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Sample records for radionuclide rebreathing system

  1. 21 CFR 892.1390 - Radionuclide rebreathing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... gaseous or volatile radionuclide or a radionuclide-labeled aerosol and permit it to be respired by the patient during nuclear medicine ventilatory tests (testing process of exchange between the lungs and the...

  2. The value of closed-circuit rebreathers for biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Richrad L.; Lobel, Phillip S.; Tomoleoni, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Closed-circuit rebreathers have been used for underwater biological research since the late 1960s, but have only started to gain broader application within scientific diving organizations within the past two decades. Rebreathers offer certain specific advantages for such research, especially for research involving behavior and surveys that depend on unobtrusive observers or for a stealthy approach to wildlife for capture and tagging, research that benefits from extended durations underwater, and operations requiring access to relatively deep (>50 m) environments (especially in remote locations). Although many institutions have been slow to adopt rebreather technology within their diving programs, recent developments in rebreather technology that improve safety, standardize training requirements, and reduce costs of equipment and maintenance, will likely result in a trend of increasing utilization of rebreathers for underwater biological research.

  3. Right-to-left shunt determination in dog lungs under inhalation anesthesia with rebreathing and non-rebreathing system Determinação de shunt venoso-arterial em pulmões de cães sob anestesia geral inalatória por sistemas com e sem reinalação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Leguthe Rosa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigatge right-to-left shunt determination in dog lungs under inhalantion anesthesia with non-rebreathing and rebreathing systems and fraction of inspired oxygen (F I O2 of 0.9 and 0.4, respectively. METHODS: Two groups of 10 dogs each under inhalation anesthesia with sevoflurane: GI in which it was utilized non-rebreathing semiclosed system and F I O2 = 0.9, and GII in which it was utilized rebreathing semiclosed system and F I O2 = 0.4. The study parameters were: heart rate, medium arterial pressure, right-to-left intrapulmonary shunt, hematocrit, hemoglobin, arterial partial pressure of oxygen, mixed venous partial pressure of oxygen, mixed venous oxygen saturation, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, partial pressure of water in the alveoli. RESULTS: Shunt results were significantly different between the two groups - GI data were higher than GII in all the evaluated moments. Hence, the group with nonrebreathing (GI developed a superior grade of intrapulmonary shunt when compared with the rebreathing group (GII. The partial pressure of water in the alveoli was significantly higher in GII. CONCLUSION: The inhalation anesthesia with non-rebreathing system and F I O2 = 0.9 developed a higher grade of intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt when compared with the rebreathing system and F I O2 = 0.4. The higher humidity in GII contributed to the result.OBJETIVO: Comparar a formação de shunt venoso-arterial em pulmões de cães submetidos a anestesia geral inalatória utilizando-se sistemas de anestesia com e sem reinalação, com fração inspirada de oxigênio de 0,4 e 0,9, respectivamente. MÉTODOS: Empregaram-se 20 cães induzidos com tiopental sódico (30mg/kg e mantidos com sevoflurano (3% e alocados em dois grupos (n=10; os animais de GI foram ventilados com modalidade controlada em sistema semifechado, sem reinalação, F I O2 = 0,9, e os de GII, com modalidade controlada, sistema semifechado, com reinalação e F I O2

  4. Thermodilution versus inert gas rebreathing for estimation of effective pulmonary blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P; Clemensen, P; Andersen, P K

    2000-01-01

    To compare measurements of the effective pulmonary blood flow (Qep, i.e., nonshunted fraction of cardiac output, Qt) by the inert gas rebreathing (RB) method and the thermodilution (TD) technique in critically ill patients.......To compare measurements of the effective pulmonary blood flow (Qep, i.e., nonshunted fraction of cardiac output, Qt) by the inert gas rebreathing (RB) method and the thermodilution (TD) technique in critically ill patients....

  5. Surface and 60 FSW Performance Testing of the Modified MBS 2000 Closed Circuit Oxygen Rebreather

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fothergill, David

    2007-01-01

    ... into the system during a treatment. Since all previous testing had been performed at 1 ATA, a second major objective for the FY06 tests was to evaluate the modified MBS 2000 rebreather at 60 fsw in a hyperbaric chamber...

  6. Central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity: a rebreathing demonstration illustrating integrative human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Christina M; Skow, Rachel J; Tymko, Michael M; Boulet, Lindsey M; Davenport, Margie H; Steinback, Craig D; Ainslie, Philip N; Lemieux, Chantelle C M; Day, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    One of the most effective ways of engaging students of physiology and medicine is through laboratory demonstrations and case studies that combine 1) the use of equipment, 2) problem solving, 3) visual representations, and 4) manipulation and interpretation of data. Depending on the measurements made and the type of test, laboratory demonstrations have the added benefit of being able to show multiple organ system integration. Many research techniques can also serve as effective demonstrations of integrative human physiology. The "Duffin" hyperoxic rebreathing test is often used in research settings as a test of central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. We aimed to demonstrate the utility of the hyperoxic rebreathing test for both respiratory and cerebrovascular responses to increases in CO2 and illustrate the integration of the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems. In the present article, methods such as spirometry, respiratory gas analysis, and transcranial Doppler ultrasound are described, and raw data traces can be adopted for discussion in a tutorial setting. If educators have these instruments available, instructions on how to carry out the test are provided so students can collect their own data. In either case, data analysis and quantification are discussed, including principles of linear regression, calculation of slope, the coefficient of determination (R(2)), and differences between plotting absolute versus normalized data. Using the hyperoxic rebreathing test as a demonstration of the complex interaction and integration between the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems provides senior undergraduate, graduate, and medical students with an advanced understanding of the integrative nature of human physiology. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  7. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is an... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system... include patient and equipment supports, component parts, treatment planning computer programs, and...

  8. The radionuclide migration model in river system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukova, O.M.; Shiryaeva, N.M.; Myshkina, M.K.; Shagalova, Eh.D.; Denisova, V.V.; Skurat, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    It was propose the model of radionuclide migration in river system based on principle of the compartmental model at hydraulically stationary and chemically equilibrium conditions of interaction of radionuclides in system water-dredge, water-sediments. Different conditions of radioactive contamination entry in river system were considered. The model was verified on the data of radiation monitoring of Iput' river

  9. 21 CFR 892.5650 - Manual radionuclide applicator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... system. (a) Identification. A manual radionuclide applicator system is a manually operated device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual radionuclide applicator system. 892.5650.... This generic type of device may include patient and equipment supports, component parts, treatment...

  10. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit an... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... patient's body. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and display equipment, patient and...

  11. Development of a transportable system for radionuclide analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, W.C.; Anderson, D.L.; Lamont, W.H.; South, P.K.; Rury, M.A.; Beachley, G.M.; Ondov, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Transportable radioanalytical systems were assembled and tested for quantitative determination of γ-emitting radionuclides and screening of β- emitting radionuclides. Standard operating procedures (SOPs), including instructions for assembly, disassembly, operation, sample collection and analysis, and all other procedures needed, were developed. Foods, as well as National Institute of Standards and Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, and in-house Reference Materials were analyzed. An SOP for γ-emitting radionuclides was successfully tested at 3 locations. (author)

  12. New radionuclide generator systems for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atcher, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A current emphasis in nuclear medicine is to better match the physical lifetime of the radionuclides used in vivo for diagnosis and treatment to the biological lifetime of the diagnostic procedure or to minimize radiation dose to areas other than those to be treated. In many cases the biological lifetime is on the order of minutes. Since the direct production of radionuclides with half lives of minutes requires the user to be near a suitable reactor or accelerator, this study was undertaken to produce short-lived radionuclides indirectly. If a long-lived radionuclide decays into a short-lived radionuclide, quick separation of the daughter activity from the parent enables the user to have a short-lived daughter while freeing him from the constraint of proximity to a cyclotron. Systems where a short-lived daughter is separated from a long-lived parent are called radionuclide generators. Two generator systems were developed for use in nuclear medicine, one in diagnostic work and the other for therapeutic work. The yield and breakthrough characteristics were within the limits required to minimize unnecessary radiation exposure in patients. Two parent radionuclides were produced using 4 He beams available from medium energy cyclotrons. The yield was high enough to produce generators that would be useful in clinical applications

  13. Cardiac output by pulse contour analysis does not match the increase measured by rebreathing during human spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, Richard L; Peterson, Sean D; Yee, Nicholas J; Greaves, Danielle K

    2017-11-01

    Pulse contour analysis of the noninvasive finger arterial pressure waveform provides a convenient means to estimate cardiac output (Q̇). The method has been compared with standard methods under a range of conditions but never before during spaceflight. We compared pulse contour analysis with the Modelflow algorithm to estimates of Q̇ obtained by rebreathing during preflight baseline testing and during the final month of long-duration spaceflight in nine healthy male astronauts. By Modelflow analysis, stroke volume was greater in supine baseline than seated baseline or inflight. Heart rate was reduced in supine baseline so that there were no differences in Q̇ by Modelflow estimate between the supine (7.02 ± 1.31 l/min, means ± SD), seated (6.60 ± 1.95 l/min), or inflight (5.91 ± 1.15 l/min) conditions. In contrast, rebreathing estimates of Q̇ increased from seated baseline (4.76 ± 0.67 l/min) to inflight (7.00 ± 1.39 l/min, significant interaction effect of method and spaceflight, P < 0.001). Pulse contour analysis utilizes a three-element Windkessel model that incorporates parameters dependent on aortic pressure-area relationships that are assumed to represent the entire circulation. We propose that a large increase in vascular compliance in the splanchnic circulation invalidates the model under conditions of spaceflight. Future spaceflight research measuring cardiac function needs to consider this important limitation for assessing absolute values of Q̇ and stroke volume. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Noninvasive assessment of cardiac function during human spaceflight is an important tool to monitor astronaut health. This study demonstrated that pulse contour analysis of finger arterial blood pressure to estimate cardiac output failed to track the 46% increase measured by a rebreathing method. These results strongly suggest that alternative methods not dependent on pulse contour analysis are required to track cardiac function in spaceflight

  14. Multibarrier system preventing migration of radionuclides from radioactive waste repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olszewska Wioleta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Safety of radioactive waste repositories operation is associated with a multibarrier system designed and constructed to isolate and contain the waste from the biosphere. Each of radioactive waste repositories is equipped with system of barriers, which reduces the possibility of release of radionuclides from the storage site. Safety systems may differ from each other depending on the type of repository. They consist of the natural geological barrier provided by host rocks of the repository and its surroundings, and an engineered barrier system (EBS. The EBS may itself comprise a variety of sub-systems or components, such as waste forms, canisters, buffers, backfills, seals and plugs. The EBS plays a major role in providing the required disposal system performance. It is assumed that the metal canisters and system of barriers adequately isolate waste from the biosphere. The evaluation of the multibarrier system is carried out after detailed tests to determine its parameters, and after analysis including mathematical modeling of migration of contaminants. To provide an assurance of safety of radioactive waste repository multibarrier system, detailed long term safety assessments are developed. Usually they comprise modeling of EBS stability, corrosion rate and radionuclide migration in near field in geosphere and biosphere. The principal goal of radionuclide migration modeling is assessment of the radionuclides release paths and rate from the repository, radionuclides concentration in geosphere in time and human exposure to ionizing radiation

  15. Features of the non-contact carotid pressure waveform: Cardiac and vascular dynamics during rebreathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaccia, S.; Sirevaag, E. J.; Richter, E. J.; O'Sullivan, J. A.; Scalise, L.; Rohrbaugh, J. W.

    2016-10-01

    This report amplifies and extends prior descriptions of the use of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) as a method for assessing cardiovascular activity, on a non-contact basis. A rebreathing task (n = 35 healthy individuals) was used to elicit multiple effects associated with changes in autonomic drive as well as blood gases including hypercapnia. The LDV pulse was obtained from two sites overlying the carotid artery, separated by 40 mm. A robust pulse signal was obtained from both sites, in accord with the well-described changes in carotid diameter over the blood pressure cycle. Emphasis was placed on extracting timing measures from the LDV pulse, which could serve as surrogate measures of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the associated arterial stiffness. For validation purposes, a standard measure of pulse transit time (PTT) to the radial artery was obtained using a tonometric sensor. Two key measures of timing were extracted from the LDV pulse. One involved the transit time along the 40 mm distance separating the two LDV measurement sites. A second measure involved the timing of a late feature of the LDV pulse contour, which was interpreted as reflection wave latency and thus a measure of round-trip travel time. Both LDV measures agreed with the conventional PTT measure, in disclosing increased PWV during periods of active rebreathing. These results thus provide additional evidence that measures based on the non-contact LDV technique might provide surrogate measures for those obtained using conventional, more obtrusive assessment methods that require attached sensors.

  16. Methods and systems for detection of radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Jr., John T.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2010-05-25

    Disclosed are materials and systems useful in determining the existence of radionuclides in an aqueous sample. The materials provide the dual function of both extraction and scintillation to the systems. The systems can be both portable and simple to use, and as such can beneficially be utilized to determine presence and optionally concentration of radionuclide contamination in an aqueous sample at any desired location and according to a relatively simple process without the necessity of complicated sample handling techniques. The disclosed systems include a one-step process, providing simultaneous extraction and detection capability, and a two-step process, providing a first extraction step that can be carried out in a remote field location, followed by a second detection step that can be carried out in a different location.

  17. A model for radionuclide transport in the Cooling Water System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahook, S.D.

    1992-08-01

    A radionuclide transport model developed to assess radiological levels in the K-reactor Cooling Water System (CWS) in the event of an inadvertent process water (PW) leakage to the cooling water (CW) in the heat exchangers (HX) is described. During and following a process water leak, the radionuclide transport model determines the time-dependent release rates of radionuclide from the cooling water system to the environment via evaporation to the atmosphere and blow-down to the Savannah River. The developed model allows for delay times associated with the transport of the cooling water radioactivity through cooling water system components. Additionally, this model simulates the time-dependent behavior of radionuclides levels in various CWS components. The developed model is incorporated into the K-reactor Cooling Tower Activity (KCTA) code. KCTA allows the accident (heat exchanger leak rate) and the cooling tower blow-down and evaporation rates to be described as time-dependent functions. Thus, the postulated leak and the consequence of the assumed leak can be modelled realistically. This model is the first of three models to be ultimately assembled to form a comprehensive Liquid Pathway Activity System (LPAS). LPAS will offer integrated formation, transport, deposition, and release estimates for radionuclides formed in a SRS facility. Process water and river water modules are forthcoming as input and downstream components, respectively, for KCTA

  18. Radionuclide distributions and sorption behavior in the Susquehanna--Chesapeake Bay System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; McLean, R.I.; Domotor, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Radionuclides released into the Susquehanna--Chesapeake System from the Three Mile Island, Peach Bottom, and Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plants are partitioned among dissolved, particulate, and biological phases and may thus exist in a number of physical and chemical forms. In this project, we have measured the dissolved and particulate distributions of fallout 137 Cs; reactor-released 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 65 Zn, 60 Co, and 58 Co; and naturally occurring 7 Be and 210 Pb in the lower Susquehanna River and Upper Chesapeake Bay. In addition, we chemically leached suspended particles and bottom sediments in the laboratory to determine radionuclide partitioning among different particulate-sorbing phases to complement the site-specific field data. This information has been used to document the important geochemical processes that affect the transport, sorption, distribution, and fate of reactor-released radionuclides (and by analogy, other trace contaminants) in this river-estuarine system. Knowledge of the mechanisms, kinetic factors, and processes that affect radionuclide distributions is crucial for predicting their biological availability, toxicity, chemical behavior, physical transport, and accumulation in aquatic systems. The results from this project provide the information necessary for developing accurate radionuclide-transport and biological-uptake models. 76 refs., 12 figs

  19. Principles of radionuclide studies of the genitourinary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.E.; Pjura, G.A.; Lowry, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical assessment of renal diseases with radionuclide procedures is discussed. It has achieved general recognition only during the last decade. The proper assessment of renal function with radionuclides provides useful information for the management of patients with renal disease and renal transplant recipients. Renal imaging with radionuclides gives some information on morphology and the integrity of the urinary collecting system, but more importantly it provides functional information that may include renal blood flow or effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the quantitation of differential renal function, the evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux, the quantitation of postvoiding residual urine volume, and the differential diagnosis of testicular disease. Acute renal failure resulting from acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephirits, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized by radionuclide studies. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy also may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may reveal such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis, or infiltrative renal disease. Finally, nuclear study in transplant recipients is useful to help differentiate rejection from acute tubular necrosis and other causes of reduced renal function

  20. A data acquisition system for a radionuclide laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reher, D.; Idzerda, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    The concept and installation of a computer system for use in a radionuclide laboratory is described. It consists of a hierarchical star network of distributed intelligence. The system installation was spread over several years in three phases which made an economical solution possible. (orig.)

  1. Washing of Cloth Contaminated with Radionuclides Using a Detergent-free Laundry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Sung Paal

    2005-07-01

    In this study, a new laundry system to wash clothes without using detergent (detergent-free) was applied to wash clothes contaminated with radionuclides at the RWTF of KAERI. If the clothes contaminated with radionuclides and soil decontaminated and cleaned by washing without using detergent, the problem caused by the detergent could be solved naturally. The experiment was performed in two stages. In the first stage, washability of the processed water from the detergent=free laundry system was investigated with regard to its decontamination efficiency for the radionuclides and the detergency for the soil by using the test cloth specimens. In the second stage, real working clothes contaminated with radionuclides from the RWTF were washed by using a laundry machine equipped with a detergent-free system. Decontamination and detergency of the clothes were estimated after washing and the wastewater was also analyzed for its properties.

  2. Expert system based radionuclide identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarnio, P.A.; Ala-Heikkil, J.J.; Hakulinen, T.T.; Nikkinen, M.T.

    1998-01-01

    An expert system coupled with the gamma spectrum analysis system SAMPO has been developed for automating the qualitative identification of radionuclides as well as for determining the quantitative parameters of the spectrum components. The program is written in C-language and runs in various environments ranging from PCs to UNIX workstations. The expert system utilizes a complete gamma library with over 2600 nuclides and 80,000 lines, and a rule base of about fifty criteria including energies, relative peak intensities, genesis modes, half lives, parent-daughter relationships, etc. The rule base is furthermore extensible by the user. This is not an original contribution but a somewhat updated version of papers and reports previously published elsewhere. (author)

  3. An evaluation of fresh gas flow rates for spontaneously breathing cats and small dogs on the Humphrey ADE semi-closed breathing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Elizabeth; Ticehurst, Kim E; Zaki, Sanaa

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the fresh gas flow (FGF) rate requirements for the Humphrey ADE semi-closed breathing system in the Mapleson A mode; to determine the FGF at which rebreathing occurs, and compare the efficiency of this system to the Bain (Mapleson D) system in spontaneously breathing cats and small dogs. Prospective clinical study. Twenty-five healthy (ASA score I or II) client-owned cats and dogs (mean ± SD age 4.7 ± 5.0 years, and body weight 5.64 ± 3.26 kg) undergoing elective surgery or minor procedures. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane delivered via the Humphrey ADE system in the A mode using an oxygen FGF of 100 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). The FGF was then reduced incrementally by 5-10 mL kg(-1) minute(-1) at approximately five-minute intervals, until rebreathing (inspired CO(2) >5 mmHg (0.7 kPa)) was observed, after which flow rates were increased. In six animals, once the minimum FGF at which rebreathing occurred was found, the breathing system was changed to the Bain, and the effects of this FGF delivery examined, before FGF was increased. Rebreathing did not occur at the FGF recommended by the manufacturer for the ADE. The mean ± SD FGF that resulted in rebreathing was 60 ± 20 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). The mean minimum FGF at which rebreathing did not occur with the ADE was 87 ± 39 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). This FGF resulted in significant rebreathing (inspired CO(2) 8.8 ± 2.6 mmHg (1.2 ± 0.3 kPa)) on the Bain system. The FGF rates recommended for the Humphrey ADE are adequate to prevent rebreathing in spontaneously breathing cats and dogs cats and small dogs. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  4. Radionuclide partitioning in environmental systems: a critical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremers, A.; Maes, A.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of some of the important processes involved in the solid-liquid distribution behaviour of radionuclides in both well-defined adsorbents and multicomponent natural systems. The thermodynamic significance of distribution coefficients is analyzed and the various parameters affecting partition behaviour are discussed in relation to possible retention mechanisms. Attention is being given to factors such as solid/liquid ratio, pH-Eh, reversibility, liquid phase composition and speciation effects. Various processes are discussed such as ion exchange and complex formation involving clays, oxides, humic acids. It is shown that, only in rare cases, Ksub(D) values can be rationalized in terms of process mechanistics. In addition, it is indicated that, in general, radionuclide distribution coefficients cannot be considered as constants unless the conditions are restricted to very small loading intervals. It is furthermore suggested that, in order to produce meaningful data on radionuclide partitioning behaviour, efforts should be made to operate under conditions which are representative for the 'in situ' situation. (author)

  5. Comparison of Different Internal Dosimetry Systems for Selected Radionuclides Important to Nuclear Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Manger, Ryan P [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    This report compares three different radiation dosimetry systems currently applied by various U.S. Federal agencies and dose estimates based on these three dosimetry systems for a set of radionuclides often identified in power reactor effluents. These dosimetry systems were developed and applied by the International Commission on Radiological Protection at different times over the past six decades. Two primary modes of intake of radionuclides are addressed: ingestion in drinking water and inhalation. Estimated doses to individual organs and to the whole body based on each dosimetry system are compared for each of four age groups: infant, child, teenager, and adult. Substantial differences between dosimetry systems in estimated dose per unit intake are found for some individual radionuclides, but differences in estimated dose per unit intake generally are modest for mixtures of radionuclides typically found in nuclear power plant effluents.

  6. MODELLING OF RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION IN THE SYSTEM OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT BIOLOGICAL PONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ю. Кутлахмедов

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Migration of radionuclide coming from nuclear power plant into the system of biological pondsand then into the water reservoir-cooler is considered in the article. The theme of the work ismodeling of radionuclide migration process in the system of biological ponds on the example of thePivdennoukrainska nuclear power plant using chamber models method. Typical water ecosystemconsisting of three chambers (chamber-water, chamber-biota and chamber-bed silt was the basistaken by the authors. Application of chamber models method allowed authors to develop thedynamic chamber model of radionuclide migration in nuclear power plant biological ponds. Thismodel allows to forecast values and dynamics of radioactive water pollution based on limitedecosystem monitoring data. Thus, parameters of radioactive capacity of nuclear power plantbiological ponds system and water reservoir-cooler were modeled by authors, the estimation andprognosis of radionuclide distribution and accumulation in the system of nuclear power plantbiological ponds were done. Authors also explain the roles of basin water, biomass and bed silt inradionuclide deposition

  7. Radionuclides in groundwater flow system understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erőss, Anita; Csondor, Katalin; Horváth, Ákos; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Surbeck, Heinz

    2017-04-01

    Using radionuclides is a novel approach to characterize fluids of groundwater flow systems and understand their mixing. Particularly, in regional discharge areas, where different order flow systems convey waters with different temperature, composition and redox-state to the discharge zone. Radium and uranium are redox-sensitive parameters, which causes fractionation along groundwater flow paths. Discharging waters of regional flow systems are characterized by elevated total dissolved solid content (TDS), temperature and by reducing conditions, and therefore with negligible uranium content, whereas local flow systems have lower TDS and temperature and represent oxidizing environments, and therefore their radium content is low. Due to the short transit time, radon may appear in local systems' discharge, where its source is the soil zone. However, our studies revealed the importance of FeOOH precipitates as local radon sources throughout the adsorption of radium transported by the thermal waters of regional flow systems. These precipitates can form either by direct oxidizing of thermal waters at discharge, or by mixing of waters with different redox state. Therefore elevated radon content often occurs in regional discharge areas as well. This study compares the results of geochemical studies in three thermal karst areas in Hungary, focusing on radionuclides as natural tracers. In the Buda Thermal Karst, the waters of the distinct discharge areas are characterized by different temperature and chemical composition. In the central discharge area both lukewarm (20-35°C, 770-980 mg/l TDS) and thermal waters (40-65°C, 800-1350 mg/l TDS), in the South only thermal water discharge (33-43°C, 1450-1700 mg/l TDS) occur. Radionuclides helped to identify mixing of fluids and to infer the temperature and chemical composition of the end members for the central discharge area. For the southern discharge zone mixing components could not be identified, which suggests different cave

  8. Approaches to modelling radionuclide transfer in agricultural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological dose assessment requires information describing the concentration and distribution of radionuclides in the environment. This information can be obtained from monitoring but is also evaluated with the aid of mathematical models. In such models the pathways of radionuclides from the release point to man are described in terms of transfer between compartments. The main pathways to be considered include: deposition to vegetation and soils; transfer from soil-to-plant; uptake and turnover in domestic animals; and, intake by man. The development of mathematical models for simulating transfer via these pathways depends on: an understanding of the system under study, in particular for those processes that are most important in the overall transfer to man; the availability of data to determine the structure and parameters for the model; the computing systems available; the knowledge of the user of the model; and, the application of the model. (author)

  9. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  10. Radioactive waste-Portland cement systems: I, radionuclide distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Glasser, F.P.; Lachowski, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    Crystal chemical stabilization of radioactive wastes can be achieved during clinkering of, or with, ordinary portland cement. Waste loadings of 20 to 30 wt% are achieved by dilute solid solution of waste ions into cementitious host lattices. Higher waste loadings result in compatible noncementitious radiophases. The cementitious phases hydrate without loss of compressive strength. Crystallochemical relationships predict that the radionuclide partitioning in the anhydrous clinkered phases will be maintained in the hydration products. These cementitious hydroxylated radiophases would be in internal equilibrium under anticipated repository conditions. The radionuclide distributions observed are described in the context of established phase equilibria for commercial waste cement systems, but are applicable to transuranic, medium- and low-level wastes

  11. Status of operation of radionuclides assay system in Korean nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K.H.; Lee, K.J.; Jeong, C.W.; Ahn, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    In Korea, 17 nuclear power plants composed of 13 pressurized water reactors and 4 CANDU reactors are currently in operation. The cumulative amounts of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in nuclear power plant reached 58,718 drums (unit: 200 liter) in 2001. Efforts to construct LILW disposal facility are continued and its first operation is planned in the year 2008. Its first stage capacity is assumed to be 100,000 drums and total capacity will reach to 800,000 drums. Radwaste disposal site selection is an urgent national project at present time. Regulations and guidelines require detailed information about the radioactive waste package and its contents prior to the transport to the disposal sites. The Enforcement Decree of the Korean Atomic Energy Act (articles 234-17) requires the Minister of Science and Technology (MOST) of Korea to establish regulation for the waste acceptance (MOST notice. 1196-10). It requires detailed information about the radioactive waste package and its contents such as activity of radionuclides, total activities, types and characteristics of waste. For the measurement of the concentrations and activities of radionuclides in radwaste drum, a radionuclides assay system is installed at Korean nuclear power plant (KORI site) in 1996. The waste drum can be measured in the vertical direction with eight vertical segments while in the radial direction also with eight segments. Using this measurement method, homogeneous and non-homogeneous waste drum can be measured. Scaling factor methods have been played a dominant role in the determination of the radionuclides concentration in this system. For corrosion product, generic scaling factors were used due to the similarity and better-characterized properties of Korean analyzed data as compared with the worldwide data base of PWR industry. For fission product and TRU nuclides, it is not easy to determine the generic scaling factors. Thus simple model reflecting the operation history of power

  12. Radionuclide inventories for short run-time space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coats, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Space Nuclear Reactor Systems, especially those used for propulsion, often have expected operation run times much shorter than those for land-based nuclear power plants. This produces substantially different radionuclide inventories to be considered in the safety analyses of space nuclear systems. This presentation describes an analysis utilizing ORIGEN2 and DKPOWER to provide comparisons among representative land-based and space systems. These comparisons enable early, conceptual considerations of safety issues and features in the preliminary design phases of operational systems, test facilities, and operations by identifying differences between the requirements for space systems and the established practice for land-based power systems. Early indications are that separation distance is much more effective as a safety measure for space nuclear systems than for power reactors because greater decay of the radionuclide activity occurs during the time to transport the inventory a given distance. In addition, the inventories of long-lived actinides are very low for space reactor systems

  13. Migration of radionuclides through a river system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    Migration behavior of several atmospherically-derived radionuclides in a river watershed was studied. A main interest was in their relocation from the ground soil of the watershed to a downstream region through a river. Studied radionuclides are: {sup 137}Cs generated by weapon tests in the atmosphere; {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be of naturally occurring radionuclides; {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am released by the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Dominance of the form in suspended solid in river water (particulate form) was qualified for the radionuclides in the Kuji river watershed. An importance of discharge in flooding was also confirmed. A historical budget analysis for weapon test derived {sup 137}Cs was presented for the Hi-i river watershed and its accompanied lake sediment (Lake Shinji). The work afforded a scheme of a fate of {sup 137}Cs after falling on the ground soil and on the lake surface. Several controlling factors, which can influence on the chemical form of radionuclides discharged to a river, were also investigated in the vicinity of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. A special attention was paid on the association of the radionuclides with dissolved species in water. Preferential association of Pu and Am isotopes to a large molecular size of dissolved matrices, probably of humic substances, was suggested. (author)

  14. Ocean model system for radionuclides - validation and application to the Rokkasho coastal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    Coastal areas have complex environmental systems and often a high influence from the atmosphere, rivers and the open sea. A nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan releases liquid radioactive waste from a discharge pipe to such a complex coastal area. Consequently, the development of radionuclide migration forecast system in the ocean plays an important rule for assessing the behavior of radionuclides in the coastal area. The development of ocean model systems will be presented and model application will also be described. (author)

  15. Concerning initial and secondary character of radionuclide distribution in elementary landscape geochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Specificity of radionuclide distribution in elementary landscape geochemical systems (ELGS) treated as local system of geochemically linked elementary terrestrial units (in toposequence: watershed-slope-closing depression), belongs to one of the less investigated but practically significant problems of current geochemistry. First measurements after the Chernobyl accident showed a considerable variation of Cs-137 distribution in all examined ELGS (Shcheglov et al, 2001; Romanov, 1989; Korobova, Korovaykov, 1990; Linnik, 2008). The results may be interpreted in frames of two alternative hypotheses: 1) irregularity of the initial contamination; 2) secondary redistribution of the initially regular level of fallout. But herewith only a disproof of the first hypothesis automatically justifies the second one. Factors responsible for initial irregularity of surface contamination included: 1) the presence of the so-called "hot" particles in the initial fallout; 2) interception of radionuclides by forest canopy; 3) irregular aerial particles deposition; 4) uneven initial precipitation. Basing on monitoring Cs-137 spatial distribution that has been performed since 2005, we demonstrate that the observed spatial irregularity in distribution of Cs-137 in ELGS reflects a purely secondary distribution of initial reserves of radionuclides in fallout matter due to its migration with water in local geochemical systems. This statement has some significant consequences. 1. Mechanism of migration of matter in ELGS is complicated and could not be reduced solely to a primitive moving from watershed to closing depression. 2. The control of migration of "labeled atoms" (Cs-137) permits to understand common mechanism of migration of water in all systems on the level of ELGS. 3. Understanding formation of the structure of contamination zones in ELGS permits to use mathematical model to solve the inverse problem of restoration of the initially equable level of their contamination. Performed

  16. Computer-based radionuclide analyzer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Kengo; Ishizuka, Akira; Kobayashi, Akira; Ohhashi, Hideaki; Tsuruoka, Kimitoshi.

    1978-01-01

    The radionuclide analysis in nuclear power plants, practiced for the purpose of monitoring the quality of the primary loop water, the confirmation of the performance of reactor cleanup system and monitoring the radioactive waste effluent, is an important job. Important as it is, it requires considerable labor of experts, because the samples to be analyzed are multifarious and very large in number, and in addition, this job depends much on manual work. With a view of saving the labor, simplifying and standardizing the work, reducing radiation exposure, and automatizing the work of analysis, the computerized analyzer system has been worked out. The results of its performance test at the operating power plant have proved that the development has fairly accomplished the objects and that the system is well useful. The developmental work was carried out by the cooperation between The Tokyo Electric Power Co. and Toshiba in about 4 years from 1974 to this year. (auth.)

  17. Progress of radionuclide diagnostic methods in central nervous system diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badmaev, K.N.; Zen'kovich, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    A summarry on modern radionuclide diagnosis achivements of central nervous system diseases is presented. Most optimal tumorotropic preparations and compounds in the view of decreasing irradiation does and optimazing image are given

  18. Cenotic and physiological control of the radionuclides migration into system soil-plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    . Investigation into the various aspects of biological control of radionuclide migration in the soil-plant system is proposed as a necessary step in the development of the modern management methods for soil reclamation

  19. Introduction to CRRIS: a computerized radiological risk investigation system for assessing atmospheric releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III; Miller, C.W.; Kocher, D.C.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Murphy, B.D.

    1985-08-01

    The CRRIS is a Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System consisting of eight fully integrated computer codes which calculate environmental transport of atmospheric releases of radionuclides and resulting doses and health risks to individuals or populations. Each code may also be used alone for various assessment applications. Radionuclides are handled by the CRRIS either in terms of the released radionuclides or the exposure radionuclides which consist of both the released nuclides and decay products that grow in during environmental transport. The CRRIS is not designed to simulate short-term effects. 51 refs

  20. Airborne anthropogenic radioactivity measurements from an international radionuclide monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, L.R.; Bohner, J.D.; Williams, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Anthropogenic radioactivity is being measured in near-real time by an international monitoring system designed to verify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Airborne radioactivity measurements are conducted in-situ by stations that are linked to a central data processing and analysis facility. Aerosols are separated by high-volume air sampling with high-efficiency particulate filters. Radio-xenon is separated from other gases through cryogenic methods. Gamma-spectrometry is performed by high purity germanium detectors and the raw spectral data is immediately transmitted to the central facility via Internet, satellite, or modem. These highly sensitive sensors, combined with the automated data processing at the central facility, result in a system capable of measuring environmental radioactivity on the microbecquerel scale where the data is available to scientists within minutes of the field measurement. During the past year, anthropogenic radioactivity has been measured at approximately half of the stations in the current network. Sources of these measured radionuclides include nuclear power plant emissions, Chernobyl resuspension, and isotope production facilities. The ability to thoroughly characterize site-specific radionuclides, which contribute to the radioactivity of the ambient environment, will be necessary to reduce the number of false positive events. This is especially true of anthropogenic radionuclides that could lead to ambiguous analysis. (author)

  1. Radionuclide cardiography in medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strangfeld, D.; Mohnike, W.; Schmidt, J.; Heine, H.; Correns, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compendium on all aspects of radionuclide diagnostics concerning cardiovascular system diseases. Starting with introductory remarks on the control of cardiovascular diseases the contribution of radionuclide cardiology to functional cardiovascular diagnostics as well as pathophysiological and pathobiochemical aspects of radiocardiography are outlined. Radiopharmaceuticals used in radiocardiography, physical and technical problems in application of radionuclides and their measuring techniques are discussed. In individual chapters radionuclide ventriculography, myocardial scintiscanning, circulatory diagnostics, radionuclide diagnostics of arterial hypertension, of thrombosis and in vitro diagnostics of thrombophilia are treated in the framework of clinical medicine

  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emissions Units and Sampling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Brown, Jason H.; Walker, Brian A.

    2012-04-01

    Battelle–Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development (R&D) laboratories in Richland, WA, including those associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Hanford Site and PNNL Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all emission units that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually by PNNL staff members. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission unit system performance, operation, and design information. For sampled systems, a description of the buildings, exhaust units, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered emission unit. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided. Deregistered emission unit details are provided as necessary for up to 5 years post closure.

  3. A model for radionuclide Migration in Urban Environment and Drainage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.; Gallego, E.; Jimenez, F.

    1998-01-01

    The Model for Radionuclide Migration in Urban Environment and Drainage Systems aims to estimate the discharge of radioactivity removed by natural or forced decontamination into the receiving waters from the drainage system, as well as the radioactivity joined with the sludge produced in treatments plants, whose various applications can mean a potential hazard. This model, built in Powersim, is included in the MOIRA system, a project whose main aim is the evaluation of the situation after a radioactive contamination of the aquatic ecosystems and the estimation of optimal remedial strategies to restore the contaminated waters. Powersim is an easy-to-use software package which simulates dynamic processes. Two sub-models compose the global model: one, simulating the evolution of Cs-137 in urban areas, and the other, the behaviour of this radionuclide, once it ha entered the drainage systems, with the various existing alternatives of waste water treatment in Europe. (Author) 8 refs

  4. Safety of systems for the retention of wastes containing radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    Information and minimal requirements demanded by CNEN for the emission of the Approval Certificate of the Safety Analysis Report related to system for the retention of wastes containing radionuclide, are established, aiming to assure low radioactivity levels to the environment. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Distribution of natural and artificial radionuclides in chernozem soil/crop system from stationary experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarap, Nataša B; Rajačić, Milica M; Đalović, Ivica G; Šeremešić, Srđan I; Đorđević, Aleksandar R; Janković, Marija M; Daković, Marko Z

    2016-09-01

    The present paper focuses on the determination of radiological characteristics of cultivated chernozem soil and crops from long-term field experiments, taking into account the importance of distribution and transfer of radionuclides in the soil-plant system, especially in agricultural cropland. The investigation was performed on the experimental fields where maize, winter wheat, and rapeseed were cultivated. Analysis of radioactivity included determination of the gross alpha and beta activity as a screening method, as well as the activities of the following radionuclides: natural ((210)Pb, (235)U, (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (7)Be) and artificial ((90)Sr and (137)Cs). The activities of natural and artificial ((137)Cs) radionuclides were determined by gamma spectrometry, while the artificial radionuclide (90)Sr was determined by a radiochemical analytical method. Based on the obtained results for the specific activity of (40)K, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr, accumulation factors for these radionuclides were calculated in order to estimate transfer of radionuclides from soil to crops. The results of performed analyses showed that there is no increase of radioactivity that could endanger the food production through the grown crops.

  6. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-01-01

    Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided

  7. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-04-08

    Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

  8. Role of soil micro-organisms in the sorption of radionuclides in organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, N.R.; Potter, E.D.; Poskitt, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Sanchez, A.

    2004-01-01

    Although the fraction of radionuclides linked to soil organic matter and soil microorganisms may be relatively small when compared to the amount bound to the mineral constituents, (mostly irreversibly bound), this fraction is of great importance as it remains readily exchangeable and is thus available for plant uptake. Many studies have measured the uptake of radionuclides by organic soils but the role of soil micro-organisms may have been masked by the presence of even small amounts of clay minerals occurring in these soils. We have carried out a series of experiments using a biologically active, 'mineral-free' organic soil produced under laboratory conditions, to determine the potential of soil micro-organisms to accumulate radionuclides Cs-134 and Sr-85. Biological uptake and release was differentiated from abiotic processes by comparing experimental results with inoculated and non-inoculated sterile organic material. We have investigated the role of different clay minerals, competing potassium and calcium ions, and changes in temperature on the sorption of Cs and Sr isotopes. The results from studies so far show conclusively that living components of soil systems are of primary importance in the uptake of radionuclides in organic material, microorganisms also influence the importance of chemical factors (e.g. adsorption to clay minerals) which may play a secondary role in these highly organic systems. In further experiments we hope to define the precise role of specific soil micro-organisms in these organic systems. (author)

  9. A study of radionuclide dispersion by river systems, using GIS and remote sensing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghuis, Sander; Brown, Justin; Steenhuisen, Frits; Skorve, Johnny

    2000-01-01

    The Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine in Zheleznogorsk, Russia, is situated on the banks of the Yenisey river. The combine consists of three RBMK-type graphite moderate reactors, a reprocessing plant for the production of weapons-grade plutonium and storage facilities for nuclear waste. Discharges of radionuclides into the Yenisey river were either part of normal operation procedures or caused by accidental releases (Strand et al., 1997). So far, little is known about the transport and fate of the radioactive contaminants in the areas downstream of the Krasnoyarsk CC that are influenced by the Yenisey river system. Aim is to comprehend the dispersion of radionuclides through the river system. Remotely sensed and field study information are combined in a geographical information system (GIS) to study the processes leading to the dispersion of sediment-bound radionuclides carried by the river system. Since the extent of the study area is several thousands or kilometres of river and adjacent flood plains, use is made of a record of remotely sensed (satellite) images that are handled by the GIS. Panchromatic, high resolution satellite images as well as multispectral Landsat MSS and TM images were compiled for the area of interest. The panchromatic images were taken in a period during which the facility was in operation (1960-1972) and obtained for intervals of circa 6 months. A time series of satellite images enables the identification of erosion and sedimentation zones. The behaviour and fate of particle-reactive radionuclides, e.g. 239,240 Pu and to large extent 137 Cs, will be closely related to the movement of sediment. With respect to the behaviour and fate of more conservative radionuclides as 90 Sr, information is required accounting for fractionation between the particulate and aqueous phases. Stereo images are used to comprehend the geomorphology of the Yenisey river systems, focused on classification of sedimentary deposits. Landsat MSS and TM with five

  10. Natural systems prediction of radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the application (and limitations) of data from natural systems to the verification of performance assessments, particularly as they apply to the evaluation of the long-term performance of waste forms, backfill, canister materials, and finally, the integrity of the repository itself. Two specific examples, the corrosion of borosilicate glass and the formation of alteration products of spent fuel, will be discussed. In both cases, inferences are of three types: 1) directly applicable data (i.e. radiation effects, stable phase assemblages): 2) inferences based on the analogous behaviour of the natural and repository systems (e.g. long-term corrosion rate); 3) specific identification of new phenomena that could not have been anticipated from the short term laboratory data (i.e. new mechanisms for the retention or release of radionuclides). The latter can only be derived from the observation of natural systems. Finally, specific attention will be paid to the limitations in the use of natural systems, particularly as the spatial and temporal scales expand, and to the inherent limitations of prediction and verification. (J.P.N.)

  11. Behaviour of transuranic radionuclides in soils, plants and soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, B.N.; Mistry, K.B.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper reviews the investigations undertaken to elucidate the physicochemical, edaphic and physiological aspects of the behaviour of long-lived transuranic radionuclides 239 Pu and 241 Am in typical Indian soils and soil-plant systems. 23 refs

  12. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.; Edwards, R.Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program. 5 claims, 11 figures

  13. Therapy for incorporated radionuclides: scope and need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, V.H.

    1981-03-01

    In the United States the recent termination of funding for research on therapy for incorporated radionuclides has virtually halted progress on improved or new agents and procedures for removing radioactivity from the body. Research was eliminated, but is still needed on new removal agents, improved delivery system, in vitro test systems, and the toxicology of treatments. For many radionuclides, no adequate therapy exists. The relationship between radionuclide removal and reduction in cancer risk is still unanswered. Without proper research support, needed improvements in the treatment for incorporated radionuclides in the US are uncertain

  14. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides ( 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 240 Pu, and 3 H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay

  15. Evaluation of an automated assay system to measure soil radionuclides by L x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Drennon, B.J.; Crowell, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    An automated radionuclide assay system for conducting soil radioassays using L x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry was evaluated. Wet chemistry assay procedures were shown to be considerably more time consuming than similar analyses of soil on this radionuclide assay system. The detection limits of 241 Am and plutonium were determined, as well as the reproducibility of radionuclide assay results. The L x-ray spectrometric measurements were compared with radiochemical analyses on several tuff samples. The assay system's intrinsic germanium detector was found to respond linearly to varying low concentrations of 241 Am and plutonium, both of which were easily detected in the presence of elevated concentrations of 137 Cs

  16. MOIRA models and methodologies for assessing the effectiveness of countermeasures in complex aquatic systems contaminated by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, L.; Haakanson, L.; Gallego Diaz, E.

    1999-01-01

    The present report is composed of a set of articles written by the partners of the MOIRA project (a model-based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas). The report describes models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in complex aquatic systems and the effects of countermeasures for their restoration [it

  17. MOIRA models and methodologies for assessing the effectiveness of countermeasures in complex aquatic systems contaminated by radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Brittain, J.E. [Oslo Univ., Oslo (Norway); Zoological Museum, Oslo (Norway); Haakanson, L. [Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden). Inst. of Earth Science; Gallego Diaz, E. [Madrid Univ. Politecnica, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Nuclear

    1999-07-01

    The present report is composed of a set of articles written by the partners of the MOIRA project (a model-based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas). The report describes models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in complex aquatic systems and the effects of countermeasures for their restoration. [Italian] Il rapporto contiene articoli preparati nell'ambito del progetto MOIRA (a model-based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas), che descrive alcuni modelli per la previsione del comportamento di radionuclidi in sistemi acquatici complessi e per la valutazione dell'effetto delle contromisure per il loro recupero.

  18. MOIRA models and methodologies for assessing the effectiveness of countermeasures in complex aquatic systems contaminated by radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, L [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Brittain, J E [Oslo Univ., Oslo (Norway); Zoological Museum, Oslo [Norway; Haakanson, L [Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden). Inst. of Earth Science; Gallego Diaz, E [Madrid Univ. Politecnica, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Nuclear

    1999-07-01

    The present report is composed of a set of articles written by the partners of the MOIRA project (a model-based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas). The report describes models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in complex aquatic systems and the effects of countermeasures for their restoration. [Italian] Il rapporto contiene articoli preparati nell'ambito del progetto MOIRA (a model-based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas), che descrive alcuni modelli per la previsione del comportamento di radionuclidi in sistemi acquatici complessi e per la valutazione dell'effetto delle contromisure per il loro recupero.

  19. Applications of extraction chromatography in the development of radionuclide generator systems for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous methods have been described for the separation and purification of radionuclides for application in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, among them ion exchange, solvent extraction, and various forms of chromatography. Although extraction chromatography has previously been shown to provide a means of performing a number of separations of potential use in radionuclide generator systems, the application of the technique to generator development has thus far been limited. Recent work directed at improved methods for the determination of radionuclides in biological and environmental samples has led to the development of a series of novel extraction chromatographic resins exhibiting enhanced metal ion retention from strongly acidic media and excellent selectivity, among them materials suitable for the isolation of 212 Bi, 90 Y, and 213 Bi. These resins, along with extraction chromatographic materials employing functionalized supports to improve their physical stability or metal ion retention properties, are shown to offer promise in the development of improved radionuclide generators

  20. Radionuclides in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, J.H.; Schmidt, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclides in the Food Chain reviews past experience in meeting the challenge of radionuclide contamination of foodstuffs and water sources and, in the wake of the reactor accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, presents current concepts and programs relating to measurement, surveillance, effects, risk management, evaluation guidelines, and control and regulatory activities. This volume, based on a symposium sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute in association with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, which brought together both radiation experts and food industry policymakers, examines such vital topics as structural problems in large-scale crisis-managment systems; dose assessment from man-made sources; international recommendations on radiation protection; airborne contamination, as well as aquatic and soilborne radionuclides; food-chain contamination from testing nuclear devices; long-term health effects of radionuclides in food and water supplies; and use of mathematical models in risk assessment and management. (orig.)

  1. Transformation processes influencing physico-chemical forms of radionuclides and trace elements in natural water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Riise, G.; Oughton, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    In order to assess short and long term consequences of radionuclides and trace elements introduced to aquatic systems, knowledge on source terms, key factors and key processes influencing the speciation is essential. The mobility, bioavailability and subsequent transfer into food chains depend on the physico-chemical forms on radionuclides and trace metals. In addition, transformation processes and especially the interaction with natural organic matter (NOM) influences the distribution pattern. Furthermore, the prevailing climate conditions, e.g. episodic events and temperature are vital for fluxes and for the kinetics of the transformation processes. In the present work processes in catchments and processes associated with acidification, episodic events, climate conditions (temperature) and mixing zone phenomena influencing the speciation of radionuclides and trace metals are highlighted. These processes should be highly relevant for assessing far field consequences of radionuclides potentially released from disposal sites. (authors). 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  2. Phytoremediation of radionuclides: an emerging alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shraddha

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of nuclear power industry, nuclear weapon testing, dismantling of existing nuclear weapons and occasional accidents have contributed to an enhancement in the level of radionuclides in the environment. The radionuclides due to their long half life and transfer through the food chain effect adversely to normal biological systems. Hence, it is essential to effectively remove the radionuclides from contaminated soils and solutions. Phytoremediation - the use of plants for remediation of toxic metals and radionuclides has been recognized as an aesthetically pleasing, low cost and environment friendly in situ method. Phytoremediation is an umbrella term which covers several plant based approaches. Plants have shown the potential of remediation of these radionuclides from spiked solutions, low level nuclear waste and soil. Various aspects of phytoremediation as well as potential of various plants for remediation of radionuclides will be discussed here. (author)

  3. Process for encapsulating radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, L.E.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclides are immobilized in virtually an insoluble form by reacting at a temperature of at least 90 0 C as an aqueous alkaline mixture having a solution pH of at least 10, containing a source of silicon, the radionuclide waste, and a metal cation. The molar ratio of silicon to the metal cation is on the order of unity to produce a gel from which complex metalosilicates crystallize to entrap the radionuclides within the resultant condensed crystal lattice. The product is a silicious stone-like material which is virtually insoluble and nonleachable in alkaline or neutral environment. One embodiment provides for the formation of the complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by gel formation with subsequent calcination to the solid product; another embodiment utilizes a hydrothermal process, either above ground or deep within basalt caverns, at greater than atmospheric pressures and a temperature between 90 and 500 0 C to form complex metalo-silicates, such as strontium aluminosilicate. Another embodiment provides for the formation of complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by slurrying an alkaline mixture of bentonite or kaolinite with a source of silicon and the radionuclide waste in salt form. In each of the embodiments a mobile system is achieved whereby the metalo-silicate constituents reorient into a condensed crystal lattice forming a cage structure with the condensed metalo-silicate lattice which completely surrounds the radionuclide and traps the radionuclide therein; thus rendering the radionuclide virtually insoluble

  4. The production of radionuclides for nuclear medicine from a compact, low-energy accelerator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, William D; Parks, Geoffrey T; Titov, Dmitry; Beasley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is reliant on radionuclides for medical imaging procedures and radioimmunotherapy (RIT). The recent shut-downs of key radionuclide producers have highlighted the fragility of the current radionuclide supply network, however. To ensure that nuclear medicine can continue to grow, adding new diagnostic and therapy options to healthcare, novel and reliable production methods are required. Siemens are developing a low-energy, high-current - up to 10 MeV and 1 mA respectively - accelerator. The capability of this low-cost, compact system for radionuclide production, for use in nuclear medicine procedures, has been considered. The production of three medically important radionuclides - (89)Zr, (64)Cu, and (103)Pd - has been considered, via the (89)Y(p,n), (64)Ni(p,n) and (103)Rh(p,n) reactions, respectively. Theoretical cross-sections were generated using TALYS and compared to experimental data available from EXFOR. Stopping power values generated by SRIM have been used, with the TALYS-generated excitation functions, to calculate potential yields and isotopic purity in different irradiation regimes. The TALYS excitation functions were found to have a good agreement with the experimental data available from the EXFOR database. It was found that both (89)Zr and (64)Cu could be produced with high isotopic purity (over 99%), with activity yields suitable for medical diagnostics and therapy, at a proton energy of 10MeV. At 10MeV, the irradiation of (103)Rh produced appreciable quantities of (102)Pd, reducing the isotopic purity. A reduction in beam energy to 9.5MeV increased the radioisotopic purity to 99% with only a small reduction in activity yield. This work demonstrates that the low-energy, compact accelerator system under development by Siemens would be capable of providing sufficient quantities of (89)Zr, (64)Cu, and (103)Pd for use in medical diagnostics and therapy. It is suggested that the system could be used to produce many other

  5. Radionuclide mobility in the shallow portion of an active high-temperature geothermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the behavior of radionuclides in natural rock-water systems is crucial for the prediction of the consequences of failure of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Work in progress at Argonne National Laboratory involves the detailed geochemical analysis of rock, mineral, and water samples from shallow drill holes in a thermal area of Yellowstone National Park. This study is designed to provide data that will increase our understanding of the behavior of a group of radionuclides in an environment similar to that of the near field of a high-level nuclear waste repository

  6. Radionuclide study of the liver macrophage system in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavnov, V.M.; Savich, O.A.; Markov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    The functional state of the liver macrophage system (MS) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and to analyze the functional disturbances depending of the type of DM, presence of complications, duration of the disease and the age of the patients was studied. The obtained data suggest the necessity of radionuclide study of the liver MS with the purpose to reveal pre-clinical disturbances and administer timely treatment

  7. Radionuclide daughter inventory generator code: DIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Sharp, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The Daughter Inventory Generator (DIG) code accepts a tabulation of radionuclide initially present in a waste stream, specified as amounts present either by mass or by activity, and produces a tabulation of radionuclides present after a user-specified elapsed time. This resultant radionuclide inventory characterizes wastes that have undergone daughter ingrowth during subsequent processes, such as leaching and transport, and includes daughter radionuclides that should be considered in these subsequent processes or for inclusion in a pollutant source term. Output of the DIG code also summarizes radionuclide decay constants. The DIG code was developed specifically to assist the user of the PRESTO-II methodology and code in preparing data sets and accounting for possible daughter ingrowth in wastes buried in shallow-land disposal areas. The DIG code is also useful in preparing data sets for the PRESTO-EPA code. Daughter ingrowth in buried radionuclides and in radionuclides that have been leached from the wastes and are undergoing hydrologic transport are considered, and the quantities of daughter radionuclide are calculated. Radionuclide decay constants generated by DIG and included in the DIG output are required in the PRESTO-II code input data set. The DIG accesses some subroutines written for use with the CRRIS system and accesses files containing radionuclide data compiled by D.C. Kocher. 11 refs

  8. Dosimetric characterization of radionuclides for systemic tumor therapy: Influence of particle range, photon emission, and subcellular distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uusijaervi, Helena; Bernhardt, Peter; Ericsson, Thomas; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Various radionuclides have been proposed for systemic tumor therapy. However, in most dosimetric analysis of proposed radionuclides the charged particles are taken into consideration while the potential photons are ignored. The photons will cause undesirable irradiation of normal tissue, and increase the probability of toxicity in, e.g., the bone marrow. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties according to particle range, photon emission, and subcellular radionuclide distribution, of a selection of radionuclides used or proposed for radionuclide therapy, and to investigate the possibility of dividing radionuclides into groups according to their dosimetric properties. The absorbed dose rate to the tumors divided by the absorbed dose rate to the normal tissue (TND) was estimated for different tumor sizes in a mathematical model of the human body. The body was simulated as a 70-kg ellipsoid and the tumors as spheres of different sizes (1 ng-100 g). The radionuclides were either assumed to be uniformly distributed throughout the entire tumor and normal tissue, or located in the nucleus or the cytoplasm of the tumor cells and on the cell membrane of the normal cells. Fifty-nine radionuclides were studied together with monoenergetic electrons, positrons, and alpha particles. The tumor and normal tissue were assumed to be of water density. The activity concentration ratio between the tumor and normal tissue was assumed to be 25. The radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons combined with a low photon contribution, and the alpha emitters showed high TND values for most tumor sizes. Electrons with higher energy gave reduced TND values for small tumors, while a higher photon contribution reduced the TND values for large tumors. Radionuclides with high photon contributions showed low TND value for all tumor sizes studied. The radionuclides studied could be divided into four main groups according to their TND values: beta emitters, Auger electron

  9. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1988-12-01

    The study of radionuclide migration through rock is currently of great interest due to its relevance to the possible escape paths into the biosphere of radionuclides released from high level radioactive wastes burried in deep geological repositories. While water will provide the vehicle for transportation, interaction with geological material may greatly influence the radionuclide movement relative that of water. A flow system for laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in natural fissures in granitic rock under reducing conditions is described. The system based on the use of synthetic ground water equilibrated with granitic rock in a well sealed system, allow experiments to be carried out at -240 mV reduction potential. In flow experiments with technetium the retardation was found to be dependent on the method used for reducing TcO 4 - . The preparation of the tracer solutions is crucial, as some of the redox-reactions may be very slow. The dynamics of the Tc(VII) reduction and also speciation need to be carried out in separate experiments. (4 illustrations, 5 tables)

  10. TURVA-2012: Formulation of radionuclide release scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, Nuria; Hjerpe, Thomas; Snellman, Margit; Ikonen, Ari; Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and application for a construction licence for a repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site in south-western Finland. This paper gives a summary of the scenarios and the methodology followed in formulating them as described in TURVA-2012: Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios (Posiva, 2013). The scenarios are further analysed in TURVA-2012: Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios for the Repository System and TURVA-2012: Biosphere Assessment (Posiva, 2012a, 2012b). The formulation of scenarios takes into account the safety functions of the main barriers of the repository system and the uncertainties in the features, events, and processes (FEP) that may affect the entire disposal system (i.e. repository system plus the surface environment) from the emplacement of the first canister until the far future. In the report TURVA-2012: Performance Assessment (2012d), the performance of the engineered and natural barriers has been assessed against the loads expected during the evolution of the repository system and the site. Uncertainties have been identified and these are taken into account in the formulation of radionuclide release scenarios. The uncertainties in the FEP and evolution of the surface environment are taken into account in formulating the surface environment scenarios used ultimately in estimating radiation exposure. Formulating radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system links the reports Performance Assessment and Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios for the Repository System. The formulation of radionuclide release scenarios for the surface environment brings together biosphere description and the surface environment FEP and is the link to the assessment of the surface environment scenarios summarised in TURVA-2012: Biosphere Assessment. (authors)

  11. Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Program and related research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents the results of technical studies conducted under the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the period of October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986. The HRMP was initiated in 1973 as the Radionuclide Migration Program to study and better understand the hydrologic systems of the NTS and potential movement and rates of movement of radionuclides and other contaminants injected into these systems by underground nuclear testing

  12. A computerized system for control and management of radionuclide inventory: application in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoory, S.; Levy, I.M.; Moskowitz, G.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Vaugeois, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    An interactive computerized system for radioisotope management and instantaneous inventory is reported. The system is capable of handling operations such as filing, nuclear imaging and disposing of various radionuclides. All radiopharmaceutical transactions are achieved with the aid of a Prime 300 mini-computer of 192K words of high speed semi-conductor memory and over 120 mega bytes of disk storage. The system automatically corrects for the appropriate decay, monitors and updates the storage file after every subsequent study. The performed study is recorded in a special file, together with the time and data retrieved from the computer's real time clock at the time of the entry. The system provides an organized and complete bookkeeping of all records concerning radionuclide transactions. It is found to be simple, efficient, highly versatile, and drastically reduces the time of operation and errors in handling the radioisotope inventory. (author)

  13. Conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide transport in near-surface systems at Forsmark. SR-Site Biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pique, Angels; Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2010-11-01

    In the framework of the SR-Site safety assessment, a conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide reactive transport in near-surface systems (including till and clay systems) at Forsmark has been carried out. The objective was to evaluate the retention capacity of the near-surface systems, composed of Quaternary deposits, which would be the last natural barrier for an eventual radionuclide release from the deep repository prior to reaching the biosphere. The studied radionuclides are 14 C, 129 I, 36 Cl, 94 Nb, 59 Ni, 93 Mo, 79 Se, 99 Tc, 230 Th, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 135 Cs and U. Conceptual description and numerical simulations of radionuclide reactive transport show that cation exchange and surface complexation on illite are active processes for the retention of several radionuclides (U, Th, Ni, Cs, Sr, Ra). Surface complexation on iron hydroxide is an active process in the till system, able to effectively retain U and Ni. Another retention process of importance is the incorporation of the radionuclides into mineral phases, either by the precipitation of pure phases or solid solutions. Quantitative modelling has been useful to illustrate the incorporation of C and Sr in the carbonate solid solution in the considered model domains (till and clay), as well as the precipitation of uraninite in the clay sediments and the precipitation of native selenium and radiobarite in the till. Other mineral phases that could, a priori, retain U, Se, Nb and Tc do not precipitate in the simulations, either due to the pH-Eh conditions and/or because the dissolved concentration of the element is not high enough under the considered simulation conditions. It is important to keep in mind that changes in these parameters and in the boundary conditions could modify the predicted behaviour of these elements. The radionuclides that are most significantly retarded are Th, Ni and Cs, mainly through sorption onto illite. Therefore, if the amount of illite (or available sorption sites

  14. Conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide transport in near-surface systems at Forsmark. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pique, Angels; Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi (Amphos21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-11-15

    In the framework of the SR-Site safety assessment, a conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide reactive transport in near-surface systems (including till and clay systems) at Forsmark has been carried out. The objective was to evaluate the retention capacity of the near-surface systems, composed of Quaternary deposits, which would be the last natural barrier for an eventual radionuclide release from the deep repository prior to reaching the biosphere. The studied radionuclides are 14C, 129I, 36Cl, 94Nb, 59Ni, 93Mo, 79Se, 99Tc, 230Th, 90Sr, 226Ra, 135Cs and U. Conceptual description and numerical simulations of radionuclide reactive transport show that cation exchange and surface complexation on illite are active processes for the retention of several radionuclides (U, Th, Ni, Cs, Sr, Ra). Surface complexation on iron hydroxide is an active process in the till system, able to effectively retain U and Ni. Another retention process of importance is the incorporation of the radionuclides into mineral phases, either by the precipitation of pure phases or solid solutions. Quantitative modelling has been useful to illustrate the incorporation of C and Sr in the carbonate solid solution in the considered model domains (till and clay), as well as the precipitation of uraninite in the clay sediments and the precipitation of native selenium and radiobarite in the till. Other mineral phases that could, a priori, retain U, Se, Nb and Tc do not precipitate in the simulations, either due to the pH-Eh conditions and/or because the dissolved concentration of the element is not high enough under the considered simulation conditions. It is important to keep in mind that changes in these parameters and in the boundary conditions could modify the predicted behaviour of these elements. The radionuclides that are most significantly retarded are Th, Ni and Cs, mainly through sorption onto illite. Therefore, if the amount of illite (or available sorption sites) decreases, the

  15. Implementation of the aquatic radionuclide transport models RIVTOX and COASTOX into the RODOS System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, D.; Lyashenko, G.; Marinets, A.; Mezhueva, I.; Shepeleva, T.; Tkalich, P.; Zheleznyak, M.

    1996-01-01

    The one -dimensional model of radionuclide transport in a network of river channel RIVTOX and two-dimensional lateral-longitudinal model of radionuclide transport in rivers, reservoirs and shallow lakes COASTOX have been implemented into the hydrological model chain of the decision support system RODOS. The software framework is developed to operate the models and to support their coupling with the other parts of RODOS hydrological model chain. The validation studies were performed for RIVTOX and COASTOX on the base of the data sets from Ukrainian, German and United States rivers

  16. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  17. Radionuclide supply of the progeny via mother's milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovcharenko, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    While examining transition of radioactive substances from material organism to milk and then radionuclide administration with milk to progeny, a number of relationships had been revealed. They are similar to those discovered by the author during his study on transplacental radionuclide kinetics. The quantity of transition through placental and milk barriers of group 2 Periodical system radionuclides is inversally proportional to radionuclide mass number. There is evidence for the increase of radionuclide transition per different kinds of animal progeny mass unit during pregnancy as well as during lactation [ru

  18. Proceedings of the international workshop on mechanistic understanding of radionuclide migration in compacted/intact systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Yukio; Yui, Mikazu

    2010-03-01

    The international workshop on mechanistic understanding of radionuclide migration in compacted / intact systems was held at ENTRY, JAEA, Tokai on 21st - 23rd January, 2009. This workshop was hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as part of the project on the mechanistic model/database development for radionuclide sorption and diffusion behavior in compacted / intact systems. The overall goal of the project is to develop the mechanistic model / database for a consistent understanding and prediction of migration parameters and its uncertainties for performance assessment of geological disposal of radioactive waste. The objective of the workshop is to integrate the state-of-the-art of mechanistic sorption and diffusion model in compacted / intact systems, especially in bentonite / clay systems, and discuss the JAEA's mechanistic approaches and future challenges, especially the following discussions points; 1) What's the status and difficulties for mechanistic model/database development? 2) What's the status and difficulties for applicability of mechanistic model to the compacted/intact system? 3) What's the status and difficulties for obtaining evidences for mechanistic model? 4) What's the status and difficulties for standardization of experimental methodology for batch sorption and diffusion? 5) What's the uncertainties of transport parameters in radionuclides migration analysis due to a lack of understanding/experimental methodologies, and how do we derive them? This report includes workshop program, overview and materials of each presentation, summary of discussions. (author)

  19. Measurement of anthropogenic radionuclides in the atmosphere with a radionuclide monitoring network for nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Chushiro; Yamamoto, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    A worldwide radionuclide monitoring network for nuclear tests has detected the anthropogenic radioactive materials released in the atmosphere due to the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant impacted by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. After four months have passed since the accident occurred, most overseas stations do not detect the radionuclides of Fukushima origin any more. The Takasaki station in Japan, however, is still detecting them every day. This paper describes radionuclide monitoring stations and the network of them as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) in the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), as well as the measurement results of radionuclide particulates and radioactive isotopes of xenon released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant with the monitoring network. (J.P.N.)

  20. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides using an Eulerian-Lagrangian modelling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Abdul; Espinosa, Francisco; Avila, Ruben; Raza, S; Irfan, N

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we present an atmospheric dispersion scenario for a proposed nuclear power plant in Pakistan involving the hypothetical accidental release of radionuclides. For this, a concept involving a Lagrangian stochastic particle model (LSPM) coupled with an Eulerian regional atmospheric modelling system (RAMS) is used. The atmospheric turbulent dispersion of radionuclides (represented by non-buoyant particles/neutral traces) in the LSPM is modelled by applying non-homogeneous turbulence conditions. The mean wind velocities governed by the topography of the region and the surface fluxes of momentum and heat are calculated by the RAMS code. A moving least squares (MLS) technique is introduced to calculate the concentration of radionuclides at ground level. The numerically calculated vertical profiles of wind velocity and temperature are compared with observed data. The results obtained demonstrate that in regions of complex terrain it is not sufficient to model the atmospheric dispersion of particles using a straight-line Gaussian plume model, and that by utilising a Lagrangian stochastic particle model and regional atmospheric modelling system a much more realistic estimation of the dispersion in such a hypothetical scenario was ascertained. The particle dispersion results for a 12 h ground release show that a triangular area of about 400 km(2) situated in the north-west quadrant of release is under radiological threat. The particle distribution shows that the use of a Gaussian plume model (GPM) in such situations will yield quite misleading results.

  1. Radionuclide techniques for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.J.; Moody, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past decade, many of the prime indications for radionuclide brain scanning have become instead indications for CCT, and nuclear medicine studies of the brain have assumed more of a complementary, supportive role. However, there is great promise for improvement in central nervous system radionuclide applications with advances anticipated in both radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation. Nuclear medicine is continuing to function as a powerful research tool and, in the relatively near future, may regain its role as a major clinical test of the central nervous system

  2. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of 223 Ra and 225 Ac, from a radionuclide ''cow'' of 227 Ac or 229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ''cow'' forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ''cow'' from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ''cow''. In one embodiment the radionuclide ''cow'' is the 227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a 227 Th and the product radionuclide is the 223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the 227 Ac and retains the 227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ''cow'' is the 229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a 225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the 225 Ac and the 225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the 229 Th and passes the 225 Ra/Ac. 8 figs

  3. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  4. Radionuclides and particles in seawater with the large volume in situ filtration and concentration system in the coastal waters off Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aono, Tatsuo; Nakanishi, Takahiro; Okubo, Ayako; Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi; Kusakabe, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to determine the radionuclides in dissolved and particulate state in order to clarify the distributions and behavior of these in seawater. Because the concentrations of radionuclides and particles are very low in the ocean, it is difficult to concentrate and fractionate the particulate matters with the filtration systems in seawater. The large volume in situ filtration and concentration system (LV-FiCS) was developed to collect various forms of trace radionuclides and particles in seawater. The LV-FiCS has been operated during several cruises in the coastal waters off Japan, and several m 3 of seawaters were filtered through different kinds of filters and then pass through the adsorbents to concentrate radionuclides simultaneously. This system could be shown the vertical profiles of thorium with the size-fractionated method and the behavior of these nuclides in the ocean. (author)

  5. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lane A.; Ryan, Jack L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

  6. Evaluation of metals and radionuclides in water treatment system for drinking in Pernambuco state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Adriana Muniz de Almeida

    2017-01-01

    The metals and radionuclides are naturally incorporated into natural waters, and may be present at levels that condition the health of the population. In view of this, health agencies regulate standards which determine maximum concentration values for these elements in water intended for human consumption. However, the water sources do not have the required quality and the application of treatment technologies is necessary. These technologies remove the impurities initially incorporated into the waters of the fountains from the application of physical and chemical processes. The impurities are retained and concentrated in the treatment systems giving rise to a residue which may contain appreciable concentrations of metals and radionuclides, and this residue is included among the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). In the present study, the investigation of raw, treated and wastewater samples from 19 Water Treatment Stations located in the state of Pernambuco, in relation to the behavior of Al, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn and radionuclides 226 Ra and 228 Ra, alpha and beta total and gamma emitters in the treatment systems, from the analysis of the concentrations of these in the waters and residues, evaluating the suitability of the waters in accordance with established in the norms in force, as well as the associated with the disposal of wastes that are commonly released into the environment. The results obtained for the metals indicated that the treatment systems must have their processes optimized to ensure the adequacy of the water supplied to the population to the potability parameters and for the residues levels that could generate environmental risk were observed. For the radionuclides the levels found in the waters were low, indicating a low contribution of these to the sources undergoing treatment, and in the residues the levels were low, but within the range described in the literature, corroborating its classification as a TENORM

  7. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab

  8. Radionuclides in the study of marine processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, P.J.; Woodhead, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, the radioactive properties of the naturally occurring radionuclides have been used to determine their distributions in the marine environment and, more generally, to gain an understanding of the dynamic processes which control their behaviour in attaining these distributions. More recently the inputs from human activities of both natural and artificial (i.e. man-made) radionuclides have provided additional opportunities for the study of marine processes on local, regional and global scales. The primary objective of the symposium is to provide a forum for an open discussion of the insights concerning processes in the marine environment which can be gained from studies of radionuclide behaviour. Papers have been grouped within the following principal themes; the uses of radionuclides as tracers of water transport; scavenging and particulate transport processes in the oceans as deduced from radionuclide behaviour; processes in the seabed and radionuclides in biological systems. (Author)

  9. Development of migration prediction system (MIGSTEM) for cationic species of radionuclides through soil layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Takebe, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi

    1989-01-01

    The migration prediction system (MIGSTEM) has been developed for estimating the migration of cationic species of radionuclides through soil layers systematically. The MIGSTEM consists of the migration experiments, the one-dimensional fitting code (inverse analysis code) for determining retardation factor and dispersivity (migration factors) and the three-dimensional differential code (prediction code) for estimating the migration of the radionuclides. The migration experiments are carried out for obtaining the concentration profiles of the radionuclides in unsaturated and saturated soil layers. Using the inverse analysis code, the migration factors are obtained at one time by fitting the concentration profiles calculated to those observed. The prediction code can give the contours of concentration and the one-dimensional concentration profiles at selected time, as well as the changing in the concentration at a selected position with time. The validity of the MIGSTEM was obtained by the benchmark test on the prediction and inverse analysis codes. The MIGSTEM was applied to estimate the migration of Sr 2+ through the sandy soil. (author)

  10. RAMM: a system of computer programs for radionuclide pathway analysis calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1976-09-01

    A generalized system of computer programs, designated RAMM (Radioactive Materials Management) system, has been developed to assist in the analysis of the movement of radionuclides through the environment to man. RAMM incorporates the GASP IV continuous/discrete simulation system. A nodal approach is used whereby the system to be analyzed is split up into parts small enough that the distribution of nuclides within the node may be taken to be homogeneous. Pathways are defined between nodes, and appropriate transfer coefficients are input or generated. Output includes the time dependent contents of the nodes and dose rates, integrated doses and dose commitments of selected nodes. (author)

  11. 40 CFR 141.66 - Maximum contaminant levels for radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... beta particle and photon radioactivity from man-made radionuclides in drinking water must not produce.../year). (2) Except for the radionuclides listed in table A, the concentration of man-made radionuclides... may make this technology too complex for small surface water systems. e Removal efficiencies can vary...

  12. Radionuclide trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition

  13. Soil microorganisms determine the sorption of radionuclides within organic soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, N.R.; Poskitt, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Potter, E.D.; Sanchez, A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential of soil microorganisms to enhance the retention of 137 Cs and 85 Sr in organic systems was assessed in a series of experiments. A biologically active, 'mineral-free', organic material, produced under laboratory conditions from leaves, was used as the uptake matrix in all experiments to minimise potential interference from competing clay minerals. Biological uptake and release were differentiated from abiotic processes by comparing the sorption of radionuclides in sterilised organic material with sterile material inoculated with soil extracts or single fungal strains. Our results show conclusively that living components of soil systems are of primary importance in the uptake of radionuclides in organic material. The presence of soil microorganisms significantly enhanced the retention of Cs in organic systems and ∼70% of the Cs spike was strongly (irreversibly) bound (remained non-extractable) in the presence of microorganisms compared to only ∼10% in abiotic systems. Sorption of 85 Sr was not significantly influenced by the presence of soil microorganisms. A non-linear temperature response was observed for the retention in biotic systems with increased uptake at between 10 and 30 deg. C and lower retention at temperatures above or below the optimum range. The optimum temperatures for biological uptake were between 15 and 20 deg. C for Cs, and 25 and 30 deg. C for Sr. Our results indicate that single strains of soil and saprotrophic fungi make an important contribution to the sorption of Cs and Sr in organic systems, but can only account for part of the strong, irreversible binding observed in biotic systems. Single strains of soil fungi increased the amount of non-extractable 137 Cs (by ∼30%) and 85 Sr (by ∼20%) in the organic systems as compared to abiotic systems, but the major fraction of 137 Cs and 85 Sr sorbed in systems inoculated with saprotrophic fungi remained extractable

  14. Radionuclides in hydrothermal systems as indicators of repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.; Smith, A.R.

    1990-11-01

    Hydrothermal systems in tuffaceous and older sedimentary rocks contain evidence of the interaction of radionuclides in fluids with rock matrix minerals and with materials lining fractures, in settings somewhat analogous to the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. Earlier studies encompassed the occurrences of U and Th in a ''fossil'' hydrothermal system in tuffaceous rock of the San Juan Mountains volcanic field, CO. More recent and ongoing studies examine active hydrothermal systems in calderas at Long Valley, CA and Valles, NM. At the Nevada Test Site, occurrences of U and Th in fractured and unfractured rhyolitic tuff that was heated to simulate the introduction of radioactive waste are also under investigation. Observations to date suggest that U is mobile in hydrothermal systems, but that localized reducing environments provided by Fe-rich minerals and/or carbonaceous material concentrate U and thus attenuate its migration. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  15. Radionuclide transport in the "sediments - water - plants" system of the water bodies at the Semipalatinsk test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidarkhanova, A K; Lukashenko, S N; Larionova, N V; Polevik, V V

    2018-04-01

    This paper provides research data on levels and character of radionuclide contamination distribution in the «sediments- water - plants » system of objects of the Semipalatinsk test site (STS). As the research objects there were chosen water bodies of man-made origin which located at the territory of "Experimental Field", "Balapan", "Telkem" and "Sary-Uzen" testing sites. For research the sampling of bottom sediments, water, lakeside and water plants was taken. Collected samples were used to determine concentration of anthropogenic radionuclides 90 Sr, 239+240 Pu, 241 Am, 137 Cs. The distribution coefficient (K d ) was calculated as the ratio of the content of radionuclides in the sediments to the content in water, and the concentration ratio (F V ) was calculated as the ratio of radionuclide content in plants to the content in sediments or soil. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantifying radionuclide signatures from a γ–γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, Richard; Jackson, Mark J.; Davies, Ashley V.

    2015-01-01

    A method for quantifying gamma coincidence signatures has been developed, and tested in conjunction with a high-efficiency multi-detector system to quickly identify trace amounts of radioactive material. The γ–γ system utilises fully digital electronics and list-mode acquisition to time–stamp each event, allowing coincidence matrices to be easily produced alongside typical ‘singles’ spectra. To quantify the coincidence signatures a software package has been developed to calculate efficiency and cascade summing corrected branching ratios. This utilises ENSDF records as an input, and can be fully automated, allowing the user to quickly and easily create/update a coincidence library that contains all possible γ and conversion electron cascades, associated cascade emission probabilities, and true-coincidence summing corrected γ cascade detection probabilities. It is also fully searchable by energy, nuclide, coincidence pair, γ multiplicity, cascade probability and half-life of the cascade. The probabilities calculated were tested using measurements performed on the γ–γ system, and found to provide accurate results for the nuclides investigated. Given the flexibility of the method, (it only relies on evaluated nuclear data, and accurate efficiency characterisations), the software can now be utilised for a variety of systems, quickly and easily calculating coincidence signature probabilities. - Highlights: • Monte-Carlo based software developed to easily create/update a coincidence signal library for environmental radionuclides. • Coincidence library utilised to accurately quantify gamma coincidence signatures. • All coincidence signature probabilities are corrected for cascade summing, conversion electron emission and pair production. • Key CTBTO relevant radionuclides have been tested to verify the calculated correction factors. • Accurately quantifying coincidence signals during routine analysis will allow dramatically improved detection

  17. Random summing in a multi-detector counting system measuring mixtures of radionuclides of short and long half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxby, C.B.; Oldroyd, B.; Graham, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for correcting a radiation spectrum for the distortion caused by random summing when a multidetector array is used to acquire events from a mixture of radionuclides whose half-lives may be long or short compared with the counting period. With our own counting system it was found that both the resolving time, and the fractions of the energy of a second signal which may be added to that of the immediately previous signal, i.e., the resolving time function, are dependent upon the energies of these two signals. The method requires knowledge of the losses which occur in a multidetector system e.g., live-time error and blocking losses, the variation of the resolving time function with signal energies, a standard spectrum of each radionuclide of the mixture and the fractions of them which constitute the mixture spectrum, the decay constant of each radionuclide, and the fraction of the total events recorded by the system being received by each detector. (orig.)

  18. CRRIS: a methodology for assessing the impact of airborne radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III; Miller, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) consists of six fully integrated computer codes which calculate environmental transport and resulting doses and risks to individuals or populations exposed to atmospheric radionuclide releases. The individual codes may be used alone for various assessment applications or may be run as a system. This presentation provides an overview and introduction to this system of computer codes and their use in conducting nuclear assessments. Radionuclides are handled by CRRIS either in terms of the released radionuclides or in terms of exposure radionuclides which consist of both the released nuclides and all (or a subset of) the decay daughters that grow in during environmental transport. The capability of CRRIS to handle radionuclide chains is accomplished through PRIMUS which serves as a preprocessor by accessing a library of radionuclide decay data and sets up matricies of decay constants which are used by the other CRRIS codes in all calculations involving transport and decay. PRIMUS may also be run independently by the user to define the decay chains, radionuclide decay constants, and branching ratios

  19. System of automated processing of radionuclide investigations (SAPRI-01) in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Mechev, D.S.; Krupka, I.N.

    1988-01-01

    The author described the results of clinical testing of a system SAPRI-01 designed for automated collection, storage and processing of data on radionuclide investigations. He gave examples of automated processing of RCG and the results of positive scintigraphy of tumors of different sites using 67 Ga-citrate and 99m Tc pertechnetate in statistical and dynamic investigations. Short-comings and ways for updating 4 the system during its serial production were pointed out. The introduction of the system into clinical practice on a wide scale was shown to hold promise

  20. Developing a personal computer based expert system for radionuclide identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarnio, P.A.; Hakulinen, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    Several expert system development tools are available for personal computers today. We have used one of the LISP-based high end tools for nearly two years in developing an expert system for identification of gamma sources. The system contains a radionuclide database of 2055 nuclides and 48000 gamma transitions with a knowledge base of about sixty rules. This application combines a LISP-based inference engine with database management and relatively heavy numerical calculations performed using C-language. The most important feature needed has been the possibility to use LISP and C together with the more advanced object oriented features of the development tool. Main difficulties have been long response times and the big amount (10-16 MB) of computer memory required

  1. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement

  2. Natural radionuclides in major aquifer systems of the Parana sedimentary basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the natural radioactivity of groundwater occurring in sedimentary (Bauru and Guarani) and fractured rock (Serra Geral) aquifer systems in the Parana sedimentary basin, South America that is extensively used for drinking purposes, among others. The measurements of gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity as well the activity concentration of the natural dissolved radionuclides 40 K, 238 U, 234 U, 226 Ra, 222 Rn, 210 Po and 210 Pb were held in 80 tubular wells drilled in 21 municipalities located at Sao Paulo State and its border with Mato Grosso do Sul State in Brazil. Most of the gross alpha radioactivity data were below 1 mBq/L, whereas values exceeding the gross beta radioactivity detection limit of 30 mBq/L were found. The radioelement solubility in the studied systems varied according to the sequence radon>radium>other radionuclides and the higher porosity of sandstones relatively to basalts and diabases could justify the enhanced presence of dissolved radon in the porous aquifer. The implications of the data obtained in terms of standards established for defining the drinking water quality have also been discussed. The population-weighted average activity concentration for these radionuclides was compared to the guideline value of 0.1 mSv/yr for the total effective dose and discussed in terms of the choice of the dose conversion factors. - Highlights: → Integration of distinct radiometric data acquired in groundwaters. → Radiation dose in important hydrological resources in South America. → Contribution of 226 Ra for the more accentuated radiation dose in aquifers. → Dose factors for Rn and generation of values exceeding the maximum of 0.1 mSv/yr.

  3. Natural radionuclides in major aquifer systems of the Parana sedimentary basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos, E-mail: danielbonotto@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, IGCE-Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, Av. 24-A, No. 1515 - CP 178, CEP 13506-900-Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    This paper describes the natural radioactivity of groundwater occurring in sedimentary (Bauru and Guarani) and fractured rock (Serra Geral) aquifer systems in the Parana sedimentary basin, South America that is extensively used for drinking purposes, among others. The measurements of gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity as well the activity concentration of the natural dissolved radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb were held in 80 tubular wells drilled in 21 municipalities located at Sao Paulo State and its border with Mato Grosso do Sul State in Brazil. Most of the gross alpha radioactivity data were below 1 mBq/L, whereas values exceeding the gross beta radioactivity detection limit of 30 mBq/L were found. The radioelement solubility in the studied systems varied according to the sequence radon>radium>other radionuclides and the higher porosity of sandstones relatively to basalts and diabases could justify the enhanced presence of dissolved radon in the porous aquifer. The implications of the data obtained in terms of standards established for defining the drinking water quality have also been discussed. The population-weighted average activity concentration for these radionuclides was compared to the guideline value of 0.1 mSv/yr for the total effective dose and discussed in terms of the choice of the dose conversion factors. - Highlights: > Integration of distinct radiometric data acquired in groundwaters. > Radiation dose in important hydrological resources in South America. > Contribution of {sup 226}Ra for the more accentuated radiation dose in aquifers. > Dose factors for Rn and generation of values exceeding the maximum of 0.1 mSv/yr.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Radionuclide for the Used Resin of the Primary Purification System in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mun; Kim, Myong Seop; Park, Se Il; Kim, Tae Whan; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Chil

    2005-01-01

    In HANARO, a 30 MW research reactor, the ion exchange resin has been used for the purification of the primary coolant system. The resin used in the primary coolant purification system is replaced with new one once every 3 months during 30 MW reactor operation. The extracted resin from the primary coolant purification system is temporarily stored in a shielding treatment of the reactor hall for radiation cooling. After the radiation level of resin decreases enough to be handled for the waste disposal, it is put into the waste drum, and delivered to the waste facility in KAERI. Recently, in this procedure, the quantitative analysis of radionuclide which is contained in resin is required to have more quantitative data for the disposal. Therefore, in this work, a preliminary study was performed to find a sampling method for the representation of the characteristics of radionuclide in the spent resin

  5. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  6. Modeling the effects of repeated systemic administrations of small activity amounts In radionuclide therapy with beta emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, Carlos; Gonzalez, Joaquin; Cepero, Janet; Colom, Camila; Rodriguez, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Good results for radionuclide therapy treatments where repeated short time spaced systemic injection of small activity amounts are given have been reported. Bone marrow and kidneys are usually considered as dose-limiting organs in radionuclide therapy. The treatments in radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be optimized if irradiation effects in those one might be estimated. Xeno-grafted mice is the often biological model used during the evaluation of candidates for radionuclide therapy. A mathematical model of tumor cell kinetics was combined with another one reported for marrow cell kinetics which allows the calculation of marrow cell survival and proliferation in response to different irradiation schemes. Radionuclide therapy treatment with repeated administrations with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with beta emitters were simulated. The effects on fast-growing and slow-growing tumors were evaluated, as well as radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. For more realistic estimation of absorbed dose in mice organs the cross-irradiation due to high energy beta particles was included into the MIRD's formula. Tumor and kidneys responses to the irradiation were estimated on the linear-quadratic model framework which was adapted for a multi-exponential dose rate function describing radionuclide therapy treatments with repeated administrations. Published values for murine tumors kinetics, marrows cellular turnover rates and radiosensitivities were used during the calculations. Iso-effective schemes were also determined varying the interval between fractions and the number of administration. For a given tolerated level of thrombocytopenia and absorbed dose in kidneys an optimal regime of radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be found. The mathematical model presented here allows the prediction of the nadir and duration of thrombocytopenia, the effects on kidneys and the tumor cell response to various treatment schemes

  7. SU-E-T-666: Radionuclides and Activity of the Patient Apertures Used in a Proton Beam of Wobbling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.Y.; Chen, H.H.; Tsai, H.Y.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity of the patient apertures used in a 190-MeV proton beam of wobbling system. Methods: A proton beam of wobbling system in the first proton center in Taiwan, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, was used to bombard the patient apertures. The patient aperture was composed of 60.5 % copper, 39.4 % Zinc, 0.05 % iron, 0.05 % lead. A protable high-purity germanium (HPGe) coaxial detector was used to measure the spectra of the induced nuclides of patient apertures. The analysis of the spectra and the identification of the radionuclides were preliminarily operated by the Nuclide Navigator III Master Library. On the basis of the results by Nuclide Navigator III Master Library, we manually selected the reliable nuclides by the gamma-ray energies, branching ratio, and half life. In the spectra, we can quantify the activity of radionuclides by the Monte Carlo efficiency transfer method. Results: In this study, the radioisotopes activated in patient apertures by the 190-MeV proton beam were divided into two categories. The first category is long half-life radionuclides, such as Co-56 (half life, 77.3 days). Other radionuclides of Cu-60, Cu-61, Cu-62, Cu-66, and Zn-62 have shorter half life. The radionuclide of Cu-60 had the highest activity. From calculation with the efficiency transfer method, the deviations between the computed results and the measured efficiencies were mostly within 10%. Conclusion: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity helps us to estimate proper time intervals for cooling the patient apertures. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  8. SU-E-T-666: Radionuclides and Activity of the Patient Apertures Used in a Proton Beam of Wobbling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.Y.; Chen, H.H.; Tsai, H.Y.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity of the patient apertures used in a 190-MeV proton beam of wobbling system. Methods: A proton beam of wobbling system in the first proton center in Taiwan, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, was used to bombard the patient apertures. The patient aperture was composed of 60.5 % copper, 39.4 % Zinc, 0.05 % iron, 0.05 % lead. A protable high-purity germanium (HPGe) coaxial detector was used to measure the spectra of the induced nuclides of patient apertures. The analysis of the spectra and the identification of the radionuclides were preliminarily operated by the Nuclide Navigator III Master Library. On the basis of the results by Nuclide Navigator III Master Library, we manually selected the reliable nuclides by the gamma-ray energies, branching ratio, and half life. In the spectra, we can quantify the activity of radionuclides by the Monte Carlo efficiency transfer method. Results: In this study, the radioisotopes activated in patient apertures by the 190-MeV proton beam were divided into two categories. The first category is long half-life radionuclides, such as Co-56 (half life, 77.3 days). Other radionuclides of Cu-60, Cu-61, Cu-62, Cu-66, and Zn-62 have shorter half life. The radionuclide of Cu-60 had the highest activity. From calculation with the efficiency transfer method, the deviations between the computed results and the measured efficiencies were mostly within 10%. Conclusion: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity helps us to estimate proper time intervals for cooling the patient apertures. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  9. Evaluation of radionuclide migration in the homogeneous system of a geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvakova, S.; Duran, J.; Necas, V.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study radionuclide migration and release from a deep underground repository situated in a clay formation. An insight into the processes influencing the radionuclide transport in the near field and far field will be presented. For the calculation, a set of radionuclides has been chosen, considering the half-life, decay chains, capacity of the sorption, solubility limits and diffusion coefficients. The migration of radionuclides is dependent on transport properties of the particular nuclide. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of the backfill material and clay geological formation, the transport in the repository occurs mainly by diffusion. The migration rate will be influenced by the water chemistry, solubility, retardation and diffusive properties of the nuclides, and the water flow rate in the clay. The release rates of radionuclides from the geosphere to the biosphere will be converted into the indicative dose rates using dose conversion factors for ingestion. The impact of the critical group is considered via consumption of meat, root vegetables and drinking water from wells. (author)

  10. Radionuclide generators for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.D.; Molinski, V.J.; Hupf, H.B.; Kramer, H.

    1983-10-01

    This document reviews the chemical literature of those radionuclide generators that have gained or appear to possess utility in medical imaging. The text represents a conscientious effort to peruse the scientific literature through 1980. The intent of this work is to provide a reference point for the investigator who is interested in the development of a particular generator system and the refinements which have been reported. Moreover, the incorporation of the particular daughter radionuclide into a suitable radiodiagnostic agent is presented

  11. Development of gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid system for simultaneous imaging of I-131 radionuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kato, Katsuhiko [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogata, Yoshimune [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    Although iodine 131 (I-131) is used for radionuclide therapy, high resolution images are difficult to obtain with conventional gamma cameras because of the high energy of I-131 gamma photons (364 keV). Cerenkov-light imaging is a possible method for beta emitting radionuclides, and I-131 (606 MeV maximum beta energy) is a candidate to obtain high resolution images. We developed a high energy gamma camera system for I-131 radionuclide and combined it with a Cerenkov-light imaging system to form a gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system to compare the simultaneously measured images of these two modalities. The high energy gamma imaging detector used 0.85-mm×0.85-mm×10-mm thick GAGG scintillator pixels arranged in a 44×44 matrix with a 0.1-mm thick reflector and optical coupled to a Hamamatsu 2 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT: H12700 MOD). The gamma imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator was mounted on its top to form a gamma camera system. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was made of a high sensitivity cooled CCD camera. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was combined with the gamma camera using optical mirrors to image the same area of the subject. With this configuration, we simultaneously imaged the gamma photons and the Cerenkov-light from I-131 in the subjects. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the gamma camera system for I-131 were respectively ~3 mm FWHM and ~10 cps/MBq for the high sensitivity collimator at 10 cm from the collimator surface. The spatial resolution of the Cerenkov-light imaging system was 0.64 mm FWHM at 10 cm from the system surface. Thyroid phantom and rat images were successfully obtained with the developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, allowing direct comparison of these two modalities. Our developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system will be useful to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two

  12. Process and research method of radionuclide migration in high level radioactive waste geological disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Zhang Zhanshi

    2014-01-01

    Radionuclides released from waste can migrate from the repository to the rock and soil outside. On the other hand, nuclides also are retarded by the backfill material. Radionuclide migration is the main geochemical process of the waste disposal. This paper introduces various methods for radionuclide migration research, and give a brief analysis of the geochemical process of radionuclide migration. Finally, two of the most important processes of the radionuclide migration have been instanced. (authors)

  13. The biotic factors role in radionuclide migration of natural-vegetable complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushev, B.I.; Kazej, A.I.; Sak, M.M.; Kuz'mich, O.T.; Golushko, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    In Byelorussiyn from first months after the Chernobyl' accident investigation are conducting on the radionuclide de dynamics in the soil-plant-soil system. The isotope composition of soil contamination density and specific plants radioactivity are studying, the radionuclide migration dynamic through the soil profile is investigating. The data are shown on considerable reduction of the plants radioactivity (1986-91 years) in connection with the reduction in the soil contamination density with gamma-spectrum radionuclides, accounting for Ce-144, Pr-144, Ru-106, Cs-134 decay; information is done on gamma-spectrum radionuclides of organs in natural pine and meadows system. It is shown, that the radionuclides are actively absorbed by roots in a zone of the highest radionuclide concentration and are delivered into the overground plant parts, then actively are removed into environment in the breathing process. 11 refs.; 4 tabs

  14. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  15. VICTORIA: A mechanistic model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heams, T.J.; Williams, D.A.; Johns, N.A.; Mason, A.; Bixler, N.E.; Grimley, A.J.; Wheatley, C.J.; Dickson, L.W.; Osborn-Lee, I.; Domagala, P.; Zawadzki, S.; Rest, J.; Alexander, C.A.; Lee, R.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The VICTORIA model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a light water reactor during a severe accident is described. It has been developed by the USNRC to define the radionuclide phenomena and processes that must be considered in systems-level models used for integrated analyses of severe accident source terms. The VICTORIA code, based upon this model, predicts fission product release from the fuel, chemical reactions involving fission products, vapor and aerosol behavior, and fission product decay heating. Also included is a detailed description of how the model is implemented in VICTORIA, the numerical algorithms used, and the correlations and thermochemical data necessary for determining a solution. A description of the code structure, input and output, and a sample problem are provided

  16. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function

  17. Effect of ionizing radiation on radionuclide speciation: Preliminary results from site-specific experiments in a basaltic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Burnell, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Rockwell Hanford Operations, under contract to the Department of Energy, is investigating the suitability of the Hanford site in the state of Washington as a high level nuclear waste repository. An important consideration in these investigations is the effect of ionizing radiation on the speciation of radionuclides in the groundwater after the high-level-waste container has been breached and there is direct contact between the groundwater and the waste form (controlled released period). The effect of ionizing radiation on radionuclide speciation depends on the radiation environment and site-specific chemistry near the waste container. With respect to these two aspects, the following results will be presented: a definition of the radiation environment during the controlled release period; preliminary site-specific experimental results: (1) basaltic systems spiked with radionuclides; (2) spent fuel-groundwater-basalt experiments

  18. Radiological consequences of radionuclide releases to sewage systems from hospitals in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Cruz, Idalmis de la [Facilia AB (Sweden); Bergman, Synnoeve [Vattenfall Power Consultants AB (Sweden); Hasselblad, Serena [Callido AB (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    The report addresses radioactive discharges to sewers originating from hospitals, mainly in the form of the excretion of patients treated with radioisotopes for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. Assessments of doses to the public, including sewage workers, arising from such discharges are performed. Doses are compared against the exemption level of 10 {mu}Sv/a and the dose constraint of 100 {mu}Sv/a. As a basis for the dose assessments, information on the use of radionuclides in Swedish hospitals during the period 1999-2004 is presented and estimates of discharges to the sewage systems are derived. Current sewage treatment practices in Sweden are summarised focusing particularly on the fate of sewage sludge, both in the sewage plant and outside. Radiological impact assessments are performed in two steps. The assessments in the first stage are performed using a simple screening model, not intending to predict exposures realistically but only to identify exposure pathways and radionuclides that are potentially relevant and require further consideration in the more detailed assessments. Results show that only a few of those radionuclides used in the period 1999-2004 in Swedish hospitals for radiotherapy and radiodiagnostics could lead to potentially significant doses (P-32, Y-90, Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, I-131 and Tl-201). Relevant exposure pathways are the external exposure of sewage workers (for Tc- 99m, I-123, I-131, In-111 and Tl-201) and the exposure of the public via ingestion of water (I-131) and fish (P-32, Y-90 and In-111 and I-131). The objective of the second stage is to perform realistic assessments of the doses to sewage workers and to the public through the use of contaminated agricultural sludge and through the contamination of drinking water. For this purpose, the LUCIA model was developed. This model dynamically addresses the behaviour of radionuclides in the different process steps of a sewage plant. The model can address continuous releases as well

  19. The estimation possibility of cleaning from radionuclides for the coast parts of drainage system by the soil fractionating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlin, Y.V.; Chuikov, V.Y.; Belianina, N.G.; Barinov, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper is considered the possibility of the cleaning from the radionuclides for the coast parts of the drainage system at the Moscow SIA open-quotes Radonclose quotes by the soil fractionating treatment. It is showed that this method cannot to be used for the cleaning of the soils near water flowing (a river, a spring or a open drainage system) because the most part of the soil size-fractions is the fine fractions and the main contaminant radionuclide ( 137 Cs) is distributed among the different soil components homogeneously

  20. Standardization of methods of date processing of radionuclide investigations at SAPRI-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Mechev, D.S.; Krupka, I.N.; Ishchenko, V.P.; Zozulya, A.A.; Romanenko, V.A.; Dzhuzha, D.A.; Lazar', D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Series production of SAPRI-complex (system of automated processing of radionuclide information) intended for automatization of the process of data acquisition and processing of diagnostic radionuclide examination was set up. The features of SAPRI system having the wide possibilities for development and use of algorithms and programs for processing and analysis of radionuclide information were considered

  1. Monitoring and characterization of radionuclide transport in the hydrogeologic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Raymond, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Historical records pertaining to the 300 North and Wye Burial Grounds at the Hanford Reservation were reviewed as a prerequisite to determining programs for land reclamation. All available historical documents, agency communications, and engineering drawings related to the study areas were located, reviewed, and analyzed. An inventory of recorded location, type, and quantity of radionuclides and associated materials in each burial ground was completed and distributed to cooperating investigators. A geophysical survey of the 300 North Burial Ground was conducted as a basis for detecting the composition, size, distribution, and depth of buried objects and characterizing the sediments in which they are buried. Acoustic, radar, magnetic, and metal detection surveys were completed and their applicability evaluated; drilling techniques and equipment for recovering and characterizing sediments and radioactive contaminated material were developed. Drilling will also determine the amount and dimensional extent of radionuclide migration; sediment-fluid interaction and fluid migration through the unsaturated zone at the 300 North Burial Ground were characterized. A study to determine biological transport of radionuclides at the Wye Burial Ground was also initiated. This study involved a preliminary survey of present flora and fauna inhabiting the Wye Burial Ground site. Plant tissue was chemically and radiochemically analyzed to determine radionuclide migration and possible dose effects and population dynamics of burrowing animals that could potentially be exposed to buried waste materials were investigated

  2. Low Power, Room Temperature Systems for the Detection and Identification of Radionuclides from Atmospheric Nuclear Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    DTRA-TR-13-48 Low Power, Room Temperature Systems for the Detection and Identification of Radionuclides from Atmospheric Nuclear Test Approved for...01-C-0071 Radionuclides from Atmospheric Nuclear Tests 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Muren Chu...I IIlIl4eI ilf "tt""f;lk~ l).t::l’e.do)- mllin:: in an n-t~’J𔃻f mlllril.: II!’ ,-kll ~".r’I::!, ..... ·hkh j,-, .:auI,,·d br thP . la-ek f.r ·;IIff

  3. Models and data to predict radionuclide concentrations in river basin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, G.; Rufai, G.G.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of land may result from the detonation of nuclear weapons or nuclear accidents, such as Chernobyl. The deposition of fallout on soil and/or plants, and subsequent erosion by rainsplash and overland flow, could introduce radioactive isotopes into the water and soil resources of the environment. A model to simulate the transport and deposition of concentrated pollutants and radionuclides within the river basin is proposed. The proposed model is built on an existing Strathclyde River Basin Model, (SRBM), which has the potential to simulate runoff and erosion and the distribution of eroded soil particle sizes. An algorithm of the processes of concentration of pollutants and radionuclides can be developed based on the current understanding of the process of radionuclide attachment to soil particles. (author)

  4. Investigation on the relationship between systemic burden and annual limits on intake of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yongzeng

    1984-01-01

    The concept of systemic burden and the calculation of annual limits on intake (ALI) of radionuclides are discussed. The relationship between these two quantities is also described. Using this relationship, the ratio of actual amount of intake to ALI can be obtained for the assessment of the risk to internal exposure

  5. RIVER-RAD, Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: RIVER-RAD assesses the potential fate of radionuclides released to rivers. The model is simplified in nature and is intended to provide guidance in determining the potential importance of the surface water pathway, relevant transport mechanisms, and key radionuclides in estimating radiological dose to man. 2 - Method of solution: A compartmental linear transfer model is used in RIVER-RAD. The river system model in the code is divided into reaches (compartments) of equal size, each with a sediment compartment below it. The movement of radionuclides is represented by a series of transfers between the reaches, and between the water and sediment compartments of each reach. Within each reach (for both the water and sediment compartments), the radionuclides are assumed to be uniformly mixed. Upward volatilization is allowed from the water compartment, and the transfer of radionuclides between the reaches is determined by the flow rate of the river. Settling and resuspension velocities determine the transfer of absorbed radionuclides between the water and sediment compartments. Radioactive decay and decay-product buildup are incorporated into all transport calculations for all radionuclide chains specified by the user. Each nuclide may have unique input and removal rates. Volatilization and radiological decay are considered as linear rate constants in the model. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: None noted

  6. Methodical aspects of radionuclide study of locomotor system in patients with systemic diseases of connective tissue with single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potsibyina, V.V.; Oderyij, Je.A.

    1998-01-01

    The original technique was used to examine 427 patients aged 18-64 with systemic diseases of locomotor system connective tissue and 65 controls. In addition to clinical studies, radionuclide signs of locomotor system lesions was investigated with NUCLETRON APEX SP-6 CT unit using labeled with Tc-99m and osteotropic radiopharmaceuticals

  7. 40 CFR 141.26 - Monitoring frequency and compliance requirements for radionuclides in community water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... identified in the finished water. (iii) Annual monitoring for strontium-90 and tritium shall be conducted by... requirements for radionuclides in community water systems. 141.26 Section 141.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER...

  8. Development of a computational system for monitoring data management in vivo of the radionuclides in human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Arlene A. dos; Lucena, Eder A. de; Dantas, Ana Leticia A.; Dantas, Bernardo M.

    2014-01-01

    The management of in vivo monitoring process of internal contamination by radionuclides in human beings request a set of steps ranging from the spectrum acquisition to reporting. The spectrum analysis is the identification and quantification of radioactive materials present in organs and individual's body tissues submitted to monitoring procedures. The Body Counter Unit of IRD performs in vivo measurements emitting radionuclide photons in the 10-3000 keV energy range, using NaI type scintillation detectors (Tl) 8” x 4” and 3” x 3” and as semiconductor detectors type HPGe. The measuring system uses the Canberra Genie 2000 software for the acquisition of spectra with 1024 channels related to their respective energies. The counting are distributed in the spectrum due to the energy of the photons emitted by radionuclides of interest. The SIGMIV program (System for Management of in vivo monitoring), developed in MS Visual Basic 2010 accesses the spectrum after it is converted into an EXCEL spreadsheet. This program uses a bank Data developed in MS-Access to store information associated with each measurement, as counting and calibration parameters. SIGMIV generates a report containing personal information, activity and radionuclides of interest present in the body, associated with respective uncertainties and minimum activity detectable. The program SIGMIV optimized monitoring procedures 'in vivo', showing that is flexible, reliable and easy to handle, thus becoming an important tool for development routine in In vivo Monitoring Laboratory of IRD

  9. Primary 4πβ-γ coincidence system for standardization of radionuclides by means of plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccarelli, Aida Maria

    2003-01-01

    The present work describes a 4π(α,β)-γ coincidence system for absolute measurement of radionuclide activity using a plastic scintillator in 4π geometry for charged particles detection and a Nal (Tl) crystal for gamma-ray detection. Several shapes and dimensions of the plastic scintillator have been tried in order to obtain the best system configuration. Radionuclides which decay by alpha emission, β - , β + and electron capture have been standardized. The results showed excellent agreement with other conventional primary system which makes use of a 4π proportional counter for X-ray and charged particle detection. The system developed in the present work have some advantages when compared with the conventional systems, namely; it does not need metal coating on the films used as radioactive source holders. When compared to liquid scintillators, is showed the advantage of not needing to be kept in dark for more than 24 h to allow phosphorescence decay of ambient light. Therefore it can be set to count immediately after the sources are placed inside of it. (author)

  10. Consultative committee on ionizing radiation: Impact on radionuclide metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, L.R.; Ratel, G.

    2016-01-01

    In response to the CIPM MRA, and to improve radioactivity measurements in the face of advancing technologies, the CIPM's consultative committee on ionizing radiation developed a strategic approach to the realization and validation of measurement traceability for radionuclide metrology. As a consequence, measurement institutions throughout the world have devoted no small effort to establish radionuclide metrology capabilities, supported by active quality management systems and validated through prioritized participation in international comparisons, providing a varied stakeholder community with measurement confidence. - Highlights: • Influence of CIPM MRA on radionuclide metrology at laboratories around the world. • CCRI strategy: to be the “undisputed hub for ionizing radiation global metrology.” • CCRI Strategic Plan stresses importance of measurement confidence for stakeholder. • NMIs increasing role in radionuclide metrology by designating institutions (DIs). • NMIs and DIs establish quality systems; validate capabilities through comparisons.

  11. Radionuclides in the ecological system of the Boka Kotorska Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martic, M.; Ajdacic, N.

    1988-01-01

    In order to determine radioactive contamination in the South Adriatic region after May, 1986, activities of 21 radionuclides of natural and artificial origin were determined by gamma-spectrometry in the samples of sea water, sediments and several characteristic types of organisms collected on several locations in the Boka Kotorska Bay and open sea. Quantitative data on radionuclide contents are presented. Change of activity levels with respect to the 'zero state' determined for this region during previous years is also discussed. (author) 6 refs.; 4 tabs

  12. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  13. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  14. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  15. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Prouty

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  16. [Economic assessment of low flow anesthesia with analysis of the break-even point. Experience at an underutilized operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varesio, V; Agosta, I; Masullo, F; Malnati, R; Martegani, G M

    1997-04-01

    Many authors indicate the importance of economic saving obtained with the use of the inhalation rebreathing anaesthesia instead of non rebreathing anaesthesia, always referring to parameters which are the duration of anesthesia (1 hour) and the use of the operating theatre each year. It is presumed that the utilization of rebreathing system is at least a 1.000 hours/year. However it is not necessary that all the operating theatres employ 1.000 hours/year in rebreathing anesthesia. This method requires annual depreciation costs of the capital invested for the purchase of new adequate ventilators, to modificative those already existing and guarantee adequate monitoring and the maintenance of these equipment. The importance is stressed of individuating a method of economical evaluation comparing the effective savings obtained with the real utilization of rebreathing anesthesia for each operating theatre and the costs of purchasing and maintaining the equipment. From our point of view the break-even point analysis has demonstrated to be a consistent instrument for the evaluation of the real economic advantage of rebreathing system in each hospital. It is suggested to utilize a conventional formula for the determination of the break even point, which means the minimal number of hours for year that justifies economically the adoption of rebreathing anaesthesia. An example of this analysis has been applied for an operating theatre in the hospital of Morbegno, where the major utilization of regional anaesthesia leads to a reduced number hours/year of rebreathing anesthesia which remains anyhow economically advantageous.

  17. Radionuclide fixation mechanisms in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, S.

    1991-01-01

    In the safety evaluation of the radioactive waste disposal in geological environment, the mass balance equation for radionuclide migration is given. The sorption of radionuclides by geological formations is conventionally represented by the retardation of the radionuclides as compared with water movement. In order to quantify the sorption of radionuclides by rocks and sediments, the distribution ratio is used. In order to study quantitatively the long term behavior of waste radionuclides in geological environment, besides the distribution ratio concept in short term, slower radionuclide retention reaction involving mineral transformation should be considered. The development of microspectroscopic method for long term reaction path modeling, the behavior of iron during granite and water interaction, the reduction precipitation of radionuclides, radionuclide migration pathways, and the representative scheme of radionuclide migration and fixation in rocks are discussed. (K.I.)

  18. The foundation of computer based closed radionuclide sources turnover control system in Moscow city region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.E.; Kozlov, A.A.; Lavrov, K.N.; Sobolev, I.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of Closed Radionuclide Sources (CRS) automated account and control in Moscow city and Moscow region. Information relations structure between authorities and enterprises is shown. Special computer oriented system of CRS turnover monitoring is used for this purposes. Its possibilities and numeric characteristics of database are mentioned. This system benefit and application aspects are discussed in detail. (author)

  19. Quantitative assessment of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to assess the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark, with special focus on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits and sediments for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is based on data and information from Forsmark Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. From the geological point of view, the near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits and sediments that overlay the granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the more abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit and the remainder is made of clayey deposits. These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time horizons considered in this work, is calcium carbonate together with minor amounts of clay minerals (e.g. illite). The till deposits forms aquifers with relatively high hydraulic conductivities. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with low to very low amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich layers (gyttja), which can promote reducing conditions in the porewaters. All these clays exhibits relatively low hydraulic conductivity values. Five radionuclides have been selected for conceptualization and qualitative evaluation of retention process: U as an actinide, Se as a redox-sensitive radionuclide, Cs as a monovalent cation, Sr as a divalent cation, and I as an anion radionuclide. Overall, radionuclide retention capacity in the surface systems at Forsmark can be provided by sorption on charged surfaces of clays and oxyhydroxides, co-precipitation with sulphates, sulphides, oxyhydroxides and carbonates, and sorption on organic matter. Two-dimensional coupled hydrogeological and reactive solute transport models have been developed to simulate the geochemical behaviour of U, Cs and Sr. These three radionuclides have

  20. Marine biogeochemistry of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides entering the ocean from runoff, fallout, or deliberate release rapidly become involved in marine biogeochemical cycles. Sources, sinks and transport of radionuclides and analogue elements are discussed with emphasis placed on how these elements interact with marine organisms. Water, food and sediments are the source terms from which marine biota acquire radionuclides. Uptake from water occurs by surface adsorption, absorption across body surfaces, or a combination of both. Radionuclides ingested with food are either assimilated into tissue or excreted. The relative importance of the food and water pathway in uptake varies with the radionuclide and the conditions under which exposure occurs. Evidence suggests that, compared to the water and food pathways, bioavailability of sediment-bound radionuclides is low. Bioaccumulation processes are controlled by many environmental and intrinsic factors including exposure time, physical-chemical form of the radionuclide, salinity, temperature, competitive effects with other elements, organism size, physiology, life cycle and feeding habits. Once accumulated, radionuclides are transported actively by vertical and horizontal movements of organisms and passively by release of biogenic products, e.g., soluble excreta, feces, molts and eggs. Through feeding activities, particles containing radionuclides are ''packaged'' into larger aggregates which are redistributed upon release. Most radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to such particles but are remineralized as they sink and/or decompose. In the pelagic zones, sinking aggregates can further scavenge particle-reactive elements thus removing them from the surface layers and transporting them to depth. Evidence from both radiotracer experiments and in situ sediment trap studies is presented which illustrates the importance of biological scavenging in controlling the distribution of radionuclides in the water column. (author)

  1. Procedures for economic distribution of radionuclides in research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, N.A.

    1979-01-01

    A radionuclide accountability system for use in a research facility is described. It can be operated manually or adapted for computer use. All radionuclides are ordered, received, distributed and paid for by the Radiological Control Office who keep complete records of date of order, receipt, calibration use, transfer and/or disposal. Wipe leak tests, specific activity and lot number are also recorded. The procedure provides centralized total accountability records, including financial records, of all radionuclide orders, and the economic advantages of combined purchasing. The use of this system in two medical facilities has resulted in considerable financial savings in the first year of operation. (author)

  2. Dynamic sorption data of selected radionuclides in sediment-water-systems from the Gorleben region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.

    1993-01-01

    In 48 sediment-water-systems from the Gorleben region about 300 continuous-flow-column experiments were performed with 10 radionuclides. To simulate conditions as close as possible to natural ones (as regards the bedding of sediments, speed of filtration, environment, and microbiology - if necessary) for the sediment-groundwater-systems, the ranges of retardation factors for fresh, mixed and salt water systems were specified. For the investigated sand-water-systems, a comparison of the results obtained from continuous-flow-column and batch experiments for 85Sr and 134Cs was made. (orig.) [de

  3. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.J.; Kennedy, V.H.; Nelson, A.

    1983-06-01

    A bibliographical database has been developed to provide quick access to research and background literature in the field of radioecology. This is a development of an earlier database described by Nelson (Bocock 1981). ITE's particular fields of interest have led to a subject bias in the bibliography towards studies in Cumbria, especially those concerned with radionuclides originating from the reprocessing plant at Sellafield, and towards ecological research studies that are complementary to radionuclide studies. Other subjects covered, include the chemistry of radionuclides, budgets and transfers within ecosystems and techniques for the analysis of environmental samples. ITE's research objectives have led to the establishment of a specialized database which is intended to complement rather than compete with the large international databases made available by suppliers such as IRS-DIALTECH or DIALOG. Currently the database holds about 1900 references which are stored on a 2 1/2 megabyte hard disk on a Digital PDP11/34 computer operating under a time shared system. The references follow a standard format. (author)

  4. Sorption of radionuclides from Pb-Bi melt. Report 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalov, Eh.E.; Il'icheva, N.S.; Trifonova, O.E.

    2015-01-01

    Results of laboratory investigations of sorption and interfacial distribution of 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 154,155 Eu and 235,238 U radionuclides in the system Pb-Bi melt - steel surface are analyzed. It is shown that 106 Ru and 125 Sb are concentrated in Pb-Bi melt and other radionuclides with higher oxygen affinity are sorbed on oxide deposits on structural materials. Temperature dependences of sorption efficiency of radionuclides are studied. It is shown that there is sharp increase of this value for all radionuclides near the temperature range 350-400 deg C. Recommendations are given on the use of 106 Ru and 125 Sb as a reference for fuel element rupture detection system with radiometric monitoring of coolant melt samples and 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 134m Cs with radiometric monitoring of sorbing samples [ru

  5. A study on the radionuclide transport by bacteria in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to develop a predictive model based on a conceptual three phase system and to investigate the influence of bacteria and their generation on the transport of radionuclide in porous and fractured media. The mass balance for bacteria, substrate and radionuclide were formulated. To illustrate the model simply, an equilibrium condition was assumed to partition the substrate, bacteria and radionuclide concentrations between the solid soil matrix, aqueous phase, rock matrix and bacterial surface. From the numerical calculation of the radionuclide transport in the presence of bacteria, it was found that the growth of bacteria and supplied primary substrate as limiting or stimulating growth factor of bacteria are the most important factors of the radionuclide transport. We also found that, depend on the transport of bacteria the temporal and spatial distribution of radionuclide concentration was significantly altered. The model proposed in this study will improve the evaluation of the role of the bacteria in the transport of radionuclide in groundwater systems. Furthermore, this model would be usefully utilized in analyzing the important role of colloidal particulate on the overall performance of radioactive waste safety

  6. Radionuclide getters in the near-field chemistry of repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, T.R.; Lee, D.J.

    1991-06-01

    The solubility of many radionuclides in a radwaste repository will be limited by the high pH of the cement based system. However, the inclusion of specific sorbing media, within the cement backfill, offers the ability to improve the retention of the more mobile radionuclides, such as caesium and iodine; thereby further reducing their environmental impact. This programme of work is intended to assess the radionuclide sorption efficiency of selected inorganic getters incorporated in cement. (author)

  7. Physico-chemical and hydraulic mechanisms of radionuclide mobilization in aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplev, A.V.; Bulgakov, A.A.; Comans, R.N.J.; Hilton, J.; Smith, J.; Madruga, M.J.; Voitsekhovich, O.V.; Sansone, U.; Kudelsky, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents main results of joint studies carried out in frame of EC-coordinated ECP-3 Project 'Modelling and study of the mechanisms of the transfer of radioactive material from the terrestrial ecosystem to and in water bodies around Chernobyl' in part of geochemical pathways. Physico-chemical models of specific migration processes are developed and recommended for application as sub models for inclusion in the decision support system (JSP-1). Main parameters, determining the behaviour of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems are identified and methods for their estimation in |emergency situations are proposed

  8. The role of natural organics in radionuclide migration in natural aquifer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    The wide variety of organic compounds present in natural waters is assessed for the role they may play in radionuclide and, especially, actinide migration. Some natural analog and environmental data are briefly reviewed for evaluation of the effect of organics in these systems. The binding constants and the kinetics of complexation of actinides by humics are discussed in terms of probable effects on actinide migration. The role of organics in redox, and in sorption, is also considered. (orig.)

  9. Diffusion of radionuclides in concrete/bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albinsson, Y.; Boerjesson, S.; Andersson, K.; Allard, B.

    1993-02-01

    In a repository for nuclear waste, different construction materials will be used. Two important materials among these are concrete and bentonite clay. These will act as mechanical barriers, preventing convective water flow and also retard transport due to diffusion of dissolved radionuclides by a combination of mechanical constraints and chemical interactions with the solid. An important issue is the possible change of the initial sodium bentonite into the calcium form due to ion exchange with calcium from the cement. The initial leaching of the concrete has been studied using radioactive spiked concrete in contact with compacted bentonite. The diffusion of Cs, Am and Pu into 5 different types of concrete in contact with porewater have been measured. The measured diffusivity for Cs agrees reasonable well with data found in literature. For Am and Pu no movement could be measured (less than 0.2 mm) even though the contact times were extremely long (2.5 y and 5 y, respectively). This report gives also a summary of the previously published results about sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in cement performed in Prav/KBS/SKB projects 1980-1990. 25 refs

  10. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  11. Transfer of accidentally released radionuclides in agricultural systems (TARRAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Maubert, Colle; Rauret, G.; Grandison, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project is to contribute to the reliability of radiological assessment methods and establish a scientific base for the design of post-accident countermeasures. Three main aspects are considered in this project: A simulated accidental source term is used and the behaviour of aerosol deposits containing Sr, Cs and Ag isotopes are followed in some European soil-crop systems; the modification of radionuclide transfer rates through the food chain by well established food processing techniques is studied for Sr, Cs, Co and Ru; the project includes a study on the specific mediterranean diet and transfer data that are compared with currently used generic parameters. Seven contributions of the project for the reporting period are presented. (R.P.) 11 figs., 12 tabs

  12. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wollongong Univ.; Tomiyoshi, K.; Sekine, T.

    1997-01-01

    The present status and future directions of research and development on radionuclide generator technology are reported. The recent interest to develop double-neutron capture reactions for production of in vivo generators; neutron rich nuclides for radio-immunotherapeutic pharmaceuticals: and advances with ultra-short lived generators is highlighted. Emphasis is focused on: production of the parent radionuclide; the selection and the evaluation of support materials and eluents with respect to the resultant radiochemical yield of the daughter, and the breakthrough of the radionuclide parent: and, the uses of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, biomedical and industrial applications. The 62 Zn → 62 Cu, 66 Ni → 66 Cu, 103m Rh → 103 Rh, 188 W → 188 Re and the 225 Ac → 221 Fr → 213 Bi generators are predicted to be emphasized for future development. Coverage of the 99 Mo → 99m Tc generator was excluded, as it the subject of another review. The literature search ended June, 1996. (orig.)

  13. Radionuclide transport in the Neogene aquifer system located in the environment of the Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedeon, M.; Marivoet, J.; Vandersteen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework the Belgian research program on the long term management of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste coordinated by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Boom Clay is considered as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in NE-Belgium (Campine area). In the frame of the performance assessments of a disposal system located in the Boom Clay Formation, the transport of radionuclides diffusing through the clay barrier into the aquifers located above is modelled. The transport model for the Neogene aquifer is based on a series of groundwater flow models simulating the aquifer systems in the surroundings of the Boom Clay. This series of groundwater models include the regional north-eastern Belgium model simulating flow both above and below the Boom Clay, the recently updated deep-aquifer pumping model, simulating transient flow in the over-exploited aquifers below the Boom Clay and finally the catchment-scale Neogene aquifer model, simulating flow in the aquifer system above the Boom Clay. The Neogene aquifer system consists of two main aquifers. The Pliocene aquifer is located at the top, separated from the underlying Miocene aquifer by the Kasterlee Clay aquitard. The Miocene aquifer consists of three hydrostratigraphic units: the Diest, Berchem and Voort Formations; with the last two having a lower hydraulic conductivity than the Diest unit. The transport model for the Neogene aquifer represents a fraction of the catchment-scale Neogene aquifer model. It stretches from the local divide between the Grote and Kleine Nete Rivers up to the Kleine Nete River, representing the main model sink. The boundary conditions and the sources/sinks in the Pliocene aquifer are defined mostly by the surface water features, such as the rivers, brooks, lakes and canals. In the partially confined Miocene aquifer, the effect of the surface water features is dampened and the heads at the model

  14. Assessment of atmospherically-released radionuclides using the computerized radiological risk investigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C.B.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Miller, C.W.; Baes, C.F. III.

    1986-01-01

    For radionuclides, the standards are in terms of an annual dose, and the regulations require assurance that no member of the general public receives a dose in excess of that standard. Thus, spatial variations in the population around an emission source must be considered. Furthermore, for most chemical pollutants the standards are written in terms of an air concentration while for radionuclides other pathways of exposure, e.g., uptake of the airborne emissions by terrestrial food chains must also be considered. The remainder of this paper discusses the computer codes that make up the CRRIS and how they are used to perform an assessment of the health impacts on man of radionuclides released to the atmosphere

  15. Limitations of radionuclide flow studies in bilateral carotid thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messert, B.; Tyson, I.B.; Barron, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography as a noninvasive procedure has become an important tool in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. Determinations of arm-to-brain circulation times complemented by the transit times of the radionuclide bolus through the brain afford insight into the functional status of the vascular system of the brain. Delays in perfusion, asymmetries in appearance, and washout of the radionuclide material can be correlated with disease entities. However, as with many procedures elevated to the status of a screening test, the possibility of false-positive and false-negative results exists. Two cases of bilateral carotid occlusion are presented, showing normal or only delayed, fairly symmetrical brain perfusion. The appearance of the radionuclide flow in the neck in AP and lateral views gave no suggestion of the involved deficits. Even multiple-projection imaging might fail to demonstrate major vascular obstructions. However, attentive study of these projections might yield interesting evidence of unexpected collateral flow systems. (U.S.)

  16. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  17. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.E.; Horrill, A.D.; Howard, B.J.; Lowe, V.P.W.; Parkinson, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in grazed and ungrazed saltmarshes; incorporation of radionuclides by sheep grazing on an estuarine saltmarsh; inland transfer of radionuclides by birds feeding in the estuaries and saltmarshes at Ravenglass; radionuclides in contrasting types of coastal pastures and taken up by individual plant species found in west Cumbria; procedures developed and used for the measurement of alpha and gamma emitters in environmental materials. (U.K.)

  18. Radionuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Chapter 8 presents tables on selected alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray emitters by increasing energy; information on specific activity for selected radionuclides; naturally occurring radionuclides; the natural decay series; and the artificially produced neptunium series. A table of alpha emitters is listed by increasing atomic number and by energy. The table of β emitters presented is useful in identifying β emitters whose energies and possibly half-lives have been determined by standard laboratory techniques. It is also a handy guide to β-emitting isotopes for applications requiring specific half-lives and/or energies. Gamma rays for radionuclides of importance to radiological assessments and radiation protection are listed by increasing energy. The energies and branching ratios are important for radionuclide determinations with gamma spectrometry detectors. This section also presents a table of x-ray energies which are useful for radiochemical analyses. A number of nuclides emit x-rays as part of their decay scheme. These x-rays may be counted with Ar proportional counters, Ge planar or n-type Ge co-axial detectors, or thin crystal NaI(T1) scintillation counters. In both cases, spectral measurements can be made and both qualitative and quantitative information obtained on the sample. Nuclear decay data (energy and probability by radiation type) for more than one hundred radionuclides that are important to health physicists are presented in a schematic manner

  19. Quantitative assessment of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2007-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to assess the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark, with special focus on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits and sediments for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is based on data and information from Forsmark Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. From the geological point of view, the near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits and sediments that overlay the granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the more abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit and the remainder is made of clayey deposits. These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time horizons considered in this work, is calcium carbonate together with minor amounts of clay minerals (e.g. illite). The till deposits forms aquifers with relatively high hydraulic conductivities. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with low to very low amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich layers (gyttja), which can promote reducing conditions in the porewaters. All these clays exhibits relatively low hydraulic conductivity values. Five radionuclides have been selected for conceptualization and qualitative evaluation of retention process: U as an actinide, Se as a redox-sensitive radionuclide, Cs as a monovalent cation, Sr as a divalent cation, and I as an anion radionuclide. Overall, radionuclide retention capacity in the surface systems at Forsmark can be provided by sorption on charged surfaces of clays and oxyhydroxides, co-precipitation with sulphates, sulphides, oxyhydroxides and carbonates, and sorption on organic matter. Two-dimensional coupled hydrogeological and reactive solute transport models have been developed to simulate the geochemical behaviour of U, Cs and Sr. These three radionuclides have

  20. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  1. Chemistry of groundwater and the migration process of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olteanu, Mirela; Popa, Aurelia; Crina, Bucur

    2001-01-01

    Establishing the criteria of selection of a host site for final repository of low and intermediate radioactive waste is based upon the study of two major components, the radioactivity diffusion in disposal site and the environmental impact. The hydrological characteristics of geological formation are the main factors that control radionuclides moving (migration), because, in general, the water is the natural way for dissolving and transport of these in environment. In interaction of the water with environment, the water is present like a dynamic and complex system, which contents dissolved or suspension of mineral and organic substances. Knowing the water-soil system interaction mechanism, the physical-chemical characteristics of each component in this system, the mobility in time of radionuclides, from the repository in environment can be estimated. In migration, the main problem is determination of transport rate of radionuclides in environment. (authors)

  2. Study of a 4πβ-γ coincidence system for absolute radionuclide activity measurement using plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piuvezam Filho, Helio

    2007-01-01

    The present work was intended to study a coincidence system 4π(PS)β-γ for absolute activity measurement using plastic scintillators in 4π geometry. Along with experiments on the coincidence system, simulations were also performed applying the Monte Carlo Method, by means of codes PENELOPE and ESQUEMA. These simulations were performed in order to calculate the extrapolation curve of the coincidence system 4π(PS)β-γ and compare it to experimental data. A new geometry was proposed to the coincidence system adding up a second photomultiplier tube to the previous system for improving light collection from the plastic scintillator, as this system presented limitations in the minimum detected energy due to the presence of electronic noise and low gain. The results show that an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was obtained, as well as in the minimum detected energy. Moreover, there was an increase in the detection efficiency. With these modifications, it is now possible to calibrate radionuclides which emit low energy electrons or X-rays, increasing the number of radionuclides that can be standardized with this type of system.(author)

  3. VICTORIA: A mechanistic model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system under severe accident conditions. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heams, T J [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, D A; Johns, N A; Mason, A [UKAEA, Winfrith, (England); Bixler, N E; Grimley, A J [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wheatley, C J [UKAEA, Culcheth (England); Dickson, L W [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Osborn-Lee, I [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Domagala, P; Zawadzki, S; Rest, J [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Alexander, C A [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Lee, R Y [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The VICTORIA model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a light water reactor during a severe accident is described. It has been developed by the USNRC to define the radionuclide phenomena and processes that must be considered in systems-level models used for integrated analyses of severe accident source terms. The VICTORIA code, based upon this model, predicts fission product release from the fuel, chemical reactions involving fission products, vapor and aerosol behavior, and fission product decay heating. Also included is a detailed description of how the model is implemented in VICTORIA, the numerical algorithms used, and the correlations and thermochemical data necessary for determining a solution. A description of the code structure, input and output, and a sample problem are provided.

  4. Radionuclide activity and the immune system functioning in residents of radiation contaminated areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Sokolenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to assess the relation of radioactive contamination degree to immune system functioning, in the absence or presence of additional potential immunosuppressants. To achieve the objective, during the period of 1995–2015 we examined 250 people, students of Cherkasy State University, who lived in the areas of enhanced radiation monitoring before. Also we evaluated the additional impact of the emotional stress caused by examinations on examined students. Indicators of cellular immunity were determined by immunophenotyping and dyeing using Romanowsky-Giemsa method. The level of immunoglobulins in blood serum was determined by radial immunodiffusion (Mancini method. The level of cortisol in blood serum was determined by immunoenzyme method. We have found that in absence of the emotional stress among residents of the areas contaminated with radionuclides, cortisol level remained at the upper limit of homeostatic norm. There is an average positive correlation between the activity of radionuclides in the territories of residence and the level of cortisol. There are marked average positive correlations between the activity of radionuclides and the level of neutrophils, and low positive correlations with the levels of IgG and IgM in blood serum. Average negative correlations between the activity of radionuclides and the following parameters are also observed: absolute and relative number of functionally mature T-lymphocytes with phenotype CD3+, absolute and relative number of their helper subpopulation CD4+, absolute and relative number of natural killer cells with phenotype CD16+; and strong negative correlations with immunoregulatory index CD4+/CD8+. Cortisol level shows the similar correlation with the same parameters, but correlation coefficient is lower. Under conditions of additional stress, caused by emotional load during the examinations, cortisol level significantly increases. This enhanced previously discovered

  5. Transient simulation and sensitivity analysis for transport of radionuclides in a saturated-unsaturated groundwater flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide transport by groundwater flow is an important pathway in the assessment of the environmental impact of radioactive waste disposal to the biosphere. A numerical model was developed to simulate radionuclide transport by groundwater flow and predict the radionuclide discharge rate to the biosphere. A sensitivity analysis methodology was developed to address the sensitivity of the input parameters of the radionuclide transport equation to the specified response of interest

  6. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The status of radionuclide generators for chemical research and applications related to the life sciences and biomedical research are reviewed. Emphasis is placed upon convenient, efficient and rapid separation of short-lived daughter radionuclides in a chemical form suitable for use without further chemical manipulation. The focus is on the production of the parent, the radiochemistry associated with processing the parent and daughter, the selection and the characteristic separation methods, and yields. Quality control considerations are briefly noted. The scope of this review includes selected references to applications of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and the life sciences, particularly in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. The 99 Mo-sup(99m)Tc generator was excluded. 202 references are cited. (orig.)

  7. A study on the characteristics of colloid-associated radionuclide transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yun Chang

    1997-02-01

    Recently, the radionuclide transport in the form of colloids has been focused intensively in the safety assessment of a radioactive waste repository. As colloids are considered to be able to increase the transport rate of radionuclide through geologic media, the transport of radionuclide should be adjusted by the presence of colloids. The migration of dissolved radionuclide is expected to depend on various process such as advection, dispersion and interactions with soils, and, in addition, the transport of colloid-mediated radionuclide is considered to be more complicated because of the interactions between radionuclides and colloids. In this paper the migration behavior of colloid-associated radionuclides within subsurface are reviewed and studied in detail. The colloid-mediated transport system was modelled and simulated in order to illustrate the effects of colloids on the transport of radionuclide in the aquifer system. The transport rate of radionuclide is mainly controlled by a retardation factor which is controlled by colloidal behaviors, degree of adsorption, and the related geologic parameters. Therefore it is necessary to carefully understand the accelerating tendency of the retardation difference factor, and in this study the trends are analyzed, described and the retardation difference factor is mathematically defined, simplified and applied practically to the safety and performance assessment of a future repository

  8. Modeling the Hydrogeochemical Transport of Radionuclides through Engineered Barriers System in the Proposed LLW Disposal Site of Taiwan - 12082

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chen-Wuing; Tsao, Jui-Hsuan [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Hsu [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-01

    A proposed site for final disposal of low-level radioactive waste located in Daren Township of Taitung County along the southeastern coast has been on the selected list in Taiwan. The geology of the Daren site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. A mined cavern design with a tunnel system of 500 m below the surface is proposed. Concrete is used as the main confinement material for the engineered barrier. To investigate the hydrogeochemical transport of radionuclides through engineered barriers system, HYDROGEOCHEM5.0 model was applied to simulate the complex chemical interactions among radionuclides, the cement minerals of the concrete, groundwater flow, and transport in the proposed site. The simulation results showed that the engineered barriers system with the side ditch efficiently drained the ground water and lowered the concentration of the concrete degradation induced species (e.g., hydrogen ion, sulfate, and chloride). The velocity of groundwater observed at side ditch gradually decreased with time due to the fouling of pore space by the mineral formation of ettringite and thaumasite. The short half-life of Co-60, Sr-90 and Cs-137 significantly reduced the concentrations, whereas the long half-life of I-129(1.57x10{sup 7} years) and Am-241(432 years) remain stable concentrations at the interface of waste canister and concrete barrier after 300 years. The mineral saturation index (SI) was much less than zero due to the low aqueous concentration of radionuclide, so that the precipitation formation of Co-60, Sr-90, I-129, Cs-137 and Am-241 related minerals were not found. The effect of adsorption/desorption (i.e., surface complexation model) could be a crucial geochemical mechanism for the modeling of liquid-solid phase behavior of radionuclide in geochemically dynamic environments. Moreover, the development of advanced numerical models that are coupled with hydrogeochemical transport and dose assessment of radionuclide is required in the future

  9. Haw-glass dissolution and radionuclide release: mechanism - modelling - source term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grambow, B [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fur Nukleare, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Important release controlling processes are: 1) kinetics of glass matrix dissolution (leaching), 2) formation of secondary alteration products (controlling thermodynamic solubility), 3) sorption on surfaces in the engineered barrier system and 4) formation of mobile species. Quantification of these processes requires assessment of the energetics and dynamics of the various reversible and irreversible processes within an overall open non-equilibrium system. Corrosion/dissolution of the waste matrices is not necessarily associated with a proportional release of radionuclides. The formation of new secondary phases, such as silicates, molybdates, uranates, carbonates... establishes a new geochemical barrier for re-immobilization of radionuclides dissolved from the waste matrices. The presence of iron (corroding canisters during glass alteration) reduces the solution concentration of redox sensitive radionuclides. Consequently, the container, after being corroded, constitutes an important geochemical barrier for radionuclide re-immobilization. Geochemical modelling of the long-term behaviour of glasses must be performed in an integrated way, considering simultaneous reactions of the glass, of container corrosion, of repository rock and of backfill material. Until now, only few attempts were made for integral systems modelling. (A.C.)

  10. Radiochemical schemes of obtaining 89Sr and 90Y radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usarov, Z. O.

    2010-03-01

    Key words: strontium-89, yttrium-90, extraction and extraction-chromatographic purification of radionuclides, radiopharmaceuticals. Subjects of research: strontium-89 and yttrium-90 radionuclides and their chloride forms. Purpose of work is developing of radiochemical technologies on obtaining of 89 Sr and 90 Y on the WWR-SM reactor with high radionuclide purity. Methods of research: extraction and extraction-chromatographic methods of radionuclides separation, beta- and gamma-spectrometric methods of activity measuring. The results obtained and their novelty: Were determined the conformity to laws of Y and Sr distribution in two-phase systems TBP-HNO 3 , TBP-NH 4 NO 3 , TBP-HCI, HDEHP-NO 3 , HDEHP-NH 4 NO 3 and HDEHP-HCI. Were determined the conformity to laws of Y and Sr distribution in systems with craun ethers DB-18K-6 and DTBDB-18K-6 from water solutions of HNO 3 . Radiochemical technologies on obtaining of 89 Sr and 90 Y radionuclides including radiochemical process of yttrium target with using the systems TBP-HNO 3 and HDEHP/Teflone were developed. Practical value: the radiochemical technology of obtaining 89 Sr with high radionuclide purity was developed. The method of preparation a chloride compound of 89 SrCl 2 which is used as a drug form for preparation of 89 Sr- 'Metastron' was developed. The relatively simple method of on the way obtaining 90 Y in the reactor with high radionuclidic purity that is useful for follow using in medical practice was offered. Degree of embed and economic effectivity: the developed technologies have approbation in manufacturing conditions in Radiopreparat Enterprise of INP AS RU and were offered for receiving of domestic preparations against of import foreign analogues. The statement about using the invention by obtained patent is attached to dissertation. Field of application: the received results will be introduced in manufacture at Radiopreparat Enterprise of INP AS RU for receiving of domestic preparations

  11. Environmental radionuclides tracers and timers of terrestrial processes

    CERN Document Server

    Froehlich, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The book presents a state-of-the-art summary of knowledge on the use of radionuclides to study processes and systems in the continental part of the Earth's environment. It is conceived as a companion to the two volumes of this series, which deal with isotopes as tracers in the marine environment (Livingston, Marine Radioactivity) and with the radioecology of natural and man-made terrestrial systems (Shaw, Radioactivity in Terrestrial Ecosystems). Although the book focuses on natural and anthropogenic radionuclides (radioactive isotopes), it also refers to stable environmental isotopes, which i

  12. Transfer of radionuclides in soil-plant systems following aerosol simulation of accidental release: design and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauret, G.; Real, J.

    1995-01-01

    The behaviour of 134 Cs, 110m Ag and 85 Sr was studied in different soil-plant systems, using two types of Mediterranean soil with contrasting properties (sandy and sandy-loam soils). The plant species used was lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Contamination was induced at different stages of plant growth, using a synthetic aerosol which simulated a distant contamination source. Characterisation of aerosol and soils, interception factors in the various growth stages, foliar and root uptake, leaching from leaves by irrigation and distribution and migration of radionuclides of soils were studied, in an attempt to understand the key factors involving radionuclide soil-to-plant transferance. (author)

  13. Transfer of radionuclides in soil-plant systems following aerosol simulation of accidental release: design and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauret, G. [Universitat de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Quimica Analitica; Vallejo, V.R. [Universitat de barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Biologia Vegetal; Cancio, D. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Real, J. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1995-12-31

    The behaviour of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 110m}Ag and {sup 85}Sr was studied in different soil-plant systems, using two types of Mediterranean soil with contrasting properties (sandy and sandy-loam soils). The plant species used was lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Contamination was induced at different stages of plant growth, using a synthetic aerosol which simulated a distant contamination source. Characterisation of aerosol and soils, interception factors in the various growth stages, foliar and root uptake, leaching from leaves by irrigation and distribution and migration of radionuclides of soils were studied, in an attempt to understand the key factors involving radionuclide soil-to-plant transferance. (author).

  14. The evaluation of the effects of buffer thickness and dry density on radionuclides migration in engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Fujitaka; Ishihara, Yoshinao; Makino, Hitoshi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko

    2000-01-01

    The evaluation of the effects of buffer thickness and dry density, one of the buffer design, on radionuclides migration behavior is important from the viewpoint of performance assessment since they have relation to radionuclides migration retardation. It is also considered to help investigation of buffer design that satisfy both safety and economy to condition of the disposal site, which may be required with development of disposal project in the future. Therefore we have performed a sensitivity analysis used buffer thickness and dry density as parameter and considered their combination in this report. Based on this, we have evaluated the effects of buffer thickness and dry density on radionuclides migration in engineered barrier system. And, we have considered about radionuclides migration retardation quality of the buffer which is based on the design (relationship between thickness and dry density) set in the second progress report on research and development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan. In results, the maximum release rates from the engineered barrier system for the nuclides which have high distribution coefficients and short half lives are sensitive to changes in buffer thickness and dry density. And, using dose converted from the nuclide release rates from the engineered barrier system as a convenient index, it is almost shown that the maximum of total dose is less than 10 μ Sv/y in the cases which buffer thickness and dry density are based on the buffer design set in the second progress report on research and development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan. These can be used as an information when design of buffer thickness and dry density is set by synthetically judgement of balance of safety and economy. (author)

  15. Migration of radionuclides in the soil-crop-food product system and assessment of agricultural countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdevitch, I.; Ageyets, V.

    1996-01-01

    Studies on dynamics of redistribution of radionuclides through of profile of the different soils on uncultivated agricultural lands of Belarus during the 1986-1995 period show that vertical migration occurs with low rate. In arable soils the radionuclides are distributed in comparatively uniform way through the whole depth of the 25-30 cm cultivated layer. Investigations on migration of radionuclides with wind erosion on the drained series of wet sandy and peat soils and water erosion on sloping lands show that one should take into consideration the secondary contamination of soils while forecasting a possible accumulation of radionuclides in farm products

  16. Purification of radionuclides for nuclear medicine: The multicolumn selectivity inversion generator concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    A new radionuclide generator system has been developed and demonstrated for the production of 212 Bi from 224 Ra/ 212 Pb and for 90 Y from 90 Sr. The new concept, called a Multicolumn Selectivity Inversion Generator, involves the selective retention of the desired daughter radionuclide from a solution of the parent or parents by a primary separation column followed by stripping the daughter radionuclide from the primary column, and immediately without feed adjustment, passing the daughter through a secondary separation (guard) column that retains the parents while the daughter elutes unrestrained. The new generator system minimises the effects of radiation damage to the support material permitting the reliable production of nuclides of high chemical and radionuclidic purity. (author)

  17. Transfer of Chernobyl radionuclides in the aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukova, O.; Shiryaeva, N.; Shagalova, E.; Bakarykava, Zh.

    2003-01-01

    The data on radioecology of the rivers of Belarus, which catchment area is completely or partly situated in Russia and the Ukraine (the Sozh, the Iput, the Besed, the Braginka) are given. The radioactive contamination of lakes are represent. The article demonstrates, that nowadays Chernobyl radionuclides content in surface water depends on wash-off from contaminated territories, groundwater leakage, and composition of bottom sediments. Wash out by rain and melted water is considered to be the most permanent and hazardous. The accumulation of radioactive sediments before dams, in stagnant zones of rivers and reservoirs creates moving local cites of increased concentration. Today and for forthcoming decades the main input into water contamination will be Cs-137, Sr-90 and for the nearest Chernobyl PP zone - isotopes of plutonium as well as Am-241. The migration of radionuclides on the experimental watershed of the Iput river was investigated. The studies have shown that the contamination of the Iput river in the territory of Belarus was influenced by the transboundary transfer of radionuclides from the territory of Russia during first years after Chernobyl accident. According to our estimates, at the end of 1986, this contribution amounted to 30% for Cs-137 and 96% for Sr-90; as of-now, it is 86% and 65% for Cs-137 and Sr-90, respectively. The concentration of Cs-137 in bottom sediments on some sites in the Braginka river (12940 - 49760 Bq/kg), the Revuchee lake (10345 - 18260 Bq/kg) and the Svyatskoe lake (11618 - 16430 Bq/kg) are so great, that they can be attributed to low-level waste storage facilities (9630 Bq/kg). Such high levels of radioactive contamination of bottom sediments are secondary sources of pollution of surface water. (authors)

  18. Migration of heavy natural radionuclides in a humid climatic zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titaeva, N.A.; Alexakhin, R.M.; Taskaev, A.I.; Maslov, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    Regularities and biochemical peculiarities of the migrations of heavy natural radionuclides in the environment are examined, with special reference to two regions in a humid climatic zone representing natural patterns of radionuclide distribution and to four plots artificially contaminated with high levels of natural radioactivity more than 20 years previously. It was determined that the migration of thorium, uranium, and radium isotopes through the rock-water-soil-plant system is dependent on many physiochemical properties of these radionuclides, their compounds, and the local environment. Isotopic activity ratios provide a useful tool for studying the direction of radionuclide migration and its influence on observed distribution patterns

  19. Radionuclide production for PET with a linear electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shefer, R.E.; Hughey, B.J.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Welch, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of linear electrostatic accelerator for the production of short-lived radionuclides for PET has been developed at Science Research Laboratory. The tandem cascade accelerator (TCA) is a low energy (3.7 MeV) proton and deuteron accelerator which can generate the four short-lived PET radionuclides in the quantities required for clinical use. The compact size, low weight, low power consumption and reduced radiation shielding requirements of the TCA result in a significant reduction in capital and operating costs when compared with higher energy cyclotron-based systems. Radioisotope target for the production of O-15, F-18, N-13 and C-11 have been designed specifically for use with the low energy TCA beam. A simple to use PC-based computer control system allows fully automated system operation and advanced scheduling of isotope production. Operating experience with the TCA and its PET radionuclide targets is described

  20. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  1. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A.

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools

  2. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A. [and others

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  3. Radionuclide migration through porous cement-waste composition in semi-real conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Peric, A.; Kostadinovic, A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, result of examination of Leakage rate or radionuclides Co-60 and Cs-137 in semi-real conditions are given. Radionuclides Co-60 and Cs-137 were immobilized by cement process and conditioned in concrete containers trying to make similar scenario for storing radioactive waste materials as in engineering trench system, repository. Experiments were realized with two waste water, evaporator bottom and reactor cooling system, (EB) and (RCS), from Nuclear Power Plants Krsko, in which the main radionuclides are Co-60 and Cs-137. These results will be used for future Yugoslav radioactive waste storing center (author)

  4. Development of TIGER code for radionuclide transport in a geochemically evolving region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Morihiro; Ooi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    In a transuranic (TRU) waste geological disposal facility, using cementitious materials is being considered. Cementitious materials will gradually dissolve in groundwater over the long-term. In the performance assessment report of a TRU waste repository in Japan already published, the most conservative radionuclide migration parameter set was selected considering the evolving cementitious material. Therefore, a tool to perform the calculation of radionuclide transport considering long-term geochemically evolving cementitious materials, named the TIGER code, Transport In Geochemically Evolving Region was developed to calculate a more realistic performance assessment. It can calculate radionuclide transport in engineered and natural barrier systems. In this report, mathematical equations of this code are described and validated with analytical solutions and results of other codes for radionuclide transport. The more realistic calculation of radionuclide transport for a TRU waste geological disposal system using the TIGER code could be performed. (author)

  5. Methods for determining radionuclide retardation factors: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Serne, R.J.; Rai, D.

    1980-04-01

    This report identifies a number of mechanisms that retard radionuclide migration, and describes the static and dynamic methods that are used to study such retardation phenomena. Both static and dynamic methods are needed for reliable safety assessments of underground nuclear-waste repositories. This report also evaluates the extent to which the two methods may be used to diagnose radionuclide migration through various types of geologic media, among them unconsolidated, crushed, intact, and fractured rocks. Adsorption is one mechanism that can control radionuclide concentrations in solution and therefore impede radionuclide migration. Other mechanisms that control a solution's radionuclide concentration and radionuclide migration are precipitation of hydroxides and oxides, oxidation-reduction reactions, and the formation of minerals that might include the radionuclide as a structural element. The retardation mechanisms mentioned above are controlled by such factors as surface area, cation exchange capacity, solution pH, chemical composition of the rock and of the solution, oxidation-reduction potential, and radionuclide concentration. Rocks and ground waters used in determining retardation factors should represent the expected equilibrium conditions in the geologic system under investigation. Static test methods can be used to rapidly screen the effects of the factors mentioned above. Dynamic (or column) testing, is needed to assess the effects of hydrodynamics and the interaction of hydrodynamics with the other important parameters. This paper proposes both a standard method for conducting batch Kd determinations, and a standard format for organizing and reporting data. Dynamic testing methods are not presently developed to the point that a standard methodology can be proposed. Normal procedures are outlined for column experimentation and the data that are needed to analyze a column experiment are identified

  6. Metabolism of radionuclides in domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, E.; Leising, C.

    1986-01-01

    The reactor accident at Chernobyl has shown that shortly after the contamination of the environment radionuclides can be found in animal products. The main contamination pathways of domestic animas are: uptake of radionuclides by foodstuffs; uptake of radionuclides by contaminated drinking water; uptake of radionuclides by inhalation; uptake of radionuclides through skin; uptake of radionuclides by ingestion of soil particles. Generally the uptake of radionuclides by food is the dominant exposure pathway. In rare cases the inhalation of radionuclides or the uptake by drinking water may be of importance. The metabolism of incorporated radionuclides is comparable to the respective metabolism of essential mass or trace elements or heavy metals. Radioisotopes of essential elements are for instance iron 55, manganese 54, cobalt 58 and cobalt 60. Other elements are typical antagonists to essential elements, e.g. strontium 90 is an antagonist to calcium or cesium 137 to potassium. Lead 210 and plutonium 239 behave similarly as heavy metals. Generally the knowledge of the metabolism of trace and mass elements, of antagonistic and synergistic elements and heavy metals can be applied to these radionuclides

  7. Radionuclide scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  8. Radionuclides (210Pb, 226Ra, 210Po e 137Cs) in the Cananeia-Iguape coastal system: environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Roberto Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    This work was developed in the Cananeia-lguape Coastal System, coast south of the State of Sao Paulo, with the aim of monitoring the levels of some natural radionuclides ( 210 Pb, 210 Po, 226 Ra ) and artificial ( 137 Cs) and to study the sedimentary dynamics of the area. For this, some studies and determinations were carried out, such as: sedimentation rates, concentration factors, bio-indicators and ingestion for the human population of some of these radionuclides. For the obtaining of the levels of these radionuclides, radiochemical and instrumental methodologies were developed and applied in reference samples of the International Agency of Atomic Energy (IAEA). After this, the methodologies were applied in samples of sediments, aquatic organisms and water of the channels collected in several points. In the sediments, the levels of ( 210 Pb, 226 Ra and 137 Cs varied from 6.1 to 167.5 Bq.kg -1 from 4.1 to 28.5 Bq.kg -1 and from MDC (0.28) to 6.1 Bq.kg -1 respectively. More significant correlations were observed among the percentage of mud (silt-clay) in the sediments and the levels of these radionuclides. These data were used for sedimentation rate studies in the points of sampling in the System. The sedimentation rates obtained with the values of unsupported ( 210 Pb and 137 Cs for the Ponta do Arrozal (T1), Ponta do Frade (T2), Valo Grande (T3) and Carapara-BOCA River (T4) were of 5.02 and 5.00 mm.a -1 , 2.30 and 3.82 mm.a -1 , 14.59 and 15.74 mm.a -1 , 3.41 and 5.00 mm.a -1 respectively. The sedimentation rates obtained with unsupported 210 Pb and the 137 Cs in the cores(T1, T2, T3 and T4) showed a good agreement. The sedimentation rates obtained along the System reflect the dynamics intern of the channels, that presents general tendency the one accentuated deposition process, with pronounced contribution of sediments of continental origin, for the drainages Mandira and Ribeira of Iguape Rivers, by the high biological production of the System as well as the

  9. Some considerations on the mobility of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gera, F.

    1978-01-01

    The existence of radioactive substances is usually assumed to present some risk for man and the environment. As long as radionuclides are successfully contained, no harm can occur; but every containment system has a finite probability of failure. Therefore, the mobility of radionuclides along the pathways that lead from the locations of large accumulations of radioactive substances to human populations is one of the critical parameters in any realistic risk evaluation. The largest inventories of radioactive substances are in nuclear facilities such as reactors and reprocessing plants and in storage or disposal facilities for waste or spent fuel. Eventually, most radioactive materials will end up in geologic disposal facilities; therefore, the long-term risk is particularly dependent on the mobility of long-lived radionuclides in geological media. (author)

  10. Determination of cosmic ray produced radionuclides by means of background radiation counting system, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is the third report of the progress report series on studies of cosmic ray produced radionuclides by means of low background radiation counting system. In Part I some characteristics of a low beta-gamma coincidence spectrometer are described -- counter system, electronics, background spectra, counting efficiencies -- and studies on radioactive impurities in materials for scientific research are also described. In Part II, suitable solvents for a large scale liquid scintillation counter were examined and best combinations of solvents, solutes and naphthalene are shown. In Part III, miscellaneous topics are reported. (auth.)

  11. Chapter 2. Radionuclides in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter of textbook of radioecology for university students. In this chapter authors deal with role of radionuclides in the biosphere. Chapter consists of next parts: (1) Natural radionuclides in biosphere; (2) Man-made radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) Ecologically important radionuclides; (4) Natural background; (5) Radiotoxicity and (6) Paths of transfer of radionuclides from the source to human

  12. Development of a chromatographic micro-system for radionuclides analysis in nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losno, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Radionuclides analysis is a key point for nuclear waste management and nuclear material control. Several steps of sample modification have to be carried out before measurements in order to avoid any interferences and improve measurement precision. However those different steps are long, irradiating and difficult to achieve in gloveboxes. Moreover they produce liquid and solid waste. The goal of the study is to offer a new alternative to the use of solid phase extraction column for radionuclides separation in hard nitric acid medium. The system will decrease the amount of nuclear waste due to the analysis and automatize the different steps of the analysis. A plastic device made of COC containing a micro solid phase extraction column is first designed. Stationary phase is a poly(AMA-co-EDMA) monolith synthesized in situ. Its structure is adjustable and its functionalization versatile with a high resistance to nitric acid medium. Exchange capacity is 150 mg/g of monolith for TBP and TBP/CMPO column and up to 280 mg/g of monolith in case of DAAP. Exchange coefficients are determined for U(VI), Th(IV), Eu(III) and Nd(III) for 3 different extractants (and Pu(IV) in case of TBP column). Monolith synthesis is transferred in centrifugal device and hydrodynamic behavior studied. U,Th/Eu separation was finally carried out in both classic and centrifugal micro-system on TBP column. (author) [fr

  13. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive tracers for in vivo clinical diagnosis fall within a narrow, strictly-defined set of specifications in respect of their physical properties, chemical and biochemical characteristics, and medical applications. The type of radioactive decay and physical half-life of the radionuclide are immutable properties which, along with the demands of production and supply, limit the choice of radionuclides used in medicine to only a small fraction of those known to exist. In use, the biochemical and physiological properties of a radiotracer are dictated by the chemical form of the radionuclide. This chemical form may range from elemental, molecular or ionic, to complex compounds formed by coordinate or covalent bonding of the radionuclide to either simple organic or inorganic molecules, or complex macromolecules. Few of the radiotracers which are tested in model systems ever become radiopharmaceuticals in the strictest sense. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals in use are reviewed. Drug legislation and regulations concerning drug manufacture, as well as hospital ethical constraints and legislation concerning unsealed sources of radiation must all be satisfied in order to translate a radiopharmaceutical from the laboratory to clinical use. (author)

  14. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    Radioactive tracers for in vivo clinical diagnosis fall within a narrow, strictly-defined set of specifications in respect of their physical properties, chemical and biochemical characteristics, and (approved) medical applications. The type of radioactive decay and physical half-life of the radionuclide are immutable properties which, along with the demands of production and supply, limit the choice of radionuclides used in medicine to only a small fraction of those known to exist. In use, the biochemical and physiological properties of a radiotracer are dictated by the chemical form of the radionuclide. This chemical form may range from elemental, molecular or ionic, to complex compounds formed by coordinate or covalent bonding of the radionuclide to either simple organic or inorganic molecules, or complex macromolecules. Few of the radiotracers which are tested in model systems ever become radiopharmaceuticals in the strictest sense. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals in use are reviewed. Drug legislation and regulations concerning drug manufacture, as well as hospital ethical constraints and legislation concerning unsealed sources of radiation must all be satisfied in order to translate a radiopharmaceutical from the laboratory to clinical use.

  15. The effect of bacterial generation on the transport of radionuclide in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.S.; Lee, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to develop a predictive model based on a conceptual three-phase system and to investigate the influence of bacteria and their generation on the radionuclide transport in porous media. The mass balance equations for bacteria, substrate and radionuclide were formulated. To illustrate the model simply, an equilibrium condition was assumed to partition the substrate, bacteria and radionuclide concentrations, between the solid soil matrix, aqueous phase and bacterial surface. From the numerical calculation of radionuclide transport in the presence of bacteria, it was found that the growth of bacterial and supplied primary substrate as a limiting or stimulating growth factor of bacteria are the most important factors of the radionuclide transport. It was also found that, depending on the transport of bacteria, the temporal and spatial distribution of the radionuclide concentration was significantly affected. The model proposed in this study will improve the evaluation of the role of the bacteria to the transport of radionuclide in groundwater systems. Furthermore, this model can be usefully utilized in analyzing the important role of colloidal particulate on the overall performance of radioactive waste safety. (Author)

  16. Peculiarities of radionuclide transfer to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkus, D.; Andriulaityte, I.; Luksiene, B.; Druteikiene, R.

    2003-01-01

    The biosphere and its interacting components (air, soil, bottom sediments, flora, fauna, human beings) are constantly affected by ionizing radiation. One of the ionizing radiation sources is noble radioactive gas that is continually released into the environment because of the normal operation of nuclear power plants (short-lived and long-lived noble gas) and nuclear fuel-reprocessing plants (long-lived noble gas). Another source is related to nuclear tests and the Chernobyl NPP accident, when long-lived gaseous and aerosol radionuclides ( 85 Kr, transuranics, 137 Cs, 90 Sr, etc) were spread in all environmental systems. In order to evaluate the mechanism of radionuclide transfer to plants, model experimental investigation using gaseous 85 Kr and ionic state 137 Cs was undertaken. For this purpose specific chambers with defined physical parameters were applied. The gained tentative results show the importance of these experiments for the estimation of radionuclide transfer to plants and for the prognosis of human internal irradiation. (author)

  17. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quine, T.A.; Walling, D.

    1998-01-01

    Geomorphologists have shown increasing interest in environmental radionuclides since pioneering studies by Ritchie and McHenry in the USA and Campbell, Longmore and Loughran in Australia. Environmental radionuclides have attracted this interest because they provide geomorphologists with the means to trace sediment movement within the landscape. They, therefore, facilitate investigation of subjects at the core of geomorphology, namely the rates and patterns of landscape change. Most attention has been focussed on the artificial radionuclide caesium-137 ( 137 Cs) but more recently potential applications of the natural radionuclides lead-210 ( 210 Pb) and beryllium-7( 7 Be) have been investigated (Walling et al., 1995; Wallbrink and Murray, 1996a, 1996b). The origin, characteristics and applications of these radionuclides are summarised. These radionuclides are of value as sediment tracers because of three important characteristics: a strong affinity for sediment; a global distribution and the possibility of measurement at low concentration. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides provide unique access to detailed qualitative data concerning landscape change over a range of timescales

  18. Foodstuffs, radionuclides, monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisikov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination of water and food stuffs as a result of the Chernobyl accident and permissible contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs are considered in brief. A method of radiation monitoring of food stuffs and water for the radionuclides mentioned is suggested. The method permits employment of the simplest and cheapest radiometric equipment for analysis, whole the high degree of radionuclide concentration using fiber sorbents permits using the instrumentation without expensive shields against external radiation. A description of ion-exchange unit for radiation monitoring of liquid samples of food stuffs or water, is provided [ru

  19. Generator for radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisner, P.S.; Forrest, T.R.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radionuclide generator of the kind in which a parent radionuclide, adsorbed on a column of particulate material, generates a daughter radionuclide which is periodically removed from the column. This invention is particularly concerned with technetium generators using single collection vials. The generator comprises a column, a first reservoir for the eluent, a second reservoir to contain the volume of eluent required for a single elution, and means connecting the first reservoir to the second reservoir and the second reservoir to the column. Such a generator is particularly suitable for operation by vacuum elution

  20. Emissions of the corrosion radionuclides in an atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardanyan, M.

    2010-01-01

    In area of Armenian nuclear power plant location, in atmospheric air in majority of cases log two technogenic radionuclides: l 37 C s and 9 0 S r. Presence of these radionuclides basically is caused by global fall out (consequences of tests of the nuclear weapon and Chernobyl NPP accident), whose contribution to the contents of these radionuclides in atmosphere is incomparably greater, than emissions from the NPP. However there are some cases when in an atmosphere are registered the technogenic radionuclides, caused by emissions from NPP. In the present work such case is considered. Gas-aerosol releases of NPP in the atmosphere are carefully purified by means of various high-efficiency filters and gas-cleaning systems. Nevertheless, one should forecast and measure, the possible impact of these releases on the environment in the regions surrounding the NPP. Radioactive releases of the Armenian NPP (ANPP) contain the set of radionuclides characteristic for NPPs of this type. They may be divided into three groups: 1 31 I , 1 37 C s, 1 34 C s, 9 0 S r and 8 9 S r fission fragments, isotopes of noble gases krypton and xenon and other radionuclides; corrosion originated radionuclides: 6 0 C o, 1 10m A g, 5 4 M n, 5 l C r and others; activation products of the heat-transfer agent itself. It should be noted that the amount of radioactive materials released in the environment by the ANPP during the whole period of its operation was much lower than the admissible quantities specified in the corresponding legal documents (RSN, NPPSP) acting in Armenia, which are practically identical to the internationally accepted norms. The amounts of releases and their radionuclides composition for the ANPP are given

  1. The behavior of radionuclides in the soils of Rocky Flats, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litaor, M I [Tel-Hai Rodman Coll., Upper Galilee (Israel); Barth, G; Zika, E M; Litus, G; Moffitt, J; Daniels, H [Colorado Univ., Civil and Environmental Engineering Dept., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Radionuclide contamination of soils in Rocky Flats, Colorado, resulted from leaking drums of Pu-contaminated oil stored at an outdoor area. To evaluated the mechanisms of radionuclide transport from the contaminated soils to groundwater, an advanced monitoring system was installed across a toposequence. The impact of natural rain, snowmelt, and large-scale rain simulations on the mobility and distribution of the radionuclides in soil interstitial water was studied. The distribution of radionuclides during the monitoring period from 1993 to 1995 suggested that Pu-239 + 240 and Am-241 are largely immobile in semi-arid soils. Fractionation of Pu-239 + 240 and Am-241 to different particle sizes in the soil interstitial water suggested that most of the radionuclides (83-97%) were associated with suspended particles, whereas the level of radionuclides associated with colloidal (0.45 {mu}m > X > 1 nm) and nonfilterable (< 1 nm) fractions ranged from 1.5 to 15%. (author).

  2. Multitracer study on absorption of radionuclides in atmosphere-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambe, Shizuko; Shinonaga, Taeko; Watanabe, Tadakazu; Yamaguchi, Isamu

    1996-01-01

    Direct absorption of atmospheric radionuclides by soybean plants was studied using a radioactive multitracer consisting of radionuclides of Sc, Mn, Co, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Eu, Gd, Yb, Hf, Re, and Ir. Soybean seedlings were cultivated at 23degC in a box where multitracer-adsorbed cellulose powders were floating in air. After 28-49 day-cultivation, the plants were harvested and divided into beans (seeds and pods), leaves, stems (inside and outside), and roots. Beans or leaves originating from the same node were collected together. After washing with dilute HCl solution and distilled water, they were dried and then subjected to γ-ray measurement. It was estimated that about 0.2 % of the multitracer was absorbed by the soybean plant, of which 80 % was found in the leaves, and 10 % each in beans and stems. The relative amounts of elements in the beans, leaves, and stems markedly differed depending on the element. Among the elements, Se * was greatly accumulated in the beans, leaves, and stems. Cobalt * , Se * , and Rb * were dominant in the beans, especially in the edible part of seeds. Relative amounts of Mn * , As * , Sr * , and Re * in the seeds were very small. It is noticeable that these nuclides were found in the seeds, though they were not physically exposed to the multitracer-adsorbed cellulose powders during growth. The radioactivities of Sc * , Mn * , Co * , As * , Se * , Rb * , Sr * , Y * , Eu * , Gd * , Yb * , Hf * , Re * , and Ir * were observed for the leaves. Brown leaves accumulated greater amounts of radionuclides than green ones. Main nuclides found in the stem were Sc * , Co * , Se * , Y * , Eu * , Gd * , Yb * , Hf * , and Ir * , a larger part of them on the outside. Trace amounts of Co * , Se * , and Rb * were detected in the roots. Little leakage of the multitracer into the soil was observed. These results indicate that various radionuclides in the atmosphere were directly absorbed through soybean leaves and then transported to the edible part

  3. Study on the radionuclide movement in the land water system in Rokkasho Village

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kunio

    1996-01-01

    In order to determine the margin of safety for radionuclides to be released from Rokkasho Village, an investigation is required for evaluating the radiation safety in response to the actual situations including the meteorological, geographical and ecological conditions specific to the village. Aiming to construct a model for evaluating the amount of nuclide transfer from a river to a farm land, an investigation is planned on the radionuclide behaviors in the river water and their transfer from the river to the farm land and vice versa in the village. Since several little rivers originating in a small hill flow into a brackish marsh of the village, of which water and biological environments are very complicated and highly variable, an investigation is planned in this study on the parameters involving in the inflow and outflow of nuclides for the marsh and the amount and the mechanism of radionuclide accumulation in the marsh. Thus, it will be able to estimate the degree of the effects of changes in the marsh's water environment on radionuclide behaviors in it. Since this study is to start in this year, only the plans were described here. (M.N.)

  4. Complementary modelling of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Grandia, Fidel; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2008-10-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is conducting a comprehensive geoscientific characterization of two alternative sites to allocate a deep geological repository of high level nuclear waste. The Site Characterization Program also includes the near-surface systems, which are expected to constitute the last geological barrier between the repository system and the earth's surface. The evaluation of the retention capacity of the near surface systems is, therefore, very relevant for the site characterization program. From the geological point of view, near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits that overlay a granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the most abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit (approx75% of surface extension) and the remainder is made up of clayey materials (glacial and post-glacial clays). These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time scale considered in this work, is calcium carbonate (calcite). This mineral is found along with clay minerals (e.g. illite) and Fe(III) hydroxides. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with minor amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich levels (gyttja) which can promote reducing conditions in the system. The assessment of the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark was developed in an earlier work, that focused on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is an improvement of the geochemical conceptual and numerical model already presented, based on data available in the Site Descriptive Model v 1.2 (Forsmark). Regarding the geochemical variability of the Quaternary deposits present at Forsmark and its implications on radionuclide mobility through the near-surface systems, a

  5. Marine sediments as a sink, and contaminated sediments as a diffuse source of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Borretzen, P.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Marine sediments may act as a sink for radionuclides originating from atmospheric fallout (e.g. Chernobyl accident), for radionuclides in discharges from nuclear installations (e.g. Sellafield, UK) for river transported radionuclides, and radionuclides released from nuclear waste dumped at sea (e.g. fjords at Novaya Zemlya). In order to assess short and long term consequences of radionuclides entering the marine ecosystem, the role of sediments as a relatively permanent sink and the potential for contaminated sediments to act as a diffuse source should be focused. The retention of radionuclides in sediments will depend on the source term, i.e. the physico-chemical forms of radionuclides entering the system and on interactions with various sediment components. Radionuclides associated with particles or aggregating polymers are removed from the water phase by sedimentation, while sorption to surface sediment layers is of relevance for ionic radionuclide species including negatively charged colloids. With time, transformation processes will influence the mobility of radionuclides in sediments. The diffusion into mineral lattices will increase fixation, while the influence of for instance red/ox conditions and bio-erosion may mobilize radionuclides originally fixed in radioactive particles. Thus, information of radionuclides species, surface interactions, transformation processes and kinetics is essential for reducing the uncertainties in marine transfer models. Dynamic model experiments where chemically well defined tracers are added to a sea water-marine sediment system are useful for providing information on time dependent interactions and distribution coefficients. When combined with sequential extraction techniques, information on mobility and rate of fixation is subsequently attained. In the present work experimental results from the Irish Sea and the Kara Sea will be discussed

  6. Radionuclide transfer from mother to embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toader, M.; Vasilache, R.A.; Scridon, R.; Toader, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The transfer of radionuclides from mother to embryo is still a matter of high interest. Therefore, the relation was investigated between the amount of radionuclides in the embryo and the dietary intake of the mother, this for two scenarios: a recurrent intake of variable amounts of radionuclides, and a long-term intake of a relatively constant amount of radionuclides, the radionuclide being 137 Cs. In the first case, the amount of radionuclides present in the embryo increases with the age of the embryo and with the intake of the mother. In the second case, no correlation could be found between the age of the embryo and its radioactive content; only the correlation between the intake of the mother and the radionuclide content of the embryo remained. (A.K.)

  7. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark

    2005-11-01

    Two sites in Sweden are currently under investigation by SKB for their suitability as places for deep repository of radioactive waste, the Forsmark and Simpevarp/Laxemar area. As a part of the safety assessment, SKB has formulated a biosphere model with different sub-models for different parts of the ecosystem in order to be able to predict the dose to humans following a possible radionuclide discharge from a future deep repository. In this report, a new model concept describing radionuclide transport in streams is presented. The main difference from the previous model for running water used by SKB, where only dilution of the inflow of radionuclides was considered, is that the new model includes parameterizations also of the exchange processes present along the stream. This is done in order to be able to investigate the effect of the retention on the transport and to be able to estimate the resulting concentrations in the different parts of the system. The concentrations determined with this new model could later be used for order of magnitude predictions of the dose to humans. The presented model concept is divided in two parts, one hydraulic and one radionuclide transport model. The hydraulic model is used to determine the flow conditions in the stream channel and is based on the assumption of uniform flow and quasi-stationary conditions. The results from the hydraulic model are used in the radionuclide transport model where the concentration is determined in the different parts of the stream ecosystem. The exchange processes considered are exchange with the sediments due to diffusion, advective transport and sedimentation/resuspension and uptake of radionuclides in biota. Transport of both dissolved radionuclides and sorbed onto particulates is considered. Sorption kinetics in the stream water phase is implemented as the time scale of the residence time in the stream water probably is short in comparison to the time scale of the kinetic sorption. In the sediment

  8. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    Two sites in Sweden are currently under investigation by SKB for their suitability as places for deep repository of radioactive waste, the Forsmark and Simpevarp/Laxemar area. As a part of the safety assessment, SKB has formulated a biosphere model with different sub-models for different parts of the ecosystem in order to be able to predict the dose to humans following a possible radionuclide discharge from a future deep repository. In this report, a new model concept describing radionuclide transport in streams is presented. The main difference from the previous model for running water used by SKB, where only dilution of the inflow of radionuclides was considered, is that the new model includes parameterizations also of the exchange processes present along the stream. This is done in order to be able to investigate the effect of the retention on the transport and to be able to estimate the resulting concentrations in the different parts of the system. The concentrations determined with this new model could later be used for order of magnitude predictions of the dose to humans. The presented model concept is divided in two parts, one hydraulic and one radionuclide transport model. The hydraulic model is used to determine the flow conditions in the stream channel and is based on the assumption of uniform flow and quasi-stationary conditions. The results from the hydraulic model are used in the radionuclide transport model where the concentration is determined in the different parts of the stream ecosystem. The exchange processes considered are exchange with the sediments due to diffusion, advective transport and sedimentation/resuspension and uptake of radionuclides in biota. Transport of both dissolved radionuclides and sorbed onto particulates is considered. Sorption kinetics in the stream water phase is implemented as the time scale of the residence time in the stream water probably is short in comparison to the time scale of the kinetic sorption. In the sediment

  9. Distribution coefficients for radionuclides in aquatic environments. Volume 2. Dialysis experiments in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibley, T.H.; Nevissi, A.E.; Schell, W.R.

    1981-05-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to obtain new information that can be used to predict the fate of radionuclides that may enter the aquatic environment from nuclear power plants, waste storage facilities or fuel reprocessing plants. Important parameters for determining fate are the distribution of radionuclides between the soluble and particulate phases and the partitioning of radionuclides among various suspended particulates. This report presents the results of dialysis experiments that were used to study the distribution of radionuclides among suspended sediments, phytoplankton, organic detritus, and filtered sea water. Three experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium distribution of (59)Fe, (60)Co, (65)Zn, (106)Ru, (137)Cs, (207)Bi, (238)Pu, and (241)Am in marine system. Diffusion across the dialysis membranes depends upon the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides, proceeding quite rapidly for ionic species of (137)Cs and (60)Co but much more slowly for radionuclides which occur primarily as colloids and solid precipitates such as (59)Fe, (207)Bi, and (241)Am. All the radionuclides adsorb to suspended particulates although the amount of adsorption depends upon the specific types and concentration of particulates in the system and the selected radionuclide. High affinity of some radionuclides - e.g., (106)Ru and (241)Am - for detritus and phytoplankton suggests that suspended organics may significantly affect the eventual fate of those radionuclides in marine ecosystems

  10. Radionuclide diagnosis of emergency states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishmukhametov, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Solution of emergency state radionuclide diagnostics from the technical point of view is provided by the application of the mobile quick-operating equipment in combination with computers, by the use of radionuclides with acceptable for emergency medicine characteristics and by development of radionuclide investigation data propcessing express-method. Medical developments include the study of acute disease and injury radioisotope semiotics, different indication diagnostic value determining, comparison of the results, obtained during radionuclide investigation, with clinicolaboratory and instrumental data, separation of methodical complex series

  11. Field surveying of radionuclide contamination in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turunen, J.; Rantavaara, A.; Ammann, M.

    2009-01-01

    Field measurements of radionuclides after an accidental contamination of forests assume the capacity for identification of a number of nuclides in varying source geometries. The continuous redistribution of radionuclides in forests through natural processes implies a decrease of prevailing surface contamination of trees and an increase in activity density on the ground. Portable gamma spectrometers have long been based on Na(I) detectors which, due to their low energy resolution, are not the tool for analysis of contamination from accidental releases of fission and activation products in the first days or weeks after a deposition. Data of airborne radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 were used for demonstration of initial and later distribution of radionuclides as sources of air Kerma in forests. Forest model (FDMF, PV. 6.0) of the RODOS system was used for the assessment of time-dependent Kerma rate from different forest compartments. The results show the fast reduction of activities of short-lived nuclides and their contributions to the Kerma rate in the first weeks and months. The results also give an estimate for the time needed until a gamma spectrometer with a low energy resolution would give useful information about long-lived radioactivity on the forest floor. An example is given on a portable high resolution semiconductor spectrometer that has suitable characteristics for field surveying also during occurrence of a great number of radionuclides contributing to the gamma spectrum. The needs for further research of a recently deposited radionuclide contamination on forest vegetation and soil, and the efforts for improvement of portable radiation meters and their use in management planning and radioecological research on contaminated forests are discussed. (au)

  12. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  13. Radiation protection aspects of the trafficking radionuclides contaminated metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prouza, Z.

    1999-01-01

    This paper covers the legal base of the release in the environment of radionuclides containing materials and the radiation protection aspects of trafficking in radionuclides contaminated materials. Materials, substance and objects containing radionuclides or contaminated by them may be released into the environment, if they do not exceed values authorized by SONS (State Office of Nuclear Safety). Legislative measures should be taken against illicit trafficking of the nuclear material in all the areas. The creation of a sophisticated system for the control and regulation of all important radionuclides released into the environment should be based on the radiation protection limits, constraints, reference and exemption levels which are introduced in the legislative documents; the strong supervision of producers and users of the sealed sources by SONS side, in addition to the requirements of the licensing process of their sources; a complete data-base and information exchange system related to illicit trafficking in contaminated material; in this system all the authorities with jurisdiction should be involved. The responsibilities of the persons involved in metal scrap trafficking should include arrangement of appropriate monitoring, rules for transport of the metal scrap, an adequate measuring system to monitor metal scrap including monitoring to prevent processing or smelting of the radioactive material, control measures, etc. All of the above items of legislation are an important challenge for the Czech Republic. (author)

  14. Behaviour and fate radionuclides in soils. Mathematical modelling and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovdan, E.N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of radionuclides as result of Chernobyl accident has led to contamination of 23% of territory of Republic of Belarus. Soil has high capacity to adsorb radionuclides and their intensive sorption provides the creation of a long-lived radionuclide source in a terrestrial environment. In the management of the contaminated areas and application of a countermeasure strategy it is extremely important to know the environmental mechanisms governing the behaviour of radionuclides in soils. Basic attention in the work is paid to the study of 137 Cs and 90 Sr because they are the main radionuclides from the view point of radioactive danger in polluted areas. The main features and processes that control radionuclide behaviour in soil have been analysed. On the basis of natural researches, lab test and mathematical modelling the impact of physical-chemical factors and the soil component composition changes upon the radionuclides migration and sorption in natural dispersed systems (peat, sand, bentonite, kaolin, sapropel) has been investigated. The investigations done allowed to substantiate the mathematical models of the radionuclides migration in the regions of positive and negative temperatures, to develop methods of experimental identification of main transfer characteristics and to compile a data base for these models. (orig.)

  15. Standardization of 201Tl and 55Fe radionuclides in a 4 (PC)-NaI(Tl) coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Carlos Augusto

    2008-01-01

    In the present work the procedure for the standardization of radionuclides using the 4π(PC)-NaI(Tl) coincidence system was developed. The radionuclides selected were 201 Tl, used in nuclear medicine, and 55 Fe primary standard source, used for x-ray spectrometers calibration. The 4π(PC)-NaI(Tl) is composed of a 4 proportional counter operated at 0.1MPa coupled to two NaI(Tl) crystals. The 201 Tl decays by electron capture process followed by a prompt gamma-ray. The disintegration rate was determined by extrapolation technique using two methods: electronic discrimination and external absorbers. The radioactive sources were prepared in a 20 μg cm -2 thick Collodion film. The conventional electronic system was used. The observed events were registered by the TAC method. The 55 Fe decays by electron capture process to the ground state of 55 Mn, emitting x rays with around 6 keV. The standardization was obtained by the tracing method. This technique was applied using two radionuclides, which decay by electron capture process followed by a prompt gamma-ray, namely 51 Cr and 54 Mn, as tracers. Measurements with 1 and 2 aluminum foils, each 150 g cm-2 thick were carried out. The activity was obtained by extrapolation for zero thickness Al foil. The uncertainties were treated by means of matrix covariance methodology and takes into account all correlations involved. (author)

  16. Analysis of the processes defining radionuclide migration from deep geological repositories in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazauskaite, A.; Poskas, P.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the danger of exposure arising from long-lived radionuclides to humans and environment, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) are not allowed to be disposed of in near surface repositories. There exists an international consensus that such high level and long-lived radioactive wastes are best disposed of in geological repositories using a system of engineered and natural barriers. At present, the geological repository of SNF and HLW has not been realized yet in any country but there is a lot of experience in the assessment of radionuclide migration from deep repositories, investigations of different processes related to the safety of a disposal system. The aim of this study was to analyze the processes related to the radionuclide migration from deep geological repositories in porous medium such as SNF matrix dissolution, release mechanism of radionuclides from SNF matrix, radionuclide solubility, sorption, diffusive, advective transport of radionuclides from the canister and through the engineered and natural barriers. It has been indicated that SNF matrix dissolution, radionuclide solubility and sorption are sensitive to ambient conditions prevailing in the repository. The approaches that could be used for modeling the radionuclide migration from deep repositories in porous medium are also presented. (author)

  17. Activation analysis with neutron generators using short-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salma, I.

    1993-01-01

    The short half-life involves a number of important differences in production, transportation and measurement of radionuclides, and in counting statistics as compared with those in traditional activation analysis. Experiments were performed to investigate the analytical possibilities and prospective utilization of short-lived radionuclides produced by 14-MeV neutron irradiation. A rapid pneumatic transfer system for use with neutron generators was installed and applied for detecting radionuclides with a half-life from 300 ms to 30 s. The transport time for samples with a total mass of 1-4 g is between 130 and 160 ms for pressurized air of 0.1-0.4 MPa. 11 elements were studied by the conventional activation method using both a typical pneumatic transport system (run time 3 s) and the fast pneumatic transport facility. The effect of the cyclic activation technique on the elemental sensitivities was also investigated. (orig.)

  18. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  19. The development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine - recent advances and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80% of all diagnostic clinical studies and there is increasing interest and use of therapeutic radioisotopes obtained from generator systems. This paper focuses on a discussion of the major current areas of radionuclide generator research, and the expected areas of future research and applications

  20. Radionuclide solubilities at elevated temperatures. A literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, T.; Vuorinen, U.

    1997-07-01

    This literature study contains experimental data and modelling data collected in order to illustrate how temperature affects radionuclide solubilities under conditions similar to those expected in the vicinity of a planned repository for spent nuclear fuel. The elements considered were Ni, Se, Zr, Tc, Pd, Sn, Ra, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu and Am. The temperatures of main interest are restricted to the interval between room temperature and 100 deg C. The study showed that the literature on radionuclide solubility at temperatures above room temperature is scarce. Therefore, also work that refers to conditions slightly varying from the expected repository conditions has been considered. A minor modelling exercise was done in this study in order to show the effect of temperature on the solubilities of Ni, Np and U under various conditions. The results from the literature survey and our modelling demonstrate the complexity of groundwater systems and the difficulty in finding simple and general relationships between temperature and radionuclide solubilities. Often an increase in temperature (below 100 deg C) leads to a reduction of the radionuclide solubility or leaves it roughly unchanged. However, examples are also found where the rise in temperature increases the radionuclide solubility by several orders of magnitude. (orig.)

  1. Radionuclide solubilities at elevated temperatures. A literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, T.; Vuorinen, U. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-07-01

    This literature study contains experimental data and modelling data collected in order to illustrate how temperature affects radionuclide solubilities under conditions similar to those expected in the vicinity of a planned repository for spent nuclear fuel. The elements considered were Ni, Se, Zr, Tc, Pd, Sn, Ra, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu and Am. The temperatures of main interest are restricted to the interval between room temperature and 100 deg C. The study showed that the literature on radionuclide solubility at temperatures above room temperature is scarce. Therefore, also work that refers to conditions slightly varying from the expected repository conditions has been considered. A minor modelling exercise was done in this study in order to show the effect of temperature on the solubilities of Ni, Np and U under various conditions. The results from the literature survey and our modelling demonstrate the complexity of groundwater systems and the difficulty in finding simple and general relationships between temperature and radionuclide solubilities. Often an increase in temperature (below 100 deg C) leads to a reduction of the radionuclide solubility or leaves it roughly unchanged. However, examples are also found where the rise in temperature increases the radionuclide solubility by several orders of magnitude. (orig.). 54 refs.

  2. Calibration of a 4π-γ well-type ionization chamber system for measuring of the radionuclides activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    The calibration of a 4π well-type ionization Chamber System installed at the Laboratorio de Metrologia Nuclear, of the Instituto de Energia Atomica of Sao Paulo used for of the activity determination of radioactive solutions is descrided. The determination can be performed by two methods: 1) Direct Method, comparing the ionization Chamber response for solutions of unknown activity against that obtained with a solution which is standardized by the Absolute 4πβγ Coincidence Method. By this method the following radionuclides are standardized: 241 Am, 139 Ce, 198 Au, 22 Na, 134 Cs, 54 Mn, 60 Co, 42 K, 24 Na. In this case, the accuracy achieved is about 0.2 to 0,4%. 2) Indirect Method, by means of curves of relative beta or gama efficiency, which were determined in this work. This method can be applied for those radionuclides not included in the direct method. In this case, the accuracy depends on the gama energy range of the curves and on the accuracy of the absolute gama intensities, taken from the literature. In general the uncertainty is greater than the direct method, but values of 0,2% can be achieved in favourable cases. The upper and lower limits of Activity that can be measured depend on the radionuclide. These limits are from a few micro-curies to many mili-curies, which are satisfactory for most purposes. The sample preparation is simple and the time spent in the measurement is, in general, restricted to a few minutes. These are some of the advantages of this ionization Chamber System in comparison with other systems [pt

  3. Design and application of the MARK IV scanning system for radionuclide computed tomography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Phelps, M.E.; Ricci, A.; Reivich, M.

    1976-01-01

    The MARK IV radioisotope scanning system was built to provide fast and accurate radionuclide computed tomography (RCT). It is designed primarily for detecting commonly available radioactive labels such as /sup 99m/Tc, but it is also adapted to detecting positron emitters such as 18 F. The system has interlaced convergent collimation in a 4-sided arrangement of 32-independent detectors which continuously rotate as a unit, detecting, processing, and displaying the reconstructed data while the study progresses

  4. Study of migration behavior of technogenic radionuclides in the Yenisey River-Kara Sea aquatic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.; Legin, E.; Legin, V. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shishlov, A.; Savitskii, Yu. [Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Novikov, A.; Goryachenkova, T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-03-01

    For 35 years Krasnoyarsk Mining-Chemical Combine (MCC) manufactures weapon plutonium in single-pass production reactors cooled with water of the Yenisey River. Water discharge from these reactors is the major source of radioactive contamination of the Yenisey River. We have demonstrated that after putting the reactors out of operation (in late 1992) the contamination level of the Yenisey River with short-lived radionuclides considerably decreased, and now the radioactive contamination is caused essentially by Cs-137, Eu-152, Pu-239,240, Sr-90, and Am-241, whose concentration in the aqueous phase is lower than in bottom sediments and, particularly, flood-land deposits by several orders of magnitude (except for Sr-90). The flood-land deposits are classified with the most contaminated environmental objects in the territories under the impact of MCC: their radioactivity is comparable with that of low-level waste. Taking into account the considerable depth and area of the flood-land deposits, this allows their classification as a great technogenic radiation anomaly. Comparison of the maximal Cs-137 and Pu-239,240 levels in flood-land soils and bottom sediments of the Yenisey River with those in bottom sediments of the Pripyat' River and the Kiev reservoir shows that these values are close each to other. A direct correlation is found between the spatial distribution of Cs-137 on the one hand and Pu-239,240, Eu-152, and Am-241 on the other hand in the aqueous phase and bottom sediments, which is not the case for Sr-90. Data on the distribution coefficients of the indicated radionuclides between the deposits and aqueous phase (obtained with actual and model systems) and also on the radionuclide distribution throughout geochemical mobility forms suggest that the essential part of Cs, Pu, Eu, and Am migrates with fine-disperse suspended material, the transport and distribution of which is controlled by the hydrological regime of the Yenisey River. By contrast, strontium

  5. Study of migration behavior of technogenic radionuclides in the Yenisey River-Kara Sea aquatic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.; Legin, E.; Legin, V.; Shishlov, A.; Savitskii, Yu.; Novikov, A.; Goryachenkova, T.

    2001-01-01

    For 35 years Krasnoyarsk Mining-Chemical Combine (MCC) manufactures weapon plutonium in single-pass production reactors cooled with water of the Yenisey River. Water discharge from these reactors is the major source of radioactive contamination of the Yenisey River. We have demonstrated that after putting the reactors out of operation (in late 1992) the contamination level of the Yenisey River with short-lived radionuclides considerably decreased, and now the radioactive contamination is caused essentially by Cs-137, Eu-152, Pu-239,240, Sr-90, and Am-241, whose concentration in the aqueous phase is lower than in bottom sediments and, particularly, flood-land deposits by several orders of magnitude (except for Sr-90). The flood-land deposits are classified with the most contaminated environmental objects in the territories under the impact of MCC: their radioactivity is comparable with that of low-level waste. Taking into account the considerable depth and area of the flood-land deposits, this allows their classification as a great technogenic radiation anomaly. Comparison of the maximal Cs-137 and Pu-239,240 levels in flood-land soils and bottom sediments of the Yenisey River with those in bottom sediments of the Pripyat' River and the Kiev reservoir shows that these values are close each to other. A direct correlation is found between the spatial distribution of Cs-137 on the one hand and Pu-239,240, Eu-152, and Am-241 on the other hand in the aqueous phase and bottom sediments, which is not the case for Sr-90. Data on the distribution coefficients of the indicated radionuclides between the deposits and aqueous phase (obtained with actual and model systems) and also on the radionuclide distribution throughout geochemical mobility forms suggest that the essential part of Cs, Pu, Eu, and Am migrates with fine-disperse suspended material, the transport and distribution of which is controlled by the hydrological regime of the Yenisey River. By contrast, strontium

  6. Review of radionuclide source terms used for performance-assessment analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, R.W.

    1993-06-01

    Two aspects of the radionuclide source terms used for total-system performance assessment (TSPA) analyses have been reviewed. First, a detailed radionuclide inventory (i.e., one in which the reactor type, decay, and burnup are specified) is compared with the standard source-term inventory used in prior analyses. The latter assumes a fixed ratio of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) to boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent fuel, at specific amounts of burnup and at 10-year decay. TSPA analyses have been used to compare the simplified source term with the detailed one. The TSPA-91 analyses did not show a significant difference between the source terms. Second, the radionuclides used in source terms for TSPA aqueous-transport analyses have been reviewed to select ones that are representative of the entire inventory. It is recommended that two actinide decay chains be included (the 4n+2 ''uranium'' and 4n+3 ''actinium'' decay series), since these include several radionuclides that have potentially important release and dose characteristics. In addition, several fission products are recommended for the same reason. The choice of radionuclides should be influenced by other parameter assumptions, such as the solubility and retardation of the radionuclides

  7. Personnel dosimetry in internal radiation exposure by excretory radionuclide measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonov, M.I.; Bruk, G.Ya.; Korelina, N.F.; Likhtarev, I.A.; Repin, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    The collaboration with the SAAS resulted in the development of a mathematical method to calculate radiation doses in human tissues attributed to inhaled radionuclides concerning their retention dynamics in the respiratory system and their uptake into the blood as well as the metabolic pathways in the organs. 'Sanep-stations' and radiation protection service elaborated nomograms for the determination of the commitment doses in the critical organs based on the radionuclide content of a 24-hours urinalysis without intermediate calculations. Recommendations for the use of the method and the nomograms for various radionuclides (solubility classes D and N with MAAD of 1 and 10 μm) are given in the methodological document: 'Indirect dosimetry of inhaled radionuclides in workers'. A calculation method for the annual dose of internal irradiation in tritium workers is also cited

  8. History of medical radionuclide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radionuclide production for medical use originally was incidental to isotope discoveries by physicists and chemists. Once the available radionuclides were identified they were evaluated for potential medical use. Hevesy first used 32P in 1935 to study phosphorous metabolism in rats. Since that time, the development of cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and nuclear reactors have produced hundreds of radionuclides for potential medical use. The history of medical radionuclide production represents an evolutionary, interdisciplinary development of applied nuclear technology. Today the technology is represented by a mature industry and provides medical benefits to millions of patients annually.

  9. The development of new radionuclide generator systems for nuclear medicine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Callahan, A.P.; Mirzadeh, S.; Brihaye, C.; Guillaume, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radioisotope generator systems have traditionally played a central role in nuclear medicine in providing radioisotopes for both research and clinical applications. In this paper, the development of several tungsten-188/rhenium-188 prototype generators which provide rhenium-188 for radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) is discussed. The authors have recently demonstrated that carrier-free iridium-194 can be obtained from the activated carbon system from decay of reactor-produced osmium-194 for potential RAIT applications. Instrumentation advances such as the new generation of high-count-rate (fast) gamma camera systems for first-pass technology require the availability of generator-produced ultra short-lived radioisotopes for radionuclide angiography (RNA). The activated carbon generator is an efficient system to obtain ultra short-lived iridium-191 m from osmium-191 for RNA. In addition, the growing number of PET centers has stimulated research in generators which provide positron-emitting radioisotopes. Copper-62, obtained from the zinc-62 generator, is currently used for PET evaluation of organ perfusion. The availability of the parent radioisotopes, the fabrication and use of these generators, and the practical factors for use of these systems in the radiopharmacy are discussed. 74 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Transfer mechanisms in cultivated soils of waste radionuclides from electronuclear power plants in the system river--irrigated soil--underground water level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saas, A; Grauby, A

    1974-12-31

    From symposinm on environmentl behavior of radionuclides released in the nuclear industry; Aix-en-Provence, France (14 May 1973). The location of nuclear power plants by rivers whose waters are used for irrigation and industrial and domestic consumption necessities a profound study of the river-irrigated soil- ground water system. Mechanisms of radionuclide transport in cultivated soil are considered under three principal aspects: the effect of the quality of the river water, of the irrigation channels, and of the ground water level on the mobility of the radionuclides in the soil; the influence of the type of soil (the four types of soils considered are acid brown soil, calcic brown soil, chalky brown soil, and chalky alluvial soil); and the distribution of radionuclides in the soil (hydrosoluble forms can contminate the ground water level and these are the forms in which they are taken up by plants. A study was made on the following nuclides: /sup 22/Na, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, /Sup 54/Mn, /Sup 59/Fe, /Sup 60/ Co, /sup 65/Zn, /sup 124/Sb, /sup 141 in the cultivated soils permit the evaluation of the risks of contmination of the food chain and of the underground water. This study also showed new perspectives of the behavior of radionuclides as a function of their contmination of the organo-mineral wastes of industrial and domestic origin. This pollution interfers largely with the formation of stble complexes carried by the river to irrigated soils. The quality of the water determines the distribution of the radionuclides in the profile. The hydrosoluble complex persists in the soil and migrates toward the underground water level if they are not biodegradable. The stability of these forms as a function of the soil pH and of its physicochemical characteristics, as well as that of the radionuclides considered, permit the formulation of a new balance of the radionuclides in soils. The formulation of new proposals for the contml of nuclear sites is discussed. (tr-auth)

  11. The application of polyelectrolytes to improve liquid radwaste treatment system radionuclide removal efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homyk, W.A.; Spall, M.J.; Vance, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    At nuclear plants, miscellaneous waste water treated in the liquid radwaste processing system contains a significant fraction of suspended particulate materials ranging in size from a few microns down to the submicron region. The fewer particles that typically exist as colloids are generally negatively charged by virtue of inorganic and organic anions absorbed onto the particle surfaces. Because many of the radionuclides exist as colloids and resist agglomeration and settling they are not easily removed by mechanical filtration or ion exchange processes. The colloidal materials will easily pass through most filters with conventional pore size ratings and through most ion exchange media. This leads to poor decontamination Factors (dFs) and higher radionuclide releases to the environment. A laboratory-scale testing program was conducted at Indian Point Unit No. 2 to determine the effectiveness of the use of organic polyelectrolytes to destabilize colloidal suspensions in liquid radwaste. Destabilizing colloidal suspensions will improve the removal efficiencies of the suspended material by typical filtration and ion exchange processes. The increased removal efficiencies will provide increased dFs in the liquid radwaste treatment system. The testing focused on identifying the specific organic polyelectrolytes and the associated dosages which would be effective in destabilizing the colloidal suspensions on actual waste water samples. The testing also examined the filtration characteristics of the water source to determine filter parameters such as: body feed material, body feed dosages, specific flow rates, etc., which would provide the basis for the design of filtration systems for these applications. The testing effort and the major conclusions from this investigation are given. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. The development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine. Recent advances and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80 per cent of all diagnostic clinical studies and there is increasing interest and use of therapeutic radioisotopes obtained from generator systems. This paper focuses on a discussion of the major current areas of radionuclide generator research, and the expected areas of future research and application. (author)

  13. ROOTS: a program to generate radionuclide decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    A set of algorithms has been developed to support dosimetric and transport calculations. These subroutines read a radionuclide data file and prepare a decay chain showing branching fractions and radioactive half-lives of each member. One application of these subroutines has been their implementation as a set of FORTRAN subroutines for application in the PREREM code (Ryan and Fields, 1981). Recent use of these subroutines in stand-alone form required their expansion to print branching fractions. An expanded data set based on ICRP-38 radionuclide data (ICRP, 1983) was also prepared. This subroutine package is called Radionuclide Origin and Ontogeny Tracing Subroutines (ROOTS). The package is intended for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 Computer System, and may require modification to run on other machines. 6 refs

  14. Transfer of fallout radionuclides derived from Fukushima NPP accident: 1 year study on transfer of radionuclides through hydrological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki; Patin, Jeremy; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Tsujimura, Maki; Wakahara, Taeko; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2013-04-01

    Previous experiences such as Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident have confirmed that fallout radionuclides on the ground surface migrate through natural environment including soils and rivers. Therefore, in order to estimate future changes in radionuclide deposition, migration process of radionuclides in forests, soils, ground water, rivers should be monitored. However, such comprehensive studies on migration through forests, soils, ground water and rivers have not been conducted so far. Here, we present the following comprehensive investigation was conducted to confirm migration of radionuclides through natural environment including soils and rivers. 1)Study on depth distribution of radiocaesium in soils within forests, fields, and grassland 2)Confirmation of radionuclide distribution and investigation on migration in forests 3)Study on radionuclide migration due to soil erosion under different land use 4)Measurement of radionuclides entrained from natural environment including forests and soils 5)Investigation on radionuclide migration through soil water, ground water, stream water, spring water under different land use 6)Study on paddy-to-river transfer of radionuclides through suspended sediments 7)Study on river-to-ocean transfer of radionuclides via suspended sediments 8)Confirmation of radionuclide deposition in ponds and reservoirs

  15. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the oxygen

  16. The Q system and the radiotoxicity of the radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamard, J.

    1989-01-01

    The first edition of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Regulations for the safe transport of radioactive materials was issued in 1962. The transported radionuclides were distributed into three groups according to their radiotoxicity. The radiotoxicity was evaluated by means of an injury index taking into account the dose equivalent received following a mean accident by incorporation, by inhalation, by ingestion or by wound. The 1962 regulations introduced the terminology of type A and type B packages and the nature of mean accident during which a person can incorporate an activity equal to 1/10 6 of the activity contained in the type A package. The reference dose equivalent was equal to 1/4 of the annual limit of equivalent dose for workers (in the following, they use dose in place of equivalent dose). Following these criteria the transported radionuclides were distributed into three groups of radiotoxicity: Very high - High - Low or moderate. The nature of special form materials and of low specific activity materials (LSA) was also introduced by reference to the incorporation of mass superior to 1 mg

  17. Biological accessibility of Chernobyl radionuclides and aspects of environmental rehabilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Leinova, S.L.; Ivanova, T.G.; Duksina, V.V.; Rubinchik, S.Ya.; Zaharenkov, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    The redistribution of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239,240 Pu and 241 Am within natural ecosystems and the determination of natural and artificial factors influencing on processes of radionuclide migration on biogeochemical chains were investigated. There are three main directions of investigation. The first of them is to estimate the intensity of self-purification of damaged region soil cover, taking into account landscape, soil, land-use differentiation and also peculiarities of physico-chemical occurrence forms of the radioactive fallout. In particular, the change dynamics of radionuclide physico-chemical state and vertical migration in soil of different genesis were estimated, the soil varieties with high and low rate of radionuclide migration were discovered, the peculiarities of 'hot' particles destruction, the change of their dispersity and structure composition under the influence of natural reagents were studied, the radionuclide bond strength with some components of different soil types was determined. The second problem is to estimate the biological accessibility of radionuclides. In particular, the radionuclide contamination of different components of forest and meadow phytocenoses was investigated, the change of radionuclide accumulation coefficients in system 'soil-plant' was estimated. The third problem is ecological and practice measures for environmental rehabilitation. In particular, the soil self-purification hypothesis in different natural conditions were created and the permissible criterion's of interference in natural processes were developed

  18. External accumulation of radionuclide in hepatic hydrothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albin, R.J.; Johnston, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is a complication in approximately 5% of patients with cirrhosis. Ascites is almost always present and helps to suggest the correct diagnosis. However, when ascites is absent, radionuclide imaging has proven to be helpful in establishing that the pleural effusion originated from ascitic fluid. When pleural fluid is rapidly removed, such as by thoracostomy tube drainage, the radioisotope may accumulate outside the thorax and produce a negative scan of the chest. When the radionuclide scan is nondiagnostic and the pleural space is being rapidly drained, the pleural fluid collecting system should always be imaged before rejecting a diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax

  19. Speciation and transport of radionuclides in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.E.; Toste, A.P.; Abel, K.H.; Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the chemical speciation of a number of radionuclides migrating in a slightly contaminated ground water plume are identifying the most mobile species and providing an opportunity to test and/or validate geochemical models of radionuclide transport in ground waters. Results to date have shown that most of the migrating radionuclides are present in anionic or nonionic forms. These include anionic forms of 55 Fe, 60 Co, /sup 99m/Tc, 106 Ru, 131 I, and nonionic forms of 63 Ni and 125 Sb. Strontium-70 and a small fraction of the mobile 60 Co are the only cationic radionuclides which have been detected moving in the ground water plume beyond 30 meters from the source. A comparison of the observed chemical forms with the predicted species calculated from modeling thermodynamic data and ground water chemical parameters has indicated a good agreement for most of the radioelements in the system, including Tc, Np, Cs, Sr, Ce, Ru, Sb, Zn, and Mn. The discrepancies between observed and calculated solutions species were noted for Fe, Co, Ni and I. Traces of Fe, Co, and Ni were observed to migrate in anionic or nonionic forms which the calculations failed to predict. These anionic/nonionic species may be organic complexes having enhanced mobility in ground waters. The radioiodine, for example, was shown to behave totally as an anion but further investigation revealed that 49-57% of this anionic iodine was organically bound. The ground water and aqueous extracts of trench sediments contain a wide variety of organic compounds, some of which could serve as complexing agents for the radionuclides. These results indicate the need for further research at a variety of field sites in defining precisely the chemical forms of the mobile radionuclide species, and in better understanding the role of dissolved organic materials in ground water transport of radionuclides

  20. Model of the long-term transfer of radionuclides in forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo [Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    This report describes a model of the long-term behaviour in temperate and boreal forests of radionuclides entering the ecosystem with subsurface water. The model can be applied for most radionuclides that are of relevance in safety assessment of repositories for high-level radioactive waste. The model can be used for estimating radionuclide concentrations in soil, trees, understorey plants, mushrooms and forest mammals. A recommended (nominal) value and an interval of variation are provided for each model parameter and a classification of parameters by the degree of confidence in the values is given. Model testing against existing empirical data showing satisfactory results is also presented. Forests can play an important role in the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides in the environment. Despite of this, forest ecosystems have not been addressed in previous safety assessments. This can be explained by the fact that a suitable model of the long-term transfer of a wide range of radionuclides in forests has not been readily available. The objective of this work was to develop a forest model applicable for a wide range of radionuclides of relevance for high level radioactive waste management (Am-241, Cl-36, Cs-135, I-129, Ni-59, Np-237, Pu-239, Ra-226, Sr-90, Tc-99, Th-232, U-238) that can potentially enter the ecosystem with contaminated groundwater. The model assumes that biomass growth, precipitation and evapo-transpiration drive the radionuclide cycling in the system by influencing the uptake of radionuclides by vegetation and their export from the system via runoff. The mathematical model of radionuclide transfer consists of a system of ordinary differential describing the mass balance in different forest compartments, taking into account the fluxes in and out from the compartment and the radionuclides decay. The fluxes between compartments are calculated by multiplying a transfer coefficient (TC) by the radionuclide inventory in the compartment

  1. Model of the long-term transfer of radionuclides in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Rodolfo

    2006-05-01

    This report describes a model of the long-term behaviour in temperate and boreal forests of radionuclides entering the ecosystem with subsurface water. The model can be applied for most radionuclides that are of relevance in safety assessment of repositories for high-level radioactive waste. The model can be used for estimating radionuclide concentrations in soil, trees, understorey plants, mushrooms and forest mammals. A recommended (nominal) value and an interval of variation are provided for each model parameter and a classification of parameters by the degree of confidence in the values is given. Model testing against existing empirical data showing satisfactory results is also presented. Forests can play an important role in the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides in the environment. Despite of this, forest ecosystems have not been addressed in previous safety assessments. This can be explained by the fact that a suitable model of the long-term transfer of a wide range of radionuclides in forests has not been readily available. The objective of this work was to develop a forest model applicable for a wide range of radionuclides of relevance for high level radioactive waste management (Am-241, Cl-36, Cs-135, I-129, Ni-59, Np-237, Pu-239, Ra-226, Sr-90, Tc-99, Th-232, U-238) that can potentially enter the ecosystem with contaminated groundwater. The model assumes that biomass growth, precipitation and evapo-transpiration drive the radionuclide cycling in the system by influencing the uptake of radionuclides by vegetation and their export from the system via runoff. The mathematical model of radionuclide transfer consists of a system of ordinary differential describing the mass balance in different forest compartments, taking into account the fluxes in and out from the compartment and the radionuclides decay. The fluxes between compartments are calculated by multiplying a transfer coefficient (TC) by the radionuclide inventory in the compartment

  2. Radionuclide assessment of portal hypertension syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, M.A.; Khusain, Sh.K.; Alpeisova, Sh.T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents review of radionuclide studies for portal hypertension patients. Presented results showed that portal hypertension signs were revealed for the first group patients. The signs become apparent by splenomegaly and increase of colloid accumulation in it. Accumulation of the chemical in spleen was evidence of ingestion rate increase of reticuloendothelial system owing to its hyperplasia as well as liver phagocytic activity decrease due to pathological paren-chematous process and inter liver blockade. The most typical scintigraphic signs of portal hypertension were determined according chemical accumulation decreased in spleen and marrow sequentially. It is determined radionuclide method contributes to assessment of structural and functional aberrations character in liver and spleen for cirrhosis patients. (author)

  3. Methods of Increasing the Performance of Radionuclide Generators Used in Nuclear Medicine: Daughter Nuclide Build-Up Optimisation, Elution-Purification-Concentration Integration, and Effective Control of Radionuclidic Purity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van So Le

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods of increasing the performance of radionuclide generators used in nuclear medicine radiotherapy and SPECT/PET imaging were developed and detailed for 99Mo/99mTc and 68Ge/68Ga radionuclide generators as the cases. Optimisation methods of the daughter nuclide build-up versus stand-by time and/or specific activity using mean progress functions were developed for increasing the performance of radionuclide generators. As a result of this optimisation, the separation of the daughter nuclide from its parent one should be performed at a defined optimal time to avoid the deterioration in specific activity of the daughter nuclide and wasting stand-by time of the generator, while the daughter nuclide yield is maintained to a reasonably high extent. A new characteristic parameter of the formation-decay kinetics of parent/daughter nuclide system was found and effectively used in the practice of the generator production and utilisation. A method of “early elution schedule” was also developed for increasing the daughter nuclide production yield and specific radioactivity, thus saving the cost of the generator and improving the quality of the daughter radionuclide solution. These newly developed optimisation methods in combination with an integrated elution-purification-concentration system of radionuclide generators recently developed is the most suitable way to operate the generator effectively on the basis of economic use and improvement of purposely suitable quality and specific activity of the produced daughter radionuclides. All these features benefit the economic use of the generator, the improved quality of labelling/scan, and the lowered cost of nuclear medicine procedure. Besides, a new method of quality control protocol set-up for post-delivery test of radionuclidic purity has been developed based on the relationship between gamma ray spectrometric detection limit, required limit of impure radionuclide activity and its measurement

  4. Specific processes in solvent extractiotn of radionuclide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.

    1982-01-01

    The doctoral thesis discusses the consequences of the radioactive beta transformation in systems liquid-liquid and liquid-ion exchanger, and the effect of the chemical composition of liquid-liquid systems on the distribution of radionuclide traces. A model is derived of radiolysis in two-phase liquid-liquid systems used in nuclear chemical technology. The obtained results are used to suggest the processing of radioactive wastes using the Purex process. For solvent extraction the following radionuclides were used: 59 Fe, 95 Zr- 95 Nb, 99 Mo, sup(99m)Tc, 99 Tc, 103 Pd, 137 Cs, 141 Ce, 144 Ce- 144 Pr, 234 Th, and 233 Pa. Extraction was carried out at laboratory temperature. 60 Co was used as the radiation source. Mainly scintillation spectrometry equipment was used for radiometric analysis. (E.S.)

  5. Activity concentration of radionuclides in plants in the environment of western Ghats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manigandan, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    A field study on the transfer of primordial radionuclides 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and fallout radionuclides 210 Po in different plant species in tropical forest of western Ghats environment is presented. Material and Methods: The Top storey, Second storey, Shrubs and epiphytic plant species were chosen and concentration of these radionuclides in plant and soil were measured by employing gamma ray spectrometer and alpha counter. Results: The concentration ratio shows the variation in different species while a wild plant Elaeocarpus oblongus and epiphytic plants indicated preferential uptake of these radionuclides. Conclusion: The dust trapped in the root system of. epiphytic plants could be used as bio indicator to monitor fallout radionuclides in the Western Ghats. The concentration of 232 Th and 40 K in leaves depends on the age of the leaves.

  6. Radionuclide shuntography in a hydrocephalic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fard Esfahani, A.; Taghavi, M.; Eftekhari, M.; Saghari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide shuntography is a safe and simple method to determine shunt patency and analyze changes in cerebro- spinal fluid flow. We present a case of complicated cerebro- spinal fluid shunt, in which radioisotopic scan correctly identified disconnection of the shunt tubing system localizing the site of extravasation accurately. The findings were confirmed by surgery performed for correction of the shunt system

  7. Binding and release of artificial radionuclides in sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerstner, U.; Schoer, J.

    1980-01-01

    Artificial radionuclides in aquatic systems are generally associated with more labile solid phases than are their stable counterparts. This implies that special attention must be paid to the possible effects on the biological uptake of artificial isotopes from contamined dredged materials following deposition or land application. An estimation of possible effects could be made from chemical extraction experiments similar to those already applied to stable heavy metal isotopes. Within the aquatic system the changes of the physico-chemical conditions, such as pH-values, oxygen content, salinity, and the concentration of complexing organic substances, may effect a partial remobilization of artificial radionuclides from the solids, which occurs more readily than with the respective stable isotopes. (orig.) [de

  8. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of host rocks, secondary minerals, and fluids would affect the transport of radionuclides from a previously proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Minerals in the Yucca Mountain tuffs that are important for retarding radionuclides include clinoptilolite and mordenite (zeolites), clay minerals, and iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides. Water compositions along flow paths beneath Yucca Mountain are controlled by dissolution reactions, silica and calcite precipitation, and ion-exchange reactions. Radionuclide concentrations along flow paths from a repository could be limited by (1) low waste-form dissolution rates, (2) low radionuclide solubility, and (3) radionuclide sorption onto geological media.

  9. All-union Conference. Principles and methods of regional and geochemical investigations into radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khitrov, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The collection presents abstracts of papers concerning landscape-geochemical research of radionuclides migration; aspects of 'hot particles' study; radionuclides forms and behaviour in soils, in soil-plant; soil-natural water systems, as well as in water ecosystems. Methods of natural objects artificial radioactivity study are reviewed. Distribution of natural radionuclides in soils. natural waters, etc. is discussed

  10. Endoprobe: A system for radionuclide-guided endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Srinivasan, Amarnath

    2004-01-01

    Methods to guide the surgical treatment of cancer utilizing handheld beta-sensitive probes in conjunction with tumor-avid radiopharmaceuticals [such as 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)] have previously been developed. These technologies could also potentially be used to assist in minimally invasive techniques for the diagnosis of cancer. The goal of this project is to develop and test a system for performing radionuclide-guided endoscopies. This system (called Endoprobe) has four major subsystems: beta detector, position tracker, endoscope, and user interface. The beta detection unit utilizes two miniaturized solid state detectors to preferentially detect beta particles. The position tracking system allows real-time monitoring of the unit's location. The beta detector and position tracking system's receiver are mounted on the tip of an endoscope. Information from the beta detector and tracking system, in addition to the video signal from the endoscope, are combined and presented to the user via a computer interface. The system was tested in a simulated search for radiotracer-avid areas of esophageal cancer. The search for esophageal cancer was chosen because this type of cancer is often diagnosed with endoscopic procedures and has been reported to have good affinity for FDG. Accumulations of FDG in the normal organs of the abdomen were simulated by an anthropomorphic torso phantom filled with the appropriate amounts of radioactivity. A 1.5-mm-thick gelatin film containing FDG was used to simulate radiotracer uptake in the lining of normal esophagus. Esophageal lesions (both benign and malignant) were simulated by thin disks of gelatin (diameters=3.5-12 mm) containing appropriate concentrations of FDG embedded in the gelatin film simulating normal esophagus. Endoprobe facilitated visual identification and examination of the simulated lesions. The position tracking system permitted the location of the Endoprobe tip to be monitored and plotted in real time on a

  11. Radionuclide content of Las Vegas wash sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, M.J.; Meyers, A.M.; Johnson, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    The Las Vegas Wash is an excavated waterway channel which drains all surface water and effluent discharge from sewage-treatment facilities from the greater Las Vegas Metropolitan Area to Lake Mead. Runoff and erosion processes are expected to transport man-made radioactivity that was deposited over the past several decades in the Las Vegas Valley. Additionally, radionuclides disposed of via the city's sanitary system are expected to accumulate in the Wash sediments. Fine and coarse sediment samples were collected at 100 m intervals and analyzed to determine the distribution of alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides in the lower 5,500 in of the Las Vegas Wash. Results indicate little accumulation of long-lived fission products in upstream Wash sediments. However, trace amounts of fission products measured in downstream sediments suggest the resuspension and transport of radioactive particulate matter within the Wash. Levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides found in Wash sediments were found to be consistent with levels typically found in southeast Nevada soils

  12. Bioaccumulation factors for radionuclides in freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderploeg, H.A.; Parzyck, D.C.; Wilcox, W.H.; Kercher, J.R.; Kaye, S.V.

    1975-11-01

    This report analyzes over 200 carefully selected papers to provide concise data sets and methodology for estimation of bioaccumulation factors for tritium and isotopes of strontium, cesium, iodine, manganese, and cobalt in major biotic components of freshwater environments. Bioaccumulation factors of different tissues are distinguished where significant differences occur. Since conditions in the laboratory are often unnatural in terms of chemical and ecological relationships, this review was restricted as far as possible to bioaccumulation factors determined for natural systems. Because bioaccumulation factors were not available for some shorter-lived radionuclides, a methodology for converting bioaccumulation factors of stable isotopes to those of shorter-lived radionuclides was derived and utilized. The bioaccumulation factor for a radionuclide in a given organism or tissue may exhibit wide variations among bodies of water that are related to differences in ambient concentrations of stable-element and carrier-element analogues. To account for these variations, simple models are presented that relate bioaccumulation factors to stable-element and carrier-element concentrations in water. The effects of physicochemical form and other factors in causing deviations from these models are discussed. Bioaccumulation factor data are examined in the context of these models, and bioaccumulation factor relations for the selected radionuclides are presented

  13. A soil-based model to predict radionuclide transfer in a soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roig, M.; Vidal, M.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G.; Roca, M.C.; Vallejo, V.R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to check if the main soil parameters predefined as ruling soil-plant transfer were sufficient to predict a relative scale of radionuclide mobility in mineral soils. Two agricultural soils, two radionuclides ( 85 Sr and 134 Cs), and two crops (lettuce and pea) were used in these experiments following radioactive aerosol deposition simulating the conditions of a site some distance far away from the center of a nuclear accident, for which condensed deposition would be the more significant contribution. The available fraction of these radionuclides was estimated in these soils from experiments in which various reagents were tested and several experimental conditions were compared. As a general conclusion, the soil parameters seemed to be sufficient for prediction purposes, although the model should be improved through the consideration of physiological aspects, especially those depending of the plant selectivity according to the composition of the soil solution

  14. Ionizing radiation and radionuclides in the environment: sources, origin, geochemical processes and health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dangic, A.

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiation related to the radioactivity and radionuclides appears to be ones of most dangerous environmental risks to the human health. The paper considers appearance and importance of radionuclides, both natural (cosmogenic and Earth's) and anthropogenic, mode of their entering into and movement through the environment. Most risk to the population are radionuclides related to the geological-geochemical systems - in Serbia, high concentrations of radionuclides related to these sources were indicated at a number of localities. Movement of radionuclides through the environment is regulated by the geochemical processes i.e. the geochemical cycles of the elements. For the discovering of radionuclides in the nature, the assessment of the health risks to the population and the related protection are necessary multilayer geochemical studies. (author)

  15. Model of metastatic growth valuable for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, Peter; Ahlman, Haakan; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to make a Monte Carlo simulation approach to estimate the distribution of tumor sizes and to study the curative potential of three candidate radionuclides for radionuclide therapy: the high-energy electron emitter 90 Y, the medium-energy electron emitter 177 Lu and the low-energy electron emitter 103m Rh. A patient with hepatocellular carcinoma with recently published serial CT data on tumor growth in the liver was used. From these data the growth of the primary tumor, and the metastatis formation rate, were estimated. Assuming the same tumor growth of the primary and all metastases and the same metastatis formation rate from both primary and metastases the metastatic size distribution was simulated for various time points. Tumor cure of the metastatic size distribution was simulated for uniform activity distribution of three radionuclides; the high-energy electron emitter 90 Y, the mean-energy electron emitter 177 Lu and the low-energy electron emitter 103m Rh. The simulation of a tumor cure was performed for various time points and tumor-to-normal tissue activity concentrations, TNC. It was demonstrated that it is important to start therapy as early as possible after diagnosis. It was of crucial importance to use an optimal radionuclide for therapy. These simulations demonstrated that 90 Y was not suitable for systemic radionuclide therapy, due to the low absorbed fraction of the emitted electrons in small tumors ( 103m Rh was slightly better than 177 Lu. For high TNC values low-energy electron emitters, e.g., 103m Rh was the best choice for tumor cure. However, the short half-life of 103m Rh (56 min) might not be optimal for therapy. Therefore, other low-energy electron emitters, or alpha emitters, should be considered for systemic targeted therapy

  16. Assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems in urban environment - simulation, modelling and experimental studies - LUCIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundelll-Bergman, S. (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, R.; Cruz, I. de la (Facilia AB, (Sweden)); Xu, S. (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, (Sweden)); Puhakainen, M.; Heikkinene, T.; Rahola, T. (STUK (Finland)); Hosseini, A. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Nielsen, Sven (Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU (Denmark)); Sigurgeirsson, M. (Geislavarnir rikisins (Iceland))

    2009-06-15

    This report summarises the findings of a project on assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems and was established to provide more knowledge and suitable tools for emergency preparedness purposes in urban areas. It was known that the design of sewage plants, and their wastewater treatments, is rather similar between the Nordic countries. One sewage plant in each of the five Nordic countries was selected for assessing the impact of radionuclide releases from hospitals into their sewerage systems. Measurements and model predictions of dose assessments to different potentially exposed members of the public were carried out. The results from the dose assessments indicate that in case of routine releases annual doses to the three hypothetical groups of individuals are most likely insignificant. Estimated doses for workers are below 10 muSv/y, for the two studied radionuclides 99mTc and 131I. If uncertainties in the predictions of activity concentrations in sludge are considered, then the probability of obtaining doses above 10 muSv/y may not be insignificant. The models and approaches developed can also be applied in case of accidental releases. A laboratory inter-comparison exercise was also organised to compare analytical results across the laboratories participating in the project, using both 131I, dominating man-made radionuclide in sewage systems due to the medical use. A process oriented model of the biological treatment is also proposed in the report that does not require as much input data as for the LUCIA model. This model is a combination of a simplified well known Activated Sludge Model No.1 (Henze, 1987) and the Kd concept used in the LUCIA model. The simplified model is able to estimate the concentrations and the retention time of the sludge in different parts of the treatment plant, which in turn, can be used as a tool for the dose assessment purpose.filled by the activity. (au)

  17. Assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems in urban environment - simulation, modelling and experimental studies - LUCIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundelll-Bergman, S.; Avila, R.; Cruz, I. de la; Xu, S.; Puhakainen, M.; Heikkinene, T.; Rahola, T.; Hosseini, A.; Nielsen, Sven; Sigurgeirsson, M.

    2009-06-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project on assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems and was established to provide more knowledge and suitable tools for emergency preparedness purposes in urban areas. It was known that the design of sewage plants, and their wastewater treatments, is rather similar between the Nordic countries. One sewage plant in each of the five Nordic countries was selected for assessing the impact of radionuclide releases from hospitals into their sewerage systems. Measurements and model predictions of dose assessments to different potentially exposed members of the public were carried out. The results from the dose assessments indicate that in case of routine releases annual doses to the three hypothetical groups of individuals are most likely insignificant. Estimated doses for workers are below 10 μSv/y, for the two studied radionuclides 99mTc and 131I. If uncertainties in the predictions of activity concentrations in sludge are considered, then the probability of obtaining doses above 10 μSv/y may not be insignificant. The models and approaches developed can also be applied in case of accidental releases. A laboratory inter-comparison exercise was also organised to compare analytical results across the laboratories participating in the project, using both 131I, dominating man-made radionuclide in sewage systems due to the medical use. A process oriented model of the biological treatment is also proposed in the report that does not require as much input data as for the LUCIA model. This model is a combination of a simplified well known Activated Sludge Model No.1 (Henze, 1987) and the Kd concept used in the LUCIA model. The simplified model is able to estimate the concentrations and the retention time of the sludge in different parts of the treatment plant, which in turn, can be used as a tool for the dose assessment purpose.filled by the activity. (au)

  18. Radionuclides in air, water, and biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, A.H.; Nelson, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Air, water, and biological samples collected before and after the 1965, 1969, and 1971 underground nuclear detonations at Amchitka Island were analyzed for natural and fallout radionuclides by gamma spectrometry. Selected samples were also analyzed for tritium, 55 Fe, and 90 Sr. The objectives were to search for and identify radionuclides of Amchitka origin in the samples and to contribute to the general knowledge of the distribution of radionuclides in the environment. The studies showed that there has been no escape of radionuclides from the underground sites of the three nuclear detonations at Amchitka Island except for trace quantities of radionuclides, principally tritium, in water and soil gas samples from the immediate vicinity of the surface ground zero for the 1965 event. Two naturally occurring radionuclides, 40 K and 7 Be, were the most abundant radionuclides in the samples, usually by a factor of 10 or more, except for 137 Cs in lichen samples. All levels were well below applicable Radiation Protction Guides, often being near the statistical limit of detection

  19. Radionuclides concentration in foods in Peninsular Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalina Laili; Muhamat Omar; Mohd Nahar Othman; Md Suhaimi Elias; Esther Philip, Mohd Zaidi Ibrahim; Faizal Azrin Abdul Razalim; Azmi Hassan

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides (U-238, Th-232, Ra-226, Ra-228 and K-40) and artificial radionuclides (Cs-137) in fresh, dried and cooked foodstuffs from 30 major towns in Peninsular Malaysia were determined by gamma spectrometry system and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) technique. A total of 232 samples representing a typical Malaysian community diet were analysed. The results showed that most of the samples contained only natural radionuclides. The percentage of radionuclides detected in the samples were found about 2% for U-238, 9% for Th-232, 49% for Ra-226, 77% for Ra-228, 99% for K-40 and 15% for Cs-137. The radionuclide concentrations were in the ranges of <6.1 - 29.3, <2.0 - 55.8, <0.1 - 34.4, <0.1 - 41, <0.1- 2552.3 and < 0.1 - 6.6 Bq/Kg dry weight for U-238, Th-232, Ra-226, Ra-228 and K-40 and Cs-137 respectively. The study revealed that most of the foodstuffs did not contain U-238. Lentils were found to contain significant concentration of Th-232 (4 - 49 Bq/kg) and can be considered as thorium accumulators. The concentrations of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in leafy vegetables were higher than the fruit and root vegetables. These data can be used as a reference for future food radioactivity monitoring. As edible mushroom and fern had high concentrations of Cs-137, indicating their high ability to accumulate Cs-137, they could be used as indicator plants in the event of radioactive fall outs

  20. Effect of organic complexants on the mobility of low-level-waste radionuclides in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of certain organic complexants on the distribution of some radionuclides between solution and soil has been measured. The complexants and radionuclides examined are some of those most likely to be present in low-level waste disposal sites; Cs, Sr, Ni, Co, and Eu radionuclides, and EDTA, DTPA, oxalate, and citrate complexants. The effect of complexants was found to vary widely; in some systems there was no effect and in other systems there were large effects. In some cases slow rates of reaction have not allowed equilibrium measurements to be made

  1. Distribution of uranium and radium radionuclides in the 'solid phase-interstitial soil solution' system and their migratory properties in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Vojnikova, E.V.; Popenya, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    The background content of the main alpha-emitting radionuclides of uranium and radium in the soils of the south-east territory of the Republic of Belarus has been established. The reserve of migratory active species of uranium and radium in the soils has been determined using the data on the content of the radionuclides in the interstitial soil solutions, which are the most important chain of geochemical and biological migration of the chemical elements in ecosystems. The values of radionuclides distribution coefficients in the 'solid phase - interstitial solution of soil' system were estimated. It was shown that the migratory ability of uranium in the investigated soils is higher than that of radium. A direct correlation between the contents of organic components and uranium in the soil solution has been revealed. The used approach to the investigation of the uranium and radium behavior allows comparing their abilities to the migration in dependence of the soil medium peculiarities. (authors)

  2. Metrology of trace radionuclides in environment. Standardization and traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, D.

    1999-01-01

    Widespread concern over radioactive substances in the environment regularly requires environmental and public health assessments. The credibility of an assessment will depend on the quality and reliability on measurement results that often are of paramount significance in the environmental domain. Those man made radionuclides present in the various environmental components of the French territory are however found at trace, even ultra-trace levels. This article gives an overview of standardization work and required reference materials and rules for measuring radionuclides in environmental matrices as well as the international and national systems to manage standardization and traceability. Some achievements as well as the many difficulties that the metrologist must overcome when using nuclear techniques to measure trace quantities of radionuclides are presented. (author)

  3. Radionuclide migration test using undisturbed aerated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Ohtsuka, Yoshiro; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1988-01-01

    As one of the most important part of safety assessment on the shallow land disposal of lowlevel radioactive waste, the radionuclide migration was studied using undisturbed soil samples, in order to evaluate an exact radionuclide migration in an aerated soil layer. Soil samples used in the migration test were coastal sand and loamy soil which form typical surface soil layers in Japan. The aqueous solution containing 60 CoCl 2 , 85 SrCl 2 and 137 CsCl was fed into the soil column and concentration of each radionuclide both in effluent and in soil was measured. Large amount of radionuclides was adsorbed on the surface of soil column and small amount of radionuclides moved deep into the soil column. Difference in the radionuclide profile was observed in the low concentration portion particularly. It is that some fractions of 60 Co and 137 Cs are stable in non-ionic form and move downward through the soil column together with water. The radionuclide distribution in the surface of soil column can be fairly predicted with a conventional migration equation for ionic radionuclides. As a result of radionuclide adsorption, both aerated soil layers of coastal sand and loamy soil have large barrier ability on the radionuclide migration through the ground. (author)

  4. Holistic assessment to put mobile radionuclides in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeki, H.

    2009-01-01

    Some radionuclides are inherently more mobile than others in the near- and far-field of repository systems and hence, if long-lived, tend to dominate the calculated doses in normal evolution scenarios. High mobility generally a consequence of high solubility coupled to low sorption does not, however, necessarily mean that a particular radionuclide is problematic in terms of repository safety. A more holistic approach, considering the entire safety case, gives a better indication of the critical nuclides and the R and D required to strengthen the assurance of safety. (author)

  5. Radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    The sources of the presence of radionuclides in food are presented: natural radiation and artificial radiation. The transfer of radionuclides through food chains, intakes of radionuclides to the body with its partners effective doses and typical consumption of basic foods of a rural adult population are exposed as main topics. Also the radiation doses from natural sources and exposure to man by ingestion of contaminated food with radionuclides of artificial origin are shown. The contribution of the food ingestion to the man exposure depends on: characteristics of radionuclide, natural conditions, farming practices and eating habits of the population. The principal international organizations in charge of setting guide levels for radionuclides in food are mentioned: standards, rules and the monitoring. It establishes that a guide is necessary for the food monitoring; the alone CODEX ALIMENTARIUS is applicable to emergency situations and the generic action levels proposed by the CODEX not satisfy all needs (no guiding international levels for planned or existing situations such as NORM). There are handled mainly socio-economic and political aspects. Among the actions to be taken are: to assure a public comprehensive information over the risk evaluation in food; to reinforce the collaboration among the different international organizations (WHO, IAEA, ICRP, EC) in relation with the food of set; to give follow-up to the control of the drinkable water and NORM's presence in the food. In addition, it is possible to create the necessary mechanisms to reduce the number of irrelevant measures and bureaucratic useless steps (certificates); to promote the exchange between the different institutions involved in the topic of the food, with relation to the acquired experiences and learned lessons. Likewise, it might examine the possibility of a multidisciplinary approximation (radioactive and not radioactive pollutants); to elaborate a technical guide to assure the

  6. The enrichment behavior of natural radionuclides in pulverized oil shale-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaasma, Taavi; Kiisk, Madis; Meriste, Tõnis; Tkaczyk, Alan Henry

    2014-01-01

    The oil shale industry is the largest producer of NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) waste in Estonia. Approximately 11–12 million tons of oil shale containing various amounts of natural radionuclides is burned annually in the Narva oil shale-fired power plants, which accounts for approximately 90% of Estonian electricity production. The radionuclide behavior characteristics change during the fuel combustion process, which redistributes the radionuclides between different ash fractions. Out of 24 operational boilers in the power plants, four use circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology and twenty use pulverized fuel (PF) technology. Over the past decade, the PF boilers have been renovated, with the main objective to increase the efficiency of the filter systems. Between 2009 and 2012, electrostatic precipitators (ESP) in four PF energy blocks were replaced with novel integrated desulphurization technology (NID) for the efficient removal of fly ash and SO 2 from flue gases. Using gamma spectrometry, activity concentrations and enrichment factors for the 238 U ( 238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Pb) and 232 Th ( 232 Th, 228 Ra) family radionuclides as well as 40 K were measured and analyzed in different PF boiler ash fractions. The radionuclide activity concentrations in the ash samples increased from the furnace toward the back end of the flue gas duct. The highest values in different PF boiler ash fractions were in the last field of the ESP and in the NID ash, where radionuclide enrichment factors were up to 4.2 and 3.3, respectively. The acquired and analyzed data on radionuclide activity concentrations in different PF boiler ashes (operating with an ESP and a NID system) compared to CFB boiler ashes provides an indication that changes in the fuel (oil shale) composition and boiler working parameters, as well as technological enhancements in Estonian oil shale fired power plants, have had a combined effect on the distribution patterns of natural radionuclides in

  7. Mathematical modelling and radionuclide behaviour analysis in system Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Industrial Complex - Yenisei - Kara Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platovskikh, Yu.A.; Sergeev, I.V.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Legin, V.K.; Shishlov, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    Equations describing radioisotope transfers in the suspension river water-bottom sediments based on radionuclide migration from industrial wastes and washing off reservoir are formulated. Coefficients of the equations were determined by means of measured data processing. On this base floodplaine sediments were estimated, dependence of radionuclide waste from time for all period of functioning of the plant was determined and their concentrations in water and bottom sediments were calculated. Balances between wastes, washing off the reservoir and radionuclide migration in bottom sediments, bottom land and the Kara Sea were formulated for the past. Procedure for the estimation of the migration of radionuclide exchange forms from bottom sediments following sharp decrease of waste in 1992 was developed. On the base of this effect and redistribution of radionuclides between bottom sediments and floodplaine sediments the rate of self-purification of the river in the future was evaluated [ru

  8. Modelling accumulation of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems originating from a long-term groundwater contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdenaes, Annemieke I. [Dept. of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), P.O. Box 7001, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Eckersten, Henrik [Dept. of Ecology and Crop Production, SLU, P.O. Box 7042, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Reinlert, Andre [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University, 223 62 Lund (Sweden); MMT, Sven Kaellfelts Gata 11 SE 426 71 Vaestra Froelunda (Sweden); Gustafsson, David; Jansson, Per-Erik [Dept. Land and Water Resources, KTH, SE 100 44, Stockholm (Sweden); Ekstroem, Per-Anders [Facilia AB, Gustavlundsvaegen 151A, 167 51 Bromma (Sweden); Greger, Maria [Dept. of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted as part of the risk assessment of final deposits of nuclear fuel waste. The overall objective is to assess the possible accumulation of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems after an eventual long-term groundwater contamination. The specific objectives are to assess: i) What proportion of the contamination will accumulate in the soil-plant-system? ii) Where in the soil-plant- system will it accumulate? iii) Which ecosystem characteristics and radionuclides properties are important for the accumulation? and iv) Under which circumstances do losses from the ecosystems occur? We developed the dynamic model Tracey (Gaerdenaes et al. 2009) describing cycling of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems with high temporal resolution (1 day). The model is a multi-compartmental model in which fluxes and storage of radionuclides are described for different plant parts and soil pools in each of the 10 soil layers. The radionuclide fluxes are driven either by water or carbon fluxes. The water and the carbon fluxes are simulated with the dynamic, bio-geophysical Coup Model (Jansson and Karlberg, 2004). Tracey includes two root uptake approaches of radionuclides; (i) passive uptake driven by root water uptake and (ii) active uptake driven by plant growth. A linear approach describes the adsorption of radionuclides to soil particles and organic matter. Tracey was applied on two ecosystems with contrasting hydrology, the mixed Pinus-Picea forests found in the dry, elevated areas and the Alnus forests found in the wet, low-land areas of Uppland in central east Sweden. Different varieties of the two forest types were created by varying the root depth and radiation use efficiency. The climate was cold-temperate and based on 30-year daily weather data from Uppsala. The assumed groundwater contamination was close to 1 mg of an unspecified radionuclide per m2 and year. This load corresponds to 1 Bq per m{sup 2} and year of {sup 238}U, a common long

  9. Altitude training and haemoglobin mass from the optimised carbon monoxide rebreathing method determined by a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Christopher J; Sharpe, Ken; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Saunders, Philo U; Humberstone, Clare E; Robertson, Eileen Y; Wachsmuth, Nadine B; Clark, Sally A; McLean, Blake D; Friedmann-Bette, Birgit; Neya, Mitsuo; Pottgiesser, Torben; Schumacher, Yorck O; Schmidt, Walter F

    2013-12-01

    To characterise the time course of changes in haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) in response to altitude exposure. This meta-analysis uses raw data from 17 studies that used carbon monoxide rebreathing to determine Hbmass prealtitude, during altitude and postaltitude. Seven studies were classic altitude training, eight were live high train low (LHTL) and two mixed classic and LHTL. Separate linear-mixed models were fitted to the data from the 17 studies and the resultant estimates of the effects of altitude used in a random effects meta-analysis to obtain an overall estimate of the effect of altitude, with separate analyses during altitude and postaltitude. In addition, within-subject differences from the prealtitude phase for altitude participant and all the data on control participants were used to estimate the analytical SD. The 'true' between-subject response to altitude was estimated from the within-subject differences on altitude participants, between the prealtitude and during-altitude phases, together with the estimated analytical SD. During-altitude Hbmass was estimated to increase by ∼1.1%/100 h for LHTL and classic altitude. Postaltitude Hbmass was estimated to be 3.3% higher than prealtitude values for up to 20 days. The within-subject SD was constant at ∼2% for up to 7 days between observations, indicative of analytical error. A 95% prediction interval for the 'true' response of an athlete exposed to 300 h of altitude was estimated to be 1.1-6%. Camps as short as 2 weeks of classic and LHTL altitude will quite likely increase Hbmass and most athletes can expect benefit.

  10. Determination of alpha radionuclides in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, L.; Matel, L.; Rosskopfova, O.

    2001-01-01

    In atmospheric water, external water and undercurrent the occurrence of radionuclides is usual. It is an important factor of quality of the environment. Plants ingest radionuclides from water and with they everyone. And it arises radioactivity infest food-chain. Radiotoxicity of this radionuclides is very deer sometimes. The sensitive radiochemical procedures for their determination are necessarily important. The poster presents the combined procedure used at our laboratory for determination of alpha radionuclides in biological samples. (authors)

  11. Monitoring and characterization of radionuclide transport in the hydrogeologic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Raymond, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The groundwater monitoring program provides information and data on groundwater quality required to evaluate the impact of waste disposal practices on the Hanford Reservation. The program includes: collection and analysis of groundwater samples on a routine basis; data processing, analysis and reporting; design, construction and maintenance of well sampling structures; and design and implementation of supporting research studies. Within the overall framework of the Groundwater Monitoring Program, the 300 Area and Wye Burial Ground Characterization Program was initiated to evaluate transport of radionuclides in the partially saturated zone above the water table and to provide site characterization at solid waste burial locations on the Reservation. Methods for collecting and analyzing program data include geophysical exploration by ground penetrating radar, refraction and reflection acoustics, magnetics, and metal detection; stratigraphic investigations by drilling and sample collection techniques; evaluation of transport phenomena by in situ psychrometric and gamma-neutron techniques; laboratory characterization of fluid and vapor transport-controlling mechanisms; and evaluation of biological radionuclide transport by organisms inhabiting contaminated areas

  12. Behaviors of radionuclides in wet underground soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Y.; Morisawa, S.

    Experimental studies were made of the variations of the distribution coefficient of 65 Zn, 60 Co, and /sup 110 m/Ag with Ca ion contents in sand--water and resin--water systems. It is concluded that: (1) The distribution coefficient of a radionuclide is not constant but varies greatly especially with calcium ion concentration in underground water. (2) The Saturation Index I=pH-pHs can be used as a parameter to indicate such variations. (3) Some radionuclides, existing as radiocolloids like (sup 110m/Ag and 59 Fe, are inactive toward ion exchange reactions as with hydroxide. In such cases, the nuclides migrate underground as fast as underground water

  13. Migration of radionuclide chains in subseabed disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, A.K.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    In this study of subseabed disposal, the two dimensional (axial and radial) migration of radionuclide chains released from a canister located in a sedimentary layer bounded at the top by the ocean and at the bottom by an impermeable basalt zone is analyzed to determine the escape rate of radionuclides into the seawater. Analytical solutions have been derived to represent the transient concentration profiles within the sediment, flux and discharge rates to the water column of each member present in a decay chain. Using the properties of chain members present in actinide decay systems, the effects of half-life, adsorption equilibrium and other relevant parameters are elucidated. 4 figures, 1 table

  14. Pollen as indicator of radionuclide pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, M.B.; Corey, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    To assess hazards of radioactivity in the environment, agricultural scientists must identify plant and animal species which can be used as biological indicators of radionuclide contamination. In this experiments, the pollen-bee-honey system was chosen to study movement of radioactive elements in the plant-animal-man food chain. Pollen, bees, and honey were collected from different locations at a nuclear facility in South Carolina. They were analyzed for nine radionuclides and 22 stable elements. The results showed that pollen is a more sensitive indicator of pollution than bees or honey. If pollen-monitoring shows that an area has become polluted, hives and other sources of human and animal food should not be placed in the region until it is no longer contaminated. (author)

  15. Radionuclide usage survey 1979-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.J.

    1980-08-01

    Details of a survey by the Life Sciences Working Group of the International Committee for Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM) on radionuclide usage by medical physicists in 11 countries are presented. The results indicate that the radionuclide which will be of most significance in the future will be F-18, Fe-52, Ga-67, Ga-68, Kr-81m, Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, Xe-127 and Tl-201, (U.K.)

  16. Waste Form and Indrift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, R.

    2003-01-01

    This Model Report describes the analysis and abstractions of the colloids process model for the waste form and engineered barrier system components of the total system performance assessment calculations to be performed with the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application model. Included in this report is a description of (1) the types and concentrations of colloids that could be generated in the waste package from degradation of waste forms and the corrosion of the waste package materials, (2) types and concentrations of colloids produced from the steel components of the repository and their potential role in radionuclide transport, and (3) types and concentrations of colloids present in natural waters in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. Additionally, attachment/detachment characteristics and mechanisms of colloids anticipated in the repository are addressed and discussed. The abstraction of the process model is intended to capture the most important characteristics of radionuclide-colloid behavior for use in predicting the potential impact of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport on repository performance

  17. Waste Form and Indrift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Aguilar

    2003-06-24

    This Model Report describes the analysis and abstractions of the colloids process model for the waste form and engineered barrier system components of the total system performance assessment calculations to be performed with the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application model. Included in this report is a description of (1) the types and concentrations of colloids that could be generated in the waste package from degradation of waste forms and the corrosion of the waste package materials, (2) types and concentrations of colloids produced from the steel components of the repository and their potential role in radionuclide transport, and (3) types and concentrations of colloids present in natural waters in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. Additionally, attachment/detachment characteristics and mechanisms of colloids anticipated in the repository are addressed and discussed. The abstraction of the process model is intended to capture the most important characteristics of radionuclide-colloid behavior for use in predicting the potential impact of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport on repository performance.

  18. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  19. Radionuclide Release after LBLOCA with Loss of Class IV Power Accident in CANDU-6 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A large break in a pipe train of a primary heat transport system discharges coolant, which has high energy and large mass, into the containment building. Reactor shutdown and emergency core cooling water will limit the fuel cladding failure, but cannot prevent it entirely. The containment building is the last barrier of radionuclide release to the environment. Containment isolation and pressure suppression by dousing and local air cooler reduce the amount of radionuclide release to the environment. The objective of containment behavior analysis for large break loss of coolant with loss of class IV power accident is to assess the amount of radionuclide release to the ambient atmosphere. Radionuclide release rates in this event, with all safety system available, that is, the containment building is intact, as well as with containment system impairment, are analyzed with GOTHIC and SMART code

  20. Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1999-03-23

    The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the {sup 229}Th or {sup 227}Ac ``cow`` radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium, lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column. 8 figs.

  1. Production of radionuclides with generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khujaev, S.; Egamediev, S.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    (75-85%) independently of the 99 Mo activity (250 - 1000 mCi) at the beginning and the end (up to 15 days) of the period of use. 188 W- 188 Re generator. 188 Re (T 1/2 =16.9 hours, β - m ax=2.12 MeV; γ=155 keV, 15%) is currently attractive radionuclide for radiotherapeutic applications. Rhenium-188 is produced by decay of tungsten-188 (T 1/2 =69.4 d) which can be produced by double neutron capture on enriched 188 W targets with high neutron flux. The specific activity of 188 W is reached up to 2 Ci/g. The optimal conditions for separation of 188 Re from the parent nuclide 188 W are studied. It is shown that the optimal separation condition is using acid-treated aluminium-oxide column to adsorb 188 W as isopolytungstate at pH solution of 2-4. 188 Re is eluted with 0.9% NaCl solution. The characteristics of the sodium perrhenate obtained from our generator are: radiochemical purity is 99.8%; pH 4.0-6.0; yield of 188 Re is 70-75%; breakthrough of 188 W is less than 10 -3 %. 68 Ge- 68 Ga generator. The nuclide 68 Ga (T 1/2 =68.3 min) produced by the electron capture decay of 68 Ge (T 1/2 =288 d) is useful for calibrating positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The 68 Ge is normally produced by both 66 Zn(α,2n) 68 Ge and 69 Ga(p,2n) 68 Ge nuclear reactions. The separation of daughter 68 Ga from parent 68 Ge on both aluminium oxide and tin dioxide are studied. In case of tin dioxide the optimal separation of daughter 68 Ga from parent 68 Ge can be achieved by using 1 M HCl as the eluent. It is shown that the tin dioxide - 1 M HCl generator system provides high yields of 68 Ga (75-80%) with low levels of breakthrough of 68 Ge (2 · 10 -4 %). However, the obtained final product - 68 Ga eluate in 1 M HCl can not be used for direct preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. In case of aluminium oxide we have found that preliminary annealing of aluminium oxide at 1000 deg C provides the best conditions for separation of 68 Ge- 68 Ga radionuclide chain in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid

  2. Radionuclide transport processes in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    Some major principles and the status of knowledge concerning the transport of radionuclides through terrestrial ecosystems are reviewed. Fundamental processes which control the flow of radionuclides between ecosystem components such as air, soil, plants, and animals are described, with emphasis on deposition, resuspension, plant uptake, ingestion, and assimilation. Properties of radionuclides, organisms, and ecosystems are examined in relation to their influence on the accumulation of radioactive materials by plants and animals. The effects of the physicochemical nature of the radionuclide; morphology, physiology, and behavior of the organism; and soil, nutrient, and trophic characteristics of the ecosystem are highlighted. Observations in natural ecosystems on radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 131 I, 3 H, and 239 Pu are used to illustrate current concepts. An assessment of the degree to which the processes controlling radionuclide behavior are understood and of our ability to simulate and predict such behavior with computerized models is offered. Finally, brief comments are made on research needs

  3. New radionuclide specific laboratory detection system for metallurgical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burianova, L.; Solc, J.; Dryak, P.; Moser, H.; Branger, T.; Garcia-Torano, E.; Peyres, V.; Capogni, M.; Luca, A.; Vodenik, B.; Oliveira, C.; Portugal, L.; Tzika, F.; Lutter, G.; Szucs, L.; Dziel, T.; Burda, O.; Dirk, A.; Martinkovic, J.; Sliskonen, T.; Mattila, A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main outputs of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) project 'Ionising radiation metrology for the metallurgical industry' (MetroMetal) was the recommendation on a novel spectrometric detection system optimized for the measurement of radioactivity in metallurgical samples. The recommended system, prototypes of which were constructed at two project partner's laboratories, was characterized by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Six different MC codes were used to model the system and a range of cylindrical samples of cast steel, slag and fume dust. The samples' shape, density, and elemental composition were the same as the ones of the calibration standards developed within the project to provide traceability to end-users. The MC models were used to calculate full-energy peak and total detection efficiencies as well as true coincidence summing correction (TCSC) factors for selected radionuclides of interest in the metallurgical industry: 60 Co, 137 Cs, 192 Ir, 214 Bi, 214 Pb, and 208 Tl. The MC codes were compared to each other on the basis of the calculated detection efficiencies and TCSC factors. In addition, a 'Procedural guide for calculation of TCSC factors for samples in metallurgical industry' was developed for end-users. The TCSC factors reached in certain cases up to 32% showing that the summing effects are of high importance in the close measurement geometries met in routine analysis of metallurgical samples. (authors)

  4. Plant rhizosphere processes influencing radionuclide mobility in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Cowan, C.E.; McFadden, K.M.; Garland, T.R.; Wildung, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    Native vegetation associated with commercial low-level waste disposal sites has the potential for modifying the soil chemical environment over the long term and, consequently, the mobility of radionuclides. These effects were assessed for coniferous and hardwood tree species by using plants grown in lysimeter systems and examining their influence on soil solution chemistry using advanced analytical and geochemical modeling techniques. The study demonstrated formation of highly mobile anionic radionuclide complexes with amino acids, peptides, and organic acids originating from plant leaf litter and roots. The production of complexing agents was related to season and tree species, suggesting that vegetation management and exclusion may be appropriate after a site is closed. This research provides a basis for focusing on key complexing agents in future studies to measure critical affinity constants and to incorporate this information into mathematical models describing biological effects on radionuclide mobility. 26 refs., 5 figs., 23 tabs

  5. Oceanic distributions of radionuclides from nuclear weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1977-01-01

    Data on the transport of fallout radionuclides in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are reviewed. Relevance of water column fallout data to the disposal of radioactive waste in marine locations is discussed. It is pointed out that regional patterns of delivery of soluble radionuclides must be assumed to persist at least for decades, in spite of the homogenizing action of ocean current systems and that, although there are delays in relation to density discontinuities in the water column, particle-associated radionuclides are generally delivered directly to the sediment surface. The chemistry of particle association appears increasingly complex, in relation both to the element selectivity among kinds of particles, and the stability of the associations once formed, and regional conditions may lead to retention of Pu (and possibly other nuclides) in discrete layers or throughout the water column, in opposition to its general tendency to associate with particles

  6. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for loW--level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements

  7. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocock, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the distribution and movement of radionuclides in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems in north-west England with particular emphasis on inputs to, and outputs from ecosystems; on plant and soil aspects; and on radionuclides in fallout and in discharges by the nuclear industry. (author)

  8. Geotrap: radionuclide migration in geologic, heterogeneous media. Summary of accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    GEOTRAP - the OECD/NEA Project on Radionuclide Migration in Geologic, Heterogeneous Media - was carried out in the context of site evaluation and safety assessment of deep repository systems for long-lived radioactive waste. The project was created in 1996 with the aim of developing an understanding of, and modelling capability for, potential radionuclide migration. This report provides an overview of the project's main findings and accomplishments over its five-year life. This summary should help make the valuable information collected and generated by the GEOTRAP project accessible to a wide readership both within and outside the radioactive waste community.It is a reflection of the careful attention paid by this community to the question of radionuclide transport. (authors)

  9. A predictive model for the behavior of radionuclides in lake systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a predictive model for the behavior of 137Cs in lacustrine systems. The model was tested by comparing its predictions to contamination data collected in various lakes in Europe and North America. The migration of 137Cs from catchment basin and from bottom sediments to lake water was discussed in detail; these two factors influence the time behavior of contamination in lake water. The contributions to the levels of radionuclide concentrations in water, due to the above factors, generally increase in the long run. The uncertainty of the model, used as a generic tool for prediction of the levels of contamination in lake water, was evaluated. Data sets of water contamination analyzed in the present work suggest that the model uncertainty, at a 68% confidence level, is a factor 1.9

  10. Distribution of radionuclides during melting of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurber, W.C.; MacKinney, J.

    1997-02-01

    During the melting of steel with radioactive contamination, radionuclides may be distributed among the metal product, the home scrap, the slag, the furnace lining and the off-gas collection system. In addition, some radionuclides will pass through the furnace system and vent to the atmosphere. To estimate radiological impacts of recycling radioactive scrap steel, it is essential to understand how radionuclides are distributed within the furnace system. For example, an isotope of a gaseous element (e.g., radon) will exhaust directly from the furnace system into the atmosphere while a relatively non-volatile element (e.g., manganese) can be distributed among all the other possible media. This distribution of radioactive contaminants is a complex process that can be influenced by numerous chemical and physical factors, including composition of the steel bath, chemistry of the slag, vapor pressure of the particular element of interest, solubility of the element in molten iron, density of the oxide(s), steel melting temperature and melting practice (e.g., furnace type and size, melting time, method of carbon adjustment and method of alloy additions). This paper discusses the distribution of various elements with particular reference to electric arc furnace steelmaking. The first two sections consider the calculation of partition ratios for elements between metal and slag based on thermodynamic considerations. The third section presents laboratory and production measurements of the distribution of various elements among slag, metal, and the off-gas collection system; and the final section provides recommendations for the assumed distribution of each element of interest.

  11. The repeatability of left ventricular volume assessment by a new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system during head-up tilt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Bonpei; Hosaka, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Katsuhiro

    2001-01-01

    The precise measurement of changes in left ventricular volume is important to elucidate the mechanisms of neurally mediated syncope. This study was conducted to determine whether or not a brand-new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system (C-VEST system) can be clinically used to easily and precisely measure left ventricular volume and function in tilt testing. To assess the repeatability of the C-VEST system, 12 healthy volunteers (mean age 24±4 years old) underwent 20 minute head-up tilt testing and we measured the temporal changes in left ventricular volume and ejection fraction twice a day (first and second studies). To investigate the changes in the C-VEST measurements and the detector position in the first and second studies, tilt testing was performed with an 80-degree passive tilt, which is the same as the standard procedure used in diagnosing neurally mediated syncope. The coefficient of repeatability for both the C-VEST and detector position was well within the clinical range (coefficient of repeatability in left ventricular volume ranged from 1.7 to 2.8; coefficient of repeatability in the detector position ranged from 2.3 to 3.1). Precise evaluation of the left ventricular volume can be achieved by an ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system in tilt testing. (author)

  12. Artificial radionuclides in soil, flora and fauna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marej, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Sources and ways of soil contamination by radionuclides, as well as the main regularities of radionuclide behaviour in soils, are discussed. Ways of radionuclide uptake by plants are discussed in detail, since radionuclide contamination of vegetation, and agricultural plants and pastures in particular, is one of the main factors, determining sanitary value of environmental contamination by radioactive substances

  13. Hydrologic transport of radionuclides from low-level waste burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the virgin site and of the disturbed site after burial drastically affect the transport of radionuclides from buried waste. The disturbance of the land surface during the waste burial operation causes changes in the local ground-water regimen. These changes can increase the water table elevation and cause the occurrence of perched water in burial trenches. The combination of these changes may lead to submersion of the waste and to increased radionuclide transport from the burial site in both surface and groundwater. Factors such as ion exchange can retard or in some cases, with competing ions, can also mobilize radionuclides and increase their discharge into ground and surface water. Because of complexing agents (organics) contained in the waste, increased mobility of some radionuclides can be expected. The chemical form of radionuclides in the water, the ground-water quality, and the chemistry of the geologic formation in which the waste is buried all influence the movement of radionuclides in the hydrologic system. For the assessment of the environmental impact of low-level waste burial, models capable of simulating both the chemical and the physical factors that affect hydrologic transport must be available. Several models for conducting such simulation are presently available. However, the input parameters used in these models are highly variable; and the accuracy of parameter measurement must be considered in evaluating the reliability of simulated results

  14. Removal of dissolved heavy metals and radionuclides by microbial spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revis, N.W.; Hadden, C.T.; Edenborn, H.

    1997-01-01

    Microbial systems have been shown to remove specific heavy metals from contaminated aqueous waste to levels acceptable to EPA for environmental release. However, systems capable of removing a variety of heavy metals from aqueous waste to environmentally acceptable levels remain to be reported. The present studies were performed to determine the specificity of spores of the bacterium Bacillus megaterium for the adsorption of dissolved metals and radionuclides from aqueous waste. The spores effectively adsorbed eight heavy metals from a prepared metal mix and from a plating rinse waste to EPA acceptable levels for waste water. These results suggest that spores have multiple binding sites for the adsorption of heavy metals. Spores were also effective in adsorbing the radionuclides 85 strontium and 197 cesium. The presence of multiple sites in spores for the adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides makes this biosorbent a good candidate for the treatment of aqueous wastes associated with the plating and nuclear industries. 17 refs., 4 tabs

  15. Radionuclide studies in patients with neurological and psychiatric complications of systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, P.; Krajka-Lauer, J.; Koseda-Dragan, M.; Lyczak, P.; Stepien, E.

    1998-01-01

    The psychiatric and neurological complications are present in a major part of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). When biochemical and immunological assessment of those patients is currently satisfactory , diagnostic imaging of central nervous system is met with difficulties. The paper overviews the psychiatric and neurological complications of SLE, pathological changes in CNS and the diagnostic imaging of CNS in SLE. The paper underlines an important role of radionuclide studies in the diagnostic algorithm in this group of patients facing the unsatisfactory sensitivity and specificity of computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Regional cerebral blood flow imaging using simple photon computed tomography and cerebral glucose metabolism using positron emission tomography may play the crucial role both in assessment of present CNS involvement and for the follow-up in the course of therapy. (author)

  16. Environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.

    1982-01-01

    The environmental behaviour of the radionuclides making the major contribution to man's irradiation through diet is described. The following stages are emphasized: transfer of radionuclides to plants; transfer of radionuclides to animals; metabolism of inhaled or ingested radionuclides in animals providing food for man; transfer of radionuclides through the aquatic environment; application of food chain models. (43 references)

  17. Radioactivity: radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.E.; Baratta, E.J.; Jelinek, C.F.

    1977-01-01

    The results are summarized of the analysis for strontium-90, cesium-137, iodine-131, ruthenium-106, and potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, in samples of total diet and selected import commodities in the foods compliance program of the Food and Drug Administration. On the basis of the radionuclide intake guidelines established by the Federal Radiation Council (FRC), the low content of radionuclides found in the total diet samples for fiscal years 1973 and 1974 demonstrates the need for surveillance only at the present level. The low levels of radionuclides found in a limited number of edible imported commodities indicate that their contribution to the total diet would not increase the levels of these radionuclides above those recommended for only periodic surveillance by the FRC. The potassium levels, determined from potassium-40 activity, found in meats and fish agree with the value for normal muscle tissue for the reference man reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. Of the other commodities, nuts contained the highest levels, while sugar, beverages, and processed foods contained the lowest levels of potassium. Although cesium and potassium are chemical analogs with similar metabolic properties, because of their variable content in some leafy samples as a result of surface contamination, a correlation between cesium-137 levels and the cesium-137-to-potassium ratio was inconclusive

  18. Final Report (BMWi Project No.: 02 E 10971): Joint project: Retention of radionuclides relevant for final disposal in natural clay rock and saline systems - Subproject 2: Geochemical behavior and transport of radionuclides in saline systems in the prese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Fritsch, Katharina [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Lippold, Holger [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Poetsch, Maria [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Kulenkampff, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Jordan, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Joseph, Claudia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Cherkouk, Andrea [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Bader, Miriam [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2016-02-29

    The objective of this project was to study the influence of increased salinities on interaction processes in the system radionuclide – organics – clay – aquifer. For this, complexation, redox, sorption, and diffusion studies were performed under variation of the ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg-1) and the background electrolyte (NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2).

  19. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  20. CORP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Keiser, Stefanie; Robach, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In this Cores of Reproducibility in Physiology (CORP) article, we present the theory and practical aspects of the carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method for the determination of total hemoglobin mass in humans. With CO rebreathing, a small quantity of CO is diluted in O2 and rebreathed for a spe......In this Cores of Reproducibility in Physiology (CORP) article, we present the theory and practical aspects of the carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method for the determination of total hemoglobin mass in humans. With CO rebreathing, a small quantity of CO is diluted in O2 and rebreathed...

  1. Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, G.; Du, Yong [Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals since the 1940s. The radionuclides originally used, including 131I and 32P, are still in use. The role of the physicist in radionuclide therapy encompasses radiation protection, imaging and dosimetry. Radiation protection is of particular importance given the high activities of the unsealed sources that are often administered, and must take into account medical staff, comforters and carers, and, as patients are discharged while still retaining activity, members of the public. Regulations concerning acceptable levels of exposure vary from country to country. If the administered radiopharmaceutical is a γ emitter, then imaging can be performed which may be either qualitative or quantitative. While a regular system of quality control must be in place to prevent misinterpretation of image data, qualitative imaging does not usually rely on the image corrections necessary to determine the absolute levels of activity that are localized in the patient. Accurate quantitative imaging is dependent on these corrections and can permit the distribution of absorbed doses delivered to the patient to be determined with sufficient accuracy to be clinically beneficial.

  2. Evaluation of Radionuclides Migration from RADON-Type Radioactive Waste Repository in Geosphere and Biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigaliuniene, D.; Poskas, P.

    2001-01-01

    Migration of radionuclides from hypothetical ISAM RADON-Type repository is analysed there. This is the first comprehensive analysis for such type repository. Generated four different system evolution and radionuclides migration scenarios cover a wide range of possible system states. Off-site scenarios as well as on-site scenarios consider radionuclide release from disposal facility and migration in geosphere and biosphere. Calculations are performed using computer code AMBER. According to the results, the highest dose is from two on-site scenarios (SCE1 erosion scenario and SCE3). The most important radionuclides in this case are 226 Ra with its decay products, 228 Ra, and 239 Pu. The doses from short-lived and mobile radionuclides arc insignificant for all on-site scenarios. The doses for the off-site scenarios are less than 0,1 mSv/y. Radon gases may cause the dose of about 1 mSv/y. The comparison of the results from this study and IAEA report for similar scenarios shows that the differences in most cases are less than one order of magnitude. (author)

  3. Modeling Radionuclide Decay Chain Migration Using HYDROGEOCHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. C.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear technology has been employed for energy production for several decades. Although people receive many benefits from nuclear energy, there are inevitably environmental pollutions as well as human health threats posed by the radioactive materials releases from nuclear waste disposed in geological repositories or accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. Theoretical studies have been undertaken to understand the transport of radionuclides in subsurface environments because that the radionuclide transport in groundwater is one of the main pathway in exposure scenarios for the intake of radionuclides. The radionuclide transport in groundwater can be predicted using analytical solution as well as numerical models. In this study, we simulate the transport of the radionuclide decay chain using HYDROGEOCHEM. The simulated results are verified against the analytical solution available in the literature. Excellent agreements between the numerical simulation and the analytical are observed for a wide spectrum of concentration. HYDROGECHEM is a useful tool assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  4. Aspects of uranium/thorium series disequilibrium applications to radionuclide migration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.

    1989-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider the contribution which the uranium/thorium series disequilibrium concept can make to understanding the retardation and transport of radionuclides in the far-field of a radioactive waste repository. In principle, naturally occurring isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium can be regarded as geochemical analogues of the divalent radionuclides and multivalent actinides expected to be present in the radioactive waste inventory. The study of their retardation and/or transport in real rock/water systems which have taken place over geological timescales, can make an important contribution to establishing a rational basis for long-term predictive modelling of radionuclide transport required for safety assessments. (author)

  5. Radionuclide transport in the repository near-field and far-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V.-M.; Smith, P.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a background report of the TURVA-2012 safety case report 'Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios for the Repository System'. This report gives a comprehensive account of the modelling of radionuclide release from a defective canister and the subsequent migration to the surface groundwater system. The focus of this report is in the radionuclide migration both in the repository near-field and in the repository far-field. Radionuclide releases from the canister and migration through the repository near-field and far-field have also been analysed in the probabilistic sensitivity analysis based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. Those simulations are discussed in a separate report by Cormenzana. Calculation cases are derived from three different types of scenarios: (i) The base scenario that assumes a single initially defective canister located in a cautiously selected canister position, i.e. selecting the failed canister location such that radionuclide release and transport properties are conservative compared to the statistics over all canister locations. Migration processes and parameter values follow the most likely lines of evolution. Repository safety functions are assumed to perform according to the design basis. Calculation cases defined in the Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios report are also supplemented by additional calculation cases that are aimed to study variability between different DFN realisations (additional BS-ALL cases), longitudinal dispersion (BS-RC-ld cases) and alternative realisations of the transport classes along the release paths (BS-RC-tc cases), (ii) Variant scenarios that study declined performance of the repository safety functions. These include enhanced corrosion failure and degradation of the buffer under variant geochemical conditions (iii) Disturbance scenarios that analyse influences of unlikely events on the radionuclide release and migration. Analysis of the variant and disturbance scenarios

  6. Radionuclide metrology: traceability and response to a radiological accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauhata, L.; Cruz, P.A.L. da; Silva, C.J. da; Delgado, J.U.; Oliveira, A.E. de; Oliveira, E.M. de; Poledna, R.; Loureiro, J. dos S.; Ferreira Filho, A.L.; Silva, R.L. da; Filho, O. L.T.; Santos, A.R.L. dos; Veras, E.V. de; Rangel, J. de A.; Quadros, A.L.L.; Araújo, M.T.F. de; Souza, P.S. de; Ruzzarim, A.; Conceição, D.A. da; Iwahara, A., E-mail: palcruz@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes

    2017-07-01

    In the case of a radiological accident, there are characteristic phases: discovery and initial assistance with first aid; the triage and monitoring of the affected population; the release of the affected people; forward the victims to medical care; as well as the preparation of the report on the accident. In addition, studies and associated researches performed in the later period. Monitors, dosimeters and measuring systems should be calibrated by contaminating radionuclide standards. The radioactive sources used must be metrologically reliable. In Brazil, this function is performed by LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, designated by INMETRO, which Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory is responsible for the standardization and supply of radioactive sources in diverse geometries and matrices. This laboratory has a stock of radionuclide solutions with controlled environmental variables for the preparation of sources, which are calibrated and standardized by mean of primary and secondary systems. It is also responsible for the dissemination of standards and, in order to establish the metrological traceability of national standards, participates in international key-comparisons promoted by BIPM and regional metrology organizations. Internally, it promotes the National Comparison Programs for laboratories for the analysis of environmental samples and the traceability for producing centers of radiopharmaceuticals and Nuclear Medicine Services in the country. The paper presents the demand for {sup 137}Cs related to the radioactive accident in Goiania/Brazil and the significant results for the main radionuclides standardized by the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory for international key-comparisons and national comparisons to provide metrological traceability. With the obtained results, the LNMRI of Brazil integrates the international metrology BIPM network and fulfills its function of supplying, with about a hundred of radioactive standards, the country's needs in different applications

  7. Radionuclide metrology: traceability and response to a radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauhata, L.; Cruz, P.A.L. da; Silva, C.J. da; Delgado, J.U.; Oliveira, A.E. de; Oliveira, E.M. de; Poledna, R.; Loureiro, J. dos S.; Ferreira Filho, A.L.; Silva, R.L. da; Filho, O. L.T.; Santos, A.R.L. dos; Veras, E.V. de; Rangel, J. de A.; Quadros, A.L.L.; Araújo, M.T.F. de; Souza, P.S. de; Ruzzarim, A.; Conceição, D.A. da; Iwahara, A.

    2017-01-01

    In the case of a radiological accident, there are characteristic phases: discovery and initial assistance with first aid; the triage and monitoring of the affected population; the release of the affected people; forward the victims to medical care; as well as the preparation of the report on the accident. In addition, studies and associated researches performed in the later period. Monitors, dosimeters and measuring systems should be calibrated by contaminating radionuclide standards. The radioactive sources used must be metrologically reliable. In Brazil, this function is performed by LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, designated by INMETRO, which Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory is responsible for the standardization and supply of radioactive sources in diverse geometries and matrices. This laboratory has a stock of radionuclide solutions with controlled environmental variables for the preparation of sources, which are calibrated and standardized by mean of primary and secondary systems. It is also responsible for the dissemination of standards and, in order to establish the metrological traceability of national standards, participates in international key-comparisons promoted by BIPM and regional metrology organizations. Internally, it promotes the National Comparison Programs for laboratories for the analysis of environmental samples and the traceability for producing centers of radiopharmaceuticals and Nuclear Medicine Services in the country. The paper presents the demand for 137 Cs related to the radioactive accident in Goiania/Brazil and the significant results for the main radionuclides standardized by the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory for international key-comparisons and national comparisons to provide metrological traceability. With the obtained results, the LNMRI of Brazil integrates the international metrology BIPM network and fulfills its function of supplying, with about a hundred of radioactive standards, the country's needs in different applications

  8. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

    1984-09-12

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  9. FTRANS, Radionuclide Flow in Groundwater and Fractured Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.; Golis, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: FTRANS (Fractured flow and Transport of Radionuclides) is a two-dimensional finite-element code designed to simulate ground-water flow and transport of radioactive nuclides in a fractured porous return medium. FTRANS takes into account fluid interactions between the fractures and porous matrix blocks, advective-dispersive transport in the fractures and diffusion in the porous matrix blocks, and chain reactions of radionuclide components. It has the capability to model the fractured system using either the dual-porosity or the discrete- fracture modeling approach or a combination of both. FTRANS can be used to perform two-dimensional near-field or far-field predictive analyses of ground-water flow and to perform risk assessments of radionuclide transport from nuclear waste repository subsystems to the biosphere. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Although FTRANS does cannot account for deformation processes which can affect the flow capacity and velocity field

  10. Design of environment monitoring system to evaluate radionuclide release from subsystem on PWR nuclear power accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro; Sugiyanto; Pande Made Udiyani; Jupiter Sitorus Pane

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plan (NPP) as a renewable energy source is selected as an alternative, because it has many advantages that is environmentally friendly, fuel supply which is independent of the season, and the price that can compete with other power plants. However, the existence of some public skepticism about nuclear radiation safety, the government must be convinced about the operation of nuclear power plants are safe and secure. Research on the design of environment monitoring system for evaluation of radionuclide release from the reactor subsystems and the environment due to accidents at power reactors has been done. The study was conducted by calculating the distribution of radionuclide release into the reactor subsystem and the environment and also to build the environment radiation monitoring system. Environmental monitoring system consists of a radiation counter, early warning systems, meteorological measurement systems, GPS systems and GIS. Radiation monitoring system used to record the data of radiation, meteorological measurement system used to record data of wind and speed direction, while the GPS system is used to determine position of data measurements. The data is then transmitted to a data acquisition system and then to be transmitted to the control center. Collection and transmission of data is done via SMS formatting using a modem device that is placed in the control center. The control center receives measurement data from various places. In this case the control center has a function as an SMS Gateway. This system can visualize for different measurement locations. Furthermore, radiation data and position data to be integrated with digital maps. System integration is then visualized in a personal computer. To position of measurements directly visualized on the map and also look for the data displayed on a monitor as a red or green circle colour. That colour indicated as a safe limit of radiation monitor. When the cycle colour is red, the system will

  11. A simplified radionuclide source term for total-system performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.L.

    1991-11-01

    A parametric model for releases of radionuclides from spent-nuclear-fuel containers in a waste repository is presented. The model is appropriate for use in preliminary total-system performance assessments of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; for this reason it is simpler than the models used for detailed studies of waste-package performance. Terms are included for releases from the spent fuel pellets, from the pellet/cladding gap and the grain boundaries within the fuel pellets, from the cladding of the fuel rods, and from the radioactive fuel-assembly parts. Multiple barriers are considered, including the waste container, the fuel-rod cladding, the thermal ''dry-out'', and the waste form itself. The basic formulas for release from a single fuel rod or container are extended to formulas for expected releases for the whole repository by using analytic expressions for probability distributions of some important parameters. 39 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Decomissioning of nuclear reactors - methods for calculation of radionuclide inventories in contaminated BWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, K.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study has been to develop and demonstrate calculation models for the prediction of radionuclide inventories in contaminated systems in the Nordic BWRs at the time of decommissioning. Oskarshamn 2 was selected as reference reactor for the study. The study is divided in radionuclide inventories of activated corrosion products, and inventories of fission products and actinides from leaking fuel. The study is restricted to contamination outside the reactor pressure vessel. Inventories of activated corrosion products on primary system surfaces were predicted with the ABB Atom computer code BKM-CRUD. The calculations were performed for an extended operation time up to year 2010 for the nuclides Co60, Co58, Zn65 and Mn54. A special set of calculations were also made covering the non-standard nuclides Fe55, Ni59, No63 and Mo93. ABB Atom has carried out a comprehensive program on shutdown dose rates and activity measurements in delivered BWRs. The resulting data base have been used in the study to derive conversion factors for evaluation of contamination levels in secondary systems from the BKM-CRUD results for primary systems. Fission products and actinides were treated by defining two different fuel leakage scenarios. The first one corresponds to a rather stable situation, with an average leakage rate of 1 'standard pin hole' (i.e. 2 MBq/s Xe133). The second scenario means more severe fuel leakage every 10 years (200 MBq/s Xe133). The radioactive inventories in different part of the plant were calculated by combining the surface areas with the calculated contamination levels in the different systems. The uncertainty in total activity inventory has been estimated to not exceed a factor of 2. The uncertainty in total activity inventory has been to not exceed a factor of 2. The estimated inventories in this study has been compared to the results from other studies, and a reasonable agreement was achieved

  13. Speciation of radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunten, H.R. von; Benes, P.

    1994-02-01

    Methods for the determination of the speciation of radionuclides in aerosols, in aquatic solutions, in sediments, soils and rocks are reviewed. At present, most of the results about speciation are deduced from model calculations, model experiments, and separation of species (forms) of radionuclides, e.g., by sequential extraction procedures. Methods of direct determination of speciation of radionuclides (e.g. by laser induced spectroscopy) are in general not yet sensitive enough for a measurement of the very low concentrations of radionuclides in the environment. The methodological part of this paper is followed by a review of the very abundant literature about speciation of important radionuclides in the environment, i.e. in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. The review does not include the biosphere. Literature up to spring 1993 is included (with a few more recent additions). (author)

  14. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide migration have been studied in natural fissures orieted parallel to the axis of granite drill cores. A short pulse of the radionuclides solution was injected at one end of the fissure and the temporal change in radionuclide concentration of the eluate measured. After several hundred fissure volumes water had been pumped through the fissure following the radionuclide pulse the activity distribution on the fissure surfaces was measured. From the retardation of 152 Eu, 235 Np and 237 Pu it is concluded that these radionuclides are transported in the oxidation states Eu(III), Pu(IV) and Np(V). The distribution coefficients K sub (d) calculated from flow and activity distribution data on the basis of geometric surface area/volume ratios are of the same order as published K sub (d) values obtained from batch equilibrium experiments. (Author)

  15. Scatter and crosstalk corrections for 99mTc/123I dual-radionuclide imaging using a CZT SPECT system with pinhole collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Peng; Hutton, Brian F.; Holstensson, Maria; Ljungberg, Michael; Hendrik Pretorius, P.; Prasad, Rameshwar; Liu, Chi; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Thorn, Stephanie L.; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The energy spectrum for a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has a low energy tail due to incomplete charge collection and intercrystal scattering. Due to these solid-state detector effects, scatter would be overestimated if the conventional triple-energy window (TEW) method is used for scatter and crosstalk corrections in CZT-based imaging systems. The objective of this work is to develop a scatter and crosstalk correction method for 99m Tc/ 123 I dual-radionuclide imaging for a CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT system with pinhole collimators (GE Discovery NM 530c/570c). Methods: A tailing model was developed to account for the low energy tail effects of the CZT detector. The parameters of the model were obtained using 99m Tc and 123 I point source measurements. A scatter model was defined to characterize the relationship between down-scatter and self-scatter projections. The parameters for this model were obtained from Monte Carlo simulation using SIMIND. The tailing and scatter models were further incorporated into a projection count model, and the primary and self-scatter projections of each radionuclide were determined with a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) iterative estimation approach. The extracted scatter and crosstalk projections were then incorporated into MLEM image reconstruction as an additive term in forward projection to obtain scatter- and crosstalk-corrected images. The proposed method was validated using Monte Carlo simulation, line source experiment, anthropomorphic torso phantom studies, and patient studies. The performance of the proposed method was also compared to that obtained with the conventional TEW method. Results: Monte Carlo simulations and line source experiment demonstrated that the TEW method overestimated scatter while their proposed method provided more accurate scatter estimation by considering the low energy tail effect. In the phantom study, improved defect contrasts were observed with both

  16. Behaviors and chemical forms of radionuclides in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yoshihide

    1981-01-01

    Although the radionuclides introduced into the marine environment from various sources and routes are finally distributed among the components of the marine ecosystem, the residence time is one of the most useful measures of the reactivity of an element in the oceanic chemical system. Heavy metals such as Mn, Fe, Co and Zn which have shorter residence times, reveal more complicated behaviours in relation to marine radioecological interest than alkaline earth element such as Sr which has a longer residence time. The possible physico-chemical forms of radionuclides in the oceans are usually classified into three categories, that is, species in true solution, colloidal species, and particulate forms. The modeling to study the dispersion of radionuclides introduced into the marine environment can be approached with the aid of the knowledge of behaviors of their stable counterparts in seawater. The different physico-chemical forms between stable and radioactive nuclides in seawater may cause different biological concentration of the element. To realize the chemical speciation of radionuclides in the marine environment, it is also important in thermodynamical calculation to consider heterogeneous interfaces where cause raising the concentration of reactants in seawater, especially in the coastal waters. In the discussion on the primary factors that can affect the elemental distribution in the marine environment, primary productivity and bacterial activity are emphasized for the transformation of physicochemical states of radionuclides in the marine environment. Finally, the radioecological differences between radiocobalt in organic complexed and ionic forms were demonstrated in the experiments on the uptake and elimination of radiocobalt by mussels. (J.P.N.)

  17. Radionuclide behavior in water saturated porous media: Diffusion and infiltration coupling of thermodynamically and kinetically controlled radionuclide water - mineral interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasennykh, M.Yu.; Apps, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    A model is developed describing one dimensional radionuclide transport in porous media coupled with locally reversible radionuclide water-mineral exchange reactions and radioactive decay. Problems are considered in which radionuclide transport by diffusion and infiltration processes occur in cases where radionuclide water-solid interaction are kinetically and thermodynamically controlled. The limits of Sr-90 and Cs-137 migration are calculated over a wide range of the problem variables (infiltration velocity, distribution coefficients, and rate constants of water-mineral radionuclide exchange reactions)

  18. A study on the radionuclide transport through fractured porous media based on the network resistance model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ki Ha

    2000-02-01

    Before the actual construction of radioactive waste repository, analysis of radionuclide transport is required to predict the radiological effect on public and environment. Many models have been developed to predict the realistic radionuclide transport through the repository. In this study, Network Resistance Model (NRM) that is similar to electrical circuit network is adopted to simulate the radionuclide transport. NRM assume the media of repository as the resistance of the radionuclide transport and describes the transport phenomena of radionuclide by connecting the resistance as network. NRM is easy to apply to describe complex system and take less calculation time compared to the other model. The object of this study is to develop the fast, simple and efficient calculation method to simulate the radionuclide with the newly adopted concept using network resistance. New system configuration specially focused on rock edge region is introduced by dividing the rock matrix. By dividing the rock edge from the main rock matrix region, the rock edge region is more carefully analyzed and compared. Rock edge region can accelerate radionuclide transport due to the reducing effect on the total resistivity of rock matrix. Therefore, increased radioactive dose is expected when we apply NRM methodology in the performance assessment of the repository. Result of the performance assessment can be more conservative and reliable. NRM can be applied to other system configuration and for more complex pathways. NRM is simple to us e and easy to modify than any other modeling method

  19. A vector Wiener filter for dual-radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Links, J.M.; Prince, J.L.; Gupta, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    The routine use of a single radionuclide for patient imaging in nuclear medicine can be complemented by studies employing two tracers to examine two different processes in a single organ, most frequently by simultaneous imaging of both radionuclides in two different energy windows. In addition, simultaneous transmission/emission imaging with dual-radionuclides has been described, with one radionuclide used for the transmission study and a second for the emission study. There is thus currently considerable interest in dual-radionuclide imaging. A major problem with all dual-radionuclide imaging is the crosstalk between the two radionuclides. Such crosstalk frequently occurs, because scattered radiation from the higher energy radionuclide is detected in the lower energy window, and because the lower energy radionuclide may have higher energy emissions which are detected in the higher energy window. The authors have previously described the use of Fourier-based restoration filtering in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) to improve quantitative accuracy by designing a Wiener or other Fourier filter to partially restore the loss of contrast due to scatter and finite spatial resolution effects. The authors describe here the derivation and initial validation of an extension of such filtering for dual-radionuclide imaging that simultaneously (1) improves contrast in each radionuclide's direct image, (2) reduces image noise, and (3) reduces the crosstalk contribution from the other radionuclide. This filter is based on a vector version of the Wiener filter, which is shown to be superior [in the minimum mean square error (MMSE) sense] to the sequential application of separate crosstalk and restoration filters

  20. Radionuclide distributions in phytocenoses elements of the Chernobyl' NPP 30-km zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, I.S.; Mishenkov, N.N.; Arkhipov, N.P.

    1989-01-01

    In order to estimate the radioecological situation in phytocenoses of the 30-km zone consisting in the main of conifer and conifer-foliage forests, the studies, which give, an opportunity to divide the pine forests into five zones according to degrees of radiation injury character revealing, are made. These zones are characterized by total death, strong injury, intermediate injury, weak injury and stimulation. Radionuclides redistribution in the system including wood fier, forest litter and soil, their accumulation in organs and elements if each cenosis component are studied. The characteristics of experimental sections are given. The data on radionuclide distributions in soil profile of forest tracts, radionuclide concentrations in pine organs, radionuclide contents in mushrooms (conifers), contamination distribution (%) in pines under different levels of soil contamination are given. 6 tabs

  1. Evaluation of obstructive uropathy in children: radionuclide renography vs. the Whitaker test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senac, M.O. Jr.; Miller, J.H.; Stanley, P.

    1984-01-01

    Differentiation of obstructed from dilated, nonobstructed urinary systems in the postoperative child is a difficult diagnostic problem. A comparison study was performed in 21 children with hydroureteronephrosis using the Whitaker test in combination with conventional radionuclide renography and/or diuretic (furosemide)-augmented radionuclide renography. The results of each method were corelated with the clinical assessment and surgical findings. Conventional renography was found to be an unreliable study, with a clinical correctness of only 57%. Results were more favorable for both the Whitaker test and diurectic-augmented radionuclide renography, with clinical correctness in 86% and 85%, respectively. Due to the noninvasive nature of the study, diuretic-augmented radionuclide renography should be the initial procedure once hydroureteronephrosis is established. A recommended algorithm of the child with postoperative hydroureteronephrosis is suggested

  2. Application of Monte Carlo simulation to the standardization of positron emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tongu, Margareth Lika Onishi

    2009-01-01

    Since 1967, the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory (LNM) at the Nuclear and Energy Research (IPEN) in Sao Paulo, Brazil, has developed radionuclide standardization methods and measurements of the Gamma-ray emission probabilities per decay by means of 4πβ-γ coincidence system, a high accuracy primary method for determining disintegration rate of radionuclides of interest. In 2001 the LNM started a research field on modeling, based on Monte Carlo method, of all the system components, including radiation detectors and radionuclide decay processes. This methodology allows the simulation of the detection process in a 4πβ-γ system, determining theoretically the observed activity as a function of the 4πβ detector efficiency, enabling the prediction of the behavior of the extrapolation curve and optimizing a detailed planning of the experiment before starting the measurements. One of the objectives of the present work is the improvement of the 4π proportional counter modeling, presenting a detailed description of the source holder and radioactive source material, as well as absorbers placed around the source. The simulation of radiation transport through the detectors has been carried out using code MCNPX. The main focus of the present work is on Monte Carlo modeling of the standardization of positron emitting radionuclides associated (or not) with electron capture and accompanied (or not) by the emission of Gamma radiation. One difficulty in this modeling is to simulate the detection of the annihilation Gamma ray, which arise in the process of positron absorption within the 4π detector. The methodology was applied to radionuclides 18 F and 22 Na. (author)

  3. Hydrologic transport of radionuclides from low-level waste burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, J.O.

    1977-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the virgin site and of the disturbed site after burial drastically affect the transport of radionuclides from buried waste. The disturbance of the land surface during the waste burial operation causes changes in the local ground-water regimen. These changes can increase the water table elevation and cause the occurrence of perched water in burial trenches. The combination of these changes may lead to submersion of the waste and to increased radionuclide transport from the burial site in both surface and ground water. Factors such as ion exchange can retard or in some cases, with competing ions, can also mobilize radionuclides and increase their discharge into ground and surface water. Because of complexing agents (organics) contained in the waste, increased mobility of some radionuclides can be expected. The chemical form of radionuclides in the water, the ground-water quality, and the chemistry of the geologic formation in which the waste is buried all influence the movement of radionuclides in the hydrologic system. For the assessment of the environmental impact of low-level waste burial, models capable of simulating both the chemical and the physical factors that affect hydrologic transport must be available. Several models for conducting such simulation are presently available. However,the input parameters used in these models are highly variable, and the accuracy of parameter measurement must be considered in evaluating the reliability of simulated results

  4. Dosimetric model for antibody targeted radionuclide therapy of tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, W.T.; Barrett, A.

    1990-01-01

    Although encouraging results have been obtained using systemic radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of cancer, it is likely that regional applications may prove more effective. One such strategy is the treatment of central nervous system leukemia in children by intrathecal instillation of targeting or nontargeting beta particle emitting radionuclide carriers. The beta particle dosimetry of the spine is assessed, assuming that the spinal cord and the cerebrospinal fluid compartment can be adequately represented by a cylindrical annulus. The radionuclides investigated were 90 Y, 131 I, 67 Cu, and 199 Au. It is shown that the radiation dose to the cord can be significantly reduced using short range beta particle emitters and that there is little advantage in using targeting carriers with these radionuclides. 199 Au and 67 Cu also have the advantage of having a suitable gamma emission for imaging, permitting pretherapy imaging and dosimetric calculations to be undertaken prior to therapy. If these methods prove successful, it may be possible to replace the external beam component used in the treatment of central nervous system leukemia in children by intrathecal radionuclide therapy, thus reducing or avoiding side effects such as growth and intellectual impairment

  5. Testing of Models for Predicting the Behaviour of Radionuclides in Freshwater Systems and Coastal Areas. Report of the Aquatic Working Group of EMRAS Theme 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    During last decades a number of projects have been launched to validate models for predicting the behaviour of radioactive substances in the environment. Such projects took advantage from the great deal of experimental data gathered, following the accidental introduction of radionuclides into the environment (the accident at the Chernobyl power plant was the most obvious example), to assess the contamination levels of components of the ecosystem and of the human food chain. These projects stimulated intensive efforts for improving the reliability of the models aimed at predicting the migration of 137 Cs in lakes and of 137 Cs and 90 Sr in rivers. However, there are few examples of similar extensive model validation studies for other aquatic systems, such as coastal waters, or for other long lived radionuclides of potential radiological importance for freshwater systems. The validation of models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in the freshwater environment and coastal areas was the object of the EMRAS working group on testing of models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in freshwater systems and coastal areas. Five scenarios have been considered: (1) Wash-off of 90 Sr and 137 Cs deposits from the Pripyat floodplain (Ukraine). Modellers were asked to predict the time dependent water contamination of Pripyat River following the inundation of the river floodplain heavily contaminated following the Chernobyl accident. Available input data were the deposits of radionuclides in the floodplain, the time dependent contamination of water in the river entering the floodplain, the water fluxes and several other morphological, meteorological and hydrological data. Concentrations of radionuclides in the water of the River Prypiat down-stream of the floodplain were supplied to assess the performances of the models. (2) Radionuclide discharge from the Dnieper River (Ukraine) into its estuary in the Black Sea. Modellers were asked to predict the time

  6. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golian, C.; Lever, D.A.; Baker, A.J.; Connell, L.D.; Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.; Lindgreen, M.; Pers, K.; Skagius, K.; Murakami, T.; Ohnuki, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that 234 U is preferentially mobile relative to 238 U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater, thus leading to ( 234

  7. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Lever, D A; Baker, A J; Connell, L D [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Bennett, D G; Read, D [WS Atkins Science and Technology Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindgreen, M; Pers, K; Skagius, K [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Murakami, T; Ohnuki, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that {sup 234}U is preferentially mobile relative to {sup 238}U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater

  8. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Lever, D.A.; Baker, A.J.; Connell, L.D. [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Bennett, D.G.; Read, D. [WS Atkins Science and Technology Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindgreen, M.; Pers, K.; Skagius, K. [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Murakami, T.; Ohnuki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI (Japan)

    1992-12-31

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that {sup 234}U is preferentially mobile relative to {sup 238}U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater

  9. Transport and accumulation of radionuclides in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frissel, M.J.; Jakubick, A.T.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.

    1979-01-01

    The movement of radioactive isotopes through the water phase of soils is by far the most important. Most of the water-transported radioactive isotopes (radionuclides) occur via their dissolved salts, while the rest is carried by small soil particles to which the radionuclides are adsorbed. In the case of many chemicals, it is possible to calculate the movement or migration through soil from adsorption measurements made in the laboratory and from knowledge of the flow pattern of soil water. With increasing complexity of the chemical-soil-water system predictions become more uncertain. In the case of radionuclides the amounts expressed in units of weight are extremely small. This renders terms such as 'soluble' or 'insoluble' inapplicable. In these cases transport of 'radiocolloids' and adsorbed particles as 'insoluble' compounds may be more significant. For fallout strontium and cesium reliable predictive models have been developed. For fallout plutonium such models are under development. For calculations or predictions of the migration of radioactive material from deep soil layers to the soil surface fewer mathematical models are available. Many laboratory studies cannot yet be made due to lack of suitable soil samples from the sites under study. Nevertheless safety studies already carried out in a preliminary way are reliable, since factos such as adsorption of radionuclides on soils are neglected; consequently most safety studies overestimate possible risks. Further studies are required to ascertain how 'pessimistic' are the present safety criteriy. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Radionuclides in Canada goose eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickard, W.H.; Sweany, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    Low levels of radionuclides were measured in Canada goose eggs taken from deserted nests from Columbia River islands on the Energy Research and Development Administration's Hanford Reservation. Potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, was the most abundant radionuclide measured in egg contents and egg shell. Strontium-90 was incorporated into egg shells and cesium-137 into inner egg contents. Manganese-54, cobalt-60, and zinc-65 were more abundant in inner egg contents than in egg shell. Cerium-144 was detected in egg shell but not in inner shell

  11. Sensors and Automated Analyzers for Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.

    2003-01-01

    The production of nuclear weapons materials has generated large quantities of nuclear waste and significant environmental contamination. We have developed new, rapid, automated methods for determination of radionuclides using sequential injection methodologies to automate extraction chromatographic separations, with on-line flow-through scintillation counting for real time detection. This work has progressed in two main areas: radionuclide sensors for water monitoring and automated radiochemical analyzers for monitoring nuclear waste processing operations. Radionuclide sensors have been developed that collect and concentrate radionuclides in preconcentrating minicolumns with dual functionality: chemical selectivity for radionuclide capture and scintillation for signal output. These sensors can detect pertechnetate to below regulatory levels and have been engineered into a prototype for field testing. A fully automated process monitor has been developed for total technetium in nuclear waste streams. This instrument performs sample acidification, speciation adjustment, separation and detection in fifteen minutes or less

  12. The behaviour of long-lived redox sensitive radionuclides in soil-plant system during the process of climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semioshkina, N.; Staudt, C.; Kaiser, C. [Helmhotz Zetrum Muenchen (Germany); Proehl, G. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)); Noseck, U.; Fahrenholz, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit - GRS (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    One important aspect of climate changes for the long-term safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories is its impact on exposure pathways for humans in the future, which are dependent on the environmental characteristics mentioned. It is conceivable that effects or processes occurring during climate changes lead to an increased accumulation and/or release of radionuclides in the biosphere resulting in higher doses compared to that calculated for discrete climate states. In order to shed light on this question key processes are identified which might lead to such an increased accumulation and/or release of radionuclides. The transition from one climate to another can cause changes in the physicochemical composition of radionuclides: some of them may become more available for plant uptake and due to this, their activity concentration in the plants increases. Other radionuclides maybe stronger bound to soil and their activity concentration in plants decreases. Such changes might also cause remobilization of radionuclides from localised areas with contaminated sediments, their re-suspension and transfer to the surrounding areas. A suitable illustration of the processes related to the changes of the redox potential is the examination of a dry lake or fen bed for agricultural purposes as pasture or ameliorated pasture. In these cases the accumulation of radionuclides in the lake or fen sediment is followed by their release and increasing mobility after agricultural processing of the dry bed of lake or fen. Ploughing of the soil leads to increased supply of oxygen to previous anoxic soil layers causing an increase in redox potential. The presented model describes a scenario, where the land is initially very humid and very low Eh-values cause high sorption and accumulation of radionuclides in soil particles. Then this land is dried out, the redox potential increases and redox sensitive radionuclides change their speciation and their behaviour. Such processes might

  13. Reports of 5. International scientific-practical conference 'Heavy metals and radionuclides in the environment'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    To the collection, consisting of 3 chapters, are included more 185 reports of plenary and sectional meetings of the conference, reflecting biogeochemical problems of heavy metals and radionuclides, modeling of processes of their migration and accumulation in natural and anthropogenic landscapes; physiology-biochemical aspects of metabolism and the participation of heavy metals and radionuclides in ecology-tropic system; the sources of entering of heavy metals and radionuclides to the natural components, ecological regulation of their loadings and the organization of environment monitoring; new methods of defining of heavy metals and radionuclides in the natural objects; of top-soil and natural water polluted by heavy metals and radionuclides; bio indicational methods of evaluation the condition of natural and anthropogenic landscapes, the problems of heavy metals and radionuclides in the context of education of higher educational establishments. The materials are made for the specialists, who work in the sphere of protection of environment, biogeochemists, ecologists, hydro chemists, biologists, pedologists, scientists, teachers and students of educational institutions

  14. Radionuclide deposition control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for controlling the deposition, on to the surfaces of reactor components, of the radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from a liquid stream containing the radionuclides. The method consists of disposing a getter material (nickel) in the liquid stream, and a non-getter material (tantalum, tungsten or molybdenum) as a coating on the surfaces where deposition is not desired. The process is described with special reference to its use in the coolant circuit in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. (U.K.)

  15. Transportation of natural radionuclides and rare earth light elements in the lagoon system of Buena, RJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauria, Dejanira da Costa

    1999-03-01

    it was investigated the transport of the series natural radionuclides and the earth rare light elements in a coastal lagoon system, located in a monazite rich region, in the coast north region of Rio de Janeiro state. The lagoon water showed off abnormal concentrations of radium isotopes and of the earth rare light elements (ERLEs). The longitudinal gradient of the Ra, of the ERLEs and of the major ion concentration's, whose data were obtained during two and half years of the research at the place, and the statistical analysis pointed to two mainly source as responsible for the water lagoon composition - the marine and the underground waters. The underground water supplies the radionuclides and ERLEs, possibly originated by monazite lixiviation. Based on the water speciation modeling, the results of laboratory adsorption on sediment experiments and the sediment characterization, the behavior of the radio isotopes, the ERLEs, U, Th e Pb-210, along of the lagoon, are discussed. It is also discussed the role of the aquatic macrophyte Typha dominguesis Pers in the nuclide uptake and the following liberation. (author)

  16. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S.; Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R.

    1994-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., 60 Co and 106 Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters

  18. Integrated performance assessment model for waste package behavior and radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossik, R.; Miller, I.; Cunnane, M.

    1992-01-01

    Golder Associates Inc. (GAI) has developed a probabilistic total system performance assessment and strategy evaluation model (RIP) which can be applied in an iterative manner to evaluate repository site suitability and guide site characterization. This paper describes one component of the RIP software, the waste package behavior and radionuclide release model. The waste package component model considers waste package failure by various modes, matrix alteration/dissolution, and radionuclide mass transfer. Model parameters can be described as functions of local environmental conditions. The waste package component model is coupled to component models for far-field radionuclide transport and disruptive events. The model has recently been applied to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain

  19. Radionuclide speciation in the environment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.; Moulin, C.

    2001-01-01

    Speciation determination is of prime importance to explain and evaluate the mobility, the toxicity and the risk resulting from the presence of trace elements in natural systems, in particular in the case of radionuclides, in the framework of environment and waste management purposes. The present paper will then focus more specifically on the physico-chemical speciation of radionuclides, and more particularly of actinides, in the environment, with emphasis on the behavior in solution: from a chemical point of view (with important ligands including colloidal phases) using experimental data and speciation calculations, as well as from a more technical point of view (with analytical methods for in situ speciation determination and thermodynamic data determination). A review of recent papers (mainly from CEA) is presented. (orig.)

  20. Radionuclide transfer to fruit in the IAEA TRS No. 472

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giosuè S.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the approach taken to present the information on fruits in the IAEA report TRS No. 472, supported by the IAEA-TECDOC-1616, which describes the key transfer processes, concepts and conceptual models regarded as important for dose assessment, as well as relevant parameters for modelling radionuclide transfer in fruits. Information relate to fruit plants grown in agricultural ecosystems of temperate regions. The relative significance of each pathway after release of radionuclides depends upon the radionuclide, the kind of crop, the stage of plant development and the season at time of deposition. Fruit intended as a component of the human diet is borne by plants that are heterogeneous in habits, and morphological and physiological traits. Information on radionuclides in fruit systems has therefore been rationalised by characterising plants in three groups: woody trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. Parameter values have been collected from open literature, conference proceedings, institutional reports, books and international databases. Data on root uptake are reported as transfer factor values related to fresh weight, being consumption data for fruits usually given in fresh weight.

  1. Radionuclide transfer from soil to agricultural plants: measurements and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbarese, C; Terrasi, F.; D'Onofrio, A.D.; Stellato, L.; Lubritto, C.; Ermice, A.; Cotrufo, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    To assess the internal doses to humans from ingestion of radionuclides present in agricultural products it is necessary to know the main processes which determine the transport of radionuclides in the environment (Russel, 1966; Peterson, 1983; IAEA, 1995). The available data, generally, do not reflect natural conditions, and the mechanisms of translocation and mobility of radionuclides within the soil-plant system are still not fully understood (Coughtrey and Thorne, 1983; Fresquez et a., 1998; Krouglov et al., 1997; Frissel, 1992; Roca and Vallejo, 1995; Desmet et al., 1990). The knowledge of the contributions of direct contamination of plant fruits and of the process of root to fruit transfer can improve the understanding of exposure through ingestion and of the mechanisms determining sorption and translocation. Several studies on the relations among specific activities of various radionuclides in different environmental compartments have been performed in the last decades (Coughtrey and Thorne, 1983; Fresquez et al., 1998; Krouglov et al., 1997; Howard et al., 1995; Strand et al., 1994; Konshin, 1992; Frissel, 1992; Alexakhin and Korneev, 1992; Desmet et al., 1990)

  2. Ecological processes in the cycling of radionuclides within arctic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Worldwide fallout radionuclides in arctic ecosystems was investigated ecologically by circumpolar nations during 1959-80. Several of the radionuclides are isotopes of elements which currently contribute to arctic haze; they thus serve as effective tracers of biogeochemical processes. Investigations demonstrated the effective concentration of several radionuclides, particularly strontium-90 (an alkaline earth metal) and cesium-137 (a light alkali metal) which are chemical analogs of calcium and potassium, two very important stable elements in biotic systems. Transfer of 137 Cs through the lichen-cariboureindeer-man food chain characteristic of circumpolar nations, resulted in body burdens in Inuit that were 20 to 200 times greater than those in human populations of temperature latitudes. Radiation exposures from 90 Sr, 137 Cs and other natural and worldwide fallout radionuclides, were two to three times greater than for most other world populations. These results demonstrate the concentration capabilities of arctic ecosystems for several groups of chemical elements that have counterparts in arctic haze. These elements, therefore, provide the basis for considering the ecological implications of current situations

  3. MATADOR (Methods for the Analysis of Transport And Deposition Of Radionuclides) code description and User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avci, H.I.; Raghuram, S.; Baybutt, P.

    1985-04-01

    A new computer code called MATADOR (Methods for the Analysis of Transport And Deposition Of Radionuclides) has been developed to replace the CORRAL-2 computer code which was written for the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). This report is a User's Manual for MATADOR. MATADOR is intended for use in system risk studies to analyze radionuclide transport and deposition in reactor containments. The principal output of the code is information on the timing and magnitude of radionuclide releases to the environment as a result of severely degraded core accidents. MATADOR considers the transport of radionuclides through the containment and their removal by natural deposition and by engineered safety systems such as sprays. It is capable of analyzing the behavior of radionuclides existing either as vapors or aerosols in the containment. The code requires input data on the source terms into the containment, the geometry of the containment, and thermal-hydraulic conditions in the containment

  4. Mobility and Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurian, A.; Olufemi Phaneuf, M.; Mabit, L.

    2016-01-01

    It is crucial to understand the behavior of radionuclides in the environment, their potential mobility and bioavailability related to long-term persistence, radiological hazards, and impact on human health. Such key information is used to develop strategies that support policy decisions. The environmental behavior of radionuclides depends on ecosystem characteristics. A given soil’s capacity to immobilize radionuclides has been proved to be the main factor responsible for their resulting activity concentrations in plants. The mobility and bioavailability of radionuclides in soils is complex, depending on clay-sized soil fraction, clay mineralogy, organic matter, cation exchange capacity, pH and quantities of competing cations. Moreover, plant species have different behaviors regarding radionuclide absorption depending on soil and plan characteristics

  5. Radionuclides deposition over Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourchet, M.; Magand, O.; Frezzotti, M.; Ekaykin, A.; Winther, J.-G.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive map of the distribution patterns for both natural and artificial radionuclides over Antarctica has been established. This work integrates the results of several decades of international programs focusing on the analysis of natural and artificial radionuclides in snow and ice cores from this polar region. The mean value (37±20 Bq m -2 ) of 241 Pu total deposition over 28 stations is determined from the gamma emissions of its daughter 241 Am, presenting a long half-life (432.7 yrs). Detailed profiles and distributions of 241 Pu in ice cores make it possible to clearly distinguish between the atmospheric thermonuclear tests of the fifties and sixties. Strong relationships are also found between radionuclide data ( 137 Cs with respect to 241 Pu and 210 Pb with respect to 137 Cs), make it possible to estimate the total deposition or natural fluxes of these radionuclides. Total deposition of 137 Cs over Antarctica is estimated at 760 TBq, based on results from the 90-180 deg. East sector. Given the irregular distribution of sampling sites, more ice cores and snow samples must be analyzed in other sectors of Antarctica to check the validity of this figure

  6. Behaviour of long-lived radionuclides in soil-plant systems of the Mediterranean region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolakis, C.; Papanicolaou, E.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the project are the selection of regions in Greece with high degree of contamination and sampling of the main soil types - in various depths - and of the cultivated or indigenous plants grown on them; determination of the physicochemical parameters of the soil samples and the radionuclide concentration, especially of 137 Cs, in the soil and plant samples; greenhouse experimentation with selected soil types and main agricultural crops to establish uptake rates, and laboratory studies to investigate translocation of radionuclides within undisturbed soil columns; correlation of analytical and experimental data and calculation of transfer factors from soil to plants and various products. (R.P.) 12 refs

  7. TURVA-2012: Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Paul; Poteri, Antti; Nordman, Henrik; Cormenzana, Jose Luis; Snellman, Margit; Marcos, Nuria; Hjerpe, Thomas; Koskinen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and application for a construction licence for a repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site in south-western Finland. This paper gives a summary of the analyses of the radionuclide release scenarios formulated in a companion paper, TURVA-2012: Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios (Marcos, 2014). The scenarios and the analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in a further paper: TURVA-2012: Performance Assessment (Hellae, 2014). For each scenario, calculation cases are analysed to evaluate compliance of the proposed repository with regulatory requirements on radiological protection, as well as to illustrate the impact of specific uncertainties or combinations of uncertainties on the calculated results. Each case illustrates different possibilities for how the repository might evolve and perform over time, taking into account uncertainties in the models and parameter values used to represent radionuclide release, retention and transport and, for biosphere assessment calculation cases, radiation exposure. The calculation cases each address a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are considered: - The presence of an initial defect in the copper overpack of the canister that penetrates the overpack completely (subsequent corrosion of the insert may then lead to an enlargement of the defect). - Corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion. - Shear movements on fractures intersecting the deposition holes. However, the likelihood and consequences of more than one canister failure occurring during the assessment time fame are also considered, generally based on the findings from the single canister calculations. Quantitative

  8. Performance analysis of numeric solutions applied to biokinetics of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingatos, Danielle dos Santos; Bevilacqua, Joyce da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Biokinetics models for radionuclides applied to dosimetry problems are constantly reviewed by ICRP. The radionuclide trajectory could be represented by compartmental models, assuming constant transfer rates between compartments. A better understanding of physiological or biochemical phenomena, improve the comprehension of radionuclide behavior in the human body and, in general, more complex compartmental models are proposed, increasing the difficulty of obtaining the analytical solution for the system of first order differential equations. Even with constant transfer rates numerical solutions must be carefully implemented because of almost singular characteristic of the matrix of coefficients. In this work we compare numerical methods with different strategies for ICRP-78 models for Thorium-228 and Uranium-234. The impact of uncertainty in the parameters of the equations is also estimated for local and global truncation errors. (author)

  9. Idaho radionuclide exposure study: Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.G.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    Phosphate ores contain elevated levels of natural radioactivity, some of which is released to the environment during processing or use of solid byproducts. The effect of radionuclides from Idaho phosphate processing operations on the local communities has been the subject of much research and study. The literature is reviewed in this report. Two primary radionuclide pathways to the environment have been studied in detail: (1) airborne release of volatile radionuclides, primarily 210 Po, from calciner stacks at the two elemental phosphorus plants; and (2) use of byproduct slag as an aggregate for construction in Soda Springs and Pocatello. Despite the research, there is still no clear understanding of the population dose from radionuclide emissions, effluents, and solid wastes from phosphate processing plants. Two other potential radionuclide pathways to the environment have been identified: radon exhalation from phosphogypsum and ore piles and contamination of surface and ground waters. Recommendations on further study needed to develop a data base for a complete risk assssment are given in the report

  10. Cosmogenic radionuclides. Theory and applications in the terrestrial and space environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, Juerg; Steiger, Rudolf von; McCracken, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. The book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any field of modern science, and how these tools may assist in the solution of many present and future problems that we face here on Earth. The book provides a comprehensive discussion of the basic principles behind the applications of cosmogenic (and other) radionuclides as environmental tracers and dating tools. The second section of the book discusses in some detail the production of radionuclides by cosmic radiation, their transport and distribution in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, their storage in natural archives, and how they are measured. The third section of the book presents a number of examples selected to illustrate typical tracer and dating applications in a number of different spheres (atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, biosphere, solar physics and astronomy). At the same time the authors have outlined the limitations of the use of cosmogenic radionuclides. Written on a level understandable by graduate students without specialist skills in physics or mathematics, the book addresses a wide audience, ranging from archaeology, biophysics, and geophysics, to atmospheric physics, hydrology, astrophysics and space science.

  11. Cosmogenic radionuclides. Theory and applications in the terrestrial and space environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Juerg [Eidgenoessische Anstalt fuer Wasserversorgung, Abwasserreinigung und Gewaesserschutz, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Steiger, Rudolf von [International Space Science Insitute, Bern (Switzerland); McCracken, Ken [Maryland Univ., College Park (United States). IPST

    2012-07-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. The book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any field of modern science, and how these tools may assist in the solution of many present and future problems that we face here on Earth. The book provides a comprehensive discussion of the basic principles behind the applications of cosmogenic (and other) radionuclides as environmental tracers and dating tools. The second section of the book discusses in some detail the production of radionuclides by cosmic radiation, their transport and distribution in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, their storage in natural archives, and how they are measured. The third section of the book presents a number of examples selected to illustrate typical tracer and dating applications in a number of different spheres (atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, biosphere, solar physics and astronomy). At the same time the authors have outlined the limitations of the use of cosmogenic radionuclides. Written on a level understandable by graduate students without specialist skills in physics or mathematics, the book addresses a wide audience, ranging from archaeology, biophysics, and geophysics, to atmospheric physics, hydrology, astrophysics and space science.

  12. Some parameters of radionuclide kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokof'ev, O.N.; Smirnov, V.A.; Belen'kij, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical values of the rates of radionuclide absorption into, and elimination from, bovine organs were determined. Kinetic rate constants of radionuclides such as 89 Sr, 99 Mo, 131 I, 132 Tl, and 140 Be were calculated. The calculations were done for muscle, liver, and kidney

  13. Radionuclide - Soil Organic Matter Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between soil organic matter, i.e. humic and fulvic acids, and radionuclides of primary interest to shallow land burial of low activity solid waste have been reviewed and to some extent studied experimentally. The radionuclides considered in the present study comprise cesium, strontium...

  14. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide migration has been studied in natural fissures running parallel to the axes of granitic drill cores. A short pulse of radionuclide solution was injected at one end of the fissure and the temporal change in radionuclide concentration of the eluate measured. At the end of each experiment the fissure was opened and the radionuclide distribution on the fissure surfaces measured. The retardation of 241 Am(III) at pH 8.2 as well as the variation in 235 Np(V) retardation with pH are found to be in good agreement with K d-values obtained in batch experiments. The reduction of (TcO - 4 ) to Tc(IV) leads as expected to increasing retardation.(author)

  15. Radionuclide migration in water reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionova, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    Toxicity degree and radiation effect of different radionuclides depend on multiple factors, whose interaction can strengthen or weaken the effects through the mechanism of nuclide accumulation by hydrobiontes. Stage of development of an aquatic organism, its age, mass and sex as well as lifetime and residence time of the organism in the given medium are of importance. The radionuclide build up depends on illumination, locale of the bioobject residence, on the residence nature. The concentration of radionuclides in aquatic organisms and bionts survival depend on a season, temperature of the residence medium, as well as salinity and mineral composition of water influence

  16. Assessment of function of the cardiovascular system in arterial hypertension using radionuclide methods of investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, N.M.; Babayan, A.S.; Mikaehlyan, R.S.; Mnatsakyan, Eh.L.

    1986-01-01

    Proceeding from a study of the nature of changes in hemodynamics during development of hypertensive disease (HD) at its different stages it was shown that hemodynamic changes in 42.1% of the patients with Stage 1-2A HD were of hypertensive type, in the patients with Stage 2B-3 HD normal and hypokinetic types of the blood circulation prevailed. After bicycle ergometry exercise the reactivity of the cardiovascular system was revealed more completely. The most complete information on function of the cardiovascular system and myocardial contractility can be obtained with the help of radioangiocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. However in the absence of a gamma-chamber radiocardiography can provide necessary information on function of the cardiovascular system in case it is used in one and the same patient over time using bicycle ergometry testing

  17. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, store d, and potentially emitted . These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989a). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2012, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]) . These minor sources include d about 140 stack sources and no diffuse sources . T here were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley Lab operations . Emissions from minor sources were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building- specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA -approved computer code s, CAP88-PC and COMPLY , to calculate doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) at any offsite point where there is a residence, school, business, or office. Because radionuclides are used at three noncontiguous locations (the main site, Berkeley West Bio center, and Joint BioEnergy Institute), three different MEIs were identified.

  18. Biomedical applications of radionuclide generators with equal decay constants for parent and daughter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to an article by Spencer and Hosain (Int. J. Appl. Radiat. Isotopes; 27:57 (1976)) on the theoretical aspects of radionuclide generator systems in which the parent and daughter nuclides have equal decay constants in which it was suggested that 'it would be possible to use an appropriate chemical compound of a parent and introduce it in a biological system to study the behaviour of the daughter element'. It is here pointed out that this suggestion assumes that in any biological system the daughter radionuclide produced by the decay of the parent nuclide in vivo will readily enter the general 'metabolic' pool of the daughter element. However studies are cited which have shown that virtually all the daughter radionuclide in many such systems remain within the skeleton and thus it is asserted that the assumption that a daughter radionuclide produced by the decay of a parent nuclide in vivo provides a true tracer for the behaviour of the daughter element is not generally valid, and considerable caution would have to be used in the interpretation of results obtained by this type of study. In a reply, the original authors say that the point made is germane but that the concept was well known to them and hence the use of the expression 'an appropriate chemical compound of a parent...' in their original paper. (U.K.)

  19. Basic studies on the estimation of the capacitance of human pulmonary 'venous' system using radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Hideki; Gotoh, Kohshi; Suzuki, Takahiko; Ohsumi, Yukio; Yagi, Yasuo; Hirakawa, Senri

    1993-01-01

    To establish the methodology to assess the capacitance of human pulmonary 'venous' system, using radionuclide angiocardiography and passive leg elevation, some basic aspects of the method were investigated. The pulmonary 'venous' system consisted of pulmonary veins and the left atrium. A short segment of the volume-pressure curve in human pulmonary 'venous' system was obtained as a line connecting the 2 points. (1) Pulmonary 'venous' volume-mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure plot (P 'V' V-PCW plot) in supine position, where P 'V' V=0.7 x PBV. Pulmonary blood volume (PBV) was obtained by radionuclide angiocardiography, while mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCW) was simultaneously recorded by a floating catheter. (2) ΔP 'V' V-ΔPCW relation where ΔP 'V' V=0.8 x ΔPBV. Increment of the pulmonary blood volume (ΔPBV) during passive elevation of legs was measured from the baseline PBV and the percentage increase in the radioactivity over the right anterior chest during the leg elevation, after correction for (a) radioactivity from chest wall origin, and for (b) attenuation of the radioactive beams by the lung and the anterior chest wall. ΔPCW was the increase in PCW during leg elevation. The present study focussed on the details of the two corrections, (a) and (b), using, in parts, mechanical models. The present study also focussed on the reproducibility of the ΔP 'V' V, ΔPCW and Cp'v' (compliance of the pulmonary 'venous' system). The coefficient of variation was ±23% in ΔP 'V' V, ±18% in ΔPCW and ±18% in Cp'v', indicating a fair degree of reproducibility. (author)

  20. Radionuclide identification using subtractive clustering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Marcos Santana; Mourelle, Luiza de Macedo

    2011-01-01

    Radionuclide identification is crucial to planning protective measures in emergency situations. This paper presents the application of a method for a classification system of radioactive elements with a fast and efficient response. To achieve this goal is proposed the application of subtractive clustering algorithm. The proposed application can be implemented in reconfigurable hardware, a flexible medium to implement digital hardware circuits. (author)

  1. Geochemical effects on the behavior of LLW radionuclides in soil/groundwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, K.M.; Sterne, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Assessing the migration potential of radionuclides leached from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and decommissioning sites necessitates information on the effects of sorption and precipitation on the concentrations of dissolved radionuclides. Such an assessment requires that the geochemical processes of aqueous speciation, complexation, oxidation/reduction, and ion exchange be taken into account. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing technical support to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for defining the solubility and sorption behavior of radionuclides in soil/ground-water environments associated with engineered cementitious LLW disposal systems and decommissioning sites. Geochemical modeling is being used to predict solubility limits for radionuclides under geochemical conditions associated with these environments. The solubility limits are being used as maximum concentration limits in performance assessment calculations describing the release of contaminants from waste sources. Available data were compiled regarding the sorption potential of radionuclides onto {open_quotes}fresh{close_quotes} cement/concrete where the expected pH of the cement pore waters will equal to or exceed 10. Based on information gleaned from the literature, a list of preferred minimum distribution coefficients (Kd`s) was developed for these radionuclides. The K{sub d} values are specific to the chemical environments associated with the evolution of the compositions of cement/concrete pore waters.

  2. Sensitivity analysis and uncertainties simulation of the migration of radionuclide in the system of geological disposal-CRP-GEORC model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Rui; Wang Ju; Chen Weiming; Zong Zihua; Zhao Honggang

    2008-01-01

    CRP-GEORC concept model is an artificial system of geological disposal for High-Level radioactive waste. Sensitivity analysis and uncertainties simulation of the migration of radionuclide Se-79 and I-129 in the far field of this system by using GoldSim Code have been conducted. It can be seen from the simulation results that variables used to describe the geological features and characterization of groundwater flow are sensitive variables of whole geological disposal system. The uncertainties of parameters have remarkable influence on the simulation results. (authors)

  3. Natural decay series radionuclide studies at the Needle's Eye natural analogue site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, A.B.; Scott, R.D.; Houston, C.M.; Hooker, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report covers work on a natural radioactive geochemical system and has been carried out with the aim of improving confidence in using predictive models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. It is one of a series being produced and is concerned with the U/Th decay series characterization of the hydrothermal mineral veins and the movement of these radionuclides into post-glacial flood plain deposits

  4. MOIRA: a computerised decision support system for the management of radionuclide contaminated freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, Eduardo; Brittain, John E.; Hakanson, Lars; Heling, Rudie; Hofman, Dmitry; Monte, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    The radiation dose resulting from contamination of freshwater ecosystems due to the release of radioactive substances into the environment may be reduced by applying suitable countermeasures. Despite their benefits, intervention strategies may have detrimental effects of economic, ecological and social nature. Thus, it is of paramount importance to assess, by objective criteria, the global cost-benefit balance of different options. The MOIRA project (A MOdel based computerised system for management support to Identify optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems) has developed a user-friendly, computerised tool that will allow decision makers to choose optimal intervention strategies for freshwater ecosystems with different contamination scenarios. The aim of the paper is to briefly describe the main components of the MOIRA system and to demonstrate its application using real case based scenarios. (author)

  5. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  6. Water, soil, crops and radionuclides. Studies on the behavior of radionuclides in the terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    In order to predict the migration of artificially-produced radionuclides into a human body and its radiation dose rates of human body and to decrease the exposed radiation doses of human body, the behavior of radionuclides in the environment must be elucidated. In National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), the environmental radioecological research group of Nakaminato Laboratory for Marine Radioecology has progressed the survey and research on the behavior of artificially-produced radionuclides in the terrestrial environment. This article describes the research results (the radioactivity of water, soil, and crops) made so far at Nakaminato Laboratory for Marine Radioecology. (M.H.)

  7. Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silviera, D.J.

    1981-03-01

    This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references.

  8. Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silviera, D.J.

    1981-03-01

    This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references

  9. Abscess detection with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide studies may aid in the diagnosis and localization of intra-abdominal infections. Despite the introduction of new radiographic and ultrasound methods, there are several clinical situations in which radionuclide scans have proved useful. Those include detection of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, evaluation of liver abscess, differentiation between pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess, evaluation of fever of unknown origin, and evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease. Each clinical situation is discussed separately here

  10. Natural and Synthetic Barriers to Immobilize Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, W.

    2011-01-01

    The experiments of weathering of glass waste form and the reacted sediments with simulated glass leachates show that radionuclide sequestration can be significantly enhanced by promoting the formation of secondary precipitates. In addition, synthetic phosphate-bearing nanoporous material exhibits high stability at temperature and has a very high K d value for U(VI) removal. Both natural and synthetic barrier materials can be used as additional efficient adsorbents for retarding transport of radionuclides for various contaminated waste streams and waste forms present at U. S. Department of Energy clean-up sites and the proposed geologic radioactive waste disposal facility. In the radioactive waste repository facility, natural or synthetic materials are planned to be used as a barrier material to immobilize and retard radionuclide release. The getter material can be used to selectively scavenge the radionuclide of interest from a liquid waste stream and subsequently incorporate the loaded getters in a cementitious or various monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides from monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides from monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides form monolithic waste forms by being emplaced as a backfill barrier material around the wastes or waste form to minimize the potential around the wastes or waste form to minimize the potential hazard of leached radioactive wastes. The barrier material should be highly efficient to sequester radionuclides and possess physical and chemical stability for long-term exposure to severe weathering conditions. Because potential leaching of radionuclides depends on various environmental and weathering conditions of the near-field repository, the barrier materials must be durable and not disintegrate under a range of moisture, temperature, pressure, radiation, Eh, ph. and

  11. Arsenic and radionuclide occurrence and relation to geochemistry in groundwater of the Gulf Coast Aquifer System in Houston, Texas, 2007–11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Jeannette H.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2016-03-21

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Houston, began a study in 2007 to determine concentrations, spatial extent, and associated geochemical conditions that might be conducive for mobility and transport of selected naturally occurring trace elements and radionuclides in the Gulf Coast aquifer system in Houston, Texas. Water samples were collected from 91 municipal supply wells completed in the Evangeline and Chicot aquifers of the Gulf Coast aquifer system in northeastern, northwestern, and southwestern Houston; hereinafter referred to as northeast, northwest and southwest Houston areas. Wells were sampled in three phases: (1) 28 municipal supply wells were sampled during 2007–8, (2) 60 municipal supply wells during 2010, and (3) 3 municipal supply wells during December 2011. During each phase of sampling, samples were analyzed for major ions, selected trace elements, and radionuclides. At a subset of wells, concentrations of arsenic species and other radionuclides (carbon-14, radium-226, radium-228, radon-222, and tritium) also were analyzed. Selected physicochemical properties were measured in the field at the time each sample was collected, and oxidation-reduction potential and unfiltered sulfides also were measured at selected wells. The source-water (the raw, ambient water withdrawn from municipal supply wells prior to water treatment) samples were collected for assessment of aquifer conditions in order to provide community water-system operators information that could be important when they make decisions about which treatment processes to apply before distributing finished drinking water.

  12. Radionuclide therapy: regional and systemic routes of administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1991-01-01

    The optimal sequencing and integration of radiopharmaceutical therapy with respect to the multiple and competing therapeutic modalities is examined. It is estimated that the central goal of therapeutic nuclear medicine is to increase radiopharmaceutical delivery to tumour targets while sparing sensitive normal tissues. Among the factors to be considered in the choice of therapeutic radionuclides are: the decay mode, gamma-ray yield, half-lives and chemical reactivity. Several routes of administration are discussed and a number of manipulations which may be used to further improve radioparmaceutical delivery are outlined. The difficulty to perform accurate radiation dosimetry is also briefly examined. 14 refs., 1 tab

  13. Radionuclide release calculations for SAR-08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, Gavin; Miller, Alex; Smith, Graham; Jackson, Duncan

    2008-04-01

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the post-closure safety assessment of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate waste (L/ILW), SAFE, the SKB has prepared an updated assessment called SAR-08. This report describes the radionuclide release calculations that have been undertaken as part of SAR-08. The information, assumptions and data used in the calculations are reported and the results are presented. The calculations address issues raised in the regulatory review, but also take account of new information including revised inventory data. The scenarios considered include the main case of expected behaviour of the system, with variants; low probability releases, and so-called residual scenarios. Apart from these scenario uncertainties, data uncertainties have been examined using a probabilistic approach. Calculations have been made using the AMBER software. This allows all the component features of the assessment model to be included in one place. AMBER has been previously used to reproduce results the corresponding calculations in the SAFE assessment. It is also used in demonstration of the IAEA's near surface disposal assessment methodology ISAM and has been subject to very substantial verification tests and has been used in verifying other assessment codes. Results are presented as a function of time for the release of radionuclides from the near field, and then from the far field into the biosphere. Radiological impacts of the releases are reported elsewhere. Consideration is given to each radionuclide and to each component part of the repository. The releases from the entire repository are also presented. The peak releases rates are, for most scenarios, due to organic C-14. Other radionuclides which contribute to peak release rates include inorganic C-14, Ni-59 and Ni-63. (author)

  14. Radionuclide release calculations for SAR-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Gavin; Miller, Alex; Smith, Graham; Jackson, Duncan (Enviros Consulting Ltd, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom))

    2008-04-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the post-closure safety assessment of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate waste (L/ILW), SAFE, the SKB has prepared an updated assessment called SAR-08. This report describes the radionuclide release calculations that have been undertaken as part of SAR-08. The information, assumptions and data used in the calculations are reported and the results are presented. The calculations address issues raised in the regulatory review, but also take account of new information including revised inventory data. The scenarios considered include the main case of expected behaviour of the system, with variants; low probability releases, and so-called residual scenarios. Apart from these scenario uncertainties, data uncertainties have been examined using a probabilistic approach. Calculations have been made using the AMBER software. This allows all the component features of the assessment model to be included in one place. AMBER has been previously used to reproduce results the corresponding calculations in the SAFE assessment. It is also used in demonstration of the IAEA's near surface disposal assessment methodology ISAM and has been subject to very substantial verification tests and has been used in verifying other assessment codes. Results are presented as a function of time for the release of radionuclides from the near field, and then from the far field into the biosphere. Radiological impacts of the releases are reported elsewhere. Consideration is given to each radionuclide and to each component part of the repository. The releases from the entire repository are also presented. The peak releases rates are, for most scenarios, due to organic C-14. Other radionuclides which contribute to peak release rates include inorganic C-14, Ni-59 and Ni-63. (author)

  15. Phytoremediation of soils contaminated with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Isamu

    2004-01-01

    Aiming at efficient phytoremediation of soils contaminated with radionuclides, we examined the effect of soil microbes on the uptake ability of plants using the multitracer technique to find that tomato rhizofungi in Fusarium spp. can stimulate the uptake of 85 Sr and 137 Cs by the plants. The synergic effect of a nonpathogenic strain of F. oxysporum on the uptake of radionuclides by plants proved to be enhanced by introducing a phytochelatin synthase gene into the fungus. Since soil contamination by radionuclides is still an unsolved problem in many parts of the world. Studies on phytoremediation of polluted soil environment will be important for developing effective strategies and devising adequate techniques to reduce human risks caused by food contamination of radionuclides. (author)

  16. Short-lived radionuclide production capability at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mausner, L.F.; Richards, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Linac Isotope Producer is the first facility to demonstrate the capability of a large linear accelerator for efficient and economical production of difficult-to-make, medically useful radionuclides. The linac provides a beam of 200-MeV protons at an integrated beam current of up to 60 μA. The 200-MeV proton energy is very suitable for isotope production because the spallation process can create radionuclides unavailable at lower energy accelerators or reactors. Several medically important short-lived radionuclides are presently being prepared for on-site and off-site collaborative research programs. These are iodine-123, iron-52, manganese-52m, ruthenium-97, and the rubidium-81-krypton-81m system. The production parameters for these are summarized

  17. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This volume serves as an introduction to the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. This report includes discussions of radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha-emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than five years). Each report includes information regarding radiological and chemical characteristics of specific radionuclides. Information is also included discussing waste streams and waste forms that may contain each radionuclide, and radionuclide behavior in the environment and in the human body. Not all radionuclides commonly found at low-level radioactive waste sites are included in this report. The discussion in this volume explains the rationale of the radionuclide selection process

  18. Radionuclide transport behavior in a generic geological radioactive waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Marco; Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens T

    2015-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport to study the influence of several factors, including the ambient hydraulic gradient, groundwater pressure anomalies, and the properties of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ), on the prevailing transport mechanism (i.e., advection or molecular diffusion) in a generic nuclear waste repository within a clay-rich geological formation. By comparing simulation results, we show that the EDZ plays a major role as a preferential flowpath for radionuclide transport. When the EDZ is not taken into account, transport is dominated by molecular diffusion in almost the totality of the simulated domain, and transport velocity is about 40% slower. Modeling results also show that a reduction in hydraulic gradient leads to a greater predominance of diffusive transport, slowing down radionuclide transport by about 30% with respect to a scenario assuming a unit gradient. In addition, inward flow caused by negative pressure anomalies in the clay-rich formation further reduces transport velocity, enhancing the ability of the geological barrier to contain the radioactive waste. On the other hand, local high gradients associated with positive pressure anomalies can speed up radionuclide transport with respect to steady-state flow systems having the same regional hydraulic gradients. Transport behavior was also found to be sensitive to both geometrical and hydrogeological parameters of the EDZ. Results from this work can provide useful knowledge toward correctly assessing the post-closure safety of a geological disposal system. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  19. A new statistical method for transfer coefficient calculations in the framework of the general multiple-compartment model of transport for radionuclides in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, F; Arruda-Neto, J D; Manso, M V; Helene, O M; Vanin, V R; Rodriguez, O; Mesa, J; Likhachev, V P; Filho, J W; Deppman, A; Perez, G; Guzman, F; de Camargo, S P

    1999-10-01

    A new and simple statistical procedure (STATFLUX) for the calculation of transfer coefficients of radionuclide transport to animals and plants is proposed. The method is based on the general multiple-compartment model, which uses a system of linear equations involving geometrical volume considerations. By using experimentally available curves of radionuclide concentrations versus time, for each animal compartment (organs), flow parameters were estimated by employing a least-squares procedure, whose consistency is tested. Some numerical results are presented in order to compare the STATFLUX transfer coefficients with those from other works and experimental data.

  20. A new statistical method for transfer coefficient calculations in the framework of the general multiple-compartment model of transport for radionuclides in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, F.; Manso, M.V.; Rodriguez, O.; Mesa, J.; Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.; Helene, O.M.; Vanin, V.R.; Likhachev, V.P.; Pereira Filho, J.W.; Deppman, A.; Perez, G.; Guzman, F.; Camargo, S.P. de

    1999-01-01

    A new and simple statistical procedure (STATFLUX) for the calculation of transfer coefficients of radionuclide transport to animals and plants is proposed. The method is based on the general multiple-compartment model, which uses a system of linear equations involving geometrical volume considerations. By using experimentally available curves of radionuclide concentrations versus time, for each animal compartment (organs), flow parameters were estimated by employing a least-squares procedure, whose consistency is tested. Some numerical results are presented in order to compare the STATFLUX transfer coefficients with those from other works and experimental data. (author)

  1. Simulation of radionuclide chemistry and sorption characteristics in the geosphere by artificial intelligence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shangjyh; National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu; Wang Shigang; Ho Liwei

    1988-01-01

    An expert system operated in a personal computer is employed to simulate chemistry and sorption phenomena of radionuclides in the geosphere. The system handles both qualitative and quantitative analyses primarily for the actinides and fission products. The system also incorporates data bases of several groundwater and rock types with mineral and chemical compositions, the distribution coefficients of nuclides for minerals, etc. The decision rule base facilitates this system to carry out the reasoning procedures to predict the solubility-limiting phase, solute species, oxidation states and possible complex formations of radionuclides, as well as to calculate the distribution coefficients and retardation factors in a geological formation, provided that the essential groundwater and host rock information are available. It is concluded that this device of artificial intelligence provides a vehicle to accumulate developed human knowledge and serves as a tool not only for simulating the complicated radionuclide behaviour in the geosphere, but also for instructional or educational purpose in this field. (orig.)

  2. A field-deployable, aircraft-mounted sensor for the environmental survey of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepel, E.A.; Geelhood, B.D.; Hensley, W.K.; Quam, W.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Radionuclide Sensor System (ERSS) 3 is an extremely sensitive sensor, which has been cooperatively developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) for environmental surveys of radionuclides. The ERSS sensors fit in an airborne pod and include twenty High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors for the high-resolution measurement of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, twenty-four 3 He detectors for possible neutron measurements, and two video cameras for visual correlation. These aerial HPGe sensors provide much better gamma-ray energy resolution than can be obtained with NaI(Tl) detectors. The associated electronics fit into three racks. The system can be powered by the 28 V DC electrical supply of typical aircraft or 120 V AC. The data acquisition hardware is controlled by customized software and a real-time display is provided. Each gamma-ray event is time stamped and stored for later analysis. This paper will present the physical design, discuss the software used to control the system, and provide some examples of its use. (author)

  3. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  4. Carbon dioxide narcosis due to inappropriate oxygen delivery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herren, Thomas; Achermann, Eva; Hegi, Thomas; Reber, Adrian; Stäubli, Max

    2017-07-28

    Oxygen delivery to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be challenging because of their potential hypoxic ventilatory drive. However, some oxygen delivery systems such as non-rebreathing face masks with an oxygen reservoir bag require high oxygen flow for adequate oxygenation and to avoid carbon dioxide rebreathing. A 72-year-old Caucasian man with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was admitted to the emergency department because of worsening dyspnea and an oxygen saturation of 81% measured by pulse oximetry. Oxygen was administered using a non-rebreathing mask with an oxygen reservoir bag attached. For fear of removing the hypoxic stimulus to respiration the oxygen flow was inappropriately limited to 4L/minute. The patient developed carbon dioxide narcosis and had to be intubated and mechanically ventilated. Non-rebreathing masks with oxygen reservoir bags must be fed with an oxygen flow exceeding the patient's minute ventilation (>6-10 L/minute.). If not, the amount of oxygen delivered will be too small to effectively increase the arterial oxygen saturation. Moreover, the risk of carbon dioxide rebreathing dramatically increases if the flow of oxygen to a non-rebreathing mask is lower than the minute ventilation, especially in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and low tidal volumes. Non-rebreathing masks (with oxygen reservoir bags) must be used cautiously by experienced medical staff and with an appropriately high oxygen flow of 10-15 L/minute. Nevertheless, arterial blood gases must be analyzed regularly for early detection of a rise in partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a hypoxic ventilatory drive. These patients are more safely managed using a nasal cannula with an oxygen flow of 1-2L/minute or a simple face mask with an oxygen flow of 5L/minute.

  5. Remediation of radionuclide pollutants through biosorption - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nilanjana [Environmental Biotechnology Division, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore (India)

    2012-01-15

    The development of nuclear science and technology has led to the increase of nuclear wastes containing radionuclides to be released and disposed in the environment. Pollution caused by radionuclides is a serious problem throughout the world. To solve the problem, substantial research efforts have been directed worldwide to adopt sustainable technologies for the treatment of radionuclide containing wastes. Biosorption represents a technological innovation as well as a cost effective excellent remediation technology for cleaning up radionuclides from aqueous environment. A variety of biomaterials viz. algae, fungi, bacteria, plant biomass, etc. have been reported for radionuclide remediation with encouraging results. This paper reviews the achievements and current status of radionuclide remediation through biosorption which will provide insights into this research frontier. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Comparison of the effectiveness of high flow nasal oxygen cannula vs. standard non-rebreather oxygen face mask in post-extubation intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotfain, Evgeni; Zlotnik, Alexander; Schwartz, Andrei; Frenkel, Amit; Koyfman, Leonid; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Klein, Moti

    2014-11-01

    Optimal oxygen supply is the cornerstone of the management of critically ill patients after extubation, especially in patients at high risk for extubation failure. In recent years, high flow oxygen system devices have offered an appropriate alternative to standard oxygen therapy devices such as conventional face masks and nasal prongs. To assess the clinical effects of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) compared with standard oxygen face masks in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients after extubation. We retrospectively analyzed 67 consecutive ventilated critical care patients in the ICU over a period of 1 year. The patients were allocated to two treatment groups: HFNC (34 patients, group 1) and non-rebreathing oxygen face mask (NRB) (33 patients, group 2). Vital respiratory and hemodynamic parameters were assessed prior to extubation and 6 hours after extubation. The primary clinical outcomes measured were improvement in oxygenation, ventilation-free days, re-intubation, ICU length of stay, and mortality. The two groups demonstrated similar hemodynamic patterns before and after extubation. The respiratory rate was slightly elevated in both groups after extubation with no differences observed between groups. There were no statistically significant clinical differences in PaCO2. However, the use of HFNC resulted in improved PaO2/FiO2 post-extubation (P < 0.05). There were more ventilator-free days in the HFNC group (P< 0.05) and fewer patients required reintubation (1 vs. 6). There were no differences in ICU length of stay or mortality. This study demonstrated better oxygenation for patients treated with HFNC compared with NRB after extubation. HFNC may be more effective than standard oxygen supply devices for oxygenation in the post-extubation period.

  7. Radionuclide injury to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Sanders, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequently observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. 88 references

  8. Influence of fracture networks on radionuclide transport from solidified waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetharam, S.C., E-mail: suresh.seetharam@sckcen.be [Performance Assessments Unit, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Perko, J.; Jacques, D. [Performance Assessments Unit, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Mallants, D. [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road – Gate 4, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    investigated system, radionuclide properties and the imposed water flow boundary conditions, results demonstrate that: (i) magnitude of peak radionuclide fluxes is less sensitive to the fracture network geometry, (ii) timing of the peak radionuclide fluxes is possibly sensitive to the fracture networks, (iii) a uniform flow model represents a limiting case of a porous medium with large number of fine fractures, (iv) the effect of fracture width on the radionuclide flux depends on the ratio of fracture to matrix conductivity and is less sensitive if the ratio is large and the width is higher than a certain critical size, and (v) increased dispersivity in fractured media influences the transport behaviour differently compared to non-fractured media; in particular, the behaviour depends on the nature of fracture network.

  9. Influence of fracture networks on radionuclide transport from solidified waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seetharam, S.C.; Perko, J.; Jacques, D.; Mallants, D.

    2014-01-01

    investigated system, radionuclide properties and the imposed water flow boundary conditions, results demonstrate that: (i) magnitude of peak radionuclide fluxes is less sensitive to the fracture network geometry, (ii) timing of the peak radionuclide fluxes is possibly sensitive to the fracture networks, (iii) a uniform flow model represents a limiting case of a porous medium with large number of fine fractures, (iv) the effect of fracture width on the radionuclide flux depends on the ratio of fracture to matrix conductivity and is less sensitive if the ratio is large and the width is higher than a certain critical size, and (v) increased dispersivity in fractured media influences the transport behaviour differently compared to non-fractured media; in particular, the behaviour depends on the nature of fracture network

  10. The vertical distribution of radionuclides in a Ribble Estuary saltmarsh: transport and deposition of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.E.; McDonald, P.; Parker, A.; Rae, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Routine discharges of low-level liquid radioactive waste by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) at Sellafield and Springfields have resulted in enhanced levels of radionuclides in sediments of the Ribble Estuary, NW England, UK. Variations in radionuclide concentrations ( 137 Cs, 230 Th, and 239240 Pu) with depth in a mature saltmarsh core were analysed in order to investigate historical discharge trends and waste-dispersal mechanisms. Core samples from Longton/Hutton Marsh were analysed by gamma-spectrometry and α-spectrometry for radionuclides and by laser granulometry to establish grain-size variations with depth. Distinct subsurface maxima were present for 137 Cs and 239240 Pu with activities as high as 4500 Bq kg -1 for 137 Cs and 600 Bq kg -1 for 239240 Pu. Thorium-230 exhibited complex activity profiles with depth, specific activities ranging between 200 and 2400 Bq kg -1 . The vertical distributions of Sellafield-derived radionuclides ( 137 Cs and 239240 Pu) in mature saltmarsh deposits reflect the time-integrated discharge pattern from Sellafield, implying a transport mechanism that has involved the mixing of sediment labelled with radioactivity from recent discharges and sediment labelled from historical discharge events before deposition. A mechanism involving the transport of contaminated silt therefore seems to dominate. The vertical distribution of Springfields-derived 230 Th in the same areas reflects the annual gross-α discharge pattern from BNFL Springfields. In contrast to the Sellafield-derived radionuclides, a fairly rapid transport mechanism from source to sink is implied, with little or no time for mixing with radionuclides discharged years earlier. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Thin-target excitation functions: a powerful tool for optimizing yield, radionuclidic purity and specific activity of cyclotron produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardi, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    loci of the maxima of Y(E,ΔE) curves are present in most cases. As a relevant conclusion, use of target thickness larger than the 'effective' value, is unsuitable from technological point of view, due to larger power density deposited by the beam in target material itself, instead of target cooling system. Finally, this set of Thick-Target Yields and maxima permits calculating the optimum irradiation conditions to produce radionuclides with higher as possible yield, radionuclidic purity and specific activity. In order to join the advantages of the accurate knowledge of thin-target excitation functions and cross-sections of radionuclide of interest and its radioisotopic impurities, very selective radiochemical separations were optimized to separate the radionuclide itself from the irradiated target without any addition of isotopic carrier. A large number of very high specific activity radionuclides for environmental, toxicological and biomedical research applications have been produced in No Carrier Added form, by medium energy proton, deuteron and alpha accelerating cyclotrons. Some practical examples of radionuclides produced recently are presented. (author)

  12. Remediation of Deep Vadose Zone Radionuclide and Metal Contamination: Status and Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresel, P. Evan; Truex, Michael J.; Cantrell, Keri

    2008-12-30

    This report documents the results of a PNNL literature review to report on the state of maturity of deep vadose zone remediation technologies for metal contaminants including some radionuclides. Its recommendations feed into decisionmakers need for scientific information and cost-effective in situ remediation technlogies needed under DOE's Environmental Management initiative Enhanced Remediation Methods: Scientific & Technical Basis for In Stu Treatment Systems for Metals and Radionuclides.

  13. What is the role of the bystander response in radionuclide therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren eBrady

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide therapy for cancer is undergoing a renaissance, with a wide range of radionuclide and clinical delivery systems currently under investigation. Dosimetry at the cellular and subcellular level is complex with inhomogeneity and incomplete targeting of all cells such that some tumour cells will receive little or no direct radiation energy. There is now sufficient preclinical evidence of a bystander response which can modulate the biology of these unirradiated cells with current research demonstrating both protective and inhibitory responses. Dependence upon fraction of irradiated cells has also been found has and the presence of functional gap junctions appears to be import for several bystander responses. The selection of either high or low LET radionuclides may be critical. While low LET radionuclides appear to have a bystander response proportional to dose, the dose-response from high LET radionuclides are more complex. In media transfer experiments a U shaped response curve has been demonstrated for high LET treatments. However this U shaped response has not been seen with co-culture experiments and its relevance remains uncertain. For high LET treatments there is a suggestion that dose rate effects may also be important with inhibitory effects noted with 125I labelling study and a stimulatory seen with 123I labelling in one study.

  14. Discharge of radionuclides in liquid effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggleby, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    One of the aims of the Radiation Health Committee of the National Health and Medical Research Council, through Council recommendations, is to achieve some degree of uniformity in State legislation applied to the public health aspects of radiation. In developing the recommendation on the discharge of radionuclides to sewerage systems the Committee made use of the comparatively new concept of the Annual Limit on Intake (ALI)

  15. Interpretation of biological-rate coefficients derived from radionuclide content, radionuclide concentration and specific activity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderploeg, H.A.; Booth, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Rigorous expressions are derived for the biological-rate coefficients (BRCs) determined from time-dependent measurements of three different dependent variables of radionuclide tracer experiments. These variables, which apply to a single organism, are radionuclide content, radionuclide concentration and specific activity. The BRCs derived from these variables have different mathematical expressions and, for high growth rates, their numerical values can be quite different. The precise mathematical expressions for the BRCs are presented here to aid modelers in selecting the correct parameters for their models and to aid experiments in interpreting their results. The usefulness of these three variables in quantifying elemental uptakes and losses by organisms is discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Research on sorption behavior of radionuclides under shallow land environment. Mechanism and standard methodologies for measurement of distribution coefficients of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Tadao; Takebe, Shinichi; Nagao, Seiya; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Komiya, Tomokazu; Hagiwara, Shigeru

    2001-01-01

    This study consists of two categories' research works. One is research on sorption mechanism of radionuclides with long half-life, which are Technetium-99, TRU elements and U series radionuclides, on soil and rocks, including a development of database of distribution coefficients of radionuclides. The database on the distribution coefficients of radionuclides with information about measurement conditions, such as shaking method, soil characteristics and solution composition, has been already opened to the public (JAERI-DATABASE 20001003). Another study is investigation on a standard methodology of the distribution coefficient of radionuclide on soils, rocks and engineering materials in Japan. (author)

  17. Radionuclides in the environment: Risks and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzerman, A.W.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental chemistry plays a critical role in the open-quotes nuclear ageclose quotes. It makes a vital contribution to understanding of the sources, fate and effects of radionuclides in the environment, both man-made and natural. Risk assessment of radionuclides in the environment relies heavily on the tools of environmental chemistry. On the other hand, radionuclides provide unique opportunities to exploit in environmental chemistry investigations due to their well-defined sources, traceability in environmental processes, analytical sensitivities, and open-quotes built-inclose quotes radioactive decay open-quotes clocksclose quotes. In some cases naturally present radionuclides are utilized, while in others tracers are deliberately added or have already been added by the nuclear fuel cycle or nuclear testing. Several examples in each of these categories are discussed to spotlight the current status of environmental chemistry and radionuclides in the environment as an example application

  18. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1992-01-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system use relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the code Electron Gamma Shower (EGS4). Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessel sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was or cross fire between blood vessels was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the doses to blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures

  19. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W.

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor cross fire between vessel was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the dose in blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Integrated performance assessment model for waste policy package behavior and radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossik, R.; Miller, I.; Cunnane, M.

    1992-01-01

    Golder Associates Inc. (GAI) has developed a probabilistic total system performance assessment and strategy evaluation model (RIP) which can be applied in an iterative manner to evaluate repository site suitability and guide site characterization. This paper describes one component of the RIP software, the waste package behavior and radionuclide release model. The waste package component model considers waste package failure by various modes, matrix alteration/dissolution, and radionuclide mass transfer. Model parameters can be described as functions of local environmental conditions. The waste package component model is coupled to component models for far-field radionuclide transport and disruptive events. The model has recently been applied to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain

  1. An international database of radionuclide concentration ratios for wildlife: development and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copplestone, D.; Beresford, N.A.; Brown, J.E.; Yankovich, T.

    2013-01-01

    A key element of most systems for assessing the impact of radionuclides on the environment is a means to estimate the transfer of radionuclides to organisms. To facilitate this, an international wildlife transfer database has been developed to provide an online, searchable compilation of transfer parameters in the form of equilibrium-based whole-organism to media concentration ratios. This paper describes the derivation of the wildlife transfer database, the key data sources it contains and highlights the applications for the data. -- Highlights: • An online database containing wildlife radionuclide transfer parameters is described. • Database underpins recent ICRP and IAEA data wildlife transfer compilations. • Database contains equilibrium based whole organism to media concentration ratios

  2. Radionuclide carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carrier is described. It comprises a modified anionic starch derivative with 0.1% to 1.5% by weight of a reducing agent and 1 to 20% by weight of anionic substituents

  3. Interactions of low-level, liquid radioactive wastes with soils. 1. Behavior of radionuclides in soil-waste systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.B.; Essington, E.H.; Polzer, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of radioactive wastes and soils vary over a wide range. Liquid radioactive waste entering the environment will eventually contact the soil or geological matrix; interactions will be determined by the chemical and physical nature of the liquid, as well as the soil matrix. We report here the results from an investigation of certain of those characteristics as they relate to retention of radionuclides by soils. Three fractions were demonstrated in the waste as filterable, soluble-sorbable, and soluble-nonsorbable; the physical nature of each fraction was demonstrated using autoradiographic techniques. Isotopes of plutonium and uranium and americium-241 in the soluble fraction of the waste were shown to have a negative charge as determined by ion exchange techniques. In the soil-waste systems, the net charge for those radionuclides was shown to change from predominantly negative to predominantly positive. Nevertheless, cesium-137 was shown to be predominantly positited by TVA and approved by NRC (formerly AEC) since June 1973. This report is based upon the revisions, approved through the end of this reporting period

  4. Chapter 13. Radionuclides in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter of textbook of radioecology for university students. In this chapter authors deal with problems connected with using of radionuclides in medicine. Methods of treatment with using of radionuclides are reviewed. Chapter consists of next parts: (1) Remotion of thyroid gland; (2) Treatment of cerebrally tumour in nuclear reactor; (3) Artificial heart

  5. Naturally occurring radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djujic, I.

    1995-01-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides are the major source of radiation exposure to humans. The principal way of natural radiation exposure is the inhalation of 222 Rn decay products (about 85% of the total). The remainder is equally divided between internally deposited radionuclides, cosmic and terrestrial sources. In the present study, the content of 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th and 238 U in representative food samples (milk, pork, beef, potatoes, wheat and corn flour) and samples of different food items that do not represent entire national production but provide interesting additional data for approximative calculation of naturally occurring radionuclide intake is presented. Daily weight of food eaten, participation of food groups, as well as daily intake by food of mentioned naturally occurring radionuclides in the Serbian diet was obtained on the base of house hold budget surveys. The result obtained for daily intake estimates in mBq for Serbian population are 78.1 ( 40 K), 38.2( 210 Pb), 52.3( 226 Ra), 2.0( 230 Th) and 12.5( 238 U). (author)

  6. Elimination of radionuclides and heavy metals from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarcik, I.; Cipakova, A.; Palagyl, S.

    1994-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of radionuclides and heavy metals, their vertical migration and gradual extraction from soils were studied. Tessier sequential extraction method was used for determination the physicochemical forms of radionuclides and heavy metals absorbed by root system of plants and leached into ground water. Fixed forms of heavy metals and radionuclides are prevailing in soils. As to artificial ( 90 Sr, 137 Cs) isotope ratio of fixed forms bound with soil components, it is higher for 137 Cs (black earth - 95%, sandy soil - 62%) as compared to 90 Sr. Mobilization procedures for elimination of unfavourable influence of these pollutants in soils were used. The bacteria Pseudomonas sp. and Micrococcus l. are applied for this purpose. At the same time the growing of technical plants (Linum usitatissimum L. and Brassica napus L. var.) was studied as a method for mobilizing the heavy metals and radionuclides from soils. Retardation influence of bacteria on 85 Sr was noticed after as much as 3 months. The sum of water-soluble and exchangeable fractions reached 60%. Values of Cs distribution proved that microorganisms or plants used had no appreciable influence on Cs-mobility. After 3 months the relative ratio of accessible fraction increased with about 5%. As to heavy metals, both bacteria and plant growing influenced their retardation. In the case of Cd, one month operation of microorganisms resulted in important increase of easily available Cd-ratio (about 25%) in soils. (author)

  7. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-01-01

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitored in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program. Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media

  8. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  9. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  10. Determination of natural occurring radionuclides concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajic, J.; Markovic, V.; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains certain concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from radioactive chains of uranium and thorium - 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, 208 Tl, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. Inhaling of tobacco smoke leads to internal exposure of man. In order to estimate absorbed dose of irradiation it is necessary to determine concentrations of radionuclides present in the tobacco leaves. In this paper specific activities of naturally occurring radionuclides were measured in tobacco samples from cigarettes which are used in Serbia. [sr

  11. Manual of bioassay procedures for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleskach, S.; Petkau, A.

    1986-06-01

    A monitoring program is described by which atomic radiation workers ar monitored for internal contamination with radionuclides in the workplace. The program involves analytical procedures for measuring alpha, beta and gamma activity in biological specimens, usually urine. Radionuclides are identified by their characteristic radiation using liquid scintillation counting, and alpha, beta and gamma spectrometry. Examples of calculating the minimum detectable activity for specific radionuclides are given and used to derive call-in-criteria in accordance with which the different groups of workers are monitored each month

  12. Application of Radionuclide Tracer Techniques in Research on Bio-Effects of Carbon Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ying; Ran Tiecheng; Li Qingnuan; Xu Jingying; Li Wenxin

    2010-01-01

    There are few effective means to detect and analyze nanomaterials, therefore, radionuclide labeling and tracing techniques play an important role in the studies of interaction between nanoparticles and living systems. This paper briefly summarizes the main results from the application of radionuclide tracer techniques in the studies of interaction between carbon nanoparticles (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and nano-carbon blacks) and animals and mammalian cells, cites the experimental information on absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of nanomaterials, and indicates the signification of these information in the drug development and bio-safety studies of nanomaterials. Based on the novel properties of carbon nanoparticles, the superiority of radionuclide tracer techniques over fluorescent labeling techniques is stressed. It is expected that the radionuclide tracer techniques have an increasing application prospect in the interdisciplinary fields of nanoscience and life science. (authors)

  13. Radionuclides in ground-level air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.

    1987-01-01

    In the air surveillance programme the concentrations of artificial radionuclides are monitored in the air close to the ground to obtain the necessary basic data for estimating the exposure of the Finnish population to fall-out radionuclides and also to detect atmospheric traces of radioactive materials caused by their use or production. Airborne dust is collected on filters with high-volume air samplers and the concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the air are evaluated. In the first quarter of 1986 only long-lived cesium, caused by earlier atmospheric nuclear explosions was detected. The concentrations of cesium were very low. In January and March a small amount of short-lived, fresh fission and activation products were also observed

  14. The ENSDF based radionuclide source for MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlizov, A.N.; Tryshyn, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    A utility for generating source code of the Source subroutine of MCNP (a general Monte Carlo NxParticle transport code) on the basis of ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) is described. The generated code performs statistical simulation of processes, accompanying radioactive decay of a chosen radionuclide through a specified decay branch, providing characteristics of emitted correlated particles on its output. At modeling the following processes are taken into account: emission of continuum energy electrons at beta - -decay to different exited levels of a daughter nucleus; annihilation photon emission accompanying beta + -decay; gamma-ray emission; emission of discrete energy electrons resulted from internal conversion process on atomic K- and L I,II,III -shells; K and LX-ray emission at single and double fluorescence, accompanying electron capture and internal conversion processes. Number of emitted particles, their types, energies and emission times are sampled according to characteristics of a decay scheme of a particular radionuclide as well as characteristics of atomic shells of mother and daughter nuclei. Angular correlations, calculated for a particular combination of nuclear level spins, mixing ratios and gamma-ray multipolarities, are taken into account at sampling of directional cosines of emitted gamma-rays. The paper contains examples of spectrometry system response simulation at measurements with real radionuclide sources. (authors)

  15. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237

  16. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  17. Measurements for modeling radionuclide transfer in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, B.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical methods for measuring radionuclides in the aquatic environment are discussed for samples of fresh water and seawater, fish and shellfish, biota such as algae, plankton, seaweed, and aquatic plants, and sediment. Consideration is given to radionuclide collection and concentration, sample preservation, radiochemical and instrumental analysis, and quality assurance. Major problems are the very low environmental levels of the radionuclides of interest, simultaneous occurrence of radionuclides in several chemical and physical forms and the numerous factors that affect radionuclide levels in and transfers among media. Some radionuclides of importance in liquid effluents from nuclear power stations are listed, and sources of radiochemical analytical methods are recommended

  18. Entrapment of Radionuclides in Nanoparticle Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the technical field of imaging compositions useful for diagnosing cancer and other diseases in a subject. In particular, the invention relates to a class of diagnostic compounds comprising a novel liposome composition with encapsulated metal entities such as r...... tissue and, in general, pathological conditions associated with leaky blood vessels. The present invention provides a new diagnostic tool for the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique.......The present invention is directed to the technical field of imaging compositions useful for diagnosing cancer and other diseases in a subject. In particular, the invention relates to a class of diagnostic compounds comprising a novel liposome composition with encapsulated metal entities...... such as radionuclides,for example 61Cu and 64Cu copper isotopes. The invention further relates to a novel method for loading delivery systems, such as liposome compositions, with metal entities such as radionuclides, and the use of liposomes for targeted diagnosis and treatment of a target site, such as cancerous...

  19. Statistical analysis of fallout radionuclides transfer to paddy-field rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Morisawa, S.; Inoue, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Radionuclides released from nuclear facilities to atmosphere are transported through various pathways in biosphere and cause human exposure. Among these radionuclides transfer pathways, an ingestion of crops containing radionuclides is one of the dominant pathway for human exposure. For the safety assessment of nuclear facilities, it is important to understand the behavior of radionuclides in agricultural environment and to describe them in a mathematical model. In this paper, a statistical model is proposed for estimating the concentration of fallout radionuclides in paddy-field rice, the staple food for Japanese people. For describing behavior of fallout radionuclides in a paddy-field, a dynamic model and a statistical model have been proposed respectively. The model used in this study has been developed assuming that the amount of radionuclides transfer to brown rice (hulled rice) or polished rice through direct deposition of airborne radionuclides (the direct deposition pathway) and root uptake from a paddy soil (the root uptake pathway) are proportional to the deposition flux of radionuclides and concentration of radionuclides in paddy soil respectively. That is, the model has two independent variables; the deposition flux of radionuclides and the concentration of radionuclides in the paddy soil, and has single dependent variable; the concentration of radionuclides in brown rice or polished rice. The regression analysis is applied by using environmental monitoring data. Then the distribution of radionuclides between rice-bran (skin part of rice crop) and polished rice (core part) through both the direct deposition pathway and the root uptake pathway are evaluated by the model. (author)

  20. Scatter and crosstalk corrections for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging using a CZT SPECT system with pinhole collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Peng [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hutton, Brian F. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Holstensson, Maria [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm 14186 (Sweden); Ljungberg, Michael [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Lund 222 41 (Sweden); Hendrik Pretorius, P. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Prasad, Rameshwar; Liu, Chi, E-mail: chi.liu@yale.edu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Thorn, Stephanie L.; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Yale Translational Research Imaging Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The energy spectrum for a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has a low energy tail due to incomplete charge collection and intercrystal scattering. Due to these solid-state detector effects, scatter would be overestimated if the conventional triple-energy window (TEW) method is used for scatter and crosstalk corrections in CZT-based imaging systems. The objective of this work is to develop a scatter and crosstalk correction method for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging for a CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT system with pinhole collimators (GE Discovery NM 530c/570c). Methods: A tailing model was developed to account for the low energy tail effects of the CZT detector. The parameters of the model were obtained using {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I point source measurements. A scatter model was defined to characterize the relationship between down-scatter and self-scatter projections. The parameters for this model were obtained from Monte Carlo simulation using SIMIND. The tailing and scatter models were further incorporated into a projection count model, and the primary and self-scatter projections of each radionuclide were determined with a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) iterative estimation approach. The extracted scatter and crosstalk projections were then incorporated into MLEM image reconstruction as an additive term in forward projection to obtain scatter- and crosstalk-corrected images. The proposed method was validated using Monte Carlo simulation, line source experiment, anthropomorphic torso phantom studies, and patient studies. The performance of the proposed method was also compared to that obtained with the conventional TEW method. Results: Monte Carlo simulations and line source experiment demonstrated that the TEW method overestimated scatter while their proposed method provided more accurate scatter estimation by considering the low energy tail effect. In the phantom study, improved defect contrasts were

  1. Accumulation of radionuclides by lichen symbionts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifontova, M G; Kulikov, N V [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehkologii Rastenij i Zhivotnykh

    1983-01-01

    The aim of investigation is the quantitative estimation of ability and role of separate symbionts in the accumulation of radionuclides. As investigation volumes, durably cultivated green lichen alga Trebouxia erici and lichen fungi extracted from Cladonia rangiferina, Parmelia caperata and Acarospora fuscata are used. The accumulation of radioactive isotopes with fungi and seaweeds is estimated according to accumulation coefficients (AC) which are the ratio of radiation concentration in plants and agarized medium. Radionuclide content (/sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs) is determined radiometrically. A special series of experiments is done to investigate radionuclide accumulation dependences with lichen seaweed and fungi on light conditions. It is shown that both symbionts of lichen-seaweed and fungus take part in the accumulation of radionuclide from outer medium (atmospheric fall-out and soil). However fungus component constituting the base of structural organization of thallus provides the greater part of radionuclides accumulated by the plant. Along with this the violation of viability of seaweed symbionts particularly in the case of light deficiency brings about the reduction of /sup 137/Cs sorption by seaweeds and tells on the total content of radiocesium in plant thallus.

  2. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  3. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersahin, Devrim, E-mail: devrimersahin@yahoo.com; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, 333 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2011-10-11

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  4. Radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains data on the levels of radionuclides in the UK foodchain. Most data derive from monitoring programmes that exist around nuclear sites, and in some cases date back to the 1960s. Some comparative data from site operator and government-run programmes are included. Data from monitoring undertaken after the Chernobyl accident are summarised. General monitoring of the foodchain for both artificial and natural radionuclides, and the results of relevant government-sponsored research are also described. The report includes basic information on radioactivity in the environment, radiation protection standards and describes what measures are taken to routinely monitor the foodchain and assess public risk. (Author)

  5. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose

  6. Radionuclide data bases available for bioaccumulation factors for freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1982-01-01

    Aquatic models currently in use for dose assessment simulate the transfer of radionuclides in aquatic environments and the transfer to man. In these models the assimilation of a radionuclide in aquatic biota is calculated by using a simple empirical relationship known as the bioaccumulation factor (BF) to represent the transfer of the radionuclide from water to organism. The purpose of this article is to review data bases that are available for BFs for freshwater biota and to identify the uncertainties associated with them. Data bases for raidoisotopes of Co, Cs, C, H, I, Pu, Ra, Ru, Sr, and U are reviewed. With the exception of ruthenium and carbon, the review is restricted to BFs determined for natural freshwater systems. Factors influencing the variability of BFs are identified, uncertainties associated with the validation of BFs are discussed, and some guidance is given for collecting data and measuring BFs

  7. Research on the assessment technology of the radionuclide inventory for the radioactive waste disposal(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. J.; Hong, D. S.; Hwang, G. H.; Shin, J. J.; Yuk, D. S. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Characteristics and states of management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in site : state of management for each type of wastes, characteristics of low and intermediate level solid radioactive waste, stage of management of low and intermediate level solid radioactive waste. Survey of state of management and characteristics of low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in foreign countries : state of management of disposal facilities, classification criteria and target radionuclides for assessment in foreign disposal facilities. Survey of the assessment methods of the radionuclides inventory and establishing the direction of requirement : assessment methods of the radionuclides inventory, analysis of radionuclides assay system in KORI site, establishment the direction of requirement in the assessment methods.

  8. Radionuclides in house dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Dodd, N J; Hammond, D J

    1985-04-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  9. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow in hematologic systemic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, F.; Hahn, K.; Gamm, H.

    1987-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies of the bone marrow were carried out in 164 patients suffering from hematologic systemic disease. One third of 90 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) displayed a pathological distribution pattern representing bone marrow expansion. In HL there were 17% accumulation defects caused by metastases in contrast to only 7% in NHL. Among 30 patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia bone marrow expansion was found in 60%, bone marrow displacement and aplasia 10%. Focal bone marrow defects were found in 3 patients. All patients with primary polycythemia rubra vera displayed a pathologic bone marrow distribution pattern as well as splenomegaly. All patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and one patient with an acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) had a pathological distribution pattern with bone marrow expansion and displacement. Focal bone marrow defects were not seen. Multiple myeloma with bone marrow expansion was found in 6 of 12 patients and focal accumulation defects were found in 40%, the latter lesions being not visible or equivocal on skeletal imaging studies. Pathological changes in liver and spleen were found in a high percentage of the total collective. The results document the important clinical value of bone marrow scintigraphy among the hematologic diseases studied.

  10. Radionuclide accumulation peculiarities demonstrated by vegetable varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruk, A.V.; Goncharenko, G.G.; Kilchevsky, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on ecological and genetic aspects of radionuclide accumulation demonstrated by a number of vegetable varieties. The researches resulted in determining the cabbage varieties which were characterised by the minimal level of radionuclide accumulation. It was shown that the above varieties manifested the relation between radionuclide accumulation and morphobiological characteristics such as vegetation period duration and yield criteria. The study specified the genotypes with high ecological stability as regards to radionuclide accumulation: 'Beloruskaya 85' cabbage and 'Dokhodny' tomato showed the best response to Cs 137, while 'Beloruskaya 85', 'Rusinovka', 'Amager 611' cabbage varieties and 'Sprint' tomato showed the minimal level of Sr 90 accumulation. (authors)

  11. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  12. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  13. Preparation of porous materials for radionuclides capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajzikova, Anna; Smrcek, Stanislav; Kozempel, Jan; Vlk, Martin; Barta, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Porous materials showing promise for radionuclide capture from water at contaminated sites were prepared. Nanoporous materials (size of pores 1-100 nm) and some polymers are well suited to this purpose owing their affinity for selected radionuclides. Nanoporous metal oxides and silica gel with styrene-divinylbenzene-TODGA-modified surface were prepared, characterized and tested for radionuclide ( 227 Ac, 227 Th, 223 Ra) capture efficiency. (orig.)

  14. Radionuclide Data Centre. Tasks and problems of obtaining the most reliable values of the nuclear physics characteristics of radionuclides and radiation physics parameters of radionuclide sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chechev, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    Information is provided on the establishment of the Radionuclide Data Centre under the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute. Its functions and areas of activity are discussed. The paper focuses on the procedure of obtaining the evaluated values of the decay and radiative characteristics of the widely used radionuclides. (author)

  15. Radionuclides release possibility analysis of MSR at various accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong Wie; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are some accidents which go beyond our expectation such as Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and amounts of radionuclides release to environment, so more effort and research are conducted to prevent it. MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) is one of GEN-IV reactor types, and its coolant and fuel are mixtures of molten salt. MSR has a schematic like figure 1 and it has different features with the solid fuel reactor, but most important and interesting feature of MSR is its many safety systems. For example, MSR has a large negative void coefficient. Even though power increases, the reactor slows down soon. Radionuclides release possibility of MSR was analyzed at various accident conditions including Chernobyl and Fukushima ones. The MSR was understood to prevent the severe accident by the negative reactivity coefficient and the absence of explosive material such as water at the Chernobyl disaster condition. It was expected to contain fuel salts in the reactor building and not to release radionuclides into environment even if the primary system could be ruptured or broken and fuel salts would be leaked at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster condition of earthquake and tsunami. The MSR, which would not lead to the severe accident and therefore prevents the fuel release to the environment at many expected scenarios, was thought to have priority in the aspect of accidents. A quantitative analysis and a further research are needed to evaluate the possibility of radionuclide release to the environment at the various accident conditions based on the simple comparison of the safety feature between MSR and solid fuel reactor.

  16. Radionuclide methods application in cardiac studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotina, E.D.; Ploskikh, V.A.; Babin, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    Radionuclide methods are one of the most modern methods of functional diagnostics of diseases of the cardio-vascular system that requires the use of mathematical methods of processing and analysis of data obtained during the investigation. Study is carried out by means of one-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Mathematical methods and software for SPECT data processing are developed. This software allows defining physiologically meaningful indicators for cardiac studies

  17. Human dose pathways of radionuclides in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.

    2009-01-01

    Forest soil, understorey vegetation and trees are all sources of radionuclides and human radiation doses after contaminating atmospheric deposition. People are exposed to radiation externally from sources outside the body and internally via ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides. Understorey vegetation contributes to ingestion doses through berries, herbs, wild honey, mushrooms and game meat; also trees provide feed to terrestrial birds and big game. During stay in forests people are subject to external radiation from forest floor and overstorey, and they may inhale airborne radioactive aerosol or gaseous radionuclides in ground level air. In the early phase of contamination also resuspended radionuclides may add to the internal dose of people via inhalation. People in Nordic countries are most exposed to radiation via ingestion of radionuclides in wild foods. The distribution of radionuclides in forests is changed by environmental processes, and thereby also the significance of various dose pathways to humans will change with time. External exposure is received in living environment from contaminated stemwood used as building timber and for manufacturing of furniture and other wood products. The aim of this paper is to outline the significance of various human dose pathways of radionuclides in forests considering the public and workers in forestry and production of bioenergy. Examples on effective doses are given based on two historical events, atmospheric nuclear weapon tests (mostly in 1950's and in 1960's) and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. (au)

  18. Quantitative estimation of compliance of human systemic veins by occlusion plethysmography with radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Hisato; Gotoh, Kohshi; Suzuki, Takahiko; Ohsumi, Yukio; Yagi, Yasuo; Tsukamoto, Tatsuo; Terashima, Yasushi; Nagashima, Kenshi; Hirakawa, Senri

    1989-01-01

    Volume-pressure relationship and compliance of human systemic veins were estimated quantitatively and noninvasively using radionuclide. The effect of nitroglycerin (NTG) on these parameters was examined. Plethysmography with radionuclide (RN) was performed using the occlusion method on the forearm in 56 patients with various cardiac diseases after RN angiocardiography with 99m Tc-RBC. The RN counts-venous pressure curve was constructed from (1) the changes in radioactivity from region of interest on the forearm that were considered to reflect the changes in the blood volume of the forearm, and (2) the changes in the pressure of the forearm vein (fv) due to venous occlusion. The specific compliance of the forearm veins (Csp.fv; (1/V)·(ΔV/ΔP)) was obtained graphically from this curve at each patient's venous pressure (Pv). Csp.fv was 0.044±0.012 mmHg -1 in class I (mean±SD; n=13), 0.033±0.007 mmHg -1 in class II (n=30), and 0.019±0.007 mmHg -1 in class III (n=13), of the previous NYHA classification of work tolerance. There were significant differences in Csp.fv among the three classes. The systemic venous blood volume (Vsv) was determined by subtracting the central blood volume, measured by RN-angiocardiography, from total blood volume, measured by the indicator dilution method utilizing 131 I-human serum albumin. Systemic venous compliance (Csv) was calculated from Csv=Csp.fv·Vsv. The Csv was 127.2±24.8 ml·mmHg -1 (mean±SD) in class I, 101.1±24.1 ml·mmHg -1 in class II and 62.2±28.1 ml·mmHg -1 in class III. There were significant differences in Csv among the three classes. The class I Csv value was calculated to be 127.2±24.8 ml·mmHg -1 and the Csv/body weight was calculated to be 2.3±0.7 ml·mmHg -1 ·kg -1 of body weight. The administration of NTG increased Csv significantly in all cases. (J.P.N.)

  19. General program for the advancement of the radionuclide technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The 'General Program for the Advancement of the Radionuclide Technology' was elaborated in 1978 by the 'Arbeitsgemeinschaft zur Foerderung der Radionuklidtechnik' (AFR) (Association for the Promotion of Radionuclide Technology). In addition to an inventory of the major applications of radionuclide technology, this General Program includes a comprehensive description of tasks relating to the central topics of raw materials, environment, technology and materials, health and nutrition, scientific developments of radionuclide technology. The 'General Program for the Advancement of the Radionuclide Technology' serves inter alia as a basis of evaluation in opinions on funding applications filed with the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) with respect to the provision of advanced techniques involving radionuclides for industrial application. (orig.) [de

  20. Water purification from radionuclides with using fibroid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaydarov, R. A.; Gapurova, O.U.; Khaydarov, R.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Purification waste water and drinking water from radionuclides, heavy metal ions, organic contamination is one of the important problems today. For solving this problem we have created three types of fibroid sorbents on the base of Polyester: cationic and anionic exchange and carbonic. Main properties of these sorbents are described in this article. For example characteristics of the sorbents for removing radionuclides Co-60,57, Zn-65, Sr-89,90, Cs-134,137, etc., radionuclides containing organic molecules M-P-32, M-I-131, M-Mo-99+Tc-99m, M-C-14, etc., heavy metal ions Zn, Ni, Cu, Sb, Pb, Cd, Cr, U, etc., organic molecules (pesticides, phenols, dioxin, benzene, toluene, etc.) were investigated. Influence of pH on percent removal, influence of K, Na and another ions concentrations in the liquid on the percent removal, decreasing of the saturation capacity from number of regeneration and another characteristics are described. Static exchange capacity of the cationic sorbents is 1-2 mg-equ/g and anionic - 0.5-1 mg-equ/g. Capacity of the carbonic sorbents for benzene is 100 mg/g. Time of chemical balance setting is 1-2 s. The sorbents are effective in removing the low concentrations of contamination from the water (lower than 100-200 mg/l) and the air (lower than 100 mg/m 3 ). The use of sorbents in drinking water filters and mini-systems is described. The industrial water purification system consists of coagulating unit, sorbent unit and disinfectant unit. The systems are used in atomic power stations, electroplating plants, matches plants, leather and skin treating plants, car-washing stations, etc

  1. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammels, plants and sediments within Mortandad Canyon, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

    1996-01-01

    Small mammals, plants and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System outfall number-sign 051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos County, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation ingestion, or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for 241 Am, 90 Sr, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and total U. With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring

  2. Important processes affecting the release and migration of radionuclides from a deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barátová, Dana; Nečas, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    The processes that affect significantly the transport of contaminants through the near field and far field of a deep geological repository of spent nuclear fuel were studied. The processes can be generally divided into (i) processes related to the release of radionuclides from the spent nuclear fuel; (ii) processes related to the radionuclide transport mechanisms (such as advection and diffusion); and (iii) processes affecting the rate of radionuclide migration through the multi-barrier repository system. A near-field and geosphere model of an unspecified geological repository sited in a crystalline rock is also described. Focus of the treatment is on the effects of the different processes on the activity flow of the major safety-relevant radionuclides. The activity flow was simulated for one spent fuel cask by using the GoldSim simulation tool. (orig.)

  3. Terrestrial ecosystems: an ecological content for radionuclide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heal, O.W.; Horrill, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution and retention of radionuclides within terrestrial ecosystems varies greatly with both the radionuclide and the environmental conditions. Physico-chemical conditions, particularly those of the soil, strongly influence element retention but superimposed and interacting with these conditions are the biological processes which control the dynamics of the labile fraction of most elements. Net ecosystem production expresses the complementary biological processes of primary production and decomposition which control the internal element dynamics and the balance of inputs to and outputs from terrestrial ecosystems. Analysis of ecosystem structure and function has shown that although research often concentrates on relatively stable stages of ecosystem development, element retention is high during the early stages of ecosystem succession through the accumulation of plant biomass and dead organic matter. Element output tends to increase with time reaching a balance with inputs in mature ecosystems. Following disturbance, plant uptake tends to be reduced and decomposition stimulated, resulting in increased output until secondary succession and accumulation is re-established. Research on element dynamics in ecosystems indicates that major factors influencing the mobility of radionuclides in terrestrial systems will be the successional state of the ecosystem and intensity of disturbance. (author)

  4. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  5. Geochemistry and radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretically, the geochemical barrier can provide a major line of defense in protecting the biosphere from the hazards of nuclear waste. The most likely processes involved are easily identified. Preliminary investigations using computer modeling techniques suggest that retardation is an effective control on radionuclide concentrations. Ion exchange reactions slow radionuclide migration and allow more time for radioactive decay and dispersion. For some radionuclides, solubility alone may limit concentrations to less than the maximum permissible now considered acceptable by the Federal Government. The effectiveness of the geochemical barrier is ultimately related to the repository site characteristics. Theory alone tells us that geochemical controls will be most efficient in an environment that provides for maximum ion exchange and the precipitation of insoluble compounds. In site selection, consideration should be given to rock barriers with high ion exchange capacity that might also act as semi-permeable membranes. Also important in evaluating the site's potential for effective geochemical controls are the oxidation potentials, pH and salinity of the groundwater

  6. Field studies of radionuclide transport at the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors summarize the results of: in situ field column experiments to study the transport behaviour of several long-lived radionuclides, 4 natural gradient non-reactive radiotracer injection experiments at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) Twin Lake Tracer Test Site, and a model validation study that used data for 90 Sr from two well-defined contaminated groundwater flow systems at CRL. The paper also describes a current re-evaluation of radionuclide release and transport from a 1960 experimental burial (in a CRL sand aquifer) of glass blocks containing fission and activation products. (J.P.N.)

  7. Report of the consultants' meeting on target and processing technologies for cyclotron production of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    Cyclotron produced radionuclides are used routinely for the diagnosis of a wide variety of diseases. Recently a number of radionuclides available from cyclotrons have been proposed for use in radiotherapy. In fact Pd-103 has become routinely available in some parts of the world for incorporation into brachytherapy seeds for treating prostate cancer. The consultants meeting reviewed the status of target and processing technologies associated with cyclotron production of radionuclides. The main topics of discussion included the basic nuclear data that is crucial to the production of the desired radionuclides, gas and solid target systems, the automated chemical processing units, the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) required in order to use these radionuclides in human patients in a safe and efficacious manner and a review of possible candidate nuclides that show promise for use in Nuclear Medicine in the near future. Advances in the preparation of solid targets using electroplating technology has created the possibility of preparing targets capable of operating at very high beam currents which would make the production of large quantities of SPECT agents possible at cyclotron facilities throughout the world. Recognising the needs of the developing countries which have established cyclotron facilities, the consultants focussed on how to provide the technology for preparing solid targets that could be used in the existing facilities. While solid target technology can be used for many radionuclides the report concentrated on several key radionuclides, which are of current importance or show potential for use in the near future. Tl-201 is currently used for cardiac profusion studies throughout the world. New target preparation techniques could potentially make many of the member states self sufficient in the production of this nuclide. I-123 has tremendous potential because of the near ideal photon energy for SPECT cameras and its well-understood chemistry. However, it

  8. DKPRO: A radionuclide decay and reprocessing code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, D.; Schmittroth, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    The DKPRO code solves the general problem of modeling complex nuclear wastes streams using ORIGEN2 radionuclide production files. There is a continuing need for estimates of Hanford radionuclides. Physical measurements are one basis; calculational estimates, the approach represented here, are another. Given a known nuclear fuel history, it is relatively straightforward to calculate radionuclide inventories with codes such as the widely-used Oak Ridge National Laboratory code ORIGEN2

  9. Transfer of radionuclides into human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Wirth, E.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now the potential radiation exposure to breast-fed babies due to contaminated human milk has not been taken into account, when deriving international limit values and reference levels for radionuclides in foodstuffs, in air at monitored work places or for exposures in the medical field. It was the aim of the research project 'Transfer of radionuclides into human milk' to quantify the transfer of incorporated radionuclides into mother's milk, and develop simple models to estimate the radiation exposure of babies through the ingestion of human milk. The study focused on considerations of the radiation exposure due to the ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs by the mother, the inhalation of radionuclides at monitored work places, and the administration of radiopharmaceuticals to breast-feeding mothers. The blocking of infant thyroid glands by stable iodine in the case of accidental releases of radioiodine was considered as well. (orig.) [de

  10. Study on the immunological and genetic effects induced by internal exposure to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Wang Liuyi; Luan Meiling

    1995-02-01

    The immune system is the important part of defense mechanism in organism. Studies have demonstrated the high radiosensitivity of the immunocytes to internal radionuclide exposure. It is evident that serious functional disturbances and morphological changes of immune organs are induced by internal contamination of radionuclides, including suppression of division and proliferation of immunocytes, induction of irreversible sequelae, leading to injurious effects on both central and peripheral immune organs. In order to study the consequences of the injuries of genetic material caused by internal contamination of radionuclides, researches have developed from the harmful effects on parental generation to those on the offspring. The present paper reports the study on the genetic injuries of somatic and germ cells induced by internal radionuclide exposure. Emphasis is placed on the molecular basis of radio-genetic effect and the relations of the molecular basis of DNA injury to gene mutation and chromosome aberration

  11. Release of iodine radionuclides from gas media in a system of selective block sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Miroshnikov, V.S.; Mel'nikov, V.A.; Chetverikov, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    A scheme of extracting iodine radionuclides from gas flows in a system of selective sorbents has been developed. The method provides separation of three forms of iodine: the aerosol component, the elementary iodine and organic-iodine compounds. Aerosols are trapped by a mechanical filter made of porous polytetrafluoroethylene with pores of no more than 1 μm. Silver-based sorbents for the elementary iodine are made by sintering the granular polytetrafluoroethylene (the size of granules is 0.1-0.5 mm) with of finely dispersed solver (5% mass). Organic iodine compounds are extracted by a silica sorbent impregnated with silver nitrate. The efficiency of sorbents was tested in gas flows with a known content of 131 I in the form of elementary iodine and methyl iodide. The results of experiments show that the efficiency of sorption of elementary iodine by a metallic-silver sorbent and of methyl iodide by a SiO 2 /AgNO 3 sorbent constitutes no less than 99% at a flow rate of up to 200 l/h. The iodine has been extracted at a flow rate of 100 l/h during 100 hours and for that time the efficiency of the iodine sorbtion has not changed. The suggested variant of extracting iodine radionuclides from gaseous media can be used both for fast control of iodine content in gas blowoffs and for researches aimed at studying the distribution of iodine forms in steam-and-gas media depending on nuclear plant operating conditions

  12. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto. Formulation of radionuclide release scenarios 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and application for a construction licence for a repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site in south-western Finland. This report presents the radionuclide release scenarios and the methodology followed in formulating them. The formulation of scenarios takes into account the regulatory framework, the knowledge acquired in the present safety case as well as in previous safety assessments, the safety functions of the barriers of the repository system and the uncertainties in the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that may affect the entire disposal system (i.e. repository system plus the surface environment) from the emplacement of the first canister until the far future. In the report Performance Assessment, the performance of the engineered and natural barriers has been assessed against the loads expected during the evolution of the repository system and the site. Uncertainties have been identified and these are taken into account in the formulation of radionuclide release scenarios. The uncertainties in the FEPs affecting the characteristics and evolution of the surface environment are taken into account in formulating the surface environment scenarios used ultimately for assessing radiation exposure. Formulating radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system links the reports Performance Assessment and Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios for the Repository System. The formulation of radionuclide release scenarios for the surface environment brings together Biosphere Description and the surface environment FEPs and is the link to the assessment of the surface environment scenarios analysed in Biosphere Assessment. (orig.)

  13. Radionuclide migration in crystalline rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelttae, P.

    2002-01-01

    Crystalline rock has been considered as a host medium for the repository of high radioactive spent nuclear fuel in Finland. The geosphere will act as an ultimate barrier retarding the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere if they are released through the technical barriers. Radionuclide transport is assumed to take place along watercarrying fractures, and retardation will occur both in the fracture and within the rock matrix. To be able to predict the transport and retardation of radionuclides in rock fractures and rock matrices, it is essential to understand the different phenomena involved. Matrix diffusion has been indicated to be an important mechanism, which will retard the transport of radionuclides in rock fractures. Both dispersion and matrix diffusion are processes, which can have similar influences on solute breakthrough curves in fractured crystalline rock. In this work, the migration of radionuclides in crystalline rock fractures was studied by means of laboratory scale column methods. The purpose of the research was to gain a better understanding of various phenomena - particularly matrix diffusion - affecting the transport and retardation behaviour of radionuclides in fracture flow. Interaction between radionuclides and the rock matrix was measured in order to test the compatibility of experimental retardation parameters and transport models used in assessing the safety of underground repositories for spent nuclear fuel. Rock samples of mica gneiss and of unaltered, moderately altered and strongly altered tonalite represented different rock features and porosities offering the possibility to determine experimental boundary limit values for parameters describing both the transport and retardation of radionuclides and rock matrix properties. The dominant matrix diffusion behaviour was demonstrated in porous ceramic column and gas diffusion experiments. Demonstration of the effects of matrix diffusion in crystalline rock fracture succeeded for the

  14. Purification of radionuclides for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    Novel systems for the rapid separation of 67 Cu, 90 Y, 188 Re, 212 Bi, 213 Bi, and 223 Ra are described. To achieve the high levels of decontamination required of radionuclides used in radioimmunotherapy, we have utilised combinations of ion exchange (IX) and novel extraction chromatographic (EXC) resins. The objective of each separation system is to remove by many orders of magnitude the parent isotopes and to reduce the concentrations of stable, sometimes adventitious impurities, to low levels. The latter objective is particularly important to achieve a high degree of bonding of radionuclide onto a monoclonal antibody. The purification of 212 Bi (60.6 min half-life) furnishes a good example of the level of purity that we have achieved using tandem combinations of EXC and IX resins. Bismuth-212 was separated from its daughters, 212 Pb, 224 Ra, 228 Th and 232 U at the 50 mCi level. The resultant 212 Bi decayed to background in a few days indicative of high purity. Another example of extraordinary removal of parent nuclide from daughter nuclide and subsequent purification of daughter from stable elements is the preparation of 90 Y. Strontium-90 was removed from 90 Y by > 10 9 . The purified 90 Y uptake by monoclonal antibodies was close to 100%

  15. Investigation of transformation of radionuclides in soils oil polluted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbatov, F.Y.; Ahmedov, M.M.; Ibadov, N.A.; Balayev, V.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Despite of constant improvement in view of last achievement of a science and technique the technological processes of oil production are accompanied by coming in environment a number of chemical substances - oil products, poly aromatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, salts of heavy metals, including soluble and insoluble compound of stable and radioactive isotopes of metals, various gases etc. Technological processes of production, transportation of crude oil and its complex processing is followed with essential pollution of soil by oil products, radioactive substances because of crude oil and grounds waters spillage. The problem of radioactive pollution of environment in oil-extracting sites and especially in old deposits of Apsheron peninsula, in particular, in oil fields of Surakhani and Balakhani by the various factors is rather urgent in Azerbaijan. On a whole, radioactive-ecological situation is defined by the quantitative contents of natural radionuclides, chemical structure of grounds waters and oil, and also accumulation of radioactive substances in pipelines and modular items as crystals radiobarits or calcium and magnesium salts. Systemic and complex research on this direction will allow creating the mechanism of radionuclides transformation in oil-contaminated soils. The condition of radioactive background of soil cover of oil field in Surakhani was studied in our researches. The soil samples taken from various depths of deposit are investigated. The quantities of total oil components, aliphatic and poly aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals and natural radionuclides are determined. The attempt is made to explain dependence of various meanings of carried out analyses on the depth of taken samples. In summary it is necessary to note, that the researches on more detailed study of influence of the factors on processes of accumulation and transformation natural radionuclides proceed. The systemic researches on this direction will allow securing of

  16. Numerical simulation of the impact of water-air fronts on radionuclides plumes in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, J.; Francisco, A.S.; Pereira, F.; Amaral Souto, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the interaction of water-air fronts with radionuclide plumes in unsaturated heterogeneous porous media. This problem is modeled by a system of equations that describes both the water-air flow and the radionuclide transport. The water-air problem is solved numerically by a mixed finite element combined with a non-oscillatory central difference scheme. For the radionuclide transport equation we use the Modified Method of Characteristics (MMOC). We present the results of numerical simulations for heterogeneous permeability fields taking into account sorption effects. (author)

  17. Impact assessment of radionuclides released to environment from the European Spallation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, S.; Andersson, K. [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Ene, D. [European Spallation Soure AB - ESS, Lund (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a large science and technology infrastructure project currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, with operation planned by 2019. The facility design and construction includes a linear proton accelerator, a heavy-metal target station, neutron instruments, laboratories, and a data management and software development centre. During operation the ESS will produce a wide range of radionuclides via spallation and activation processes. Radiological assessments are needed to ensure that operational discharges and releases from potential incidents/accidents are within acceptable limits. The spectrum of radionuclides produced at ESS is quite different from that produced in nuclear power plants and assessment work has therefore been challenged by lack of information on less well-known radionuclides. Traditional assessment methodologies have been applied focusing on releases to air and public sewer systems and calculating radiation doses to representative persons living in and near Lund close to the ESS site. Exposure pathways considered include external radiation from radionuclides in air, external radiation from radionuclides deposited on ground and skin, inhalation of radionuclides and ingestion of locally produced contaminated food. Atmospheric dispersion has been simulated with the Gaussian plume model which is considered adequate within a few kilometres. Effects of release height have been investigated and site specific values of other parameters such as wind speed, wind direction, rain fall etc. have been used. Contamination of food has been calculated from the (ECOSYS) food dose model used in the RODOS and ARGOS decision support systems. The food dose model does not contain specific data for a number of ESS relevant radionuclides, e.g. {sup 7}Be, {sup 32}P and {sup 35}S. The data required include mobility of these isotopes, soil-to-plant concentration ratios and equilibrium transfer factors of daily intake by ingestion of meat

  18. An Exact Solution for the Assessment of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Radionuclides in the Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R. L.; Chen, J-S.

    2002-01-01

    In a report on model evaluation, the authors ran the HYDRUS Code, among other transport codes, to evaluate the impacts of nonequilibrium sorption sites on the time-evolution of 99Tc and 90Sr through the vadose zone. Since our evaluation was based on a rather low, annual recharge rate, many of the numerical results derived from HYDRUS indicated that the nonequilibrium sorption sites, in essence, acted as equilibrium sorption sites. To help explain these results, we considered a ''stripped-down'' version of the HYDRUS system. This ''stripped-down'' version possesses two dependent variables, one for the radionuclides in solution and the other for the radionuclides adsorbed to the nonequilibrium sites; and it possesses constant physical parameters. The resultant governing equation for the radionuclides in solution is a linear, advection-dispersion-reaction (i.e., radioactive decay) partial differential equation containing a history integral term accounting for the nonequilibrium sorption sites. It is this ''stripped-down'' version, which is the subject of this paper. We found an exact solution to this new version of the model. The exact solution is given in terms of a single definite integral of terms involving elementary functions of the independent variables and the system parameters. This integral possesses adequate convergence properties and is easy to evaluate, both in a quantitative matter and in a qualitative manner. The parameters that are considered in the system are as follows: the radionuclide's equilibrium partition coefficient between water and soil, the bulk density of the soil, the fractions of equilibrium/nonequilibrium sorption sites, the volumetric water content, the first order equilibrium adsorption rate constant, the first order radioactive decay rate constant, the liquid water soil tortuosity factor, the molecular diffusion coefficient in water, the longitudinal dispersivity factor, and the Darcian fluid flux density. In addition, the system

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux in children: radionuclide gastroesophagography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumhagen, J.D.; Rudd, T.G.; Christie, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sixty-five symptomatic infants and children underwent radionuclide gastroesophagography, acid reflux testing, and barium esophagography with water-siphon testing to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the scintigraphic technique in detecting gastroesophageal reflux. After ingesting /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid in fruit juice, patients rested beneath the gamma camera for 30 to 60 min while esophageal activity was monitored continuously. By using the acid reflux test as a standard of comparison, the senstivity of radionuclide gastroesophagography was 75%. Because of its physiologic nature, low radiation exposure, and convenience, radionuclide gastroesophagography warrants further evaluation as a screening test for gastroesophageal reflux

  20. Soil - plant experimental radionuclide transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrin, R.I.; Dulama, C.N.; Toma, Al.

    2006-01-01

    Some experimental research was performed in our institute to assess site specific soil-plant transfer factors. A full characterization of an experimental site was done both from pedo-chemical and radiological point of view. Afterwards, a certain number of culture plants were grown on this site and the evolution of their radionuclide burden was then recorded. Using some soil amendments one performed a parallel experiment and the radionuclide root uptake was evaluated and recorded. Hence, transfer parameters were calculated and some conclusions were drawn concerning the influence of site specific conditions on the root uptake of radionuclides. (authors)

  1. Development of polymer-extractant composite beads for separation of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manmohan; Singh, Krishankant; Bajaj, P.N.

    2009-01-01

    A novel micro porous polymer-extractant composite bead system, containing liquid extractant encapsulated in the core of a polymeric shell, with required porosity and hydrophilicity, to allow exchange of radionuclides without, any significant leaching out of the encapsulated extractant, has been developed for solid-liquid extraction of radionuclides from acidic waste solutions. The reuse of the beads is possible as there is practically no change in its radionuclide extraction efficiency, after repeated extraction second time. The high porosity and hydrophilicity of the synthesized TBP-encapsulated polymeric beads is evident from the presence of ∼ 78% water in the swollen condition. Evaluation of the synthesized beads for extraction of uranium and plutonium from aqueous acidic waste solutions, indicated possibility of their use under the conditions of PUREX process. The aliquate 336-encapsulated polymeric beads showed selective extraction of plutonium from aqueous nitrate solutions in the presence of uranium, and back extraction of the loaded plutonium, using dilute nitric acid or ascorbic acid. (author)

  2. Determination of radionuclide solubility limits to be used in SR 97. Uncertainties associated to calculated solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Duro, L.; Jordana, S. [QuantiSci S.L., Barcelona (Spain); Pablo, J. de [DEQ-UPC, Barcelona (Spain); Savage, D. [QuantiSci Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-01

    The thermochemical behaviour of 24 critical radionuclides for the forthcoming SR97 PA exercise is discussed. The available databases are reviewed and updated with new data and an extended database for aqueous and solid species of the radionuclides of interest is proposed. We have calculated solubility limits for the radionuclides of interest under different groundwater compositions. A sensitivity analysis of the calculated solubilities with the composition of the groundwater is presented. Besides selecting the most likely solubility limiting phases, in this work we have used coprecipitation approaches in order to calculate more realistic solubility limits for minor radionuclides, such as Ra, Am and Cm. The comparison between the calculated solubilities and the concentrations measured in relevant natural systems (NA) and in spent fuel leaching experiments helps to assess the validity of the methodology used and to derive source term concentrations for the radionuclides studied. The uncertainties associated to the solubilities of the main radionuclides involved in the spent nuclear fuel have also been discussed in this work. The variability of the groundwater chemistry; redox conditions and temperature of the system have been considered the main factors affecting the solubilities. In this case, a sensitivity analysis has been performed in order to study solubility changes as a function of these parameters. The uncertainties have been calculated by including the values found in a major extent in typical granitic groundwaters. The results obtained from this analysis indicate that there are some radionuclides which are not affected by these parameters, i.e. Ag, Cm, Ho, Nb, Ni, Np, Pu, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc and U

  3. Modeling of radionuclide migration through porous material with meshless method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrankar, L.; Turk, G.; Runovc, F.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the long term safety of a radioactive waste disposal system, mathematical models are used to describe groundwater flow, chemistry and potential radionuclide migration through geological formations. A number of processes need to be considered when predicting the movement of radionuclides through the geosphere. The most important input data are obtained from field measurements, which are not completely available for all regions of interest. For example, the hydraulic conductivity as an input parameter varies from place to place. In such cases geostatistical science offers a variety of spatial estimation procedures. Methods for solving the solute transport equation can also be classified as Eulerian, Lagrangian and mixed. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is usually obtained by finite difference methods (FDM), finite element methods (FEM), or finite volume methods (FVM). Kansa introduced the concept of solving partial differential equations using radial basis functions (RBF) for hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic PDEs. Our goal was to present a relatively new approach to the modelling of radionuclide migration through the geosphere using radial basis function methods in Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates. Radionuclide concentrations will also be calculated in heterogeneous and partly heterogeneous 2D porous media. We compared the meshless method with the traditional finite difference scheme. (author)

  4. Sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qinhong; Weng Jianqing; Wang Jinsheng

    2010-01-01

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview on sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment, as well as a brief discussion of salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current developments that have lead, or could potentially contribute, to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) uranium mining and milling; (5) commercial fuel reprocessing; (6) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes that include radionuclides might be released in the future, and (7) nuclear accidents. Then, we briefly summarize the inventory of radionuclides 99 Tc and 129 I, as well as geochemical behavior for radionuclides 99 Tc, 129 I, and 237 Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment; biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  5. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  6. Direct measurement of γ-emitting radionuclides in waste drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Ruwei; Mao Yong; Zhang Xiuzhen; Xia Xiaobin; Guo Caiping; Han Yueqin

    1993-01-01

    The low-level rad waste produced from nuclear power plant, nuclear facilities, and in the process of their decommissioning is stored in waste depository. For the safety of transport and storage of these wastes, some test must be done. One of them is to analyse the kinds and activities of radionuclides in each waste drum. Segmented scanning gamma spectrum analysis can be used for direct measurement of gamma-emitting radionuclides in drum. Gamma emitters such as Co-60, Cs-137, Ra-226 can be measured directly from outside of drum. A method and system for direct measuring gamma emitters in waste drum are described, and measuring apparatus and measurement results as well

  7. Radionuclide characterization of environmental air around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gede Sutresna Wijaya; Anung Muharini

    2015-01-01

    Air is an important environmental component in human life. Presence of air pollutants or contaminants will have a negative impact on human health. According to the existence of a nuclear facility in Yogyakarta, the characterization of radionuclides in the air is absolutely necessary to ensure the safety of people and the environment and also to supervise the safe operation of the facility. In this research the characterization of radionuclides in the air was carried through the air sampling by using High Volume Air Sampler equipped with filter TFA 2133, followed by analysis using combination of a gamma and alpha spectrometers. The concentration of radioactivity in the air fluctuates depending on the time and duration of sampling. Characterization of gamma emitting radionuclides in the air is dominated by radon progeny radionuclides such as 214 Pb, 214 Bi with activity 20.09 ± 1.23 until 32.91 ± 4.87 Bq/m 3 and 31.22 ± 1.76 until 44.25 ± 4.91 Bq/m 3 . Alpha emitter radionuclide was dominated by 214 Po (7.69 MeV) which is also radon progeny and a primordial radionuclides. It can be concluded that the presence of radionuclides in the environmental air not as a product resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities in Yogyakarta. (author)

  8. Standardization of radionuclides 45Ca, 137Cs, 204Tl by tracing method using 4πβ-γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponge-Ferreira, Claudia Regina Ponte

    2005-01-01

    The procedure followed for the standardization of 45 Ca, 137 Cs and 204 Tl is described. The activity measurements was carried out in a 4πβ-γ coincidence system by the tracing method. The radionuclides chosen as the P-y emitting tracer nuclide were 60 Co for the 45 Ca and 134 Cs for 137 Cs and 204 TL because their end-point beta-ray energy are close to the respective beta emitters. The radioactive sources were prepared using two different techniques: one was the drops technique and the other was the solution technique. In the drop technique the sources were prepared by dropping directly on the subtract both solutions (tracer and beta pure). In the other technique a solution of tracer plus beta pure was mixed previously before making the radioactive sources. The activities of the radionuclides obtained with these technique were compared and the values are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties. (author)

  9. Radiation monitoring for radionuclide release in water system resulted from nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vintsukevich, N.V.; Tomilin, Yu.A.

    1983-01-01

    Pre-operational investigation into environmental radioactivity in the vicinity of Yuzhno-Ukrainskaya NPP with reverse- direct flow cooling scheme of circulating water was conducted. Considering that reservoir-coolant of NPP will be connected constantly with water reservoirs located on the Yuzhnyj Bug river possibilities of radionuclide accumulation in different river components - 5ilt, algae, river water-were investigated. It was established that increase of pH and salt concentration in water of river undercurrent create the conditions for formation of radionuclide sedimentary forms, increase their accumulation in bottom sediments and aqquatic vegetation. The conclusion on the necessity of constant radiation monitoring for relase of liquid coastes of Yuzhno-Ukrainskaya NPP in the Yuzhnyj Bug river is drawn

  10. An overview of BORIS: Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamponnet, C.; Martin-Garin, A.; Gonze, M.-A.; Parekh, N.; Vallejo, R.; Sauras-Yera, T.; Casadesus, J.; Plassard, C.; Staunton, S.; Norden, M.; Avila, R.; Shaw, G.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict the consequences of an accidental release of radionuclides relies mainly on the level of understanding of the mechanisms involved in radionuclide interactions with different components of agricultural and natural ecosystems and their formalisation into predictive models. Numerous studies and databases on contaminated agricultural and natural areas have been obtained, but their use to enhance our prediction ability has been largely limited by their unresolved variability. Such variability seems to stem from incomplete knowledge about radionuclide interactions with the soil matrix, soil moisture, and biological elements in the soil and additional pollutants, which may be found in such soils. In the 5th European Framework Programme entitled Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils (BORIS), we investigated the role of the abiotic (soil components and soil structure) and biological elements (organic compounds, plants, mycorrhiza, and microbes) in radionuclide sorption/desorption in soils and radionuclide uptake/release by plants. Because of the importance of their radioisotopes, the bioavailability of three elements, caesium, strontium, and technetium has been followed. The role of one additional non-radioactive pollutant (copper) has been scrutinised in some cases. Role of microorganisms (e.g., K d for caesium and strontium in organic soils is much greater in the presence of microorganisms than in their absence), plant physiology (e.g., changes in plant physiology affect radionuclide uptake by plants), and the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (e.g., interferes with the uptake of radionuclides by plants) have been demonstrated. Knowledge acquired from these experiments has been incorporated into two mechanistic models CHEMFAST and BIORUR, specifically modelling radionuclide sorption/desorption from soil matrices and radionuclide uptake by/release from plants. These mechanistic models have been incorporated into an assessment model to enhance its

  11. An overview of BORIS: Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamponnet, C. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, DEI/SECRE, CADARACHE, B.P. 1, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France)], E-mail: christian.tamponnet@irsn.fr; Martin-Garin, A.; Gonze, M.-A. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, DEI/SECRE, CADARACHE, B.P. 1, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France); Parekh, N. [Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Vallejo, R.; Sauras-Yera, T.; Casadesus, J. [Department of Plant Biology, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Plassard, C.; Staunton, S. [INRA, UMR Rhizosphere and Symbiosis, Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier (France); Norden, M. [Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, 171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Avila, R. [Facilia AB, Valsgaerdevaegen 12, 168 53 Bromma, Stockholm (Sweden); Shaw, G. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    The ability to predict the consequences of an accidental release of radionuclides relies mainly on the level of understanding of the mechanisms involved in radionuclide interactions with different components of agricultural and natural ecosystems and their formalisation into predictive models. Numerous studies and databases on contaminated agricultural and natural areas have been obtained, but their use to enhance our prediction ability has been largely limited by their unresolved variability. Such variability seems to stem from incomplete knowledge about radionuclide interactions with the soil matrix, soil moisture, and biological elements in the soil and additional pollutants, which may be found in such soils. In the 5th European Framework Programme entitled Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils (BORIS), we investigated the role of the abiotic (soil components and soil structure) and biological elements (organic compounds, plants, mycorrhiza, and microbes) in radionuclide sorption/desorption in soils and radionuclide uptake/release by plants. Because of the importance of their radioisotopes, the bioavailability of three elements, caesium, strontium, and technetium has been followed. The role of one additional non-radioactive pollutant (copper) has been scrutinised in some cases. Role of microorganisms (e.g., K{sub d} for caesium and strontium in organic soils is much greater in the presence of microorganisms than in their absence), plant physiology (e.g., changes in plant physiology affect radionuclide uptake by plants), and the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (e.g., interferes with the uptake of radionuclides by plants) have been demonstrated. Knowledge acquired from these experiments has been incorporated into two mechanistic models CHEMFAST and BIORUR, specifically modelling radionuclide sorption/desorption from soil matrices and radionuclide uptake by/release from plants. These mechanistic models have been incorporated into an assessment model to enhance

  12. Workshop on development of radionuclide getters for the Yucca Mountain waste repository: proceedings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Lukens, Wayne W. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

    2006-03-01

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository, located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility for permanent disposal of spent reactor fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analysis has indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose are technetium, iodine, and neptunium, all of which are highly mobile in the environment. Containment of these radionuclides within the repository is a priority for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). These proceedings review current research and technology efforts for sequestration of the radionuclides with a focus on technetium, iodine, and neptunium. This workshop also covered issues concerning the Yucca Mountain environment and getter characteristics required for potential placement into the repository.

  13. Development of radionuclide inventory estimation method using scaling factor for the Korean NPPs: scope and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ki Ha; Lee, Sang Chul; Kang, Sang Hee; Lee, Kun Jai; Jeong, Chan Woo; Ahn, Sang Myeon; Kim, Tae Wook; Kim, Kyoung Doek; Herr, Y. H.

    2003-01-01

    Regulations and guidelines for radionuclide waste disposal require detailed information about the characteristics of radioactive waste drums prior to the transport to the disposal sites. Therefore, it is important to know the accurate radionuclide inventory of radioactive waste. However, estimation of radionuclide concentrations on drummed radioactive waste is difficult and unreliable. In order to overcome these difficulties, scaling factors have been used to assess the activities of radionuclides which could not be directly analyzed. A radionuclides assay system has been operated at Korean nuclear power plant (KORI site) since 1996 and consolidated scaling factor concept has played a dominant role in determination of radionuclides concentrations. For corrosion product radionuclides, generic scaling factors were used due to the similar trend and better-characterized properties of Korean analyzed data compared to the worldwide database. It is not easy to use the generic scaling factors for fission product and TRU radionuclides. Thus simple model reflecting the history of the operation of power plant and nuclear fuel condition is applied. However, some problems are still remained. For examples, disparity between the actual and ideal correlation pairs, inaccuracy of analyzed sample values, uncertainty in representative of derived scaling factor values and so on. As a result, the correlation ratios are somewhat dispersive. So it is planned to establish an assay system using more improved scaling factors. In this study, the scope of research is expanded and planned such as following. 1) Considering more assay target nuclides, 2) Considering more target NPPs, 3) More reliable sampling and measurement techniques, 4) Improvement of accuracy and representativeness of derived scaling factor values and 5) Conformation of correlation pairs based on Korean analyzed data. As this study progresses, it is possible to get more accurate and reliable prediction for the information of

  14. A basic toxicity classification of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    In the course of its work in the field of health and safety the International Atomic Energy Agency has often met the practical requirement for grading radionuclides in order of their relative radiotoxicities. This need was particularly evident when the Agency's Basic Safety Standards for the protection of health against ionizing radiation were in preparation, when it was necessary to exempt quantities of radionuclides from inclusion in the norms. A basic toxicity grading might be of help to laboratories in meeting some of their requirements in problems related to waste management as well as for the design of experimental facilities. It should also serve as a basis for the development of safety criteria for laboratory equipment and procedures for handling and transporting various quantities and kinds of radionuclides. The purpose of the present Report is to make a toxicity grading of the radionuclides according to the risk of biological injury which they may cause when they have become incorporated in the human body. 4 refs, 4 tabs

  15. A basic toxicity classification of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-04-01

    In the course of its work in the field of health and safety the International Atomic Energy Agency has often met the practical requirement for grading radionuclides in order of their relative radiotoxicities. This need was particularly evident when the Agency's Basic Safety Standards for the protection of health against ionizing radiation were in preparation, when it was necessary to exempt quantities of radionuclides from inclusion in the norms. A basic toxicity grading might be of help to laboratories in meeting some of their requirements in problems related to waste management as well as for the design of experimental facilities. It should also serve as a basis for the development of safety criteria for laboratory equipment and procedures for handling and transporting various quantities and kinds of radionuclides. The purpose of the present Report is to make a toxicity grading of the radionuclides according to the risk of biological injury which they may cause when they have become incorporated in the human body. 4 refs, 4 tabs.

  16. Method of preparing radionuclide doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperus, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of preparing aliquot dosea of a tracer material useful in diagnostic nuclear medicine comprising: storing discrete quantities of a lyophilized radionuclide carrier in separate tubular containers from which air and moisture is excluded, selecting from the tubular containers a container in which is stored a carrier appropriate for a nuclear diagnostic test to be performed, interposing the selected container between the needle and the barrel of a hypodermic syringe, and drawing a predetermined amount of a liquid containing a radionuclide tracer in known concentration into the hypodermic syringe barrel through the hypodermic needle and through the selected container to dissolve the discrete quantity of lyophilized carrier therein to combine the carrier with the radionuclide tracer to form an aliquot dose of nuclear diagnostic tracer material, as needed

  17. Transfer parameters of radionuclides in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    To increase the accuracy of estimation of exposure dose by radionuclides in the marine, the informations of environmental parameter data in the marine were collected, arranged and discussed. The informations were discussed by 'a sectional committee of marine suspended solids and sediment'. The following problems were investigated and the studies were recorded in this report, clear explanation about the distribution factor (kd), the estimation method of kd, the fluctuating factor of kd data (properties of suspension and sediment, differences among the experimental methods), the physical and chemical behavior of radionuclides, sediment of radionuclides by means of sorption to the suspended particles in the marine, sorption of radionuclides into the marine soil (sediment), re-eluent of radionuclides sorpted in the marine soil (sediment), and relation between marine organism and marine suspended materials and sediment. (S.Y.)

  18. Realistic assessment of the radiological impact due to radionuclide releases to the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Radioecological models are inherently associated with uncertainties, since ecological parameters are subject to a more or less pronounced variability; furthermore, the knowledge of the exposure conditions is - even in the best case - incomplete. To keep models simple and widely applicable and to avoid at the same time underestimations, parameters are selected with a conservative bias. However, conservative results are not appropriate for decision making and optimisation. To discuss the prevention of overly conservative models, in this paper, some selected processes are analysed that are involved in the transfer of radionuclides in the environment as e.g. interception of radionuclides deposited during precipitation by vegetation, systemic transport of radionuclides, migration of radionuclides in soil and speciation in soil. These processes are characterized, and it is discussed which factors should be integrated in modelling to achieve more realistic results. (author)

  19. Gamma spectrometric validation of measurements test of radionuclides in food matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Mychelle M.L.; Custodio, Luis G.; Bonifacio, Rodrigo L.; Taddei, Maria Helena T.

    2013-01-01

    In a testing laboratory the quality system encompasses a set of activities planned and systematic, which ensure the traceability process of an analysis, which is based on the standards NBR ISO/TEC 17025. With the need for analysis of radionuclides in food products to meet the requirements of import and export, accreditation of testing on this standard becomes increasingly necessary. The Gamma Spectrometry is a technique used for direct determination of radionuclides in different matrices, among them the food, being possible the simultaneous determination of different radionuclides in the same sample without the need for a chemical separation. In the process of Accreditation the methodology validation is an important step that includes testing accuracy, traceability, linearity and recovery. This paper describes the procedures used to validate the assay for determining radionuclides using gamma spectrometry in food. These procedures were performed through analysis of a certificated reference material by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Soil 327), analysis of samples of milk powder prepared from the doping with certified liquid standards also by the results obtained in the participation of tests of proficiency in analysis of environmental samples. (author)

  20. Radionuclide transfer to freshwater biota species: review of Russian language studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenko, S.; Fesenko, J.; Sanzharova, N.; Karpenko, E.; Titov, I.

    2011-01-01

    Around 130 publications reporting studies on radionuclide transfer to freshwater biota species conducted in the former USSR were reviewed to provide the concentration ratio values. None of these studies were available up to now in the English language reviews or publications. The values derived have been compared with the CR values used for freshwater systems in the International reviews. For some radionuclides reviewed in this paper, the data are in good agreement with the mean CR values presented earlier, however for some of them, in particular, for 241 Am (bivalve molluscs, gastropods and pelagic fish), 60 Co (gastropods, benthic fish and insect larvae), 90 Sr and 137 Cs (benthic fish and zooplankton), the mean values given here are substantially different from those presented earlier. The data reported in this paper for thirty five radionuclides and eleven groups of freshwater species markedly improve the extent of available data for evaluation of radiation impact on freshwater species. - Research highlights: → The paper provides information on concentration ratios to freshwater biota species for 35 radionuclides. Many of the data are for 90 Sr and 137 Cs. → For the majority of radionuclides reviewed in this paper, the CR values are in good agreement with those given in the recent International reviews. → For 241 Am (bivalve molluscs, gastropods and pelagic fish), 60 Co (gastropods, benthic fish and insect larvae), 90 Sr and 137 Cs (benthic fish and zooplankton), the mean values based on review of the Russian language publications are substantially different from those presented in the International reviews. → Information presented in the paper significantly increases the availability of data on radionuclide accumulation in freshwater species.

  1. Production of medical short-lived radionuclides in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    The production of radionuclides for medical and biomedical research in Canada has been reviewed with respect to the national geographic and demographic characteristics which influence their use. The types of facilities available for the production of short-lived radionuclides have been summarized, and a tabulation of the radionuclides that are produced has been presented. In broad terms production facilities can be classified as belonging to one of two groups, nuclear reactor or charged-particle accelerators. The charged-particle accelerators produce the more neutron-deficient and (because of the resultant decay properties) the more useful radionuclides for medical application. The nuclear reactor facilities for radionuclide production range in size and capacity from the high-flux research reactors of AECL to the six SLOWPOKE reactors, five of which are located on university campuses across the country. The McMaster University reactor is used to produce curie quantities of fluorine-18 weekly. Millicurie amounts of a large number of radionuclides, most of which have half-lives ranging from 2 to 50 hr, are produced in the low-flux reactors, in support of basic medical research

  2. Simulation of radionuclide transport in U.S. agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.D.; Baes, C.F. III.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the recent concern about the impact of energy technologies on man and related health effects, there has emerged a need for models to calculate or predict the effects of radionuclides on man. A general overview is presented of a model that calculates the ingrowth of radionuclides into man's food chain. The FORTRAN IV computer program TERRA, Transport of Environmentally Released Radionuclides in Agriculture, simulates the build-up of radionuclides in soil, four plant food compartments, in meat and milk from beef, and in the livestock food compartments that cause radionuclide build-up in milk and meat from beef. A large data set of spatially oriented parameters has been developed in conjunction with TERRA. This direct-access data set is called SITE, Specific Information on the Terrestrial Environment, and contains 35 parameters for each of 3525 half-degree longitude-latitude cells which define the lower 48 states. TERRA and SITE are used together as a package for determining radionuclide concentrations in man's food anywhere within the conterminous 48 states due to atmospheric releases

  3. Assessment of the important radionuclides in nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1985-10-01

    The relative importance of the various radionuclides contained in nuclear waste has been assessed by consideration of (1) the quantity of each radionuclide present, (2) the Environmental Protection Agency's release limits for radionuclides, (3) how retardation processes such as solubility and sorption affect radionuclie transport, and (4) the physical and chemical forms of radionuclides in the waste. Three types of waste were reviewed: spent fuel, high-level waste, and defense high-level waste. Conditions specific to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project potential site at Yucca Mountain were used to describe radionuclide transport. The actinides Am, Pu, Np, and U were identified as the waste elements for which solubility and sorption data were most urgently needed. Other important waste elements were identified as Sr, Cs, C, Ni, Zr, Tc, Th, Ra, and Sn. Under some conditions, radionuclides of three elements (C, Tc, and I) may have high solubility and negligible sorption. The potential for transport of some waste elements (C and I) in the gas phase must also be evaluated for the Yucca Mountain Site. 12 refs., 17 tabs

  4. Development and application of an on-line sequential injection system for the separation of artificial and natural radionuclides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.-K.; Sansone, U.; Martin, P.; Kim, C.-S.

    2007-02-01

    The Chemistry Unit of the Physics, Chemistry and Instrumentation Laboratory in the IAEA's Seibersdorf Laboratory in Austria, has the programmatic responsibility to provide assistance to Member State laboratories in maintaining and improving the reliability of analytical measurement results, both in trace element and radionuclide determinations. This is accomplished through the provision of reference materials of terrestrial origin, validated analytical procedures, training in the implementation of internal quality control, and through the evaluation of measurement performance by organization of worldwide and regional interlaboratory comparison exercises. In this framework an on-line sequential injection (SI) system was developed, which can be widely used for the separation and preconcentration of target analytes from diverse environmental samples. The system enables the separation time to be shortened by maintaining a constant flow rate of solution and by avoiding clogging or bubbling in a chromatographic column. The SI system was successfully applied to the separation of Pu in IAEA reference material (IAEA Soil-6) and to the sequential separation of 210 Po and 210 Pb in phosphogypsum candidate reference material. The replicate analysis results of Pu in IAEA reference material (Soil-6) obtained with the SI system are in good agreement with the recommended value within 5% of standard deviation. The SI system enabled a halving in the separation time required for of radionuclides

  5. Radionuclide release from low-level waste in field lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblath, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    A field program has been in operation for 8 years at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to determine the leaching/migration behavior of low-level radioactive waste using lysimeters. The lysimeters are soil-filled caissons containing well characterized wastes, with each lysimeter serving as a model of a shallow land burial trench. Sampling and analysis of percolate water and vegetation from the lysimeters provide a determination of the release rates of the radionuclides from the waste/soil system. Vegetative uptake appears to be a major pathway for migration. Fractional release rates from the waste/soil system are less than 0.01% per year. Waste-to-soil leach rates up to 10% per year have been determined by coring several of the lysimeters. The leaching of solidified wasteforms under unsaturated field conditions has agreed well with static, immersion leaching of the same type waste in the laboratory. However, releases from the waste/soil system in the lysimeter may be greater than predicted based on leaching alone, due to complexation of the radionuclides by other components leached from the wastes to form mobile, anionic species

  6. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  7. Effect of gley formation on leaching of radionuclides and toxic metals from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legin, E.K.; Trifonov, Yu.I.; Khokhlov, M.L.; Legina, E.E.; Strukov, V.N.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclides and toxic metals, entering the soil as a result of technogenic contamination, are not uniformly distributed throughout the soil body, but preferentially fixed on so-called gel films. The gel films represent colloid formations consisting of primarily amorphous iron hydroxides, coordination polymers of mixed Ca,Fe,Al fulvates and humates, and amorphous silica fixed on the muddy aluminosilicate fraction ( 238 U, 239,240 Pu, 152 Eu, 232 Th, 60 Co) and stable elements (Co, Eu) leached from soil samples directly correlates with that of iron, suggesting that under reducing conditions the drainage solution contains a mixture of iron, radionuclides, and microelements of nearly constant composition. This result is consistent with the existing views that radionuclides and microelements in soils are concentrated in the gel films. Furthermore, it reveal that in the investigated system solubilisation of the gel films is accompanied by a combined transfer of radionuclides and stable microelements to the aqueous phase. The most significant effect of leaching was observed for plutonium. (author)

  8. Nominal Range Sensitivity Analysis of peak radionuclide concentrations in randomly heterogeneous aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadini, F.; De Sanctis, J.; Cherubini, A.; Zio, E.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Uncertainty quantification problem associated with the radionuclide migration. ► Groundwater transport processes simulated within a randomly heterogeneous aquifer. ► Development of an automatic sensitivity analysis for flow and transport parameters. ► Proposal of a Nominal Range Sensitivity Analysis approach. ► Analysis applied to the performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository. - Abstract: We consider the problem of quantification of uncertainty associated with radionuclide transport processes within a randomly heterogeneous aquifer system in the context of performance assessment of a near-surface radioactive waste repository. Radionuclide migration is simulated at the repository scale through a Monte Carlo scheme. The saturated groundwater flow and transport equations are then solved at the aquifer scale for the assessment of the expected radionuclide peak concentration at a location of interest. A procedure is presented to perform the sensitivity analysis of this target environmen