Natarajan, A.T. [J.A. Cohen Institute of Radiopathology and Radiation Protection, Interuniversity Institute, Leiden (Netherlands)

    1995-04-01

    The potential of enhanced chromatid damage, observed after X-irradiation of G{sub 2} phase, has been used to detect individuals genetically predisposed to cancer, utilising fibroblasts/lymphocytes from these patients as well as fibroblasts derived from human tumours. Fibroblasts and/or lymphocyte samples of two autosomal recessive syndromes (xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Fanconi`s anaemia (FA)) and one congenital or acquired disorder, aplastic anaemia (AA), were employed for the G{sub 2} radiosensitivity assay. In addition, we have estimated the frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations as well as G{sub 2} radiosensitivity of eight samples of fibroblasts/fibroblast-like cells (two normal, two colorectal carcinoma, two Wilms` tumour, one retinoblastoma and one polyposis coli), and three samples of lymphocytes (two normal and one from a lymphoma patient). The results obtained indicate that there were no differences between fibroblast cells derived from patients or tumours, except FA patients, in the frequency of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations when compared to normal cells. Following X-irradiation we did not observe any significantly increased G{sub 2} radiosensitivity in FA and XP cells. Lymphocytes from AA and lymphoma patients, and all tumour cell lines except retinoblastoma, responded with increased frequencies of aberrations following G{sub 2} X-irradiation in comparison to cells derived from normal individuals. In our hands, the G{sub 2} sensitivity assay could not always discriminate cells from cancer-prone individuals from those of controls.

  13. Radiosensitivity is increased by knockdown of FTS in uterine cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Wo Yoon; Anandharaj, Arunkumar; Cinghu, Senthikumar; Kim, Won Dong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Ran [Dept. of Environmental and Tropical Medicine, Konkuk University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Uterine cervical cancer is still the second largest cancer in women worldwide, despite of effective screening methods. Radiotherapy is used to treat all the stages of cervical cancer and more than 60% of cervical cancer patients receive radiotherapy. New therapeutic targets or approaches are needed to further increase the results of radiotherapy. In the present study, we demonstrated the radiation induced overexpression and nuclear export of FTS in cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that silencing of FTS expression with FTS shRNA enhanced radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis FTS is involved in radioresistance of cervical cancer. Targeted inhibition of FTS can shutdown the key elemental characteristics of cervical cancer and could lead to an effective therapeutic strategy.

  14. Radiosensitivity is increased by knockdown of FTS in uterine cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Wo Yoon; Anandharaj, Arunkumar; Cinghu, Senthikumar; Kim, Won Dong; Yu, Jae Ran

    2012-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer is still the second largest cancer in women worldwide, despite of effective screening methods. Radiotherapy is used to treat all the stages of cervical cancer and more than 60% of cervical cancer patients receive radiotherapy. New therapeutic targets or approaches are needed to further increase the results of radiotherapy. In the present study, we demonstrated the radiation induced overexpression and nuclear export of FTS in cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that silencing of FTS expression with FTS shRNA enhanced radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis FTS is involved in radioresistance of cervical cancer. Targeted inhibition of FTS can shutdown the key elemental characteristics of cervical cancer and could lead to an effective therapeutic strategy

  15. Nanoparticle Drones to Target Lung Cancer with Radiosensitizers and Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred Ngwa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has opened up a new, previously unimaginable world in cancer diagnosis and therapy, leading to the emergence of cancer nanomedicine and nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy. Smart nanomaterials (nanoparticle drones can now be constructed with capability to precisely target cancer cells and be remotely activated with radiation to emit micrometer-range missile-like electrons to destroy the tumor cells. These nanoparticle drones can also be programmed to deliver therapeutic payloads to tumor sites to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we examine the state-of-the-art and potential of nanoparticle drones in targeting lung cancer. Inhalation (INH (air versus traditional intravenous (“sea” routes of navigating physiological barriers using such drones is assessed. Results and analysis suggest that INH route may offer more promise for targeting tumor cells with radiosensitizers and cannabinoids from the perspective of maximizing damage to lung tumors cells while minimizing any collateral damage or side effects.

  16. Nanoparticle Drones to Target Lung Cancer with Radiosensitizers and Cannabinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Kumar, Rajiv; Moreau, Michele; Dabney, Raymond; Herman, Allen

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up a new, previously unimaginable world in cancer diagnosis and therapy, leading to the emergence of cancer nanomedicine and nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy. Smart nanomaterials (nanoparticle drones) can now be constructed with capability to precisely target cancer cells and be remotely activated with radiation to emit micrometer-range missile-like electrons to destroy the tumor cells. These nanoparticle drones can also be programmed to deliver therapeutic payloads to tumor sites to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we examine the state-of-the-art and potential of nanoparticle drones in targeting lung cancer. Inhalation (INH) (air) versus traditional intravenous (“sea”) routes of navigating physiological barriers using such drones is assessed. Results and analysis suggest that INH route may offer more promise for targeting tumor cells with radiosensitizers and cannabinoids from the perspective of maximizing damage to lung tumors cells while minimizing any collateral damage or side effects. PMID:28971063

  17. Nanoparticle Drones to Target Lung Cancer with Radiosensitizers and Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Kumar, Rajiv; Moreau, Michele; Dabney, Raymond; Herman, Allen

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up a new, previously unimaginable world in cancer diagnosis and therapy, leading to the emergence of cancer nanomedicine and nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy. Smart nanomaterials (nanoparticle drones) can now be constructed with capability to precisely target cancer cells and be remotely activated with radiation to emit micrometer-range missile-like electrons to destroy the tumor cells. These nanoparticle drones can also be programmed to deliver therapeutic payloads to tumor sites to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we examine the state-of-the-art and potential of nanoparticle drones in targeting lung cancer. Inhalation (INH) (air) versus traditional intravenous ("sea") routes of navigating physiological barriers using such drones is assessed. Results and analysis suggest that INH route may offer more promise for targeting tumor cells with radiosensitizers and cannabinoids from the perspective of maximizing damage to lung tumors cells while minimizing any collateral damage or side effects.

  18. Radiosensitivity of primary tumour cultures as a determinant of curability of human head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, L.J.; Tofilon, P.J.; Goepfert, H.; Brock, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1987, 31 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck who were treated on protocol by surgery and post-operative radiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center had radiosensitivity measurements made on primary cultures of the surgical specimens using the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System. The parameter of cell survival at 2 Gy (S 2 ) was correlated with the clinical outcome independently of pathological risk factors. All five recurrences have been in patients with S 2 values >0.3 (p = 0.08). Evidence of significant intratumoral heterogeneity of cellular radiosensitivity in vitro was demonstrated in one of four cultures tested. Mathematical modelling suggests that in the absence of marked heterogeneity, the S 2 parameter is likely to be more robust than other radiobiologically based assays in predicting clinical treatment outcome. (author)

  19. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is a radiosensitizing target for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Emma; Yue, Shijun; Moriyama, Eduardo H; Hui, Angela B; Kim, Inki; Shi, Wei; Alajez, Nehad M; Bhogal, Nirmal; Li, Guohua; Datti, Alessandro; Schimmer, Aaron D; Wilson, Brian C; Liu, Peter P; Durocher, Daniel; Neel, Benjamin G; O'Sullivan, Brian; Cummings, Bernard; Bristow, Rob; Wrana, Jeff; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2011-01-26

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the eighth most common malignancy worldwide, comprising a diverse group of cancers affecting the head and neck region. Despite advances in therapeutic options over the last few decades, treatment toxicities and overall clinical outcomes have remained disappointing, thereby underscoring a need to develop novel therapeutic approaches in HNC treatment. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), a key regulator of heme biosynthesis, was identified from an RNA interference-based high-throughput screen as a tumor-selective radiosensitizing target for HNC. UROD knockdown plus radiation induced caspase-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HNC cells in vitro and suppressed the in vivo tumor-forming capacity of HNC cells, as well as delayed the growth of established tumor xenografts in mice. This radiosensitization appeared to be mediated by alterations in iron homeostasis and increased production of reactive oxygen species, resulting in enhanced tumor oxidative stress. Moreover, UROD was significantly overexpressed in HNC patient biopsies. Lower preradiation UROD mRNA expression correlated with improved disease-free survival, suggesting that UROD could potentially be used to predict radiation response. UROD down-regulation also radiosensitized several different models of human cancer, as well as sensitized tumors to chemotherapeutic agents, including 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and paclitaxel. Thus, our study has revealed UROD as a potent tumor-selective sensitizer for both radiation and chemotherapy, with potential relevance to many human malignancies.

  20. Radiosensitizing Silica Nanoparticles Encapsulating Docetaxel for Treatment of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Jodi; Castilla-Ojo, Noelle; Sridhar, Srinivas; Kumar, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    The applications of nanoparticles in oncology include enhanced drug delivery, efficient tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and diagnostics. The "theranostic properties" associated with nanoparticles have shown enhanced delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs with superior imaging capabilities and minimal toxicities. In conventional chemotherapy, only a fraction of the administered drug reaches the tumor site or cancer cells. For successful translation of these formulations, it is imperative to evaluate the design and properties of these nanoparticles. Here, we describe the design of ultra-small silica nanoparticles to encapsulate a radiosensitizing drug for combined chemoradiation therapy. The small size of nanoparticles allows for better dispersion and uptake of the drug within the highly vascularized tumor tissue. Silica nanoparticles are synthesized using an oil-in-water microemulsion method. The microemulsion method provides a robust synthetic route in which the inner hydrophobic core is used to encapsulate chemotherapy drug, docetaxel while the outer hydrophilic region provides dispersibility of the synthesized nanoparticles in an aqueous environment. Docetaxel is commonly used for treatment of resistant or metastatic prostate cancer, and is known to have radiosensitizing properties. Here, we describe a systematic approach for synthesizing these theranostic nanoparticles for application in prostate cancer.

  1. Individual radiosensitivity measured with lymphocytes may be used to predict the risk of fibrosis after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeller, Ulrike; Borgmann, Kerstin; Bonacker, Michael; Kuhlmey, Antje; Bajrovic, Amira; Jung, Horst; Alberti, Winfried; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyse the relationship of individual cellular radiosensitivity and fibrosis after breast conserving therapy. A new model was used describing the percentage of patients developing fibrosis per year and per patient at risk. Patients and methods: In a retrospective study, 86 patients were included, who had undergone breast conserving surgery and irradiation of the breast with a median dose of 55 Gy (54-55 Gy) given at 2.5 Gy/fraction (n=57) or 2 Gy/fraction (n=29). Median age was 62 years (range 44-86) and median follow-up was 7.5 years (range 5-17). Patients were examined for fibrosis according to the LENT/SOMA score. For analysis, fibrosis was classified as grade 0 and grade 1 (G0-1) or present grade 2 and grade 3 (G2-3). The time to complete development of fibrosis was determined by analysis of yearly mammograms. Individual cellular radiosensitivity was determined by scoring lethal chromosomal aberrations in in vitro irradiated (6 Gy) lymphocytes using metaphase technique. Patients with low/intermediate cellular radiosensitivity were compared with patients with high cellular radiosensitivity using actuarial methods. Results: Ten patients developed fibrosis at 1-8 years after radiotherapy. Individual cellular radiosensitivity was described by normal distribution of lethal chromosomal aberrations, the average was 5.47 lethal aberrations per cell (standard deviation (SD) 0.71). Cellular radiosensitivity was defined as low/intermediate (≤6.18 lethal aberrations) in 73 patients and high (>6.18 lethal aberrations; mean+SD) in 13 patients. In both groups, the actuarial rate of fibrosis-free patients decreased exponentially with time after radiotherapy. Patients with high cellular radiosensitivity showed a 2.3-fold higher annual rate for fibrosis than patients with intermediate and low radiosensitivity (3.6 versus 1.6% per year). Conclusions: In breast cancer patients, high individual cellular radiosensitivity as determined by the number of

  2. Potential of radiosensitizing agents in cancer chemo-radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girdhani S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential of herbs and other plant-based formulations have been increasingly recognized in prevention and treatment of human diseases including cancer. There exist enormous prospect for screening and evaluation of herbal/plant products for developing effective radiosensitization and radioprotection relevant to nuclear research program. Investigations in our laboratory have focused on the mechanism of activity of variety of anticancer and antioxidant agents, namely, Eugenol, (EU, Ellagic acid (EA, Triphala (TPL, Tocopherol Succinate (TOS and Arachidonic acid on normal and cancer cells with view to design effective protocols in practical radioprotection and cancer radiotherapy. This paper is mainly focused on studies on cytotoxic effects on cancer cell lines. Results have shown that these agents produced radiosensitizing action involving oxidative damage, membrane alteration and damage to nucleic acid in various human cell lines. Studies were performed employing fluorescence probes and electron spin resonance methods and gel electrophoresis protocols. It has been found that cytotoxic effect was induced by initiating membrane oxidative damage and by triggering intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS by gamma radiation in combination with phytochemicals like TPL, EA and TOS in tumor cell line Ehrlich Ascites (EAC, Human cervical (HeLa and breast (MCF-7 cells. Membrane damage and ROS generation was measured by DPH and DCF-FDA fluorescent probes respectively after exposure to low to moderate doses of gamma radiation. This talk will present the cytotoxic effects of phytochemicals in combination with ionizing radiation. It is emphasized that modulation of membrane peroxidative damage and intra cellular ROS may help achieve efficient killing of cancer cells which may provide a new approach to developing effective treatment of cancer.

  3. Prediction of radiosensitivity of oral cancers by serial cytological assay of nuclear changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattathiri, N.V.; Nair, K.M.; Bharathykkutty, C.; Prathapan, R.; Chirayathmanjiyil, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify the relationship between the radiosensitivity of oral cancers and the induction of micronucleation, nuclear budding and multinucleation (polynucleation) evaluated by serial cytology during fractionated radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients with epidermoid cancer of the oral cavity receiving radiotherapy (60 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks) were studied. Serial scrape smears were taken from the tumour before and during radiotherapy and stained by Giemsa and the frequency of micronucleated cells (MNC), nuclear budded cells (NBC) and multinucleated cells (PNC) was evaluated by light microscopy. After a minimum follow-up period of 30 months the patients were classified as having resistant or sensitive tumours, depending on whether the primary tumour had recurred or not within that time. Within-group and between-group analysis on the induction of the above individual parameters and two combined parameters, the micro- or multinucleated cell (MPC) count and the abnormally nucleated cell (ANC) count, was done. The counts were expressed per 1000 uni-nucleated cells. Results: In both groups each parameter showed a statistically significant increase with dose, the increase being higher in the sensitive group. The ANC count showed the greatest increase, the mean counts before treatment and after 28.8 Gy being 24.3 and 157.8 (P<0.0005), respectively, in the sensitive group and 21.0 and 65.2 (P<0.0005), respectively, in the resistant group. After 28.8 Gy the sensitive tumours had significantly higher ANC (P=0.01), MPC (P<0.05) and PNC (P<0.05) counts. Conclusion: The study shows that serial cytological assay of nuclear changes (SCANCing) during radiotherapy is a potentially useful test to predict radiosensitivity. The fact that multinucleation showed the greatest relation with radiosensitivity suggests that injury to the cytokinetic apparatus is important in determining tumour radiosensitivity. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier

  4. Effect of quercetin on radiosensitivity of human uterine cervix cancer HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xiaofang; Hong Chengjiao; Zhang Baoguo

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of Quercetin on radiosensitivity of human Uterine Cervix Cancer HeLa cells, MTT assay and clonogenic assay were performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of Quercetin on the cells. Clonogenic assay was used to observe its effects on the radiosensitivity of the cells. MTT result shows that the inhibition of Quercetin on the cells is in the dose-dependent and time-dependent. And the clonogenic assay result shows that the effect of Quercetin on HeLa cells can be divided into two parts, one for the inhibition of HeLa cells and another for the induction of HeLa cell death. The other clonogenic assay result also shows Quercetin can decrease clonogenic survival rate of HeLa cells exposed to X rays. The study shows Quercetin might enhance the radiosensitivity of the HeLa cell line. And it may provide a useful evaluation to combination of ionizing radiation and Quercetin for cancer patients. (authors)

  5. Metformin enhances radiosensitivity via inhibition of DNA repair pathway in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook; Lee, Ji Young; Song, Kyung Hee; Choi, Kyul; Kim, Eun Ho; Ha, Hun Joo [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we provide a scientific rationale for the clinical application of metformin as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Currently, it is one of the commonest chemoradiotherapy worked better than the radiotherapy or chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. To enhance radiosensitivity of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy, it is to use potential anticancer agents that act as radiosensitizers. Metformin, one of the most widely used antidiabetic drugs, has recently been associated with potential antitumorigenic effects. Our data shows that metformin combined with radiation enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy and down-regulates DNA repair proteins. Therefore, we provides a scientific rationale for the clinical application of metformin as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer.

  6. Metformin enhances radiosensitivity via inhibition of DNA repair pathway in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook; Lee, Ji Young; Song, Kyung Hee; Choi, Kyul; Kim, Eun Ho; Ha, Hun Joo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we provide a scientific rationale for the clinical application of metformin as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Currently, it is one of the commonest chemoradiotherapy worked better than the radiotherapy or chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. To enhance radiosensitivity of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy, it is to use potential anticancer agents that act as radiosensitizers. Metformin, one of the most widely used antidiabetic drugs, has recently been associated with potential antitumorigenic effects. Our data shows that metformin combined with radiation enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy and down-regulates DNA repair proteins. Therefore, we provides a scientific rationale for the clinical application of metformin as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer

  7. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krarup, Marianne; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based on the construction of continuous exponential growth curves. Methods and Materials: Fifteen SCLC cell lines were studied, applying a slightly modified clonogenic assay and a growth extrapolation method. A dose-survival curve was obtained for each experiment and used for calculating several survival parameters. The multitarget single hit model was applied to calculate the cellular radiosensitivity (D 0 ), the capacity for sublethal damage repair (D q ), and the extrapolation number (n). Values for α and β were determined from best-fit curves according to the linear-quadratic model and these values were applied to calculate the surviving fraction after 2-Gy irradiation (SF 2 ). Results: In our investigation, the extrapolation method proved to be inappropriate for the study of in vitro cellular radiosensitivity due to lack of reproducibility. The results obtained by the clonogenic assay showed that the cell lines studied were radiobiologically heterogeneous with no discrete features of the examined parameters including the repair capacity. Conclusion: The results indicate that SCLC tumors per se are not generally candidates for hyperfractionated radiotherapy

  8. Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Hui; Yuan Zhu; Zhu Hong; Li Lei; Shi Huashan; Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo; Xiao Jianghong; Li Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

  9. Genetic bases of the radiosensitivity of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaloge, S.; Marsiglia, H.

    2005-01-01

    Local-regional radiation therapy is one of the major therapeutic means in the management of breast cancer. Three questions however arise from the important advances, achieved in this domain in the past years. The first question concerns the possibilities to identify and overcome the radioresistance of a subset of tumours. The second question is how to recognize women likely to benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy, and therefore to diminish treatment indications in other groups. Finally, the third question is how to identify subjects at high risk for long term injury following breast irradiation, in order to adapt techniques and indications in such populations. The major advances of breast cancer molecular genetics in the past years should provide clinicians with tools to answer these important questions. In this paper, we review the molecular germ line (BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM,...) and somatic (p53, tyrosine kinase receptors, as well as actors of cell cycle, signal transduction, apoptosis, DNA repair...) main bases of breast cancer radiosensitivity. Recent methods of exploration of the genetic background of both the host and the tumours (gene and protein expression profiles) are also reviewed as major tools of breast cancer management in the next few years. (author)

  10. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole on human colorectal cancer cells exposed to high doses of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Gong, Aimin; Ji, Jun; Wu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Lv, Suqing; Lv, Hongzhu; Sun, Xizhuo

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of a new radiosensitizer, doranidazole, and enhancing irradiation on colorectal cancer cells. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole was determined using colony formation and propidium iodide (PI) assays to measure cell growth inhibition and the cell killing effect of human colorectal cancer cell lines exposed to high doses of γ-ray irradiation under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Fluorescence staining and cell migration assays were also used to assess the radiosensitizing effect. Cell proliferation evaluated by clonogenic survival curves was significantly inhibited by 5 mmol/L doranidazole, particularly at doses ranging from 10 to 30 Gy of irradiation. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole on colorectal cancer cells occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Doranidazole also inhibited the mobility of cell invasion and migration. Doranidazole can enhance the killing effect and the cell growth inhibition of colorectal cancer after high-dose irradiation in a time and dose-dependent manner

  11. Linkage disequilibrium pattern of the ATM gene in breast cancer patients and controls; association of SNPs and haplotypes to radio-sensitivity and post-lumpectomy local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fosså Sophie D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATM protein is activated as a result of ionizing radiation, and genetic variants of the ATM gene may therefore affect the level of radiation-induced damage. Individuals heterozygous for ATM mutations have been reported to have an increased risk of malignancy, especially breast cancer. Materials and methods Norwegian breast cancer patients (272 treated with radiation (252 of which were evaluated for radiation-induced adverse side effects, 95 Norwegian women with no known history of cancer and 95 American breast cancer patients treated with radiation (44 of which developed ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence, IBTR were screened for sequence variations in all exons of the ATM gene as well as known intronic variants by denaturating high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC followed by sequencing to determine the nature of the variant. Results and Conclusion A total of 56 variants were identified in the three materials combined. A borderline significant association with breast cancer risk was found for the 1229 T>C (Val>Ala substitution in exon 11 (P-value 0.055 between the Norwegian controls and breast cancer patients as well as a borderline significant difference in haplotype distribution (P-value 0.06. Adverse side effects, such as: development of costal fractures and telangiectasias, subcutaneous and lung fibrosis, pleural thickening and atrophy were evaluated in the Norwegian patients. Significant associations were found for several of the identified variants such as rs1800058 (Leu > Phe where a decrease in minor allele frequency was found with increasing level of adverse side effects for the clinical end-points pleural thickening and lung fibrosis, thus giving a protective effect. Overall our results indicate a role for variation in the ATM gene both for risk of developing breast cancer, and in radiation induced adverse side effects. No association could be found between risk of developing ipsilateral breast tumour

  12. Linkage disequilibrium pattern of the ATM gene in breast cancer patients and controls; association of SNPs and haplotypes to radio-sensitivity and post-lumpectomy local recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edvardsen, Hege; Tefre, Toril; Jansen, Laila; Vu, Phuong; Haffty, Bruce G; Fosså, Sophie D; Kristensen, Vessela N; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2007-01-01

    The ATM protein is activated as a result of ionizing radiation, and genetic variants of the ATM gene may therefore affect the level of radiation-induced damage. Individuals heterozygous for ATM mutations have been reported to have an increased risk of malignancy, especially breast cancer. Norwegian breast cancer patients (272) treated with radiation (252 of which were evaluated for radiation-induced adverse side effects), 95 Norwegian women with no known history of cancer and 95 American breast cancer patients treated with radiation (44 of which developed ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence, IBTR) were screened for sequence variations in all exons of the ATM gene as well as known intronic variants by denaturating high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) followed by sequencing to determine the nature of the variant. A total of 56 variants were identified in the three materials combined. A borderline significant association with breast cancer risk was found for the 1229 T>C (Val>Ala) substitution in exon 11 (P-value 0.055) between the Norwegian controls and breast cancer patients as well as a borderline significant difference in haplotype distribution (P-value 0.06). Adverse side effects, such as: development of costal fractures and telangiectasias, subcutaneous and lung fibrosis, pleural thickening and atrophy were evaluated in the Norwegian patients. Significant associations were found for several of the identified variants such as rs1800058 (Leu > Phe) where a decrease in minor allele frequency was found with increasing level of adverse side effects for the clinical end-points pleural thickening and lung fibrosis, thus giving a protective effect. Overall our results indicate a role for variation in the ATM gene both for risk of developing breast cancer, and in radiation induced adverse side effects. No association could be found between risk of developing ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence and any of the sequence variants found in the American patient

  13. Enterolactone: A novel radiosensitizer for human breast cancer cell lines through impaired DNA repair and increased apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigdeli, Bahareh; Goliaei, Bahram; Masoudi-Khoram, Nastaran; Jooyan, Najmeh; Nikoofar, Alireza; Rouhani, Maryam; Haghparast, Abbas; Mamashli, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is a potent treatment against breast cancer, which is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. However, the emergence of radioresistance due to increased DNA repair leads to radiotherapeutic failure. Applying polyphenols combined with radiation is a more promising method leading to better survival. Enterolactone, a phytoestrogenic polyphenol, has been reported to inhibit an important radioresistance signaling pathway, therefore we conjectured that enterolactone could enhance radiosensitivity in breast cancer. To assess this hypothesis, radiation response of enterolactone treated MDA-MB-231 and T47D cell lines and corresponding cellular mechanisms were investigated. Methods: Cytotoxicity of enterolactone was measured via MTT assay. Cells were treated with enterolactone before X-irradiation, and clonogenic assay was used to evaluate radiosensitivity. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometric analysis. In addition, DNA damages and corresponding repair, chromosomal damages, and aberrations were assessed by comet, micronucleus, and cytogenetic assays, respectively. Results: Enterolactone decreased the viability of cells in a concentration- and time dependent manner. Enterolactone significantly enhanced radiosensitivity of cells by abrogating G2/M arrest, impairing DNA repair, and increasing radiation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, increased chromosomal damages and aberrations were detected in cells treated with enterolactone combined with X-rays than X-ray alone. These effects were more prominent in T47D than MDA-MB-231 cells. Discussion: To our knowledge, this is the first report that enterolactone is a novel radiosensitizer for breast cancer irrespective of estrogen receptor status. Authors propose enterolactone as a candidate for combined therapy to decrease the radiation dose delivered to patients and subsequent side effects. - Highlights: • Enterolactone is proposed to be a novel radiosensitizer for

  14. Enterolactone: A novel radiosensitizer for human breast cancer cell lines through impaired DNA repair and increased apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigdeli, Bahareh, E-mail: bhr.bigdeli@ut.ac.ir [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, 16th Azar St., Enghelab Sq., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Goliaei, Bahram, E-mail: goliaei@ut.ac.ir [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, 16th Azar St., Enghelab Sq., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masoudi-Khoram, Nastaran, E-mail: n.masoudi@alumni.ut.ac.ir [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, 16th Azar St., Enghelab Sq., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jooyan, Najmeh, E-mail: n.jooyan@ut.ac.ir [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, 16th Azar St., Enghelab Sq., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza, E-mail: nikoofar@iums.ac.ir [Department of Radiotherapy, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Shahid Hemmat Highway, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rouhani, Maryam, E-mail: rouhani@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Biological Sciences, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Prof. Yousef Sobouti Blvd., Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghparast, Abbas, E-mail: Haghparast@sbmu.ac.ir [Neuroscience Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Daneshjo St., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mamashli, Fatemeh, E-mail: mamashli@ut.ac.ir [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, 16th Azar St., Enghelab Sq., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is a potent treatment against breast cancer, which is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. However, the emergence of radioresistance due to increased DNA repair leads to radiotherapeutic failure. Applying polyphenols combined with radiation is a more promising method leading to better survival. Enterolactone, a phytoestrogenic polyphenol, has been reported to inhibit an important radioresistance signaling pathway, therefore we conjectured that enterolactone could enhance radiosensitivity in breast cancer. To assess this hypothesis, radiation response of enterolactone treated MDA-MB-231 and T47D cell lines and corresponding cellular mechanisms were investigated. Methods: Cytotoxicity of enterolactone was measured via MTT assay. Cells were treated with enterolactone before X-irradiation, and clonogenic assay was used to evaluate radiosensitivity. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometric analysis. In addition, DNA damages and corresponding repair, chromosomal damages, and aberrations were assessed by comet, micronucleus, and cytogenetic assays, respectively. Results: Enterolactone decreased the viability of cells in a concentration- and time dependent manner. Enterolactone significantly enhanced radiosensitivity of cells by abrogating G2/M arrest, impairing DNA repair, and increasing radiation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, increased chromosomal damages and aberrations were detected in cells treated with enterolactone combined with X-rays than X-ray alone. These effects were more prominent in T47D than MDA-MB-231 cells. Discussion: To our knowledge, this is the first report that enterolactone is a novel radiosensitizer for breast cancer irrespective of estrogen receptor status. Authors propose enterolactone as a candidate for combined therapy to decrease the radiation dose delivered to patients and subsequent side effects. - Highlights: • Enterolactone is proposed to be a novel radiosensitizer for

  15. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  16. Radiosensitizing effect of epothilone B on human epithelial cancer cells

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    Baumgart, T.; Kriesen, S.; Hildebrandt, G.; Manda, K. [Univ. of Rostock (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Klautke, G.; Fietkau, R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kuznetsov, S.A.; Weiss, D.G. [Univ. of Rostock (Germany). Inst. of Biological Sciences, Cell Biology, and Biosystems Technology

    2012-02-15

    A combined modality treatment employing radiation and chemotherapy plays a central role in the management of solid tumors. In our study, we examined the cytotoxic and radiosensitive effect of the microtubule stabilizer epothilone B on two human epithelial tumor cell lines in vitro and its influence on the microtubule assembly. Cancer cells were treated with epothilone B in proliferation assays and in combination with radiation in colony-forming assays. For the analysis of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and the influence of the drug on its repair a {gamma}H2AX foci assay was used. To determine the effect of epothilone B on the microtubule assembly in cells and on purified tubulin, immunofluorescence staining and tubulin polymerization assay, respectively, were conducted. Epothilone B induced a concentration- and application-dependent antiproliferative effect on the cells, with IC{sub 50} values in the low nanomolar range. Colony forming assays showed a synergistic radiosensitive effect on both cell lines which was dependent on incubation time and applied concentration of epothilone B. The {gamma}H2AX assays demonstrated that ionizing radiation combined with the drug resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in the number of double-strand breaks and suggested a reduction in DNA repair capacity. Epothilone B produced enhanced microtubule bundling and abnormal spindle formation as revealed by immunofluorescence microscopy and caused microtubule formation from purified tubulin. The results of this study showed that epothilone B displays cytotoxic antitumor activity at low nanomolar concentrations and also enhances the radiation response in the tumor cells tested; this may be induced by a reduced DNA repair capacity triggered by epothilone B. It was also demonstrated that epothilone B in fact targets microtubules in a more effective manner than paclitaxel. (orig.)

  17. Radiosensitivity of skin fibroblasts from atomic bomb survivors with and without breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadayuki; Setlow, R.B.; Bender, M.A.

    1990-11-01

    Fibroblasts were established in vitro from skin biopsies obtained from 55 women and one man with or without breast cancer and with or without exposure to radiation from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. The radiosensitivity of these cells was evaluated by clonogenic assays after exposure to X rays or to fission neutrons from a 252 Cf source. Data were fitted to a multitarget model, S/S 0 = A[1-(1-e kD ) N ], for both X-ray and neutron dose-survival curves. A single-hit model, S/S 0 = Ae kD , fits the neutron dose-survival responses as well. These was no difference in the means or variances of radiosensitivity between exposed and nonexposed groups, or between patients with or without breast cancer. Hence, although the sample is not large, it provides no support for the hypothesis that A-bomb radiation preferentially induces breast cancer in women whose cells in vitro are sensitive to cell killing by radiation. (author)

  18. Radiosensitizing effect of PSMC5, a 19S proteasome ATPase, in H460 lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ji-Hye; Yun, Hong Shik; Lee, Su-Jae; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Woo; Song, Ji-Young; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2016-01-01

    The function of PSMC5 (proteasome 26S subunit, ATPase 5) in tumors, particularly with respect to cancer radioresistance, is not known. Here, we identified PSMC5 as a novel radiosensitivity biomarker, demonstrating that radiosensitive H460 cells were converted to a radioresistance phenotype by PSMC5 depletion. Exposure of H460 cells to radiation induced a marked accumulation of cell death-promoting reactive oxygen species, but this effect was blocked in radiation-treated H460 PSMC5-knockdown cells through downregulation of the p53-p21 pathway. Interestingly, PSMC5 depletion in H460 cells enhanced both AKT activation and MDM2 transcription, thereby promoting the degradation of p53 and p21 proteins. Furthermore, specific inhibition of AKT with triciribine or knockdown of MDM2 with small interfering RNA largely restored p21 expression in PSMC5-knockdown H460 cells. Our data suggest that PSMC5 facilitates the damaging effects of radiation in radiation-responsive H460 cancer cells and therefore may serve as a prognostic indicator for radiotherapy and molecular targeted therapy in lung cancer patients. - Highlights: • PSMC5 is a radiation-sensitive biomarker in H460 cells. • PSMC5 depletion inhibits radiation-induced apoptosis in H460 cells. • PSMC5 knockdown blocks ROS generation through inhibition of the p53-p21 pathway. • PSMC5 knockdown enhances p21 degradation via AKT-dependent MDM2 stabilization.

  19. Preliminary screening of the radiosensitivity-associated genes on colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Chungen; Yang Xiaodong; Zhou Liying; Wu Yongyou; Jiang Yinfen; Dai Hong; Lv Xiaodong; Gong Wei

    2007-01-01

    The screening of radiosensitive genes of human colorectal cancer was made by gene chip. Two human colorectal cancer cell lines LOVO and SW480 were cultivated and the total RNA was extracted from at least lxl0 7 cells. Then the gene expression profiling was performed by HG-U133 Plus 2.0 Array and the difference of gene expression has been analyzed. The results shows that there are 16882 genes expressed in LOVO cell and 17114 genes expressed in SW480 cell through gene expression profiling. It has been found that the genes with 2-fold expressed differentially include 908 genes up-regulated and 1312 genes down-regulated. The same genes, such as Fas and NFkB which is up-regulated, Caspas6, and RAD21 which is down-regulated, have been proved to be related to radiosensitivity. The genes with high expression level including CEACAM5, THBS1, SERPINE2, ARL7, HPGD in LOVO cell may also be related to the radiosensitivity. And the genes with high expression level including SCD, NQ01, LYZ, KRT20, ATP1B1 in SW480 cell may be related to the radioresistance of human colorectal cancer. It could be concluded that the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer can be reflected from gene and protein expression level. And gene expression profiling is a fast and sensitive tool to predict the radiosensitivity and screen radiosensitive genes of colorectal cancer. (authors)

  20. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  1. Lacrimal Gland Radiosensitivity in Uveal Melanoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Karin; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Naus, Nicole; Pan, Connie de; Santen, Cornelis A. van; Levendag, Peter; Luyten, Gre P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To find a dose-volume effect for inhomogeneous irradiated lacrimal glands. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2006, 72 patients (42 men and 30 women) were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial (median follow-up, 32 months). A total dose of 50 Gy was given on 5 consecutive days. The mean of all Schirmer test results obtained ≥6 months after treatment was correlated with the radiation dose delivered to the lacrimal gland. Also, the appearance of dry eye syndrome (DES) was related to the lacrimal gland dose distribution. Results: Of the 72 patients, 17 developed a late Schirmer value <10 mm; 9 patients developed DES. A statistically significant relationship was found between the received median dose in the lacrimal gland vs. reduced tear production (p = 0.000) and vs. the appearance of DES (p = 0.003), respectively. A median dose of 7 Gy/fraction to the lacrimal gland caused a 50% risk of low Schirmer results. A median dose of 10 Gy resulted in a 50% probability of DES. Conclusion: We found a clear dose-volume relationship for irradiated lacrimal glands with regard to reduced tear production and the appearance of DES.

  2. Targeted Radiosensitization of ETS Fusion-Positive Prostate Cancer through PARP1 Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumin Han

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ETS gene fusions, which result in overexpression of an ETS transcription factor, are considered driving mutations in approximately half of all prostate cancers. Dysregulation of ETS transcription factors is also known to exist in Ewing's sarcoma, breast cancer, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We previously discovered that ERG, the predominant ETS family member in prostate cancer, interacts with the DNA damage response protein poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 in human prostate cancer specimens. Therefore, we hypothesized that the ERG-PARP1 interaction may confer radiation resistance by increasing DNA repair efficiency and that this radio-resistance could be reversed through PARP1 inhibition. Using lentiviral approaches, we established isogenic models of ERG overexpression in PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. In both cell lines, ERG overexpression increased clonogenic survival following radiation by 1.25 (±0.07 fold (mean ± SEM and also resulted in increased PARP1 activity. PARP1 inhibition with olaparib preferentially radiosensitized ERG-positive cells by a factor of 1.52 (±0.03 relative to ERG-negative cells (P < .05. Neutral and alkaline COMET assays and immunofluorescence microscopy assessing γ-H2AX foci showed increased short- and long-term efficiencies of DNA repair, respectively, following radiation that was preferentially reversed by PARP1 inhibition. These findings were verified in an in vivo xenograft model. Our findings demonstrate that ERG overexpression confers radiation resistance through increased efficiency of DNA repair following radiation that can be reversed through inhibition of PARP1. These results motivate the use of PARP1 inhibitors as radiosensitizers in patients with localized ETS fusion-positive cancers.

  3. Cell lines radiosensitization of thyroid cancer by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, M; Dagrosa, M A; Rossich, L; Casal, M; Pisarev, M A; Thomasz, L; Juvenal G J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine neoplasia. Surgical resection and radioactive iodine is an effective treatment for well-differentiated tumors. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC-I) are agents that cause hyperacetylation of histone proteins and as a consequence remodeling of chromatin structure. They can induce growth arrest, differentiation and apoptotic cell death in different tumor cells. The use of HDAC-I agents could be of utility to enhance the response to external radiation therapy of those thyroid cancers that are refractory to most conventional therapeutic treatments. Objective: To study the effect of HDAC-I as radiosensitizers for the treatment of thyroid cancer and their ability to induce differentiation of thyroid cancer cells. Materials and methods: The human thyroid follicular (WRO) and papillary (TPC-1) carcinoma cell lines were seeded and incubated with increasing doses (0, 0.3, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mM) of the HDAC-I sodium butirate (NaB) and valproic acid (VA) to evaluate cell proliferation and iodide uptake. Cells were irradiated with a 60 Co γ-ray source (1 ± 5% Gy/min) and postirradiation survival was quantified with the colony formation assay. Survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) was calculated for each cell line. Cell cycle and cell death were evaluated at a dose of 3 Gy. Iodide uptake, PCR analysis and transient transfection studies were performed. Results: Cell proliferation was not significantly suppressed after 24 hours of incubation with both drugs at all assayed doses. Iodide uptake was not modified after incubation with HDAC-I of both cell lines. SF2 was reduced from 68 ± 1.6 % in the control WRO cells to 42 ± 3.8 % (P<0.001) in NaB-treated cells. In TPC-1 SF2 was reduced from 32 ± 1.1 % in the control cells to 24 ± 0.8 % (P<0.01). In VA-treated cells SF2 was reduced from 69 ± 0.02 % in control WRO cells to 56 ± 0.01 % (P<0.01) and from 31 ± 2 % in control TPC-1 cells to 11 ± 1 % (P<0.01). There was an arrest

  4. Metformin kills and radiosensitizes cancer cells and preferentially kills cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang W.; Lee, Hyemi; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Williams, Brent; Powers, John; Santos, Troy Dos; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Park, Heon Joo

    2012-01-01

    The anti-cancer effects of metformin, the most widely used drug for type 2 diabetes, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation were studied with MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and FSaII mouse fibrosarcoma cells. Clinically achievable concentrations of metformin caused significant clonogenic death in cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to cancer stem cells relative to non-cancer stem cells. Metformin increased the radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro, and significantly enhanced the radiation-induced growth delay of FSaII tumors (s.c.) in the legs of C3H mice. Both metformin and ionizing radiation activated AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR and suppression of its downstream effectors such as S6K1 and 4EBP1, a crucial signaling pathway for proliferation and survival of cancer cells, in vitro as well as in the in vivo tumors. Conclusion: Metformin kills and radiosensitizes cancer cells and eradicates radioresistant cancer stem cells by activating AMPK and suppressing mTOR. PMID:22500211

  5. Phase I/II Trial of Sequential Chemoradiotherapy Using a Novel Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer, Doranidazole (PR-350), in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (WJTOG-0002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Koji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Negoro, Shunichi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hida, Toyoaki; Kawahara, Masaaki; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Hirokawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Ariyoshi, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I/II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of PR-350, a novel hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, when administered with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) after induction chemotherapy (CT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Two cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel (180 mg/m 2 ), or carboplatin (AUC = 6) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ) were given before RT of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. In the Phase I portion, the starting dosage of PR-350 was 10 daily administrations (2000 mg/m 2 ) in combination with RT, and this number was increased in increments of 10 for successive groups to 30 doses. Results: In total, 37 patients were enrolled. In Phase I (n = 20), PR-350 could be administered 30 times with concurrent thoracic RT. Thus, in Phase II (n = 17), PR-350 was administered 30 times. The major toxicity was radiation pneumonitis, with Grade 3 or more pneumonitis noted in 6 patients (16%) including 2 with treatment-related deaths. However, no Grade 3 or more esophageal toxicity was noted, and only Grade 1 peripheral neuropathy was noted in 9 patients (24%). For all 37 patients, the median survival time (MST) and the 2-year survival rate were 15.9 months and 24%, respectively. For 18 patients receiving 21 to 30 doses of PR-350, the MST and 2-year survival rate were 20.9 months and 33%, respectively. Conclusions: Thoracic RT combined with 30 daily administrations of PR-350 after induction CT was well tolerated and promising for locally advanced NSCLC

  6. Radiosensitization effect of CMNa on hypoxic pancreatic cancer cell in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Lijie; Zhang Li; Ding Tiangui; Peng Zhaoxiang; Yu Huan; Gao Yuwei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of glycodidazolum natrium (CMNa) on pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxic condition. Methods: The human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells were exposed to a single fraction of high-dose γ-ray radiation either with CMNa or under hypoxic condition. The percentage of dead cells was detected with a multiwell plated reader, and fluorescence intensities of propidium iodide were measured before and after digitonin treatment. The sensitizing effect of CMNa on cell killing induced by high-dose irradiation was evaluated by time and concentration dependence. The selective radiosensitive effect of CMNa on hypoxia was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: The death rate of pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells paralleled with the increasing concentration of CMNa under hypoxic condition after 30 gray irradiation. The selective radiosensitive effect of CMNa on hypoxia was time-dependent. Conclusions: CMNa can enhance the radiosensitivity of pancreatic cancer Pane-1 cells under hypoxic condition with high-dose irradiation. (authors)

  7. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debin Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy.

  8. The docetaxel radiosensitization experience for the treatment of unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shoji; Maruyama, Michio; Tanami, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    Docetaxel is an increasingly important drug for the treatment of esophageal cancer. The docetaxel radiosensitization has been established in cancer cell lines. The therapeutic response and toxicity of a weekly docetaxel in combination with radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer were examined. Ten patients with locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell esophageal cancer were recruited in the following protocol. The median age was 65.7 years. Patients received radiation in 2 Gy single daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy. Docetaxel (10 mg/m 2 ) was administered weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. One patient could not be evaluated. The overall response rate was 77% with 11% complete response (CR) and 66% partial response (PR). Mild grade 2 leukocytes toxicity was observed in 2/10 patients, which enforced the treatment absence for 7-14 days. Grade 2 stomatitis was noted in one patient. No severe grade 3 adverse effects were observed. It is concluded that low-dose docetaxel with radiotherapy is feasible and, a high response rate can be expected. Toxicity is modest, and this protocol may be useful for the outpatients or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (author)

  9. Analysis of the individual radio sensitivity of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auer, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Individual radiosensitivity has a crucial impact on radiotherapy related side effects. A prediction of individual radiosensitivity could avoid these side effects. Our aim was to study a breast cancer collective for its variation of individual radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 129 individuals. 67 breast cancer patients and 62 healthy and age matched individuals were looked at and their individual radiosensitivity was estimated by a 3-color Fluorescence in situ hybridization approach. Blood samples were obtained (i) before starting adjuvant radiotherapy and were in vitro irradiated by 2 Gy; (ii) after 5 single doses of 1.8 Gy and after 72 h had elapsed. DNA of lymphocytes was probed with whole chromosome painting for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. The rate of breaks per metaphase was analyzed and used as a predictor of individual radiosensitivity. Breast cancer patients were distinctly more radio-sensitive compared to healthy controls. Additionally the distribution of the cancer patients' radiosensitivity was broader. A subgroup of 9 rather radio-sensitive and 9 rather radio-resistant patients was identified. A subgroup of patients aged between 40 and 50 was distinctly more radio-sensitive than younger or older patients. The in vivo irradiation approach was not applicable to detect individual radiosensitivity. In the breast cancer collective a distinctly resistant and sensitive subgroup is identified, which could be subject for treatment adjustment. Especially in the range of age 40 to 50 patients have an increased radiosensitivity. An in vivo irradiation in a breast cancer collective is not suitable to estimate individual radiosensitivity due to a low deposed dose.

  10. Radiosensitization by PARP inhibition to proton beam irradiation in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Takahisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Division of Chemotherapy and Clinical Cancer Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Soichiro; Fujimori, Hiroaki [Division of Chemotherapy and Clinical Cancer Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Matsushita, Keiichiro; Nishio, Teiji [Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima-shi, Hiroshima (Japan); Okayasu, Ryuichi [International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba-shi, Chiba (Japan); Masutani, Mitsuko, E-mail: mmasutan@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Division of Chemotherapy and Clinical Cancer Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Frontier Life Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2016-09-09

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 regulates DNA damage responses and promotes base excision repair. PARP inhibitors have been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation in various cancer cells and animal models. We have demonstrated that the PARP inhibitor (PARPi) AZD2281 is also an effective radiosensitizer for carbon-ion radiation; thus, we speculated that the PARPi could be applied to a wide therapeutic range of linear energy transfer (LET) radiation as a radiosensitizer. Institutes for biological experiments using proton beam are limited worldwide. This study was performed as a cooperative research at heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences. HIMAC can generate various ion beams; this enabled us to compare the radiosensitization effect of the PARPi on cells subjected to proton and carbon-ion beams from the same beam line. After physical optimization of proton beam irradiation, the radiosensitization effect of the PARPi was assessed in the human lung cancer cell line, A549, and the pancreatic cancer cell line, MIA PaCa-2. The effect of the PARPi, AZD2281, on radiosensitization to Bragg peak was more significant than that to entrance region. The PARPi increased the number of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and enhanced G2/M arrest after proton beam irradiation. This result supports our hypothesis that a PARPi could be applied to a wide therapeutic range of LET radiation by blocking the DNA repair response. - Highlights: • Effective radiosensitizers for particle radiation therapy have not been reported. • PARP inhibitor treatment radiosensitized after proton beam irradiation. • The sensitization at Bragg peak was greater than that at entrance region. • DSB induction and G2/M arrest is involved in the sensitization mechanism.

  11. TGFβ1 polymorphisms and late clinical radiosensitivity in patients treated for gynecologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyck, Kim de; Van Eijkeren, Marc; Claes, Kathleen; Bacher, Klaus; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between six transforming growth factor β1 gene (TGFβ1) polymorphisms (-1.552delAGG, -800G>A, -509C>T, Leu10Pro, Arg25Pro, Thr263Ile) and the occurrence of late normal tissue reactions after gynecologic radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight women with cervical or endometrial cancer and 140 control individuals were included in the study. According to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAEv3.0) scale, 25 patients showed late adverse RT reactions (CTC2+), of whom 11 had severe complications (CTC3+). Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), single base extension and genotyping assays were performed to examine the polymorphic sites in TGFβ1. Results: Homozygous variant -1.552delAGG, -509TT, and 10Pro genotypes were associated with the risk of developing late severe RT reactions. Triple (variant) homozygous patients had a 3.6 times increased risk to develop severe RT reactions (p = 0.26). Neither the -800A allele, nor the 25Pro allele or the 263Ile allele were associated with clinical radiosensitivity. There was perfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the -1.552delAGG and the -509C>T polymorphisms, and tight LD between the -1.552/-509 and the Leu10Pro polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis revealed two major haplotypes but could not distinguish radiosensitive from nonradiosensitive patients. Conclusions: The present study shows that homozygous variant TGFβ1 -1.552delAGG, -509TT, and 10Pro genotypes may be associated with severe clinical radiosensitivity after gynecologic RT

  12. Safety and efficacy of enzyme targeting intraoperative radiosensitization therapy (KORTUC-IORT) for advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Akihito; Hamada, Norihiko; Kariya, Shinji; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We developed a new radiosensitizer injection containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate just followed by intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer, named KORTUC-IORT (Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinoma + IORT). Fourteen patients were treated with KORTUC-IORT, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and systemic chemotherapy. With KORTUC-IORT, the agent containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate, was injected into tumor tissue just prior to administration of IORT under ultrasonic guidance. All treatments related with KORTUC-IORT were well tolerated, with few adverse effects. One year survival rate is 67% and median survival period is 15 months. The present formulation can be delivered safely and effectively under the conditions used. (author)

  13. Pretreatment microRNA Expression Impacting on Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Predicts Intrinsic Radiosensitivity in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines and Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Monique C.; ten Hoeve, Jelle J.; Grénman, Reidar; Wessels, Lodewyk F.; Kerkhoven, Ron; te Riele, Hein; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Verheij, Marcel; Begg, Adrian C.

    2015-01-01

    Predominant causes of head and neck cancer recurrence after radiotherapy are rapid repopulation, hypoxia, fraction of cancer stem cells, and intrinsic radioresistance. Currently, intrinsic radioresistance can only be assessed by ex vivo colony assays. Besides being time-consuming, colony assays do

  14. Pretreatment microRNA Expression Impacting on Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Predicts Intrinsic Radiosensitivity in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines and Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.C.; ten Hoeve, J.J.; Grénman, R.; Wessels, L.F.; Kerkhoven, R.; te Riele, H.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Verheij, M.; Begg, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Predominant causes of head and neck cancer recurrence after radiotherapy are rapid repopulation, hypoxia, fraction of cancer stem cells, and intrinsic radioresistance. Currently, intrinsic radioresistance can only be assessed by ex vivo colony assays. Besides being time-consuming, colony

  15. Pretreatment microRNA Expression Impacting on Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Predicts Intrinsic Radiosensitivity in Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines and Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C. de; Hoeve, J.J. Ten; Grenman, R.; Wessels, L.F.; Kerkhoven, R.; Riele, H. Te; Brekel, M.W. van den; Verheij, M.; Begg, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Predominant causes of head and neck cancer recurrence after radiotherapy are rapid repopulation, hypoxia, fraction of cancer stem cells, and intrinsic radioresistance. Currently, intrinsic radioresistance can only be assessed by ex vivo colony assays. Besides being time-consuming, colony

  16. Targeting MEK5 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Prostate Cancer and Impairs Tumor-Associated Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    analysis of tumor necrosis factor - alpha resistant human breast cancer cells reveals a MEK5/Erk5-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0296 TITLE: Targeting MEK5 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Prostate Cancer and Impairs Tumor - Associated...Cancer and Impairs Tumor -Associated Angiogenesis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0296 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  17. antiEGFR conjugated gold nanoparticles for increasing radiosensitivity in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha; Avasthi, Devesh K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the set back that lies in lung cancer treatment is the over expression of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). EGFR is a transmembrane receptor that is highly expressed in lung cancer that leads to cell survival, proliferation and spread of the disease. Over the years, EGFR inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, are being used in combination with radiotherapy in lung cancer patients so as to achieve better results. In the recent time, application of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) in diagnosis and treatment of cancer has been extensively used in biomedical research. Among various applications, there is considerable use of AuNPs seen on the dose enhancement effect (radiosensitization) in radiation therapy of cancer. The conjugation of AuNP with monoclonal antibody antiEGFR (antiEGFR-AuNP) may provide excellent agent to sensitize the cells to heavy ion radiation. We synthesized AuNPs by citrate reduction method. Most of AuNPs were in the size range of 6-8 nm as studies by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). These AuNPs were found to be non toxic in A549 cells and thus biocompatible. Further, we conjugated AuNPs with antiEGFR (antiEGFR-AuNP). The conjugation was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. A549 cells were treated with antiEGFR-AuNP. TEM was carried out of ultrathin cross sections of antiEGFR-AuNP treated A549 cells to check the attachment internalization of AuNPs. We observed that the AuNPs are attached on the cell membrane as well as internalized in cytoplasm. Upon exposure of antiEGFR-AuNP treated cells to heavy ion 12 C beam, showed increase in radiosensitization as studied by survival assay and MTT assay. We will also explain the EGFR expression and cell cycle proliferation in A549 cells upon heavy ion beam irradiation of these. The study aims to overcome the current limitations of cancer-targeted therapies and improve the treatment modality of lung cancer. (author)

  18. Compliance and toxicity of the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole in the treatment of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metwally, Mohamed Ahmed Hassan; Frederiksen, Katrine Diemer; Overgaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. To evaluate the compliance and toxicity of the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole in head and neck cancer patients. Methods. A retrospective study of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), treated in Denmark between 1990 and 2013. All patients treated...... with radical radiotherapy (± chemotherapy) [66-70 Gy; 33-35 fractions; 2 Gy/fraction; 5-6 fractions/week] concomitant with the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole. Nimorazole was administered as oral tablets in doses of approximately 1.2 g/m(2) body surface area in connection with the first of each daily...

  19. Radiosensitizing efficacy of iso-metronidazole after intravesical application in bladder cancer. A clinical phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kob, D.; Lilienthal, A.; Bauhardt, H.; Merkle, K.; Schroeder, E.; Schroeder, E.; Hentschel, M.

    1991-01-01

    The radiosensitizing efficacy of iso-Metronidazole, a 4-Nitroimidazole derivative, was evaluated in a prospective clinical phase II study. The results of combined radiotherapy of 25 patients with bladder cancer were compared with those of a control group of 25 patients treated with radiotherapy only. Tumor regression six months after radiotherapy was used as an endpoint. The surgical procedure was performed as double TUR. Evaluating the local tumor control after additional application of iso-Metronidazole a gain factor of 1.2 is obtained. (orig.) [de

  20. Proliferative activity of stomach cancer and assessment of individual radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chissov, V.I.; Sergeeva, N.S.; Dar'yalova, S.L.; Petrov, A.N.; Repina, A.G.; Belous, T.A.; Pelevina, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    An indirect immunofluorescent method with polyclonal antibodies to thymidine was used to assess the proliferative activity (PA-percent of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle) of 79 stomach tumors from primary cancer patients. Stomach cancer PA was shown to vary from 0.1 to 69.7%. Stomach cancer PA did not depend either on a tumor size or a degree of the involvement of regional lymph nodes. The mean PA of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma was slightly lower (14.9±4.7%) than that of low differentiated ones. Of 79 patients a tumor process was interpreted as a resectable one in 62. They were given preoperative irradiation at a total focal dose of 36 Gy followed by operation. It was shown that tumor radioresistance could be predicted in unchanged PA indices of their increase at the beginning of a course of irradiation with the probability of 95%

  1. Radiation response in vitro of fibroblasts from a Fanconi anemia patient with marked clinical radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djuzenova, C.; Flentje, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Plowman, P.N. [Radiotherapy/Clinical Oncology, St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    Background: fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive chromosome instability disorder characterized by progressive pancytopenia and cancer susceptibility. The risks of radiation therapy in FA patients who have cancer remain to be investigated. Recently, Marcou et al. (2001) reported a case of severe clinical radiosensitivity in a female FA patient with a tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy. By contrast, her in vitro irradiated skin fibroblasts revealed nearly normal radiosensitivity as determined by the colony survival assay. Material and methods: in view of this discrepancy, the radiation response of this particular FA fibroblast strain (designated 425BR) was further analyzed in the present study by means of the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay, and also by the cytochalasin-blocked micronuclei (MN) test. In addition, the expression levels of DNA repair proteins, hMre11, Rad50, and Rad51, were investigated using Western blot and foci immunofluorescence staining. Results: the Comet assay revealed that the initial DNA fragmentation in irradiated FA cells was two times higher and the DNA rejoining process was three times slower than that in control (1BR3) fibroblasts. Moreover, although the baseline level of MNs was lower in FA cells than in controls, the FA fibroblasts were more prone (about two times) to MN production than control cells when irradiated with 2-4 Gy. Western blot analysis of the DNA repair proteins (hMre11, Rad50, and Rad51) did not reveal any abnormalities in protein expression levels or their migration patterns in the fibroblasts derived from an FA patient either before or after irradiation. At the same time, in vitro irradiated cells from the FA patient exhibited a significantly reduced number of nuclei with focally concentrated DNA repair Rad51 protein than in control cells. Conclusion: the increased DNA damage and MN induction in irradiated FA fibroblasts, and the reduction of the formation of DNA

  2. Radiation response in vitro of fibroblasts from a Fanconi anemia patient with marked clinical radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuzenova, C.; Flentje, M.; Plowman, P.N.

    2004-01-01

    Background: fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive chromosome instability disorder characterized by progressive pancytopenia and cancer susceptibility. The risks of radiation therapy in FA patients who have cancer remain to be investigated. Recently, Marcou et al. (2001) reported a case of severe clinical radiosensitivity in a female FA patient with a tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy. By contrast, her in vitro irradiated skin fibroblasts revealed nearly normal radiosensitivity as determined by the colony survival assay. Material and methods: in view of this discrepancy, the radiation response of this particular FA fibroblast strain (designated 425BR) was further analyzed in the present study by means of the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay, and also by the cytochalasin-blocked micronuclei (MN) test. In addition, the expression levels of DNA repair proteins, hMre11, Rad50, and Rad51, were investigated using Western blot and foci immunofluorescence staining. Results: the Comet assay revealed that the initial DNA fragmentation in irradiated FA cells was two times higher and the DNA rejoining process was three times slower than that in control (1BR3) fibroblasts. Moreover, although the baseline level of MNs was lower in FA cells than in controls, the FA fibroblasts were more prone (about two times) to MN production than control cells when irradiated with 2-4 Gy. Western blot analysis of the DNA repair proteins (hMre11, Rad50, and Rad51) did not reveal any abnormalities in protein expression levels or their migration patterns in the fibroblasts derived from an FA patient either before or after irradiation. At the same time, in vitro irradiated cells from the FA patient exhibited a significantly reduced number of nuclei with focally concentrated DNA repair Rad51 protein than in control cells. Conclusion: the increased DNA damage and MN induction in irradiated FA fibroblasts, and the reduction of the formation of DNA

  3. Pronounced radiosensitization of cultured human cancer cells by COX inhibitor under acidic microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Tushar; Ryu, Samuel; Lee, Ho Jun; Brown, Stephen; Kim, Jae Ho

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the influence of pH on the cytotoxicity and radiosensitization by COX (cyclooxygenase) -1 and -2 inhibitors using established human cancer cells in culture. Methods and Materials: Nonselective COX inhibitor, ibuprofen (IB), and selective COX-2 inhibitor, SC-236, were used to determine the cytotoxicity and radiosensitization at varying pH of culture media. Human colon carcinoma cell line (HT-29) was exposed to the drug alone and in combination with radiation at different pH of the cell culture media. The end point was clonogenic ability of the single-plated cells after the treatment. Results: Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization of IB increased with higher drug concentration and longer exposure time. The most significant radiosensitization was seen with IB (1.5 mM) for 2-h treatment at pH 6.7 before irradiation. The dose-modifying factor as defined by the ratio of radiation doses required to achieve the same effect on cell survival was 1.8 at 10% survival level. In contrast, SC-236 (50 μM for 2-8 h) showed no pH-dependent cytotoxicity. There was modest increase in the cell killing at lower doses of radiation. Conclusion: An acidic pH was an important factor affecting the increased cytotoxicity and radiosensitization by ibuprofen. Radiation response was enhanced at shoulder portion of the cell survival curve by selective COX-2 inhibitor

  4. Andrographolide radiosensitizes human esophageal cancer cell line ECA109 to radiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z-M; Kang, Y-H; Yang, X; Wang, J-F; Zhang, Q; Yang, B-X; Zhao, K-L; Xu, L-P; Yang, L-P; Ma, J-X; Huang, G-H; Cai, J; Sun, X-C

    2016-01-01

    To explore the radiosensitivity of andrographolide on esophageal cancer cell line ECA109. The inhibition effects of andrographolide were measured using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Clonogenic survival assay was used to evaluate the effects of andrographolide on the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer cells. Immunofluorescence was employed to examine Bax expression. The changes in cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assayed using flow cytometry. The expression of NF-κb/Cleaved-Caspase3/Bax/Bcl-2 was measured using Western blot analysis. DNA damage was detected via γ-H2AX foci counting. With a clear dose and time effects, andrographolide was found to inhibit the proliferation of esophageal cell line ECA109. The results of the clonogenic survival assay show that andrographolide could markedly enhance radiosensitivity (P Andrographolide caused a dose-dependent increase in Cleaved-Caspase3/Bax protein expression and a decrease in Bcl-2/NF-κb expression. Apoptosis in andrographolide-treated ECA-109 increased significantly compared with the apoptosis in the simple drug and radiation combined with drug groups (P andrographolide combined with radiation group increased the number of DNA double chain breaks. Andrographolide can increase the radiosensitivity of esophageal cell line ECA109. This result may be associated with the decrease in the NF-κb level and the induced apoptosis of esophageal cancer cells. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. Laryngeal preservation with definitive radiotherapy in radiosensitive hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Kuratomi, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Tomoya; Honda, Hiroshi; Terashima, Hiromi

    2003-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with hypopharyngeal cancer treated by irradiation at Kyushu University Hospital between 1985 and 1992 were analyzed retrospectively. They included 53 men and 4 women, and their ages ranged from 39 to 83 years (mean, 63 years). Two patients had stage I, 7 had stage II, 13 had stage III, and 35 had stage IV disease according to the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) (1997) classification. Initially, they were irradiated in the conventional way with a dose of 30 Gy, and 17 patients with good response were irradiated to curative dose (more than 60 Gy), and 32 patients with poor response were operated immediately. Medically inoperable or unresectable patients were treated in a semiradical way (n=8). The 5-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 46% and 51%, respectively. Five-year cause-specific survival rates were 88% for stages I and II (n=9), 67% for stage III (n=13), and 35% for stage IV (n=35). Five-year cause-specific survival according to treatment method was 58% for surgery and 51 % for curative radiotherapy. There was no statistically significant difference between the two rates. These results suggest that initial radiation response is an important factor in deciding on the following treatment method. Curative radiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer according to initial radiation response is a desirable treatment strategy. (author)

  6. Effect of primarily cultured human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts on radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Xiaoqin; Ji Jiang; Chen Yongbing; Shan Fang; Lu Xueguan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) on the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells when CAF is placed in direct contact co-culture with lung cancer cells. Methods: Human lung CAF was obtained from fresh human lung adenocarcinoma tissue specimens by primary culture and subculture and was then identified by immunofluorescence staining. The CAF was placed in direct contact co-culture with lung cancer A 549 and H 1299 cells, and the effects of CAF on the radiosensitivity of A 549 and H 1299 cells were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Results: The human lung CAF obtained by adherent culture could stably grow and proliferate, and it had specific expression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast activation protein,but without expression of cytokeratin-18. The plating efficiency (PE, %) of A 549 cells at 0 Gy irradiation was (20.0 ± 3.9)% when cultured alone versus (32.3 ± 5.5)% when co-cultured with CAF (t=3.16, P<0.05), and the PE of H 1299 cells at 0 Gy irradiation was (20.6 ± 3.1)% when cultured alone versus (35.2 ± 2.3)% when co-cultured with CAF (t=6.55, P<0.05). The cell survival rate at 2 Gy irradiation (SF 2 ) of A 549 cells was 0.727 ±0.061 when cultured alone versus 0.782 ± 0.089 when co-cultured with CAF (t=0.88, P>0.05), and the SF 2 of H 1299 cells was 0.692 ±0.065 when cultured alone versus 0.782 ± 0.037 when co-cultured with CAF (t=2.08, P>0.05). The protection enhancement ratios of human lung CAF for A 549 cells and H 1299 cells were 1.29 and 1.25, respectively. Conclusions: Human lung CAF reduces the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells when placed in direct contact co-culture with them, and the radioprotective effect may be attributed to CAF promoting the proliferation of lung cancer cells. (authors)

  7. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes in South African breast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    radiosensitivity has been used as an indirect measure of cancer susceptibility. ... studies have shown that breast cancer patients are more sensitive to ionising radiation than healthy individuals. .... There was an effect of ER positivity on the MN.

  8. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of γ-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G 2 /M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  9. Use of Mitochondria-Specific Dye MKT-077 as a Radiosensitizer to Preoperatively Treat Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braun, Rodney D

    2007-01-01

    The major goal of this project is to determine if the rhodacyanine analog dye, MKT-077, can be used to inhibit breast cancer cell oxygen metabolism and raise tumor oxygen levels, thereby radiosensitizing the tumor...

  10. Use of Mitochondria-Specific Dye MKT-077 as a Radiosensitizer to Preoperatively Treat Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braun, Rodney D

    2006-01-01

    The major goal of this project is to determine if the rhodacyanine analog dye, MKT-077, can be used to inhibit breast cancer cell oxygen metabolism and raise tumor oxygen levels, thereby radiosensitizing the tumor...

  11. Use of Mitochondria-Specific Dye MKT-077 as a Radiosensitizer to Preoperatively Treat Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braun, Rodney D

    2008-01-01

    The major goal of this project is to determine if the rhodacyanine analog dye, MKT-077, can be used to inhibit breast cancer cell oxygen metabolism and raise tumor oxygen levels, thereby radiosensitizing the tumor...

  12. Integration of a Radiosensitivity Molecular Signature Into the Assessment of Local Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Roca, Javier F.; Fulp, William J.; Caudell, Jimmy J.; Servant, Nicolas; Bollet, Marc A.; Vijver, Marc van de; Naghavi, Arash O.; Harris, Eleanor E.; Eschrich, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, we developed radiosensitivity (RSI), a clinically validated molecular signature that estimates tumor radiosensitivity. In the present study, we tested whether integrating RSI with the molecular subtype refines the classification of local recurrence (LR) risk in breast cancer. Methods and Materials: RSI and molecular subtype were evaluated in 343 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy that included whole-breast radiation therapy with or without a tumor bed boost (dose range 45-72 Gy). The follow-up period for patients without recurrence was 10 years. The clinical endpoint was LR-free survival. Results: Although RSI did not uniformly predict for LR across the entire cohort, combining RSI and the molecular subtype identified a subpopulation with an increased risk of LR: triple negative (TN) and radioresistant (reference TN-radioresistant, hazard ratio [HR] 0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.92, P=.02). TN patients who were RSI-sensitive/intermediate had LR rates similar to those of luminal (LUM) patients (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.47-1.57, P=.63). On multivariate analysis, combined RSI and molecular subtype (P=.004) and age (P=.001) were the most significant predictors of LR. In contrast, integrating RSI into the LUM subtype did not identify additional risk groups. We hypothesized that radiation dose escalation was affecting radioresistance in the LUM subtype and serving as a confounder. An increased radiation dose decreased LR only in the luminal-resistant (LUM-R) subset (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05-0.98, P=.03). On multivariate analysis, the radiation dose was an independent variable only in the LUMA/B-RR subset (HR 0.025, 95% CI 0.001-0.946, P=.046), along with age (P=.008), T stage (P=.004), and chemotherapy (P=.008). Conclusions: The combined molecular subtype–RSI identified a novel molecular subpopulation (TN and radioresistant) with an increased risk of LR after breast-conserving therapy. We propose that the combination of RSI and

  13. Integration of a Radiosensitivity Molecular Signature Into the Assessment of Local Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Roca, Javier F., E-mail: javier.torresroca@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Department of Chemical Biology and Molecular Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Fulp, William J. [Department of Bioinformatics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Caudell, Jimmy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Servant, Nicolas [Institut Curie, INSERM U900, Paris (France); Mines ParisTech, Paris (France); Bollet, Marc A. [Institut Curie, INSERM U900, Paris (France); Vijver, Marc van de [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Naghavi, Arash O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Harris, Eleanor E. [East Carolina University, Greensborough, North Carolina (United States); Eschrich, Steven A. [Department of Bioinformatics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: Recently, we developed radiosensitivity (RSI), a clinically validated molecular signature that estimates tumor radiosensitivity. In the present study, we tested whether integrating RSI with the molecular subtype refines the classification of local recurrence (LR) risk in breast cancer. Methods and Materials: RSI and molecular subtype were evaluated in 343 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy that included whole-breast radiation therapy with or without a tumor bed boost (dose range 45-72 Gy). The follow-up period for patients without recurrence was 10 years. The clinical endpoint was LR-free survival. Results: Although RSI did not uniformly predict for LR across the entire cohort, combining RSI and the molecular subtype identified a subpopulation with an increased risk of LR: triple negative (TN) and radioresistant (reference TN-radioresistant, hazard ratio [HR] 0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.92, P=.02). TN patients who were RSI-sensitive/intermediate had LR rates similar to those of luminal (LUM) patients (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.47-1.57, P=.63). On multivariate analysis, combined RSI and molecular subtype (P=.004) and age (P=.001) were the most significant predictors of LR. In contrast, integrating RSI into the LUM subtype did not identify additional risk groups. We hypothesized that radiation dose escalation was affecting radioresistance in the LUM subtype and serving as a confounder. An increased radiation dose decreased LR only in the luminal-resistant (LUM-R) subset (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05-0.98, P=.03). On multivariate analysis, the radiation dose was an independent variable only in the LUMA/B-RR subset (HR 0.025, 95% CI 0.001-0.946, P=.046), along with age (P=.008), T stage (P=.004), and chemotherapy (P=.008). Conclusions: The combined molecular subtype–RSI identified a novel molecular subpopulation (TN and radioresistant) with an increased risk of LR after breast-conserving therapy. We propose that the combination of RSI and

  14. Hereditary syndromes with enhanced radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, D.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity to ionizing radiation is modified by heritable genetic factors. This is exemplified by heritable disorders that are characterized by predisposition to the development of neoplasms. Cells derived from patients with ataxia telangiectasia, Nijmegen breakage syndrome and ataxia telangiektasia-like disorder show a markedly changed reaction to exposure to ionizing radiation. Correspondingly, at least in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an enhanced radiosensitivity that is of clinical importance has been observed. In addition to these recessive disorders, some autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are associated with increased radiosensitivity. As cells from these patients still have a normal allele (that is dominant over the mutant allele), the cellular phenotype is most often normal. Specifically, there is no overtly altered reaction in response to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, two dominant cancer predisposition syndromes, namely hereditary retinoblastoma and naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, are associated with a enhanced radiosensitivity as indicated by increased development of tumors following radiation therapy. (orig.) [de

  15. Inhibition of HAS2 induction enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells via persistent DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yan Nan; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •HAS2 may be a promising target for the radiosensitization of human cancer. •HAS2 is elevated (up to ∼10-fold) in irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cancer cells. •HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation. •HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death. •Thus, the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. -- Abstract: Hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), a synthetic enzyme for hyaluronan, regulates various aspects of cancer progression, including migration, invasion and angiogenesis. However, the possible association of HAS2 with the response of cancer cells to anticancer radiotherapy, has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. Upon exposure to radiation, all of the tested human cancer cell lines exhibited marked (up to 10-fold) up-regulation of HAS2 within 24 h. Inhibition of HAS2 induction significantly reduced the survival of irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cells. Interestingly, HAS2 depletion rendered the cells to sustain irradiation-induced DNA damage, thereby leading to an increase of apoptotic death. These findings indicate that HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation via persistent DNA damage, further suggesting that the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. Thus, HAS2 could potentially be targeted for therapeutic interventions aimed at radiosensitizing cancer cells

  16. DNMT (DNA methyltransferase) inhibitors radiosensitize human cancer cells by suppressing DNA repair activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jin Ho; Chie, Eui Kyu; Da Young, Park; Kim, In Ah; Kim, Il Han

    2012-01-01

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation are two major factors in epigenetic phenomenon. Unlike the histone deacetylase inhibitors, which are known to exert radiosensitizing effects, there have only been a few studies thus far concerning the role of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors as radiosensitizers. The principal objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DNMT inhibitors on the radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines, and to elucidate the mechanisms relevant to that process. A549 (lung cancer) and U373MG (glioblastoma) cells were exposed to radiation with or without six DNMT inhibitors (5-azacytidine, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, zebularine, hydralazine, epigallocatechin gallate, and psammaplin A) for 18 hours prior to radiation, after which cell survival was evaluated via clonogenic assays. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed via flow cytometry. Expressions of DNMT1, 3A/3B, and cleaved caspase-3 were detected via Western blotting. Expression of γH2AX, a marker of radiation-induced DNA double-strand break, was examined by immunocytochemistry. Pretreatment with psammaplin A, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and zebularine radiosensitized both A549 and U373MG cells. Pretreatment with psammaplin A increased the sub-G1 fraction of A549 cells, as compared to cells exposed to radiation alone. Prolongation of γH2AX expression was observed in the cells treated with DNMT inhibitors prior to radiation as compared with those treated by radiation alone. Psammaplin A, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and zebularine induce radiosensitivity in both A549 and U373MG cell lines, and suggest that this effect might be associated with the inhibition of DNA repair

  17. Cabazitaxel-induced stabilization of microtubules enhances radiosensitivity in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eKunos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Up to 40% of women with ovarian cancer have short disease-free intervals due to molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance. New therapeutic strategies are sought. Ovarian cancers are sensitive to radiochemotherapy. The taxane cabazitaxel (XRP6258, Jevtana promotes tubulin assembly and stabilizes microtubules against depolymerization in cells, acting similarly in mechanism to paclitaxel. Here, sequences of cabazitaxel-radiation co-administration are tested for drug-alone cytotoxicity and optimal radiosensitization.Methods: SKOV3, OVCAR3, and TOV-112D ovarian cancer cells were administered cabazitaxel 24 h before (first, 18 h before (second, together (third, or 24 h after (fourth a single radiation dose, and then, investigated by clonogenic assay and flow cytometric assays. Radiation dose-cell survival data were fitted by two-stage multivariate analyses of variance. High content flow cytometry partitioned cabazitaxel effects into G2-phase versus M-phase events by DNA content, cyclin A2, and phospho-S10-histone H3 (PHH3. Paclitaxel served as a comparator. Findings: Cabazitaxel cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were dose dependent. Cabazitaxel added 24 h before radiation was the most lethal schedule. DNA content measurements by flow cytometry showed that cabazitaxel-treated cells accumulated in the radiosensitive G2/M 4C DNA complement compartment. Cytometry also showed that surviving cabazitaxel-induced cell cycle arrested cells resolve the arrest by entering 4C or by 8C DNA complement cell cycles.Interpretation: The radiosensitizing effect of cabazitaxel was schedule dependent, due to cell cycle redistribution, and best when cabazitaxel was given 24 h before radiation. Clinical trials of administering both cabazitaxel and radiation should be explored in women with chemoresistant ovarian cancer. Funding: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center and Sanofi-Aventis

  18. Radiosensitization effects of sorafenib on colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Mi-Sook; Jung, Won-Gyun; Jeong, Youn Kyoung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Radiotherapy is a standard therapy in the adjuvant treatment of resected colon and rectum cancers, and its combination with chemotherapy has been shown to reduce local failure and distant metastasis still further, thereby improving the outcome of treatment. One potential chemotherapeutic agent for this, sorafenib (Nexavar, BAY43-9006), is an oral multikinase inhibitor that blocks tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and induces tumor cell apoptosis by inhibiting serine/threonine kinases (c-RAF and mutant and wild-type BRAF) as well as the receptor tyrosine kinases vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (VEGFR2 and VEGFR3), platelet- derived growth factor receptor , FLT3, and c-KIT. Sorafenib is currently used in clinics to treat patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and thyroid cancer. These findings provide a molecular evidence base for the use of chemoradiation to treat colon cancer, and in vivo modeling should be used to further assess its suitability for clinical applications.

  19. 53BP1 loss suppresses the radiosensitizing effect of icotinib hydrochloride in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai; Yao, Jing; Liu, Tao; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Hong

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of the expression of P53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), a key component in DNA damage repair pathways, on the radiosensitizing effect of icotinib hydrochloride in colorectal cancer and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this influence. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to verify the gene-knockout effect of 53BP1 small hairpin RNA (ShRNA), and colony formation assay was employed to investigate the influence of 53BP1 downregulation on the radiosensitizing effect of icotinib hydrochloride in HCT116 cells. Cell apoptosis, cell cycle distributions, and histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) fluorescence foci after 53BP1 knockdown were evaluated. Relative protein expression in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM)-checkpoint kinase-2 (CHK2)-P53 pathway was measured by Western blot analysis to unravel the molecular mechanisms linking the pathway to the above phenomena. Icotinib hydrochloride increased the radiosensitivity of HCT116 cells; however, this effect was suppressed by the downregulation of 53BP1 expression, a change that inhibited cell apoptosis, increased the percentage of HCT116 cells arrested in S-phase and inhibited the protein expression of key molecules in the ATM-CHK2-P53 apoptotic pathway. Our studies confirmed that the loss of 53BP1 serves as a negative regulator of the radiosensitizing effect of icotinib in part by suppressing the ATM-CHK2-P53 apoptotic pathway.

  20. Potential in a single cancer cell to produce heterogeneous morphology, radiosensitivity and gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadayuki; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Kawai, Seiko; Koyama-Saegusa, Kumiko; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Imai, Takashi; Shimada, Yutaka; Inazawa, Johji

    2005-01-01

    Morphologically heterogeneous colonies were formed from a cultured cell line (KYSE70) established from one human esophageal carcinoma tissue. Two subclones were separated from a single clone (clone 13) of KYSE70 cells. One subclone (clone 13-3G) formed mainly mounding colonies and the other (clone 13-6G) formed flat, diffusive colonies. X-irradiation stimulated the cells to dedifferentiate from the mounding state to the flat, diffusive state. Clone 13-6G cells were more radiosensitive than the other 3 cell lines. Clustering analysis for gene expression level by oligonucleotide microarray demonstrated that in the radiosensitive clone 13-6G cells, expression of genes involved in cell adhesion was upregulated, but genes involved in the response to DNA damage stimulus were downregulated. The data demonstrated that a single cancer cell had the potential to produce progeny heterogeneous in terms of morphology, radiation sensitivity and gene expression, and irradiation enhanced the dedifferentiation of cancer cells. (author)

  1. Relationship between in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the expression of normal tissue damage following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, J.B.P.; Burrill, W.; Spreadborough, A.R.; Levine, E.; Warren, C.; Scott, D.; Kiltie, A.E.; Roberts, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    There is a need for rapid and reliable tests for the prediction of normal tissue responses to radiotherapy, as this could lead to individualization of patient radiotherapy schedules and thus improvements in the therapeutic ratio. Because the use of cultured fibroblasts is too slow to be practicable in a clinical setting, we evaluated the predictive role of assays of lymphocyte chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients having radiotherapy for breast cancer. Radiosensitivity was assessed using a macronucleus (MN) assay at high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) on lymphocytes irradiated in the G 0 phase of the cell cycle (Scott D, Barber JB, Levine EL, Burril W, Roberts SA. Radiation-induced micronucleus induction in lymphocytes identifies a frequency of radiosensitive cases among breast cancer patients: a test for predisposition? Br. J. Cancer 1998;77;614-620) and an assay of G 2 phase chromatid radiosensitivity ('G 2 assay') (Scott D, Spreadborough A, Levine E, Roberts SA. Genetic predisposition in breast cancer. Lancet 1994; 344: 1444). In a study of acute reactions, blood samples were taken from breast cancer patients before the start of radiotherapy, and the skin reaction documented. 116 patients were tested with the HDR MN assay, 73 with the LDR MN assay and 123 with the G 2 assay. In a study of late reactions, samples were taken from a series of breast cancer patients 8-14 years after radiotherapy and the patients assessed for the severity of late effects according to the 'LENT SOMA' scales. 47 were tested with the HDR assay, 26 with the LDR assay and 19 with the G 2 assay. For each clinical endpoint, patients were classified as being normal reactors or 'highly radiosensitive patients' (HR patients (Burnet NG. Johansen J, Turesson I, Nyman J. Describing patients' normal tissue reactions: Concerning the possibility of individualising radiotherapy dose prescriptions based on potential predictive assays of normal tissue radiosensitivity. Int. J. Cancer 1998

  2. HAP1 gene expression is associated with radiosensitivity in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Jun-ying; Yin, Li; Wu, Jian-zhong; Guo, Wen-jie; Wu, Jian-feng; Chen, Meng; Xia, You-you; Tang, Jin-hai; Ma, Yong-chao; He, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Overexpression of HAP1 gene promotes apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. • HAP1 reduces tumor volume in nude mice xenograft models after irradiation. • HAP1 increases radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells in vitro and vivo. - Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between huntingtin-associated protein1 (HAP1) gene and radiation therapy of breast cancer cells. Methods: HAP1 gene was transfected into breast cancer MCF-7 cells, which was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis (qRT-PCR) and Western blot in vitro. The changes of cell radiosensitivity were assessed by colony formation assay. Apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. The expressions of two radiation-induced genes were evaluated by Western blot. Tumor growth was investigated in nude mice xenograft models in vivo. Results: Our data showed that HAP1 gene expression was significantly increased in HAP1-transfected MCF-7 cells in comparison with the parental cells or negative control cells. The survival rate in MCF-7/HAP1 cells was significantly decreased after irradiation (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy), compared to cells in MCF-7 and MCF-7/Pb groups in vitro. HAP1 gene increased apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. Additionally, the tumor volume and weight in MCF-7/HAP1 + RT group were observably lower than in MCF-7/HAP1 group and MCF-7/Pb + RT group. Conclusion: The present study indicated that HAP1 gene expression was related to the radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells and may play an important role in the regulation of cellular radiosensitivity

  3. Enhanced Radiosensitization Effect of Curcumin Delivered by PVP-PCL Nanoparticle in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuixia Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the principal polyphenolic curcuminoid, has been reported in numerous studies for its antitumor effect in a series of cancers. It is also reported that curcumin possesses radiosensitization effect in some cancers. However, the poor solubility and unsatisfied bioavailability of curcumin significantly undermine its potential application. Here we prepared curcumin loaded nanoparticles by employing PVP-PCL as drug carrier. Characterization studies indicated the satisfied drug loading efficiency and a sustained in vitro release pattern. Quantification uptake study showed that the uptake efficiency of Cum-NPs by lung cancer cells was time- and dose-dependent. In vitro anticancer study demonstrated the superior cytotoxic effect of Cum-NPs with stronger apoptotic induction over free Cum. Most importantly, there is almost no report on the radiosensitization effect of curcumin loaded nanoparticles. Here, Cum-NPs led to more inhibition of the colony forming ability of A549 cells as compared to the equivalent concentration of free Cum as shown in clonogenic assay. Furthermore, Cum-NPs are much more effective in enhancing the tumor growth inhibitory effect of radiation therapy in a A549 xenograft model. Therefore, results from the current study seem to be the first report on the radiosensitization effect of Cum-NPs and paved the way for a curcumin nanodrug delivery system as a potential radiation adjuvant.

  4. Co-inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 enhances radiosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ping; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Zhang, Qing; Li, Zhao-bin; Xu, Wen-cai; Fu, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been shown to closely correlate with radioresistance of breast cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the impact of co-inhibition of EGFR and IGF-1R on the radiosensitivity of two breast cancer cells with different profiles of EGFR and IGF-1R expression. The MCF-7 (EGFR +/−, IGF-1R +++) and MDA-MB-468 (EGFR +++, IGF-1R +++) breast cancer cell lines were used. Radiosensitizing effects were determined by colony formation assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were measured by flow cytometry. Phospho-Akt and phospho-Erk1/2 were quantified by western blot. In vivo studies were conducted using MDA-MB-468 cells xenografted in nu/nu mice. In MDA-MB-468 cells, the inhibition of IGF-1R upregulated the p-EGFR expression. Either EGFR (AG1478) or IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) radiosensitized MDA-MB-468 cells. In MCF-7 cells, radiosensitivity was enhanced by AG1024, but not by AG1478. Synergistical radiosensitizing effect was observed by co-inhibition of EGFR and IGF-1R only in MDA-MB-468 cells with a DMF 10% of 1.90. The co-inhibition plus irradiation significantly induced more apoptosis and arrested the cells at G0/G1 phase in MDA-MB-468 cells. Only co-inhibition of EGFR and IGF-1R synergistically diminished the expression of p-Akt and p-Erk1/2 in MDA-MB-468 cells. In vivo studies further verified the radiosensitizing effects by co-inhibition of both pathways in a MDA-MB-468 xenograft model. Our data suggested that co-inhibition of EGFR and IGF-1R synergistically radiosensitized breast cancer cells with both EGFR and IGF-1R high expression. The approach may have an important therapeutic implication in the treatment of breast cancer patients with high expression of EGFR and IGF-1R

  5. Radiosensitivity and cell kinetics of the human solid cancer transplanted to nude mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeuchi, Shunji

    1983-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyse the relationship between radiosensitivity and cell kinetics of human solid cancer in experimental nude mouse system. Four strains of tumors used for the experiment were poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (Lu-9), oat cell carcinoma of the lung (Lu-24), well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue (To-1) and moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (Es-4) which were serially transplantable to BALB/c nude mice. Radiosensitivity was evaluated by tumor growth in terms of inhibition rate, histological change and host reaction after irradiation. Cell kinetics were studied by autoradiography with pulse administration of 3 H-thymidine to mice. Although Lu-24 was most radiosensitive, followed by To-1, Es-4 and Lu-9 in the order of sensitivity, it was suggested that they might be more radioresistant in nude mice without T-cell function than in human. Regarding squamous cell carcinomas, well differentiated type was more radiosensitive than poorly differentiated one. All of these tumors in nude mouse revealed distinct percent labeled mitosis curves with two clear peaks which were quite different from those in human body. Lu-24 showed a characteristic pattern with a long time lag before visible growth, short G 1 , and low growth fraction, compared to other three tumors. Three strains of squamous cell carcinoma demonstrated similar cell kinetic factors which were almost the same as those in human body reported previously. The differences in volume doubling time of tumor, growth fraction and cell loss factor were partially related to those of radiosensitivities among tumors except for Lu-24. The theoretical volume doubling time was proved to be most reliable for estimation of effectiveness of irradiation, but the labeling index was not a valuable indicator for it. (author)

  6. Garcinol, a Histone Acetyltransferase Inhibitor, Radiosensitizes Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Non-Homologous End Joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oike, Takahiro [Division of Multistep Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Ogiwara, Hideaki [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Torikai, Kohta [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Yokota, Jun [Division of Multistep Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Takashi, E-mail: tkkohno@ncc.go.jp [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway used to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation (IR), requires chromatin remodeling at DSB sites through the acetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs). However, the effect of compounds with HAT inhibitory activities on the DNA damage response (DDR), including the NHEJ and cell cycle checkpoint, as well as on the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated whether garcinol, a HAT inhibitor found in the rinds of Garcinia indica fruit (called mangosteens), has effects on DDR, and whether it can be used for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The following assays were used to examine the effect of garcinol on the inhibition of DSB repair, including the following: a conventional neutral comet assay; a cell-based assay recently developed by us, in which NHEJ repair of DSBs on chromosomal DNA was evaluated; the micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay; and immunoblotting for autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We assessed the effect of garcinol on the cell cycle checkpoint after IR treatment by analyzing the phosphorylation levels of checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 and histone H3, and by cell cycle profile analysis using flow cytometry. The radiosensitizing effect of garcinol was assessed by a clonogenic survival assay, whereas its effects on apoptosis and senescence were examined by annexin V and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-Gal) staining, respectively. Results: We found that garcinol inhibits DSB repair, including NHEJ, without affecting cell cycle checkpoint. Garcinol radiosensitized A549 lung and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells with dose enhancement ratios (at 10% surviving fraction) of 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. Cellular senescence induced by IR was enhanced by garcinol. Conclusion: These results suggest that garcinol is a radiosensitizer that

  7. Radiosensitivity in breast cancer assessed by the histone γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuzenova, Cholpon S; Elsner, Ines; Katzer, Astrid; Worschech, Eike; Distel, Luitpold V; Flentje, Michael; Polat, Bülent

    2013-01-01

    High expression of constitutive histone γ-H2AX, a sensitive marker of DNA damage, might be indicative of defective DNA repair pathway or genomic instability. 53BP1 (p53-binding protein 1) is a conserved checkpoint protein with properties of a DNA double-strand breaks sensor. This study explores the relationship between the clinical radiosensitivity of tumor patients and the expression/induction of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 in vitro. Using immunostaining, we assessed spontaneous and radiation-induced foci of γ-H2AX and 53 BP1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from unselected breast cancer (BC) patients (n=57) undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Cells from apparently healthy donors (n=12) served as references. Non-irradiated cells from controls and unselected BC patients exhibited similar baseline levels of DNA damage assessed by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci. At the same time, the γ-H2AX assay of in vitro irradiated cells revealed significant differences between the control group and the group of unselected BC patients with respect to the initial (0.5 Gy, 30 min) and residual (2 Gy, 24 h post-radiation) DNA damage. The numbers of 53BP1 foci analyzed in 35 BC patients were significantly higher than in controls only in case of residual DNA damage. A weak correlation was found between residual foci of both proteins tested. In addition, cells from cancer patients with an adverse acute skin reaction (grade 3) to RT showed significantly increased radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci and their protracted disappearance compared to the group of BC patients with normal skin reaction (grade 0–1). The mean number of γ-H2AX foci after 5 clinical fractions was significantly higher than that before RT, especially in clinically radiosensitive patients. The γ-H2AX assay may have potential for screening individual radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients.

  8. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation of T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, S.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrime, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.P.

    1980-01-01

    In vitro radiation-survival of peripheral blood T-lymphocytes was studied in fifteen clinically normal adults and four patients with Fanconi's anemia (FA). Lymphocyte blastogenesis and cloning were measured following phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or Concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. PHA-responsive lymphocytes from FA patients were significantly more radiosensitive than lymphocytes from normal individuals

  9. Proteasome inhibitors block DNA repair and radiosensitize non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle R Cron

    Full Text Available Despite optimal radiation therapy (RT, chemotherapy and/or surgery, a majority of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC fail treatment. To identify novel gene targets for improved tumor control, we performed whole genome RNAi screens to identify knockdowns that most reproducibly increase NSCLC cytotoxicity. These screens identified several proteasome subunits among top hits, including the topmost hit PSMA1, a component of the core 20 S proteasome. Radiation and proteasome inhibition showed synergistic effects. Proteasome inhibition resulted in an 80-90% decrease in homologous recombination (HR, a 50% decrease in expression of NF-κB-inducible HR genes BRCA1 and FANCD2, and a reduction of BRCA1, FANCD2 and RAD51 ionizing radiation-induced foci. IκBα RNAi knockdown rescued NSCLC radioresistance. Irradiation of mice with NCI-H460 xenografts after inducible PSMA1 shRNA knockdown markedly increased murine survival compared to either treatment alone. Proteasome inhibition is a promising strategy for NSCLC radiosensitization via inhibition of NF-κB-mediated expression of Fanconi Anemia/HR DNA repair genes.

  10. Cytolethal Distending Toxin Enhances Radiosensitivity in Prostate Cancer Cells by Regulating Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwai-Jeng Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT produced by Campylobacter jejuni contains three subunits: CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC. Among these three toxin subunits, CdtB is the toxic moiety of CDT with DNase I activity, resulting in DNA double-strand breaks (DSB and, consequently, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M stage and apoptosis. Radiation therapy is an effective modality for the treatment of localized prostate cancer (PCa. However, patients often develop radioresistance. Owing to its particular biochemical properties, we previously employed CdtB as a therapeutic agent for sensitizing radioresistant PCa cells to ionizing radiation (IR. In this study, we further demonstrated that CDT suppresses the IR-induced autophagy pathway in PCa cells by attenuating c-Myc expression and therefore sensitizes PCa cells to radiation. We further showed that CDT prevents the formation of autophagosomes via decreased high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 expression and the inhibition of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO formation, which are associated with enhanced radiosensitivity in PCa cells. The results of this study reveal the detailed mechanism of CDT for the treatment of radioresistant PCa.

  11. Curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of renal cancer cells by suppressing NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Ziming; Chong, Tie; Yang, Jie; Li, Hongliang; Chen, Haiwen

    2017-10-01

    The radiation resistance of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains the primary obstacle to improve patient survival. This study aimed to investigate the effects of curcumin on the radiosensitivity of RCC cells. Human RCC cell (ACHN) was exposed to irradiation (IR) and/or curcumin treatment. Cell viability, DNA repair, cell cycle, and apoptosis, were evaluated by MTT, immunofluoresence staining and flow cytometry. Moreover, ACHN cells were xenografted into nude mice and subjected to IR and/or curcumin treatment. The expression of NF-κB signaling related proteins in ACHN cells and xenografts was detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that curcumin significantly increased radiosensitivity of ACHN cells by inhibiting the cell proliferation and DNA damage repair, causing cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase, inducing apoptosis in vitro, and suppressing the growth of xenografts in vivo. In addition, curcumin enhanced radiosensitivity was through markedly inhibiting IR-induced NF-κB signaling by modulating the related protein expressions including NF-κBP65, I-κB, VEGF, COX2, and Bcl-2 in ACHN cells, which was further strengthened by NF-κB inhibitor PDTC treatment. Thus, curcumin may confer radiosensitivity on RCC via inhibition of NF-κB activation and its downstream regulars, suggesting the potential application of curcumin as an adjuvant in radiotherapy of RCC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. In vitro radiosensitization by oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil in a human colon cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellstroem, Johan; Kjellen, Elisabeth; Johnsson, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The current study was designed to compare the radiosensitizing effects of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) in a human colon cancer cell line. A human colon cancer cell line (S1) was treated with various doses of oxaliplatin, 5FU, radiation, and combinations thereof. Various clinically used schedules were mimicked. 5FU was either incubated during 1 h ('bolus') or 24 h ('continuous infusion'). When combining oxaliplatin and 5FU, an isobologram analysis revealed synergistic effects, regardless of 5FU schedule. The IC 10 and IC 50 -doses for the drugs where then combined with radiotherapy. With equitoxic drug doses (IC 50 ), radiosensitization was observed in the following order: oxaliplatin>5FU 24 h>5FU 1 h exposure. The degree of potentiation corresponded to approximately 0.8 Gy, 0.7 Gy, and 0.2 Gy, respectively. In this experimental setting, oxaliplatin seemed to be a better radiosensitizer than 5FU, and longer incubation time with 5FU was better than short exposure

  13. The role of propranolol as a radiosensitizer in gastric cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao XH

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Xinhua Liao, Prakash Chaudhary, Guanglin Qiu, Xiangming Che, Lin Fan General Surgery Department, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China Purpose: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines indicate that radiotherapy in gastric cancer shows limited effectiveness at reducing the growth of gastric cancer. Therefore, enhancing the sensitivity and effect of radiotherapy with propranolol, a β-adrenoceptor antagonist, could reduce tumor growth. The role of propranolol as a radiosensitizer has not been adequately studied; therefore, the purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of propranolol as a radiosensitizer against gastric cancer in vivo. Methods: Sixty-four male nude mice bearing tumor xenografts were randomly divided into four groups. Cell culture was performed using the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line SGC-7901. Mice with tumor xenografts were treated with propranolol, isoproterenol, and radiation. The data for tumor weight and volume were obtained for statistical analyses. Furthermore, the expression levels of COX-2, NF-κB, VEGF, and EGFR were examined using immunohistochemical techniques and Western blotting.Results: The growth in the volume and weight of the tumor was lower in mouse models treated with propranolol and radiation therapy compared to the other groups. Decreased expression of NF-κB was also observed in treatment groups where both propranolol and radiation were used, leading to the reduction of COX-2, EGFR, and VEGF expression compared to that in the other groups.Conclusion: The present study indicated that propranolol potentiates the antitumor effects of radiotherapy in gastric cancer by inhibiting NF-κB expression and its downstream genes: VEGF, EGFR, and COX-2. Keywords: propranolol, radiosensitizer, gastric cancer, radiation therapy 

  14. Computed Tomography Demonstration of the Production and Distribution of Oxygen Gas Following Intratumoral Injection of a New Radiosensitizer (KORTUC) for Patients with Breast Cancer-Is Intratumoral Injection Not an Ideal Approach to Solve the Major Problem of Tumor Hypoxia in Radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Naoya; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Kei; Okino, Kazuhiro; Akima, Ryo; Morita-Tokuhiro, Shiho; Tsuzuki, Akira; Yaogawa, Shin; Nishioka, Akihito; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We previously developed a new enzyme-targeting radiosensitization treatment named Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II), which contains hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate for injection into various types of tumors. For breast cancer treatment, the radiosensitization agent was injected into the tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance, immediately prior to each administration of radiation therapy. At approximately three hours after the second or third injection, computed tomography (CT) was performed to confirm the production and distribution of oxygen gas generated from the KORTUC radiosensitization agent by catalysis of peroxidases contained mainly in tumor tissue. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that tumor hypoxia could be overcome by such a procedure and to evaluate the method of intratumoral injection in terms of confirming oxygen distribution in the target tumor tissue and around the tumor to be visualized on dedicated CT imaging. Three-dimensional reconstructed maximum intensity projection imaging of contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare the position of the tumor and that of the generated oxygen. Distributed oxygen gas was confirmed in the tumor tissue and around it in all 10 patients examined in the study. A region of oxygen gas was measured as an average value of -457.2 Hounsfield units (HU) as a region of interest. A slightly increased HU value compared to the density of air or oxygen was considered due to the presence of tumor tissue in the low-density area on 5-mm-thick reconstructed CT imaging. The results of this study showed that intratumoral oxygen was successfully produced by intratumoral KORTUC injection under ultrasonographic guidance, and that tumor hypoxia, which is considered a main cause of radioresistance in currently used Linac (linear accelerator) radiation therapy for malignant neoplasms, could be resolved by this method.

  15. Exfoliative cytology in study of radiosensitivity of uterine cervical cancer, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Yoshiharu; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Tomita, Kazuhiko; Kotani, Toshio; Nakayama, Akiko

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of cytological judgment of radiosensitivity of uterine cervical cancer by comparison between pre- and post-irradiation smears given 1,000 rads by telecobalt external test irradiation. The estimation of radiation effects on nuclei and the cytological presumption of histological typing in pre-irradiation smears have brought about satisfactory results; agreement between histological and cytological judgements of radiosensitivity was about 96.8%. Cytological criteria of good sensitivity are as follows; Disparity in size of chromatin particles and irregular distribution. Irregularity of nuclear membrane with nuclear wrinkling with diminution of thickness of nuclear membrane. Mature squamous cell carcinoma without pearl formation. Those of poor sensitivity are as follows; Existence of many unchanged viable cells and less disturbances of chromatines. Existence of cells exibiting adenocarcinoma and carcinoma of intermediate type. Clusters of cyanophilic cells having lacy, indistinct cell borders. (auth.)

  16. Analysis of the individual radio sensitivity of breast cancer patients; Untersuchungen zur individuellen Strahlenempfindlichkeit von Brustkrebspatientinnen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Judith

    2013-04-04

    Individual radiosensitivity has a crucial impact on radiotherapy related side effects. A prediction of individual radiosensitivity could avoid these side effects. Our aim was to study a breast cancer collective for its variation of individual radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 129 individuals. 67 breast cancer patients and 62 healthy and age matched individuals were looked at and their individual radiosensitivity was estimated by a 3-color Fluorescence in situ hybridization approach. Blood samples were obtained (i) before starting adjuvant radiotherapy and were in vitro irradiated by 2 Gy; (ii) after 5 single doses of 1.8 Gy and after 72 h had elapsed. DNA of lymphocytes was probed with whole chromosome painting for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. The rate of breaks per metaphase was analyzed and used as a predictor of individual radiosensitivity. Breast cancer patients were distinctly more radio-sensitive compared to healthy controls. Additionally the distribution of the cancer patients' radiosensitivity was broader. A subgroup of 9 rather radio-sensitive and 9 rather radio-resistant patients was identified. A subgroup of patients aged between 40 and 50 was distinctly more radio-sensitive than younger or older patients. The in vivo irradiation approach was not applicable to detect individual radiosensitivity. In the breast cancer collective a distinctly resistant and sensitive subgroup is identified, which could be subject for treatment adjustment. Especially in the range of age 40 to 50 patients have an increased radiosensitivity. An in vivo irradiation in a breast cancer collective is not suitable to estimate individual radiosensitivity due to a low deposed dose.

  17. Effect of BRCA1 on radiosensitivity of different lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huiwen; Wang Miao; Wang Yansu; Ren Hang; Xu Jiaying; Jiao Yang; Fan Saijun; Meng Qinghui

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects BRCA1 on sensitivity of lung cancer cells to γ-irradiation. Methods: A mammalian expression pcDNA3 vectors encoding a full-length of BRCA1 cDNA and BRCA1 siRNA were transfected into lung cancer cells. Western blot, MTT and clonogenic assays were used to determine BRCA1 protein expression and cell survival following γ-irradiation respectively. Results: There is a close relationship between BRCA1 level and radiosensitivity in different lung cancer cell lines. Compared with the control cells transfected with the 'empty' pcDNA3 vector and parental cells, the more survival of cells transfected with BRCA1 was observed after irradiation. The BRCA1-caused radioresistance were observed in both A549 and HTB-58 lung cancer lines. However, NIH-H2170 cells transfected with BRCA1 siRNA became more sensitive to γ-irradiation. Conclusion: This study, for the first time, demonstrates that the alteration of BRCA1 expression significantly affects radiosensitivity of lung cancer, indicating that BRCA1 may be an important mediator in radiotherapy of lung cancer cells. (authors)

  18. Radiogenomics: predicting clinical normal tissue radiosensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsner, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Studies on the genetic basis of normal tissue radiosensitivity, or  'radiogenomics', aims at predicting clinical radiosensitivity and optimize treatment from individual genetic profiles. Several studies have now reported links between variations in certain genes related to the biological response...... to radiation injury and risk of normal tissue morbidity in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. However, after these initial association studies including few genes, we are still far from being able to predict clinical radiosensitivity on an individual level. Recent data from our own studies on risk...

  19. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R.S.; Pal, Debojyoti [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, Deepak [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-09-09

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • DIMC enhances radiosensitivity of cancer cells by inducing cell death. • DIMC with radiation disrupted the cellular redox and targeted cancer stem cells. • DNA repair is hampered when cells are treated with DIMC. • DIMC inhibited thioredoxin reductase in cancer cells.

  20. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R.S.; Pal, Debojyoti; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K.

    2016-01-01

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • DIMC enhances radiosensitivity of cancer cells by inducing cell death. • DIMC with radiation disrupted the cellular redox and targeted cancer stem cells. • DNA repair is hampered when cells are treated with DIMC. • DIMC inhibited thioredoxin reductase in cancer cells.

  1. Cisplatin-mediated radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer cells is stimulated by ATM inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulany, Mahmoud; Mihatsch, Julia; Holler, Marina; Chaachouay, Hassan; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cisplatin activates ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), a protein with roles in DNA repair, cell cycle progression and autophagy. We investigated the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin with respect to its effect on ATM pathway activation. Material and methods: Non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC) cell lines (A549, H460) and human fibroblast (ATM-deficient AT5, ATM-proficient 1BR3) cells were used. The effects of cisplatin combined with irradiation on ATM pathway activity, clonogenicity, DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair and cell cycle progression were analyzed with Western blotting, colony formation and γ-H2AX foci assays as well as FACS analysis, respectively. Results: Cisplatin radiosensitized H460 cells, but not A549 cells. Radiosensitization of H460 cells was not due to impaired DNA-DSB repair, increased apoptosis or cell cycle dysregulation. The lack of radiosensitization demonstrated for A549 cells was associated with cisplatin-mediated stimulation of ATM (S1981) and AMPKα (T172) phosphorylation and autophagy. However, in both cell lines inhibition of ATM and autophagy by KU-55933 and chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) respectively resulted in a significant radiosensitization. Combined treatment with the AMPK inhibitor compound-C led to radiosensitization of A549 but not of H460 cells. As compared to the treatment with KU-55933 alone, radiosensitivity of A549 cells was markedly stimulated by the combination of KU-55933 and cisplatin. However, the combination of CQ and cisplatin did not modulate the pattern of radiation sensitivity of A549 or H460 cells. In accordance with the results that cisplatin via stimulation of ATM activity can abrogate its radiosensitizing effect, ATM deficient cells were significantly sensitized to ionizing radiation by cisplatin. Conclusion: The results obtained indicate that ATM targeting can potentiate cisplatin-induced radiosensitization

  2. Radio-sensitization of WRN helicase deficient cancer cells by targeting homologous recombination pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Pooja; Saha, Bhaskar; Patro, Birija Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are primarily repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, it is well established that a subset DSBs which are accumulated in IR-induced G2 phase are dependent on homologous recombination (HR). DNA repair deficient tumor cells have been shown to accumulate high levels of DNA damage. Consequently, these cells become hyperdependent on DNA damage response pathways, including the CHK1-kinase-mediated HR-repair. These observations suggest that DNA repair deficient tumors should exhibit increased radio-sensitivity under HR inhibition. Genetic defects leading to functional loss of werner (WRN) protein is associated with genomic instability and increased cancer incidence. WRN function is known to be abrogated in several human cancer cells due to hypermethylation of CpGisland-promoter and transcriptional silencing of WRN gene. In the current investigation, using isogenic pairs of cell lines differing only in the WRN function, we showed that WRN-deficient cell lines were hyper-radiosensitive to CHK1 pharmacologic inhibition. Here, we found that unrepaired DSB was drastically increased in WRN-deficient cells vis-à-vis WRN-proficient cells in response to IR and CHK1 inhibitor (CHK1i). Our results revealed a marginal role of NHEJ pathway accountable for the radio-sensitivity of WRN-deficient cells. Interestingly, silencing CTIP, a HR protein required for RAD51 loading, significantly abrogated the CHK1i-mediated radiosensitivity in WRN-deficient cells. Silencing of WRN or CTIP individually led to no significant difference in the extent of DNA end resection, as required during HR pathway. Imperatively, our results revealed that WRN and CTIP together play a complementary role in executing DNA end resection during HR-mediated repair of IR induced DSBs. Altogether, our data indicated that inhibition of IR-induced HR pathway at RAD51 loading, but not at DSB end resection, make the WRN-deficient cancer cells

  3. SHP1-mediated cell cycle redistribution inhibits radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Rubo; Ding, Qian; Li, Pindong; Xue, Jun; Zou, Zhenwei; Huang, Jing; Peng, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Radioresistance is the common cause for radiotherapy failure in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the degree of radiosensitivity of tumor cells is different during different cell cycle phases. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of cell cycle redistribution in the establishment of radioresistance in NSCLC, as well as the signaling pathway of SH2 containing Tyrosine Phosphatase (SHP1). A NSCLC subtype cell line, radioresistant A549 (A549S1), was induced by high-dose hypofractionated ionizing radiations. Radiosensitivity-related parameters, cell cycle distribution and expression of cell cycle-related proteins and SHP1 were investigated. siRNA was designed to down-regulate SHP1expression. Compared with native A549 cells, the proportion of cells in the S phase was increased, and cells in the G0/G1 phase were consequently decreased, however, the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase did not change in A549S1 cells. Moreover, the expression of SHP1, CDK4 and CylinD1 were significantly increased, while p16 was significantly down-regulated in A549S1 cells compared with native A549 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of SHP1 by siRNA increased the radiosensitivity of A549S1 cells, induced a G0/G1 phase arrest, down-regulated CDK4 and CylinD1expressions, and up-regulated p16 expression. SHP1 decreases the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells through affecting cell cycle distribution. This finding could unravel the molecular mechanism involved in NSCLC radioresistance

  4. Chromosomal radiosensitivity during the G2 cell-cycle period of skin fibroblasts from individuals with familial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshad, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors reported previously that human cells after neoplastic transformation in culture had acquired an increased susceptibility to chromatid damage induced by x-irradiation during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Evidence suggested that this results from deficient DNA repair during G2 phase. Cells derived from human tumors also showed enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. Furthermore, skin fibroblasts from individuals with genetic diseases predisposing to a high risk of cancer, including ataxia-telangiectasia, Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, and xeroderma pigmentosum exhibited enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. The present study shows that apparently normal skin fibroblasts from individuals with familial cancer--i.e., from families with a history of neoplastic disease--also exhibit enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. This radiosensitivity appears, therefore, to be associated with both a genetic predisposition to cancer and a malignant neoplastic state. Furthermore, enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity may provide the basis for an assay to detect genetic susceptibility to cancer

  5. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based...

  6. pSv3neo transfection and radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parris, C.N.; Masters, J.R.W.; Green, M.H.L.

    1990-01-01

    Immortalisation of human fibroblasts by transfection with a plasmid, pSV3neo, results in an increase in their radioresistance. The change in radiosensitivity may either be a consequence of transformation or due to expression of the SV40 T-antigen in pSV3neo. To investigate these two possibilities, we transfected pSV3neo into cells already transformed and immortalised. The radiosensitivies of three human bladder cancer cell lines were unaltered in clones expressing T-antigen, indicating that the changes observed in fibroblasts probably are a consequence of transformation, and not the presence of SV40 T-antigen. (author)

  7. Radiosensitizing Silica Nanoparticles encapsulating Docetaxel for Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Belz, Jodi; Castilla-Ojo, Noelle; Sridhar, Srinivas; Kumar, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    The applications of nanoparticles in oncology include enhanced drug delivery, efficient tumor targeting, treatment monitoring and diagnostics. The ‘theranostic properties’ associated with nanoparticles have shown enhanced delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs with superior imaging capabilities and minimal toxicities. In conventional chemotherapy, only a fraction of the administered drug reaches the tumor site or cancer cells. For successful translation of these formulations, it is imperative to ...

  8. Effect of microenviroment hypoxia on glioma cells radiosensitivity through cancer stem cell pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Liumei; Feng Libo; Lu Xueguan; Chen Liesong; Guo Xinwei; Tian Ye

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of microenviroment hypoxia on glioma cells radiosensitivity through cancer stem pathway, and to explore the related mechanism. Methods: Glioma cell lines SHG44 and U251 were cultured in normoxia (20% O 2 ) or continuous hypoxia (1% O 2 ) for 12 and 24 h. The fraction of glioma cells with positive expression of CD133 was assayed by flow cytometry. The radiosensitivity of glioma cells was determined by clonogenic cell assay. Western blotting was used to investigate the expressions of HIF-1 α and its downstream gene Notch 1. Results: The fraction of glioma cells with positive expression of CD133 was higher after hypoxic culture for 12 and 24 h than that of the corresponding cells cultured in normoxia. Compared to the cells cultured in normoxia, SF 2 (survival fraction at 2 Gy) were enhanced significantly in SHG44 and U251 cells cultured in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h. The OER (oxygen-enhancement ratio) of SHG44 cells in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h was 1.54 and 1.38, respectively. The OER of U251 cells was 1.44 and 1.23, respectively. The radiosensitivity of these two cell line was decreased in hypoxia. The protein expressions of HIF-1 α and Notch 1 genes were elevated more significantly for cells cultured in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h than for those in normoxia. Conclusions: Microenviroment hypoxia could increase the radioresistance of glioma cells through enrichment of cancer stem cells, and HIF-1 α-Notch 1 signal pathway may play an important role in this process. (authors)

  9. Association of in vitro radiosensitivity and cancer in a family with acute myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech-Hansen, N.T.; Sell, B.M.; Mulvihill, J.J.; Paterson, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    The gamma-ray sensitivity of skin fibroblasts from six members of a cancer family was investigated using a colony-forming assay. Fibroblasts from the three members with cancer (two sisters with acute myelogenous leukemia and the mother with cervical carcinoma) showed a significant (p less than 0.05) increase in radiosensitivity, while three members without cancer (the father and two sons) showed a normal radioresponse. The possibility that the increased gamma-ray sensitivity was due to defective DNA repair was investigated using assays for DNA repair replication, single-strand break rejoining, and removal of enzyme-sensitive sites in gamma-irradiated DNA. Results of these assays indicate that the kinetics of enzymatic repair of radiogenic DNA damage in general, and the rejoining of single-strand scissions and excision repair of base and sugar radioproducts in particular, were the same in the cell lines from the sensitive and clinically normal family members

  10. Association of in vitro radiosensitivity and cancer in a family with acute myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech-Hansen, N.T.; Sell, B.M.; Mulvihill, J.J.; Paterson, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    The γ-ray sensitivity of skin fibroblasts from six members of a cancer family was investigated using a colony-forming assay. Fibroblasts from the three members with cancer (two sisters with acute myelogenous leukemia and the mother with cervical carcinoma) showed a significant ( p > 0.05) increase in radiosensitivity, while three members without cancer (the father and two sons) showed a normal radioresponse. The possiblity that the increased γ-ray sensitivity was due to defective DNA repair was investigated using assays for DNA repair replication, single-strand break rejoining, and removal of enzyme-sensitive sites in γ-irradiated DNA. Results of these assays indicate that the kinetics of enzymatic repair of radiogenic DNA damage in general, and the rejoining of single-strand scissions and excision repair of base and sugar radioproducts in partigular, were the same in the cell lines from the sensitive and clinically normal family members

  11. The study on the effect of artesunate on the radio-sensitivity of human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Chong; Cao Jianping; Ni Qianying

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of artesunate on radio-sensitivity of human cervical cancer cells in vitro. The human cervical cancer cells HeLa and Siha were used as the experimental cells. MTT assay was used to determine the most appropriate drug concentration in the subsequent experiment, and the effect of human cervical cancer cells treated with artesunate and irradiation of 60 Co γ-rays was studied by using conventional chromosomal aberration analysis and cytokinesis block method (CB method). The results show that when the concentration of artesunate in this experiment was 2.0 μmol/L for HeLa cell and 4.0 μmol/L for Siha cell respectively, the chromosome aberration, micronuclei cell and micronuclei rates of HeLa cells treated with artesunate were more serious than that of the only irradiation, but there is almost no change with Siha cells. (authors)

  12. Down-regulation of LncRNA TUG1 enhances radiosensitivity in bladder cancer via suppressing HMGB1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huijuan; Hu, Xigang; Zhang, Hongzhi; Li, Wenbo

    2017-04-04

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to regulate the sensitivity of different cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy. Aberrant expression of lncRNA Taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) has been found to be involved in the development of bladder cancer, however, its function and underlying mechanism in the radioresistance of bladder cancer remains unclear. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was conducted to measure the expression of TUG1 and HMGB1 mRNA in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. HMGB1 protein levels were tested by western blot assays. Different doses of X-ray were used for radiation treatment of bladder cancer cells. Colony survival and cell viability were detected by clonogenic assay and CCK-8 Kit, respectively. Cell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. A xenograft mouse model was constructed to observe the effect of TUG1 on tumor growth in vivo. The levels of TUG1 and HMGB1 were remarkably increased in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. Radiation treatment markedly elevated the expression of TUG1 and HMGB1. TUG1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis and decreased colony survival in SW780 and BIU87 cells under radiation. Moreover, TUG1 depletion suppressed the HMGB1 mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, overexpression of HMGB1 reversed TUG1 knockdown-induced effect in bladder cancer cells. Radiation treatment dramatically reduced the tumor volume and weight in xenograft model, and this effect was more obvious when combined with TUG1 silencing. LncRNA TUG1 knockdown enhances radiosensitivity of bladder cancer by suppressing HMGB1 expression. TUG1 acts as a potential regulator of radioresistance of bladder cancer, and it may represent a promising therapeutic target for bladder cancer patients.

  13. Radiosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells by 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Theodore S.; Chang, Emily Y.; Hahn, Tina M.; Hertel, Larry W.; Shewach, Donna S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: We have reported that the deoxycytidine analog 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (dFdCyd) is a potent radiosensitizer of HT29 human colon cancer cells probably through its effects on intracellular deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pools. Because dFdCyd has activity against pancreatic cancer in clinical trials, we wished to determine if dFdCyd would radiosensitize human pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: We assessed the effect of dFdCyd on radiation sensitivity of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, Panc-1 and BxPC-3. To begin to investigate the mechanism of sensitization, we determined the effect of dFdCyd on dNTP pools and cell cycle distribution. Results: We found that dFdCyd produced radiation enhancement ratios of 1.7-1.8 under noncytotoxic conditions in both cell lines. Sensitization was not associated with intracellular levels of 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine triphosphate, the cytotoxic metabolite of dFdCyd, but occurred when dATP pools were depleted below the level of approximately 1 μM. Although both cell lines showed substantial cell cycle redistribution after drug treatment, the flow cytogram of the BxPC-3 cells would not, by itself, be anticipated to result in increased radiation sensitivity. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that dFdCyd is a potent radiation sensitizer of human pancreatic cancer cells and support the development of a clinical protocol using combined dFdCyd and radiation therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  14. Radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells by the phytochemical agent sulforaphane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Fahim, Tammer; Thurnher, Dietmar; Czembirek, Cornelia; Eder-Czembirek, Christina; Schmidt, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables. Recently it gained attention because of its antiproliferative properties in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane could act as a radiosensitizer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Four head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (i.e., (HNSCC) SCC9, SCC25, CAL27, and FADU) were treated with sulforaphane and subsequently irradiated. Then proliferation and clonogenic assays were performed. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Possible regulation of Akt and Mcl-1 was investigated by western blotting. Sulforaphane and radiation in combination leads to stronger inhibition of cell proliferation and of clonogenic survival than each treatment method alone. Western blot analysis of Akt and Mcl-1 showed no changed expression. Sulforaphane is a promising agent in the treatment of head and neck cancer due to its antiproliferative and radio-sensitizing properties. A combination of sulforaphane and radiation decreases clonogenic survival. Apoptosis is not regulated through Akt or the Mcl-1 protein. (orig.)

  15. Radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells by the phytochemical agent sulforaphane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Fahim, Tammer; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery; Czembirek, Cornelia; Eder-Czembirek, Christina [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Cranio-, Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery; Schmidt, Rainer [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and -biology

    2011-09-15

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables. Recently it gained attention because of its antiproliferative properties in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane could act as a radiosensitizer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Four head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (i.e., (HNSCC) SCC9, SCC25, CAL27, and FADU) were treated with sulforaphane and subsequently irradiated. Then proliferation and clonogenic assays were performed. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Possible regulation of Akt and Mcl-1 was investigated by western blotting. Sulforaphane and radiation in combination leads to stronger inhibition of cell proliferation and of clonogenic survival than each treatment method alone. Western blot analysis of Akt and Mcl-1 showed no changed expression. Sulforaphane is a promising agent in the treatment of head and neck cancer due to its antiproliferative and radio-sensitizing properties. A combination of sulforaphane and radiation decreases clonogenic survival. Apoptosis is not regulated through Akt or the Mcl-1 protein. (orig.)

  16. Correlation between the parameters of radiosensitivity in human cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Yoon; Kim, Won Dong; Min, Kyung Soo

    1998-01-01

    We conducted clonogenic assay using human cancer cell lines (MKN-45, PC-14, Y-79, HeLa) to investigate a correlation between the parameters of radiosensitivity. Human cancer cell lines were irradiated with single doses of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10Gy for the study of radiosensitivity and sublethal damage repair capacity was assessed with two fractions of 5Gy separated with a time interval of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 hours. Surviving fraction was assessed with clonogenic assay using Sperman-Karber method and mathematical analysis of survival curves was done with linear-quadratic (LQ), multitarget-single hit(MS) model and mean inactivation dose(D). Surviving fractions at 2Gy(SF2) were variable among the cell lines, ranged from 0.174 to 0.85. The SF2 of Y-79 was lowest and that of PC-14 was highest(p<0.05, t-test). LQ model analysis showed that the values of α for Y-79, MKN-45, HeLa and PC-14 were 0.603, 0.356, 0.275 and 0.102 respectively, and those of β were 0.005, 0.016, 0.025 and 0.027 respectively. Fitting to MS model showed that the values of Do for Y-79, MKN-45, HeLa and PC-14 were 1.59, 1.84, 1.88 and 2.52 respectively, and those of n were 0.97, 1.46, 1.52 and 1.69 respectively. The Ds calculated by Gauss-Laguerre method were 1.62, 2.37, 2.61 and 3.95 respectively. So the SF2 was significantly correlated with α, Do and D. Their Pearson correlation coefficiencics were -0.953 and 0.993, 0.999 respectively(p<0.05). Sublethal damage repair was saturated around 4 hours and recovery ratios (RR) at plateau phase ranged from 2 to 3.79. But RR was not correlated with SF2, α, β, Do, D. The intrinsic radiosensitivity was very different among the tested human cell lines. Y-79 was the most sensitive and PC-14 was the least sensitive. SF2 was well correlated with α, Do, and D. RR was high for MKN-45 and HeLa but had nothing to do with radiosensitivity parameters. These basic parameters can be used as baseline data for various in vitro radiobiological experiments

  17. Overexpression of microRNA-132 enhances the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells by down-regulating Bmi-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-Feng; Zhang, Shu-Hua; Li, Xue-Feng; Cao, Li-Yan; Fu, Zhan-Zhao; Yu, Shao-Nan

    2017-10-06

    We examined the effects of microRNA-132 (miR-132) on Bmi-1 expression and radiosensitivity in HeLa, SiHa, and C33A cervical cancer (CC) cells and 104 CC patients. MiR-132 expression was decreased and Bmi-1 expression was increased in tumor tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and in radiotherapy-resistant patients compared to radiotherapy-sensitive patients. MiR-132 expression and Bmi-1 mRNA expression were also negatively correlated in tumor tissues. HeLa, SiHa, and C33A cells were divided into blank, miR-132 negative control (NC), miR-132 inhibitor, miR-132 mimics, siBmi-1, and miR-132 inhibitor + siBmi-1 groups, after which expression of miR-132 and Bmi-1, and the interaction between them and cell survival, proliferation, and apoptosis were examined. Bmi-1 was confirmed as a target of miRNA-132. Survival was higher and apoptosis lower in the miR-132 inhibitor group than the blank group after various doses of radiation. By contrast, survival was lower and apoptosis higher in the miRNA-132 mimics and siBmi-1 groups than in the blank group. Moreover, miR-132 expression increased and Bmi-1 mRNA expression decreased in each group at radiation doses of 6 and 8 Gy. Finally, co-administration of radiotherapy and exogenous miR-132 inhibited the growth of HeLa cell transplant-induced tumors in nude mice more effectively than radiotherapy alone. These results suggest overexpression of miR-132 enhances the radiosensitivity of CC cells by down-regulating Bmi-1 and that miR-132 may be a useful new target for the treatment of CC.

  18. Long-term results of treatment of patients with metronidazole and protracted radiotherapy: a base for comparative randomized studies with hypoxic radiosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, A.B.M.F.; Njo, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    From 1974 to 1978, a pilot study was undertaken in the Academic Hospital of the Free University of Amsterdam to evaluate the use of hypoxic radiosensitizer metronidazole given with conventional protracted radiotherapy. All patients had advanced malignancies, 70 head and neck cancers being available for long-term evaluation. Only four showed evidence of (reversible) neuropathy, including one patient with two attacks of reversible psychosis. With a minimum follow-up period of 30 months, the local control rates of some of these tumors appear to be encouraging and higher (54%) than usually obtained, without evidence of any long-term enhanced late effect of radiation or carcinogenesis. Clinical benefit has been persistently reported from metronidazole from a number of centers. Reports on other hypoxic radiosensitizers are not always clearly encouraging to date. In view of these facts, three-armed studies appear desirable and are being pursued

  19. AT-406, an IAP inhibitor, activates apoptosis and induces radiosensitization of normoxic and hypoxic cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Qin, Qin; Zhan, Liang-Liang; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Hong-Cheng; Yang, Xi; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Li-Ping; Liu, Zhe-Ming; Wang, Di; Cui, He-Qing; Meng, Ciu-Ciu; Cai, Jing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Sun, Xin-Chen

    2014-01-01

    IAP antagonists increased the antitumor efficacy of X-irradiation in some types of cancers, but their effects on hypoxic cancer cells remain unclarified. We aims to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of an IAP inhibitor AT-406 on cervical cancer cell lines under both normoxia and hypoxia conditions. Hela and Siha cells were treated to investigate the effects of drug administration on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and radiosensitivity. Western blot analysis was used to determine the role of AT-406 in inhibition of IAPs. The pathway of apoptosis was characterized by caspases activity assay. AT-406 potently sensitized Hela cells but not Siha cells to radiation under normoxia. Notably, the radiosensitizing effect of AT-406 on hypoxic cells was more evident than on normoxic cells in both cell lines. Further mechanism studies by western blot showed that under normoxia AT-406 decreased the level of cIAP1 in Hela cells in a dose-dependent manner; while additional downregulation of XIAP expression was induced by AT-406 treatment under hypoxia in both cell lines. Finally, AT-406 works on both extrinsic death receptor and intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathways to activate apoptosis. Totally, AT-406 acts as a strong radiosensitizer in human cervical cancer cells, especially in hypoxic condition.

  20. EGFR inhibitor C225 increases the radiosensitivity of human lung squamous cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ruijie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the present study is to investigate the direct biological effects of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitor C225 on the radiosensitivity of human lung squamous cancer cell-H520. H520 cells were treated with different dosage of 60Co γ ray irradiation (1.953 Gy/min in the presence or absence of C225. The cellular proliferation, colony forming capacity, apoptosis, the cell cycle distribution as well as caspase-3 were analyzed in vitro. Results We found that C225 treatment significantly increased radiosensitivity of H-520 cells to irradiation, and led to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase, whereas 60Co γ ray irradiation mainly caused G2 phase arrest. H-520 cells thus displayed both the G1 and G2 phase arrest upon treatment with C225 in combination with 60Co γ ray irradiation. Moreover, C225 treatment significantly increased the apoptosis percentage of H-520 cells (13.91% ± 1.88% compared with the control group (5.75% ± 0.64%, P Conclusion In this regard, C225 treatment may make H-520 cells more sensitive to irradiation through the enhancement of caspase-3 mediated tumor cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

  1. Reduction of nitric oxide level enhances the radiosensitivity of hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, Wael; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Mobaraki, Abdulelah; Yoshida, Yukari; Noda, Shinei; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (E-TKI) resistance has emerged as an important clinical issue. To overcome this resistance, researchers have examined different modalities, either for use as a monotherapy or in combination with E-TKI therapy. In the present study, we investigated whether a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) levels affects the radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. A549 and H3255 NSCLC cells were examined. They were subjected to hypoxic conditions and monotherapy, or combined therapy using radiation and N G -monomethyl- L -arginine, monoacetate (LNMMA). Reductions in nitric oxide levels enhanced the radiosensitivity of both cell lines and significantly reduced the expression of both hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and EGFR in H3255 cells compared to A549 cells. Since NO is significantly associated with cell metabolism, we measured the levels of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 (PDK-1), reactive oxygen species, and oxygen and observed that the expression of PDK-1 was significantly reduced. This reduction was seen simultaneously after the silencing of HIF-1α; however, not following LNMMA treatment. The oxygen concentration was significantly increased in the treated cells, and their viability decreased in parallel. Reactive oxygen species were decreased after LNMMA and radiation treatment. Adding EGFR-TKI to cells with reduced NO levels further suppressed cell viability when combined with radiation. This study suggests that a reduction in the NO level might substantially overcome the radioresistance of mutant NSCLC cells. (author)

  2. Effect of sanguinarine on the growth and radiosensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiaying; Ji Junmin; Jiao Yang; Wu Li; Fan Sanjun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of sanguinarine on the growth and radiosensitivity of ovarian cancer SK-OV-3 cells. Methods: Cell growth was determined by MTT and clonogenic assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry assay. The cell apoptosis was analyzed by Annexin V/PI assay. Results: Sanguinarine inhibited SK-OV-3 cell growth in a dose-and time-dependent fashion and its IC 50 values were 3.02 and 1.11 μmol/L at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Sanguinarine also significantly triggered a sub-G 1 peak, an indicator of apoptosis,and caused a G 0 /G 1 arrest. Furthermore, the cell apoptosis induced by X-irradiation was significantly increased at 6 Gy when the cells were pre-treated with sanguinarine, in which the early apoptotic population increased from 10.28% to 43.28% (t=19.41, P<0.01) and the late apoptotic population increased from 20.26% to 30.80% (t=8.78, P<0.01). The multi-target click model was used to fit survival curves and the SER of sanguinarine treatment approached to 1.625 at the dose of D 0 . Conclusions: Sanguinarine could inhibit SK-OV-3 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and enhance cell radiosensitivity at low doses. (authors)

  3. The alkylphospholipid, perifosine, radiosensitizes prostate cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yuanhong; Ittmann, Michael; Thompson, Timothy C; Butler, E Brian; Xu, Bo; Teh, Bin S; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Sun, Mianen; Brinkman, Kathryn L; Wang, Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie; Mai, Weiyuan; Huang, Ying; Floryk, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Perifosine is a membrane-targeted alkylphospholipid developed to inhibit the PI3K/Akt pathway and has been suggested as a favorable candidate for combined use with radiotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of the combined treatment of perifosine and radiation (CTPR) on prostate cancer cells in vitro and on prostate cancer xenografts in vivo. Human prostate cancer cell line, CWR22RV1, was treated with perifosine, radiation, or CTPR. Clonogenic survival assays, sulforhodamine B cytotoxity assays and cell density assays were used to assess the effectiveness of each therapy in vitro. Measurements of apoptosis, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and Western blots were used to evaluate mechanisms of action in vitro. Tumor growth delay assays were used to evaluate radiation induced tumor responses in vivo. In vitro, CTPR had greater inhibitory effects on prostate cancer cell viability and clonogenic survival than either perifosine or radiation treatment alone. A marked increase in prostate cancer cell apoptosis was noted in CTPR. Phosphorylation of AKT-T308 AKT and S473 were decreased when using perifosine treatment or CTPR. Cleaved caspase 3 was significantly increased in the CTPR group. In vivo, CTPR had greater inhibitory effects on the growth of xenografts when compared with perifosine or radiation treatment alone groups. Perifosine enhances prostate cancer radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. These data provide strong support for further development of this combination therapy in clinical studies

  4. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in cancer therapy. Does eicosapentanoic acid influence the radiosensitivity of tumor cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manda, Katrin; Kriesen, Stephan; Hildebrandt, Guido [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fietkau, Rainer; Klautke, Gunther [Univ. Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) can enhance the radiosensitivity of different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods: Colon adenocarcinoma cells HT-29, and two glioblastoma multiforme tumor cells T98G and U251 were cultured under standard conditions. Cell growth was observed during administration with different concentrations of EPA, using it as the free fatty acid dissolved in ethanol or bound to bovine serum albumin. To investigate the influence of EPA (free and bound) on radiosensitivity, tumor cells were pretreated 30 minutes or 24 hours prior to irradiation with the fatty acid. Cell survival was measured by colony-forming assays. Results: When combined with irradiation, incubation with EPA was found to result in enhanced radiosensitivity with substantial variation: while there was strong radiosensitization for HT-29 and U251 cells, almost no effect for T98G cells was observed. A marked radiosensitization was clearly dependent on the treatment schedule. Conclusion: The observations suggest that EPA is not only a nutritional adjuvant but also may be a potential candidate to enhance the efficacy of irradiation on human cancer cells. (orig.)

  5. Impacts of berberine on the growth, migration and radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Chaoqian; Xu Jiaying; Jiao Yang; Hu Xudong; Che Jun; Fan Saijun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the impacts of berberine on the growth, migration and radiosensitivity in human breast cancer cells. Methods: MTT assay was used to evaluate cell growth.In vitro scratch migration assay was used to determine cell migration. Annexin V assay was used to detect cell apoptosis. The distribution of cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry assay. Colony formation assay was used to detect the influence of berberine on cell radiosensitivity. Western blot assay was employed to measure protein expression. Results: Berberine inhibited cell growth and migration in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, berberine resulted in a cell cycle G 0 /G 1 arrest. Compared with control, the early apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells treated with 40 pμmol/L of berberine was as high as 86.6% and 66.6% (t=8.79, 10.32, P<0.01), respectively. Berberine caused a dose-dependent increase in Bax and Caspase-3 protein expressions, but did not change Cyclin D1 protein expression, while suppressed the expressions of Cyclin B1 and Bcl-2 protein. As analyzed with multi-target click model fitting curves, the SER D0 of berberine-treated cells were 1.12 and 1.22 for MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells respectively at the dose D 0 of X-rays. Conclusions: The berberine inhibited the growth and migration of breast cancer cells via apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest. Moreover, berberine increases cell sensitivity to X-ray irradiation. (authors)

  6. Radiosensitivity and effect of hypoxia in HPV positive head and neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Busk, Morten; Olthof, Nadine; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Horsman, Michael R.; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: HPV associated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a distinct subgroup of HNSCC characterized by a favorable prognosis and a distinct molecular biology. Previous data from the randomized DAHANCA 5 trial indicated that HPV positive tumors did not benefit from hypoxic modifications by Nimorazole during radiotherapy, whereas a significant benefit was observed in the HPV negative tumors. However, more studies have demonstrated equal frequencies of hypoxic tumors among HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors. The aim of the present study was to determine radiosensitivity, the impact of hypoxia and the effect of Nimorazole in HPV positive and HPV negative cell lines. Materials and method: The used cell lines were: UDSCC2, UMSCC47 and UPCISCC90 (HPV positive) and FaDu DD , UTSCC33 and UTSCC5 (HPV negative). Cells were cultured under normoxic or hypoxic conditions, and gene expression levels of previously established hypoxia induced genes were assessed by qPCR. Cells were irradiated with various doses under normoxia, hypoxia or hypoxia +1 mM Nimorazole, and the clonogenic survival was determined. Results: The HPV positive and HPV negative cell lines exhibited similar patterns of upregulation of hypoxia induced genes in response to hypoxia. The HPV positive cell lines were up to 2.4 times more radiation sensitive than HPV negative cell lines. However, all HPV positive cells displayed the same response to hypoxia in radiosensitivity, with an OER in the range 2.3–2.9, and a sensitizer effect of Nimorazole of 1.13–1.29, similar to HPV negative cells. Conclusions: Although HPV positive cells had a markedly higher radiosensitivity compared to HPV negative cells, they displayed the same relative radioresistance under hypoxia and the same relative sensitizer effect of Nimorazole. The clinical observation that HPV positive patients do not seem to benefit from Nimorazole treatment is not due to inherent differences in hypoxia sensitivity

  7. WAF1 induction and infection by HPV E6 as a determinants of radiosensitivity in human cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harima, Yoko; Oka, Atsutoshi; Harima, Keizo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    To establish a new predictor of outcome for human cervical carcinoma treatment, the relationship between WAF1 mRNA levels during treatment, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor radiosensitivity were investigated. Forty patients with uterine cervical carcinoma were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Only those patients who beard wild-type p53 were included into present clinical trial. p53 status was investigated using SSCP analysis. HPV E6 was determined by PCR, WAF1 mRNA was estimated by RT-PCR. Twenty-one patients achieved complete response (CR), 11 patients achieved partial response (PR), and 8 patients had no change (NC). The increase in WAF1 mRNA after irradiation at 10.8 Gy positively correlated both with better treatment response and improved survival. Although the infection by HPV did not directly influence on the survival rate, it decreased the inducibility of WAF1. p53-dependent activation of WAF1 gene expression during treatment may be a strong determinant of the efficacy of cervical cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  8. WAF1 induction and infection by HPV E6 as a determinants of radiosensitivity in human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harima, Yoko; Oka, Atsutoshi; Harima, Keizo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1998-01-01

    To establish a new predictor of outcome for human cervical carcinoma treatment, the relationship between WAF1 mRNA levels during treatment, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor radiosensitivity were investigated. Forty patients with uterine cervical carcinoma were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Only those patients who beard wild-type p53 were included into present clinical trial. p53 status was investigated using SSCP analysis. HPV E6 was determined by PCR, WAF1 mRNA was estimated by RT-PCR. Twenty-one patients achieved complete response (CR), 11 patients achieved partial response (PR), and 8 patients had no change (NC). The increase in WAF1 mRNA after irradiation at 10.8 Gy positively correlated both with better treatment response and improved survival. Although the infection by HPV did not directly influence on the survival rate, it decreased the inducibility of WAF1. p53-dependent activation of WAF1 gene expression during treatment may be a strong determinant of the efficacy of cervical cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Axin gene methylation status correlates with radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lian-He; Stoecker, Maggie; Wang, Endi; Xu, Ke; Wang, En-Hua; Han, Yang; Li, Guang; Xu, Hong-Tao; Jiang, Gui-Yang; Miao, Yuan; Zhang, Xiu-Peng; Zhao, Huan-Yu; Xu, Zheng-Fan

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that Axin1 (Axin) is down-regulated in many cases of lung cancer, and X-ray irradiation increased Axin expression and inhibited lung cancer cells. The mechanisms, however, were not clear. Four lung cancer cell lines were used to detect the methylation status of Axin with or without X-ray treatment. Real-time PCR was used to quantify the expression of Axin, and western blot analysis was applied to measure protein levels of Axin, β-catenin, Cyclin D1, MMP-7, DNMTS, MeCP2 and acetylated histones. Flow cytometric analysis, colony formation assay, transwell assay and xenograft growth experiment were used to study the biological behavior of the cells with hypermethylated or unmethylated Axin gene after X-ray treatment. Hypermethylated Axin gene was detected in 2 of 4 cell lines, and it correlated inversely with Axin expression. X-ray treatment significantly up-regulated Axin expression in H446 and H157 cells, which possess intrinsic hypermethylation of the Axin gene (P<0.01), but did not show up-regulation in LTE and H460 cells, which have unmethylated Axin gene. 2Gy X-ray significantly reduced colony formation (from 71% to 10.5%) in H157 cells, while the reduction was lower in LTE cells (from 71% to 20%). After X-ray irradiation, xenograft growth was significantly decreased in H157 cells (from 1.15 g to 0.28 g) in comparison with LTE cells (from 1.06 g to 0.65 g). Significantly decreased cell invasiveness and increased apoptosis were also observed in H157 cells treated with X-ray irradiation (P<0.01). Down-regulation of DNMTs and MeCP2 and up-regulation of acetylated histones could be detected in lung cancer cells. X-ray-induced inhibition of lung cancer cells may be mediated by enhanced expression of Axin via genomic DNA demethylation and histone acetylation. Lung cancer cells with a different methylation status of the Axin gene showed different radiosensitivity, suggesting that the methylation status of the Axin gene may be one important factor

  10. Genetic components for radiosensitivity. Gene expression in radiosensitive monocygotic twins. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2012-01-01

    The underlying hypothesis of this project was that the variation of individual radiosensitivity is determined by the different expression of single gens. This concept was tested using 60 monozygotic twin pairs, followed by an evaluation with 80 prostate cancer patients. Radiosensitivity was assessed for both G0- as well as G2-phase using chromosomal assays. G0- radiosensitivity is determined by lethal chromosomal aberrations and reflects the individual amount of cell killing, while G2-sensitivity is determined by chromatid breaks and is taken as an indicator of individual cancer risk. For both populations, G0- and G2-radiosensitivity are characterized by substantial variation with a CV of 11 and 14% or 27 and 21%, respectively. While the mean G0-sensitivity is the same for both populations, there is a slight difference for G2. The slightly higher value of G2-sensitivity found for prostate cancer patients might result from the higher age of this group. For both populations gene expression profiles were determined using the Affymetrix chip HG-U133+2.0. Overall gene expression was characterized by a huge variation covering more than four decades. However, for single genes, expression showed little variation with CV generally ranging only between 2 and 8%. Analysis of data using several different methods revealed that variation of both G0- as well as G2-radiosensitivity cannot be ascribed to the different expression of single genes. For twins, random forests can be used to identify 8 to 10 genes than are relevant either for G0- or G2-radiosensitivity. However, these genes cannot be confirmed by an evaluation with 80 prostate cancer patients. This finding clearly demonstrates that the hypothesis, due to which variation of individual radiosensitivity is caused by different expression of single genes, has to be rejected. It appears more likely that this parameter is determined by complex interactions of several genes in functional networks. (orig.)

  11. Hematoporphyrin derivatives potentiate the radiosensitizing effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwarakanath, B.S.; Adhikari, J.S.; Jain, Viney

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Two deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of glucose transport and glycolysis, has been shown to differentially inhibit the repair of radiation damage in cancer cells by reducing the flow of metabolic energy. Since hematoporphyrin derivatives (Hpd) inhibit certain enzymes of the respiratory metabolism, resulting in an increase in the glucose usage and glycolysis, Hpd could possibly enhance the energy-linked radiosensitizing effects of 2-DG in cancer cells. The purpose of the present work was to verify this suggestion. Methods and Materials: Two human tumor cell lines (cerebral glioma, BMG-1 and squamous cell carcinoma, 4197) and a murine tumor cell line (Ehrlich ascites tumor [EAT], F-15) in vitro were investigated. A commercially available preparation of Hpd, Photosan-3 (PS-3) was used in the present studies. Cells incubated with 0-10 μg/ml PS-3 for 0-24 h before irradiation were exposed to 2.5 Gy of Co-60 gamma rays and maintained under liquid holding conditions for 1-4 h to facilitate repair. 2-DG (0-5 mM) added at the time of irradiation was present during the liquid holding. Radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) and cell death (macrocolony assay) were analyzed as parameters of radiation response. Effects of these radiosensitizers on glucose usage and glycolysis were also studied by measuring the glucose consumption and lactate production using enzymatic assays. Results: The glucose consumption and lactate production of BMG-1 cells (0.83 and 1.43 pmole/cell/h) were twofold higher than in the 4197 cells (0.38 and 0.63 pmole/cell/h). Presence of PS-3 (10 μg/ml) enhanced the rate of glycolysis (glucose consumption and lactate production) in these cells by 35% to 65%, which was reduced by 20% to 40% in the presence of 5 mM 2-DG. In exponentially growing BMG-1 and EAT cells, presence of 2-DG (5 mM; equimolar with glucose) for 4 hours after irradiation increased the radiation-induced micronuclei formation and cell death by nearly 40

  12. Variable radiosensitivity in fibroblasts from patients with tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, A.; Yoshida, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Arima, M.; Ohno, K.

    1985-01-01

    It has been reported that some of the cultured cell strains derived from patients with tuberous sclerosis (TS) showed hypersensitivity to gamma-rays or a radiomimetic chemical. Thirteen fibroblast cell strains from 11 patients with TS were examined for their sensitivity to x-rays as determined from their colony-forming ability. All strains derived from normal-appearing skin of patients, either sporadic or familial cases, showed sensitivity within the normal control range. Five cell strains originating from tumorous skin of 3 patients did not show hypersensitivity. It was concluded that the sensitivity to x-rays of cultured cells of TS is essentially normal. However, the mean D0 or D10 values of the strains from tumorous skin tended to be lower compared to those for normal skin of patients. In addition, the hypersensitivity to x-rays was confirmed in the cell strains of TS which had been shown to be hypersensitive to gamma-rays. These results appear to indicate that at least some of the cells of TS are liable to change to exhibit a hypersensitive trait in unknown acquired conditions

  13. Evaluation of the single radiosensitivity in patients subjected to medical exposure that show severe skin reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Portas, M.; Perez, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Burnt Hospital of the Buenos Aires City Government (HQGCBA) it is a hospital of reference of the Net of Medical Responses in Radiological Emergencies of the Argentine Republic. In the mark of an agreement among the HQGCBA and the Authority Regulatory Nuclear (ARN), it is in execution a study protocol for the one boarding diagnoses and therapeutic of radioinduced cutaneous leisure. They exist individual variations that can condition the response to the ionizing radiations (IR), so much in accidental exposures as having programmed (radiotherapy, radiology interventionist). In this context, the individual radiosensitivity is evaluated in the patients signed up in this protocol that presented sharp or late cutaneous reactions, with grades of severity 3-4 (approaches EORTC/RTOG). The capacity of repair of the DNA was evaluated in outlying blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro (2 Gy, gamma of Co-60) by means of the micronucleus techniques and comet essay in alkaline conditions. In this work two cases in those that is applied this study protocol, the therapeutic answer and its correlate with the discoveries of the radiosensitivity tests is presented. Case 1: patient of feminine sex, subjected to external radiotherapy by a breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma; developed sharp cutaneous radiotoxicity grade 3 (confluent humid epithelitis) that motivate the interruption of the treatment. Case 2: patient of masculine sex, subjected to a coronary angioplasty (interventionist radiology); developed late cutaneous radiotoxicity grade 4 (ulceration in dorsal region). Both patients were treated with topical trolamine associated to systemic administration of pentoxiphiline and antioxidants. The therapeutic answer is evaluated by means of clinical pursuit, photographic serial register and complementary exams (thermography and ultrasonography of high frequency). In the case 1 the answer was very favorable, with precocious local improvement and complete remission of symptoms and

  14. Post-irradiation DNA synthesis inhibition and G2 phase delay in radiosensitive body cells from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients: An indication of cell cycle defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, Mohammed A.; Kunhi, Mohammed; Einspenner, Michael; Khan, Bashir A.; Al-Sedairy, Sultan

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, both post-irradiation DNA synthesis and G 2 phase accumulation were analyzed in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and fibroblast cell strains derived from (Saudi) patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), ataxia telangiectasia (AT), AT heterozygotes and normal subjects. A comparison of the percent DNA synthesis inhibition (assayed by 3 H-thymidine uptake 30 min after irradiation), and a 24 h post-irradiation G 2 phase accumulation determined by flow cytometry placed the AT heterozygotes and the NHL patients in an intermediate position between the normal subjects (with maximum DNA synthesis inhibition and minimum G 2 phase accumulation) and the AT homozygotes (with minimum DNA synthesis inhibition and maximum G 2 accumulation). The similarity between AT heterozygotes and the NHL patients with respect to the two parameters studied after irradiation was statistically significant. The data indicating a moderate abnormality in the control of cell cycle progression after irradiation in the LCLs and fibroblasts from NHL patients may explain the enhanced cellular and chromosomal radiosensitivity in these patients reported by us earlier. In addition to demonstrating a link between cell cycle abnormality and radiosensitivity as a possible basis for cancer susceptibility, particularly in the NHL patients, the present studies emphasized the usefulness of the assay for 24 h post-irradiation G 2 phase accumulation developed elsewhere in characterizing AT heterozygote-like cell cycle anomaly in cancer patients irrespective of whether they carried the AT gene or any other affecting the cell cycle

  15. Novel Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 radiosensitizes prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Nishant; Wild, Aaron T; Chettiar, Sivarajan T; Aziz, Khaled; Kato, Yoshinori; Gajula, Rajendra P; Williams, Russell D; Cades, Jessica A; Annadanam, Anvesh; Song, Danny; Zhang, Yonggang; Hales, Russell K; Herman, Joseph M; Armour, Elwood; DeWeese, Theodore L; Schaeffer, Edward M; Tran, Phuoc T

    2013-04-01

    Outcomes for poor-risk localized prostate cancers treated with radiation are still insufficient. Targeting the "non-oncogene" addiction or stress response machinery is an appealing strategy for cancer therapeutics. Heat-shock-protein-90 (Hsp90), an integral member of this machinery, is a molecular chaperone required for energy-driven stabilization and selective degradation of misfolded "client" proteins, that is commonly overexpressed in tumor cells. Hsp90 client proteins include critical components of pathways implicated in prostate cancer cell survival and radioresistance, such as androgen receptor signaling and the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway. We examined the effects of a novel non-geldanamycin Hsp90 inhibitor, AUY922, combined with radiation (RT) on two prostate cancer cell lines, Myc-CaP and PC3, using in vitro assays for clonogenic survival, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, γ-H2AX foci kinetics and client protein expression in pathways important for prostate cancer survival and radioresistance. We then evaluated tumor growth delay and effects of the combined treatment (RT-AUY922) on the PI3K-Akt-mTOR and AR pathways in a hind-flank tumor graft model. We observed that AUY922 caused supra-additive radiosensitization in both cell lines at low nanomolar doses with enhancement ratios between 1.4-1.7 (p < 0.01). RT-AUY922 increased apoptotic cell death compared with either therapy alone, induced G 2-M arrest and produced marked changes in client protein expression. These results were confirmed in vivo, where RT-AUY922 combination therapy produced supra-additive tumor growth delay compared with either therapy by itself in Myc-CaP and PC3 tumor grafts (both p < 0.0001). Our data suggest that combined RT-AUY922 therapy exhibits promising activity against prostate cancer cells, which should be investigated in clinical studies.

  16. Preclinical evaluation of sunitinib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a radiosensitizer for human prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Colin; Sheu, Tommy; Bridges, Kathleen; Mason, Kathy; Kuban, Deborah; Mathew, Paul; Meyn, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Many prostate cancers demonstrate an increased expression of growth factor receptors such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) which have been correlated with increased resistance to radiotherapy and poor prognosis in other tumors. Therefore, response to radiation could potentially be improved by using inhibitors of these abnormally activated pathways. We have investigated the radiosensitizing effects of sunitinib, a potent, multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the VEGFR and PDGFR receptors, on human prostate cancer cells. The radiosensitizing effects of sunitinib were assessed on human prostate cancer cell lines DU145, PC3 and LNCaP by clonogenic assay. Sunitinib’s ability to inhibit the activities of its key targets was determined by immunoblot analysis. The radiosensitizing effects of sunitinib in vivo were tested on human tumor xenografts growing in nude mice where response was assessed by tumor growth delay. Clonogenic survival curve assays for both DU145 and PC3 cells showed that the surviving fraction at 2 Gy was reduced from 0.70 and 0.52 in controls to 0.44 and 0.38, respectively, by a 24 hr pretreatment with 100 nM sunitinib. LNCaP cells were not radiosensitized by sunitinib. Dose dependent decreases in VEGFR and PDGFR activation were also observed following sunitinib in both DU145 and PC3 cells. We assessed the ability of sunitinib to radiosensitize PC3 xenograft tumors growing in the hind limb of nude mice. Sunitinib given concurrently with radiation did not prolong tumor growth delay. However, when animals were treated with sunitinib commencing the day after fractionated radiation was complete, tumor growth delay was enhanced compared to radiation alone. We conclude, based on the in vivo results, that sunitinib and radiation do not interact directly to radiosensitize the PC3 tumor cells in vivo as they did in vitro. The fact that tumor growth delay was enhanced when sunitinib was

  17. Hyperthermia enhances radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells through ROS inducing autophagic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Ming-Chen; Long, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Yin-Bing; Zhang, Bo-Huo; Yan, Zhao-Fei; Yu, Fei-Hong; Cui, Shu-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) enhances the anti-cancer effects of radiotherapy (RT), but the precise biochemical mechanisms involved are unclear. This study was aim to investigate if mild HT sensitizes colorectal cancer cells to RT through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducing autophagic cell death in a mice model of HCT116 human colorectal cancer. HCT116 mice model were randomly divided into five groups: mock group, hyperthermia group (HT), radiotherapy group (RT), HT + RT group, and HT + RT +N-acetyl L-cysteine (NAC) group (HT + CT + NAC). After four weeks of treatment, cancer growth inhibition, rate and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured with MTT and JC-1 assays, respectively, while ROS were estimated fluorimetrically. The relationship of these parameters to expressions of autophagy-related genes Beclin1, LC3B, and mTOR was analyzed. Gene expression was measured by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There were significant increases in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential in the HT + RT group. ROS levels in the HT + RT group increased more significantly than in any other group. In contrast, ROS levels in the HT + RT + NAC group were significantly decreased relative to the HT + RT group. The number of autophagic bodies in HT + RT group was higher than that of mock group. There were significant increases in the expression of Beclin1 and LC3B genes, while mTOR expression was significantly decreased in the HT + CT group. Treatment with NAC reversed the pattern of these changes. These results indicate that HT enhances the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to RT through ROS inducing autophagic cell death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Icotinib enhances lung cancer cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting MAPK/ERK and AKT activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yonghong; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Jing

    2018-05-16

    Icotinib hydrochloride is a small epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that was developed by Chinese scientists. While clinical trials have revealed its efficacy in the treatment of lung cancer, very little is known about its role in enhancing radiosensitivity. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of Icotinib in enhancing lung cancer cell radiosensitivity and have detailed its underlying molecular mechanism. The lung cancer cell line H1650 was pretreated with or without Icotinib for 24 hours before radiation, and clonogenic survival assay was performed. Cell apoptosis was also analyzed by flow cytometry, while western blotting was performed to examine the activation of EGFR and its downstream kinases in H1650 cells after Icotinib and radiation treatment. Furthermore, a xenograft animal model was established to evaluate the radiosensitivity of Icotinib in vivo and to confirm its mechanism. Our results demonstrate that pretreatment with Icotinib reduced clonogenic survival after radiation, inhibited EGFR activation, and increased radiation-induced apoptosis in H1650 cells. The phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and EGFR was inhibited after Icotinib and radiation combination treatment in vitro and in vivo compared with individual treatments. Combination treatment also affected the expression of the DNA repair protein H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX). In conclusion, our results reveal that Icotinib enhances radiosensitivity in lung cancers in vitro and in vivo and the mechanism of this may involve blocking the EGFR-AKT and MAPK-ERK pathways and limiting DNA repair. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Three cases of unresectable locally advanced breast cancer treated with local injection of the new radiosensitization (KORTUC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Taijyu; Yosikawa, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshida, Ken; Uesugi, Yasuo; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Inomata, Taisuke

    2013-01-01

    New radiosensitization therapy named Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectabe carcinomas (KORTUC) using a new agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate is the world first treatment developed in Japan. The agent was injected into tumor two times per week under ultrasonographic guidance. Unresectable locally advanced breast cancer is radiation resistance. The local control is difficult in a conventional radiation therapy. In 3 cases, KORTUC was enforced safety, and remarkable effects was admitted. (author)

  20. Potentiation of radiosensitivity by tetrandrine in human breast cancer cells and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xinchen; Zhen Yongsu; Shao Rongguang; Wang Junjie

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potentiation of radiosensitivity and mechanism by tetrandrine (Tet) in human breast cancer p53-mutant MCF-7/ADR and p53-wt MCF-7 cells. Methods: Clonogenic assay, flow cytometry, Western blotting were preformed in this experiment. Results: The data of clonogenic assay showed that Tet markedly sensitized MCF-7/ADR cell to X-rays, and the sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) of Tet was 1.51. Flow cytometry assay showed that exposure of MCF-7/ADR cells to X-rays caused cells to arrest in G 2 phase, whereas Tet was able to lower the number of cells arrested in G 2 phase. However, in MCF-7 cells, the potentiation effect of Tet was lower, and its SER was 1.10. MCF-7 cells were induced to arrest in G 1 and G 2 phases by X-rays, and the number of cells arrested in G 2 phase abrogated by Tet was less than that in MCF-7/ADR cells. Furthermore, the results showed that the levels of Cyclin B1 and Cdc2 expression decreased after X-irradiation, and the mitotic index was lower too. Tet could reverse this decrease and induce X-ray-irradiated cells to enter mitosis. Conclusion: Tet is a potent G 2 checkpoint abrogator and markedly enhances the cytotoxicity of X irradiation in the p53-mutant cancer cells

  1. Radiosensitization of C225 on human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H-520

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingdong; Wang Junjie; Liu Feng; Zhao Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of C225 (cetuximab), a chimeric human-mouse anti-epithelial growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, combined with 60 Co gamma irradiation against human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H-520. Methods: H-520 cells were treated either with different dose of 60 Co irradiation (1,2,4,6,8 and 10 Gy)alone or together with C225 (100 nmol/L). Colony forming capacity was determined to create the survival curve 10 days after the treatment. Cells in different groups were harvested 72 hours after irradiation for apoptosis analysis or 48 hours after irradiation for cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry assay. Results: The clone number in combinational treatment group was less than that in irradiation only group, which suggested that the cell survival rate in the combinational treatment group was significantly decreased comparing with irradiation only group (F=6.36, P O + G 1 phases for C225 treatment, in G 2 + M phases for 60 Co irradiation, and in both G 0 + G 1 and G 2 + M phases for C225 in combination with 60 Co irradiation. Conclusions: C225 has radiosensitizing effects on H-520 cells, which may through the enhancement of 60 Co irradiation-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. This study provides a supportive evidence for clinical treatment in non-small cell lung cancer. (authors)

  2. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post box-10502, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2013-07-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  3. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET – 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ∼ 28% reduction of 12 C 6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells

  4. The enhancement of radiosensitivity by celecoxib, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on human cancer cells expressing differential levels of cyclooxygenase-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyo, Hong Ryull; Shin, You Keun; Kim, Hyun Seok; Seong, Jin Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the modulation of radiosensitivity by celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, on cancer cells over- and under-expressing COX-2. A clonogenic radiation survival analysis was performed on A549 human lung and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines incubated in both 1 and 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing media. The apoptosis in both cell lines was measured after treatment with radiation and/or celecoxib. Celecoxib enhanced the radiation sensitivity of the A549 cells in the medium containing the 10% FBS, with radiation enhancement ratios of 1.58 and 1.81 respectively, at surviving fractions of 0.1, with 30 μ M and 50 μ M celecoxib. This enhanced radiosensitivity disappeared in the medium containing the 1% FBS. Celecoxib did not change the radiation sensitivity of the MCF-7 cells in either media. The induction of apoptosis by celecoxib and radiation was not synergistic in either cell line. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, preferentially enhanced the effect of radiation on COX-2 over-expressing cancer cells compared to the cells with a low expression, and this effect disappeared on incubation of the cells during drug treatment in the medium with suboptimal serum concentration. Apoptosis did not appear to be the underlying mechanism of this radiation enhancement effect due to celecoxib on the A549 cells. These findings suggest radiosensitization by a selective COX-2 inhibitor is COX-2 dependent

  5. The combination effect of sodium butyrate and 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine on radiosensitivity in RKO colorectal cancer and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Seong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall level of chromatin compaction is an important mechanism of radiosensitivity, and modification of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation may increase radiosensitivity by altering chromatin compaction. In this study, we investigated the effect of a demethylating agent, a histone deacetylase(HDAC inhibitor, and the two agents combined on radiosensitivity in human colon and breast cancer cell lines. Methods In this study, we used RKO colorectal cancer cell line and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines and normal colon cell lines. On each of the cell lines, we used three different agents: the HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate(SB, the demethylating agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine(5-aza-DC, and radiation. We then estimated the percentage of the cell survival using the XTT method and experimented to determine if there was an augmentation in the therapeutic effect by using different combinations of the two or three of the treatment methods. Results After treatment of each cell lines with 5-aza-DC, SB and 6 grays of radiation, we observed that the survival fraction was lower after the treatment with 5-aza-DC or SB than with radiation alone in RKO and MCF-7 cell lines(p Conclusion In conclusion, 5-aza-DC and SB can enhance radiosensitivity in both MCF-7 and RKO cell lines. The combination effect of a demethylating agent and an HDAC inhibitor is more effective than that of single agent treatment in both breast and colon cancer cell lines.

  6. SU-E-T-668: Radiosensitizing Effect of Bosutinib On Prostate and Colon Cancers: A Pilot in Vitro Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wang, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Recently it has been reported that Bosutinib, a clinical kinase inhibitor, can enhance the tumor cell chemosensitivity by overriding DNA damage checkpoints. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no report on its effect on cell radiosensitivity in the literature. The objective of the present study is to determine whether Bosutinib has the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for various cancer cell lines. Methods: In this study, we tested 4 cell lines derived from human prostate (LNCaP, PC-3, DU-145) and colon (HT-29) cancers. The cells were seeded into 12-well plates 24 hours prior to the radiation treatments. For each cell line, we designed 4 study groups, namely, the control, Bosutinib, radiotherapy, and radiotherapy+Bosutinib groups. We used 6 MV photon beams from a Siemens Artiste accelerator to deliver 2 Gy dose in one fraction to the cells in the radiotherapy and radiotherapy+Bosutinib groups. Immediately after irradiation, the cells in the radiotherapy+Bosutinib group were treated with Bosutinib (1µM) for 3 hours. The cell survival was evaluated through clonogenic assays. Results: The cell survival rates of the LNCaP, PC-3, DU-145, and HT-29 cells were found to be 21%, 92%, 76%, and 93% for the radiotherapy group; 21%, 69%, 67%, and 81% for the radiotherapy+Bosutinib group; and 103%, 107%, 86%, and 102% for the Bosutinib group, respectively. Although synergetic cell killing was not seen for the LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines in this study, the cell survival data from the clonogenic assay indicated that Bosutinib could enhance the sensitivity of PC-3 and HT-29 cells to radiation treatment. Conclusion: Our preliminary results demonstrated the possibility of Bosutinib as a radiosensitizer for certain prostate and colon cancers, which are resistant to radiotherapy. Further studies are warranted to quantify the radiosensitizing effect of Bosutinib.

  7. SU-E-T-668: Radiosensitizing Effect of Bosutinib On Prostate and Colon Cancers: A Pilot in Vitro Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C; Wang, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recently it has been reported that Bosutinib, a clinical kinase inhibitor, can enhance the tumor cell chemosensitivity by overriding DNA damage checkpoints. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no report on its effect on cell radiosensitivity in the literature. The objective of the present study is to determine whether Bosutinib has the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for various cancer cell lines. Methods: In this study, we tested 4 cell lines derived from human prostate (LNCaP, PC-3, DU-145) and colon (HT-29) cancers. The cells were seeded into 12-well plates 24 hours prior to the radiation treatments. For each cell line, we designed 4 study groups, namely, the control, Bosutinib, radiotherapy, and radiotherapy+Bosutinib groups. We used 6 MV photon beams from a Siemens Artiste accelerator to deliver 2 Gy dose in one fraction to the cells in the radiotherapy and radiotherapy+Bosutinib groups. Immediately after irradiation, the cells in the radiotherapy+Bosutinib group were treated with Bosutinib (1µM) for 3 hours. The cell survival was evaluated through clonogenic assays. Results: The cell survival rates of the LNCaP, PC-3, DU-145, and HT-29 cells were found to be 21%, 92%, 76%, and 93% for the radiotherapy group; 21%, 69%, 67%, and 81% for the radiotherapy+Bosutinib group; and 103%, 107%, 86%, and 102% for the Bosutinib group, respectively. Although synergetic cell killing was not seen for the LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines in this study, the cell survival data from the clonogenic assay indicated that Bosutinib could enhance the sensitivity of PC-3 and HT-29 cells to radiation treatment. Conclusion: Our preliminary results demonstrated the possibility of Bosutinib as a radiosensitizer for certain prostate and colon cancers, which are resistant to radiotherapy. Further studies are warranted to quantify the radiosensitizing effect of Bosutinib

  8. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK α subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 waf/cip as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21 waf/cip and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21 waf/cip pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  9. Misonidazole as a radiosensitizer in the radiotherapy of glioblastomas and oesophageal cancer. Pharmacokinetic and clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamulevicius, P.; Streffer, C.; Bamberg, M.; Scherer, E.

    1981-01-01

    Since May 1978 the hypoxic-cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole (MIS), has been under clinical investigation in a phase III trial with multiple doses of the drug in 11 patients with brain tumours (seven glioblastomas, four recurrent brain tumours) and three patients with oesophageal carcinoma. The doses of MIS administered were usually well tolerated but the principal toxicities observed were peripheral neuropathy as well as nausea and vomiting in the glioblastoma patients. The neuropathy was completely reversible. The incidence of neuropathy was not related to the pharmacological parameters of plasma level or half-life. Pharmacological assessment by high-pressure liquid chromatography included assays of plasma, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The demethylated product, Ro-05-9963, was detected as the major metabolite. Peak plasma levels were obtained one to four hours after administration of MIS, with a half-life of five to ten hours. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of MIS correlated well with those of the plasma. MIS was mainly excreted as the demethylated metabolite, but less than 40% of the given dose could be recovered. The results obtained suggest that the present MIS dosage for glioblastoma patients results in a low plasma level with no observable therapeutic effect. (author)

  10. Fanconi's anemia and clinical radiosensitivity. Report on two adult patients with locally advanced solid tumors treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, M.; Karstens, J.H.; Schindler, D.; Gross, M.; Doerk, T.; Morlot, S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Patients with Fanconi's anemia (FA) may exhibit an increased clinical radiosensitivity of various degree, although detailed clinical data are scarce. We report on two cases to underline the possible challenges in the radiotherapy of FA patients. Case Report and Results: Two 24- and 32-year-old male patients with FA were treated by definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancers. In the first patient, long-term tumor control could be achieved after delivery of 67 Gy with a - in part - hyperfractionated split-course treatment regimen and, concurrently, one course of carboplatin followed by salvage neck dissection. Acute toxicity was marked, but no severe treatment-related late effects occurred. 5 years later, additional radiotherapy was administered due to a second (squamous cell carcinoma of the anus) and third (squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck) primary, which the patient succumbed to. By contrast, the second patient experienced fatal acute hematologic toxicity after delivery of only 8 Gy of hyperfractionated radiotherapy. While the diagnosis FA could be based on flow cytometric analysis of a lymphocyte culture in the second patient, the diagnosis in the first patient had to be confirmed by hypersensitivity to mitomycin of a fibroblast cell line due to complete somatic lymphohematopoietic mosaicism. In this patient, phenotype complementation and molecular genetic analysis revealed a pathogenic mutation in the FANCA gene. The first patient has not been considered to have FA until he presented with his second tumor. Conclusion: FA has to be considered in patients presenting at young age with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or anus. The diagnosis FA is of immediate importance for guiding the optimal choice of treatment. Radiotherapy or even radiochemotherapy seems to be feasible and effective in individual cases. (orig.)

  11. Radio-sensitization of esophageal cancer EC9706 cells to X ray by histone deacetylase inhibiter Trichostatin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiaoli; Qin Guangyong; Fang Huasheng; Zhang Fengqiu; Ya Huiyuan

    2009-01-01

    Cell apoptosis and the expression of DNA damage repair-related genes XRCC2, ATM and Lig4 were detected separately by flow cytometry analysis and real-time fluorescence quantitative (RT-PCR), in order to investigate the effect of Trichostatin A (TSA) pre-treatment on the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer EC9706 cells to X ray in vitro. The results indicate that pre-irradiation exposure to TSA enhances cell apoptotic rate by X ray markedly (P<0.05) and the mRNA levels of XRCC2, ATM and Lig4 (except 8Gy) are up-regulated by X ray individually (P<0.05). TSA alone and TSA in combination with X ray all reduce mRNA levels of XRCC2, ATM and Lig4. In conclusions, TSA may radio-sensitize EC9706 cells to X ray by reducing mRNA levels of XRCC2, ATM and Lig4. (authors)

  12. Cell killing and radiosensitization by caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chun-Te; King, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a biologically active ingredient of honeybee propoplis. The cytotoxicity and radiation sensitization effects of CAPE were evaluated in human lung cancer A549 cells and normal lung fibroblast WI-38 cells. A549 cells treated with 6 μg/ml CAPE showed marked growth inhibition (60%) at 48 hr after treatments. During the same time, the number of viable cells decreased to 46% of the control value. In contrast, WI-38 cells showed 20% growth inhibition with no change in the number of viable cells under the same treatment conditions. At 72 hr after CAPE treatment (6 μg/ml), the percentage of apoptotic cells in A549 cultures increased significantly to 67% and an S/G2 arrest was also detected in the culture. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the level of intracellular glutathione and hydrogen peroxide contents within one hr after CAPE treatment, and the expression of cyclin B 1 was reduced 6 hr after treatment. The radiation sensitization effect of CAPE on A549 cells was determined from the clonogenic survival curves, and the results showed a small but significant difference in radiation survival between cells treated with or without CAPE. Taken together, our results suggest that the effects of CAPE on differential cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and radiosensitization are associated with glutathione depletion that occurred shortly after treatments. (author)

  13. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in H1299 cancer cells by actin-associated protein cofilin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.-J.; Sheu, T.-J.; Keng, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    Cofilin is an actin-associated protein that belongs to the actin depolymerization factor/cofilin family and is important for regulation of actin dynamics. Cofilin can import actin monomers into the nucleus under certain stress conditions, however the biological effects of nuclear transport are unclear. In this study, we found that over-expression of cofilin led to increased radiation sensitivity in human non-small lung cancer H1299 cells. Cell survival as determined by colony forming assay showed that cells over-expressing cofilin were more sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) than normal cells. To determine whether the DNA repair capacity was altered in cofilin over-expressing cells, comet assays were performed on irradiated cells. Repair of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation was detected in cofilin over-expressing cells after 24 h of recovery. Consistent with this observation, the key components for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, including Rad51, Rad52, and Ku70/Ku80, were down-regulated in cofilin over-expressing cells after IR exposure. These findings suggest that cofilin can influence radiosensitivity by altering DNA repair capacity

  14. Apoptosis and radiosensitivity induced by N-acety1 phytosphingosine, in human cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kim, K. S.; Han, Y. S.; Jeon, S. J.; Song, J. Y.; Jung, I. S.; Hong, S. H.; Yun, Y. S.; Park, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramide is a key lipid molecule in signal transduction with a role in various regulatory pathways including differentiation, proliferation and especially apoptosis. Ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is associated with accumulation of ceramide, and the sphingomyelinase deficiency results in radioresistance. We investigated the exogenous treatment of N-acetyl-phytosphingosine (NAPS), an analogue of N-acetyl-sphingosine (C 2 -Ceramide), and C 2 -ceramide exert apoptotic effect on human T cell lymphoma Jurkat cells and breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. NAPS and C 2 -Ceramide has cytotoxic effect in time- and dose-dependent manner, and increased caspase-3, 8 activity. However, NAPS induced apoptosis more effectively, and increased caspase activity induced by NAPS is more higher than C 2 -ceramide. Moreover, NAPS decreased clonogenicity of irradiated cells and increased radiation-induced apoptosis significantly. Increased cell death by irradiation in the presence of NAPS is owing to the increase of caspase activity. These data suggest that NAPS might be used for lead as a new type of radiosensitizing agent increasing radiation-induced apoptosis

  15. Knock-down of miR-221 and miR-222 in the radiosensitization of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunzhi; Kang Chunsheng; Cao Yongzhen; Pu Peiyu; Lu Zhonghong; Du Yue

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radiosensitizing effect of knock-down of miR-221 miR-222 on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and explore the possible mechanism. Methods: Antisense oligonucleotides of miR-221 and miR-222 (AS-miR-221 and AS-miR-222), mediated by lipofectamine, were transfected to MCF-7 cells to knock down miR-221 and miR-222, Northern blotting was conducted to detect the expression of miR-221 and miR-222 in transfected cells. The cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and Caspase-3 and Caspase-7 activity assay. Clonogenic assay was used to measure the sensitizing enhancement ratio. Target genes of miR-221 and miR-222 relevant to radio-sensitivity were searched using bioinformatics analysis. The targeted protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Results: The expression of miR-221 and miR-222 in the AS-miR-221/222 cells determined by Northern blotting was significantly reduced. Compared with the control group, the cell apoptosis and mitotic cell death after the radiation were significantly higher in AS-miR-221/222 cells. The sensitizing enhancement ratio was 1.87. Based on bioinformatics analysis, PTEN was a target gene of miR-221 and miR-222 which could enhance the radiosensitivity of MCF-7 cells. In AS-miR-221/222 cells, the expression of PTEN was up-regulated while pAkt down-regulated. Conclusions: AS-miR-221 and AS-miR-222 may enhance the radiosensitivity of MCF-7 breast cancer cells by up-regulating the expression of PTEN. (authors)

  16. Diagnosis and therapy of cutaneous radiation syndrome. Individual radiosensitivity assessment in patients undergoing medical exposures presenting severe cutaneous radiation induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Perez, Maria R.; Portas, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burn Center) is one of the reference hospitals of the Medical Radiological Emergency Response Network of Argentina. In the frame of an agreement between the Burn Center and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina, a research project for an approach based on diagnosis and therapy of cutaneous radiation induced lesions is in progress. Individual radiosensitivity assessment was conducted in patients included in this research protocol that showed acute and/or late cutaneous reactions with grades 3 and 4 of the Toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and the European organization for research and treatment of cancer (EORTC). DNA repair capacity and its kinetics were evaluated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using alkaline comet assay and micronucleus test. In this paper, two representative cases, in which the research protocol was applied, are presented. Therapeutic response and its correlation with radiosensitivity test results are described. Case 1: female patient undergoing external radiotherapy for invasive ductal breast cancer that presented acute cutaneous radiotoxicity, grade 3 (confluent moist epithelitis, )that led to treatment break. Case 2: male patient undergoing coronary angioplasty (interventional radiology), which developed late cutaneous radiotoxicity, grade 4 (ulceration at the dorsal region). Patients were treated with: topic administration of trolamine and silver sulfadiazine with lidocaine, associated with systemic administration of pentoxiphiline and anti-oxidants. The therapeutic response was evaluated through clinical follow-up, serial photographic record and complementary tests (tele thermography and high frequency ultrasonography). Case 1 response was positive (favorable) with early local recovery and complete remission of signs and symptoms after 5 months. Both MN frequencies and comet assay showed values compatible with normal radiosensitivity

  17. Alterations in growth phenotype and radiosensitivity after fractionated irradiation of breast carcinoma cells from a single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, D.E.; Joyce, M.; Jung, L.; Band, V.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate growth regulation and radiosensitivity in surviving clonogens after fractionated irradiation. Four breast carcinoma cell lines isolated from the primary tumor (21NT, 21PT) and metastases (21MT-1, 21MT-2) of a single patient were exposed to cumulative radiation doses of 30 Gy yielding cell lines designated -IR with respect to their parent. The irradiated lines were then compared to their parent for serum- and growth factor-requirements under defined media conditions, ability to proliferate in soft agar, concentration of TGF-alpha in conditioned medium, and radiosensitivity. The irradiated lines showed no change in proliferative doubling times under serum- and growth factor-supplemented media conditions. A single line, 21MT-1-IR, acquired a limited ability to proliferate in serum- and growth factor-deplete medium with a day 2-4 doubling time of 44.5 hr. Three lines, 21MT-1-IR, 21MT-2-IR, and 21NT-IR, formed colonies in soft agar in contrast to none of the unirradiated parent lines. There were significant 6-8 fold increases in conditioned media TGF-alpha concentrations for 21MT-2-IR and 21NT-IR cells. The 21MT-1-IR and 21NT-IR cells were significantly less radiosensitive than their respective parent lines. This decrease in radiosensitivity appeared to be at least partially mediated by a released factor as the radiosensitivity of 21MT-1 cells was significantly decreased by pre-incubation with conditioned medium from 21MT-1-IR cells. Radiation-induced changes in growth phenotype vary with respect to clonal origin of the cell line and may influence the radiosensitivity of surviving clonogens after fractionated treatment. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. A Meta Analysis of Radiosensitivity on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
by Metronidazole Amino Acidum Natrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei REN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy and safety of radiosensitivity on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC using metronidazole amino acidum natrium (CMNa are yet to be proven. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of radiosensitivity on NSCLC by CMNa to provide references for further clinical practice and research. Methods Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs were obtained from the Cochrane library, Pubmed, EMbase, CBM, CNKI, VIP, and Wan Fang databases. Dates were searched through other means. RCTs of radiosensitivity on NSCLC by CMNa were included. The data included in the study were evaluated and analyzed using the Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan 5.1 software. Results A total of 21 RCTs were included. The results of the meta-analyses showed that the total effective rate of the test group that received CMNa plus radiotherapy was higher than that of the control group that received radiotherapy alone (OR=3.29, 95%CI: 2.47-4.39, P<0.000,01 or radiotherapy plus placebo (OR=3.65, 95%CI: 2.25-5.92, P<0.000,01, respectively. No significant differences were found in the quality of life between one and two-year survival rates (P>0.05. No significant differences were found among radiation pneumonitis, radiation esophagitis, hematological toxicity, and cardiotoxicity (P>0.05. Conclusion CMNa plus radiotherapy elicit beneficial effects in the treatment of NSCLC and produce fewer adverse effects. Therefore, this technique can be recommended and applied in clinics.

  19. Differences in radiosensitivity among cells in culture and in experimental tumours: Significance for the effectiveness of human cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.; Amsterdam Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Problems in the application of radiobiological data on various types of models, cell in vitro, experimental tumours, and clinical models, to the prediction of tumour radiocurability are discussed. On the basis of observations on cells in culture and experimental tumours it is suggested that heterogeneity in responsiveness of tumours in patients is caused in a large part by differences in intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity. Methods and developments are reviewed, which may yield better assays for the prediction of tumour responsiveness to treatments. (Auth.)

  20. Chromosomal fragility syndrome and family history of radiosensitivity as indicators for radiotherapy dose modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsbeih, Ghazi; Story, Michael D.; Maor, Moshe H.; Geara, Fady B.; Brock, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Beside a few known radiosensitive syndromes, a patient's reaction to radiotherapy is difficult to predict. In this report we describe the management of a pediatric cancer patient presented with a family history of radiosensitivity and cancer proneness. Laboratory investigations revealed a chromosomal fragility syndrome and an increased cellular radiosensitivity in vitro. AT gene sequencing revealed no mutations. The patient was treated with reduced radiation doses to avoid the presumed increased risks of toxicity to normal tissues. The patient tolerated well the treatment with no significant acute or late radiation sequelae. Five years later, the patient remains both disease and complications free. While an accurate laboratory test for radiosensitivity is still lacking, assessments of chromosomal fragility, cell survival and clinical medicine will continue to be useful for a small number of patients

  1. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, M.F.; Khanna, K.K.; Watters, D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  2. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, M.F. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research and The Department of Surgery; Khanna, K.K.; Watters, D. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research

    1998-12-31

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  3. Radiation-induced damage to normal tissues after radiotherapy in patients treated for gynecologic tumors: Association with single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3, and OGG1 genes and in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyck, Kim de; Eijkeren, Marc van; Claes, Kathleen; Morthier, Rudy; Paepe, Anne de; Vral, Anne; Ridder, Leo de; Thierens, Hubert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association of polymorphisms in XRCC1 (194Arg/Trp, 280Arg/His, 399Arg/Gln, 632Gln/Gln), XRCC3 (5' UTR 4.541A>G, IVS5-14 17.893A>G, 241Thr/Met), and OGG1 (326Ser/Cys) with the development of late radiotherapy (RT) reactions and to assess the correlation between in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity and clinical radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two women with cervical or endometrial cancer treated with RT were included in the study. According to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, scale, 22 patients showed late adverse RT reactions. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assays were performed to examine polymorphic sites, the G2 assay was used to measure chromosomal radiosensitivity, and patient groups were compared using actuarial methods. Results: The XRCC3 IVS5-14 polymorphic allele was significantly associated with the risk of developing late RT reactions (odds ratio 3.98, p = 0.025), and the XRCC1 codon 194 variant showed a significant protective effect (p = 0.028). Patients with three or more risk alleles in XRCC1 and XRCC3 had a significantly increased risk of developing normal tissue reactions (odds ratio 10.10, p = 0.001). The mean number of chromatid breaks per cell was significantly greater in patients with normal tissue reactions than in patients with no reactions (1.16 and 1.34, respectively; p = 0.002). Patients with high chromosomal radiosensitivity showed a 9.2-fold greater annual risk of complications than patients with intermediate chromosomal radiosensitivity. Combining the G2 analysis with the risk allele model allowed us to identify 23% of the patients with late normal tissue reactions, without false-positive results. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that clinical radiosensitivity is associated with an enhanced G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity and is significantly associated with a combination of different polymorphisms in

  4. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation ot T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x-irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST (patients, D37 . 198 R; normals, D37 . 309 R, p . 0.057) and colony formation assay (patients, D37 . 53 R; normals, D37 . 109 R, p . 0.016). No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed

  5. Technical knowledge assessment in radiology in patients protection in collective environments and more radiosensitive organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, R.F.

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-rays in medical fields has increased significantly in recent years, since various therapeutic procedures can be performed without the need for surgery, which presents the greatest risk to the patient. An example of this increase is the practice of cardiac catheterization, this procedure fluoroscopy is used for placement of central venous catheters and temporary pacemakers, and long-term use increases the risk of exposure to X-rays to the patient, doctor and his assistants. This has been observed with concern by many researchers, since many companies did not fit the standards of radiation protection. This failure can lead to exposure of professionals, patients and caregivers. It is therefore of fundamental importance, the use of personal protective equipment such as aprons and thyroid plumbíferos protectors, for dose reduction produced by the primary and secondary radiation. This study evaluated the knowledge of radiology professionals in Goiânia, on the use of lead apron in collective environments and use of guards in sensitive parts of patients to radiation. Through an information gathering technique based on a questionnaire with closed questions. From dista and focuses on the knowledge of professionals. The results showed that there is a serious deficiency as regards the most radiosensitive organ protection of patients when they are exposed to X-ray beams. (author)

  6. Apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors and patients with laryngeal cancer after γ-irradiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlova, N.V.; Smirnova, S.G.; Zamulaeva, I.A.; Andreev, V.G.; Ryabchenko, N.I.; Saenko, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors and cancer patients after γ-radiation with different doses is studied by the flow cytometry method. Wide intra- and interindividual variabilities of the lymphocyte radiosensitivity by different donors are observed. The radiosensitivity does not depend on the subpopulation composition of the lymphocyte pool. The persons with very low and high lymphocyte radiosensitivities are found significantly more often among the cancer patients than among the healthy donors. One can suggest that this method is useful to define risk groups with regard to radiogenic neoplasms and prognosis of radiotherapy efficiency [ru

  7. Correlation of in vitro lymphocyte radiosensitivity and gene expression with late normal tissue reactions following curative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnon, Paul; Kabacik, Sylwia; MacKay, Alan; Raffy, Claudine; A’Hern, Roger; Owen, Roger; Badie, Christophe; Yarnold, John; Bouffler, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Identification of mechanisms of late normal tissue responses to curative radiotherapy that discriminate individuals with marked or mild responses would aid response prediction. This study aimed to identify differences in gene expression, apoptosis, residual DNA double strand breaks and chromosomal damage after in vitro irradiation of lymphocytes in a series of patients with marked (31 cases) or mild (28 controls) late adverse reaction to adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Gene expression arrays, residual γH2AX, apoptosis, G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity and G0 micronucleus assay were used to compare case and control lymphocyte radiation responses. Results: Five hundred and thirty genes were up-regulated and 819 down-regulated by ionising radiation. Irradiated samples were identified with an overall cross-validated error rate of 3.4%. Prediction analyses to classify cases and controls using unirradiated (0 Gy), irradiated (4 Gy) or radiation response (4–0 Gy) expression profiles correctly identified samples with, respectively, 25%, 22% or 18.5% error rates. Significant inter-sample variation was observed for all cellular endpoints but cases and controls could not be distinguished. Conclusions: Variation in lymphocyte radiosensitivity does not necessarily correlate with normal tissue response to radiotherapy. Gene expression analysis can predict of radiation exposure and may in the future help prediction of normal tissue radiosensitivity.

  8. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation of T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST and colony formation assay. No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed

  9. Cooperative Enhancement of Radiosensitivity After Combined Treatment of 17-(Allylamino)-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin and Celecoxib in Human Lung and Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Mee

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether the combined treatment of 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an inhibitor of heat-shock protein 90 (hsp90), and celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, can cooperatively enhance the radiosensitivity of various human cancer cells. Combined treatment with 17-AAG and celecoxib, at clinically relevant concentrations, cooperatively induced radiosensitization in all tested cancer cells, but not in normal cells. Cooperative radiosensitization by the drug combination was also shown in a human tumor xenograft system. We found that ataxia-telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are novel client proteins of hsp90. Combined treatment with 17-AAG and celecoxib cooperatively induced downregulation of ATR and ATM. In conclusion, combined treatment with 17-AAG and celecoxib at clinically relevant concentrations may significantly enhance the therapeutic efficacy of ionizing radiation. PMID:21830942

  10. The Effect of VPA on Increasing Radiosensitivity in Osteosarcoma Cells and Primary-Culture Cells from Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Breast Cancer in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guochao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Fengmei; Tian, Youjia; Tian, Zhujun; Cai, Zuchao; Lim, David; Feng, Zhihui

    2017-05-10

    This study explored whether valproic acid (VPA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor) could radiosensitize osteosarcoma and primary-culture tumor cells, and determined the mechanism of VPA-induced radiosensitization. The working system included osteosarcoma cells (U2OS) and primary-culture cells from chemical carcinogen (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats; and clonogenic survival, immunofluorescence, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosome aberrations, and comet assays were used in this study. It was found that VPA at the safe or critical safe concentration of 0.5 or 1.0 mM VPA could result in the accumulation of more ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks, and increase the cell radiosensitivity. VPA-induced radiosensitivity was associated with the inhibition of DNA repair activity in the working systems. In addition, the chromosome aberrations including chromosome breaks, chromatid breaks, and radial structures significantly increased after the combination treatment of VPA and IR. Importantly, the results obtained by primary-culture cells from the tissue of chemical carcinogen-induced breast cancer in rats further confirmed our findings. The data in this study demonstrated that VPA at a safe dose was a radiosensitizer for osteosarcoma and primary-culture tumor cells through suppressing DNA-double strand breaks repair function.

  11. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark, E-mail: mark.deridder@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

  12. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes

  13. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are commonly used in cancer radiotherapy, low energy keV X-rays might be much more effective with HZ radiosensitization.

  14. Biochemical evidence for deficient DNA repair leading to enhanced G2 chromatid radiosensitivity and susceptibility to cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantt, R.; Parshad, R.; Price, F.M.; Sanford, K.K.

    1986-01-01

    Human tumor cells and cells from cancer-prone individuals, compared with those from normal individuals, show a significantly higher incidence of chromatid breaks and gaps seen in metaphase cells immediately after G2 X irradiation. Previous studies with DNA repair-deficient mutants and DNA repair inhibitors strongly indicate that the enhancement results from a G2 deficiency(ies) in DNA repair. We report here biochemical evidence for a DNA repair deficiency that correlates with the cytogenetic studies. In the alkaline elution technique, after a pulse label with radioactive thymidine in the presence of 3-acetylaminobenzamide (a G2-phase blocker) and X irradiation, DNA from tumor or cancer-prone cells elutes more rapidly during the postirradiation period than that from normal cells. These results indicate that the DNA of tumor and cancer-prone cells either repairs more slowly or acquires more breaks than that of normal cells; breaks can accumulate during incomplete or deficient repair processes. The kinetic difference between normal and tumor or cancer-prone cells in DNA strand-break repair reaches a maximum within 2 h, and this maximum corresponds to the kinetic difference in chromatid aberration incidence following X irradiation reported previously. These findings support the concept that cells showing enhanced G2 chromatid radiosensitivity are deficient in DNA repair. The findings could also lead to a biochemical assay for cancer susceptibility

  15. Radiation induced chromosomal instability in lymphocytes of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, H.; Sagara, M.; Ban, S.; Noda, S.; Iwakawa, M.; Harada, Y.; Imai, T.; Cologne, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay has been extensively used to evaluate the radiation sensitivity of human individuals. Using the CBMN assay, Scott et al (1998, 1999) demonstrated that a fraction of radiosensitive individuals in breast cancer case population was larger than in normal individual population. However, Vral et al were very skeptical about the Scott et al's findings (2002). Under the approval from the ethical committee of NIRS, peripheral blood was obtained from 46 normal healthy females, 131 breast cancer patients, 32 cervical cancer patients and 7 female head and neck cancer patients. Radiosensitivity of T-lymphocytes was assessed by using a CBMN assay. The frequencies of MN per binucleated cell in healthy donors were 0.031(±0.010) and 0.151(±0.066) for cells treated before and after X-ray-irradiation (2Gy), respectively. Spontaneous MN frequencies in cancer patients were significantly higher than healthy donors (p < 0.001). Radiation sensitivities of breast- and head and neck-cancer patients were significantly higher than normal individuals (p < 0.001). Cervical cancer patients were more resistant to irradiation than healthy donors, though the number of cases for statistical analysis was small. (p < 0.001). We are considering that the HPV infection affected the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cases. Because it is widely believed that one key mechanism which leads to spontaneous micronucleus formation involves an imbalance of chromosomal segregation and a chromosomal instability in patients' lymphocytes might be greater than that in normal individuals' lymphocytes. Recently, Kuschel et al (2002) demonstrated that ratios in two SNPs on XRCC3 were significantly different between cancer patients and healthy females. Then, we can suppose that the radiation-related genes with low penetrance may be involved in tumorigenesis of mammary- and head and neck-cells, and also, in patients' radiation susceptibility

  16. Radiosensitivity of cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P [Radiation Biology Section, Chester Beatty Research Institute, Royal Cancer Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1960-07-15

    The mechanism by which radiation kills cells must be investigated with the goal to make possible to devise means to alter the radiosensitivity of cells. The object of our investigation, supported by IAEA, is to try and find the reasons for the variation in sensitivity between different cells. Once we know the reason for the differences in radiosensitivity of different micro-organisms we can begin to look rationally for ways of enhancing the radiation response of the more sensitive organisms. An investigation of this type has implications far beyond food sterilization, as it cannot fail to provide fundamental facts about radiation injury to cells in general. Cancer researchers have looked for many years for means of sensitizing cancer cells to radiation

  17. Radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, P.

    1960-01-01

    The mechanism by which radiation kills cells must be investigated with the goal to make possible to devise means to alter the radiosensitivity of cells. The object of our investigation, supported by IAEA, is to try and find the reasons for the variation in sensitivity between different cells. Once we know the reason for the differences in radiosensitivity of different micro-organisms we can begin to look rationally for ways of enhancing the radiation response of the more sensitive organisms. An investigation of this type has implications far beyond food sterilization, as it cannot fail to provide fundamental facts about radiation injury to cells in general. Cancer researchers have looked for many years for means of sensitizing cancer cells to radiation

  18. Prospective study evaluating the radiosensitizing effect of reduced doses of temozolomide in the treatment of Egyptian patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaber M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available May Gaber, Hanan Selim, Tamer El-NahasDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Cairo University, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: In view of the documented toxicity of continuous daily radiosensitizer doses of temozolomide concomitant with radiation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, we aimed to compare it with a different schedule of abbreviated radiosensitizer dosing.Patients and methods: This was a randomized prospective study comparing toxicity and survival in 60 Egyptian patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Patients in arm I received temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 daily with radiotherapy for 42 days, starting 4 weeks after surgery and reaching to a total radiation dose of 60 Gy/30 Fractions/6 weeks, while patients in arm II received temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 concomitantly with the same radiotherapy schedule daily in the first and last weeks of the same radiotherapy program.Results: Common grade 1–2 adverse events were malaise in 28 patients (46.7%, followed by alopecia (40% and nausea (26.7%. Grade 3–4 convulsion and decreased level of consciousness was seen in only four patients who were all from arm I. The median progression-free survival (PFS for the entire study population was 10.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.3–14, and PFS at 12 months was 32%. The median PFS in arm I was 8.8 months (95% CI 5.9–11.7 and in arm II 11.5 months (95% CI 8.9–14.2, and PFS at 12 months for both arms was 32% and 30% respectively (P=0.571. The median overall survival (OS of the whole group of patients was 14.2 months (95% CI 13–15.5, and OS was 70% at 12 months and 25% at 18 months. The median OS for patients in arm I was 12.3 months (95% CI 7.7–16.9, whereas in arm II it was 14.3 months (95% CI 14–14.7 (P=0.83.Conclusion: Reduced radiosensitizer dosing of temozolomide concomitant with radiotherapy in glioblastoma multiforme exhibited comparable efficacy with a classic continuous daily schedule, though with better tolerability

  19. Leukocyte apoptosis as a predictor of radiosensitivity in Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Sandra; Leskovac, Andreja; Joksic, Ivana; Filipovic, Jelena; Joksic, Gordana; Vujic, Dragana; Guc-Scekic, Marija

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare cancer-prone genetic disease characterized by impaired oxygen metabolism and defects in DNA damage repair. Response of FA cells to ionizing radiation has been an issue intensively debated in the literature. To study in vitro radiosensitivity in patients suffering from FA and their parents (heterozygous carriers), we determined radiation-induced leukocyte apoptosis using flow cytometry. As TP53 gene is involved in the control of apoptosis, we studied its status in FA lymphocytes using dual colour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FA patients and female heterozygous carriers display radiosensitive response to ionizing radiation seen as abnormal elimination of cells via apoptosis. By employment of FISH, the TP53 allele loss in FA lymphocytes was not observed. In diseases related to oxidative stress, determination of radiation-induced apoptosis is the method of choice for testing the radiosensitivity. (author)

  20. Radiosensitivity of fibroblasts obtained from a cafe-au-lait spot and normal-appearing skin of a patient with neurofibromatosis (NF-6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, M.A.; Smith, B.P.; Sigut, D.; Sackey, K.

    1990-01-01

    Fibroblast cells derived from a cafe-au-lait spot and normal-appearing skin of a neurofibromatosis (NF-6) patient were studied for radiosensitivity in comparison with two normal cell lines used as controls. No difference in radiosensitivity was observed between the patient's cell lines and the controls using acute gamma-irradiation. However, a markedly increased radiosensitivity of the fibroblasts obtained from the patient's skin of normal appearance was demonstrated after chronic gamma-irradiation. The cells from the cafe-au-lait spot showed intermediate sensitivity to chronic irradiation as compared with the control cell lines and the fibroblasts derived from the normal skin of the patient. These results showed the usefulness of chronic irradiation in detecting increased cellular radiosensitivity which may result from a unique DNA repair defect in an NF patient. We suggest that enhanced genetic changes in radiosensitive NF patients may lead to formation of cafe-au-lait lesions and certain tumors. Such a transformation may be associated with production of radiotolerant cells

  1. Radiosensitizers action on Iodine 131 therapeutical effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agote, Marcos; Kreimann, Erica L.; Bocanera, Laura V.; Dagrosa, Maria A.; Juvenal, Guillermo J.; Pisarev, Mario A.

    1999-01-01

    Present studies were aimed to research the possible application of a radiosensitizer, nicotinamide, to increase the therapeutical effect of radioiodine. There were used goitrous and normal rats with growing dose of Iodine 131, with and without simultaneous treatment with nicotinamide. The obtained results show that the nicotinamide treatment importantly increases the thyroid radio destructive effect induced by radioiodine. Under these experimental conditions, nicotinamide induces to a significant increase of thyroid vascularisation, without changes in the proteins ADP-ribosylation activity. These results show, for the first time, the radiosensitizer effect of nicotinamide in front of Iodine 131 and give the possibility of using it in the treatment of hyperthyroid or thyroid difference cancer patients. (author)

  2. Predictive radiosensitivity tests in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Taja, Maria R.; Sardi, M.; Busto, E.; Mairal, L.; Roth, B.; Menendez, P.; Bonomi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Individual radiosensitivity is an inherent characteristic, associated with an abnormally increased reaction to ionising radiation of both the whole body and cells derived from body tissues. Human population is not uniform in its radiation sensitivity. Radiosensitive sub-groups exist, which would suffer an increased incidence of both deterministic and stochastic effects. Clinical studies have suggested that a large part of the spectrum of normal tissue reaction may be due to differences in individual radiosensitivity. The identification of such sub-groups should be relevant for radiation therapy and radiation protection purposes. It is suggested that DNA repair mechanisms are involved. Consequently, the characterization of DNA repair in lymphocytes through cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) and alkaline single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet) assays could be a suitable approache to evaluate individual radiosensitivity in vitro. The aims of this study were: 1) To assess the in vitro radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from two groups of cancer patients (prospectively and retrospectively studied), using MN and comet assays, in comparison with the clinical radiation reaction and 2) To test the predictive potential of both techniques for the identification of radiosensitivity sub-groups. 38 cancer patients receiving radiation therapy were enrolled in this study. 19 patients were evaluated prior, mid-way and on completion of treatment (prospective group) and 19 patients were evaluated about 6-18 month after radiotherapy (retrospective group). Cytogenetic data from the prospective group were analysed using a mathematical model to evaluate the attenuation of the cytogenetic effect as a function of the time between a single exposure and blood sampling, estimating a cytogenetic recovery factor k. In the retrospective group, blood samples were irradiated in vitro with 0 (control) or 2 Gy and evaluated using MN test. Cytogenetic data were analysed

  3. Insulin-like growth factor stimulation increases radiosensitivity of a pancreatic cancer cell line through endoplasmic reticulum stress under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Hiroko; Mukai, Mutsuko; Inoue, Masahiro; Inoue, Takehiro

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is an obstacle to radiotherapy. Radiosensitivity under hypoxic conditions is determined by molecular oxygen levels, as well as by various biological cellular responses. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a widely recognized survival signal that confers radioresistance. However, under hypoxic conditions the role of IGF signaling in radiosensitivity is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that IGF-II stimulation decreases clonogenic survival under hypoxic conditions in the pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1 and Panc-1, and in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. IGF treatment under hypoxic conditions suppressed increased radiation sensitivity in these cell lines by pharmacologically inhibiting the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a major IGF signal-transduction pathway. Meanwhile, IGF-II induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress response under hypoxia, including increased protein levels of CHOP and ATF4, mRNA levels of CHOP, GADD34, and BiP as well as splicing levels of XBP-1. The response was suppressed by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin activity. Overexpression of CHOP in AsPC-1 cells increased radiation sensitivity by IGF-II simulation under hypoxic conditions, whereas suppression of CHOP expression levels with small hairpin RNA or a dominant negative form of a proline-rich extensin-like receptor protein kinase in hypoxia decreased IGF-induced radiosensitivity. IGF-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to radiosensitization independent of cell cycle status. Taken together, IGF stimulation increased radiosensitivity through the endoplasmic reticulum stress response under hypoxic conditions. (author)

  4. In vivo radiosensitization by diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, C.R.; Blekkenhorst, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) has been suggested to have both radiosensitizing (due to superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition) and radioprotective properties. We have studied the activity of SOD up to 24 h after intratumoral administration of 50, 100, 150, and 300 mg/kg DDC in 3-methylcholanthrene-induced tumors in BALB/c mice. Maximal inhibition of SOD (8% of control) was obtained 1 h after administration of 100 mg/kg DDC. Tumor response to DDC and X irradiation was assessed using a tumor growth-delay assay, after 11 Gy 100-kVp X rays given up to 24 h after DDC administration. Radiation-induced tumor growth delay (7.11 +/- 1.76 days) was enhanced only when tumors were irradiated 2-4 h after 50 mg/kg DDC. When higher doses of DDC were used, tumor cure was noted when DDC was injected 1-6 h before irradiation. We suggest our findings are consistent with radiosensitization being due to SOD inhibition, but that if insufficient time is allowed between DDC injection and irradiation, the sensitization is masked by a radioprotective effect. We believe that further investigations as to the therapeutic potential of DDC in human patients with cancer are warranted

  5. A randomized double-blind phase III study of nimorazole as a hypoxic radiosensitizer of primary radiotherapy in supraglottic larynx and pharynx carcinoma. Results of the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study (DAHANCA) Protocol 5-85

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, J.; Hansen, H.S.; Overgaard, M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A multicenter randomized and balanced double-blind trial with the objective of assessing the efficacy and tolerance of nimorazole given as a hypoxic radiosensitizer in conjunction with primary radiotherapy of invasive carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx and pharynx. PATIENTS AND TREATMENT...... for the end-points of final loco-regional control (including surgical salvage) and cancer-related deaths (52 versus 41%, P = 0.002). This trend was also found in the overall survival but to a lesser, non-significant extent (26 versus 16%, 10-year actuarial values, P = 0.32). Cox multivariate regression...... of dying from cancer. The compliance to radiotherapy was good and 98% of the patients received the planned dose. Late radiation-related morbidity was observed in 10% of the patients, irrespective of nimorazole treatment. Drug-related side-effects were minor and tolerable with transient nausea and vomiting...

  6. Heat shock protein 90 chaperone complex inhibitor enhanced radiosensitivity through modification of response to hormone and degradation of androgen receptor in hormone sensitive prostate cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, N.; Harashima, K.; Akimoto, T.

    2003-01-01

    It is easily speculated that androgen or androgen deprivation affects proliferative activity or radiosensitivity, but there has been enough information how androgen or androgen deprivation influences the response to radiation. In this setting, the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on cellular growth and radiosensitivity was examined in hormone-responsive human prostate cancer cell line (LnCap). The binding of androgen receptor (AR) with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) plays an important role in stability of the function of receptor. It was, therefore, examined how Hsp90 chaperone complex inhibitor modified the effect of DHT on radiosensitivity in addition to the effect of DHT, especially focusing on AR and its downstream signal transduction pathways. Hydroxy-flutamide (OH-flutamide) was also used to confirm the effect of activation of AR on radiosensitivity because AR of LnCap has a point mutation, leading to activation of AR caused by the binding of OH-flutamide. Radicicol was used as a Hsp90 chaperone complex inhibitor, and incubated with cells at a concentration of 500 nM. Radicicol was incubated with cells for 9 h, and cells were irradiated 1 h after the start of incubation. DHT and OH-flutamide were incubated with cells until staining. DHT or OH-flutamide resulted in stimulation of cellular growth in contrast to inhibition of cellular growth caused by higher concentrations, so that we adopted 1 nM as a concentration of DHT and 1μM as a concentration of OH-flutamide. DHT or OH-flutamide in combination with radiation resulted in slight decrease in radiosensitivity compared with radiation alone. Radicicol at a concentration of 500 nM in combination with DHT or OH-flutamide abolished decrease in radiosensitivity caused by DHT or OH-flutamide. In terms of the expression of AR, radicicol in combination with radiation and/or DHT, OH-flutamide induced degradation of AR. In consistent with degradation of AR, the expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA) decreased

  7. Inhibition of UBE2D3 expression attenuates radiosensitivity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by increasing hTERT expression and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Wang

    Full Text Available The known functions of telomerase in tumor cells include replenishing telomeric DNA and maintaining cell immortality. We have previously shown the existence of a negative correlation between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT and radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Here we set out to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation by telomerase of radiosensitivity in MCF-7 cells. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screening of a human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma radioresistant (Hep2R cDNA library was first performed to search for potential hTERT interacting proteins. We identified ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D3 (UBE2D3 as a principle hTERT-interacting protein and validated this association biochemically. ShRNA-mediated inhibition of UBE2D3 expression attenuated MCF-7 radiosensitivity, and induced the accumulation of hTERT and cyclin D1 in these cells. Moreover, down-regulation of UBE2D3 increased hTERT activity and cell proliferation, accelerating G1 to S phase transition in MCF-7 cells. Collectively these findings suggest that UBE2D3 participates in the process of hTERT-mediated radiosensitivity in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells by regulating hTERT and cyclin D1.

  8. Genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhanced radiosensitivity in human esophageal cancer cell lines in vitro: Possible involvement of inhibition of survival signal transduction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on radiosensitivity was examined, especially focusing on 'survival signal transduction pathways'. Methods and Materials: Two human esophageal squamous cell cancer cell lines, TE-1 (p53, mutant) and TE-2 (p53, wild), were used. Radiosensitivity was determined by clonogenic assay, and activation of survival signals was examined by Western blot. Results: Genistein (30 μM) greatly enhanced radiosensitivity in these cell lines by suppressing radiation-induced activation of survival signals, p42/p44 extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT/PKB. Significant increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and increased poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase cleavage were observed in TE-2, but not in TE-1 even after combination of genistein with irradiation. In terms of changes in expression of p53-related proteins, increase in expression of Bax and decrease in that of Bcl-2 were observed in TE-2 but not in TE-1, suggesting that the main mode of cell death induced by genistein in a cell line with wild type p53 differed from that with mutant p53. Conclusions: This study suggested that survival signals, including p42/p44 ERK and AKT/PKB, may be involved in determining radiosensitivity, and genistein would be a potent therapeutic agent that has an enhancing effect on radiation

  9. Radiosensitizing effect of artesunate on nude mice transplanted with HeLa cells of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yuanyuan; Feng Yang; Zhang Xuguang; Zhu Wei; Ni Qianying; Geng Chong; Chen Guanglie; Luo Judong; Fan Saijun; Cao Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radiosensitization of artesunate on nude mouse transplanted with HeLa cells,and to explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: HeLa cells were inoculated into the nude mice to establish tumor model. Mice were randomly divided into 4 groups as blank control,artesunate group, radiation group and artesunate + radiation group when average volume of tumor were about 5 mm × 5 mm× 5 mm. During the term of treatment, the volume of tumors were measured every 2 days. After 14 days treatment, the mice were killed and tumor tissues were harvested for flow cytometry to detect the alteration of cell cycle. Meanwhile, the pathological change of the tumor tissue was observed with HE staining method, and the change of expression of cycle regulatory protein Cyclin B1, Cdc2 and Wee1 were detected by Western blot. Results: The growth of tumor was significantly inhibited by artesunate combined with radiation and its inhibition rate was 72.34%. Flow cytometry results showed that the percent of cells in G 1 phase increased and G 2 phase decreased in the artesunate + radiation group compared with those in irradiation group (t=4.41, 4.12, P<0.05). The expression level of Cyclin B1 was obviously increased while that of Wee1 decreased in the artesunate + radiation compared with irradiation group. There was no difference in the expression of Cdc2 among the four groups. Conclusions: Artesunate can dramatically increase the radiosensitivity of transplanted tumor of HeLa cells. The possible mechanism might be related to the decreasing G 2 phase by regulating the expression of Cyclin B1 and Wee1. (authors)

  10. Differential response of DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation: role of reactive oxygen species, GSH and Nrf2 in radiosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Kunwar, Amit; Sandur, Santosh K; Pandey, Badri N; Chaubey, Ramesh C

    2014-01-01

    Radioresistance is the major impediment in radiotherapy of many cancers including prostate cancer, necessitating the need to understand the factors contributing to radioresistance in tumor cells. In the present study, the role of cellular redox and redox sensitive transcription factor, Nrf2 in the radiosensitivity of prostate cancer cell lines PC3 and DU145, has been investigated. Differential radiosensitivity of PC3 and DU145 cells was assessed using clonogenic assay, flow cytometry, and comet assay. Their redox status was measured using DCFDA and DHR probes. Expression of Nrf2 and its dependent genes was measured by EMSA and real time PCR. Knockdown studies were done using shRNA transfection. PC3 and DU145 cells differed significantly in their radiosensitivity as observed by clonogenic survival, apoptosis and neutral comet assays. Both basal and inducible levels of ROS were higher in PC3 cells than that of DU145 cells. DU145 cells showed higher level of basal GSH content and GSH/GSSG ratio than that of PC3 cells. Further, significant increase in both basal and induced levels of Nrf2 and its dependent genes was observed in DU145 cells. Knock-down experiments and pharmacological intervention studies revealed the involvement of Nrf2 in differential radio-resistance of these cells. Cellular redox status and Nrf2 levels play a causal role in radio-resistance of prostate cancer cells. The pivotal role Nrf2 has been shown in the radioresistance of tumor cells and this study will further help in exploiting this factor in radiosensitization of other tumor cell types. © 2013.

  11. Andrographolide impedes cancer stemness and enhances radio-sensitivity in oral carcinomas via miR-218 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Po-Yu; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Wang, Tong Hong; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Lu, Ming-Yi; Liao, Yi-Wen; Lee, Tzu-Hsin; Peng, Chih-Yu

    2017-01-17

    Current evidence suggests that oral cancer stem cells (OCSCs) possess high tumorigenic and metastatic properties as well as chemo- and radioresistance. In this study, we demonstrated that andrographolide, the main bioactive component in the medicinal plant Andrographis, significantly reduced oncogenicity and restored radio-sensitivity of ALDH1+CD44+ OCSCs. Mechanistic studies showed that andrographolide treatment increased the expression of microRNA-218 (miR-218), leading to the downregulation of Bmi1. We showed that knockdown of miR-218 in ALDH1-CD44- non-OCSCs enhanced cancer stemness, while silencing of Bmi1 significantly counteracted it. Furthermore, we found tumor growth was reduced in mice bearing xenograft tumors after andrographolide treatment via activation of miR-218/Bmi1 axis. Together, these data demonstrated that the inhibition of tumor aggressiveness in OCSCs by andrographolide was mediated through the upregulation of miR-218, thereby reducing Bmi1 expression. These findings suggest that andrographolide may be a valuable natural compound for anti-CSCs treatment of OSCC.

  12. Genetic factors affecting radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition: application of a continuous low dose-rate irradiation colony formation assay to select radiosensitive retinoblastoma family members for correction with a cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.F.; Nagasawa, H.; Bedford, J.S.; Little, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to identify new or undescribed functions of radiosensitivity and genomic instability genes using a continuous low dose-rate colony formation assay. This assay expands on the standard colony formation assay, whereby colony formation ability (retention of proliferative capacity) is measured during continuous low dose-rate irradiation rather than 10-14 days following the completion of such exposures. This approach has previously employed by the Bedford laboratory to identify a Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) mutant of CHO cells, irs-20. In this study we examine the growth response of fibroblasts derived from recently identified radiosensitive retinoblastoma family members, both affected probands and their unaffected parents, and various apparently normal fibroblast lines obtained from the NIGMS Human Genetic Cell Repository (Coriell Medical Institute, Camden, NJ). Colony formation was assayed by plating single cells, exposing them at 37 deg C to continuous Cs-137 gamma irradiation at dose rates of 0.5-8.5 cGy/h, and scoring survivors as colonies with >100 viable cells. The retinoblastoma family members display severely limited growth (survival less than 10E-3) at dose rates greater than 2-2.5 cGy/h, while the apparently normal cell lines do not display such inhibited growth until 6-7 cGy/h. Two of the retinoblastoma family cell lines, MF-6F and MF-15F (both unaffected but radiosensitive parents), were selected as targets of transfection with a viral cDNA library (ViraPort human cDNA library, Stratagene Cloning Systems, La Jolla, CA) and subjected to a ∼3 cGy/h selection dose rate, where uncorrected survival relative to normal cells is lower by a factor of 50-150. Colonies recovered will provide valuable information regarding the genetic nature of their radiosensitivity (possibly involving chromosome stability, DNA repair, and/or cell cycle regulatory pathways), that may influence risks for cancer and heritable effects for a previously

  13. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Feins, Richard; Johnstone, David W.; Watson, Thomas; Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m 2 , 20 mg/m 2 , and 25 mg/m 2 were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m 2 ), II (20 mg/m 2 ), and III (25 mg/m 2 ), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 ± 0.06 μmol/l, 0.32 ± 0.05 μmol/l, and 0.52 ± 0.14 μmol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 ± 0.09 μmol/l, 0.61 ± 0.1 μmol/l, and 0.96 ± 0.23 μmol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 μmol/l (t > 0.05 μmol/l) was 1.6 ± 0.3 h, 1.9 ± 0.2 h, and 3.0 ± 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 μmol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization

  14. The inherited basis of human radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Certain individuals cannot tolerate 'conventional' doses of radiation therapy. This is known to be true of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia and ligase IV deficiency. Although in vitro testing may not correlate completely with clinical radiosensitivity, fibroblasts and lymphoblasts from patients with both of these disorders have been clearly shown to be radiosensitive. Using a colony survival assay (CSA) to test lymphoblastoid cells after irradiation with 1 Gy, a variety of other genetic disorders have been identified as strong candidates for clinical radiosensitivity, such as Nijmegen breakage syndrome, Mre11 deficiency, and Fanconi's anemia. These data are presented and considered as a starting-point for the inherited basis of human radiosensitivity

  15. The Henri Mondor Procedure of Morbidity and Mortality Review Meetings: Prospective Registration of Clinical, Dosimetric, and Individual Radiosensitivity Data of Patients With Severe Radiation Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, Yazid, E-mail: yazid.belkacemi@aphp.fr [AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); AP-HP, Henri Mondor Breast Center, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); INSERM U955 Eq 07, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); Colson-Durand, Laurianne [AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); AP-HP, Henri Mondor Breast Center, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); Granzotto, Adeline [INSERM, UMR1052, Radiobiology Group, Cancer Research Centre of Lyon, Lyon (France); Husheng, Shan; To, Nhu Hanh; Majdoul, Soufya; Guet, Saada; Hervé, Marie-Laure; Fonteneau, Gloria; Diana, Christian; Le Bret, Cindy; Dominique, Claude [AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); Fayolle, Maryse [AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); AP-HP, Henri Mondor Breast Center, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); Foray, Nicolas [INSERM, UMR1052, Radiobiology Group, Cancer Research Centre of Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy (RT), various radiation-induced toxicities can develop in about one-fourth of patients. An international interest in using morbidity and mortality rates to monitor the quality of care and integrate morbidity and mortality review (MMR) meetings into organizations' governance processes has arisen. We report the first results of patients included in our MMR procedure that included biological assays for individual intrinsic radiosensitivity (IIRS). Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients were prospectively included in the MMR database. Twenty-two were evaluable for IIRS. Prostate (n=10) and breast (n=8) cancers were the most frequent disease types. The total dose delivered, determined according to the type of disease, ranged from 30 to 74 Gy. Our MMR procedure requires strict criteria: patients with unresolved toxicity of grade 3 or higher with availability of clinical (photographic) data, IIRS results obtained from skin biopsy assays, treatment modalities, and follow-up data. The RT technique and dosimetry were reviewed. Results: Our prospective registration of toxicities showed mainly rectitis, occurring in 7 cases, and skin toxicities, occurring in 9. Of the 7 patients with rectitis, 5 received 66 Gy of post-prostatectomy RT with V50 (rectum volume receiving 50 Gy) ranging from 45% to 75% and a mean maximal dose of 66.5 Gy. For dermatitis and cystitis, the mean maximal doses were in the range of classical constraints without any overdosage or dose heterogeneity. No errors were found in the review of treatment planning and positioning. Conversely, all the patients were considered biologically as radiosensitive with genomic instability and ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair impairments. Conclusions: The MMR review of files allowed clear answers for patients on the relationship between clinical events and their IIRS. Our procedure has allowed education of all our staff to monitor

  16. The Henri Mondor Procedure of Morbidity and Mortality Review Meetings: Prospective Registration of Clinical, Dosimetric, and Individual Radiosensitivity Data of Patients With Severe Radiation Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Colson-Durand, Laurianne; Granzotto, Adeline; Husheng, Shan; To, Nhu Hanh; Majdoul, Soufya; Guet, Saada; Hervé, Marie-Laure; Fonteneau, Gloria; Diana, Christian; Le Bret, Cindy; Dominique, Claude; Fayolle, Maryse; Foray, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy (RT), various radiation-induced toxicities can develop in about one-fourth of patients. An international interest in using morbidity and mortality rates to monitor the quality of care and integrate morbidity and mortality review (MMR) meetings into organizations' governance processes has arisen. We report the first results of patients included in our MMR procedure that included biological assays for individual intrinsic radiosensitivity (IIRS). Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients were prospectively included in the MMR database. Twenty-two were evaluable for IIRS. Prostate (n=10) and breast (n=8) cancers were the most frequent disease types. The total dose delivered, determined according to the type of disease, ranged from 30 to 74 Gy. Our MMR procedure requires strict criteria: patients with unresolved toxicity of grade 3 or higher with availability of clinical (photographic) data, IIRS results obtained from skin biopsy assays, treatment modalities, and follow-up data. The RT technique and dosimetry were reviewed. Results: Our prospective registration of toxicities showed mainly rectitis, occurring in 7 cases, and skin toxicities, occurring in 9. Of the 7 patients with rectitis, 5 received 66 Gy of post-prostatectomy RT with V50 (rectum volume receiving 50 Gy) ranging from 45% to 75% and a mean maximal dose of 66.5 Gy. For dermatitis and cystitis, the mean maximal doses were in the range of classical constraints without any overdosage or dose heterogeneity. No errors were found in the review of treatment planning and positioning. Conversely, all the patients were considered biologically as radiosensitive with genomic instability and ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair impairments. Conclusions: The MMR review of files allowed clear answers for patients on the relationship between clinical events and their IIRS. Our procedure has allowed education of all our staff to monitor

  17. Fanconi's anemia and clinical radiosensitivity. Report on two adult patients with locally advanced solid tumors treated by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, M.; Karstens, J.H. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schindler, D.; Gross, M. [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. of Human Genetics; Doerk, T. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Morlot, S. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Inst. of Human Genetics

    2003-11-01

    Background: Patients with Fanconi's anemia (FA) may exhibit an increased clinical radiosensitivity of various degree, although detailed clinical data are scarce. We report on two cases to underline the possible challenges in the radiotherapy of FA patients. Case Report and Results: Two 24- and 32-year-old male patients with FA were treated by definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancers. In the first patient, long-term tumor control could be achieved after delivery of 67 Gy with a - in part - hyperfractionated split-course treatment regimen and, concurrently, one course of carboplatin followed by salvage neck dissection. Acute toxicity was marked, but no severe treatment-related late effects occurred. 5 years later, additional radiotherapy was administered due to a second (squamous cell carcinoma of the anus) and third (squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck) primary, which the patient succumbed to. By contrast, the second patient experienced fatal acute hematologic toxicity after delivery of only 8 Gy of hyperfractionated radiotherapy. While the diagnosis FA could be based on flow cytometric analysis of a lymphocyte culture in the second patient, the diagnosis in the first patient had to be confirmed by hypersensitivity to mitomycin of a fibroblast cell line due to complete somatic lymphohematopoietic mosaicism. In this patient, phenotype complementation and molecular genetic analysis revealed a pathogenic mutation in the FANCA gene. The first patient has not been considered to have FA until he presented with his second tumor. Conclusion: FA has to be considered in patients presenting at young age with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or anus. The diagnosis FA is of immediate importance for guiding the optimal choice of treatment. Radiotherapy or even radiochemotherapy seems to be feasible and effective in individual cases. (orig.)

  18. Basal HIF-1a expression levels are not predictive for radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, D.; Multhoff, G.; Helmholtz Center Munich, CCG - Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, Munich; Bayer, C.; Emmerich, K.; Molls, M.; Vaupel, P.; Huber, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    High levels of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1a in tumors are reported to be associated with tumor progression and resistance to therapy. To examine the impact of HIF-1a on radioresistance under normoxia, the sensitivity towards irradiation was measured in human tumor cell lines that differ significantly in their basal HIF-1a levels. HIF-1a levels were quantified in lysates of H1339, EPLC-272H, A549, SAS, XF354, FaDu, BHY, and CX- tumor cell lines by ELISA. Protein levels of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), and GAPDH were assessed by Western blot analysis. Knock-down experiments were performed using HIF-1a siRNA. Clonogenic survival after irradiation was determined by the colony forming assay. According to their basal HIF-1a status, the tumor cell lines were divided into low (SAS, XF354, FaDu, A549, CX-), intermediate (EPLC-272H, BHY), and high (H1339) HIF-1a expressors. The functionality of the high basal HIF-1a expression in H1339 cells was proven by reduced CA IX expression after knocking-down HIF-1a. Linear regression analysis revealed no correlation between basal HIF-1a levels and the survival fraction at either 2 or 4 Gy in all tumor cell lines investigated. Our data suggest that basal HIF-1a levels in human tumor cell lines do not predict their radiosensitivity under normoxia. (orig.)

  19. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Martin R.; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2016-08-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing.

  20. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlotto, John; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  1. Radiosensitivity of cancer-initiating cells and normal stem cells (or what the Heisenberg uncertainly principle has to do with biology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Wendy Ann; Bristow, Robert Glen

    2009-04-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that parallels between normal stem cell biology and cancer biology may provide new targets for cancer therapy. Prospective identification and isolation of cancer-initiating cells from solid tumors has promoted the descriptive and functional identification of these cells allowing for characterization of their response to contemporary cancer therapies, including chemotherapy and radiation. In clinical radiation therapy, the failure to clinically eradicate all tumor cells (eg, a lack of response, partial response, or nonpermanent complete response by imaging) is considered a treatment failure. As such, biologists have explored the characteristics of the small population of clonogenic cancer cells that can survive and are capable of repopulating the tumor after subcurative therapy. Herein, we discuss the convergence of these clonogenic studies with contemporary radiosensitivity studies that use cell surface markers to identify cancer-initiating cells. Implications for and uncertainties regarding incorporation of these concepts into the practice of modern radiation oncology are discussed.

  2. Radiosensitivity of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Quero, L.; Rivera, S.

    2011-01-01

    The frequency of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in the western world and the role of radiotherapy is more and more discussed. Classically, hepatocellular carcinoma was considered as a radioresistant tumour: in fact, modern radio-biologic studies, performed on cell lines directly established from patients, showed that hepatocellular carcinoma has the same radiosensitivity than the other epithelial tumours. From clinical studies, its α/β ratio has been estimated to be around 15 Gy. Radiosensitivity of normal hepatic parenchyma is now well evaluated and some accurate NTCP models are available to guide hepatic irradiation. The biology of hepatocellular carcinoma is also better described: the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapies will be a promising approach in the near future. (authors)

  3. Chemical radiosensitizers with special reference to metronidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.; Purohit, O.P.; Nair, C.R.; Dutta, T.K.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt at rationalisation of drug dose schedule for a radiosensitizer in a cancer clinic is attempted. A prospective analysis of tissue tolerance, response data and complications of the two groups of patients (treated by oral and high intermittent rectal routes) was made with matched control. The study group has definite use of metronidazole. It is further highlighted that there is an additional advantage of the rectal administration route of the drug as compared to that of the oral route. This is a preliminary communication. (author)

  4. The selection of patients for accelerated radiotherapy on the basis of tumor growth kinetics and intrinsic radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, S.L.; Kang-Sow Chan

    1990-01-01

    Mathematical modelling was used to reach qualitative conclusions concerning the relative rate of local tumor control that might be achieved by using accelerated fractionation to treat only the patients with the most rapidly growing rumors, compared with the control rated that could be expected from either conventional or accelerated radiotherapy alone. The results suggest that concomitant boost therapy is equally or more effective than conventional dose fractionation for all tumors, regardless of their growth kinetics. For tumors with very short clonogen doubling times, CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy) may be even more effective than concomitant boost treatment, but CHART is less effective than conventional or concomitant boost therapy for tumors with longer clonogen doubling times. Thus, there is a rationale for using a predictive assay of tumor clonogen doubling times to identify the patients who should be treated with CHART. However, improvements in local tumor control resulting from concomitant boost treatment or the selective use of CHART are not likely to be apparent in the population as a whole, because the overall control rated are largely determined by refractory tumors having little chance of control with any of the treatments and by higher responsive tumors that are likely to be controlled regardless of the treatment choice. Differences in control rated with different treatment strategies are most apparent in the stochastic fraction of the population, which excludes those patients for whom there is either very little change (e.g. 99%) of achieving local control with both treatments. The stochastic fraction can be approximated by excluding those patients with the most radioresistant and the most radiosensitive tumors, since intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity appears to be the single most important factor determining treatment outcome. (author). 32 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. New perspectives for radiosensitization in pancreatic carcinoma: A review of mechanisms involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis; Mecanismes de carcinogenese des cancers du pancreas: quelles pistes pour la radiosensibilisation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, F. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Tenon, Assistance publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Universite Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Centre de recherche, institut Curie, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Inserm U612, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Fernet, M.; Favaudon, V. [Centre de recherche, institut Curie, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Inserm U612, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Monnier, L.; Touboul, E. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Tenon, Assistance publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Universite Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-08-15

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The 5-year overall survival is less than 5 %. This very poor prognosis can be explained both by late diagnosis and by treatment resistance, including resistance to radiation therapy. A better understanding of the pancreatic tumorigenesis and knowledge of the most frequent mutations in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (KRAS, p16, TP53, Smad4) open new perspectives for the development of more effective treatments. This review presents the major genetic and molecular alterations in pancreatic cancer that could be targeted to improve radiosensitization. (authors)

  6. TAS-116, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, selectively enhances radio-sensitivity of human cancer cells to X-rays and carbon ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghyun; Sunada, Shigeaki; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Fujimori, Akira; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 inhibitors have been investigated as cancer therapeutics in mono-therapy and to augment radiotherapy, however serious adverse effects of early generation Hsp90 inhibitors limited their development. TAS-116 is a novel Hsp90 inhibitor with lower adverse effects than other Hsp90 inhibitors, and here we investigated the radio-sensitizing effects of TAS-116 in low LET X-ray, and high LET carbon ion irradiated human cancer cells and mouse tumor xenografts. TAS-116 decreased cell survival of both X-ray and carbon ion-irradiated human cancer cell lines (HeLa and H1299 cells), and similar to other Hsp90 inhibitors, it did not affect radiosensitivity of non-cancerous human fibroblasts. TAS-116 increased the number of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, and delayed the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). TAS-116 reduced the expression of proteins that mediate repair of DSBs by homologous recombination (RAD51) and non-homologous end joining (Ku, DNA-PKcs), and suppressed formation of RAD51 foci and phosphorylation/activation of DNA-PKcs. TAS-116 also decreased expression of the cdc25 cell cycle progression marker, markedly increasing G2/M arrest. Combined treatment of mouse tumor xenografts with carbon ions and TAS-116 showed promising delay in tumor growth compared to either individual treatment. These results demonstrate that TAS-116 radio-sensitizes human cancer cells to both X rays and carbon ions by inhibiting the two major DSB repair pathways, and these effects were accompanied by marked cell cycle arrest. The promising results of combination TAS-116 + carbon ion radiation therapy of tumor xenografts justify further exploration of TAS-116 as an adjunct to radiotherapy using low or high LET radiation. PMID:28062703

  7. ATM haplotypes and cellular response to DNA damage: association with breast cancer risk and clinical radiosensitivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angele, S.; Romestaing, P.; Moullan, N.; Vuillaume, M.; Chapot, B.; Friesen, M.; Jongmans, W.; Cox, D.G.; Pisani, P.; Gerard, J.P.; Hall, J.

    2003-01-01

    The ATM gene, mutated in the cancer-prone and radiation-sensitive syndrome ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), could predispose to breast cancer (BC) development and adverse radiotherapy responses. Sixteen ATM variants were genotyped in 254 BC cases, 70 of whom were adverse radiotherapy responders (RS-BC),

  8. Knockdown of TC-1 enhances radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dapeng; Li, Lei; Yan, Wei

    2016-04-15

    Thyroid cancer 1 (TC-1, C8ofr4) is widely expressed in vertebrates and associated with many kinds of tumors. Previous studies indicated that TC-1 functions as a positive regulator in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, its exact role and regulation mechanism in radiosensitivity of NSCLC are still unclear. The expression level of TC-1 was measured by qRT-PCR and western blot in NSCLC cell lines. Proliferation and apoptosis of NSCLC cells in response to TC-1 knockdown or/and radiation were determined by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was further examined by western blotin vitroandin vivo Compared to TC-1 siRNA or radiotherapy alone, TC-1 silencing combined with radiation inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in NSCLC cell lines by inactivating of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Furthermore, inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by XAV939, a Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor, contributed to proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction in NSCLC A549 cells. Combinative treatment of A549 xenografts with TC-1 siRNA and radiation caused significant tumor regression and inactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway relative to TC-1 siRNA or radiotherapy alone. The results fromin vitroandin vivostudies indicated that TC-1 silencing sensitized NSCLC cell lines to radiotherapy through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Disruption of MEK/ERK/c-Myc signaling radiosensitizes prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Carmela; Di Rocco, Agnese; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Mauro, Annunziata; Festuccia, Claudio; Del Fattore, Andrea; Berardinelli, Paolo; De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Bouché, Marina; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Zani, Bianca Maria; Marampon, Francesco

    2018-06-29

    Prostate cancer (PCa) cell radioresistance causes the failure of radiation therapy (RT) in localized or locally advanced disease. The aberrant accumulation of c-Myc oncoprotein, known to promote PCa onset and progression, may be due to the control of gene transcription and/or MEK/ERK-regulated protein stabilization. Here, we investigated the role of MEK/ERK signaling in PCa. LnCAP, 22Rv1, DU145, and PC3 PCa cell lines were used in in vitro and in vivo experiments. U0126, trametinib MEK/ERK inhibitors, and c-Myc shRNAs were used. Radiation was delivered using an x-6 MV photon linear accelerator. U0126 in vivo activity alone or in combination with irradiation was determined in murine xenografts. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling down-regulated c-Myc protein in PCa cell lines to varying extents by affecting expression of RNA and protein, which in turn determined radiosensitization in in vitro and in vivo xenograft models of PCa cells. The crucial role played by c-Myc in the MEK/ERK pathways was demonstrated in 22Rv1 cells by the silencing of c-Myc by means of short hairpin mRNA, which yielded effects resembling the targeting of MEK/ERK signaling. The clinically approved compound trametinib used in vitro yielded the same effects as U0126 on growth and C-Myc expression. Notably, U0126 and trametinib induced a drastic down-regulation of BMX, which is known to prevent apoptosis in cancer cells. The results of our study suggest that signal transduction-based therapy can, by disrupting the MEK/ERK/c-Myc axis, reduce human PCa radioresistance caused by increased c-Myc expression in vivo and in vitro and restores apoptosis signals.

  10. Application of bio-marker to study on tumor radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Wanfeng; Ding Guirong; Han Liangfu

    2001-01-01

    To definite tumor radiosensitivity is important for applying the schedules of individualization of patient radiotherapy. Many laboratories were carrying on the research which predict the tumor radiosensitivity with one bio-marker or/and multi-bio-marker in various levels. At present has not witnessed the specific bio-marker, but it provides an excellent model for predicting tumor radiosensitivity

  11. Molecular Modulation of Inhibitors of Apoptosis as a Novel Approach for Radiosensitization of Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    in multiple myeloma cells is associated with a cleavage of Mcl-1 and Bim and a decrease in the Mcl-1/Bim...improved tumor control by radiotherapy in vivo [66], advocating a distinct role for XIAP in radiation resistant phenotype of human cancers, and...about the role of endogenous Smac in cells treated with Smac- mimetic IAP-inhibitors and irradiation. In multiple human cancer models,

  12. E3 Ligase cIAP2 Mediates Downregulation of MRE11 and Radiosensitization in Response to HDAC Inhibition in Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Judith; Jevons, Sarah J; Groselj, Blaz; Ellermann, Sophie; Konietzny, Rebecca; Kerr, Martin; Kessler, Benedikt M; Kiltie, Anne E

    2017-06-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex mediates DNA repair pathways, including double-strand breaks induced by radiotherapy. Meiotic recombination 11 homolog (MRE11) is downregulated by histone deacetylase inhibition (HDACi), resulting in reduced levels of DNA repair in bladder cancer cells and radiosensitization. In this study, we show that the mechanism of this downregulation is posttranslational and identify a C-terminally truncated MRE11, which is formed after HDAC inhibition as full-length MRE11 is downregulated. Truncated MRE11 was stabilized by proteasome inhibition, exhibited a decreased half-life after treatment with panobinostat, and therefore represents a newly identified intermediate induced and degraded in response to HDAC inhibition. The E3 ligase cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2) was upregulated in response to HDAC inhibition and was validated as a new MRE11 binding partner whose upregulation had similar effects to HDAC inhibition. cIAP2 overexpression resulted in downregulation and altered ubiquitination patterns of MRE11 and mediated radiosensitization in response to HDAC inhibition. These results highlight cIAP2 as a player in the DNA damage response as a posttranscriptional regulator of MRE11 and identify cIAP2 as a potential target for biomarker discovery or chemoradiation strategies in bladder cancer. Cancer Res; 77(11); 3027-39. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Radiosensitivity of Patient-Derived Glioma Stem Cell 3-Dimensional Cultures to Photon, Proton, and Carbon Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiblak, Sara; Tang, Zili [German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Campos, Benito; Gal, Zoltan; Unterberg, Andreas [Division of Neurological Research, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Heidelberg Medical School, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen [German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Herold-Mende, Christel [Division of Neurological Research, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Heidelberg Medical School, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, Amir, E-mail: a.amir@dkfz.de [German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiosensitivity of primary glioma stem cell (GSC) cultures with different CD133 status in a 3-dimensional (3D) model after photon versus proton versus carbon irradiation. Methods and Materials: Human primary GSC spheroid cultures were established from tumor specimens of six consented glioblastoma patients. Human U87MG was used as a classical glioblastoma radioresistant cell line. Cell suspensions were generated by mechanical dissociation of GSC spheroids and embedded in a semi-solid 3D matrix before irradiation. Spheroid-like colonies were manually counted by microscopy. Cells were also recovered and quantified by fluorescence. CD133 expression and DNA damage were evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: The fraction of CD133{sup +} cells varied between 0.014% and 96% in the six GSC cultures and showed a nonsignificant correlation with plating efficiency and survival fractions. The 4 most photon-radioresistant GSC cultures were NCH644, NCH421k, NCH441, and NCH636. Clonogenic survival for proton irradiation revealed relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) in the range of 0.7-1.20. However, carbon irradiation rendered the photon-resistant GSC cultures sensitive, with average RBE of 1.87-3.44. This effect was partly attributed to impaired capability of GSC to repair carbon ion–induced DNA double-strand breaks as determined by residual DNA repair foci. Interestingly, radiosensitivity of U87 cells was comparable to GSC cultures using clonogenic survival as the standard readout. Conclusions: Carbon irradiation is effective in GSC eradication with similar RBE ranges approximately 2-3 as compared with non-stem GSC cultures (U87). Our data strongly suggest further exploration of GSC using classic radiobiology endpoints such as the here-used 3D clonogenic survival assay and integration of additional GSC-specific markers.

  14. Radiosensitivity of Patient-Derived Glioma Stem Cell 3-Dimensional Cultures to Photon, Proton, and Carbon Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiblak, Sara; Tang, Zili; Campos, Benito; Gal, Zoltan; Unterberg, Andreas; Debus, Jürgen; Herold-Mende, Christel; Abdollahi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiosensitivity of primary glioma stem cell (GSC) cultures with different CD133 status in a 3-dimensional (3D) model after photon versus proton versus carbon irradiation. Methods and Materials: Human primary GSC spheroid cultures were established from tumor specimens of six consented glioblastoma patients. Human U87MG was used as a classical glioblastoma radioresistant cell line. Cell suspensions were generated by mechanical dissociation of GSC spheroids and embedded in a semi-solid 3D matrix before irradiation. Spheroid-like colonies were manually counted by microscopy. Cells were also recovered and quantified by fluorescence. CD133 expression and DNA damage were evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: The fraction of CD133"+ cells varied between 0.014% and 96% in the six GSC cultures and showed a nonsignificant correlation with plating efficiency and survival fractions. The 4 most photon-radioresistant GSC cultures were NCH644, NCH421k, NCH441, and NCH636. Clonogenic survival for proton irradiation revealed relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) in the range of 0.7-1.20. However, carbon irradiation rendered the photon-resistant GSC cultures sensitive, with average RBE of 1.87-3.44. This effect was partly attributed to impaired capability of GSC to repair carbon ion–induced DNA double-strand breaks as determined by residual DNA repair foci. Interestingly, radiosensitivity of U87 cells was comparable to GSC cultures using clonogenic survival as the standard readout. Conclusions: Carbon irradiation is effective in GSC eradication with similar RBE ranges approximately 2-3 as compared with non-stem GSC cultures (U87). Our data strongly suggest further exploration of GSC using classic radiobiology endpoints such as the here-used 3D clonogenic survival assay and integration of additional GSC-specific markers.

  15. Enhanced radiosensitivity and defective DNA repair in cultured fibroblasts derived from Rothmund Thomson syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P J; Paterson, M C [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario. Radiation Biology Branch

    1982-01-01

    Rothmund Thomson syndrome (RTS) is an oculocutaneous and cancer-prone disorder in which enhanced carcinogen sensitivity, mediated through abnormal DNA metabolism, may be an associated factor. Cultured fibroblasts from 4 RTS patients have been examined for their colony-forming abilities and DNA repair capacities following ..gamma..-irradiation. 2 of the 4 RTS strains showed enhanced sensitivity following hypoxic ..gamma..-irradiation, and 1 of these 2 strains also showed enhanced sensitivity under oxic conditions. Defective DNA repair was implicated in the above abnormal responses to ..gamma..-radiation since both strains displayed reduced levels of repair synthesis and slow removal of radiogenic DNA lesions (assayed by their sensitivity to strand-incising activities present in protein extracts of Micrococcus luteus cells). A hypothesis is presented to rationalize the origin and heterogeneity of these laboratory phenotypes of RTS.

  16. Relationship of natural incidence and radiosensitivity for bone cancer in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.; Lloyd, R.D.; Miller, S.C.; Jee, W.S.S.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of the risk coefficients for 239 Pu- or 226 Ra-induced bone cancer in two canine breeds, one with a relatively low (beagle) and the other with a very high (St. Bernard) natural incidence, indicated only slightly higher risk in the giant breed. The differences in risk for skeletal malignancy in 239 Pu and 226 Ra dogs were nonsignificant (p > 0.05). Likewise, the values of the 239 Pu: 226 Ra open-quotes toxicity ratiosclose quotes for these respective breeds, using bone cancer as the endpoint, were not significantly different at the 0.05 level. The anatomical distribution of the radiation-induced bone tumors tended to be a function of both the bone mass and the skeletal distribution of the radio nuclide, not the site of predilection for naturally occurring bone neoplasia. Although the etiology of the higher natural incidence of bone cancer in the St. Bernard was not determined, several possible factors, including a higher osteoblastic activity level in the St. Bernards, are presented. These data suggest that making extrapolations of radiation-induced bone cancer risk from animals to humans is valid. 26 refs., 5 tabs

  17. In vitro effects of imatinib mesylate on radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, Marion T; Maass, Nicolai; Mundhenke, Christoph; Dahmke, Linda; Schem, Christian; Bauerschlag, Dirk O; Weber, Katrin; Niehoff, Peter; Bauer, Maret; Strauss, Alexander; Jonat, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer treatment is based on a combination of adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy effecting intracellular signal transduction. With the tyrosine kinase inhibitors new targeted drugs are available. Imatinib mesylate is a selective inhibitor of bcr-abl, PRGFR alpha, beta and c-kit. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Imatinib has an influence on the effectiveness of radiotherapy in breast cancer cell lines and if a combination of imatinib with standard chemotherapy could lead to increased cytoreduction. Colony-forming tests of MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 were used to study differences in cell proliferation under incubation with imatinib and radiation. Changes in expression and phosphorylation of target receptors were detected using western blot. Cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis assays were performed combining imatinib with doxorubicin. The combination of imatinib and radiotherapy showed a significantly stronger inhibition of cell proliferation compared to single radiotherapy. Differences in PDGFR expression could not be detected, but receptor phosphorylation was significantly inhibited when treated with imatinib. Combination of imatinib with standard chemotherapy lead to an additive effect on cell growth inhibition compared to single treatment. Imatinib treatment combined with radiotherapy leads in breast cancer cell lines to a significant benefit which might be influenced through inhibition of PDGFR phosphorylation. Combining imatinib with chemotherapy enhances cytoreductive effects. Further in vivo studies are needed to evaluate the benefit of Imatinib in combination with radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the treatment of breast cancer

  18. Targeting PRMT5 as a Novel Radiosensitization Approach for Primary and Recurrent Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    primary and recurrent prostate cancer cells toRT During the third grant period. we generated stable cell liens to indue bly express PRMT5 shRNA using...significant impact on the reporter gene activity (data not shown). Taken together, these results suggest that these SNPs have negligible effect on the 1.8 kb

  19. Targeting of beta 1 integrins impairs DNA repair for radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickreuter, E.; Eke, I.; Krause, M.; Borgmann, K.; van Vugt, M. A.; Cordes, N.

    2016-01-01

    beta 1 Integrin-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interactions allow cancer cell survival and confer therapy resistance. It was shown that inhibition of beta 1 integrins sensitizes cells to radiotherapy. Here, we examined the impact of beta 1 integrin targeting on the repair of radiation-induced

  20. Feasibility study of Anti-MUC1 aptamer use as vector target director of 1,10 phenantrolin for radiosensitization of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Laís Nascimento

    2017-01-01

    With the rising incidence of cancer and this disease as global public health dilemma, there is an alarming need of studying new cancer therapies. To achieve the development of efficient agents is essential to understand the fundamental mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Overexpression of proteins in malignant tissues, in contrast to expression of the proteins found in normal tissues of the same organ, is crucially important and of great interest for the characterization of potential tumor biomarkers. Following this premise, MUC1 glycoprotein was selected as a therapeutic target in a breast cancer model. In order to determine the viability of the aptA aptamer as radiosensitizers carrier, the toxic compound 1,10 phenanthroline, complexed with Fe(II) was intercalated in the aptamers. The dissociation constant was found at a value of Kd = 30 μM. The selective binding and internalization of the compound was demonstrated. Based on these data, the aptA can be used as carrying vector of molecules such as 1,10-phenanthroline. As a next stage, the evaluation of its in vitro potential as radiosensitizers with the use of ionizing radiation will be done. (author)

  1. Targeting PRMT5 as a Novel Radiosensitization Approach for Primary and Recurrent Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    pressor programmed cell death 4, Cancer Res. 71 (2011) 5579–5587. [8] C. Nicholas , J. Yang, S.B. Peters, M.A. Bill, R.A. Baiocchi, F. Yan, S. Sif, S...Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1839 (2014) 1330–1340. [13] C.M. Koh, M. Bezzi, D.H. Low, W.X. Ang, S.X. Teo, F.P. Gay, M. Al-Haddawi, S.Y. Tan , M. Osato, A. Sabo

  2. Radiation induced bystander effects in modification of cellular radio-sensitivity in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, B.N.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced Bystander Effect is manifestation of radiation effects in non-irradiated cells in the population. The phenomenon may have significant implication in risk of radiation induced cancer incidence and outcome of cancer radiotherapy. To understand the bystander interaction in tumor cells, we have studied secretion of diffusible factors from control and irradiated tumor cells of different origin. Our results showed a good correlation between magnitude of secretion of diffusible factors and survival of tumor cells. These diffusible factors are shown to affect proliferation and survival of tumor cells involving regulation of kinases and genes/proteins involved in apoptotic machinery. Our experiments using pharmacological inhibitors showed involvement of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) signaling in survival of tumor cells after treatment with diffusible factors. These factors seem to be involved in exerting radio-resistance in tumor cells. Furthermore, in proton microbeam irradiation studies showed induction of double strand break measured as gH2AX foci in human lung carcinoma cells, which was found to propagate to bystander tumor cells during post-irradiation incubation. Implication of these observations in outcome of cancer radiotherapy scenario would be discussed. (author)

  3. Radiosensitivity of cancer cells against carbon-ion beams in an aspect of the p53 gene status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2004-01-01

    We can easily understand that radiation sensitivities of cancer cells are dependent on the status of cancer-related genes. It is important to clarify which genes affect radiation sensitivity and reflect the effectiveness of radiation therapy for cancer cells. We have studied about the function of a tumor suppressor gene of p53, because p53 controls apoptosis, cell cycle and DNA repair from an aspect of important roles in cell fate. By analysis of function of p53 gene, therefore, we aim to predict the therapeutic effectiveness and to select the modalities of cancer therapies such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hyperthermia. As a final goal, we want to accept the most effective therapy, namely tailor-made cancer therapy, for each patient. Here, we introduce that carbon-beam therapy induced the expression of p53-independent apoptosis-related genes and NO radicals in mutated p53 cancer cells. (author)

  4. Quercetin suppresses DNA double-strand break repair and enhances the radiosensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells via p53-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong C

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cheng Gong,1 Zongyuan Yang,1 Lingyun Zhang,2 Yuehua Wang,2 Wei Gong,2 Yi Liu3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 2Department of Oncology, XiangYang Central Hospital, Hubei University of Arts and Science, XiangYang, 3Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, Wuhan, China Abstract: Quercetin is proven to have anticancer effects for many cancers. However, the role of tumor suppressor p53 on quercetin’s radiosensitization and regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response in this process remains obscure. Here, quercetin exposure resulted in ER stress, prolonged DNA repair, and the expression of p53 protein; phosphorylation on serine 15 and 20 increased in combination with X-irradiation. Quercetin pretreatment could potentiate radiation-induced cell death. The combination of irradiation and quercetin treatment aggravated DNA damages and caused typical apoptotic cell death; as well the expression of Bax and p21 elevated and the expression of Bcl-2 decreased. Knocking down of p53 could reverse all the above effects under quercetin in combination with radiation. In addition, quercetin-induced radiosensitization was through stimulation of ATM phosphorylation. In human ovarian cancer xenograft model, combined treatment of quercetin and radiation significantly restrained the growth of tumors, accompanied with the activation of p53, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein, and γ-H2AX. Overall, these results indicated that quercetin acted as a promising radiosensitizer through p53-dependent ER stress signals. Keywords: quercetin, p53, endoplasmic reticulum stress, DNA double-strand breaks, eIF-2α (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, ATM kinase

  5. Clinical experience with the radiosensitizer misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogelnik, D.; Szepesi, T.; Kaercher, K.H.; Seitz, W.

    1979-01-01

    From April 1976 to June 1978, 74 cancer patients were treated with multiple doses of misonidazole at the University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiobiology of Vienna. Thirtyone patients had inoperable brain tumors or high-grade astrocytomas, the remaining patients suffered from late stages of various extracerebral malignancies. All patients were hospitalized and thoroughly examined for possible side-effects of this currently most promising hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. Neurotoxicity, principally the development of peripheral neuropathies, is the most important limiting factor in the clinical application of misonidazole. With total doses of 12 g/m 2 of surface area a low and acceptable incidence of neuropathies is seen. By extension of the over-all treatment time to 6-8 weeks the total dose may be increased to 15 g/m 2 . (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  6. Wound healing morbidity in STS patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy in relation to in vitro skin fibroblast radiosensitivity, proliferative capacity and TGF-β activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akudugu, John M.; Bell, Robert S.; Catton, Charles; Davis, Aileen M.; Griffin, Anthony M.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John N.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Hill, Richard P.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a recent study, we demonstrated that the ability of dermal fibroblasts, obtained from soft tissue sarcoma (STS) patients, to undergo initial division in vitro following radiation exposure correlated with the development of wound healing morbidity in the patients following their treatment with preoperative radiotherapy. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is thought to play an important role in fibroblast proliferation and radiosensitivity both of which may impact on wound healing. Thus, in this study we examined the interrelationship between TGF-β activity, radiosensitivity and proliferation of cultured fibroblasts and the wound healing response of STS patients after preoperative radiotherapy to provide a validation cohort for our previous study and to investigate mechanisms. Patients and methods: Skin fibroblasts were established from skin biopsies of 46 STS patients. The treatment group consisted of 28 patients who received preoperative radiotherapy. Eighteen patients constituted a control group who were either irradiated postoperatively or did not receive radiation treatment. Fibroblast cultures were subjected to the colony forming and cytokinesis-blocked binucleation assays (low dose rate: ∼0.02 Gy/min) and TGF-β assays (high dose-rate: ∼1.06 Gy/min) following γ-irradiation. Fibroblast radiosensitivity and initial proliferative ability were represented by the surviving fraction at 2.4 Gy (SF 2.4 ) and binucleation index (BNI), respectively. Active and total TGF-β levels in fibroblast cultures were determined using a biological assay. Wound healing complication (WHC), defined as the requirement for further surgery or prolonged deep wound packing, was the clinical endpoint examined. Results: Of the 28 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy, 8 (29%) had wound healing difficulties. Fibroblasts from patients who developed WHC showed a trend to retain a significantly higher initial proliferative ability after

  7. Estimation of absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and effective sose in patients underwent abdominopelvic spiral CT scan using impact CT patient dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Amirnia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the presence of radiosensitive organs in the abdominopelvic region and increasing the number of requests for CT scan examinations, concerns about increasing radiation doses in patients has been greatly elevated. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and the effective dose in patients underwent abdominopelvic CT scan using ImPACT CT patient dosimetry Calculator (version 1.0.4, Imaging Performance Assessment on Computed Tomography, www.impactscan.org. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Imam Reza Hospital from November to February 2015 February 2015 in the Imam Reza Hospital, in Urmia, Iran. The demographic and dosimetric information of 100 patients who underwent abdominopelvic CT scan in a 6-slice CT scanner were obtained through the data collection forms. The demographic data of the patients included age, weight, gender, and BMI. The dosimetric parameters included pitch value, CT dose volume index (CTDIvol, dose-length product (DLP, tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, collimation size, scan length, and scan time. To determine the absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and also the effective dose in patients, ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator was used. Results: The results of this study demonstrated that the mean and standard deviation (SD of patients' effective dose in abdominopelvic CT scan was 4.927±0.164 mSv. The bladder in both genders had the greatest mean organ dose, which was 64.71±17.15 mGy for men and 77.56±18.48 mGy for women (P<0.001. Conclusion: The effective dose values of this examination are in the same range as previous studies, as well as International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP recommendations. However, the radiation dose from CT scan has the largest contribution to the medical imaging. According to the ALARA principle, it is recommended that the scan parameters, especially mAs, should be

  8. Chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of small cell lung cancer cell lines studied by a newly developed 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) hybrid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hida, T.; Ueda, R.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, H.; Kato, T.; Suyama, M.; Sugiura, T.; Ariyoshi, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) hybrid assay was developed by technically combining the human tumor clonogenic assay and the MTT assay to make the most of both assays. This assay was able to estimate the in vitro growth of cultured cell lines and of tumor cells in pleural effusion, suggesting the possibility of its use for assessment of chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of fresh tumor samples. Multiple cell lines [including morphological and/or phenotypical in vitro converters and cisplatin (CDDP)-resistant lines] were established from three patients with small cell lung cancer at different stages of the disease. Chemosensitivity of these cell lines to four commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs was tested by the MTT hybrid assay. SK1 and SK3 lines were established from Patient S. K. before and after chemotherapy and radiotherapy, respectively. SK3/CDDP, a CDDP-resistant line derived from the SK3 line, was 30-fold more resistant to CDDP [50% inhibiting dose (IC50), 21.5 micrograms/ml] than the SK1 line. In Patient M. O., MOA2/CDDP, a CDDP-resistant line derived from MOA2 (an in vitro converter from the MO line), was 41-fold more resistant to CDDP (IC50, 37 micrograms/ml) than the parent MO line. From Patient T. M., TM1 and TM2 lines were established before and after chemotherapy, respectively. The latter showed 6-fold more resistance to CDDP than the former. Chemosensitivity of these lines to three other drugs, 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide, Adriamycin, and etoposide, suggested cross-resistance between CDDP and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide. Radiosensitivity study was also carried out with the MTT hybrid assay. The MOA2 line was more resistant [Do, 3.0 Gy; extrapolation number (n), 4.0] than the parental MO line (Do, 1.6 Gy; n, 2.1). There was no clear difference in radiosensitivity between the cell lines established before and after radiation therapy in Patient S. K

  9. New treatment strategy against advanced rectal cancer. Enzyme-targeting and radio-sensitization treatment under parallel use of TS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Shiro; Yamanishi, Mikio; Katsumi, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy was applied to two cases of advanced rectal cancer. In addition, radiation sensitizers were injected to the lesion endoscopically at a pace of twice a week in order to enhance therapeutic effects (so-called enzyme-targeting and radio-sensitization treatment: KORTUC [Kochi Oxydol Radio-sensitization Treatment for Unresectable Carcinomas]). The flattening of the lesion shape was observed for both cases in a short period of time, then, Mile's and lateral lymphnode dissection was performed. The remnant of lesion was not pointed out in postoperative pathological specimens for both cases, and histological judgment after the treatment was ranked as Grade 3. In light of the better-than-expected results, this hospital is preparing for clinical trials, and planning to carefully accumulate the cases. As one of the curative treatment strategies against advanced rectal cancer, the authors are willing to make this KORTUC more objectively reliable as a safe and minimally invasive therapy. (A.O.)

  10. Ectopic expression of miR-34a enhances radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells, partly by suppressing the LyGDI signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Weiming; Xu Yaxiang; Dong Yujin; Cao Lili; Tong Jian; Zhou Xinwen

    2013-01-01

    miR-34a is transcriptionally induced by the tumor suppressor gene p53, which is often downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To address whether the downstream signal of miR-34a is sufficient to induce apoptosis and to alter cellular radiosensitivity, a chemical synthetic miR-34a mimic was delivered into A549 and H1299 cells, with or without co-treatment of γ-irradiation. Results showed that ectopic expression of miR-34a induced dose-dependent cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in a p53-independent manner in both NSCLC cell lines. Interestingly, LyGDI was discovered as a new target gene of miR-34a, and downregulation of LyGDI promoted Rac1 activation and membrane translocation, resulting in cell apoptosis. Furthermore, restoration of miR-34a indirectly reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that restoration of miR-34a expression enhances radiation-induced apoptosis, partly by suppressing the LyGDI signaling pathway, and miR-34a could possibly be used as a radiosensitizer for non-small cell lung cancer therapy. (author)

  11. Silencing of osteopontin promotes the radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells by reducing the expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; ZHAO Wei; ZUO Wen-shu; WEI Ling; SONG Xian-rang; WANG Xing-wu; ZHENG Gang; ZHENG Mei-zhu

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted phosphoglycoprotein (SSP) that is overexpressed in a variety of tumors and was regarded as a molecular marker of tumors.In this study,we intended to demonstrate the role of OPN in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.Methods Recombinant plasmid expressing small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific to OPN mRNA was transfected into MDA-MB-231 cells to generate the stable transfected cell line MDA-MB-343,and the empty plasmid tansfected cells (MDA-MB-neg) or wildtype MDA-MB-231 cells were used as control cells respectively.Expression of OPN,hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins was analyzed by Western blotting analysis.The radiosensitivity of cells was determined by detecting cell apoptosis,cell proliferation and cell senescence.Results HIF-1 and VEGF proteins in MDA-MB-343 cells were significantly downregulated upon the efficient knockdown of OPN expression under either hypoxia or normoxia environment.Moreover,expression of OPN protein was upregualted upon hypoxic culture.Stable OPN-silencing also decreased cell invasion,increased cell apoptosis and cell senescence,as well as reduced clonogenic survival,resulting in increase radiation tolerance.Conclusions Suppression of OPN gene expression can enhance radiosensitivity and affect cell apoptosis in breast cancer cells.OPN seems to be an attractive target for the improvement of radiotherapy.

  12. Resveratrol enhances radiosensitivity of human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H838 cells accompanied by inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Hui-Fen; Kuo Cheng-Deng; Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Lin, Chin-Ping; Tai, Hung-Chi; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yu-Yawn

    2005-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol in red wine, possesses many pharmacological activities including cardio-protection, chemoprevention, anti-tumor effects, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inactivation. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects and possible mechanism of resveratrol in enhancing radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells. Human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H838 cells were irradiated with or without resveratrol pretreatment. The surviving fraction and sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) were estimated by using a colony formation assay and linear-quadratic model. The cell-cycle distribution was evaluated by using prospidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based assay with immobilized oligonucleotide was performed to assess the DNA binding activity of NF-κB. Resveratrol had no direct growth-inhibitory effect on NCI-H838 cells treated for 24 hours with doses up to 25 μM. Pretreatment with resveratrol significantly enhanced cell killing by radiation, with an SER up to 2.2. Radiation activated NF-κB, an effect reversed by resveratrol pretreatment. Resveratrol resulted in a decrease of cells in the G 0 /G 1 phase and an increase in the S phase. Our results demonstrate that resveratrol enhances the radiosensitivity of NCI-H838 cells accompanied by NF-κB inhibition and S-phase arrest. (author)

  13. Radiosensitivity of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhijie

    1992-11-01

    The general views on radiosensitivity of higher plants have been introduced from published references. The radiosensitivity varies with species, varieties and organs or tissues. The main factors of determining the radiosensitivity in different species are nucleus volume, chromosome volume, DNA content and endogenous compounds. The self-repair ability of DNA damage and chemical group of biological molecules, such as -SH thiohydroxy of proteins, are main factors to determine the radiosensitivity in different varieties. The moisture, oxygen, temperature radiosensitizer and protector are important external factors for radiosensitivity. Both the multiple target model and Chadwick-Leenhouts model are ideal mathematical models for describing the radiosensitivity of higher plants and the latter has more clear significance in biology

  14. Increased chromosome radiosensitivity during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    It was necessary to consider the risks of exposure of pregnant women, not only in relation to the child, but also in relation to their own hypersensitivity. We have demonstrated that pregnancy increases radiosensitivity of chromosome in the mouse at the end of gestation. This is of importance since it may have implications on radioprotection of pregnant women and give experimental guidelines to the problems of hypersensitivity to drugs and cancer aggravation during pregnancy. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was exposed to ionizing radiations. By comparison to non-pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakage was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes, after short-term culture in the presence of the serum of the same donor. Immediately after delivery, this increase in radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase in radiosensitivity. Pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy. This study provides the first evidence in human that radiosensitivity may vary in relation to physiological conditions

  15. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wang Ya, E-mail: ywang94@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  16. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J.; Wang Ya

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein–lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  17. Radiosensitization and growth inhibition of cancer cells mediated by an scFv antibody gene against DNA-PKcs in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Li; Zhou, Ping-Kun; Zhou, Li-Jun; Pan, Xiu-Jie; Wang, Yu-Xiao; Xu, Qin-Zhi; Yang, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Yu; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Zhu, Mao-Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is commonly occurred in cancers and causes radioresistance and poor prognosis. In present study, the single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) targeting DNA-PKcs was developed for the application of radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo. A humanized semisynthetic scFv library and the phage-display antibodies technology were employed to screen DNA-PKcs scFv antibody. DNA-PKcs epitopes were predicted and cloned. A humanized semisynthetic scFv library and the phage-display antibodies technology were employed to screen DNA-PKcs scFv antibody. DNA damage repair was analyzed by comet assay and immunofluorescence detection of γH2AX foci. The radiosensitization in vivo was determined on Balb/c athymic mice transplanted tumours of HeLa cells. Four epitopes of DNA-PKcs have been predicted and expressed as the antigens, and a specific human anti-DNA-PKcs scFv antibody gene, anti-DPK3-scFv, was obtained by screening the phage antibody library using the DNA-PKcs peptide DPK3. The specificity of anti-DPK3-scFv was verified, in vitro. Transfection of HeLa cells with the anti-DPK3-scFv gene resulted in an increased sensitivity to IR, decreased repair capability of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) detected by comet assay and immunofluorescence detection of γH2AX foci. Moreover, the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs was inhibited by anti-DPK3-scFv, which was displayed by the decreased phosphorylation levels of its target Akt/S473 and the autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on S2056 induced by radiation. Measurement of the growth and apoptosis rates showed that anti-DPK3-scFv enhanced the sensitivity of tumours transplanted in Balb/c athymic mice to radiation therapy. The antiproliferation and radiosensitizing effects of anti-DPK3-scFv via targeting DNA-PKcs make it very appealing for the development as a novel biological radiosensitizer for cancer therapeutic potential

  18. Effect of DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine on radiosensitivity of the human lung cancer cells in three-dimensional culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Dong; Xue Gang; Li Xiaoman; Chen Yaxiong; Ren Zhenxin; Du Yarong; Hu Burong

    2014-01-01

    5-Aza-CdR is a specific inhibitor of DNMTs which could suppress tumor growth by demethylation of genomic DNA. There have only few studies thus far concerning it as radiosensitizers in three-dimensional (3D) cells. The principal aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of 5-Aza-CdR on the radiosensitivity of A549 cells in monolayer (2D) and 3D cultures in an attempt to find out a new combination treatments with radiotherapy. The cell proliferation was detected by MTT assay after pretreated with different doses of 5-Aza-CdR for 72 h. A549 cells were treated with or without 5-Aza-CdR (2, 5 μmol/L) for 72 h before be exposed to X-rays of 1, 2, 4, 6 Gy, respectively. The DNA damage was evaluated by micronucleus assay and clonogenic assays. Pretreatment with 5-Aza-CdR inhibited the A549 cell proliferation significantly. More micronucleus were observed after irradiation in 3D cells pretreated with 2 and 5 μmol/L concentration of drug than those without treatment. The survival fractions of cells pretreated by both 2 and 5 μmol/L drug reduced significantly in 3D cultures after irradiation. These significances, however, were found in 2D cells pretreated by only 5 μmol/L drug. Our results suggest that 5-Aza-CdR can inhibit the A549 cells proliferation and apparently enhance the radiosensitivity of cells in 3D cultures. Using of the low dose 5-Aza-CdR in clinical radiotherapy may reduce side effects and enhance effectively the cancer target therapy. (authors)

  19. Radiosensitization by hematocrit manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirst, D.G.; Hazlehurst, J.L.; Brown, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors show that tumors in mice adapt to anemia in a rather complex manner. Radiosensitivity may be lower, higher or equal to normal depending on when the anemia is induced prior to irradiation. The authors study these changes in radiosensitivity which occur during a period of anemia followed by the restoration of the hematocrit. When mice were made anemic immediately before irradiation, their tumors were very resistant, but the resistance was lost over the following 24 hrs even though the anemia was maintained. If mice which had been anemic for 24 hrs were retransfused to normal levels with red blood cells immediately before irradiation, their tumors were considerably more sensitive than normal. As the interval between retransfusion and irradiation was increased, sensitization was rapidly lost so that by 24 hrs sensitivity was the same as that of control tumors. They attribute this loss of sensitization to rapid tumor growth in response to a restored oxygen supply so that new hypoxic cells are created. The implications of this for the treatment of the anemic patient are discussed

  20. A radiobiological approach to cancer treatment. Possible chemical and physical agents modifying radiosensitivity in comparison with high LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, T.

    1982-01-01

    Biological characteristics of high LET radiations are summarized to be low oxygen enhancement ratio, high RBE, low repair and low cell cycle dependency of radiosensitivity. Various chemical modifiers of radiosensitivity and radiological effect of hyperthermia are classified into these four properties. It is evident that we have now various means to mimic high LET radiations as far as biological response is concerned though some of them are still in experimental stage. Among them, the means to cope with hypoxia and repair which are assumed to be the most important causes of radioresistance of human tumors are discussed in some detail. It is expected that through the present seminar we would have consensus to concentrate our effort of development for new modifying means available and useful in developing countries. (author)

  1. Berberine enhances radiosensitivity of esophageal squamous cancer by targeting HIF-1α in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xi; Yang, Baixia; Cai, Jing; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Qu; Xu, Liping; Qin, Qin; Zhu, Hongcheng; Ma, Jianxin; Tao, Guangzhou; Cheng, Hongyan; Sun, Xinchen

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment approach for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, how to promote radiation sensitivity in ESCC remains a challenge. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of berberine, a common used Chinese medicine, on the radiosensitivity of ESCC. ECSS cell line ECA109 and TE13 were subjected to hypoxia and/or ionizing radiation (IR), in the presence or absence of berberine treatment. Cell growth and survival, and apoptosis were evaluated. In add...

  2. SN-38 Acts as a Radiosensitizer for Colorectal Cancer by Inhibiting the Radiation-induced Up-regulation of HIF-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Takayuki; Kawai, Kazushige; Hata, Keisuke; Murono, Koji; Emoto, Shigenobu; Kaneko, Manabu; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nozawa, Hiroaki

    2018-06-01

    Hypoxia offers resistance to therapy in human solid tumors. The aim of the study was to investigate whether SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan, acts as a radiosensitizer through inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. HT29 and SW480 cells were cultured with SN-38 (0-4 μM) immediately after irradiation (0-8 Gy). HIF-1α expression was assessed using flow-cytometry and western blot analysis. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the calcein assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were determined by flow-cytometry. Radiation up-regulated HIF-1α, and SN-38 inhibited the radiation-induced HIF-1α. The combination of radiation and SN-38 inhibited cell proliferation more than radiation alone; treatment with SN-38 after radiation exposure did not increase the number of apoptotic cells, whereas, it enhanced the S and G 2 /M cell-cycle arrest and decreased the population of cells in G 1 Conclusion: SN-38 inhibits the radiation-induced up-regulation of HIF-1α and acts as a radiosensitizer by inducing cell-cycle arrest in CRC cells. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Increased radiosensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines due to cell cycle dysregulation and induction of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenz, Andrea; Ziemann, Frank; Wittig, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Mayer, Christina; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Wittekindt, Claus; Dreffke, Kirstin

    2014-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) respond favourably to radiotherapy as compared to HPV-unrelated HNSCC. We investigated DNA damage response in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines aiming to identify mechanisms, which illustrate reasons for the increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancers of the oropharynx. Radiation response including clonogenic survival, apoptosis, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and cell cycle redistribution in four HPV-positive (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) and four HPV-negative (UD-SCC-1, UM-SCC-6, UM-SCC-11b, UT-SCC-33) cell lines was evaluated. HPV-positive cells were more radiosensitive (mean SF2: 0.198 range: 0.22-0.18) than HPV-negative cells (mean SF2: 0.34, range: 0.45-0.27; p = 0.010). Irradiated HPV-positive cell lines progressed faster through S-phase showing a more distinct accumulation in G2/M. The abnormal cell cycle checkpoint activation was accompanied by a more pronounced increase of cell death after x-irradiation and a higher number of residual and unreleased DSBs. The enhanced responsiveness of HPV-related HNSCC to radiotherapy might be caused by a higher cellular radiosensitivity due to cell cycle dysregulation and impaired DNA DSB repair. (orig.) [de

  4. Depression in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not enough to consider treatment and care depression in the oncology that is the most common psychiatric illness in cancer patient affects of cancer treatment and the patient`s quality of life negatively, which is determined through researches in the field. With development of psycho-oncology it has been demonstrated to establish an important link between the cancer patient`s treatment as well as psycho-social support for the patient and psychiatric treatment and care for the if it is needed. With this connection between them it has been proposed to use of bio-psycho-social-model in cancer patient to improve their care. To achieve this goal, it is expected from medical personnel to realize patients psychosocial need und if he/she has a psychiatric disorders or syndromes. For the medical personnel that work in oncology services, it is inevitable to organize in order to raise the awareness of depression in the cancer patients. In the present study, it is focused on raising the awareness of depression in cancer patient for the medical personnel. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 186-198

  5. The inherited basis of human radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, R.A. [Univ. of California, School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Experimental Pathology

    2001-11-01

    Certain individuals cannot tolerate 'conventional' doses of radiation therapy. This is known to be true of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia and ligase IV deficiency. Although in vitro testing may not correlate completely with clinical radiosensitivity, fibroblasts and lymphoblasts from patients with both of these disorders have been clearly shown to be radiosensitive. Using a colony survival assay (CSA) to test lymphoblastoid cells after irradiation with 1 Gy, a variety of other genetic disorders have been identified as strong candidates for clinical radiosensitivity, such as Nijmegen breakage syndrome, Mre11 deficiency, and Fanconi's anemia. These data are presented and considered as a starting-point for the inherited basis of human radiosensitivity.

  6. Acquired resistance to cetuximab is associated with the overexpression of Ras family members and the loss of radiosensitization in head and neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saki, Mohammad; Toulany, Mahmoud; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab in combination with radiation therapy is used to treat patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In the present study, the mechanism of acquired resistance to cetuximab in HNSCC cells was investigated in vitro. Material and methods: The HNSCC cell lines UT5 and SAS and UT5 cells with acquired resistance to cetuximab (UT5R9) were used. The radiotoxicity potentials of cetuximab and inhibitors of PI3K, MAPK and farnesylation were tested using a clonogenic survival assay. Western blotting was used to evaluate protein expression. The levels of EGFR ligands were detected by ELISA. Results: Cetuximab inhibited proliferation and induced radiosensitization in UT5 cells but not in SAS cells. In comparison with UT5 cells, cetuximab-resistant SAS cells markedly overexpressed the K-Ras, H-Ras and N-Ras proteins, as detected by Western blotting. Resistance in UT5R9 cells was associated with the overexpression of the K-Ras, H-Ras and N-Ras proteins as well as an increase in the autocrine production of the EGFR ligands amphiregulin and transforming growth factor α (TGFα). UT5R9 cells were significantly more radioresistant than UT5 cells. Radioresistant UT5R9 cells were not radiosensitized by cetuximab, but knocking down H-RAS and N-RAS with siRNA and targeting Ras farnesylation using the farnesyltransferase inhibitor lonafarnib induced radiosensitization in these cells. Targeting PI3K and MEK revealed that the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the MAPK/ERK pathway is associated with radioresistance in UT5R9 cells. Conclusion: Targeting Ras and PI3K activity improves the outcome of irradiation in cetuximab-resistant HNSCC cell lines in vitro

  7. Differences in radiosensitivity between three HER2 overexpressing cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Stenerloew, Bo; Goestring, Lovisa; Palm, Stig; Carlsson, Joergen

    2008-01-01

    HER2 is a potential target for radionuclide therapy, especially when HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells are resistant to Herceptin registered treatment. Therefore, it is of interest to analyse whether HER2 overexpressing tumour cells have different inherent radiosensitivity. The radiosensitivity of three often used HER2 overexpressing cell lines, SKOV-3, SKBR-3 and BT-474, was analysed. The cells were exposed to conventional photon irradiation, low linear energy transfer (LET), to characterise their inherent radiosensitivity. The analysis was made with clonogenic survival and growth extrapolation assays. The cells were also exposed to alpha particles, high LET, from 211 At decays using the HER2-binding affibody molecule 211 At-(Z HER2:4 ) 2 as targeting agent. Assays for studies of internalisation of the affibody molecule were applied. SKOV-3 cells were most radioresistant, SKBR-3 cells were intermediate and BT-474 cells were most sensitive as measured with the clonogenic and growth extrapolation assays after photon irradiation. The HER2 dependent cellular uptake of 211 At was qualitatively similar for all three cell lines. However, the sensitivity to the alpha particles from 211 At differed; SKOV-3 was most resistant, SKBR-3 intermediate and BT-474 most sensitive. These differences were unexpected because it is assumed that all types of cells should have similar sensitivity to high-LET radiation. The sensitivity to alpha particle exposure correlated with internalisation of the affibody molecule and with size of the cell nucleus. There can be differences in radiosensitivity, which, if they also exist between patient breast cancer cells, are important to consider for both conventional radiotherapy and for HER2-targeted radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V., E-mail: chvetsov2@gmail.com; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data obtained

  9. Mechanisms of radio-resistance and its modification by chemicals. Coordinated programme on improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.B.; Shenoy, M.

    1982-01-01

    Several membrane specific drugs have been tested for their radiosensitizing effects under hypoxia/anoxia using E.Coli cells. Among these chlorpromazine (CPZ) proved most effective. Investigations on its mechanism of action revealed partial involvement of radiolytic transients and its inhibitory effect on DNA repair and synthesis. A ''coctail'' consisting of CPZ and other drugs like procaine lignocaine, or telsacaine sensitized hypoxic bacteria beyond ''oxygen effect''. CPZ also showed preferential cytotoxicity to anoxic/hypoxic bacteria. Prolonged treatment of cells with CPZ under hypoxia at elevated temperatures (up to 39 0 C) proved more lethal and the surviving cells showed extreme radiosensitivity (DMF=0.11). These results therefore wave situ extension of investigations to tumours. Two animal tumours viz a fibrosarcoma and sarcoma 180 were grown on Swiss mice. CPZ enhanced the radiation induced regression of these solid tumours. CPZ on its own showed chemotherapeutic effect and controlled the growth of these tumours. The chemotherapeutic effect was further enhanced at hyperthermic temperatures (41 and 42 0 C). Pharmokinetic investigations on distribution and retention of CPZ in plasma, tumours and other organs have been completed using S-35 labelled CPZ. Clinical trials with human patients are being initiated. Attempts are also being made to target such drugs to tumour sites by encapsulating them in artificial liposomes and blood cells

  10. Enhanced apoptosis and radiosensitization by combined 13-CIS-retinoic acid and interferon-α2a; role of RAR-β gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Samuel; Stein, Joseph P.; Chung, Chung T.; Lee, Yong J.; Kim, Jae Ho

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Combined use of 13-cis-retinoic acid (cRA) and interferon-α2a (IFNα) induced significant radiosensitization in human cervical cancer ME-180 cell line, whereas it failed to achieve similar radiation enhancement in HeLa cells. The differential radiosensitization could be from the difference of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) expression because RAR-β was highly expressed in ME-180 cells in contrast to the HeLa cells where RAR-β was not detectable. We examined the role of this gene in mediating radiosensitization by cRA and IFNα, and explored the mechanism of radiation-induced cell killing. Methods and Materials: Human cervical cancer cell lines, ME-180 and HeLa, were treated with cRA and IFNα followed by radiation. Apoptosis and radiosensitization were quantitated by TUNEL assay (in situ DNA nick end labeling) and colony-forming ability of surviving cells. The cells were transfected with bcl-2 gene and RAR-β gene to test the role of these genes in mediating radiosensitization and apoptosis. Results: Synergistic radiosensitization and apoptosis was observed by combined use of cRA and IFNα with radiation in ME-180 cells which express high level of RAR-β mRNA, whereas these were not seen in HeLa cells where RAR-β mRNA is not detectable. Both radiosensitization and apoptosis were abolished by bcl-2 gene in ME-180 cells. RAR-β gene transfection induced similar radiation enhancement and apoptosis in HeLa cells. Conclusion: Apoptosis and radiation response were enhanced in the cells with high level of RAR-β mRNA expression. The RAR-β gene appears to mediate the radiation-induced apoptosis by cRA and IFNα. These findings indicate that presence of RAR-β in the cancer cells could be exploited for patient selection in using these drugs for apoptosis and radiosensitization

  11. Radiosensitivity in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, J.; Babini, G.; Mariotti, L.; Baiocco, G.; Ottolenghi, A.; Nacci, L.; Minelli, A.; Danesino, C.; Maccario, C.; Roessler, U.; Savio, M.; Gomolka, M.; Kulka, U.

    2015-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterised by bone marrow failure and a cumulative risk of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia. The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS) gene, the only gene known to be causative of the pathology, is involved in ribosomal biogenesis, stress responses and DNA repair, and the lack of SBDS sensitises cells to many stressors and leads to mitotic spindle destabilisation. The effect of ionising radiation on SBDS-deficient cells was investigated using immortalised lymphocytes from SDS patients in comparison with positive and negative controls in order to test whether, in response to ionising radiation exposure, any impairment in the DNA repair machinery could be observed. After irradiating cells with different doses of X-rays or gamma-rays, DNA repair kinetics and the residual damages using the alkaline COMET assay and the γ-H2AX assay were assessed, respectively. In this work, preliminary data about the comparison between ionising radiation effects in different patients-derived cells and healthy control cells are presented. (authors)

  12. Regulator of G-protein signaling 5 (RGS5) inhibits cell proliferation and enhances radiosensitivity of human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zumin; Wang Jin; Zuo Yufang; Yu Zhonghua; Peng Fang; Hu Xiao; Zhou Qichao; Ma Honglian; Bao Yong; Chen Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of regulator and the underlying molecular mechanisms of G-protein signaling 5 (RGS5) on radiation response in human lung cancer cells. Methods: The effects of RGS5 on viability were determined by MTT assay, and apoptosis rate was detected by flow cytometry, in human lung cancer cells. The combined effect of ionizing radiation and RGS5 on tumor cells was detected by colony formation assay. The protein expression was detected by Western blot. Results: RGS5 overexpression remarkably inhibited the survival of human lung cancer cells, and the growth inhibition rate of RGS5 overexpression on A549 and Calu-3 cells were 44.4% (F = 29.18, P < 0.05) and 39.27% (F = 23.04, P < 0.05) at 48 h, and 54.3%(F = 103.45, P < 0.05), 44.7%(F = 108.02, P < 0.05) at 72 h post-irradiation, respectively. RGS5 might exert its inhibitory effects on human lung cancer cells by inducing tumor cell apoptosis, while the apoptotic cells rate in A549 and Calu-3 cells in control group, pTRiEX group and pTRiEX-RGS5 group were (1.3±0.2)%, (3.4±0.6)%, (19.6±2.3)% (F = 86.62, P < 0.05), and (3.2±0.8)%, (3.0±0.9)%, (12.8±1.8)% (F = 28.80, P < 0.05) at 36 h post-irradiation, respectively. Furthermore, RGS5 could sensitize the lung cancer cells to radiation. Conclusions: RGS5 might play an inhibitory role in human lung cancer cell proliferation, which may explain the pathoclinical observation thet high expression of RGSS is a favorable prognostic factor in NSCLC patients. In addition, RGS5 also enhance the anti-tumor effects of radiation in human lung cancer cells. (authors)

  13. Radiosensitization of human endothelial cells by IL-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains an important cancer treatment modality but despite improvements in dose delivery many patients still fail at their primary tumor site. Therefore, new strategies designed to improve local control are needed. Protocols combining radiation with anti-angiogenic agents might be of particular advantage based on their documented low toxicity. In this regard, we have been conducting preclinical investigations of a novel cytokine, mda7/IL-24. Our collaborators have shown that mda7/IL-24 protein targets the endothelial cells of the tumor microvascular system and has potent anti-angiogenic properties in both in vitro and in vivo assays. Recently, we have demonstrated that recombinant mda7/IL-24 protein radiosensitizes human endothelial cells in vitro. Specifically, 10 ng/ml of recombinant human IL-24 protein for 12 hrs reduced the survival at 2 Gy for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from 0.33 to 0.12. We are also working on understanding the molecular basis for this radiosensitizing effect. Preliminary data suggest a model whereby mda7/IL-24 engages a specific receptor on the surface of endothelial cells and initiates a signal transduction pathway that modulates the cell's propensity for radiation-induced apoptosis and capacity for repairing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. Mechanistic insight gained from these studies may have implications for the actions of other anti-angiogenic agents and may generally explain the regulation of radiosensitivity imparted by growth factors and cytokines

  14. RGD-conjugated gold nanorods induce radiosensitization in melanoma cancer cells by downregulating αvβ3 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang B

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Wencai Xu1, Teng Luo2, Ping Li1, Chuanqing Zhou2, Daxiang Cui3, Bo Pang4, Qiushi Ren4, Shen Fu11Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital, 2School of Biomedical Engineering, and 3National Key Laboratory of Nano/Micro Fabrication Technology, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of Ministry of Education, Institute of Micro-Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Melanoma is known to be radioresistant and traditional treatments have been intractable. Therefore, novel approaches are required to improve the therapeutic efficacy of melanoma treatment. In our study, gold nanorods conjugated with Arg-Gly-Asp peptides (RGD-GNRs were used as a sensitizer to enhance the response of melanoma cells to 6 mV radiation.Methods and materials: A375 melanoma cells were treated by gold nanorods or RGD-GNRs with or without irradiation. The antiproliferative impact of the treatments was measured by MTT assay. Radiosensitizing effects were determined by colony formation assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle data were measured by flow cytometry. Integrin αvβ3expression was also investigated by flow cytometry.Results: Addition of RGD-GNRs enhanced the radiosensitivity of A375 cells with a dose-modifying factor of 1.35, and enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that RGD-GNRs plus irradiation induced significant G2/M phase arrest in A375 cells. Both spontaneous and radiation-induced expressions of integrin αvβ3 were downregulated by RGD-GNRs.Conclusion: Our study indicated that RGD-GNRs could sensitize melanoma A375 cells to irradiation. It was hypothesized that this was mainly through downregulation of radiation-induced αvβ3, in addition to induction of a higher proportion of cells within the G2/M phase. The combination of RGD-GNRs and

  15. Increased Chromosomal Radiosensitivity in Women Carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations Assessed With the G2 Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernestos, Beroukas; Nikolaos, Pandis; Koulis, Giannoukakos; Eleni, Rizou; Konstantinos, Beroukas; Alexandra, Giatromanolaki; Michael, Koukourakis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Several in vitro studies suggest that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers present increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Different assays for the assessment of deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand break repair capacity have been used, but results are rather inconsistent. Given the concerns about the possible risks of breast screening with mammography in mutation carrier women and the potentially damaging effects of radiotherapy, the purpose of this study was to further investigate the radiosensitivity of this population. Methods and Materials: The G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay was used to assess chromosomal breaks in lymphocyte cultures after exposure to 1 Gy. A group of familiar breast cancer patients carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (n = 15) and a group of healthy mutation carriers (n = 5) were investigated and compared with a reference group of healthy women carrying no mutation (n = 21). Results: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had a significantly higher number of mean chromatid breaks per cell (p = 0.006) and a higher maximum number of breaks (p = 0.0001) as compared with their matched controls. Both healthy carriers and carriers with a cancer history were more radiosensitive than controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.025, respectively). Age was not associated with increased radiosensitivity (p = 0.868). Conclusions: Our results indicate that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers show enhanced radiosensitivity, presumably because of the involvement of the BRCA genes in deoxyribonucleic acid repair and cell cycle control mechanisms.

  16. Radiosensitizers and protectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Kim, J.H.; Hilaris, B.; Chu, F.C.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past decades, various physical, biological, and clinical strategies have been investigated to improve the therapeutic effectiveness of radiation. One of these efforts has been to develop chemical radiosensitizers and protectors. In the broadest sense, a radiation sensitizer is any agent that enhances the cytolethal effects of radiation. Drugs that selectively protect tissues from radiation injury are under active study. This chapter briefly reviews the present status of chemical radiosensitizers and protectors. The discussion of sensitizers will be limited to the oxic cell and hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and their clinical applications

  17. Curcumin Modulates the Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells by Suppressing Constitutive and Inducible NF-κB Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandur, Santosh K.; Deorukhkar, Amit; Pandey, Manoj K.; Pabon, Ana Maria B.S.; Shentu, Shujun; Guha, Sushovan; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is an integral part of the preoperative treatment of rectal cancers. However, only a minority of patients achieve a complete pathologic response to therapy because of resistance of these tumors to radiation therapy. This resistance may be mediated by constitutively active pro-survival signaling pathways or by inducible/acquired mechanisms in response to radiation therapy. Simultaneous inhibition of these pathways can sensitize these tumors to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal cancer cells were exposed to clinically relevant doses of gamma rays, and the mechanism of their radioresistance was investigated. We characterized the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation as a mechanism of inducible radioresistance in colorectal cancer and used curcumin, the active ingredient in the yellow spice turmeric, to overcome this resistance. Results: Curcumin inhibited the proliferation and the post-irradiation clonogenic survival of multiple colorectal cancer cell lines. Radiation stimulated NF-κB activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas curcumin suppressed this radiation-induced NF-κB activation via inhibition of radiation-induced phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of κB alpha, inhibition of inhibitor of κB kinase activity, and inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Curcumin also suppressed NF-κB-regulated gene products (Bcl-2, Bcl-x L , inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2, cyclooxygenase-2, and cyclin D1). Conclusions: Our results suggest that transient inducible NF-κB activation provides a prosurvival response to radiation that may account for development of radioresistance. Curcumin blocks this signaling pathway and potentiates the antitumor effects of radiation therapy.

  18. Evaluation of different biomarkers to predict individual radiosensitivity in an inter-laboratory comparison--lessons for future studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Greve

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is a powerful cure for several types of solid tumours, but its application is often limited because of severe side effects in individual patients. With the aim to find biomarkers capable of predicting normal tissue side reactions we analysed the radiation responses of cells from individual head and neck tumour and breast cancer patients of different clinical radiosensitivity in a multicentric study. Multiple parameters of cellular radiosensitivity were analysed in coded samples of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs and derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs from 15 clinical radio-hypersensitive tumour patients and compared to age- and sex-matched non-radiosensitive patient controls and 15 lymphoblastoid cell lines from age- and sex- matched healthy controls of the KORA study. Experimental parameters included ionizing radiation (IR-induced cell death (AnnexinV, induction and repair of DNA strand breaks (Comet assay, induction of yH2AX foci (as a result of DNA double strand breaks, and whole genome expression analyses. Considerable inter-individual differences in IR-induced DNA strand breaks and their repair and/or cell death could be detected in primary and immortalised cells with the applied assays. The group of clinically radiosensitive patients was not unequivocally distinguishable from normal responding patients nor were individual overreacting patients in the test system unambiguously identified by two different laboratories. Thus, the in vitro test systems investigated here seem not to be appropriate for a general prediction of clinical reactions during or after radiotherapy due to the experimental variability compared to the small effect of radiation sensitivity. Genome-wide expression analysis however revealed a set of 67 marker genes which were differentially induced 6 h after in vitro-irradiation in lymphocytes from radio-hypersensitive and non-radiosensitive patients. These results warrant future validation in larger

  19. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  20. On the Path to Seeking Novel Radiosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, David; Ito, Emma; Liu Feifei

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a highly effective cancer treatment modality, and extensive investigations have been undertaken over the years to augment its efficacy in the clinic. This review summarizes the current understanding of the biologic bases underpinning many of the clinically used radiosensitizers. In addition, this review illustrates how the advent of innovative, high-throughput technologies with integration of different disciplines could be harnessed for an expeditious discovery process for novel radiosensitizers, providing an exciting future for such pursuits in radiation biology and oncology

  1. Radiosensitivity of fingermillet genotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raveendran, T S; Nagarajan, C; Appadurai, R; Prasad, M N; Sundaresan, N [Tamil Nadu Agricultural Univ., Coimbatore (India)

    1984-07-01

    Varietal differences in radiosensitivity were observed in a study involving 4 genotypes of fingermillet (Eleusine coracana (Linn.) Gaertn.) subjected to gamma-irradiation. Harder seeds were found to tolerate a higher dose of the mutagen.

  2. Radiosensitivity profiles from a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines exhibiting genetic alterations in p53 and disparate DNA-dependent protein kinase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, Gregory T.; Yannone, Steven M.; Langland, Rachel A.; Nakao, Aki; Guan, Yinghui; Long, Sydney B.T.; Vonguyen, Lien; Chen, David J.; Gray, Joe W; Chen, Fanqing

    2009-09-07

    The variability of radiation responses in ovarian tumors and tumor-derived cell lines is poorly understood. Since both DNA repair capacity and p53 status can significantly alter radiation sensitivity, we evaluated these factors along with radiation sensitivity in a panel of sporadic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We observed a gradation of radiation sensitivity among these sixteen lines, with a five-fold difference in the LD50 between the most radiosensitive and the most radioresistant cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is essential for the repair of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in human somatic cells. Therefore, we measured gene copy number, expression levels, protein abundance, genomic copy and kinase activity for DNA-PK in all of our cell lines. While there were detectable differences in DNA-PK between the cell lines, there was no clear correlation with any of these differences and radiation sensitivity. In contrast, p53 function as determined by two independent methods, correlated well with radiation sensitivity, indicating p53 mutant ovarian cancer cells are typically radioresistant relative to p53 wild-type lines. These data suggest that the activity of regulatory molecules such as p53 may be better indicators of radiation sensitivity than DNA repair enzymes such as DNAPK in ovarian cancer.

  3. Radiosensitivity of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines for Irradiation from Beta Particle-emitting Radionuclide ¹⁷⁷Lu Compared to Alpha Particles and Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Timmermand, Oskar Vilhelmsson; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitivity of the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 when irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, and to compare the effect with irradiation using alpha particles or gamma rays. Cells were irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, alpha particles from (241)Am, or gamma rays from (137)Cs. A non-specific polyclonal antibody was labeled with (177)Lu and used to irradiate cells in suspension with beta particles. A previously described in-house developed alpha-particle irradiator based on a (241)Am source was used to irradiate cells with alpha particles. External gamma-ray irradiation was achieved using a standard (137)Cs irradiator. Cells were irradiated to absorbed doses equal to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated as mean absorbed doses. For evaluation of cell survival, the tetrazolium-based WST-1 assay was used. After irradiation, WST-1 was added to the cell solutions, incubated, and then measured for level of absorbance at 450 nm, indicating the live and viable cells. LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cell lines all had similar patterns of survival for the different radiation types. No significant difference in surviving fractions were observed between cells treated with beta-particle and gamma-ray irradiation, represented for example by the surviving fraction values (mean±SD) at 2, 6, and 10 Gy (SF2, SF6, and SF10) for DU145 after beta-particle irradiation: 0.700±0.090, 0.186±0.050 and 0.056±0.010, respectively. A strong radiosensitivity to alpha particles was observed, with SF2 values of 0.048±0.008, 0.018±0.006 and 0.015±0.005 for LNCaP, DU145, and PC3, respectively. The surviving fractions after irradiation using beta particles or gamma rays did not differ significantly at the absorbed dose levels and dose rates used. Irradiation using alpha particles led to a high level of cell killing. The results show that the beta-particle emitter

  4. Psychotherapy for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong Guan, Ng; Mohamed, Salina; Kian Tiah, Lai; Kar Mun, Teoh; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Zainal, Nor Zuraida

    2016-07-01

    Objective Psychotherapy is a common non-pharmacological approach to help cancer patients in their psychological distress. The benefit of psychotherapies was documented, but the types of psychotherapies proposed are varied. Given that the previous literature review was a decade ago and no quantitative analysis was done on this topic, we again critically and systematically reviewed all published trials on psychotherapy in cancer patients. Method We identified 17 clinical trials on six types of psychotherapy for cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE. Result There were four trials involved adjunct psychological therapy which were included in quantitative analysis. Each trial demonstrated that psychotherapy improved the quality of life and coping in cancer patients. There was also a reduction in distress, anxiety, and depression after a psychological intervention. However, the number and quality of clinical trials for each type of psychotherapy were poor. The meta-analysis of the four trials involved adjunct psychological therapy showed no significant change in depression, with only significant short-term improvement in anxiety but not up to a year-the standardized mean differences were -0.37 (95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.57, -0.16) at 2 months, -0.21 (95% CI = -0.42, -0.01) at 4 months, and 0.03 (95 % CI = -0.19, 0.24) at 12 months. Conclusion The evidence on the efficacy of psychotherapy in cancer patients is unsatisfactory. There is a need for more rigorous and well-designed clinical trials on this topic.

  5. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing γH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2μg/mL], Trinovin [10μg/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 μg/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10μg/mL) and Prostate Rx (6μg/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  6. Radiosensitization In Vivo by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition with No Increase in Early Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groselj, Blaz; Ruan, Jia-Ling; Scott, Helen; Gorrill, Jessica; Nicholson, Judith; Kelly, Jacqueline; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Thompson, James; Stratford, Michael R L; Jevons, Sarah J; Hammond, Ester M; Scudamore, Cheryl L; Kerr, Martin; Kiltie, Anne E

    2018-02-01

    As the population ages, more elderly patients require radiotherapy-based treatment for their pelvic malignancies, including muscle-invasive bladder cancer, as they are unfit for major surgery. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find radiosensitizing agents minimally toxic to normal tissues, including bowel and bladder, for such patients. We developed methods to determine normal tissue toxicity severity in intestine and bladder in vivo , using novel radiotherapy techniques on a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). The effects of panobinostat on in vivo tumor growth delay were evaluated using subcutaneous xenografts in athymic nude mice. Panobinostat concentration levels in xenografts, plasma, and normal tissues were measured in CD1-nude mice. CD1-nude mice were treated with drug/irradiation combinations to assess acute normal tissue effects in small intestine using the intestinal crypt assay, and later effects in small and large intestine at 11 weeks by stool assessment and at 12 weeks by histologic examination. In vitro effects of panobinostat were assessed by qPCR and of panobinostat, TMP195, and mocetinostat by clonogenic assay, and Western blot analysis. Panobinostat resulted in growth delay in RT112 bladder cancer xenografts but did not significantly increase acute (3.75 days) or 12 weeks' normal tissue radiation toxicity. Radiosensitization by panobinostat was effective in hypoxic bladder cancer cells and associated with class I HDAC inhibition, and protein downregulation of HDAC2 and MRE11. Pan-HDAC inhibition is a promising strategy for radiosensitization, but more selective agents may be more useful radiosensitizers clinically, resulting in fewer systemic side effects. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(2); 381-92. ©2017 AACR See all articles in this MCT Focus section, "Developmental Therapeutics in Radiation Oncology." ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Individual radiosensitivity does not correlate with radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines or CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wistop, A.; Keller, U.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Distel, L.V.R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Sprung, C.N. [Div. of Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2005-05-01

    Background and purpose: spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from healthy donors, cancer patients and donors with radiosensitivity syndromes as well as CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes from patients with {>=} grade 3 late toxicity were investigated as a possible marker for the detection of individual radiosensitivity. These investigations are based on the hypothesis that hypersensitive patients have reduced levels of apoptosis after in vitro irradiation as a result of a defect in the signaling pathway. Material and methods: Epstein-Barr virus-(EBV-)transformed LCLs derived from five healthy donors, seven patients with heterozygous or homozygous genotype for ataxia-telangiectasia or Nijmegen breakage syndrome and five patients with {>=} grade 3 late toxicity (RTOG) were investigated. In addition, CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes from 21 healthy individuals and 18 cancer patients including five patients with a proven cellular hypersensitivity to radiation were analyzed. Cells were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 2 and 5 Gy and were incubated for 48 h. Apoptotic rates were measured by the TUNEL assay followed by customized image analysis. Results: four out of seven radiosensitivity syndrome patients were identified to have an increased cellular radiosensitivity as determined by reduced apoptotic rates after irradiation of their respective LCLs. Comparatively, only two of the five hypersensitive cancer patients were clearly identified by reduced apoptotic rates. Spontaneous apoptotic rates were very homogeneous among all 39 samples from controls and patients, while lymphocytes of all cancer patients showed significantly lower radiation-induced rates. Conclusion: only a subgroup of hypersensitive patients may be identified by reduction of radiation-induced apoptotic rate. It is concluded that the hypothesis according to which hypersensitive cells have reduced levels of apoptosis is only conditionally true. The authors suggest that this

  8. Vacuolar-proton-ATPase is involved in the response of cancer cells to ionizing radiation and is a new target for radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollister, T.C.; Paglin, S.; McMahill, M.S.; Gilles, F.; Yahalom, J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We have recently described a novel response of human cancer cells to radiation consisting of accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVO) (Cancer Research, 61:439-444, 2001). Acidification of AVO was inhibited by bafilomycin A1 - a specific inhibitor of vacuolar-proton-ATPase. To examine the role of AVO function in the cellular response to radiation, we determined the effect of specific inhibitors of v-H+-ATPase (bafilomycin and concanamycin) on the clonogenic survival of various cancer cell lines. In addition, Northern analysis of mRNA encoding v-H+-ATPase was performed to elucidate possible mechanisms of post-radiation v-H+-ATPase regulation. Materials and Methods: Total RNA was isolated from human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (breast), LoVo (colon), and LNCaP (prostate) cells 48 hours post-irradiation, and Northern analyses were performed. RNA was separated on a denaturing formaldehyde gel and blotted to a nylon membrane. Probes made from cDNAs to v-H+-ATPase were radioactively labeled, hybridized to the membranes, and exposed to X-ray film for determination of mRNA expression levels. Clonogenic survival assays were performed with MCF-7 and LoVo cell lines. Cells were plated at 30 cells/cm 2 , and irradiated 24 hours post-plating. Bafilomycin or concanamycin were added to culture media in various concentrations at the time of irradiation. The media was changed after a 24-hour incubation, and colonies were stained with crystal violet for counting 7 days post-irradiation. Results: Radiation-induced accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles in MCF-7, LoVo and LNCaP cells was associated with a two-fold increase in the steady-state level of mRNA for subunit c of v-H+-ATPase. Bafilomycin and concanamycin increased clonogenic cell death after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations (bafilomycin 2nM, concanamycin 2pM) these agents acted as radiosensitizers, without significant toxicity to unirradiated cells. At 2nM, bafilomycin

  9. Radiosensitizers: rationale and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews agents that are capable of sensitizing hypoxic cells to radiation and chemotherapeutic agents. The first part is a synopsis of the development of hypoxic radiosensitizers, which concludes that misonidazole can be effective against human tumors. Unfortunately, neurotoxicity limits its effectiveness in humans because the dose that can be given in conjunction with daily fractionated radiation is five to ten times lower than is required for full radiosensitization of the hypoxic cells. The second part covers our recent efforts to develop a drug that does not produce such limiting neurotoxicity. The primary rationale of our program was to synthesize a drug with a short plasma half-life that was too hydrophilic to cross the blood-brain barrier but was able to penetrate tumors and radiosensitize hypoxic cells. From this program, a new drug, SR-2508, has been found that is as efficient as misonidazole in its radiosensitizing ability, but is four to ten times less toxic. Finally, the potential of radiosensitizers not only as agents that can sensitize tumor cells to radiation, but also as agents that can specifically sensitize tumors to chemotherapeutic agents, is discussed. In addition, these drugs may be potential cytotoxic agents that produce toxicity only in solid tumors

  10. No benefits of ultrafractionation in two head-and-neck cancer cell lines with different inherent radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehringer-Wyss, Nicole; Clarkson, Stuart G.; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess if ultrafractionation is applicable in the context of an unknown hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) status, we studied the survival and repair capacity of two tumor cell lines after irradiation with two different dose/fractionation schedules that can be used in a clinical setting. Methods and Materials: Squamous cell carcinoma cell lines SCC-3 (radioresistant) and SCC-6 (radiosensitive) were used. Survival was studied by clonogenic assay after multiple fractions of 0.5 Gy (2 fractions/day, 6-h interval) and 2 Gy (1 fraction/day) for a total dose of 8 Gy of γ-rays. The capacity to repair single-strand and double-strand breaks (SSB, DSB) was assessed by comet assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of DNA-dependent protein kinase (PK) components were analyzed by RNase protection and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: In both cell lines, no apparent difference was noted between the two fractionation protocols. In particular for SCC-3, the mean surviving fraction tended to be lower after 2 Gy than after 0.5 Gy fractions. In SCC-3 and SCC-6 no significant difference was observed in the repair capacity of SSB and DSB after exposure to single doses of 0.5 Gy or 2 Gy. After exposure to the same single doses, the mRNA levels of DNA-PK catalytic subunit (PKcs), Ku 70, and Ku 80 were similar. Conclusions: Our data do not support the concept of ultrafractionation, at least when using fractions of 0.5 Gy in the cell lines studied. This suggests that methods for testing HRS status in individual tumors need to be developed before the relevance of ultrafractionation can be investigated in the clinic

  11. Poster - 14: Batch Effect Reduction in in-vitro Raman Microscopic Radiosensitivity Study Using Ovarian Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradi, Hamid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Ahmad, Abrar; Shepherdson, Dean; Nyiri, Balazs; Vuong, Nhung; Niedbala, Gosia; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Eapen, Libni

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To improve classification by reducing batch effect in samples from the ovarian carcinoma cell lines A2780s (parental wild type) and A2780cp (cisplatin cross-radio-resistant), before, right after, and 24 hours after irradiation to 10Gy. Methods: Spectra were acquired with a home built confocal Raman microscope in 3 distinct runs of six samples: unirradiated s&cp (control pair), then 0h and 24h after irradiation. The Raman spectra were noise reduced, then background subtracted with SMIRF algorithm. ∼35 cell spectra were collected from each sample in 1024 channels from 700cm-1 to 1618cm-1. The spectra were analyzed by regularized multiclass LDA. For feature reduction the spectra were grouped into 3 overlapping group pairs: s-cp, 0Gy–10Gy0h and 0Gy10–Gy24h. The three features, the three differences of the mean spectra were mapped to the analysis sub-space by the inverse regularized covariance matrix. The batch effect noticeably confounded the dose and time effect. Results: To remove the batch effect, the 2+2=4D subspace extended by the covariance matrix of the means of the 0Gy control groups was subtracted from the spectra of each sample. Repeating the analysis on the spectra with the control group variability removed, the batch effect was dramatically reduced in the dose and time directions enabling sharp linear discrimination. The cell type classification also improved. Conclusions: We identified a efficient batch effect removal technique crucial to the applicability of Raman microscopy to radiosensitivity studies both on cell cultures and potential clinical diagnostic applications.

  12. Poster - 14: Batch Effect Reduction in in-vitro Raman Microscopic Radiosensitivity Study Using Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Hamid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Ahmad, Abrar; Shepherdson, Dean; Nyiri, Balazs; Vuong, Nhung; Niedbala, Gosia; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Eapen, Libni [Carleton University, Carleton University, Carleton University, Carleton University, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To improve classification by reducing batch effect in samples from the ovarian carcinoma cell lines A2780s (parental wild type) and A2780cp (cisplatin cross-radio-resistant), before, right after, and 24 hours after irradiation to 10Gy. Methods: Spectra were acquired with a home built confocal Raman microscope in 3 distinct runs of six samples: unirradiated s&cp (control pair), then 0h and 24h after irradiation. The Raman spectra were noise reduced, then background subtracted with SMIRF algorithm. ∼35 cell spectra were collected from each sample in 1024 channels from 700cm-1 to 1618cm-1. The spectra were analyzed by regularized multiclass LDA. For feature reduction the spectra were grouped into 3 overlapping group pairs: s-cp, 0Gy–10Gy0h and 0Gy10–Gy24h. The three features, the three differences of the mean spectra were mapped to the analysis sub-space by the inverse regularized covariance matrix. The batch effect noticeably confounded the dose and time effect. Results: To remove the batch effect, the 2+2=4D subspace extended by the covariance matrix of the means of the 0Gy control groups was subtracted from the spectra of each sample. Repeating the analysis on the spectra with the control group variability removed, the batch effect was dramatically reduced in the dose and time directions enabling sharp linear discrimination. The cell type classification also improved. Conclusions: We identified a efficient batch effect removal technique crucial to the applicability of Raman microscopy to radiosensitivity studies both on cell cultures and potential clinical diagnostic applications.

  13. Cancer patients' evaluation of communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how communication with health care staff is perceived by Danish cancer patients and to characterise those patients who report problems in communication.......The aims of this study were to assess how communication with health care staff is perceived by Danish cancer patients and to characterise those patients who report problems in communication....

  14. Modern concepts for basic radiobiological factors characterizing tumor tissue radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocheva, L.; Sergieva, K.

    2002-01-01

    Traditionally radiotherapy is prescribed at doses consistent with the expected therapeutic response and tolerance of tumor and normal tissues without consideration to individual differences in radiosensitivity. However, the basic radiobiological knowledge and clinical experience along this line point to significant variations in the observed therapeutic results. It has been established that cells and tissues under experimental and clinical conditions manifest a wide spectrum of individual radiosensitivity. The aim of this survey is to outline the current concepts for the basic radiobiological factors influencing tumor radiosensitivity. A thorough discussion is done of the essence, mechanisms of action, methods of determination and measurement, and effect on the prognosis in patients with malignant diseases of a number of radiobiological factors, such as: tumor-cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor hypoxia and neovascularization. Although the knowledge of the mechanisms of radiosensitivity is constantly expanding, its clinical implementation is still rather limited. The true role of radiosensitivity in predicting the therapeutic response should be more accurately defined. (authors)

  15. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  16. Integration of Principles of Systems Biology and Radiation Biology: Toward Development of in silico Models to Optimize IUdR-Mediated Radiosensitization of DNA Mismatch Repair Deficient (Damage Tolerant) Human Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, Timothy J.; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Du, Weinan; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) and ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR). These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP), brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR-induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR deficient (MMR − ) “damage tolerant” human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular) and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice) models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR − damage tolerant cancers.

  17. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protect: Know the Signs and Symptoms of Infection Neutropenia and Risk for Infection Health Care Providers Educational Materials Cancer and Flu How to Prevent Flu from Spreading Flu Symptoms Information for Families and Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and ...

  18. Down-regulation of LncRNA TUG1 enhances radiosensitivity in bladder cancer via suppressing HMGB1 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Huijuan; Hu, Xigang; Zhang, Hongzhi; Li, Wenbo

    2017-01-01

    Background Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to regulate the sensitivity of different cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy. Aberrant expression of lncRNA Taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) has been found to be involved in the development of bladder cancer, however, its function and underlying mechanism in the radioresistance of bladder cancer remains unclear. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was conducted to measure the expression of TUG1 and HMGB1 mRNA in bladder canc...

  19. Biomarkers of Tumour Radiosensitivity and Predicting Benefit from Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forker, L J; Choudhury, A; Kiltie, A E

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of treatment for more than half of newly diagnosed cancer patients. The response to radiotherapy varies widely between individuals and although advances in technology have allowed the adaptation of radiotherapy fields to tumour anatomy, it is still not possible to tailor radiotherapy based on tumour biology. A biomarker of intrinsic radiosensitivity would be extremely valuable for individual dosing, aiding decision making between radical treatment options and avoiding toxicity of neoadjuvant or adjuvant radiotherapy in those unlikely to benefit. This systematic review summarises the current evidence for biomarkers under investigation as predictors of radiotherapy benefit. Only 10 biomarkers were identified as having been evaluated for their radiotherapy-specific predictive value in over 100 patients in a clinical setting, highlighting that despite a rich literature there were few high-quality studies for inclusion. The most extensively studied radiotherapy predictive biomarkers were the radiosensitivity index and MRE11; however, neither has been evaluated in a randomised controlled trial. Although these biomarkers show promise, there is not enough evidence to justify their use in routine practice. Further validation is needed before biomarkers can fulfil their potential and predict treatment outcomes for large numbers of patients. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiosensitivity in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauman, A.F.

    1979-01-01

    The report presents a compilation of available data on the sensitivity of plants to ionizing radiation, and provides basic information on methods of determining such sensitivities, or of estimating radiosensitivities by calcuation of the nuclear factors upon which they depend. The scope of the data presented here is necessarily limited to the most generally useful radiobiological end points and to the most commonly-used types of radiation. Many of the factors which influence radiosensitivity, particularly nuclear factors, will be discussed. Emphasis will be upon whole-plant studies done at Brookhaven National Laboratory by A.H. Sparrow and his associates, since these studies are the source of most of the available radiosensitivity data and of all the sensitivity predictions listed here. Data presented here include summaries of experimentally-determined radiosensitivities at various end points for both herbaceous and woody higher plants, and for a few species of ferns and lower plants. The algae and fungi have not been considered here due to space limitations

  1. Radiosensitivity in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nauman, A F

    1979-01-01

    The report presents a compilation of available data on the sensitivity of plants to ionizing radiation, and provides basic information on methods of determining such sensitivities, or of estimating radiosensitivities by calcuation of the nuclear factors upon which they depend. The scope of the data presented here is necessarily limited to the most generally useful radiobiological end points and to the most commonly-used types of radiation. Many of the factors which influence radiosensitivity, particularly nuclear factors, will be discussed. Emphasis will be upon whole-plant studies done at Brookhaven National Laboratory by A.H. Sparrow and his associates, since these studies are the source of most of the available radiosensitivity data and of all the sensitivity predictions listed here. Data presented here include summaries of experimentally-determined radiosensitivities at various end points for both herbaceous and woody higher plants, and for a few species of ferns and lower plants. The algae and fungi have not been considered here due to space limitations.

  2. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastià, N., E-mail: natividad.sebastia@uv.es [Radiation Protection Service, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hervás, D. [Biostatistics Unit, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pantelias, G.; Hatzi, V.I. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Soriano, J.M. [Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    testing, which simulates conditions similar to those of the highly radiosensitive lymphocytes of AT patients. The results demonstrate for the first time the cell-cycle-dependent action of these polyphenols. When non-cycling cells are irradiated, the radioprotective properties of curcumin and trans-resveratrol are more prominent. However, when cycling cells are irradiated during G2-phase, the radiosensitizing features of these compounds are more pronounced. This observation offers a new biological basis for the mechanisms underlying the action of these polyphenols in cancer radiotherapy.

  3. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastià, N.; Montoro, A.; Hervás, D.; Pantelias, G.; Hatzi, V.I.; Soriano, J.M.; Villaescusa, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    testing, which simulates conditions similar to those of the highly radiosensitive lymphocytes of AT patients. The results demonstrate for the first time the cell-cycle-dependent action of these polyphenols. When non-cycling cells are irradiated, the radioprotective properties of curcumin and trans-resveratrol are more prominent. However, when cycling cells are irradiated during G2-phase, the radiosensitizing features of these compounds are more pronounced. This observation offers a new biological basis for the mechanisms underlying the action of these polyphenols in cancer radiotherapy

  4. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L

    2014-01-01

    dysfunction in cancer patients lies in the correlation to vital clinical end points such as cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, therapy complications and quality of life (QoL). Such associations strongly emphasize the need for effective therapeutic countermeasures to be developed and implemented...... implications of muscle dysfunction in cancer patients. The efficacy of exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate cancer-related muscle dysfunction is also discussed. DESIGN: We identified 194 studies examining muscular outcomes in cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. RESULTS: Muscle...... dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...

  5. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase As Molecular Target for Radiosensitization of Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Emmy M Dolman

    Full Text Available Tumor cells might resist therapy with ionizing radiation (IR by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ of IR-induced double-strand breaks. One of the key players in NHEJ is DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, i.e. DNA-PKcs, can be inhibited with the small-molecule inhibitor NU7026. In the current study, the in vitro potential of NU7026 to radiosensitize neuroblastoma cells was investigated. DNA-PKcs is encoded by the PRKDC (protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide gene. We showed that PRKDC levels were enhanced in neuroblastoma patients and correlated with a more advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis, making DNA-PKcs an interesting target for radiosensitization of neuroblastoma tumors. Optimal dose finding for combination treatment with NU7026 and IR was performed using NGP cells. One hour pre-treatment with 10 μM NU7026 synergistically sensitized NGP cells to 0.63 Gy IR. Radiosensitizing effects of NU7026 increased in time, with maximum effects observed from 96 h after IR-exposure on. Combined treatment of NGP cells with 10 μM NU7026 and 0.63 Gy IR resulted in apoptosis, while no apoptotic response was observed for either of the therapies alone. Inhibition of IR-induced DNA-PK activation by NU7026 confirmed the capability of NGP cells to, at least partially, resist IR by NHEJ. NU7026 also synergistically radiosensitized other neuroblastoma cell lines, while no synergistic effect was observed for low DNA-PKcs-expressing non-cancerous fibroblasts. Results obtained for NU7026 were confirmed by PRKDC knockdown in NGP cells. Taken together, the current study shows that DNA-PKcs is a promising target for neuroblastoma radiosensitization.

  6. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase As Molecular Target for Radiosensitization of Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, M Emmy M; van der Ploeg, Ida; Koster, Jan; Bate-Eya, Laurel Tabe; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N; Molenaar, Jan J

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells might resist therapy with ionizing radiation (IR) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of IR-induced double-strand breaks. One of the key players in NHEJ is DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, i.e. DNA-PKcs, can be inhibited with the small-molecule inhibitor NU7026. In the current study, the in vitro potential of NU7026 to radiosensitize neuroblastoma cells was investigated. DNA-PKcs is encoded by the PRKDC (protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide) gene. We showed that PRKDC levels were enhanced in neuroblastoma patients and correlated with a more advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis, making DNA-PKcs an interesting target for radiosensitization of neuroblastoma tumors. Optimal dose finding for combination treatment with NU7026 and IR was performed using NGP cells. One hour pre-treatment with 10 μM NU7026 synergistically sensitized NGP cells to 0.63 Gy IR. Radiosensitizing effects of NU7026 increased in time, with maximum effects observed from 96 h after IR-exposure on. Combined treatment of NGP cells with 10 μM NU7026 and 0.63 Gy IR resulted in apoptosis, while no apoptotic response was observed for either of the therapies alone. Inhibition of IR-induced DNA-PK activation by NU7026 confirmed the capability of NGP cells to, at least partially, resist IR by NHEJ. NU7026 also synergistically radiosensitized other neuroblastoma cell lines, while no synergistic effect was observed for low DNA-PKcs-expressing non-cancerous fibroblasts. Results obtained for NU7026 were confirmed by PRKDC knockdown in NGP cells. Taken together, the current study shows that DNA-PKcs is a promising target for neuroblastoma radiosensitization.

  7. Increased radiosensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines due to cell cycle dysregulation and induction of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, Andrea; Ziemann, Frank; Wittig, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Philipps-University, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, BMFZ - Biomedical Research Center, Marburg (Germany); Mayer, Christina; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Wittekindt, Claus [Justus Liebig University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Giessen (Germany); Dreffke, Kirstin [Philipps-University, Institute for Radiobiology and Molecular Radiooncology, Marburg (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) respond favourably to radiotherapy as compared to HPV-unrelated HNSCC. We investigated DNA damage response in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines aiming to identify mechanisms, which illustrate reasons for the increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancers of the oropharynx. Radiation response including clonogenic survival, apoptosis, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and cell cycle redistribution in four HPV-positive (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) and four HPV-negative (UD-SCC-1, UM-SCC-6, UM-SCC-11b, UT-SCC-33) cell lines was evaluated. HPV-positive cells were more radiosensitive (mean SF2: 0.198 range: 0.22-0.18) than HPV-negative cells (mean SF2: 0.34, range: 0.45-0.27; p = 0.010). Irradiated HPV-positive cell lines progressed faster through S-phase showing a more distinct accumulation in G2/M. The abnormal cell cycle checkpoint activation was accompanied by a more pronounced increase of cell death after x-irradiation and a higher number of residual and unreleased DSBs. The enhanced responsiveness of HPV-related HNSCC to radiotherapy might be caused by a higher cellular radiosensitivity due to cell cycle dysregulation and impaired DNA DSB repair. (orig.) [German] Fuer Patienten mit HPV-assoziierten Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNSCC) ist im Vergleich zu Patienten mit nicht-HPV-assoziierten Tumoren ein besseres Ueberleben nach Radiotherapie gesichert. Ziel der Untersuchung war die Identifizierung von Unterschieden in der zellulaeren DNA-Schadensantwort von HPV-positiven und HPV-negativen Zelllinien, wodurch die bereits in Erprobung stehende Deeskalation einer Radiotherapie bei Patienten mit HPV-assoziierten HNSCC durch experimentelle Daten abgesichert werden koennte. Klonogenes Ueberleben, Induktion von Apoptose, DNA-Doppelstrang-Reparatur und Zellzyklusverhalten wurden in vier HPV-positiven (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) und vier HPV

  8. Radiation and chemical interactions producing cellular and subcellular damage and their repair. Coordinated programme on improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, T.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of biochemical studies on the DNA repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation as well as on the radiosensitization with chemicals containing halogen atoms, it was suggested that inhibition of the post-irradiation repair by chemical factors may be useful in improving the radiotherapy. It was possbile to prepare an in vitro repair system in combination with transforming DNA of Bacillus subtilis as well as human placenta extracts; it was shown that certain radiosensitizers worked actually as repair inhibitors in this in vitro system

  9. Radiosensitivity of carcinoma of esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Hidenori

    1986-01-01

    With a detailed graphic reconstruction of radiation effects shown in 11 operation materials of carcinoma of esophagus with preoperative irradiation, histologic analysis of the radiosensitivity was made. Residual cancer lesions in 11 operation specimens contained adenocarcinoma elements. Carcinoma of esophagus belonged to mixed carcinoma (syn. metaplastic cancer). Radioresistant nature resulted from the remnant adenocarcinoma elements. Protruded type (3 cases) showed about 60 % of residual cancer after preoperative irradiation of 40 Gy (Lineac or 60 Co.). The residual cancer nests histologically revealed well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with a few signet-ring cells, compatible with mucoepidermoid carcinoma. In protruded type, the mixed carcinoma was composed of segmental, disproportioned zonal squamous metaplasia. As its histogenetic origin, a main duct of esophageal gland was suggested. In 9 autopsy cases of esophageal cancer, recurrent lesion within the field of irradiation failed to respond to radiotherapy. In recurrent residual lesions, a higher proportion of adenocarcinoma elements was noticed. Therefore, the cancer part formed by a high rate of metaplasia was markedly responsive to irradiation, whereas increased residue of adenocarcinoma elements was enhanced the radioresistant property. In a middle thoracic esophagus (Im) corresponding to the commonest site of esophageal cancer, the distribution of esohageal glands was in a high density with a constant ratio of density in each age group particularly in male. In age groups with higher incidence of carcinoma of esophagus, esophageal glands markedly increased especially in male, in contrast with the indefinite number and density ratio in female cases. A high density of esophageal glands was noticed in the upper (Iu) and lower (Im) parts of the 2nd physiologic constriction, in proportion to the commonest site of carcinoma of esophagus. (J.P.N.)

  10. Radiosensitivity and genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiyue, Hu; Mingyue, Lun [Suzhou Medical Coll., JS (China)

    1995-07-01

    Reported effects of some oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and DNA repair genes on sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation are reviewed. The role of oncogenes in cellular response to irradiation is discussed, especially the extensively studied oncogenes such as the ras gene family. For tumour suppressor genes, mainly the p53, which is increasingly implicated as a gene affecting radiosensitivity, is reviewed. It is considered that there is a cell cycle checkpoint determinant which is postulated to be able to arrest the irradiated cells in G{sub 1} phase to allow them to repair damage before they undergo DNA synthesis. So far there are six DNA repair genes which have been cloned in mammalian cells, but only one, XRCC1, appears to be involved in repair of human X-ray damage. XRCC1 can correct high sisterchromatid exchange levels when transferred into EM{sub 9} cells, but its expression seems to have no correlation with radiosensitivity of human neck and head tumour cells. Radiosensitivity is an intricate issue which may involve many factors. A scheme of cellular reactions after exposure to irradiation is proposed to indicate a possible sequence of events initiated by ionizing radiation.

  11. Radiosensitivity and genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qiyue; Lun Mingyue

    1995-07-01

    Reported effects of some oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and DNA repair genes on sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation are reviewed. The role of oncogenes in cellular response to irradiation is discussed, especially the extensively studied oncogenes such as the ras gene family. For tumour suppressor genes, mainly the p53, which is increasingly implicated as a gene affecting radiosensitivity, is reviewed. It is considered that there is a cell cycle checkpoint determinant which is postulated to be able to arrest the irradiated cells in G 1 phase to allow them to repair damage before they undergo DNA synthesis. So far there are six DNA repair genes which have been cloned in mammalian cells, but only one, XRCC1, appears to be involved in repair of human X-ray damage. XRCC1 can correct high sisterchromatid exchange levels when transferred into EM 9 cells, but its expression seems to have no correlation with radiosensitivity of human neck and head tumour cells. Radiosensitivity is an intricate issue which may involve many factors. A scheme of cellular reactions after exposure to irradiation is proposed to indicate a possible sequence of events initiated by ionizing radiation

  12. Radiosensitivity of amphibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, S [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1975-04-01

    Radiosensitivity (semi-lethal dose) and the damages of radiation in the amphibia were studied by /sup 3/H-TdR from the standpoint of cellular kinetics. The cell mitosis cycle of the amphibia required a long time. The functional cell regeneration and the physiological function of the cell were slower than in mice. The reason for the low radiosensitivity of the amphibia was discussed relative to the environmental factor of temperature. Because the amphibia change body temperature according to environmental temperature, the danger of radiation damage, the actual lethal dose and the period of survival were influenced by the environmental temperature. Acute radiation danger to amphibia was essentially the same as the danger to mammalia, both young and old. LD/sub 50/ irradiation effects varied among the species. The cell regeneration, turn over, and the mitosis in the amphibia, were affected by environmental temperature, however, the courses proceeded slower than those of the mammalia. Therefore, the question remains, whether the comparison of the radiosensitivities of amphibia with other classes of animal by LDsub(50/30) irradiation was appropriate.

  13. Cachexia among US cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Susan T; Van Doren, Bryce A; Roy, Debosree; Noone, Joshua M; Zacherle, Emily; Blanchette, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition and results in poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess hospitalization incidence, patient characteristics, and medical cost and burden of cancer cachexia in the US. This study used a cross-sectional analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) for 2009. Five cancers reported to have the highest cachexia incidence were assessed. The hospitalization incidence related to cachexia was estimated by cancer type, cost and length of stay were compared, and descriptive statistics were reported for each cancer type, as well as differences being compared between patients with and without cachexia. Risk of inpatient death was higher for patients with cachexia in lung cancer (OR = 1.32; CI = 1.20-1.46) and in all cancers combined (OR = 1.76; CI = 1.67-1.85). The presence of cachexia increased length of stay in lung (IRR = 1.05; CI = 1.03-1.08), Kaposi's sarcoma (IRR = 1.47; CI = 1.14-1.89) and all cancers combined (IRR = 1.09; CI = 1.08-1.10). Additionally, cachectic patients in the composite category had a longer hospitalization stay compared to non-cachectic patients (3-9 days for those with cachexia and 2-7 days for those without cachexia). The cost of inpatient stay was significantly higher in cachexic than non-cachexic lung cancer patients ($13,560 vs $13 190; p Cachexia increases hospitalization costs and length of stay in several cancer types. Identifying the medical burden associated with cancer cachexia will assist in developing an international consensus for recognition and coding by the medical community and ultimately an effective treatment plans for cancer cachexia.

  14. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Soininen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30 and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20, indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  15. Electron spin resonance studies on the detectability of radiation damage and radiosensitization of neoplastic cells. Coordinated programme on improvement of radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukiewicz, S.

    1982-01-01

    The comparison of direct and indirect ESR methods applicable for the examination of radiation damage to melanoma cells leads to the conclusion that only the indirect ones appear to be useful for its detection. The new results of animal experiments and clinical trials carried out according to the rules of radio-chelation therapy are briefly discussed. Selective incorporation of 35 S-labelled compounds by pigmented hamster melanoma cells was found to be followed by a depression of their proliferative activity in vitro and in situ, which may suggest the possible therapeutic value of endo-irradiation. The ESR measurements performed with the use of newly elaborated indirect methods revealed that pigmented and non-pigmented cells consume oxygen at significantly different rates, which means that oxygen utilization may contribute to the overall level of radioresistance of melanoma cells. This assumption has been confirmed by comparing the radiosensitivity of melanotic and amelanotic cells to fast neutrons. Pigment-containing hamster melanoma cells which are twice as resistant to low LET radiation as their non-pigmented counterparts, proved to be equally susceptible to neutrons. The chance of improving the efficiency of radiotherapy of malignant melanomas does not appear unlikely in the light of new experimental data and clinical trials

  16. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality.

  17. Establishment, characterization, chemosensitivity, and radiosensitivity of two different cell lines derived from a human breast cancer biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gioanni, J.; Courdi, A.; Lalanne, C.M.; Fischel, J.L.; Zanghellini, E.; Lambert, J.C.; Ettore, F.; Namer, M.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro culture of a human breast cancer biopsy fragment gave rise to two permanent cell lines, CAL 18 A and CAL 18 B, which were differentiated by both morphological and ultrastructural analysis. The karyotypic and growth properties of these two cell lines also differed, providing further evidence of cell heterogeneity within a given tumor. Both cell lines lost their hormone receptors in vitro. CAL 18 A cells grew in agar and were tumorigenic after inoculation into nude mice; neither of these properties was observed in CAL 18 B cells. The chemosensitivity of 12 antineoplastic drugs was assessed by a short-term assay, using inhibition of tritiated thymidine incorporation by the cells after contact with the drugs as the end point. Only a few drugs were active at moderate concentrations. The overall responses of both cell lines were similar. The cell survival curves, established by the colony method following a single dose of radiation, were also very similar, despite the greater heterogeneity of CAL 18 B cells. The two cell lines appear to be interrelated, since CAL 18 B cells were occasionally observed to emerge from CAL 18 A clones, suggesting that malignant cell redifferentiation may occur spontaneously in vitro

  18. TCP isoeffect analysis using a heterogeneous distribution of radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlone, Marco; Wilkins, David; Nyiri, Balazs; Raaphorst, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A formula for the α/β ratio is derived using the heterogeneous (population averaged) tumor control model. This formula is nearly identical to the formula obtained using the homogeneous (individual) tumor control model, but the new formula includes extra terms showing that the α/β ratio, the ratio of the mean value of α divided by the mean value of β that would be observed in a patient population, explicitly depends on the survival level and heterogeneity. The magnitude of this correction is estimated for prostate cancer, and this appears to raise the mean value of the ratio estimate by about 20%. The method also allows investigation of confidence limits for α/β based on a population distribution of radiosensitivity. For a widely heterogeneous population, the upper 95% confidence interval for the α/β ratio can be as high as 7.3 Gy, even though the population mean is between 2.3 and 2.6 Gy

  19. Bone health in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, R; Body, J J; Aapro, M

    2014-01-01

    There are three distinct areas of cancer management that make bone health in cancer patients of increasing clinical importance. First, bone metastases are common in many solid tumours, notably those arising from the breast, prostate and lung, as well as multiple myeloma, and may cause major...... morbidity including fractures, severe pain, nerve compression and hypercalcaemia. Through optimum multidisciplinary management of patients with bone metastases, including the use of bone-targeted treatments such as potent bisphosphonates or denosumab, it has been possible to transform the course of advanced...... cancer for many patients resulting in a major reduction in skeletal complications, reduced bone pain and improved quality of life. Secondly, many of the treatments we use to treat cancer patients have effects on reproductive hormones, which are critical for the maintenance of normal bone remodelling...

  20. Cancer patients and mass media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Rajer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUNDNowadays cancer patients tend to be more involved in the medical decision process. Active participation improves health outcomes and patient satisfaction. To participate effectively patients require a huge amount of information, but time limits make it impossible to satisfy all information needs at clinics. We tried to find out which kind of media cancer patients use when searching for information and how often. Lastly, we try to find out how popular the Internet is in this regard.METODSIn this research we invited cancer patients, who had regular clinic examinations at the Oncology Institute between 21st and 25th May in 2012. We carried out a prospective research by anonymous questionnaires. We were investigating which media were used and how often. We analysed results with descriptive statistics, ANOVA, the χ²-Test and the t-test.RESULTS478 of 919 questionnaires distributed among cancer patients were returned. Mean age was 59.9 years. 61 % of responders were female, and the most common level of education was high school (33 %. Most common cancer type was breast cancer (33 %, followed by gastrointestinal and lung cancer. Patients search for information most often on television (81.4% responders, followed by specialized brochures (78%, internet (70.8% and newspapers (67.6%. Patients who do not use media for information searching are older than average (62.5 years vs. 59.9 years; p<0,000.CONCLUSIONSAccording to our results patients search for information most often on television, followed by brochures, internet and newspapers. Older patients less often search for information. This data might help doctors in everyday clinical practice.

  1. Informal Caregiving for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided. PMID:23695928

  2. The experiences of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifrangis, C; Koizia, L; Rozario, A; Rodney, S; Harrington, M; Somerville, C; Peplow, T; Waxman, J

    2011-12-01

    To assess the needs of cancer patients for information about their condition and to understand the psychological impact of their illness. The discussion of prognosis and treatment options in the palliative setting is an important and difficult part of oncology practice. To evaluate this, we examined the experiences of cancer patients of the physical and psychological impact of their disease on their life, and their opinions on the communication of end-of-life decisions and treatment options. A patient questionnaire was designed that encompassed communication regarding treatment and prognosis, quality-of-life attitudes subsequent to cancer diagnosis, end-of-life care and cancer drug funding. One hundred and twenty-five patients with a diagnosis of cancer were asked to participate and 96 questionnaires were completed and available for analysis. The questionnaire consisted of 63 questions and was completed in both an inpatient and outpatient setting. This survey brought to light a number of controversial issues in cancer service provision, highlighting the emotional and psychological changes brought about by a cancer diagnosis. Major concerns of our patients include fear of death and pain, changes in interpersonal relationships and financial constraints. Only 66% of the patients wanted to be given a prognosis by their clinicians and just 70% of the patients recalled being given a detailed prognosis. 11% of the patients were not prepared to undergo palliative treatment. In all, 7% were not prepared to accept treatment for 1 year and 2% for 5 years of life in exchange for the potential side effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy. 12% of the patients would not want to be in possession of the information that they were in the terminal phase of the illness with a short time to live and 16% would not want this discussed with their next of kin. This study informs medical professionals about the importance of tailoring information to the needs of the individual patient, and we

  3. Ginsenoside Rg3 enhances radiosensitization of hypoxic oesophageal cancer cell lines through vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia inducible factor 1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaolin; Zhen, Fuxi; Yang, Baixia; Yang, Xi; Cai, Jing; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Sheng; Cao, Yuandong; Ma, Jianxin; Cheng, Hongyan; Sun, Xinchen

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pretreatment of hypoxic human oesophageal carcinoma cell lines (EC109, TE1 and KYSE170) with ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) increases their radiosensitivity to X-rays. The growth inhibitory effect of different Rg3 concentrations was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Radiation sensitivity was measured using a clone formation assay and flow cytometry was used to measure the effects of Rg3 on radiation-induced apoptosis. Western blot analysis was used to measure the effects of Rg3 on the levels of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Rg3 inhibited EC109, TE1 and KYSE170 cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with 10 µmol/ml Rg3 increased EC109, TE1 and KYSE170 radiosensitivity. Rg3 plus radiation significantly increased the apoptosis rate compared with radiation alone. Rg3 also decreased VEGF and HIF-1α protein levels in EC109 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The combination of Rg3 and radiation increased the fragmentation of double-stranded DNA. Rg3 enhanced the radiosensitivity of human oesophageal carcinoma cell lines cultured under hypoxic conditions possibly by downregulating VEGF and HIF-1α protein levels. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Radiation therapy of gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of three parts: General Principles; Clinical Applications; and Special Topics. Some of the papers are: Introduction to Basic Radiobiology; Staging and Work-up Procedures for Patients with Gynecological Cancers; Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Cancer of the Cervix; Role of Interstitial Implantation in Gynecological Cancer; Role of Radiocolloids in Gynecological Cancer; Radiosensitizers and Protectors; and Management of Lymphoma Associated with Pregnancy

  5. Psychological aspects of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Cardoso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is accompanied by important psychological distress experienced by both patient and family. From the moment of the diagnosis on, the patient has to develop a great number of mechanisms and tasks of adjustment to the illness and its circumstances. The high prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders during the course of cancer increases in the end stage disea‐ se. Therefore, a global plan of intervention integrating somatic and psychological/ psychiatric care throughout all the phases of the illness is crucial in the treatment of these patients. Health professionals working on this field can also experience emotional reactions to their patients’ suffering. They should be aware of the emotional aspects involved and develop training to help them intervene adequately with the patient and the family. The articulation between oncologists, palliative care professionals, and mental health care teams can be of great help in providing good quality of care to cancer patients.

  6. Hope in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Turan Kavradim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, which is one of the major health problems leading to despair, uncertainty, pain and suffering, is perceived as a serious and chronic disease. Cancer negatively affects individuals' quality of life due to the physical, psychological, and socio-economic problems. Today, despite inspiring advances in diagnosis and treatment of cancer and increase in survival rates of patients, appearance of physical and psycho-social disorders during cancer course disrupts the adaptation mechanisms of patients and undermines expectations for the future. Most of the time in clinical practice, clinicians focus on physical assessments and treatment planning of cancer patients primarily, ignoring social, psychological, economic and cultural factors related with the disease. This approach definitely influences patients' hope levels and their effective dealing with the disease. The aim of this article is to guide medical staff and increase awareness about the concept of hope in patients with cancer. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 154-164

  7. Cutaneous cancer and xeroderma pigmentosum; Cancer cutane et xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Mnejja, W.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Carcinologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Sallemi, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Turki, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Dermatologie, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2007-11-15

    The cutaneous cancer at the patients affected by xeroderma pigmentosum is characterized by its multifocal character and its strong radiosensitivity. A premature care and a regular follow-up for life of these patients is indispensable for the detection and the treatment of new hurts. The precautionary measures are also important by the school eviction. (N.C.)

  8. Cutaneous cancer and xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Mnejja, W.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J.; Sallemi, T.; Turki, H.

    2007-01-01

    The cutaneous cancer at the patients affected by xeroderma pigmentosum is characterized by its multifocal character and its strong radiosensitivity. A premature care and a regular follow-up for life of these patients is indispensable for the detection and the treatment of new hurts. The precautionary measures are also important by the school eviction. (N.C.)

  9. Cellular radiosensitivity in human severe-combined-immunodeficiency (SCID) syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sproston, Anthony R.M.; West, Catharine M.L.; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the work was to establish to what extent a variety of human severe-combined-immunodeficiency (SCID) disorders are associated with in vitro cellular hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Materials and methods: A study was made of fibroblast strains established from individuals with adenosine deaminase deficiency, T(-)B(-) SCID, Omenn's syndrome and a SCID heterozygote. For comparison, an assessment was also made of the radiosensitivity of a series of fibroblast strains derived from: normal donors, a patient with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and an A-T heterozygote. Radiosensitivity was determined using a clonogenic assay following both high (HDR) and low (LDR) dose-rate irradiation. Results: Following HDR irradiation, the fibroblast strains derived from the different human SCID disorders displayed a wide range of radiosensitivity: the adenosine deaminase deficiency cells were similar in radiosensitivity to normal fibroblasts, T(-)B(-) cells were as hypersensitive to radiation as A-T cells and the Omenn's syndrome cells showed intermediate radiosensitivity. However, whereas all four normal cell strains studied showed significant LDR sparing, none of the SCID fibroblasts did. Conclusions: These data indicate that human SCID is variable in terms of radiosensitivity depending on the particular defect. In addition, the lack of LDR sparing of radiation-induced damage suggests the involvement of some form(s) of DNA repair defect in all the human SCID syndromes

  10. Analysis of enzyme targeting intraoperative radiosensitization therapy (KORTUC-IORT) for abdominal malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Akihito; Kariya, Shinji; Kataoka, Y.; Miyatake, Kana; Tadokoro, Michiko; Hamada, Norihiko; Kubota, Kei; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new radiosensitizer injection containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate just followed by intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer, named KORTUC-IORT (Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas+IORT). Fourteen patients were treated with KORTUC-IORT, external beam radiotherapy, and systemic chemotherapy. All treatments related with KORTUC-IORT were well tolerated, with few adverse effects. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 75% and 25%, respectively. The median survival period is 15 months. The present formulation can be delivered safely and effectively under the conditions used. (author)

  11. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic spectrum within the context of cancer, emphasizing the close relationship between the origin of dissociative constituents which, according to the scientific literature, compose the traumatic experience. Our results have implications for understanding dissociative symptomatology in a cancer

  12. Skin cancers in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Cappellani, Alessandro; Berretta, Massimiliano; Malaguarnera, Michele; Perrotta, Rosario Emanuele

    2013-11-01

    Cancer in older people is a common problem worldwide. Among various types of cancer, skin cancers represent an important percentage. The principal risk factors are sun exposure, family history of skin cancer, fair skin color, but also the age plays an important role in the genesis of skin cancers. In older people there are a more prolonged exposure to carcinogenesis and a decreased functionality of reparation mechanisms of the cells so they acquire a selective advantage of growing and proliferating. At the same time age causes alteration in immune system by increasing NK-cells absolute number and decreasing both the endogenous and the lymphokine-induced lytic activities. The anti-tumor immune response is also mediated by the cytotoxic T- lymphocytes and in the elderly a strong reduction of T-cell function has been demonstrated. In elderly patients the diagnosis and the treatment of skin cancers can be different from younger counterpart. For example in older patients with melanoma is important to evaluate Breslow depth while higher mitotic rate has major value in younger patients. Moreover, the treatment should consider the performance status of patients and their compliance.

  13. Ellagic acid radiosensitizes tumor cells by evoking apoptotic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahire, Vidhula R.; Mishra, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer causes millions of deaths each year globally. In most patients, the cause of treatment failure is found associated with the resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor cell resistance evokes multiple intracellular molecular pathways. In addition, the limitation in treatment outcome arises due to unintended cytotoxic effects of the synthetic anticancer drugs to normal cells and tissues. Considerable focus of research is, therefore, devoted to examine plant-based herbal compounds which may prove potential anticancer drug for developing effective cancer therapy. Research results from our laboratory have shown that ellagic acid (EA), a natural flavonoid displays enhanced tumor toxicity in combination with gamma radiation to many types of cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. Studies on the underlying mechanisms of toxicity suggest that EA employs the cellular signaling pathways in producing the observed effects. This paper gives an account of molecular mechanisms of EA-induced apoptosis process in tumor cytotoxicity. It is suggested that EA acts as a novel radiosensitizer for tumors and a radioprotector for normal cells which may offer a novel protocol for cancer treatment. (author)

  14. Socioemotional selectivity in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin; Silbereisen, Rainer K

    2006-06-01

    This study analyzed the contact preferences of newly diagnosed cancer patients and healthy control group participants. In line with the theory of socioemotional selectivity, patients were more likely than control participants to prefer contact with familiar social partners, but this difference was stronger in younger and middle-aged patients than in older patients. Across a 6-month interval, patients' contact preferences changed according to the perceived success of therapy. For example, if therapy was perceived to be successful, patients showed an increasing interest in contacts with unfamiliar social partners. Results indicate that contact preferences are adapted to the perception of limited versus extended future lifetime. Copyright (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Metformin radiosensitization effect of low and high linear energy transfer radiation in HCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Jung, Won Gyun [Division of Heavy Ion Clinical Research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Sook; Cho, Chul Koo; Jeong, Youn Kyoung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Metformin (1,1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used treatment for type 2 diabetes, provides a good tolerability profile and low cost and has recently sparked keen interest as a potential anticancer agent. Recent evidence has suggested Metformin provides a synergistic benefit with chemotherapy or radiotherapy against certain cancers in several clinical cohort studies.Treatment response rates are higher in patients treated with metformin in cohort studies of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer treated with radiation and in esophageal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. As the sensitizing effect of Metformin in HCC has been characterized in vitro and in vivo, we investigated the radio-sensitizing effect of Metformin in HCC cells in combination with γ-ray (low LET) and neutron (high LET) radiation. The radiosensitizing effect of Metformin was much higher in neutron-irradiated than in γ -irradiated cell lines. Fortunately, Metformin had little effect on normal tissues. Our studies revealed no interaction between Metformin and radiation in normal hepatocytes. High LET radiation,including neutron and carbon ion, would produce more complicated and different cellular effects; indeed, the molecular biological mechanism of high LET radiation remains a topic of investigation.

  16. Metformin radiosensitization effect of low and high linear energy transfer radiation in HCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Jung, Won Gyun; Kim, Mi Sook; Cho, Chul Koo; Jeong, Youn Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Metformin (1,1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used treatment for type 2 diabetes, provides a good tolerability profile and low cost and has recently sparked keen interest as a potential anticancer agent. Recent evidence has suggested Metformin provides a synergistic benefit with chemotherapy or radiotherapy against certain cancers in several clinical cohort studies.Treatment response rates are higher in patients treated with metformin in cohort studies of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer treated with radiation and in esophageal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. As the sensitizing effect of Metformin in HCC has been characterized in vitro and in vivo, we investigated the radio-sensitizing effect of Metformin in HCC cells in combination with γ-ray (low LET) and neutron (high LET) radiation. The radiosensitizing effect of Metformin was much higher in neutron-irradiated than in γ -irradiated cell lines. Fortunately, Metformin had little effect on normal tissues. Our studies revealed no interaction between Metformin and radiation in normal hepatocytes. High LET radiation,including neutron and carbon ion, would produce more complicated and different cellular effects; indeed, the molecular biological mechanism of high LET radiation remains a topic of investigation

  17. Radiosensitivity of neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deacon, J.M.; Wilson, P.; Steel, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is known to be clinically radioresponsive: it is possible to obtain local tumour control with relatively small doses of radiation. The main therapeutic problem, however, is one of metastatic disease, where in spite of modern combination chemotherapy, the prognosis remains poor. Systemic therapy with either drugs or radiation is dose-limited by toxicity to bone marrow stem cells. However, the advent of new technology which enables tumour cells to be removed from infiltrated marrow prior to autologous bone marrow ''rescue'' allows dose escalation, and makes the use of systemic irradiation in the treatment of stage IV disease feasible. The objective of this study was to investigate the radiobiology of neuroblastoma in detail, including intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity, repair capacity, and extrinsic dose-modifying factors which may affect tumour response in vivo. Cells at three levels of organisation were used: single cell suspensions multicellular tumour spheroids; and xenografts grown in immune-suppressed mice

  18. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and their application for assessment of individual radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghdoost, S.; Czene, S.; Harms-Ringdahl, M.; Naslund, I.; Skog, S.

    2003-01-01

    The main biological effect of ionizing radiation is the induction of different types of DNA damages. Besides strand breaks, different types of chemical changes of the deoxynucleotides appear, i.e.base-damages, induced by free radicals. One common base-damage is 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG). 8-oxo-dG is removed from the DNA by the process of base and nucleotide excision repair and released from the cell. In our previous study we have shown that excretion of 8-oxo-dG (measured by HPLC-EC) into urine is significantly different in patients showing minor radiosensitivity during the first 6-7 days of radiotherapy as compared to patients with pronounced reactions. This information could be advantageous for adjustment of the total dose and add other therapy modalities and/or treatments to benefit cancer patients. We report herein on the evaluation of a novel ELISA approach for the detection of 8-oxo-dG in human serum. Background data on 8-oxo-dG levels in serum from healthy individuals and breast cancer patients will be discussed. Dose response curves, after irradiation of whole blood in vitro, for evaluation of individual radiosensitivity for both groups will also be discussed

  19. Radiosensitivities of sensitized lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Kazuto

    1979-01-01

    Immunization of mice with cell antigens such as allogeneic tumor cells or xenogeneic erythrocytes raises a variety of immune reactions mediated by T lymphocytes: i.e. delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), cytotoxicity, and antibody production. The radiosensitivities of these reactions were examined in mice exposed to 600 R x-irradiation a few hours before or after immunization. 1) DTH to xenogeneic erythrocytes, as demonstrated by footpad reaction, was not suppressed by irradiation 3 h before or after immunization. DTH to allogeneic tumor cells, as demonstrated by a migration inhibition test, hardly developed in mice that had been irradiated before or after immunization. It may have belonged to distinct types of delayed reactions which were mediated by distinct subpopulations of T lymphocytes. 2) Cytotoxicity against allogeneic cells and xenogeneic erythrocytes showed almost the same radiosensitivity. It was scarcely detected in mice that had been irradiated before immunization. However, a low but definite degree of cytotoxicity was detected in mice that had been irradiated only a few hours after immunization. Solubilized allogeneic cells instead of native cells were used as immunizing antigens. It was also possible for precursor cells with cytotoxicity to acquire a radioresistant nature by immunization of solubilized antigens, but native cells were required as stimulation for radioresistant precursor cells to differentiated into nature cytotoxic effector cells. 3) Antibody production against xenogeneic erythrocytes or allogeneic cells was almost completely depleted in mice that had been irradiated before or after immunization. It is possible that antibody production essentially requires cell division and clonal expansion of B lymphocytes. (Bell, E.)

  20. Cancer disclosure: experiences of Iranian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Howard, Fuchsia; Nikanfar, Ali-Reza; Ferguson, Caleb

    2012-06-01

    This study explored Iranian patients' experiences of cancer disclosure, paying particular attention to the ways of disclosure. Twenty cancer patients were invited to participate in this qualitative inquiry by research staff in the clinical setting. In-depth, semistructured interview data were analyzed through content analysis. The rigor of the study was established by principles of credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability. Four themes emerged: the atmosphere of non-disclosure, eventual disclosure, distress in knowing, and the desire for information. Non-disclosure was the norm for participants, and all individuals involved made efforts to maintain an atmosphere of non-disclosure. While a select few were informed of their diagnosis by a physician or another patient, the majority eventually became aware of their diagnosis indirectly by different ways. All participants experienced distress after disclosure. The participants wanted basic information about their prognosis and treatments from their treating physicians, but did not receive this information, and encountered difficulty accessing information elsewhere. These challenges highlight the need for changes in current medical practice in Iran, as well as patient and healthcare provider education. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of the single radiosensitivity in patients subjected to medical exposure that show severe skin reactions; Evaluacion de la radiosensibilidad individual en pacientes sometidos a exposiciones medicas que manifiestan reacciones cutaneas severas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giorgio, M; Vallerga, M B [Laboratorio de Dosimetria Biologica, Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250 (C1429BNP), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Portas, M [Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Perez, M R [Laboratorio de Radiopatologia, Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    The Burnt Hospital of the Buenos Aires City Government (HQGCBA) it is a hospital of reference of the Net of Medical Responses in Radiological Emergencies of the Argentine Republic. In the mark of an agreement among the HQGCBA and the Authority Regulatory Nuclear (ARN), it is in execution a study protocol for the one boarding diagnoses and therapeutic of radioinduced cutaneous leisure. They exist individual variations that can condition the response to the ionizing radiations (IR), so much in accidental exposures as having programmed (radiotherapy, radiology interventionist). In this context, the individual radiosensitivity is evaluated in the patients signed up in this protocol that presented sharp or late cutaneous reactions, with grades of severity 3-4 (approaches EORTC/RTOG). The capacity of repair of the DNA was evaluated in outlying blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro (2 Gy, gamma of Co-60) by means of the micronucleus techniques and comet essay in alkaline conditions. In this work two cases in those that is applied this study protocol, the therapeutic answer and its correlate with the discoveries of the radiosensitivity tests is presented. Case 1: patient of feminine sex, subjected to external radiotherapy by a breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma; developed sharp cutaneous radiotoxicity grade 3 (confluent humid epithelitis) that motivate the interruption of the treatment. Case 2: patient of masculine sex, subjected to a coronary angioplasty (interventionist radiology); developed late cutaneous radiotoxicity grade 4 (ulceration in dorsal region). Both patients were treated with topical trolamine associated to systemic administration of pentoxiphiline and antioxidants. The therapeutic answer is evaluated by means of clinical pursuit, photographic serial register and complementary exams (thermography and ultrasonography of high frequency). In the case 1 the answer was very favorable, with precocious local improvement and complete remission of symptoms and

  2. Evaluation of the single radiosensitivity in patients subjected to medical exposure that show severe skin reactions; Evaluacion de la radiosensibilidad individual en pacientes sometidos a exposiciones medicas que manifiestan reacciones cutaneas severas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B. [Laboratorio de Dosimetria Biologica, Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250 (C1429BNP), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Portas, M. [Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Perez, M.R. [Laboratorio de Radiopatologia, Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: mdigiorg@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The Burnt Hospital of the Buenos Aires City Government (HQGCBA) it is a hospital of reference of the Net of Medical Responses in Radiological Emergencies of the Argentine Republic. In the mark of an agreement among the HQGCBA and the Authority Regulatory Nuclear (ARN), it is in execution a study protocol for the one boarding diagnoses and therapeutic of radioinduced cutaneous leisure. They exist individual variations that can condition the response to the ionizing radiations (IR), so much in accidental exposures as having programmed (radiotherapy, radiology interventionist). In this context, the individual radiosensitivity is evaluated in the patients signed up in this protocol that presented sharp or late cutaneous reactions, with grades of severity 3-4 (approaches EORTC/RTOG). The capacity of repair of the DNA was evaluated in outlying blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro (2 Gy, gamma of Co-60) by means of the micronucleus techniques and comet essay in alkaline conditions. In this work two cases in those that is applied this study protocol, the therapeutic answer and its correlate with the discoveries of the radiosensitivity tests is presented. Case 1: patient of feminine sex, subjected to external radiotherapy by a breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma; developed sharp cutaneous radiotoxicity grade 3 (confluent humid epithelitis) that motivate the interruption of the treatment. Case 2: patient of masculine sex, subjected to a coronary angioplasty (interventionist radiology); developed late cutaneous radiotoxicity grade 4 (ulceration in dorsal region). Both patients were treated with topical trolamine associated to systemic administration of pentoxiphiline and antioxidants. The therapeutic answer is evaluated by means of clinical pursuit, photographic serial register and complementary exams (thermography and ultrasonography of high frequency). In the case 1 the answer was very favorable, with precocious local improvement and complete remission of symptoms and

  3. The molecular basis of radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers how DNA damage induced by ionising radiation is processed within the cell. The current view of radiobiology is discussed. The author explains the molecular processes that underlie the differences in radiosensitivity

  4. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade, E-mail: wolney@cardiol.br [Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares da Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  5. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

  6. Studies on Drosophila radiosensitive strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsova, E.P.; Zakharov, I.A.

    1976-01-01

    45 of radiosensitive strains of Drosophila melanogaster were isolated by Curly/Lobe technique after EMS treatment of Livadia population males. The lethality of non-Curly late larvae after gamma-irradiation (4000r) characterized radiosensitivity strains. Most of them exhibited higher frequency of the spontaneous dominant lethals (up to 69%). The males of 6 strains were semi-sterile. 5 of these strains exhibited higher frequency of X-chromosome non-disjunction

  7. Effects of binding metronidazole to a copper-acetate compound on radiosensitizer properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron, Ana C. Valderrama; Silva, Denise de Oliveira; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2009-01-01

    Copper compounds exhibit interesting biological properties. Nitroimidazoles show radiosensitizer properties for radiotherapy tumor treatment. In the present work, the effect of binding metronidazole (1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-methyl-5-nitroimidazole = MTZ) to copper-acetate on the radiosensitizer properties has been investigated. A compound of copper-acetate-MTZ was prepared and characterized. The experiments were carried out by gamma-irradiation of Hep2 (human larynx cancer) cells under hypoxic conditions. The radiation doses for 50% cell survival in the presence of radiosensitizer were about 8.2 Gy for CuAcMTZ or free MTZ. The effect of binding metronidazole to copper acetate on radiosensitizer properties is mainly related to the radiosensitizer process which involves two events for CuAcMTZ in contrast to one event observed for the MTZ free drug. (author)

  8. Needs and preferences of patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels-Wynia, H.

    2010-01-01

    What do patients prefer in cancer care and does gender matter? Introduction: To provide patient-centred care for cancer patients it is important to have insight into the patients' specific preferences for health care. To gain such insight we have developed a questionnaire based on cancer patients’

  9. Enhancement of the radiation-lethal effect of hypoxic cancer cells by some nitroheterocyclic compounds. Part of a coordinated programme on the improvement of radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiricuta, I.

    1981-12-01

    The possibilities to enhance the lethal effect of ionizing radiation on hypoxic cells by electron-affinic compounds have stimulated the investigations for finding new chemicals with radiobiological and pharmacological features as adequate as possible. On the other hand, the experimental studies and clinical trials had shown that the aerobic toxicity seems to be the major limiting factor in the use of large doses of radiosensitizers required to achieve significant therapeutic efficiency. The investigations in the present paper were attempted to join these two main directions of research and comprised the syntheses of new nitroheterocyclic compounds with potential radiosensitization properties and the knowledge of biochemical alterations involved in the producing of aerobic toxicity of radiosensitizers aiming to find practical solutions to enhance the efficiency of radiotherapy. Several newly synthesized compounds were tested for their radiosensitizing effect. The experiments carried out on hypoxic cells V 79 showed that only 1-(hydroxyethyl-2'-phosphate)-2-methyl-5-nitroimidazole, dipotassium salt displayed an enhancement ratio of 1.17 (at 8 mM), but lower than in case of parent compound, metronidazole (enhancement ratio = 1.53). It was shown that hypoxic cell radiosensitizers interfere with the cellular energy metabolism. These interferences were found dependent on the electron affinity of drugs. In addition, those radiosensitizers producing a decrease in oxygen consumption caused a supplementary oxygenation of both normal and tumour tissues. It is concluded that the improvement of therapeutic efficiency of radiosensitizers by reducing their aerobic toxicity might be achieved by diminishing their effects on the energy metabolism or by the stimulation of this metabolism and restoration of tissue redox equilibrium

  10. No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bonin, Michael [Department of Medical Genetics, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Dikomey, Ekkehard, E-mail: dikomey@uke.de [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Raabe, Annette [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

  11. Radio-induced malignancies after breast cancer postoperative radiotherapy in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymann, Steve; Bourgier, Céline; Delaloge, Suzette; Rahal, Arslane; Caron, Olivier; Frebourg, Thierry; Barreau, Lise; Pachet, Corinne; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    There are no specific recommendations for the management of breast cancer patients with germ-line p53 mutations, an exceptional genetic condition, particularly regarding postoperative radiotherapy. Preclinical data suggested that p53 mutations conferred enhanced radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo and the few clinical observations showed that Li-Fraumeni families were at a higher risk of secondary radio-induced malignancies. We reviewed a cohort of patients with germ-line p53 mutations who had been treated for breast cancer as the first tumor event. We assessed their outcome and the incidence of secondary radio-induced malignancies. Among 47 documented Li-Fraumeni families treated from 1997 to 2007 at the Institut Gustave Roussy, 8 patients had been diagnosed with breast cancer as the first tumor event. Three patients had undergone conservative breast surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy and five patients had undergone a mastectomy (3 with postoperative radiotherapy). Thus, 6/8 patients had received postoperative radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 6 years. Median age at the diagnosis of the primary breast cancer was 30 years. The histological characteristics were as follows: intraductal carcinoma in situ (n = 3), invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 4) and a phyllodes tumor (n = 1). Among the 6 patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy, the following events had occurred: 3 ipsilateral breast recurrences, 3 contralateral breast cancers, 2 radio-induced cancers, and 3 new primaries (1 of which was an in-field thyroid cancer with atypical histology). In contrast, only one event had occurred (a contralateral breast cancer) among patients who had not received radiation therapy. These observations could argue in favor of bilateral mastectomy and the avoidance of radiotherapy

  12. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto, E-mail: arojasmtz@gmail.com, E-mail: augusto.rojasm@uanl.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. (author)

  13. Comparison of radiosensitivity between human hematopoietic cell lines derived from patients with Down's syndrome and from normal persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.C.; Banerjee, A.; Tan, J.C.; Hou, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Seven hematopoietic cell lines, four derived from the peripheral blood of patients with Down's syndrome (DS) and three from normal persons, were irradiated with 100, 150, 300, and 500 rads from a 60 Co source and harvested for cell count and chromosome aberration studies every 12 hours for 72 hours post irradiation. Cell growth inhibition and an increase in chromosome aberration were observed in all the cell lines at each dose level and time interval. No significant difference was observed in the effects between DS and normal cell lines. The most common types of aberrations in the 12-hour samples were chromosome and/or chromatid breaks. In the later samples, chromatid exchanges were predominant. The results of the variance analyses on the induced chromosome aberrations in six lines (three DS and three normal lines) showed radiation dosage to be the largest component of total variance, following postirradiation duration and cell lines. The samples harvested 24 and 36 hours post irradiation generally showed greater effects than the samples of other harvest durations. The cell line variance could only be attributed to the differences among and between individual cell lines rather than the difference between DS and normal cell lines

  14. Radiosensitivity in cultured human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.; Masson, W.K.

    1980-01-01

    Caution is urged in the use of freshly isolated cultures of human diploid fibroblasts for quantitative studies of radiosensitivity. The distribution of x ray sensitivities of 'normal' human fibroblast cultures of foetal origin (10 subjects, skin or lung biopsy) and post-foetal origin (34 subjects, skin biopsy) are compared with the distribution in 12 patients with ataxia telangiectasia (probability of including any one of these in a normal post-foetal distribution is 0.01%). Cultures from nominally normal subjects showed a broad distribution of D 0 range of 98 +- 160 rad and assuming normal distribution, a mean +- one standard deviation of 122 +- 17 rad. Mean D 0 values for foetal origin cultures were 117 +- 12; values for post-foetal cultures D 0 were 124 +- 18. No systematic variation in D 0 was observed for age of donor, number of cell divisions in culture or for cloning efficiency. For ataxia telangiectasia D 0 values were 46 +- 7 rad. (U.K.)

  15. [Nutrition therapy of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövey, József

    2017-09-20

    The majority of cancer patients becomes malnourished during the course of their disease. Malnutrition deteriorates the efficiency of all kinds of oncologic interventions. As a consequence of it, treatment-related toxicity increases, hospital stay is lengthened, chances of cure and survival as well as the quality of life of the patients worsen. Nutritional status therefore influences all aspects of outcome of oncology care. In spite of this the use of nutritional therapy varies across health care providers but its application is far from being sufficient during active oncology interventions as well as rehabilitation and supportive care. It threatens not only the outcome and quality of life of cancer patients but also the success of oncologic treatments which often demand high input of human and financial resources. Meanwhile application of nutritional therapy is legally regulated in Hungary and a very recent update of the European guideline on cancer patient nutrition published in 2017 is available. Moreover, cost effectiveness of nutritional therapy has been proven in a number of studies. In this review we present the basics of nutritional therapy including nutritional screening and evaluation, nutritional plan, the role of nutrition support teams, oral, enteral and parenteral nutrition, the use of different drugs and special nutrients and the follow-up of the patients.

  16. ATM-induced radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E. K.; Ahn, S. D.; Rhee, Y. H.; Chung, H. S.; Ha, S. W; Song, C. W.; Griffin, R. J.; Park, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been known that ATM plays a central role in response of cells to ionizing radiation by enhancing DNA repair. We have investigated the feasibility of increasing radiosensitivity of tumor cells with the use of ATM inhibitors such as caffeine, pentoxifylline and wortmannin. Human colorectal cancer RKO.C cells and RKO-ATM cells (RKO cells overexpressing ATM) were used in the present study. The clonogenic cell survival in vitro indicated that RKO-ATM cells were markedly radioresistant than RKO.C cells. Treatment with 3 mM of caffeine significantly increased the radiosensitivity of cells, particulary the RKO-ATM cells, so that the radiosensitivity of RKO.C cells and RKO-ATM cells were almost similar. The radiation induced G2/M arrest in RKO-ATM cells was noticeably longer than that in RKO.C cells and caffeine treatment significantly reduced the length of the radiation induced G2/M arrest in both RKO.C and RKO-ATM cells. Pentoxifylline and wortmannin were also less effective than caffeine to radiosensitize RKO.C or RKO-ATM cells. However, wortmannin was more effective than caffeine against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells indicating the efficacy of ATM inhibitor to increase radiosensitivity is cell line dependent. For in vivo study, RKO.C cells were injected s.c. into the hind-leg of BALB/c-nuslc nude mice, and allowed to grow to 130mm3 tumor. The mice were i.p. injected with caffeine solution or saline and the tumors irradiated with 10 Gy of X-rays. The radiation induced growth delay was markedly increased by 1-2 mg/g of caffeine. It was concluded that caffeine increases radiosensitivity of tumor cells by inhibiting ATM kinase function, thereby inhibiting DNA repair, that occurs during the G2/M arrest after radiation

  17. Roscovitine strongly enhances the effect of olaparib on radiosensitivity for HPV neg. but not for HPV pos. HNSCC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, Frank; Seltzsam, Steve; Dreffke, Kristin; Preising, Stefanie; Arenz, Andrea; Subtil, Florentine S B; Rieckmann, Thorsten; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Wittig, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    At present, advanced stage human Papillomavirus (HPV) negative and positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are treated by intense multimodal therapy that includes radiochemotherapy, which are associated with relevant side effects. Patients with HPV positive tumors possess a far better prognosis than those with HPV negative cancers. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve the outcome especially of the latter one as well as quality of life for all HNSCC patients. Here we tested whether roscovitine, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which hereby also blocks homologous recombination (HR), can be used to enhance the radiation sensitivity of HNSCC cell lines. In all five HPV negative and HPV positive cell lines tested, roscovitine caused inhibition of CDK1 and 2. Surprisingly, all HPV positive cell lines were found to be defective in HR. In contrast, HPV negative strains demonstrated efficient HR, which was completely suppressed by roscovitine. In line with this, for HPV negative but not for HPV positive cell lines, treatment with roscovitine resulted in a pronounced enhancement of the radiation-induced G2 arrest as well as a significant increase in radiosensitivity. Due to a defect in HR, all HPV positive cell lines were efficiently radiosensitized by the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib. In contrast, in HPV negative cell lines a significant radiosensitization by olaparib was only achieved when combined with roscovitine.

  18. Hormonal status can modify radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricoul, M.; Sabatier, L.; Dutrillaux, B.

    1997-01-01

    In preliminary experiments, we have demonstrated that pregnancy increases chromosome radiosensitivity in the mouse at the end of gestation. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was then exposed to ionizing radiations in vitro. By comparison to non pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakages was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes. Immediately after delivery, this increase of radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase of radiosensitivity. Thus, pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy and the risks of radiation exposure of pregnant women have to be considered not only n relation to the child, but also to their own hypersensitivity. (authors)

  19. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Skin test of radiosensitivity. Application to Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Gluckman, E.

    1983-01-01

    A test of skin radiosensitivity is described. It is achieved by irradiating small skin fields (15 mm in diameter) with 50 kV X-rays. The radiosensitivity is evaluated from the skin reaction observed for a single acute dose of 8 and 10 Gy; it is considered increased if the reaction for 10 Gy exceeds the desquamation threshold, and scored according to the observed reaction. The test includes an evaluation of the cellular repair, assessed on the comparison of the reactions for single dose and split irradiation. The time of the reaction peak is also reported. Abnormal reactions have been observed on 4 out of 8 patients with Fanconi Anemia

  1. Skin test of radiosensitivity. Application to Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutreix, J. (Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)); Gluckman, E. (Centre Hayem, Hopital St.-Louis, 75 Paris (France))

    1983-01-01

    A test of skin radiosensitivity is described. It is achieved by irradiating small skin fields (15 mm in diameter) with 50 kV X-rays. The radiosensitivity is evaluated from the skin reaction observed for a single acute dose of 8 and 10 Gy; it is considered increased if the reaction for 10 Gy exceeds the desquamation threshold, and scored according to the observed reaction. The test includes an evaluation of the cellular repair, assessed on the comparison of the reactions for single dose and split irradiation. The time of the reaction peak is also reported. Abnormal reactions have been observed on 4 out of 8 patients with Fanconi Anemia.

  2. Oral complications in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications

  3. Re-evaluation of in vitro radiosensitivity of human fibroblasts of different genetic origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.; Fertil, B.

    1986-08-01

    Statistical analysis of the radiosensitivity of 204 survival curves of non-transformed human fibroblast cell strains of different genetic origins was made using the multi-target one-hit model (characterized by parameters eta and D/sub 0/), the surviving fraction for a 2 Gy dose (S/sub 2/) and the mean inactivation dose (D-bar). D-bar is found to be the parameter for characterization of anomalous radiosensitivity linked to a genetic disorder and discrimination between groups of cell strains of differing radiosensitivity. It allows the description of a range of 'normal' radiosensitivity for control fibroblasts and classification of genetic disorders as a function of their mean radiosensitivity expressed in terms of D-bar. Nine groups of cell strains appear to exhibit radiosensitivity differing significantly from the controls: seven groups are hypersensitive (ataxia-telengiectasia homozygotes and heterozygotes, Cockayne's syndrome, Gardner's syndrome, 5-oxoprolinuria homozygotes and heterozygotes, Fanconi's anaemia) and two groups are more radioresistant (fibroblasts from retinoblastoma patients and individuals with chromosome 13 anomalies). Since the coupled parameter eta and D/sub 0/ failed to discriminate between the radiosensitivity of the different genetic groups, the use of D-bar to make an intercomparison of intrinsic radiosensitivity of non-transformed human fibroblasts is recommended. (U.K.).

  4. Re-evaluation of in vitro radiosensitivity of human fibroblasts of different genetic origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.; Fertil, B.

    1986-01-01

    Statistical analysis of the radiosensitivity of 204 survival curves of non-transformed human fibroblast cell strains of different genetic origins was made using the multi-target one-hit model (characterized by parameters eta and D 0 ), the surviving fraction for a 2 Gy dose (S 2 ) and the mean inactivation dose (D-bar). D-bar is found to be the parameter for characterization of anomalous radiosensitivity linked to a genetic disorder and discrimination between groups of cell strains of differing radiosensitivity. It allows the description of a range of 'normal' radiosensitivity for control fibroblasts and classification of genetic disorders as a function of their mean radiosensitivity expressed in terms of D-bar. Nine groups of cell strains appear to exhibit radiosensitivity differing significantly from the controls: seven groups are hypersensitive (ataxia-telengiectasia homozygotes and heterozygotes, Cockayne's syndrome, Gardner's syndrome, 5-oxoprolinuria homozygotes and heterozygotes, Fanconi's anaemia) and two groups are more radioresistant (fibroblasts from retinoblastoma patients and individuals with chromosome 13 anomalies). Since the coupled parameter eta and D 0 failed to discriminate between the radiosensitivity of the different genetic groups, the use of D-bar to make an intercomparison of intrinsic radiosensitivity of non-transformed human fibroblasts is recommended. (U.K.)

  5. Novel Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin C.; Ha, Ye J.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Choi, Eun Y.; Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Jong H.; Kang, Tae W.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Yong S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Studies aimed at predicting individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) are urgently needed, especially considering the risks associated with poorly responsive patients. Methods and Materials: A 3-step strategy for the determination of CRT sensitivity is proposed based on (1) the screening of a human genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG); (2) clinical association analysis of 113 patients treated with preoperative CRT; and (3) a cell-based functional assay for biological validation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 9 SNPs associated with preoperative CRT responses. Positive responses (TRG 1-3) were obtained more frequently in patients carrying the reference allele (C) of the SNP CORO2A rs1985859 than in those with the substitution allele (T) (P=.01). Downregulation of CORO2A was significantly associated with reduced early apoptosis by 27% (P=.048) and 39% (P=.023) in RKO and COLO320DM colorectal cancer cells, respectively, as determined by flow cytometry. Reduced radiosensitivity was confirmed by colony-forming assays in the 2 colorectal cancer cells (P=.034 and .015, respectively). The SNP FAM101A rs7955740 was not associated with radiosensitivity in the clinical association analysis. However, downregulation of FAM101A significantly reduced early apoptosis by 29% in RKO cells (P=.047), and it enhanced colony formation in RKO cells (P=.001) and COLO320DM cells (P=.002). Conclusion: CRT-sensitive SNP markers were identified using a novel 3-step process. The candidate marker CORO2A rs1985859 and the putative marker FAM101A rs7955740 may be of value for the prediction of radiosensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts

  6. Effect of 17-AAG on radio-sensitivity of HeLa and V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yanling; Hong Chengjiao; Zhang Baoguo

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the radio-sensitizing effect of 17-AAG, an inhibitor of Heat Shock Protein 90, on human Uterine Cervix Cancer HeLa and V79 cells, Clonogenic assay was used to observe the cell survival rate. The results show that 17-AAG can decrease obviously (p 0.05). This indicates that 17-AAG may enhance the radio-sensitivity of the HeLa cell line and has no effect on the V79 cell line. (authors)

  7. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Guy-Anne [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.; Faria, Sergio L.; Duclos, Marie [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sturgeon, Jeremy [Department of Medical Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  8. Radiosensitization by the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat under hypoxia and with capecitabine in experimental colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saelen, Marie Grøn; Ree, Anne Hansen; Kristian, Alexandr; Fleten, Karianne Giller; Furre, Torbjørn; Hektoen, Helga Helseth; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2012-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat is a candidate radiosensitizer in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Radiosensitivity is critically influenced by hypoxia; hence, it is important to evaluate the efficacy of potential radiosensitizers under variable tissue oxygenation. Since fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the only clinically validated regimen in LARC, efficacy in combination with this established regimen should be assessed in preclinical models before a candidate drug enters clinical trials. Radiosensitization by vorinostat under hypoxia was studied in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in one colorectal carcinoma xenograft model by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Radiosensitizing effects of vorinostat in combination with capecitabine were assessed by evaluation of tumor growth delay in two colorectal carcinoma xenografts models. Under hypoxia, radiosensitization by vorinostat was demonstrated in vitro in terms of decreased clonogenicity and in vivo as inhibition of tumor growth. Adding vorinostat to capecitabine-based CRT increased radiosensitivity of xenografts in terms of inhibited tumor growth. Vorinostat sensitized colorectal carcinoma cells to radiation under hypoxia in vitro and in vivo and improved therapeutic efficacy in combination with capecitabine-based CRT in vivo. The results encourage implementation of vorinostat into CRT in LARC trials

  9. Radiosensitization by the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat under hypoxia and with capecitabine in experimental colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saelen, Marie Grøn; Ree, Anne Hansen; Kristian, Alexandr; Fleten, Karianne Giller; Furre, Torbjørn; Hektoen, Helga Helseth; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2012-09-27

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat is a candidate radiosensitizer in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Radiosensitivity is critically influenced by hypoxia; hence, it is important to evaluate the efficacy of potential radiosensitizers under variable tissue oxygenation. Since fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the only clinically validated regimen in LARC, efficacy in combination with this established regimen should be assessed in preclinical models before a candidate drug enters clinical trials. Radiosensitization by vorinostat under hypoxia was studied in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in one colorectal carcinoma xenograft model by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Radiosensitizing effects of vorinostat in combination with capecitabine were assessed by evaluation of tumor growth delay in two colorectal carcinoma xenografts models. Under hypoxia, radiosensitization by vorinostat was demonstrated in vitro in terms of decreased clonogenicity and in vivo as inhibition of tumor growth. Adding vorinostat to capecitabine-based CRT increased radiosensitivity of xenografts in terms of inhibited tumor growth. Vorinostat sensitized colorectal carcinoma cells to radiation under hypoxia in vitro and in vivo and improved therapeutic efficacy in combination with capecitabine-based CRT in vivo. The results encourage implementation of vorinostat into CRT in LARC trials.

  10. Radiosensitization by the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat under hypoxia and with capecitabine in experimental colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saelen Marie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat is a candidate radiosensitizer in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. Radiosensitivity is critically influenced by hypoxia; hence, it is important to evaluate the efficacy of potential radiosensitizers under variable tissue oxygenation. Since fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT is the only clinically validated regimen in LARC, efficacy in combination with this established regimen should be assessed in preclinical models before a candidate drug enters clinical trials. Methods Radiosensitization by vorinostat under hypoxia was studied in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in one colorectal carcinoma xenograft model by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Radiosensitizing effects of vorinostat in combination with capecitabine were assessed by evaluation of tumor growth delay in two colorectal carcinoma xenografts models. Results Under hypoxia, radiosensitization by vorinostat was demonstrated in vitro in terms of decreased clonogenicity and in vivo as inhibition of tumor growth. Adding vorinostat to capecitabine-based CRT increased radiosensitivity of xenografts in terms of inhibited tumor growth. Conclusions Vorinostat sensitized colorectal carcinoma cells to radiation under hypoxia in vitro and in vivo and improved therapeutic efficacy in combination with capecitabine-based CRT in vivo. The results encourage implementation of vorinostat into CRT in LARC trials.

  11. The combination of olaparib and camptothecin for effective radiosensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura Katsutoshi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is a key enzyme involved in the repair of radiation-induced single-strand DNA breaks. PARP inhibitors such as olaparib (KU-0059436, AZD-2281 enhance tumor sensitivity to radiation and to topoisomerase I inhibitors like camptothecin (CPT. Olaparib is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of PARP-1 and PARP-2 that has been tested in multiple clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of the sensitizing effect of olaparib for radiation and CPT in order to support clinical application of this agent. Methods DLD-1 cells (a human colorectal cancer cell line and H1299 cells (a non-small cell lung cancer cell line with differences of p53 gene status were used. The survival of these cells was determined by clonogenic assay after treatment with drugs and X-ray irradiation. The γH2AX focus formation assay was performed to examine the influence of olaparib on induction and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks after exposure to radiation or CPT. Results A radiosensitizing effect of olaparib was seen even at 0.01 μM. Its radiosensitizing effect after exposure for 2 h was similar to that after 24 h. H1299 cells with depletion or mutation of p53 were more radioresistant than H1299 cells with wild-type p53. However, similar enhancement of radiosensitization by olaparib was observed with all of the tested cell lines regardless of the p53 status. Olaparib also sensitized cells to CPT. This sensitizing effect was seen at low concentrations of olaparib such as 0.01 μM, and its sensitizing effect was the same at both 0.01 μM and 1 μM. The combination of olaparib and CPT had a stronger radiosensitizing effect. The results of the γH2AX focus assay corresponded with the clonogenic assay findings. Conclusion Olaparib enhanced sensitivity to radiation and CPT at low concentrations and after relatively short exposure times such as 2 h. The radiosensitizing effect of olaprib

  12. The combination of olaparib and camptothecin for effective radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Someya, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Matsumoto, Hideki; Takahashi, Akihisa; Hareyama, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a key enzyme involved in the repair of radiation-induced single-strand DNA breaks. PARP inhibitors such as olaparib (KU-0059436, AZD-2281) enhance tumor sensitivity to radiation and to topoisomerase I inhibitors like camptothecin (CPT). Olaparib is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of PARP-1 and PARP-2 that has been tested in multiple clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of the sensitizing effect of olaparib for radiation and CPT in order to support clinical application of this agent. DLD-1 cells (a human colorectal cancer cell line) and H1299 cells (a non-small cell lung cancer cell line) with differences of p53 gene status were used. The survival of these cells was determined by clonogenic assay after treatment with drugs and X-ray irradiation. The γH2AX focus formation assay was performed to examine the influence of olaparib on induction and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks after exposure to radiation or CPT. A radiosensitizing effect of olaparib was seen even at 0.01 μM. Its radiosensitizing effect after exposure for 2 h was similar to that after 24 h. H1299 cells with depletion or mutation of p53 were more radioresistant than H1299 cells with wild-type p53. However, similar enhancement of radiosensitization by olaparib was observed with all of the tested cell lines regardless of the p53 status. Olaparib also sensitized cells to CPT. This sensitizing effect was seen at low concentrations of olaparib such as 0.01 μM, and its sensitizing effect was the same at both 0.01 μM and 1 μM. The combination of olaparib and CPT had a stronger radiosensitizing effect. The results of the γH2AX focus assay corresponded with the clonogenic assay findings. Olaparib enhanced sensitivity to radiation and CPT at low concentrations and after relatively short exposure times such as 2 h. The radiosensitizing effect of olaprib was not dependent on the p53 status of tumor cells. These

  13. Potential clinical impact of normal-tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, Soeren M.

    1997-01-01

    A critical appraisal is given of the possible benefit from a reliable pre-treatment knowledge of individual normal-tissue sensitivity to radiotherapy. The considerations are in part, but not exclusively, based on the recent experience with in vitro colony-forming assays of the surviving fraction at 2 Gy, the SF 2 . Three strategies are reviewed: (1) to screen for rare cases with extreme radiosensitivity, so-called over-reactors, and treat these with reduced total dose, (2) to identify the sensitive tail of the distribution of 'normal' radiosensitivities, refer these patients to other treatment, and to escalate the dose to the remaining patients, or (3) to individualize dose prescriptions based on individual radiosensitivity, i.e. treating to isoeffect rather than to a specific dose-fractionation schedule. It is shown that these strategies will have a small, if any, impact on routine radiotherapy. Screening for over-reactors is hampered by the low prevalence of these among otherwise un-selected patients that leads to a low positive predictive value of in vitro radiosensitivity assays. It is argued, that this problem may persist even if the noise on current assays could be reduced to (the unrealistic value of) zero, simply because of the large biological variation in SF 2 . Removing the sensitive tail of the patient population, will only have a minor effect on the dose that could be delivered to the remaining patients, because of the sigmoid shape of empirical dose-response relationships. Finally, individualizing dose prescriptions based exclusively on information from a normal-tissue radiosensitivity assay, leads to a nearly symmetrical distribution of dose-changes that would produce a very small gain, or even a loss, of tumor control probability if implemented in the clinic. From a theoretical point of view, other strategies could be devised and some of these are considered in this review. Right now the most promising clinical use of in vitro radiosensitivity

  14. The role of polymorphisms of genes repair pathway to the radiotoxicity in patients with cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Ana Terra Silva

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Brazil, cervical cancer is the second most common among women. Radiation therapy is part of its interdisciplinary management, playing an important role in their loco regional control. The major challenge of modern medicine in radiotherapy is to develop predictive methods that can determine the level of radiosensitivity of the patient and the healthy surrounding tissue in order to individualize the prescribed radiation dose, to prevent severe side effects and promoting better local tumor control. This study evaluated the acute and chronic adverse effects on the skin, lower gastrointestinal tract and urinary tract of radiotherapy in 47 cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Biological material was collected and DNA from peripheral blood was extracted of ali patients studied. The fragments of TP53 and ATM were amplified to be sequenced, to verify if there are any polymorphisms witch could be responsible to the radiosensitivity of the patients. Results and Discussion: In a univariate analysis, the variable age was strongly associated with a risk of acute toxicity skin (p=O,023). Patients that received a high dose of external beam radiation and patients who have undergone brachytherapy, showed a significantly higher incidence of chronic urinary tract toxicity (p=O,031) and (p=O,019), respectively. The exchange G>A in the position 5557 of the A TM gene was significantly associated with the risk of acute lower gastrointestinal tract (p=O,008). There wasn't association between the other TP53 polymorphisms analyzed and the frequency of side effects (p>O,05). Our data revealed that patients who evolved significant association presented death (p=O,019) with the increase of chronic skin radiossensitivity. Conclusions: These observations corroborate the importance of investigating the genetic profile to predict adverse side effects in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. These genes have an important role in DNA repair pathways and probably

  15. Clinical and laboratory assessment of a combination of drugs with radiation. Coordinated programme on improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleehen, N.

    1982-01-01

    Applications were clinically studied of misonidazole (MISO) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with pharmacokinetic studies. Work with desmethylmisonidazole was focused on its penetration into the CNS because its low lipophilicity would predict poorer access than MISO. Laboratory work was focused on the interaction of hyperthermia with drugs. Cytotoxicity of MISO induced by hyperthermia was studied. Heat response following hypoxic pretreatment with MISO of EMT6 spheroids showed marked enhancement of subsequent heat killing dependent on the duration of the hypoxic pretreatment. The effect was studied in vitro of preheat temperature at modest temperatures (39 to 43 0 C) on thermal tolerance and subsequent hyperthermic (43 to 44 0 C) interaction with bleomycin, adriamycin and BCNU. Interaction between several cytotoxic drugs and two potentially critical normal tissues, skin and bone marrow was studied in the mouse. No increase in the heat reaction in the skin of the mouse foot was observed following single injections of adriamycin, bleomycin or 5 daily doses of bleomycin together with a single heat treatment. Single doses of BCNU and CTX increased the heat reaction. The radioprotector WR2721 failed to protect against either the heat or heat drug reactions from CTX and BCNU

  16. Radiosensitiviness of blood lymphocytes from skin cancer patients and healthy volunteers as determined by micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, Tania Helena Ochi.

    1995-01-01

    Cancer, a major death cause in developed countries, has been related to somatic mutations that could be detected by cytogenetic analysis. Among the tools used in these tests, the micronucleus assay has been largely applied at population surveillance, biological dosimetry and early detection of groups with higher risks to developing cancers. In this study, we analysed the chromosome susceptibility of blood lymphocytes from basocellular skin cancer patients and healthy volunteers. The cytogenetic analysis was performed by a micronucleus assay, using progressive doses of ionizing radiation from a 60 Co source as mutagen. Briefly, the blood lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro, as processed by the cytokinesis-blocked method. The micronucleus frequency and distribution, cell cycle kinetics, nucleation index and dose-response relationship were determined in each patient. The results showed that the basocellular skin cancer patients lymphocytes presented higher spontaneous micronucleus frequency as compared with those from healthy young volunteers but lower than healthy now young volunteers . The radiation-induced micronucleus analysis showed that the basocellular skin cancer patients' lymphocytes presented similar proportion of damage lymphocytes as compared with those from healthy volunteers. Nevertheless, the magnitude of this damage was higher in this group with doses. Higher than 400 c Gy, which was not occurred in healthy volunteers. Cell cycle kinetics, as determined by the nucleation index, was lower in basocellular skin cancer patients as compared with healthy volunteers, indicating a more slow cell cycle. Our data showed that the lymphocytes from carcinoma basocellular patients were more radiosensitive as compared with those form healthy volunteers. (author). 159 refs., 21 figs., 16 tabs

  17. Psychiatric Problems in Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munevver Tunel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a physical disorder with concurrent mental and social components. During cancer, the feelings of fear, hopelessness, guilt, helplessness, abandonment perceived as a crisis leading to destruction in the suffering person. Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among cancer patients is approximately 50% and most of disorders are related with the occurrence of cancer and cancer treatment. Majority of patients present with major depression, adjustment disorder, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, suicidial ideation, and delirium. Treatment of psychiatric disorders and cancer therapy should be conducted along with special consideration of drug interactions. This article reviews the adaptation process experienced by individuals during diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, it psychological effects, resulting psychiatric comorbidites and their treatments. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(3.000: 189-219

  18. Sympathoadrenal and hypophyseal-adrenal systems in preoperative irradiation of patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarutinov, V.I.; Starosel'skij, I.V.; Gol'dshmidt, B.Ya.; Shmal'ko, Yu.P.; Levchenko, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of 74 patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer. Stages 3 and 4. The excretion of catecholamines, corticosteroids and their precursors was studied, tests with adrenalin before and after preoperative irradiation at a summary dose of 30 Gy were done. It has been shown that before the start of radiation therapy the excretion of catecholamines and corticosteroids is lowered, the reaction to adrenalin administration is negative in most patients, the phase syndrome of cardiac hypodynamics associated with disturbed function of the sympathoadrenal system was revealed. Preoperative irradiation in patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer results in an incres ased excretion of 17-ketosteroids (17-KS) and 17-ketogenic steroids, however 17-KS excretion does not reach the normal level. For better tolerance of irradiation and for a radiosensitization effect testenate is administered to patients before and during radiation therapy. The administration of testenate 7-10 days before the start and during radiotherapy proved to be effective Which was confirmed by noticeable necrobiotic and necrotic changes of cancer cells

  19. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Joana Pedro Lopes; Paula Manuela de Castro Cardoso Pereira; Ana Filipa dos Reis Baltazar Vicente; Alexandra Bernardo; María Fernanda de Mesquita

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery...

  20. Effect of radiotherapy on the natural killer (NK)-cell activity of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnes, K.; Florence, J.; Penny, R.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radiotherapy on peripheral blood natural killer (NK)-cell number and activity in 15 patients with cancer, prior to the commencement and at the completion of radiotherapy. The following observations were made. Prior to radiotherapy NK activity could not be correlated with the stage of malignancy. In all patients with advanced disease and with subnormal baseline NK activity, the outcome of radiotherapy was unfavorable. Following radiotherapy to sites including the mediastinum, patients had decreased NK activity compared with those receiving treatment to other sites. This decrease was not related to the dose of radiotherapy or stage of malignancy. The tumor response was favorable in most patients whose NK activity decreased as a result of radiotherapy. The decrease in NK activity may be associated with a decrease in the percentage of NK (N901) cells in the peripheral blood. The reduction in NK activity in those patients receiving mediastinal irradiation may be due to the large volume of blood which transits the field, so that the NK cells, or their more radiosensitive precursors, may be damaged and/or differentiation inhibited. Thus, these new observations show that radiotherapy does indeed affect the NK activity in cancer patients predominantly when the irradiation site includes the mediastinum

  1. Environmental and genetic interactions in human cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, M.C.

    Humans, depending upon their genetic make-up, differ in their susceptibility to the cancer-causing effects of extrinsic agents. Clinical and laboratory studies on the hereditary disorder, ataxia telangiectasia (AT) show that persons afflicted with this are cancer-prone and unusually sensitive to conventional radiotherapy. Their skin cells, when cultured, are hypersensitive to killing by ionizing radiation, being defective in the enzymatic repair of radiation-induced damange to the genetic material, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). This molecular finding implicates DNA damage and its imperfect repair as an early step in the induction of human cancer by radiation and other carcinogens. The parents of AT patients are clincally normal but their cultured cells are often moderately radiosensitive. The increased radiosensitivity of cultured cells offers a means of identifying a presumed cancer-prone subpopulation that should avoid undue exposure to certain carcinogens. The radioresponse of cells from patients with other cancer-associated genetic disorders and persons suspected of being genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer has also been measured. Increased cell killing by γ-rays appears in the complex genetic disease, tuberous sclerosis. Cells from cancer-stricken members of a leukemia-prone family are also radiosensitive, as are cells from one patient with radiation-associated breast cancer. These radiobiological data, taken together, strongly suggest that genetic factors can interact with extrinsic agents and thereby play a greater causative role in the development of common cancers in man than previously thought. (L.L.)

  2. Effect of electroporation on radiosensitization with cisplatin in two cell lines with different chemo- and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranjc, S.; Cemazar, M.; Grosel, A.; Pipan, Z.; Sersa, G.

    2003-01-01

    Aim. Radiosensitization with cisplatin can be enhanced by electroporation of cells and tumours. The aim of this study was to extend our previous studies on two carcinoma tumour models with different chemo- and radiosensitivity in order to evaluate whether this treatment is effective also on less chemo- and radiosensitive tumour cells. Materials and methods. This in vitro study was performed on carcinoma SCK and EAT-E cells. The cytotoxicity of three-modality treatment consisting of cisplatin, electroporation and irradiation was determined by the clonogenic assay. Results. The radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin on the two cell lines was greatly enhanced by electroporation. By this combined treatment, less chemo and radiosensitive EAT-E cells were rendered as sensitive as more chemo and radiosensitive SCK cells. Conclusion. The enhancement of cisplatin-induced radiosensitization of cells by electroporation could be beneficially used in the treatment of intrinsically less chemo- and radiosensitive tumours. (author)

  3. Unique proteomic signature for radiation sensitive patients; a comparative study between normo-sensitive and radiation sensitive breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiöld, Sara [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Azimzadeh, Omid [Institute of Radiation Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany); Merl-Pham, Juliane [Research Unit Protein Science, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg (Germany); Naslund, Ingemar; Wersall, Peter; Lidbrink, Elisabet [Division of Radiotherapy, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tapio, Soile [Institute of Radiation Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany); Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The unique protein expression profiles were found that separate radiosensitive from normal sensitive breast cancer patients. • The oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response suggested to be the hallmarks of radiation sensitivity. - Abstract: Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. Understanding the mechanisms behind normal tissue sensitivity is essential in order to minimize adverse side effects and yet to prevent local cancer reoccurrence. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of radiation sensitivity to enable personalized cancer treatment. To investigate the mechanisms behind radiation sensitivity a pilot study was made where eight radiation-sensitive and nine normo-sensitive patients were selected from a cohort of 2914 breast cancer patients, based on acute tissue reactions after radiation therapy. Whole blood was sampled and irradiated in vitro with 0, 1, or 150 mGy followed by 3 h incubation at 37 °C. The leukocytes of the two groups were isolated, pooled and protein expression profiles were investigated using isotope-coded protein labeling method (ICPL). First, leukocytes from the in vitro irradiated whole blood from normo-sensitive and extremely sensitive patients were compared to the non-irradiated controls. To validate this first study a second ICPL analysis comparing only the non-irradiated samples was conducted. Both approaches showed unique proteomic signatures separating the two groups at the basal level and after doses of 1 and 150 mGy. Pathway analyses of both proteomic approaches suggest that oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response are hallmarks of radiation sensitivity supporting our previous study on oxidative stress response. This investigation provides unique characteristics of radiation sensitivity essential for individualized radiation therapy.

  4. Unique proteomic signature for radiation sensitive patients; a comparative study between normo-sensitive and radiation sensitive breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiöld, Sara; Azimzadeh, Omid; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Naslund, Ingemar; Wersall, Peter; Lidbrink, Elisabet; Tapio, Soile; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The unique protein expression profiles were found that separate radiosensitive from normal sensitive breast cancer patients. • The oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response suggested to be the hallmarks of radiation sensitivity. - Abstract: Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. Understanding the mechanisms behind normal tissue sensitivity is essential in order to minimize adverse side effects and yet to prevent local cancer reoccurrence. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of radiation sensitivity to enable personalized cancer treatment. To investigate the mechanisms behind radiation sensitivity a pilot study was made where eight radiation-sensitive and nine normo-sensitive patients were selected from a cohort of 2914 breast cancer patients, based on acute tissue reactions after radiation therapy. Whole blood was sampled and irradiated in vitro with 0, 1, or 150 mGy followed by 3 h incubation at 37 °C. The leukocytes of the two groups were isolated, pooled and protein expression profiles were investigated using isotope-coded protein labeling method (ICPL). First, leukocytes from the in vitro irradiated whole blood from normo-sensitive and extremely sensitive patients were compared to the non-irradiated controls. To validate this first study a second ICPL analysis comparing only the non-irradiated samples was conducted. Both approaches showed unique proteomic signatures separating the two groups at the basal level and after doses of 1 and 150 mGy. Pathway analyses of both proteomic approaches suggest that oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response are hallmarks of radiation sensitivity supporting our previous study on oxidative stress response. This investigation provides unique characteristics of radiation sensitivity essential for individualized radiation therapy

  5. Guidelines Urge Exercise for Cancer Patients, Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benefits of exercise are well documented in a number of cancers. A panel of experts in cancer, fitness, obesity, and exercise training convened by the American College of Sports Medicine is spreading what they believe to be one of the most important messages for cancer patients and survivors: Avoid inactivity.

  6. A randomized double-blind phase III study of nimorazole as a hypoxic radiosensitizer of primary radiotherapy in supraglottic larynx and pharynx carcinoma. Results of the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study (DAHANCA) Protocol 5-85

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, J; Hansen, Hanne Sand; Overgaard, Marie

    1998-01-01

    A multicenter randomized and balanced double-blind trial with the objective of assessing the efficacy and tolerance of nimorazole given as a hypoxic radiosensitizer in conjunction with primary radiotherapy of invasive carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx and pharynx....

  7. Increased cancer risk in patients with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdar, Omer; Hayran, Mutlu; Guven, Deniz Can; Yılmaz, Tolga Birtan; Taheri, Sahand; Akman, Abdullah C; Bilgin, Emre; Hüseyin, Beril; Berker, Ezel

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have noted a possible association between periodontal diseases and the risk of various cancers. We assessed cancer risk in a cohort of patients with moderate to severe periodontitis. Patients diagnosed with moderate to severe periodontitis by a periodontist between 2001 and 2010 were identified from the hospital registry. Patients younger than 35 years of age or with a prior cancer diagnosis were excluded. The age- and gender-standardized incidence rates (SIR) were calculated by dividing the number of observed cases by the number of expected cases from Turkish National Cancer Registry 2013 data. A total of 280 patients were included (median age 49.6, 54% female). Median follow-up was 12 years. Twenty-five new cancer cases were observed. Patients with periodontitis had 77% increased risk of cancer (SIR 1.77, 95% CI 1.17-2.58, p = .004). Women with periodontitis had significantly higher risk of breast cancer (SIR 2.40, 95% CI 0.88-5.33) and men with periodontitis had significantly higher risk of prostate cancer (SIR 3.75, 95% CI 0.95-10.21) and hematological cancers (SIR 6.97, 95% CI 1.77-18.98). Although showing a causal association necessitates further investigation, our results support the idea that periodontitis might be associated with increased cancer risk, particularly with hematological, breast and prostate cancers.

  8. Bevacizumab in the treatment of five patients with breast cancer and brain metastases: Japan Breast Cancer Research Network-07 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Daigo Yamamoto,1,3 Satoru Iwase,2 Yu Tsubota,1 Noriko Sueoka,1 Chizuko Yamamoto,3 Kaoru Kitamura,4 Hiroki Odagiri,5 Yoshinori Nagumo61Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, 2Department of Palliative Medicine, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Seiko Hospital, Neyagawa, Osaka, 4Breast Unit, Nagumo Clinic, Fukuoka, 5Department of Surgery, Hirosaki National Hospital, Hirosaki, 6Breast Unit, Nagumo Clinic, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Brain metastases from breast cancer occur in 20%–40% of patients, and the frequency has increased over time. New radiosensitizers and cytotoxic or cytostatic agents, and innovative techniques of drug delivery are still under investigation.Methods: Five patients with brain metastases who did not respond to whole-brain radiotherapy and then received bevacizumab combined with paclitaxel were identified using our database of records between 2011 and 2012. The clinicopathological data and outcomes for these patients were then reviewed.Results: The median time to disease progression was 86 days. Of five patients, two (40% achieved a partial response, two had stable disease, and one had progressive disease. In addition, one patient with brain metastases had ptosis and diplopia due to metastases of the right extraocular muscles. However, not only the brain metastases, but also the ptosis and diplopia began to disappear after 1 month of treatment. The most common treatment-related adverse events (all grades were hypertension (60%, neuropathy (40%, and proteinuria (20%. No grade 3 toxicity was seen. No intracranial hemorrhage was observed.Conclusion: We present five patients with breast cancer and brain metastases, with benefits from systemic chemotherapy when combined with bevacizumab.Keywords: brain, bevacizumab, metastatic breast cancer

  9. Psychosocial coping strategies in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprah, L.; Sostaric, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The aim of this review is to present common psychosocial problems in cancer patients and their possible coping strategies. Cancer patients are occupied with many psychosocial problems, which are only partially related to their health state and medical treatments. They are faced with a high social pressure, based on prejudices and stereotypes of this illness. The review presents the process of confrontation with the cancer diagnosis and of managing the psychological consequences of cancer. The effects of specific coping styles, psychosocial interventions and a social support on initiation, progression and recurrence of cancer are also described. Conclusions. Although some recent meta-analysis could not provide scientific evidence for the association between coping strategies and the cancer initiation, the progression or the recurrence (neither have studies rejected the thesis of association), the therapeutic window for the psychosocial intervention is still wide and shows an important effect on the quality of lives of many cancer patients. (author)

  10. Studies of serial serum electrophoretic pattern for prognosis in various cancer patients during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra, Woo Youn; Woo, Won Hyung

    1971-01-01

    During the period from June. 1969 to Dec. 1970, the serum protein electrophoretic patterns of 44 cases of various cancer patients have been studied to determine the alterations in serum protein fractions in patients who were responding to irradiation or those failing. The serum electrophoretic pattern could be observed as an indicator of prognosis or radiosensitivity. A blood sample was obtained prior to any treatment and the follow up sampling was performed 2 times during radiation therapy. Serum total protein was determined by the method of Wolfson and serum electrophoresis was carried out by using Spinoco Model R B electrophoresis system. The results were following: Seven cases out of cases of cervical cancer responding favorably to radiotherapy showed decreased in Alpha-2 globulin fraction were increased. A case whose third time serum electrophoretic pattern showed multiple myeloma type died 5 months after radiotherapy with bone metastasis. Four cases out of 9 cases of favorably responded breast cancer patients showed decreased in Alpha-2 globulin foraction compared with 2 cases of unfavorable response showed increased in Alpha-2 globulin fraction

  11. Studies of serial serum electrophoretic pattern for prognosis in various cancer patients during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ra, Woo Youn; Woo, Won Hyung [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-10-15

    During the period from June. 1969 to Dec. 1970, the serum protein electrophoretic patterns of 44 cases of various cancer patients have been studied to determine the alterations in serum protein fractions in patients who were responding to irradiation or those failing. The serum electrophoretic pattern could be observed as an indicator of prognosis or radiosensitivity. A blood sample was obtained prior to any treatment and the follow up sampling was performed 2 times during radiation therapy. Serum total protein was determined by the method of Wolfson and serum electrophoresis was carried out by using Spinoco Model R B electrophoresis system. The results were following: Seven cases out of cases of cervical cancer responding favorably to radiotherapy showed decreased in Alpha-2 globulin fraction were increased. A case whose third time serum electrophoretic pattern showed multiple myeloma type died 5 months after radiotherapy with bone metastasis. Four cases out of 9 cases of favorably responded breast cancer patients showed decreased in Alpha-2 globulin foraction compared with 2 cases of unfavorable response showed increased in Alpha-2 globulin fraction.

  12. Membrane specific drugs as radiosensitizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, K.C.; Mishra, K.P.; Shenoy, M.A.; Singh, B.B.; Srinivasan, V.T.; Verma, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Procaine, paracetamol, and chlorpromazine showed inhibition of post irradiation repair. The chlorpromazie effect could be further augmented by treatment of cells with procaine. Chlorpromazine was also found to be preferentially toxic to hypoxid bacterial cells, and the survivors showed extreme radiosensitivity to gamma rays. Chlorpromazine was found to inhibit tumour growth in swiss mice when given intraperitoneally as well as when injected directly into the tumour. When combined with single x-ray doses, significant radiosensitization was observed in two in vivo tumours sarcoma 180A and fibrosarcoma. These results indicated that chlorpromazine may prove a good drug for combined chemo-radiotherapy of solid tumours. Investigations continued studying various aspects such as effectiveness in other tumour lines, distribution in healthy and tumour bearing animals, hyperthermia and drug combination effects, and encapsulation of the drug in artificial liposomes and blood cells. (ERB)

  13. Preferential radiosensitization of human prostatic carcinoma cells by mild hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Samuel; Brown, Stephen L.; Kim, Sang-Hie; Khil, Mark S.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Recent cell culture studies by us and others suggest that some human carcinoma cells are more sensitive to heat than are rodent cells following mild hyperthermia. In studying the cellular mechanism of enhanced thermosensitivity of human tumor cells to hyperthermia, prostatic carcinoma cells of human origin were found to be more sensitive to mild hyperthermia than other human cancer cells. The present study was designed to determine the magnitude of radiosensitization of human prostatic carcinoma cells by mild hyperthermia and to examine whether the thermal radiosensitization is related to the intrinsic thermosensitivity of cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Two human prostatic carcinoma cell lines (DU-145 and PC-3) and other carcinoma cells of human origin, in particular, colon (HT-29), breast (MCF-7), lung (A-549), and brain (U-251) were exposed to temperatures of 40-41 deg. C. Single acute dose rate radiation and fractionated radiation were combined with mild hyperthermia to determine thermal radiosensitization. The end point of the study was the colony-forming ability of single-plated cells. Results: DU-145 and PC-3 cells were found to be exceedingly thermosensitive to 41 deg. C for 24 h, relative to other cancer cell lines. Ninety percent of the prostatic cancer cells were killed by a 24 h heat exposure. Prostatic carcinoma cells exposed to a short duration of heating at 41 deg. C for 2 h resulted in a substantial enhancement of radiation-induced cytotoxicity. The thermal enhancement ratios (TERs) of single acute dose radiation following heat treatment 41 deg. C for 2 h were 2.0 in DU-145 cells and 1.4 in PC-3 cells. The TERs of fractionated irradiation combined with continuous heating at 40 deg. C were similarly in the range of 2.1 to 1.4 in prostate carcinoma cells. No significant radiosensitization was observed in MCF-7 and HT-29 cells under the same conditions. Conclusion: The present data suggest that a significant radiosensitization of

  14. Radiosensitivity of garlic air bulbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhila, Eh.D.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents data on the radiosensitivity of various sorts of garlic. It is shown that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the irradiated aerial bulbs of stemmed varieties of garlic is directly dependent upon the gmma-ray dose. With increasing dose the germination capacity and the viability of the plants diminishes. A dose of 750 r was found to be critical for the bulbs of the garlic varieties studied

  15. Local-regional control in breast cancer patients with a possible genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Laura M.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Thames, Howard D.; Strom, Eric A.; McNeese, Marsha D.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Singletary, S. Eva; Heaton, Keith M.; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2000-01-01

    %, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with a possible genetic predisposition to breast cancer had low 5-year rates of local recurrence when treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation, but the local failure rate exceeded 50% when radiation was omitted. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that patients with an underlying genetic predisposition develop cancers with radiosensitive phenotypes

  16. Studies on Drosophila radiosensitivity strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsova, E.R.; Sharygin, V.I.; Khromykh, Yu.U.

    1985-01-01

    Fertility of radiosensitive mutant drosophila female strain rad (2) 201 61 after irradiation and frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM), induced by γ-radiation for 0-5 h and 5-7 days, are investigated. It is shown, that oocytes of the mutant strain are more radiosensitive as compared with cells of mongrel flies as to criterion of DLM appearance over the period of maturing. Early oocytes of stages 2-7 are the most sensitive, i.e. at the stages, corresponding to the manifestation of previously established recombination-defective properties of mutations rad (2) 201 61 . It is also sown, that doses of γ-rays, exceeding 10 Gy produce a strong sterilizing effect on mutant females due to destruction and resorption of egg chambers, irradiated at the stages of previtellogenetic growth of oocytes. In females, carrying mutation of radiosensitivity there is no direct correlation betwen sensitivity of oocytes proper to DLM induction and sensitivity of egg folleicles to resorbing effect of γ-rays. The ways of possible involvement of mutant locus studied into genetic processes in various specialized cells of drosophila

  17. Cancer screening in patients infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, Keith; Dubrow, Robert; Silverberg, Michael; Crothers, Kristina; Braithwaite, Scott; Justice, Amy

    2011-09-01

    Non-AIDS-defining cancers are a rising health concern among HIV-infected patients. Cancer screening is now an important component of health maintenance in HIV clinical practice. The decision to screen an HIV-infected patient for cancer should include an assessment of individualized risk for the particular cancer, life expectancy, and the harms and benefits associated with the screening test and its potential outcome. HIV-infected patients are at enhanced risk of several cancers compared to the general population; anal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and lung cancer all have good evidence demonstrating an enhanced risk in HIV-infected persons. A number of cancer screening interventions have shown benefit for specific cancers in the general population, but data on the application of these tests to HIV-infected persons are limited. Here we review the epidemiology and background literature relating to cancer screening interventions in HIV-infected persons. We then use these data to inform a conceptual model for evaluating HIV-infected patients for cancer screening.

  18. Circulating procoagulant microparticles in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Thaler, Johannes; Ay, Cihan; Weinstabl, Harald; Dunkler, Daniela; Simanek, Ralph; Vormittag, Rainer; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie; Zielinski, Christoph; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Accumulating evidence indicates that microparticles (MPs) are important mediators of the interaction between cancer and the hemostatic system. We conducted a large prospective cohort study to determine whether the number of circulating procoagulant MPs is elevated in cancer patients and whether the elevated MP levels are predictive of occurrence of venous thrombembolism (VTE). We analyzed plasma samples of 728 cancer patients from the ongoing prospective observational Vien...

  19. Fostering hope in the patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichwala, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    When a patient is diagnosed with cancer, feelings such as fear, anxiety, and hopelessness can negatively affect a person's frame of mind. Hope can help a patient decrease anxiety and increase quality of life. Nurses should assess hope, provide interventions, be empathetic, listen, and treat patients with dignity to help improve hope and quality of life. This article features how hope can have a positive impact and provides specific information about how nurses can promote and foster hope in patients with cancer.

  20. Taste and smell changes in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJpma, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cancer often experience changes in taste and smell perception during chemotherapy. The aim of this dissertation was to investigate taste and smell changes and short- and long-term effects of chemotherapy in a homogeneous population of testicular cancer patients treated with

  1. Haemorheological Changes in African Breast Cancer Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    complications, African patients with breast cancer may well be predisposed to thrombotic complications during illness. ... having breast cancer were studied. The patients were diagnosed by one of the authors from histological biopsy from the lump removed from the breast. None of ... statistics (Student's t-test for paired data.

  2. Comparison of radiosensitivities of human autologous normal and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.C.; Kopecky, K.J.; Hiraoka, T.; Ezaki, H.; Clifton, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted to examine differences between the radiosensitivities of normal and neoplastic epithelial cells of the human thyroid. Freshly excised thyroid tissues from the tumours of eight patients with papillary carcinoma (PC) and five with follicular adenoma (FA) were cultured in vitro separately from normal thyroid tissue obtained from the surgical margins of the same patients. Plating efficiency of unirradiated control tissue was lower, on average for tumour tissue compared with normal tissue. Radiosensitivity, measured by the 37% inactivation dose D 0 , was greater for carcinoma tissue than for normal tissue in seven out of eight PC cases. Adenomatous tissue was less radiosensitive than normal tissue in four out of five FA cases. This is the first report comparing the radiosensitivity of autologous normal and abnormal epithelial tissue from the human thyroid. (author)

  3. Modulation of radiosensitivity by growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, F.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of the publication follows. For the past 70 years, radiotherapy protocols were defined to target and kill cancer cells. New research developments showed that the tissue or tumor radiosensitivities might be directly modulated by its own microenvironment. Between all the micro-environmental cells, endothelial cells are playing a unique role due to the need of angio-genesis for tumor genesis and to the microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis involved in acute normal tissue and tumor radiosensitivities. Both endothelial behaviours may be controlled by specific growth factors secreted by tumor cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are two cytokines involved in angio genesis and endothelial cell survival. Because radiation exposure develops opposite molecular and cellular responses by inhibiting proliferation and by enhancing apoptosis, inhibiting these cytokines has been proposed as a relevant strategy to improve radiotherapy efficiency. Drugs or antibody against VEGF, or other growth factors have been used with success to limit endothelial cell resistance, but also to transiently normalize of blood vessels to improve oxygen distribution into the tumor. However, better characterisation of the role of the cytokines will help to better improve the strategy of the use of their antagonists. We demonstrate that bFGF or sphingosin 1 phosphate (S1P), a lipid endothelial growth factor, protects endothelial cells from radiation stress by inhibiting the pre-mitotic apoptosis through enhancement of pro-survival molecular cascade, such as the Pi3K/AKT pathway, but not post-mitotic death. This discrepancy allowed a specific use of S1P as pharmacological drug protecting quiescent endothelial cells, present in normal tissue blood vessels, but not in proliferating angiogenic blood vessels, majority present in tumor blood vessel. In vivo studies are underway. (author)

  4. Causes of death among cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaorsky, N G; Churilla, T M; Egleston, B L; Fisher, S G; Ridge, J A; Horwitz, E M; Meyer, J E

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to characterize the causes of death among cancer patients as a function of objectives: (i) calendar year, (ii) patient age, and (iii) time after diagnosis. US death certificate data in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Stat 8.2.1 were used to categorize cancer patient death as being due to index-cancer, nonindex-cancer, and noncancer cause from 1973 to 2012. In addition, data were characterized with standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), which provide the relative risk of death compared with all persons. The greatest relative decrease in index-cancer death (generally from > 60% to deaths were stable (typically >40%) among patients with cancers of the liver, pancreas, esophagus, and lung, and brain. Noncancer causes of death were highest in patients with cancers of the colorectum, bladder, kidney, endometrium, breast, prostate, testis; >40% of deaths from heart disease. The highest SMRs were from nonbacterial infections, particularly among 1,000 for lymphomas, P death from index- and nonindex-cancers varies widely among primary sites. Risk of noncancer deaths now surpasses that of cancer deaths, particularly for young patients in the year after diagnosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Thyroid cancer outcomes in Filipino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Lukas H; Shah, Manish; Eski, Spiro; Walfish, Paul G; Freeman, Jeremy L

    2010-02-01

    To compare the outcomes of patients having thyroid cancer among Filipinos vs non-Filipinos. Retrospective medical record review. High-volume tertiary referral center in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. A total of 499 patients with thyroid cancer (36 Filipino and 463 non-Filipino) treated at Mount Sinai Hospital from January 1, 1984, to August 31, 2003, with a minimum 5-year follow-up period and a minimum 1.0-cm tumor size. Patients were identified from a thyroid cancer database. Data on patient, tumor, and treatment factors were collected along with outcomes. The presence of thyroid cancer recurrence, the rate of death from disease, and the time to recurrence. The 2 groups were similar for sex, age, history of head and neck radiation exposure, family history of thyroid cancer, follow-up time, tumor size, tumor pathologic findings, presence of tumor multifocality, stage of primary disease, type of thyroid surgery, use of postoperative radioactive iodine therapy, and use of external beam radiation therapy. Filipino patients experienced a thyroid cancer recurrence rate of 25% compared with 9.5% for non-Filipino patients (odds ratio, 3.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-7.49; P = .004). On multivariate analysis, the increased risk of thyroid cancer recurrence persisted for Filipino patients (odds ratio, 6.99; 95% confidence interval, 2.31-21.07; P Filipino patients and non-Filipino patients regarding the rate of death from disease (5.6% vs 1.9%) and the time to recurrence (52.6 vs 53.1 months). Filipino patients have a significantly higher risk of thyroid cancer recurrence compared with non-Filipino patients. However, no significant difference was noted in the time to recurrence or the rate of death from disease. These findings justify a more aggressive initial management and follow-up regimen for Filipino patients with thyroid cancer.

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Odd Jarle; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2013-02-19

    The criteria for refraining from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients are based on patients' right to refuse treatment and the duty of the treating personnel not to exacerbate their suffering and not to administer futile treatment. When is cardiopulmonary resuscitation futile in these patients? Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed for the period 1989-2010 on the results of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in advanced cancer patients and on factors that affected the results of CPR when special mention was made of cancer. The searches yielded 333 hits and 18 included articles: four meta-analyses, eight retrospective clinical studies, and six review articles. Cancer patients had a poorer post-CPR survival than non-cancer patients. Survival declined with increasing extent of the cancer disease. Widespread and therapy-resistant cancer disease coupled with a performance status lower than WHO 2 or a PAM score (Pre-Arrest Morbidity Index) of above 8 was regarded as inconsistent with survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is futile for in-hospital cancer patients with widespread incurable disease and poor performance status.

  7. Effect of Gamma Radiation on Amino Acid Based Vesicle Carrying Radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Ratasha Alia Mohd Rosli; Faizal Mohamed; Muhammad Amir Syafiq Mohd Sah; Irman Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Vesicles has been developed and studied to be used as a medium to transport radiosensitizer in treating cancer cells by increasing its sensitivity effectively towards the radiation given during radiotherapy. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of gamma radiation on amino acid-based vesicle carrying radiosensitizer. Amino acid based vesicles carrying radiosensitizer were synthesized using sonication method with sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate and decanol being the primary surfactant, while hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate as the encapsulated radiosensitizer. The synthesized vesicle was then irradiated at radiation doses equivalent to those given during radiotherapy. Irradiated vesicle carrying radiosensitizer were then characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Polarized Light Microscope. Results obtained shows that there were no significant changes in morphology and molecular conformation of the synthesized vesicle after irradiation. Even at higher radiation dose of 100 Gray and 200 Gray, the results remained unchanged. This indicates that the synthesized vesicle carrying radiosensitizer is morphologically and spectroscopically stable even at high radiation doses. (author)

  8. Effect of radiotherapy on the immunocompetence in patients with bronchogenic carcinoma and laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi

    1981-01-01

    We evaluated the immunocompetence of 80 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma and 17 patients with laryngeal cancer undergoing radiotherapy, using collectively many types of immunological parameters. In patients with bronchogenic carcinoma, no significant difference was seen with PHA and PPD skin tests, but the reactivity of PHA skin tests gradually decreased in the course of treatment. It was assumed that radiotherapy might not interfere with the recognition of antigen. Lymphocyte blastoid transformations with PHA, Con A and PWM were all inhibited significantly. Since these three mitogens can stimulate the different groups of lymphocyte, the inhibition to the proliferative function of lymphocyte due to radiotherapy would seem to cover a wide area, including T and B lymphocyte. Concerning the comparative radiosensitivity of T and B lymphocyte, no significant result was obtained. However, in the dose of 20Gy the percentage of T lymphocyte decreased, while the percentage of B lymphocyte increased. The percentage of early rosetts, one subset of T cell, decreased more sensitively than that of T cell, but there was no significant difference. Immunocompetence of cases in stage III, which was significantly high before treatment, decreased to the same level as those in stage IV according to the treatment. In patients with laryngeal cancer, lymphocyte counts and reactivity of PHA skin tests were not influenced by radiotherapy, and then reactivity of PPD skin tests and lymphocyte blastoid transformations with PHA and Con A tended to increase instead. (J.P.N.)

  9. Pharmacokinetics of metronidazole and its effect on the body during its use as a radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'vin, B.M.; Polyakov, P.Yu.; Zimina, E.S.; Dar'yalova, S.L.; Kiseleva, E.S.; Sokolova, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    During gamma-beam therapy (40-60 Gy) a study was made of the content of metronidazole (MZ) in the blood of 20 patients with oral mucosa cancer and 12 patients with esophageal cancer devending on a mode of its administration. A MZ effect on liver apd renal fUnction was studied. MZ was administered to the patients with cancer of both sites on the first 3 days of radiation therapy 3 h before an enlarged fraction of 4 Gy, estimated at 145 mg per 1 kg body mass (8-10 g) per os or via a gastrostoma and 15 h in rectal administration. In the patients with oral mucosa cancer after the administration of MZ per os its level which was sufficient for radiosensitization, was achieved after 2 h and remained for subsequent 4 h with maximum accumulation of 262-+22 μg/ml in