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Sample records for radionuclide dna probe

  1. The use of radionuclide DNA probe technology in epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fernandes, Octavio [Fundacao Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina Tropical; Gomes, Rosangela Fatima; Melo, Maria Norma de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Parasitologia]|[Cor Jesus Fontes Mato Grosso Univ., Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Julio Muller

    2000-07-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis are due to different species that belongs to Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana complex and Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis complex, respectively. Cutaneous leishmaniasis ulcers may persist for months to years but eventually they heal, while mucocutaneous leishmaniasis can result in destructive lesions on the nose, oral pharynx, lips or face. The specific diagnosis of the disease is important because of the high cost and toxicity of the treatment and the subsequent medical follow-up depends on the precise identification of the complex that causes the infection. The epidemiological information furnished by the identification of parasites of a given endemic region is also essential for the design of appropriate control measures. In this work we typed, using specific DNA probes labelled with {sup 32}P radionuclide, samples collected from patients living in endemic areas of Mato Grosso state. The results showed that L. braziliensis is the predominant group infecting human patients in the state. We have typed, up to the moment 68 samples. 64 samples (94.1%) belonged to the L. braziliensis complex and only 4 (5.9%) belonged to the L. mexicana complex. (author)

  2. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  3. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  4. The use of radionuclide DNA probe technology for epidemiological studies of tegumentary leishmaniasis in Mato Grosso state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fernandes, Octavio [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina Tropical; Heub, Marcia; Fontes, Cor Jesus [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso, Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Julio Muller; Carvalho, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro; Melo, Maria Norma de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Parasitologia

    2005-10-15

    DNA hybridisation, using probes labelled with 32 P, was used to type Leishmania samples isolated from patients living in endemic areas of Mato Grosso State (Brazil), and clinically diagnosed as having tegumentary leishmaniasis. k DNA cloned mini-circle probes specific for the Leishmania mexicana and Leishmania braziliensis complexes were used. The results showed that L. braziliensis is the predominant group infecting human patients in the state. Sixty-eight samples were typed, 64 samples (94.1%) belonging to the L. braziliensis complex and only four (5.9%) belonging to the L. mexicana complex. Accurate identification of the Leishmania permits better orientation of the medical follow-up, since clinical manifestations may vary depending on the complex to which the parasite belongs. The epidemiological information furnished by the identification of the Leishmania in given endemic area is also essential for the design of appropriate control measures. (author)

  5. The use of radionuclide DNA probe technology for epidemiological studies of tegumentary leishmaniasis in Mato Grosso state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de; Fernandes, Octavio; Heub, Marcia; Fontes, Cor Jesus; Carvalho, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro; Melo, Maria Norma de

    2005-01-01

    DNA hybridisation, using probes labelled with 32 P, was used to type Leishmania samples isolated from patients living in endemic areas of Mato Grosso State (Brazil), and clinically diagnosed as having tegumentary leishmaniasis. k DNA cloned mini-circle probes specific for the Leishmania mexicana and Leishmania braziliensis complexes were used. The results showed that L. braziliensis is the predominant group infecting human patients in the state. Sixty-eight samples were typed, 64 samples (94.1%) belonging to the L. braziliensis complex and only four (5.9%) belonging to the L. mexicana complex. Accurate identification of the Leishmania permits better orientation of the medical follow-up, since clinical manifestations may vary depending on the complex to which the parasite belongs. The epidemiological information furnished by the identification of the Leishmania in given endemic area is also essential for the design of appropriate control measures. (author)

  6. The use of radionuclide DNA probe technology for epidemiological studies of tegumentary leishmaniasis in Mato Grosso state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antero Silva Ribeiro de Andrade

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA hybridisation, using probes labelled with 32P, was used to type Leishmania samples isolated from patients living in endemic areas of Mato Grosso State (Brazil, and clinically diagnosed as having tegumentary leishmaniasis. kDNA cloned mini-circle probes specific for the Leishmania mexicana and Leishmania braziliensis complexes were used. The results showed that L. braziliensis is the predominant group infecting human patients in the state. Sixty-eight samples were typed, 64 samples (94.1% belonging to the L. braziliensis complex and only four (5.9% belonging to the L. mexicana complex. Accurate identification of the Leishmania permits better orientation of the medical follow-up, since clinical manifestations may vary depending on the complex to which the parasite belongs. The epidemiological information furnished by the identification of the Leishmania in given endemic area is also essential for the design of appropriate control measuresHibridização, utilizando sondas de DNA marcadas com 32P, foi utilizada para a tipagem de amostras de Leishmania isoladas de pacientes do estado do Mato Grosso (Brasil, diagnosticados clinicamente como portadores de leishmaniose tegumentar. Sondas de minicírculos clonados de kDNA, específicas para os complexos Leishmania mexicana e Leishmania braziliensis, foram utilizadas. Os resultados demonstraram que o complexo L. brasiliensis é o grupo predominante infectando pacientes humanos no estado do Mato Grosso. Foram tipadas 68 amostras: 64 (94,1% foram identificadas como pertencentes ao complexo L. brasiliensis e somente 4 (5,9% como pertencentes ao complexo L. mexicana. A tipagem de Leishmania é importante para um melhor acompanhamento médico, uma vez que as manifestações clínicas podem variar em função do complexo ao qual o parasita pertence. A informação fornecida pela identificação também é essencial para a definição das medidas de controle mais adequadas e compreensão da epidemiologia da

  7. DNA damage induced by radionuclide internal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Fengmei; Zhao Jingyong; Hong Chengjiao; Lao Qinhua; Wang Liuyi; Yang Shuqin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the DNA damage of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) in rats exposed to radionuclide internal irradiation. Methods: The radionuclides were injected into the rats and single cell get electrophoresis (SCGE) was performed to detect the length of DNA migration in the rat PBMC. Results: DNA migration in the rat PBMC increased with accumulative dose or dose-rate. It showed good relationship of dose vs. response and of dose-rate vs. response, both relationship could be described as linear models. Conclusion: Radionuclide internal irradiation could cause DNA damage in rat PBMC. (authors)

  8. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  9. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  10. Nonisotopic DNA probe techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kricka, Larry J

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this book is to bring together descriptions of the principal nonisotopic methods for DNA hybridization assays, together with experimental details of the methods, including labelling...

  11. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-labeled DNA probe. Images PMID:16348233

  12. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-l...

  13. Radionuclide evaluation of left ventricular function with nonimaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, J P; Blaufox, M D

    1979-10-01

    Portable nonimaging probes have been developed that can evaluate left ventricular function using radionuclide techniques. Two modes of data acquisition are possible with these probe systems, first-pass and gated. Precordial radiocardiograms obtained after a bolus injection can be used to determine cardiac output, pulmonary transit time, pulmonary blood volume, left ventricle ejection fraction, and left-to-right shunts. Gated techniques can be used to determine left ventricular ejection fraction and sytolic time intervals. Probe-determined indices of left ventricular function agree excellently with comparable measurements determined by conventional camera-computer methods as well as by invasive techniques. These have begun to be used in a preliminary manner in a variety of clinical problems associated with left ventricular dysfunction. This review discusses the types of probe systems available, the methods used in positioning them, and details the specifics of their data acquisition and processing capacity. The major criticisms of probe methods are that they are nonimaging and that they measure global rather than regional left ventricular function. In spite of these criticisms, probe systems, because of their portability, high sensitivity, and relatively low cost are useful supplements to conventional camera-computer systems for the measurement of parameters of left ventricular performance using radionuclide techniques.

  14. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both 32 P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis

  15. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  16. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different c...

  17. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA.

  18. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  19. DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Eric A; Neufeld, Josh D

    2010-08-02

    DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) is a powerful technique for identifying active microorganisms that assimilate particular carbon substrates and nutrients into cellular biomass. As such, this cultivation-independent technique has been an important methodology for assigning metabolic function to the diverse communities inhabiting a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Following the incubation of an environmental sample with stable-isotope labelled compounds, extracted nucleic acid is subjected to density gradient ultracentrifugation and subsequent gradient fractionation to separate nucleic acids of differing densities. Purification of DNA from cesium chloride retrieves labelled and unlabelled DNA for subsequent molecular characterization (e.g. fingerprinting, microarrays, clone libraries, metagenomics). This JoVE video protocol provides visual step-by-step explanations of the protocol for density gradient ultracentrifugation, gradient fractionation and recovery of labelled DNA. The protocol also includes sample SIP data and highlights important tips and cautions that must be considered to ensure a successful DNA-SIP analysis.

  20. Microarray of DNA probes on carboxylate functional beads surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄承志; 李原芳; 黄新华; 范美坤

    2000-01-01

    The microarray of DNA probes with 5’ -NH2 and 5’ -Tex/3’ -NH2 modified terminus on 10 um carboxylate functional beads surface in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) is characterized in the preseni paper. it was found that the microarray capacity of DNA probes on the beads surface depends on the pH of the aqueous solution, the concentra-tion of DNA probe and the total surface area of the beads. On optimal conditions, the minimum distance of 20 mer single-stranded DNA probe microarrayed on beads surface is about 14 nm, while that of 20 mer double-stranded DNA probes is about 27 nm. If the probe length increases from 20 mer to 35 mer, its microarray density decreases correspondingly. Mechanism study shows that the binding mode of DNA probes on the beads surface is nearly parallel to the beads surface.

  1. Microarray of DNA probes on carboxylate functional beads surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The microarray of DNA probes with 5′-NH2 and 5′-Tex/3′-NH2 modified terminus on 10 m m carboxylate functional beads surface in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)- carbodiimide (EDC) is characterized in the present paper. It was found that the microarray capacity of DNA probes on the beads surface depends on the pH of the aqueous solution, the concentration of DNA probe and the total surface area of the beads. On optimal conditions, the minimum distance of 20 mer single-stranded DNA probe microarrayed on beads surface is about 14 nm, while that of 20 mer double-stranded DNA probes is about 27 nm. If the probe length increases from 20 mer to 35 mer, its microarray density decreases correspondingly. Mechanism study shows that the binding mode of DNA probes on the beads surface is nearly parallel to the beads surface.

  2. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yi

    2003-01-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize

  3. Radionuclides in diffusion probing of inorganic materials based on chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.

    1994-01-01

    Migration of tellurium-125m, selenium-75, sulfur-35 radionuclides in solid solutions Pb 1-y (Se 0.08 Te 0.92 ) y and (Pb 1-x Sn x ) y Te 1-y , where x=0.1 and 0.2, has been studied, the results are presented. Data on dependence of selenium and tellurium self-diffusion coefficients on temperature in the range of 600-750 deg C are given. The results of the study of self-diffusion coefficient isothermal dependences on lead and tellurium vapour pressure in equilibrium with solid phases have been considered. It is ascertained that a change in the temperature and p-n transitions initiate the change in self-diffusion mechanisms of chalcogenide atoms. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Applications of DNA-Stable Isotope Probing in Bioremediation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Vohra, Jyotsna; Murrell, J. Colin

    DNA-stable isotope probing, a method to identify active microorganisms without the prerequisite of cultivation, has been widely applied in the study of microorganisms involved in the degradation of environmental pollutants. Recent advances and technique considerations in applying DNA-SIP in bioremediation are highlighted. A detailed protocol of a DNA-SIP experiment is provided.

  5. Imitation of radiation-induced damages to DNA with a radionuclide incorporated into polynucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Because of a great variety and different reparability of radiation-induced DNA lesions it is difficult to evaluate the radiobiologacal significance of certain individual alterations. It is suggested that the radionuclides incorporated anto DNA can be used to imitate different types of radiation damages to DNA. Both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the problem are discussed

  6. Whole genomic DNA probe for detection of Porphyromonas endodontalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, R; Makkar, S R; Sela, M N; Stevens, R

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a DNA probe for Porphyromonas endodontalis. Pure cultures of P. endodontalis were grown in TYP medium, in an anaerobic chamber. DNA was extracted from the P. endodontalis and labeled using the Genius System by Boehringer Mannheim. The labeled P. endodontalis DNA was used in dot-blot hybridization reactions with homologous (P. endodontalis) and unrelated bacterial samples. To determine specificity, strains of 40 other oral bacterial species (e.g. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, and Prevotella intermedia) were spotted and reacted with the P. endodontalis DNA probe. None of the panel of 40 oral bacteria hybridized with the P. endodontalis probe, whereas the blot of the homologous organism showed a strong positive reaction. To determine the sensitivity of the probe, dilutions of a P. endodontalis suspension of known concentration were blotted onto a nylon membrane and reacted with the probe. The results of our investigation indicate that the DNA probe that we have prepared specifically detects only P. endodontalis and can detect at least 3 x 10(4) cells.

  7. Probe Selection for DNA Microarrays using OligoWiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Juncker, Agnieszka; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide abundance measurements using DNA microarray technology are possible only if appropriate probes complementary to the target nucleotides can be identified. Here we present a protocol for selecting DNA probes for microarrays using the OligoWiz application. OligoWiz is a client-server appl......Nucleotide abundance measurements using DNA microarray technology are possible only if appropriate probes complementary to the target nucleotides can be identified. Here we present a protocol for selecting DNA probes for microarrays using the OligoWiz application. OligoWiz is a client......-server application that offers a detailed graphical interface and real-time user interaction on the client side, and massive computer power and a large collection of species databases (400, summer 2007) on the server side. Probes are selected according to five weighted scores: cross-hybridization, deltaT(m), folding...... computer skills and can be executed from any Internet-connected computer. The probe selection procedure for a standard microarray design targeting all yeast transcripts can be completed in 1 h....

  8. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  9. AMS. A powerful tool for probing nucleosynthesis via long-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Kaeppeler, F.

    2005-01-01

    The potential of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) will be demonstrated on typical radionuclides of interest with half-lives between some years and up to hundred million years. The Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) represents a state-of-the-art AMS facility which provides the ability for quantifying nuclides over the whole mass range. At VERA, AMS is used for quantifying long-lived radionuclides within a wide range of applications - from archaeology to astrophysics. Lack of information on cross section data exists for a list of nuclides pointed out by nuclear data requests. The potential of AMS as a powerful tool for probing nucleosynthesis will be demonstrated by means of some prime examples. Recent developments in the technique of AMS will be highlighted and some applications of AMS in astrophysics will be discussed. In addition, an overview on detection limits, measurement precision as well as the recent measurement program at VERA for quantifying such long-lived radionuclides will be presented. (author)

  10. Probe Microscopic Studies of DNA Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Umemura

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids of DNA and carbon nanotubes (CNTs are promising nanobioconjugates for nanobiosensors, carriers for drug delivery, and other biological applications. In this review, nanoscopic characterization of DNA-CNT hybrids, in particular, characterization by scanning probe microscopy (SPM, is summarized. In many studies, topographical imaging by atomic force microscopy has been performed. However, some researchers have demonstrated advanced SPM operations in order to maximize its unique and valuable functions. Such sophisticated approaches are attractive and will have a significant impact on future studies of DNA-CNT hybrids.

  11. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  12. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich-Bode, Karin; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas; Weier, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli

    2008-12-16

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-?B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  13. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas P.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-12-04

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-{kappa}B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  14. Genotypic characterization of Rickettsiae by DNA probes generated from Rickettsia Prowazekii DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demkin, V.V.; Rydkina, E.B.; Likhoded, L.Ya.; Ignatovich, V.F.; Genig, V.A.; Balayeva, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Southern blot analysis of HindIII-cleaved rickettsial DNA was used for genotypic characterization of the typhus group (TG) species (R. prowazekii, R. typhi, R. canada) and a few species were of the spotted fever group (SFG)rickettsiae (R. sibirica, R. conorii, R. akari). Four different DNA probes were employed. PBH11 and PBH13 probes were morphospecific HindIII fragment of R prowazekii DNA. MW218 probe contained the gene for 51 K antigen and MW264 probe contained the citrate synthase gene of R. prowazekii. All the probes hybridized with the tested TG and SFG rickettsial DNAs, forming from 1 to 5 bands, but they did not with R. tsutsudamushi or C. burnetii DNAs. All the probes demonstrated specific hybridization pattern with TG species and R. akari. PBH11. PBH13 and MW264 probes clearly distinguished R. sibirica and R. conorii from the other tested rickettsiae, but not from each other. However, these two species differed slightly with MW218 probe. Several strains of each species were analyzed in this way and except for strains of R. conorii identical intra-species pattern were obtained. These data lead us to consider the obtained hybridization patterns as criteria for genotypic identification. (author)

  15. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne' , Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  16. Probing the DNA Structural Requirements for Facilitated Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    DNA glycosylases perform a genome-wide search to locate damaged nucleotides among a great excess of undamaged nucleotides. Many glycosylases are capable of facilitated diffusion, whereby multiple sites along the DNA are sampled during a single binding encounter. Electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are crucial for facilitated diffusion, but the extent to which diffusing proteins rely on the double-helical structure DNA is not known. Kinetic assays were used to probe the DNA searching mechanism of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and to test the extent to which diffusion requires B-form duplex DNA. Although AAG excises εA lesions from single-stranded DNA, it is not processive on single-stranded DNA because dissociation is faster than N-glycosidic bond cleavage. However, the AAG complex with single-stranded DNA is sufficiently stable to allow for DNA annealing when a complementary strand is added. This observation provides evidence of nonspecific association of AAG with single-stranded DNA. Single-strand gaps, bubbles, and bent structures do not impede the search by AAG. Instead, these flexible or bent structures lead to the capture of a nearby site of damage that is more efficient than that of a continuous B-form duplex. The ability of AAG to negotiate these helix discontinuities is inconsistent with a sliding mode of diffusion but can be readily explained by a hopping mode that involves microscopic dissociation and reassociation. These experiments provide evidence of relatively long-range hops that allow a searching protein to navigate around DNA binding proteins that would serve as obstacles to a sliding protein. PMID:25495964

  17. CHEMLAB. A probe for in-situ radionuclide experiments. Diffusion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats; Eriksen, Trygve E. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-06-01

    CHEMLAB is a borehole laboratory built into a probe, in which in situ experiments can be carried out under ambient conditions with respect to pressure and temperature with the use of natural groundwater from the surrounding rock. The first CHEMLAB experiments, diffusion of cations and anions in compacted bentonite clay, have been carried out in borehole KA2512A at a depth of 320 m in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Diffusant solutions of Co{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, Cs{sup +}, I{sup -} and TcO{sup 4-} with {sup 57}Co, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 131}I and {sup 99}Tc as tracers were used. measured profiles for the radionuclides in the bentonite are in good agreement with profiles predicted from modelling based on apparent diffusivities and sorption coefficients obtained in laboratory experiments with clay compacted to corresponding dry density and synthetic ground water with the same composition as in borehole KA2512A.

  18. CHEMLAB. A probe for in-situ radionuclide experiments. Diffusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Mats; Eriksen, Trygve E.

    2001-06-01

    CHEMLAB is a borehole laboratory built into a probe, in which in situ experiments can be carried out under ambient conditions with respect to pressure and temperature with the use of natural groundwater from the surrounding rock. The first CHEMLAB experiments, diffusion of cations and anions in compacted bentonite clay, have been carried out in borehole KA2512A at a depth of 320 m in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Diffusant solutions of Co 2+ , Sr 2+ , Cs + , I - and TcO 4- with 57 Co, 85 Sr, 134 Cs, 131 I and 99 Tc as tracers were used. measured profiles for the radionuclides in the bentonite are in good agreement with profiles predicted from modelling based on apparent diffusivities and sorption coefficients obtained in laboratory experiments with clay compacted to corresponding dry density and synthetic ground water with the same composition as in borehole KA2512A

  19. Evaluation of the Gen-Probe DNA probe for the detection of legionellae in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    A commercial DNA probe kit designed to detect rRNA from legionellae was evaluated for its ability to correctly discriminate between legionellae and non-legionellae taken from culture plates. The probe kit, made by the Gen-Probe Corp. (San Diego, Calif.), was radiolabeled with 125 I, and probe bacterial RNA hybridization, detected in a simple one-tube system hybridization assay, was quantitated with a gamma counter. A total of 156 Legionella sp. strains were tested, of which 125 were Legionella pneumophila and the remainder were strains from 21 other Legionella spp. A total of 106 gram-negative non-legionellae, isolated from human respiratory tract (81%) and other body site (19%) specimens, were also tested; 14 genera and 28 species were represented. The probe easily distinguished all of the legionellae from the non-legionellae. The average legionellae/non-legionellae hybridization ratio was 42:1, and the lowest ratio was 2:1; a minor modification in the procedure increased the lowest ratio to 5:1. In addition to correctly identifying all Legionella species, the probe was able to separate some of the various species of Legionella. L. pneumophila strains hybridized more completely to the probe than did the other Legionella spp.; L. wadsworthii and L. oakridgensis hybridized only about 25% of the probe relative to L. pneumophila. Some strains of phenotypically identified L. pneumophila had much lower hybridization to the probe than other members of the species and may represent a new Legionella species. The simplicity of the technique and specificity of the probe make it a good candidate for confirming the identity of legionellae in culture

  20. DNA imaging and quantification using chemi-luminescent probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, G.; Redjdal, N.; Laniece, P.; Siebert, R.; Tricoire, H.; Valentin, L.

    1999-01-01

    During this interdisciplinary study we have developed an ultra sensitive and reliable imaging system of DNA labelled by chemiluminescence. Based on a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD, the system achieves sensitivities down to 10 fg/mm 2 labelled DNA over a surface area of 25 x 25 cm 2 with a sub-millimeter resolution. Commercially available chemi-luminescent - and enhancer molecules are compared and their reaction conditions optimized for best signal-to-noise ratios. Double labelling was performed to verify quantification with radioactive probes. (authors)

  1. Photoenzyme probes of photodamage to cells and cellular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Development of photoenzyme probes for detection of ultraviolet damage to cells and DNA is reviewed with special emphasis on a process using polyethylene glycol to induce cell fusion. Polyethylene glycol is easy to obtain and handle, is gentle to the cells and does not induce latent or productive virus infection; therefore, it may be a general method for insertion of exogenous enzymes into mammalian cells. (PCS)

  2. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Miyahara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acid (PNA has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  3. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry. PMID:23435052

  4. Strand breaks in plasmid DNA following positional changes of Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of our studies is to elucidate the kinetics of DNA strand breaks caused by low-energy Auger electron emitters in close proximity to DNA. Previously we have studied the DNA break yields in plasmids after the decay of indium-111 bound to DNA or free in solution. In this work, we compare the DNA break yields in supercoiled DNA of iodine-125 decaying close to DNA following DNA intercalation, minor-groove binding, or surface binding, and at a distance form DNA. Supercoiled DNA, stored at 4 C to accumulate radiation dose from the decay of 125 I, was then resolved by gel electrophoresis into supercoiled, nicked circular, and linear forms, representing undamaged DNA, single-strand breaks, and double-strand breaks respectively. DNA-intercalated or groove-bound 125 I is more effective than surface-bound radionuclide or 125 I free in solution. The hydroxyl radical scavenger DMSO protects against damage by 125 I free in solution but has minimal effect on damage by groove-bound 125 I. (orig.)

  5. Application of synthetic DNA probes to the analysis of DNA sequence variants in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, R.B.; Petz, L.D.; Yam, P.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Oligonucleotide probes provide a tool to discriminate between any two alleles on the basis of hybridization. Random sampling of the genome with different oligonucleotide probes should reveal polymorphism in a certain percentage of the cases. In the hope of identifying polymorphic regions more efficiently, we chose to take advantage of the proposed hypermutability of repeated DNA sequences and the specificity of oligonucleotide hybridization. Since, under appropriate conditions, oligonucleotide probes require complete base pairing for hybridization to occur, they will only hybridize to a subset of the members of a repeat family when all members of the family are not identical. The results presented here suggest that oligonucleotide hybridization can be used to extend the genomic sequences that can be tested for the presence of RFLPs. This expands the tools available to human genetics. In addition, the results suggest that repeated DNA sequences are indeed more polymorphic than single-copy sequences. 28 references, 2 figures

  6. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Progress report, May 1974--May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    The mutagenic effect of 3 H incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster was studied in relation to age and radiation dose. The 3 H was incorporated into DNA in the germ line by feeding male larvae in late second instar a pulse of the radionuclide. Genetic stocks were used in a mating scheme to produce a cross that produces only male larvae for labeling with the radionuclide, and another cross was made that produces the parental females as virgins since no male progeny are produced. The F 1 generation was scored for losses of the X or Y chromosome because of dominant markers, Bar-Stone and yellow-plus, on the Y-chromosome. All the F 1 and F 2 males were sterile permitting out-crossing of females to nontreated stocks for sex-linked recessive lethal tests in the F 2 and F 3 . (U.S.)

  7. Probing the Structure of DNA Aptamers with a Classic Heterocycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Reid Bishop

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA aptamers are synthetic, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides selectedby SELEX methods for their binding with specific ligands. Here we present ethidiumbinding results for three related DNA aptamers (PDB code: 1OLD, 1DB6, and 2ARGthat bind L-argininamide (L-Arm. The ligand bound form of each aptamer's structurehas been reported and each are found to be composed primarily of two domainsconsisting of a stem helical region and a loop domain that forms a binding pocket for thecognate ligand. Previous thermodynamic experiments demonstrated that the DNAaptamer 1OLD undergoes a large conformational ordering upon binding to L-Arm. Herewe extend those linkage binding studies by examining the binding of the heterocyclicintercalator ethidium to each of the three aptamers by fluorescence and absorptionspectrophotometric titrations. Our results reveal that ethidium binds to each aptamer with∆Go's in the range of -8.7 to -9.4 kcal/mol. The stoichiometry of binding is 2:1 for eachaptamer and is quantitatively diminished in the presence of L-Arm as is the overallfluorescence intensity of ethidium. Together, these results demonstrate that a portion ofthe bound ethidium is excluded from the aptamer in the presence of a saturating amountof L-Arm. These results demonstrate the utility of ethidium and related compounds forthe probing of non-conventional DNA structures and reveal an interesting fundamentalthermodynamic linkage in DNA aptamers. Results are discussed in the context of thethermodynamic stability and structure of each of the aptamers examined.

  8. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  9. Detection of DNA fingerprints of cultivated rice by hybridization with a human minisatellite DNA probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    A human minisatellite DNA probe detects several restriction fragment length polymorphisms in cultivars of Asian and African rice. Certain fragments appear to be inherited in a Mendelian fashion and may represent unlinked loci. The hybridization patterns appear to be cultivar-specific and largely unchanged after the regeneration of plants from tissue culture. The results suggest that these regions of the rice genome may be used to generate cultivar-specific DNA fingerprints. The demonstration of similarity between a human minisatellite sequence and polymorphic regions in the rice genome suggests that such regions also occur in the genomes of many other plant species

  10. Labelling of HBV-DNA probe using reagent made in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Quanshi

    1991-01-01

    The labelling hepatitis Bvirus DNA (HBV-DNA) probe was studied by using reagent made in China. The results showed that: (1) The dNTPs with high specific activity was necessary for the labelling of nigh specific activity HBV-DNA probe; (2) reaction of labelling HBV-DNA probe was completed in a few minutes; (3) 0.37 MBq 3 H dTTP (specific activity 1.554TBq/mmol) was enough to label 1 μg HBV-DNA and the specific activity of probe reached 3.4 x 10 cpm/μg; (4) 7 MBqα- 32 P dATP (specific activity > 111 TBq/mmol) can label HBV-DNA probe to specific activity 1.35 x 10 cpm/μg. It was concluded that the reagent made in China can be used for the study in molecular biology

  11. Detection of TTV-DNA in PBMC using digoxigenin labelled probe by in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Qi Qige

    2002-01-01

    To determine TTV-DNA in PBMC in patients with viral hepatitis, a study of in situ hybridization using digoxigenin labelled probe by PCR method to the TTV ORF1 region was performed on PBMC. Results showed that the detection rate of TTV-DNA using double-stranded probe in TTV-DNA positive group in sera was 58.06 (18/31), and the detection rate of TTV-DNA using double-stranded probe in TTV-DNA negative group in sera was 27.59 (8/29). For TTV-DNA positive group detected by double- stranded probe, then we use negative- stranded probe to detect their replication. The detection rate was 22.2%(4/18). Conclusions: TTV can infect PBMC and replicate in PBMC

  12. Iodination as a probe for small regions of disrupted secondary structure in double-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Nes, Ingolf F.; Wells, Robert D.

    1976-01-01

    Conditions were established where the thallium-catalyzed iodination of random coil DNA proceeded 100–200 times faster than for native DNA. This reaction was explored as a probe for localized regions of disrupted base pairs in duplex DNA. A heteroduplex was constructed between DNA fragments produced...

  13. Method and apparatus for synthesis of arrays of DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrina, Francesco; Sussman, Michael R.; Blattner, Frederick R.; Singh-Gasson, Sangeet; Green, Roland

    2002-04-23

    The synthesis of arrays of DNA probes sequences, polypeptides, and the like is carried out using a patterning process on an active surface of a substrate. An image is projected onto the active surface of the substrate utilizing an image former that includes a light source that provides light to a micromirror device comprising an array of electronically addressable micromirrors, each of which can be selectively tilted between one of at least two positions. Projection optics receives the light reflected from the micromirrors along an optical axis and precisely images the micromirrors onto the active surface of the substrate, which may be used to activate the surface of the substrate. The first level of bases may then be applied to the substrate, followed by development steps, and subsequent exposure of the substrate utilizing a different pattern of micromirrors, with further repeats until the elements of a two dimensional array on the substrate surface have an appropriate base bound thereto. The micromirror array can be controlled in conjunction with a DNA synthesizer supplying appropriate reagents to a flow cell containing the active substrate to control the sequencing of images presented by the micromirror array in coordination of the reagents provided to the substrate.

  14. DNA damage in blood lymphocytes in patients after {sup 177}Lu peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Uta; Bluemel, Christina; Buck, Andreas Konrad; Werner, Rudolf Alexander; Lassmann, Michael [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Nowak, Carina; Scherthan, Harry [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate DNA double strand break (DSB) formation and its correlation with the absorbed dose to the blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing their first peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with {sup 177}Lu-labelled DOTATATE/DOTATOC. The study group comprised 16 patients receiving their first PRRT. At least six peripheral blood samples were obtained before, and between 0.5 h and 48 h after radionuclide administration. From the time-activity curves of the blood and the whole body, residence times for blood self-irradiation and whole-body irradiation were determined. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated, fixed with ethanol and subjected to immunofluorescence staining for colocalizing γ-H2AX/53BP1 DSB-marking foci. The average number of DSB foci per cell per patient sample was determined as a function of the absorbed dose to the blood and compared with an in vitro calibration curve established in our laboratory with {sup 131}I and {sup 177}Lu. The average number of radiation-induced foci (RIF) per cell increased over the first 5 h after radionuclide administration and decreased thereafter. A linear fit from 0 to 5 h as a function of the absorbed dose to the blood agreed with our in vitro calibration curve. At later time-points the number of RIF decreased, indicating progression of DNA repair. Measurements of RIF and the absorbed dose to the blood after systemic administration of {sup 177}Lu may be used to obtain data on the individual dose-response relationships in vivo. Individual patient data were characterized by a linear dose-dependent increase and an exponential decay function describing repair. (orig.)

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering based nonfluorescent probe for multiplex DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lan; Yu, Chenxu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    To provide rapid and accurate detection of DNA markers in a straightforward, inexpensive, and multiplex format, an alternative surface-enhanced Raman scattering based probe was designed and fabricated to covalently attach both DNA probing sequence and nonfluorescent Raman tags to the surface of gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuP-RTag). The intensity of Raman signal of the probes could be controlled through the surface coverage of the nonfluorescent Raman tags (RTags). Detection sensitivity of these probes could be optimized by fine-tuning the amount of DNA molecules and RTags on the probes. Long-term stability of the DNA-AuP-RTag probes was found to be good (over 3 months). Excellent multiplexing capability of the DNA-AuP-RTag scheme was demonstrated by simultaneous identification of up to eight probes in a mixture. Detection of hybridization of single-stranded DNA to its complementary targets was successfully accomplished with a long-term goal to use nonfluorescent RTags in a Raman-based DNA microarray platform.

  16. Leishmania diagnostic and identification py using 32P labelled DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de; Melo, Maria Norma de

    1999-10-01

    P 32 labelled DNA probes are valious instruments for the parasitic diseases by using hybridization reaction. In this paper we describe the methodology and present the foundations for the radioactive probes production, based on the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), for the Leishmania diagnostic an identification. We also describe the kDNA purification protocol from Leishmania reference cepa, the process of P 32 labelling of the kDNA by using the nick translation method, gathering, sample preparation and treatment, the optimum conditions for the hybridization reaction and the procedures for the autoradiography

  17. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence genes: invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandeh, Nadia; Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    The pathotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause different types of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The presence of a wide range of virulence genes in UPEC enables us to design appropriate DNA microarray probes. These probes, which are used in DNA microarray technology, provide us with an accurate and rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment in association with UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. The main goal of this article is to introduce the UPEC virulence genes as invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes. Main search engines such as Google Scholar and databases like NCBI were searched to find and study several original pieces of literature, review articles, and DNA gene sequences. In parallel with in silico studies, the experiences of the authors were helpful for selecting appropriate sources and writing this review article. There is a significant variety of virulence genes among UPEC strains. The DNA sequences of virulence genes are fabulous patterns for designing microarray probes. The location of virulence genes and their sequence lengths influence the quality of probes. The use of selected virulence genes for designing microarray probes gives us a wide range of choices from which the best probe candidates can be chosen. DNA microarray technology provides us with an accurate, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic method which is facilitated by designing microarray probes. Via these tools, we are able to have an accurate diagnosis and a definitive treatment regarding UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes.

  19. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in foods, by a combination of PCR and DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingianni, A; Floris, M; Palomba, P; Madeddu, M A; Quartuccio, M; Pompei, R

    2001-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a frequent contaminant of water and foods. Its rapid detection is needed before some foods can be prepared for marketing. In this work L. monocytogenes has been searched for in foods, by a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a DNA probe. Both PCR and the probe were prepared for recognizing a specific region of the internalin gene, which is responsible for the production of one of the most important pathogenic factors of Listeria. The combined use of PCR and the DNA probe was used for the detection of L. monocytogenes in over 180 environmental and food samples. Several detection methods were compared in this study, namely conventional culture methods; direct PCR; PCR after an enrichment step; a DNA probe alone; a DNA probe after enrichment and another commercially available gene-probe. Finally PCR and the DNA probe were used in series on all the samples collected. When the DNA probe was associated with the PCR, specific and accurate detection of listeria in the samples could be obtained in about a working-day. The present molecular method showed some advantages in terms of rapidity and specificity in comparison to the other aforementioned tests. In addition, it resulted as being easy to handle, even for non-specialized personnel in small diagnostic microbiology laboratories. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Detecting the effects of toxic agents on spermatogenesis using DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, N.B.

    1987-01-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of spermatogenesis suggest that DNA probes can be used to monitor the effects of toxic agents in male germ cells of mammals. Molecular hybridization analyses with DNA probes can provide a reproducible methodology capable of detecting changes ranging from massive deletions to single base pair substitutions in the genome of exposed individuals. A constantly increasing number of DNA probes that can be used to detect such alterations in human sperm DNA exist for both ubiquitously expressed proteins and for genes solely expressed in the testis. In this chapter, the currently available testicular stage-specific and/or cell type-specific DNA probes and the techniques by which they can be utilized in reproductive toxicology studies are discussed. The advantages, limitations, and future technological advances of this novel biological marker system for the human male reproductive system are also considered

  1. Synthesis and detection of 3'-OH terminal biotin-labeled DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brakel, C.L.; Engelhardt, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nick translation has been used to prepare biotin-dUTP-containing DNA probes. These stable DNA probes have been identified, following hybridization to target DNA, by fluorescence using antibiotin antibodies or by enzyme reactions in which the enzyme has been linked to avidin or streptavidin. It is probable that this technology will be applicable to certain diagnostic determinations and that, with sufficient sensitivity, this technology might provide a system for obtaining rapid and specific diagnoses in situations presently requiring time-consuming growth assays. The sensitivity of this assay can be increased in two ways: (1) by increasing the amount of biotin contained in the DNA probes, and (2) by increasing the response to individual biotin molecules in the DNA probes. This report demonstrates that terminal deoxynucleotide transferase can be employed to increase the biotin content of DNA probes. We also introduce a new streptavidin-linked enzyme system that produces a greater response to biotinylated DNA probes than does streptavidin-linked horseradish peroxidase

  2. Surface density dependence of PCR amplicon hybridization on PNA/DNA probe layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Danfeng; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Fang

    2005-01-01

    at an intermediate sodium concentration (approximately 100 mM). These effects were mainly ascribed to the electrostatic cross talk among the hybridized DNA molecules and the secondary structure of PCR amplicons. For the negatively charged DNA probes, the hybridization reaction was subjected additionally to the DNA....../DNA electrostatic barrier, particularly in lower ionic strength range (e.g., 10 approximately 150 mM Na(+)). The electrostatic cross talk was shown to be largely reduced if the PNA probe layer was sufficiently diluted by following a strategic templated immobilization method. As a consequence, a pseudo...

  3. Generation of species-specific DNA probes for Leishmania aethiopica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laskay, T.; Kiessling, R.; Rinke deWit, T. F.; Wirth, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    We report here the cloning of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) sequences from Leishmania aethiopica in order to develop a specific and sensitive method for the identification of the parasite. Analysis of the cloned kDNA sequences showed different taxonomic specificities demonstrating sequence diversity within

  4. Probing structural changes of self assembled i-motif DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Iljoon; Patil, Sachin; Fhayli, Karim; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    We report an i-motif structural probing system based on Thioflavin T (ThT) as a fluorescent sensor. This probe can discriminate the structural changes of RET and Rb i-motif sequences according to pH change. This journal is

  5. Combining ligation reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis to obtain reliable long DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Mondello, Monica; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-05-01

    New DNA amplification methods are continuously developed for sensitive detection and quantification of specific DNA target sequences for, e.g. clinical, environmental or food applications. These new applications often require the use of long DNA oligonucleotides as probes for target sequences hybridization. Depending on the molecular technique, the length of DNA probes ranges from 40 to 450 nucleotides, solid-phase chemical synthesis being the strategy generally used for their production. However, the fidelity of chemical synthesis of DNA decreases for larger DNA probes. Defects in the oligonucleotide sequence result in the loss of hybridization efficiency, affecting the sensitivity and selectivity of the amplification method. In this work, an enzymatic procedure has been developed as an alternative to solid-phase chemical synthesis for the production of long oligonucleotides. The enzymatic procedure for probe production was based on ligation of short DNA sequences. Long DNA probes were obtained from smaller oligonucleotides together with a short sequence that acts as bridge stabilizing the molecular complex for DNA ligation. The ligation reactions were monitored by capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF) using a bare fused-silica capillary. The capillary gel electrophoresis-LIF method demonstrated to be very useful and informative for the characterization of the ligation reaction, providing important information about the nature of some impurities, as well as for the fine optimization of the ligation conditions (i.e. ligation cycles, oligonucleotide and enzyme concentration). As a result, the yield and quality of the ligation product were highly improved. The in-lab prepared DNA probes were used in a novel multiplex ligation-dependent genome amplification (MLGA) method for the detection of genetically modified maize in samples. The great possibilities of the whole approach were demonstrated by the specific and sensitive

  6. DNA polymorphisms revealed by the RAPD technique show differences between radionuclide-contaminated and uncontaminated mosquitofish populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakis, C.W.; Shugart, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    In 1977, approximately 250 Mosquitofish (Gambusia affines) were transplanted from a relatively uncontaminated site into a small pond on the Oak Ridge Reservation that is heavily contaminated with radionuclides. DNA polymorphisms, using the RAPD technique, were examined in order to determine if any genetic differentiation had occurred between the two populations. Also, fish from another radionuclide-contaminated population (White Oak Lake) and two unrelated non-contaminated populations were also examined. The RAPD (Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA) technique uses the polymerase chain reaction with a short oligonucleotide primer to produce DNA fragments of various lengths. When analyzed by gel electrophoresis, these fragments form banding patterns similar to DNA fingerprints. A total of 26 primers were used to produce DNA band patterns, many of which revealed population differences. In addition several primers revealed banding patterns which differentiated between the Crystal Springs and Pond 3513 populations. Furthermore, bands found at high frequency in Pond 3513 and White Oak Lake populations were absent or present at a lower frequency in the non-contaminated populations. For some primers, the contaminated populations showed more DNA bands per individual, and fish with more bands had fewer DNA strand breaks than the fish with fewer bands. These data will be discussed with relation to biomonitoring programs and evolution of resistance to genotoxins in natural populations

  7. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O' Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  8. Beat-to-beat left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation: radionuclide assessment with the computerized nuclear probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.; Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Lachman, A.B.; Zaret, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    There is wide beat-to-beat variability in cycle length and left ventricular performance in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, left ventricular ejection fraction and relative left ventricular volumes were evaluated on a beat-to-beat basis with the computerized nuclear probe, an instrument with sufficiently high sensitivity to allow continuous evaluation of the radionuclide time-activity curve. Of 18 patients with atrial fibrillation, 5 had mitral stenosis, 6 had mitral regurgitation, and 7 had coronary artery disease. Fifty consecutive beats were analyzed in each patient. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 17 to 51%. There was substantial beat-to-beat variation in cycle length and left ventricular ejection fraction in all patients, including those with marked left ventricular dysfunction. In 14 patients who also underwent multiple gated cardiac blood pool imaging, there was an excellent correlation between mean ejection fraction derived from the nuclear probe and gated ejection fraction obtained by gamma camera imaging (r . 0.90). Based on beat-to-beat analysis, left ventricular function was dependent on relative end-diastolic volume and multiple preceding cycle lengths, but not preceding end-systolic volumes. This study demonstrates that a single value for left ventricular ejection fraction does not adequately characterize left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, both the mean beat-to-beat and the gated ejection fraction may underestimate left ventricular performance at rest in such patients

  9. In situ study of radionuclide diffusion into clays with specific device: Autolab probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcheron, J.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this shared cost contract between the French Atomic Energy Commissariat, Nuclear Safety and Protection Institute and the Commission of the European Communities was to build and use an experimental drilling probe, the AUTOLAB prob, which was designed to measure the diffusion into clay of radioactive pollutants originating from a high activity waste storage. The measurement was carried out in-situ during drilling. The probe is equipped a new operating mode which involves using the pressure of the drilling water as its source of energy. The probe is autonomous and can stay in the bore hole for an extensive period of time without requiring any monitoring and without introducing any pollution. The diffusion experiment was carried out in a bore-hole at the JRC in ISPRA (ITALY). Two diffusion experiments were carried out in identical conditions (clay, 85Sr tracer, water samples), one in Laboratory, (ISPRA JRC Radiochemistry Laboratory, ITALY), and the other in-situ. The results displayed that 85Sr diffusion was considerably faster in the in-situ experiment than in that conducted in Laboratory. The explanation for this phenomenon, which could be due to the balance of carbonates, has not yet been clearly established. This test shows the value of comparing laboratory tests with in-situ tests conducted accurately using well adapted equipment. 9 refs., 10 figs

  10. Exciton-controlled fluorescence: application to hybridization-sensitive fluorescent DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Ikeda, Shuji; Kubota, Takeshi; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    A hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probe has been designed for nucleic acid detection, using the concept of fluorescence quenching caused by the intramolecular excitonic interaction of fluorescence dyes. We synthesized a doubly thiazole orange-labeled nucleotide showing high fluorescence intensity for a hybrid with the target nucleic acid and effective quenching for the single-stranded state. This exciton-controlled fluorescent probe was applied to living HeLa cells using microinjection to visualize intracellular mRNA localization. Immediately after injection of the probe into the cell, fluorescence was observed from the probe hybridizing with the target RNA. This fluorescence rapidly decreased upon addition of a competitor DNA. Multicoloring of this probe resulted in the simple simultaneous detection of plural target nucleic acid sequences. This probe realized a large, rapid, reversible change in fluorescence intensity in sensitive response to the amount of target nucleic acid, and facilitated spatiotemporal monitoring of the behavior of intracellular RNA.

  11. DNA probe for strain typing of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, A; Kwon-Chung, K J

    1992-01-01

    A 7-kb linear plasmid, harbored by a URA5 transformant, hybridized to all the chromosomes of Cryptococcus neoformans separated by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis. Its linear maintenance was determined to have been facilitated by the presence of telomere-like sequences at its free ends. Hybridization of this plasmid to AccI-digested genomic DNAs of 26 C. neoformans strains generated 21 unique DNA fingerprints. The DNA fingerprints of isolates within the same serotype...

  12. 2-Aminopurine hairpin probes for the detection of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Yazbi, Amira F.; Loppnow, Glen R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molecular beacon with 2AP bases detects DNA damage in a simple mix-and-read assay. ► Molecular beacons with 2AP bases detect damage at a 17.2 nM limit of detection. ► The 2AP molecular beacon is linear over a 0–3.5 μM concentration range for damage. - Abstract: Nucleic acid exposure to radiation and chemical insults leads to damage and disease. Thus, detection and understanding DNA damage is important for elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. However, current methods of DNA damage detection are either time-consuming, destroy the sample, or are too specific to be used for generic detection of damage. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence sensor of 2-aminopurine (2AP), a fluorescent analogue of adenine, incorporated in the loop of a hairpin probe for the quantification of ultraviolet (UV) C-induced nucleic acid damage. Our results show that the selectivity of the 2AP hairpin probe to UV-induced nucleic acid damage is comparable to molecular beacon (MB) probes of DNA damage. The calibration curve for the 2AP hairpin probe shows good linearity (R 2 = 0.98) with a limit of detection of 17.2 nM. This probe is a simple, fast and economic fluorescence sensor for the quantification of UV-induced damage in DNA.

  13. Determination for Enterobacter cloacae based on a europium ternary complex labeled DNA probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Ruan, Min; Qin, Pin-Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2011-11-01

    The fast detection and accurate diagnosis of the prevalent pathogenic bacteria is very important for the treatment of disease. Nowadays, fluorescence techniques are important tools for diagnosis. A two-probe tandem DNA hybridization assay was designed for the detection of Enterobacter cloacae based on time-resolved fluorescence. In this work, the authors synthesized a novel europium ternary complex Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) with intense luminescence, high fluorescence quantum yield and long lifetime before. We developed a method based on this europium complex for the specific detection of original extracted DNA from E. cloacae. In the hybridization assay format, the reporter probe was labeled with Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) on the 5'-terminus, and the capture probe capture probe was covalent immobilized on the surface of the glutaraldehyde treated glass slides. The original extracted DNA of samples was directly used without any DNA purification and amplification. The detection was conducted by monitoring the fluorescence intensity from the glass surface after DNA hybridization. The detection limit of the DNA was 5 × 10 -10 mol L -1. The results of the present work proved that this new approach was easy to operate with high sensitivity and specificity. It could be conducted as a powerful tool for the detection of pathogen microorganisms in the environment.

  14. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbock, L J; Otto, O; Skarstam, D R; Jahn, S; Chimerel, C; Gornall, J L; Keyser, U F

    2010-01-01

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of λ-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single λ-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  15. Design of 240,000 orthogonal 25mer DNA barcode probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qikai; Schlabach, Michael R; Hannon, Gregory J; Elledge, Stephen J

    2009-02-17

    DNA barcodes linked to genetic features greatly facilitate screening these features in pooled formats using microarray hybridization, and new tools are needed to design large sets of barcodes to allow construction of large barcoded mammalian libraries such as shRNA libraries. Here we report a framework for designing large sets of orthogonal barcode probes. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by designing 240,000 barcode probes and testing their performance by hybridization. From the test hybridizations, we also discovered new probe design rules that significantly reduce cross-hybridization after their introduction into the framework of the algorithm. These rules should improve the performance of DNA microarray probe designs for many applications.

  16. Coaxial atomic force microscope probes for dielectrophoresis of DNA under different buffer conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yinglei; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a coaxial AFM nanoprobe device for dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of DNA molecules in Tris-EDTA (TE) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffers. The DEP properties of 20 nm polystyrene beads were studied with coaxial probes in media with different conductivities. Due to the special geometry of our DEP probe device, sufficiently high electric fields were generated at the probe end to focus DNA molecules with positive DEP. DEP trapping for both polystyrene beads and DNA molecules was quantitatively analyzed over the frequency range from 100 kHz to 50 MHz and compared with the Clausius-Mossotti theory. Finally, we discussed the negative effect of medium salinity during DEP trapping.

  17. Usefulness of the secondary probe pTBN12 in DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Chaves, F; Yang, Z; el Hajj, H; Alonso, M; Burman, W J; Eisenach, K D; Dronda, F; Bates, J H; Cave, M D

    1996-01-01

    A comparison was made between DNA fingerprints of Mycobacterium tuberculosis produced with the insertion sequence IS6110 and those produced with the polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence contained in the plasmid pTBN12. A total of 302 M. tuberculosis isolates from the prison system in Madrid, Spain, and the Denver Public Health Department (Denver, Colo.) were analyzed with the two probes. Both probes identified the same isolates in the same clusters when the fingerprints had six or more cop...

  18. Use of Ti plasmid DNA probes for determining tumorigenicity of agrobacterium strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.J.; Norelli, J.L.; Katz, B.H.; Bishop, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two 32 P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 10 6 CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains

  19. Genetic ecotoxicology IV: survival and DNA strand breakage is dependent on genotype in radionuclide-exposed mosquitofish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, C.W. [Texas A and M University, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, College Station, TX 77843-2258 (United States); Elbl, T. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Shugart, L.R. [L.R. Shugart and Associates, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) were caged in situ in a radioactively-contaminated pond in order to determine if survival and amount of DNA strand breakage were dependent on genotype. Genotypes of fish were determined using the randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) technique, and DNA strand breakage was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. This study is a continuation of research undertaken at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which examined the effects of radionuclide contamination on the population genetic structure of mosquitofish. The previous research found 17 RAPD markers that were present at a higher frequency in contaminated than in reference populations ('contaminant-indicative bands'), and fish from contaminated sites which possessed these markers had higher fecundity and fewer strand breaks than fish which did not. One of the contaminated populations (Pond 3513) was colonized from one of the reference populations (Crystal Springs) in 1977. In the present study, fish were obtained from Crystal Springs and an additional reference site, and caged in Pond 3513. The percent survival and amount of DNA strand breakage were then determined for fish with and without the contaminant-indicative markers. When Crystal Springs fish were caged in Pond 3513, it was found that the genotypic distribution of the survivors was more similar to the native Pond 3513 population than to the Crystal Springs population. Furthermore, for nine of the contaminant-indicative markers, the percent survival was greater for fish which possessed these markers than for fish which did not. For five of these markers, fish which possessed them had higher DNA integrity (fewer strand breaks) than fish which did not. These data indicate that probability of survival and degree of DNA strand breakage in radionuclide-exposed mosquitofish are dependent on RAPD genotype, and are consistent with the hypothesis that the contaminant-indicative RAPD bands are markers of loci

  20. Gold nanoparticle-based probes for the colorimetric detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganareal, Thenor Aristotile Charles S; Balbin, Michelle M; Monserate, Juvy J; Salazar, Joel R; Mingala, Claro N

    2018-02-12

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) is considered to be the most stable metal nanoparticle having the ability to be functionalized with biomolecules. Recently, AuNP-based DNA detection methods captured the interest of researchers worldwide. Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease, a chronic gastroenteritis in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), was found to have negative effect in the livestock industry. In this study, AuNP-based probes were evaluated for the specific and sensitive detection of MAP DNA. AuNP-based probe was produced by functionalization of AuNPs with thiol-modified oligonucleotide and was confirmed by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. UV-Vis spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize AuNPs. DNA detection was done by hybridization of 10 μL of DNA with 5 μL of probe at 63 °C for 10 min and addition of 3 μL salt solution. The method was specific to MAP with detection limit of 103 ng. UV-Vis and SEM showed dispersion and aggregation of the AuNPs for the positive and negative results, respectively, with no observed particle growth. This study therefore reports an AuNP-based probes which can be used for the specific and sensitive detection of MAP DNA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Platinated DNA oligonucleotides: new probes forming ultrastable conjugates with graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2014-05-01

    Metal containing polymers have expanded the property of polymers by involving covalently associated metal complexes. DNA is a special block copolymer. While metal ions are known to influence DNA, little is explored on its polymer property when strong metal complexes are associated. In this work, we study cisplatin modified DNA as a new polymer and probe. Out of the complexes formed between cisplatin-A15, HAuCl4-A15, Hg2+-T15 and Ag+-C15, only the cisplatin adduct is stable under the denaturing gel electrophoresis condition. Each Pt-nucleobase bond gives a positive charge and thus makes DNA a zwitterionic polymer. This allows ultrafast adsorption of DNA by graphene oxide (GO) and the adsorbed complex is highly stable. Non-specific DNA, protein, surfactants and thiolated compounds cannot displace platinated DNA from GO, while non-modified DNA is easily displaced in most cases. The stable GO/DNA conjugate is further tested for surface hybridization. This is the first demonstration of using metallated DNA as a polymeric material for interfacing with nanoscale materials.Metal containing polymers have expanded the property of polymers by involving covalently associated metal complexes. DNA is a special block copolymer. While metal ions are known to influence DNA, little is explored on its polymer property when strong metal complexes are associated. In this work, we study cisplatin modified DNA as a new polymer and probe. Out of the complexes formed between cisplatin-A15, HAuCl4-A15, Hg2+-T15 and Ag+-C15, only the cisplatin adduct is stable under the denaturing gel electrophoresis condition. Each Pt-nucleobase bond gives a positive charge and thus makes DNA a zwitterionic polymer. This allows ultrafast adsorption of DNA by graphene oxide (GO) and the adsorbed complex is highly stable. Non-specific DNA, protein, surfactants and thiolated compounds cannot displace platinated DNA from GO, while non-modified DNA is easily displaced in most cases. The stable GO/DNA conjugate

  2. Probing the binding of coumarins and cyclothialidines to DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Gormley, N A; Tranter, R

    1999-01-01

    B and coumarin and cyclothialidine drugs and made mutations by site-directed mutagenesis. We used proteolysis as a probe of drug binding to wild-type and mutant proteins. Limited proteolysis of gyrase revealed that binding of these antibiotics is associated with a characteristic proteolytic fingerprint......, suggesting a drug-induced conformational change. The ability of the mutants to bind the drugs was studied by testing their ability to induce the coumarin-associated proteolytic signature and to bind to a novobiocin-affinity column. To analyze further the interaction of the drugs with gyrase, we studied...

  3. DNA polymorphisms in the Sahiwal breed of Zebu cattle revealed by synthetic oligonucleotide probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shashikanth; Yadav, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 15 randomly selected unrelated animals and from two sire families (11 animals) of the Sahiwal breed of Zebu cattle were investigated. Four oligonucleotide probes - (GTG) 5 , (TCC) 5 , (GT) 8 and (GT) 12 - were used on genomic DNA digested with restriction enzymes AluI, HinfI, MboI, EcoRI and HaeIII in different combinations. All four probes produced multiloci fingerprints with differing levels of polymorphisms. Total bands and shared bands in the fingerprints of each individual were in the range of 2.5 to 23.0 KB. Band number ranged from 9 to 17, with 0.48 average band sharing. Probes (GT) 8 , (GT) 12 and (TCC) 5 produced fingerprinting patterns of medium to low polymorphism, whereas probe (GTG) 5 produced highly polymorphic patterns. Probe (GTG) 5 in combination with the HaeIII enzyme was highly polymorphic with a heterozygosity level of 0.85, followed by (GT) 8 , (TCC) 5 and (GT) 12 with heterozygosity levels of 0.70, 0.65 and 0.30, respectively. Probe GTG 5 or its complementary sequence CAC 5 produced highly polymorphic fingerprints, indicating that the probe can be used for analysing population structure, parentage verification and identifying loci controlling quantitative traits and fertility status. (author)

  4. Immunological probes for lesions and repoair patches in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes two immunological approaches for the detection of DNA damage and its repair. The first uses a monoclonal antibody to directly measure the production and removal of one type of oxidized base, thymine glycol; the second uses an antibody to detect the repair synthesis event itself and, when combined with the use of molecular biological techniques, can be used to monitor the production and removal of lesions in specific sequences within the genome

  5. Absolute and direct microRNA quantification using DNA-gold nanoparticle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degliangeli, Federica; Kshirsagar, Prakash; Brunetti, Virgilio; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Fiammengo, Roberto

    2014-02-12

    DNA-gold nanoparticle probes are implemented in a simple strategy for direct microRNA (miRNA) quantification. Fluorescently labeled DNA-probe strands are immobilized on PEGylated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In the presence of target miRNA, DNA-RNA heteroduplexes are formed and become substrate for the endonuclease DSN (duplex-specific nuclease). Enzymatic hydrolysis of the DNA strands yields a fluorescence signal due to diffusion of the fluorophores away from the gold surface. We show that the molecular design of our DNA-AuNP probes, with the DNA strands immobilized on top of the PEG-based passivation layer, results in nearly unaltered enzymatic activity toward immobilized heteroduplexes compared to substrates free in solution. The assay, developed in a real-time format, allows absolute quantification of as little as 0.2 fmol of miR-203. We also show the application of the assay for direct quantification of cancer-related miR-203 and miR-21 in samples of extracted total RNA from cell cultures. The possibility of direct and absolute quantification may significantly advance the use of microRNAs as biomarkers in the clinical praxis.

  6. Scanning Probe Optical Tweezers: a new tool to study DNA-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisstede, J.H.G.

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of the work described in this thesis is to construct a microscope in which OT and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are combined, to be able to localize proteins while simultaneously controlling the tension within the DNA molecule. This apparatus enables the study of the effect of

  7. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, Ondřej; Ječná, K.; Leigh, M. B.; Macková, Martina; Macek, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 407, č. 12 (2009), s. 3611-3619 ISSN 0048-9697 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2B08031 Program:2B Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA-based stable isotope probing * microbial diversity * bioremediation Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.905, year: 2009

  8. Mapped DNA probes from Ioblolly pine can be used for restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping in other conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.R. Ahuja; M.E. Devey; A.T. Groover; K.D. Jermstad; D.B Neale

    1994-01-01

    A high-density genetic map based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) is being constructed for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Consequently, a large number of DNA probes from loblolly pine are potentially available for use in other species. We have used some of these DNA probes to detect RFLPs in 12 conifers and an angiosperm....

  9. Development of a biotinylated DNA probe for detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, R.E.; Arakawa, C.K.; Oshima, K.H.; O'Hara, P.J.; Landolt, M.L.; Winton, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonrad~oact~ve DNA probe assay was developed to detect and ~dent~fy infect~ous hernatopoiet~c necrosls virus (IHNV) uslng a dot blot format The probe a synthet~c DNA oligonucleot~de labeled enzymatlcally w~th biotln hybnd~zed spec~f~cally w~th nucleocaps~d mRNA extracted from Infected cells early In the vlrus repl~cation cycle A rap~d guan~dln~um th~ocyanate based RNA extraction method uslng RNAzol B and rn~crocentrifuge tubes eff~c~ently pioduced h~gh qual~ty RNA from 3 commonly used f~sh cell llnes, CHSE-214, CHH-1, and EPC The probe reacted with 6 d~verse ~solates of IHNV, but d~d not react \

  10. The generation of radiolabeled DNA and RNA probes with polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, D.B.; Sommer, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    By including a radioactive triphosphate during polymerase chain reaction (PCR), probes of very high specific activity can be generated. The advantages of PCR labeling include (1) uniform labeling with a specific activity of 5 X 10(9) cpm/micrograms or higher (sensitivity of detection: 0.028 pg of target DNA per 24 h); (2) ease of regulation of both the specific activity and the amount of labeled probe produced; (3) efficient labeling of fragments less than 500 bp; (4) efficient incorporation over a wide range of input DNA template; (5) labeling with subnanogram amounts of input DNA; and (6) direct labeling of genomic DNA. The minimal amount of input DNA allows a virtually unlimited number of PCR labeling reactions to be performed on DNA generated by one amplification under the previously described nonlabeling conditions. This obviates the need for CsCl gradients or other large scale methods of DNA preparation. The above advantages except for the very high specific activity can also be achieved by transcript labeling after an amplification where one or both of PCR primers contain a phage promoter sequence

  11. Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of radionuclide and chemical contamination: DNA damage and residue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers-Schoene, L.; Shugart, L.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Walton, B.T.

    1993-01-01

    Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of freshwater ecosystems where both low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants are present. The pond slider (Trachemys scripta) and common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) were analyzed for the presence of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 60 Co, and Hg, radionuclides and chemicals known to be present at the contaminated site, and single-strand breaks in liver DNA. The integrity of the DNA was examined by the alkaline unwinding assay, a technique that detects strand breaks as a biological marker of possible exposure to genotoxic agents. This measure of DNA damage was significantly increased in both species of turtles at the contaminated site compared with turtles of the same species at a reference site, and shows that contaminant-exposed populations were under more severe genotoxic stress than those at the reference site. The level of strand breaks observed at the contaminated site was high and in the range reported for other aquatic species exposed to deleterious concentrations of genotoxic agents such as chemicals and ionizing radiation. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides and Hg were detected in the turtles from the contaminated area. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in the more carnivorous snapping turtle compared with the slider; however, both species were effective monitors of the contaminants

  12. Multi-Probe Based Artificial DNA Encoding and Matching Classifier for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a novel matching classification strategy inspired by the artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA technology has been proposed for hyperspectral remote sensing imagery. Such a method can describe brightness and shape information of a spectrum by encoding the spectral curve into a DNA strand, providing a more comprehensive way for spectral similarity comparison. However, it suffers from two problems: data volume is amplified when all of the bands participate in the encoding procedure and full-band comparison degrades the importance of bands carrying key information. In this paper, a new multi-probe based artificial DNA encoding and matching (MADEM method is proposed. In this method, spectral signatures are first transformed into DNA code words with a spectral feature encoding operation. After that, multiple probes for interesting classes are extracted to represent the specific fragments of DNA strands. During the course of spectral matching, the different probes are compared to obtain the similarity of different types of land covers. By computing the absolute vector distance (AVD between different probes of an unclassified spectrum and the typical DNA code words from the database, the class property of each pixel is set as the minimum distance class. The main benefit of this strategy is that the risk of redundant bands can be deeply reduced and critical spectral discrepancies can be enlarged. Two hyperspectral image datasets were tested. Comparing with the other classification methods, the overall accuracy can be improved from 1.22% to 10.09% and 1.19% to 15.87%, respectively. Furthermore, the kappa coefficient can be improved from 2.05% to 15.29% and 1.35% to 19.59%, respectively. This demonstrated that the proposed algorithm outperformed other traditional classification methods.

  13. Radioactive and enzymatic cloned cDNA probes for bovine enteric coronavirus detection by molecular hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collomb, J.; Finance, C.; Alabouch, S.; Laporte, J.

    1992-01-01

    Genomic RNA of F15 strain bovine enteric coronavirus (BECV) was cloned in E. coli. Three clones (174, 160, PG 78), selected in the cDNA library, including a large portion of the nucleocapsid (N), matrix (M) and peplomeric (S) protein genes , were used as probes for a slot blot hybridization assay. Two probe labelling techniques were compared, radiolabelling with 32 P and enzymatic labelling through covalent linkage to peroxidase and chemiluminescence detection. The radioactive probe 174 detected as little as 1 to 3 pg of viral RNA, while the less sensitive enzymatic probe could not reveal more than 100 pg of RNA. No significant detection amplification was achieved when a mixture of the three probes was used. Probe 174 allowed specific identification for BECV. No hybridization was noticed either with rotaviruses or even with other antigenically unrelated members of the family Coronaviridae such as transmissible gastroenteritis virus. The test proved valid for detection of BECV in the supernatant of infected HRT-18 cells: genomic RNA could be detected after direct spotting of samples, but prior nucleic acid extraction after proteinase K treatment improved virus detection. BECV diagnosis in faecal samples using enzymatic probe was compared with conventional diagnostic methods. (authors)

  14. Radioactive and enzymatic cloned cDNA probes for bovine enteric coronavirus detection by molecular hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collomb, J; Finance, C; Alabouch, S [Lab. de Microbiologie Moleculaire, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Univ. de Nancy I, Nancy (France); Laporte, J [Station de Virologie et d' Immunologie Moleculaires, INRA, Jouy-en-Josas (France)

    1992-01-01

    Genomic RNA of F15 strain bovine enteric coronavirus (BECV) was cloned in E. coli. Three clones (174, 160, PG 78), selected in the cDNA library, including a large portion of the nucleocapsid (N), matrix (M) and peplomeric (S) protein genes , were used as probes for a slot blot hybridization assay. Two probe labelling techniques were compared, radiolabeled with [sup 32]P and enzymatic labeled through covalent linkage to peroxidase for chemiluminescence detection. The radioactive probe 174 detected as little as 1-3 pg of viral RNA, while the less sensitive enzymatic probe could not reveal more than 100 pg of RNA. No significant detection amplification was achieved when a mixture of the three probes was used. Probe 174 allowed specific identification for BECV. No hybridization was noticed either with rotaviruses or even with other antigenically unrelated members of the family Coronaviridae such as transmissible gastroenteritis virus. The test proved valid for detection of BECV in the supernatant of infected HRT-18 cells: genomic RNA could be detected after direct spotting of samples, but prior nucleic acid extraction after proteinase K treatment improved virus detection. BECV diagnosis in fecal samples using enzymatic probe was compared with conventional diagnostic methods. (authors).

  15. Cloning and Characterization of a Complex DNA Fingerprinting Probe for Candida parapsilosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, Lee; Joly, Sophie; Pujol, Claude; Simonson, Patricia; Pfaller, Michael; Soll, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis accounts for a significant number of nosocomial fungemias, but in fact, no effective and verified genetic fingerprinting method has emerged for assessing the relatedness of independent isolates for epidemiological studies. A complex 15-kb DNA fingerprinting probe, Cp3-13, was therefore isolated from a library of C. parapsilosis genomic DNA fragments. The efficacy of Cp3-13 for DNA fingerprinting was verified by a comparison of its clustering capacity with those of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and internally transcribed spacer region sequencing, by testing species specificity, and by assessing its capacity to identify microevolutionary changes both in vitro and in vivo. Southern blot hybridization of EcoRI/SalI-digested DNA with Cp3-13 provides a fingerprinting system that (i) identifies the same strain in independent isolates, (ii) discriminates between unrelated isolates, (iii) separates independent isolates into valid groups in a dendrogram, (iv) identifies microevolution in infecting populations, and (v) is amenable to automatic computer-assisted DNA fingerprint analysis. This probe is now available for epidemiological studies. PMID:11158125

  16. A sensitive DNA biosensor based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction for capture probe immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingxiang; Ding, Yingtao; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Shulian; Zhang, Bin; Ni, Jiancong; Gao, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction between probe DNA and the sulfonic dye of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid that electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode. -- Highlights: •A versatile sulfonic dye of ANS was electrodeposited on a GCE. •A DNA biosensor was fabricated based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. •High probe DNA density of 3.18 × 10 13 strands cm −2 was determined. •A wide linear range and a low detection limit were obtained. -- Abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. First, the versatile sulfonic dye molecule of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonate (AN-SO 3 − ) was electrodeposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to form a steady and ordered AN-SO 3 − layer. Then the amino-terminated capture probe was covalently grafted to the surface of SO 3 − -AN deposited GCE through the sulfamide coupling reaction between the amino groups in the probe DNA and the sulfonic groups in the AN-SO 3 − . The step-by-step modification process was characterized by electrochemistry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Using Ru(NH 3 ) 6 3+ as probe, the probe density and the hybridization efficiency of the biosensor were determined to be 3.18 × 10 13 strands cm −2 and 86.5%, respectively. The hybridization performance of the biosensor was examined by differential pulse voltammetry using Co(phen) 3 3+/2+ (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) as the indicator. The selectivity experiments showed that the biosensor presented distinguishable response after hybridization with the three-base mismatched, non-complementary and complementary sequences. Under the optimal conditions, the oxidation peak currents of Co(phen) 3 3+/2+ increased linearly with the logarithm values of the concentration of the complementary sequences in the range from 1.0 × 10 −13 M to 1.0 × 10 −8 M with

  17. Analyte-Triggered DNA-Probe Release from a Triplex Molecular Beacon for Nanopore Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bingyuan; Sheng, Yingying; Zhou, Ke; Liu, Quansheng; Liu, Lei; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2018-03-26

    A new nanopore sensing strategy based on triplex molecular beacon was developed for the detection of specific DNA or multivalent proteins. The sensor is composed of a triplex-forming molecular beacon and a stem-forming DNA component that is modified with a host-guest complex. Upon target DNA hybridizing with the molecular beacon loop or multivalent proteins binding to the recognition elements on the stem, the DNA probe is released and produces highly characteristic current signals when translocated through α-hemolysin. The frequency of current signatures can be used to quantify the concentrations of the target molecules. This sensing approach provides a simple, quick, and modular tool for the detection of specific macromolecules with high sensitivity and excellent selectivity. It may find useful applications in point-of-care diagnostics with a portable nanopore kit in the future. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Improving Probe Immobilization for Label-Free Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization on Microfabricated Gold Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Carrara

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative approaches to labeled optical detection for DNA arrays are actively investigated for low-cost point-of-care applications. In this domain, label-free capacitive detection is one of the most intensely studied techniques. It is based on the idea to detect the Helmholtz ion layer displacements when molecular recognition occurs at the electrodes/solution interface. The sensing layer is usually prepared by using thiols terminated DNA single-strength oligonucleotide probes on top of the sensor electrodes. However, published data shows evident time drift, which greatly complicates signal conditioning and processing and ultimately increases the uncertainty in DNA recognition sensing. The aim of this work is to show that newly developed ethylene-glycol functionalized alkanethiols greatly reduce time drift, thereby significantly improving capacitance based label-free detection of DNA.

  19. Neocarzinostatin as a probe for DNA protection activity--molecular interaction with caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Der-Hang; Li, Huang-Hsien; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Liu, Chia-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS), a potent mutagen and carcinogen, consists of an enediyne prodrug and a protein carrier. It has a unique double role in that it intercalates into DNA and imposes radical-mediated damage after thiol activation. Here we employed NCS as a probe to examine the DNA-protection capability of caffeine, one of common dietary phytochemicals with potential cancer-chemopreventive activity. NCS at the nanomolar concentration range could induce significant single- and double-strand lesions in DNA, but up to 75 ± 5% of such lesions were found to be efficiently inhibited by caffeine. The percentage of inhibition was caffeine-concentration dependent, but was not sensitive to the DNA-lesion types. The well-characterized activation reactions of NCS allowed us to explore the effect of caffeine on the enediyne-generated radicals. Postactivation analyses by chromatographic and mass spectroscopic methods identified a caffeine-quenched enediyne-radical adduct, but the yield was too small to fully account for the large inhibition effect on DNA lesions. The affinity between NCS chromophore and DNA was characterized by a fluorescence-based kinetic method. The drug-DNA intercalation was hampered by caffeine, and the caffeine-induced increases in DNA-drug dissociation constant was caffeine-concentration dependent, suggesting importance of binding affinity in the protection mechanism. Caffeine has been shown to be both an effective free radical scavenger and an intercalation inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that caffeine ingeniously protected DNA against the enediyne-induced damages mainly by inhibiting DNA intercalation beforehand. The direct scavenging of the DNA-bound NCS free radicals by caffeine played only a minor role. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. DNA probes for distinguishing Psychodopygus wellcomei from Psychodopygus complexus (Diptera: Psychodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Ready

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA fragments from males of Psychodopygus wellcomei were isolated and shown to be useful as sensitive diagnostic probles for positively separting individuals of this species from those of Ps. complexus. These two members of the Ps. squamiventris series are found sympatrically in foci of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the hill forests of southern Pará State. Of the two species, only Ps. welcomei is thought to be an important vector of Leishmania braziliensis sensu stricto, buth this is based on circumstantial evidence because of the difficulties of identifying female sandflies wothin the series. The diagnostic probes were isolated from a library of Ps. wellcomei built by ligationg short fragments of Sau 3A-resistricted, genomic DNA into the plasmid vector PUC 18. Differential screening of 1316 library clones with total genomic DNA of Ps. Wellcomei and Ps. complexus identified 5 recombinants, with cross-hybridizing inserts of repetitive DNA, that showed strong specificity for Ps. wellcomei. As little as 0.4% of the DNA extracted from an individual sandfly (=ca. 0.5 namograms was specifically detected. The diagnostic probes were used to identify as Ps. wellcomei a wild-caught female sandfly found infected with L. braziliensis s.s., providing only the second positive association between these two species.

  1. Investigation of paternity establishing without the putative father using hypervariable DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, T; Odaira, T; Nata, M; Sagisaka, K

    1990-09-01

    Seven kinds of DNA probes which recognize hypervariable loci were applied for paternity test. The putative father was decreased and unavailable for the test. The two legitimate children and their mother (the deceased's wife) and the four illegitimate children and their mother (the deceased's kept mistress) were available for analysis. Paternity index of four illegitimate child was investigated. Allelic frequencies and their confidence intervals among unrelated Japanese individuals were previously reported from our laboratory, and co-dominant segregation of the polymorphism was confirmed in family studies. Cumulative paternity indices of four illegitimate children from 16 kinds of standard blood group markers were 165, 42, 0.09, and 36, respectively. On the other hand, cumulative paternity indices from 7 kinds of DNA probes are 2,363, 4,685, 57,678, and 54,994, respectively, which are 14, 113, 640, 864, and 1,509 times higher than that from standard blood group markers. The DNA analyses gave nearly conclusive evidence that the putative father was the biological father of the children. Especially, the paternity relation of the third illegitimate child could not be established without the DNA analyses. Accordingly, DNA polymorphism is considered to be informative enough for paternity test.

  2. The detection of HBV DNA with gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle gene probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Dong; Luo Xiaoping; Lu Qianghua; Yao Kailun; Liu Zuli; Ning Qin

    2008-01-01

    Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by the citrate reduction of tetra-chloroauric acid in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles which were added as seeds. With a fluorescence-based method, the maximal surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotides and the maximal percentage of hybridization strands on gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were (120 ± 8) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and (14 ± 2%), respectively, which were comparable with those of (132 ± 10) and (22 ± 3%) in Au nanoparticle groups. Large network aggregates were formed when gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probe was applied to detect HBV DNA molecules as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and the high specificity was verified by blot hybridization. Our results further suggested that detecting DNA with iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic separator was feasible and might be an alternative effective method

  3. DNA probe labeling with digoxigenin-dUTP and its application in gene diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guoyang

    1992-01-01

    DNA probe labeling by the randomly primed incorporation of digoxigenin-dUTP is reported. The sensitivity of color reaction and hybridization were 32 fg and 200 fg, respectively, and both were specific for the target. Single-copy and multi-copy gene fragments among 2 μg human genomic DNA were detected by β IVS II, Fr 3-42 and 3'HVR labeled with digoxigenin-dUTP. The results were consistent with a radioactive control assay. This method has been successfully used in the gene diagnosis of adult polycystic kidney disease

  4. Adaptation and impairment of DNA repair function in pollen of Betula verrucosa and seeds of Oenothera biennis from differently radionuclide-contaminated sites of Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubriak, I I; Grodzinsky, D M; Polischuk, V P; Naumenko, V D; Gushcha, N P; Micheev, A N; McCready, S J; Osborne, D J

    2008-01-01

    The plants that have remained in the contaminated areas around Chernobyl since 1986 encapsulate the effects of radiation. Such plants are chronically exposed to radionuclides that they have accumulated internally as well as to alpha-, beta- and gamma-emitting radionuclides from external sources and from the soil. This radiation leads to genetic damage that can be countered by DNA repair systems. The objective of this study is to follow DNA repair and adaptation in haploid cells (birch pollen) and diploid cells (seed embryos of the evening primrose) from plants that have been growing in situ in different radionuclide fall-out sites in monitored regions surrounding the Chernobyl explosion of 1986. Radionuclide levels in soil were detected using gamma-spectroscopy and radiochemistry. DNA repair assays included measurement of unscheduled DNA synthesis, electrophoretic determination of single-strand DNA breaks and image analysis of rDNA repeats after repair intervals. Nucleosome levels were established using an ELISA kit. Birch pollen collected in 1987 failed to perform unscheduled DNA synthesis, but pollen at gamma/beta-emitter sites has now recovered this ability. At a site with high levels of combined alpha- and gamma/beta-emitters, pollen still exhibits hidden damage, as shown by reduced unscheduled DNA synthesis and failure to repair lesions in rDNA repeats properly. Evening primrose seed embryos generated on plants at the same gamma/beta-emitter sites now show an improved DNA repair capacity and ability to germinate under abiotic stresses (salinity and accelerated ageing). Again those from combined alpha- and gamma/beta-contaminated site do not show this improvement. Chronic irradiation at gamma/beta-emitter sites has provided opportunities for plant cells (both pollen and embryo cells) to adapt to ionizing irradiation and other environmental stresses. This may be explained by facilitation of DNA repair function.

  5. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Leigh, Mary Beth; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based molecular techniques permit the comprehensive determination of microbial diversity but generally do not reveal the relationship between the identity and the function of microorganisms. The first direct molecular technique to enable the linkage of phylogeny with function is DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP). Applying this method first helped describe the utilization of simple compounds, such as methane, methanol or glucose and has since been used to detect microbial communities active in the utilization of a wide variety of compounds, including various xenobiotics. The principle of the method lies in providing 13C-labeled substrate to a microbial community and subsequent analyses of the 13C-DNA isolated from the community. Isopycnic centrifugation permits separating 13C-labeled DNA of organisms that utilized the substrate from 12C-DNA of the inactive majority. As the whole metagenome of active populations is isolated, its follow-up analysis provides successful taxonomic identification as well as the potential for functional gene analyses. Because of its power, DNA-SIP has become one of the leading techniques of microbial ecology research. But from other point of view, it is a labor-intensive method that requires careful attention to detail during each experimental step in order to avoid misinterpretation of results.

  6. A specific DNA probe which identifies Babesia bovis in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchpoo, W; Tan-ariya, P; Boonsaeng, V; Brockelman, C R; Wilairat, P; Panyim, S

    1992-05-01

    A genomic library of Babesia bovis DNA from the Mexican strain M was constructed in plasmid pUN121 and cloned in Escherichia coli. Several recombinants which hybridized strongly to radioactively labeled B. bovis genomic DNA in an in situ screening were selected and further analyzed for those which specifically hybridized to B. bovis DNA. It was found that pMU-B1 had the highest sensitivity, detecting 25 pg of purified B. bovis DNA, and 300 parasites in 10 microliters of whole infected blood, or 0.00025% parasitemia. pMU-B1 contained a 6.0 kb B. bovis DNA insert which did not cross-hybridize to Babesia bigemina, Trypanosoma evansi, Plasmodium falciparum, Anaplasma marginale, Boophilus microplus and cow DNA. In the Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA, pMU-B1 could differentiate between two B. bovis geographic isolates, Mexican strain M and Thai isolate TS4. Thus, the pMU-B1 probe will be useful in the diagnosis of Babesia infection in cattle and ticks, and in the differentiation of B. bovis strains.

  7. Rapid Identification of Seven Waterborne Exophiala Species by RCA DNA Padlock Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafzadeh, M J; Vicente, V A; Feng, Peiying; Naseri, A; Sun, Jiufeng; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, A; de Hoog, G S

    2018-03-05

    The black yeast genus Exophiala includes numerous potential opportunistic species that potentially cause systematic and disseminated infections in immunocompetent individuals. Species causing systemic disease have ability to grow at 37-40 °C, while others consistently lack thermotolerance and are involved in diseases of cold-blooded, waterborne vertebrates and occasionally invertebrates. We explain a fast and sensitive assay for recognition and identification of waterborne Exophiala species without sequencing. The ITS rDNA region of seven Exophiala species (E. equina, E. salmonis, E. opportunistica, E. pisciphila, E. aquamarina, E. angulospora and E. castellanii) along with the close relative Veronaea botryosa was sequenced and aligned for the design of specific padlock probes for the detection of characteristic single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The assay demonstrated to successfully amplify DNA of target fungi, allowing detection at the species level. Amplification products were visualized on 1% agarose gels to confirm specificity of probe-template binding. Amounts of reagents were reduced to prevent the generation of false positive results. The simplicity, tenderness, robustness and low expenses provide padlock probe assay (RCA) a definite place as a very practical method among isothermal approaches for DNA diagnostics.

  8. Luminescent platinum(II) complexes with functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene or diphosphine selectively probe mismatched and abasic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Che, CM; Chen, T; To, WP; Zou, T; FUNG, SK; Lok, CN; YANG, C; Cao, B

    2016-01-01

    The selective targeting of mismatched DNA overexpressed in cancer cells is an appealing strategy in designing cancer diagnosis and therapy protocols. Few luminescent probes that specifically detect intracellular mismatched DNA have been reported. Here we used Pt(II) complexes with luminescence sensitive to subtle changes in the local environment and report several Pt(II) complexes that selectively bind to and identify DNA mismatches. We evaluated the complexes' DNA-binding characteristics by ...

  9. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Ahsan; Waseem, Hassan; Williams, Maggie R.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Gulari, Erdogan; Tiedje, James M.; Hashsham, Syed A.

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics) to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs). Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R2 = 0.8131). PMID:28555058

  10. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Munir

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs. Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R2 = 0.8131.

  11. Identification of salivary Lactobacillus rhamnosus species by DNA profiling and a specific probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, B; Groisillier, A; Badet, C; Dorignac, G; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    2001-03-01

    The Lactobacillus genus has been shown to be associated with the dental carious process, but little is known about the species related to the decay, although Lactobacillus rhamnosus is suspected to be the most implicated species. Conventional identification methods based on biochemical criteria lead to ambiguous results, since the Lactobacillus species found in saliva are phenotypically close. To clarify the role of this genus in the evolution of carious disease, this work aimed to find a rapid and reliable method for identifying the L. rhamnosus species. Methods based on hybridization with DNA probes and DNA amplification by PCR were used. The dominant salivary Lactobacillus species (reference strains from the ATCC) were selected for this purpose as well as some wild strains isolated from children's saliva. DNA profiling using semirandom polymorphic DNA amplification (semi-RAPD) generated specific patterns for L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469. The profiles of all L. rhamnosus strains tested were similar and could be grouped; these strains shared four common fragments. Wild strains first identified with classic methods shared common patterns with the L. rhamnosus species and could be reclassified. One fragment of the profile was purified, cloned, used as a probe and found to be specific to the L. rhamnosus species. These results may help to localize this species within its ecological niche and to elucidate the progression of the carious process.

  12. Characterization of Actinomyces with genomic DNA fingerprints and rRNA gene probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, G; Johnson, J; Schachtele, C

    1993-08-01

    Cellular DNA from 25 Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces viscosus strains belonging to the 7 taxonomic clusters of Fillery et al. (1978) and several unclustered strains was obtained by enzymatic and N-lauroylsarcosine/guanidine isothiocyanate treatment of whole cells, followed by extraction of the nucleic acid. The DNA samples were digested with restriction endonucleases BamHI or PvuII, and agarose gel electrophoresis was used to obtain DNA fingerprints. The DNA fragments were subjected to Southern blot hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled cDNA probe transcribed from Escherichia coli 16S and 23S rRNA. The patterns of bands from genomic (DNA fingerprints) and rDNA fingerprints (ribotypes) were used for comparison between the taxonomic cluster strains and strains within clusters. Representative strains from each taxonomic cluster provided different BamHI DNA fingerprints and ribotype patterns with 3 to 9 distinct bands. Some strains within a cluster showed identical ribotype patterns with both endonucleases (A. naeslundii B120 and A. naeslundii B102 from cluster 3), while others showed the same pattern with BamHI but a different pattern with PvuII (A. naeslundii ATCC 12104 and 398A from cluster 5). A viscosus ATCC 15987 (cluster 7) and its parent strain T6 yielded identical fingerprint and ribotype patterns. The genomic diversity revealed by DNA fingerprinting and ribotyping demonstrates that these techniques, which do not require phenotypic expression, are suited for study of the oral ecology of the Actinomyces, and for epidemiological tracking of specific Actinomyces strains associated with caries lesions and sites of periodontal destruction.

  13. Detection of adenovirus in nasopharyngeal specimens by radioactive and nonradioactive DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyypiae, T.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of adenovirus DNA in clinical specimens was analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization assays by both radioactive and enzymatic detection systems. The sensitivity of the hybridization tests was in the range of 10 to 100 pg of homologous adenovirus DNA. Minimal background was noticed with unrelated viral and nonviral DNA. Twenty-four nasopharyngeal mucus aspirate specimens, collected from children with acute respiratory infection, were assayed in the hybridization tests and also by an enzyme immunoassay for adenovirus hexon antigen which was used as a reference test. Sixteen specimens positive by the enzyme immunoassay also were positive in the two nucleic acid hybridization tests, and the remaining eight specimens were negative in all of the tests. The results indicate that nucleid acid hybridization tests with both radioactive and nonradioactive probes can be used for diagnosis of microbial infections

  14. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Progress report, 1978-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Current progress in studies on the mutagenic effect of 3 H incorporated into the DNA of Drosophila melanogaster is reported. It was shown that selected 3 H precursors incorporated into DNA are metabolized. The forms (metabolites) of tritium found in the DNA molecules and the mutation frequencies resulting therefrom were identified. An alcohol dehydrogenase system was developed for recovering mutations that is capable of distinguishing between base changes and chain breakage events that may lead to the formation of deletions

  15. [A new class of exciplex-formed probe detect of specific sequence DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-Yong; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Lü, Hong-Yan; Wang, Li-Min

    2009-07-01

    The present research was to develop the exciplex-based fluorescence detection of DNA. A SNP-containing region of cytochrome P450 2C9 DNA systems was evaluated to define some of the structural and associated requirement of this new class of exciplex-formed probe, and a 24-base target was selected which contains single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in genes coding for cytochrome P450. The two probes were all 12-base to give coverage of a 24-base target region to ensure specificity within the human genome. Exciplex partners used in this study were prepared using analogous phosphoramide attachment to the 3'- or 5'-phosphate group of the appropriate oligonucleotide probes. The target effectively assembled its own detector by hybridization from components which were non-fluorescent at the detection wavelength, leading to the huge improvement in terms of decreased background. This research provides details of the effects of different partner, position of partners and different excitation wavelengths for the split-oligonucleotide probe system for exciplex-based fluorescence detection of DNA. This study demonstrates that the emission intensity of the excimer formed by new pyrene derivative is the highest in these excimer and exciplex, and the excimer is easy to be formed and not sensitive to the position of partners. However the exciplex formed by the new pyrene derivative and naphthalene emitted strongly at -505 nm with large Stokes shifts (120-130 nm), and the monomer emission at 390 and 410 nm is nearly zero. Excitation wavelength of 400 nm is the best for I(e505)/I(m410) (exciplex emission at 505 nm/monomer emission at 410 nm) of the exciplex. This method features lower background and high sensitivity. Moreover the exciplex is sensitive to the steric factor, different position of partners and microenvironment, so this exciplex system is promising and could be tried to identify the SNP genes.

  16. High-performance analysis of single interphase cells with custom DNA probes spanning translocation break points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Munne, S.; Lersch, Robert A.; Marquez, C.; Wu, J.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fung, Jingly

    1999-06-01

    The chromatin organization of interphase cell nuclei, albeit an object of intense investigation, is only poorly understood. In the past, this has hampered the cytogenetic analysis of tissues derived from specimens where only few cells were actively proliferating or a significant number of metaphase cells could be obtained by induction of growth. Typical examples of such hard to analyze cell systems are solid tumors, germ cells and, to a certain extent, fetal cells such as amniocytes, blastomeres or cytotrophoblasts. Balanced reciprocal translocations that do not disrupt essential genes and thus do not led to disease symptoms exit in less than one percent of the general population. Since the presence of translocations interferes with homologue pairing in meiosis, many of these individuals experience problems in their reproduction, such as reduced fertility, infertility or a history of spontaneous abortions. The majority of translocation carriers enrolled in our in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs carry simple translocations involving only two autosomes. While most translocations are relatively easy to spot in metaphase cells, the majority of cells biopsied from embryos produced by IVF are in interphase and thus unsuitable for analysis by chromosome banding or FISH-painting. We therefore set out to analyze single interphase cells for presence or absence of specific translocations. Our assay, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of breakpoint-spanning DNA probes, detects translocations in interphase by visual microscopic inspection of hybridization domains. Probes are prepared so that they span a breakpoint and cover several hundred kb of DNA adjacent to the breakpoint. On normal chromosomes, such probes label a contiguous stretch of DNA and produce a single hybridization domain per chromosome in interphase cells. The translocation disrupts the hybridization domain and the resulting two fragments appear as physically separated hybridization domains in

  17. Construction and applications of DNA probes for detection of polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading genotypes in toxic organic-contaminated soil environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walia, S.; Khan, A.; Rosenthal, N.

    1990-01-01

    Several DNA probes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-degrading genotypes were constructed from PCB-degrading bacteria. These laboratory-engineered DNA probes were used for the detection, enumeration, and isolation of specific bacteria degrading PCBs. Dot blot analysis of purified DNA from toxic organic chemical-contaminated soil bacterial communities showed positive DNA-DNA hybridization with a 32P-labeled DNA probe (pAW6194, cbpABCD). Less than 1% of bacterial colonies isolated from garden topsoil and greater than 80% of bacteria isolated from PCB-contaminated soils showed DNA homologies with 32P-labeled DNA probes. Some of the PCB-degrading bacterial isolates detected by the DNA probe method did not show biphenyl clearance. The DNA probe method was found to detect additional organisms with greater genetic potential to degrade PCBs than the biphenyl clearance method did. Results from this study demonstrate the usefulness of DNA probes in detecting specific PCB-degrading bacteria, abundance of PCB-degrading genotypes, and genotypic diversity among PCB-degrading bacteria in toxic chemical-polluted soil environments. We suggest that the DNA probe should be used with caution for accurate assessment of PCB-degradative capacity within soils and further recommend that a combination of DNA probe and biodegradation assay be used to determine the abundance of PCB-degrading bacteria in the soil bacterial community

  18. Development and Characterization of Complex DNA Fingerprinting Probes for the Infectious Yeast Candida dubliniensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Sophie; Pujol, Claude; Rysz, Michal; Vargas, Kaaren; Soll, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Using a strategy to clone large genomic sequences containing repetitive elements from the infectious yeast Candida dubliniensis, the three unrelated sequences Cd1, Cd24, and Cd25, with respective molecular sizes of 15,500, 10,000, and 16,000 bp, were cloned and analyzed for their efficacy as DNA fingerprinting probes. Each generated a complex Southern blot hybridization pattern with endonuclease-digested genomic DNA. Cd1 generated an extremely variable pattern that contained all of the bands of the pattern generated by the repeat element RPS of Candida albicans. We demonstrated that Cd1 does not contain RPS but does contain a repeat element associated with RPS throughout the C. dubliniensis genome. The Cd1 pattern was the least stable over time both in vitro and in vivo and for that reason proved most effective in assessing microevolution. Cd24, which did not exhibit microevolution in vitro, was highly variable in vivo, suggesting in vivo-dependent microevolution. Cd25 was deemed the best probe for broad epidemiological studies, since it was the most stable over time, was the only truly C. dubliniensis-specific probe of the three, generated the most complex pattern, was distributed throughout all C. dubliniensis chromosomes, and separated a worldwide collection of 57 C. dubliniensis isolates into two distinct groups. The presence of a species-specific repetitive element in Cd25 adds weight to the already substantial evidence that C. dubliniensis represents a bona fide species. PMID:10074523

  19. An Engineered Kinetic Amplification Mechanism for Single Nucleotide Variant Discrimination by DNA Hybridization Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Seelig, Georg

    2016-04-20

    Even a single-nucleotide difference between the sequences of two otherwise identical biological nucleic acids can have dramatic functional consequences. Here, we use model-guided reaction pathway engineering to quantitatively improve the performance of selective hybridization probes in recognizing single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Specifically, we build a detection system that combines discrimination by competition with DNA strand displacement-based catalytic amplification. We show, both mathematically and experimentally, that the single nucleotide selectivity of such a system in binding to single-stranded DNA and RNA is quadratically better than discrimination due to competitive hybridization alone. As an additional benefit the integrated circuit inherits the property of amplification and provides at least 10-fold better sensitivity than standard hybridization probes. Moreover, we demonstrate how the detection mechanism can be tuned such that the detection reaction is agnostic to the position of the SNV within the target sequence. in contrast, prior strand displacement-based probes designed for kinetic discrimination are highly sensitive to position effects. We apply our system to reliably discriminate between different members of the let-7 microRNA family that differ in only a single base position. Our results demonstrate the power of systematic reaction network design to quantitatively improve biotechnology.

  20. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus M204I Mutation by Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are semiconductor nanoparticles with a diameter of less than 10 nm, which have been widely used as fluorescent probes in biochemical analysis and vivo imaging because of their excellent optical properties. Sensitive and convenient detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV gene mutations is important in clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we developed a sensitive, low-cost and convenient QDs-mediated fluorescent method for the detection of HBV gene mutations in real serum samples from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients who had received lamivudine or telbivudine antiviral therapy. We also evaluated the efficiency of this method for the detection of drug-resistant mutations compared with direct sequencing. In CHB, HBV DNA from the serum samples of patients with poor response or virological breakthrough can be hybridized to probes containing the M204I mutation to visualize fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy, where fluorescence intensity is related to the virus load, in our method. At present, the limits of the method used to detect HBV genetic variations by fluorescence quantum dots is 103 IU/mL. These results show that QDs can be used as fluorescent probes to detect viral HBV DNA polymerase gene variation, and is a simple readout system without complex and expensive instruments, which provides an attractive platform for the detection of HBV M204I mutation.

  1. Use of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) for generating specific DNA probes for oxyuroid species (Nematoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobet, E; Bougnoux, M E; Morand, S; Rivault, C; Cloarec, A; Hugot, J P

    1998-03-01

    Random amplified DNA markers (RAPD; Williams et al., 1990) were used to obtained specific RAPD fragments characterising different species of oxyuroids. We tested six species of worms parasitizing vertebrates or invertebrates: Passalurus ambiguus Rudolphi, 1819, parasite of Leporids; Syphacia obvelata (Rudolphi, 1802) Seurat, 1916, a parasite of rodents; Blatticola blattae (Graeffe, 1860) Chitwood, 1932 parasite of the cockroach Blattella germanica; Hammerschmidtiella diesingi (Hammerschmidt, 1838) Chitwood, 1932 and Thelastoma bulhoesi (Magalhaes, 1990) Travassos, 1929, parasites of the cockroach Periplaneta americana, and an undescribed parasite species of a passalid insect from New Caledonia. Among 15 oligonucleotides tested, nine produced several specific bands allowing the interspecific discrimination.

  2. Use of a D17Z1 oligonucleotide probe for human DNA quantitation prior to PCR analysis of polymorphic DNA markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, S.; Alavaren, M.; Varlaro, J. [Roche Molecular Systems, Alameda, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The alpha-satellite DNA locus D17Z1 contains primate-specific sequences which are repeated several hundred times per chromosome 17. A probe that was designed to hybridize to a subset of the D17Z1 sequence can be used for very sensitive and specific quantitation of human DNA. Sample human genomic DNA is immobilized on nylon membrane using a slot blot apparatus, and then hybridized with a biotinylated D17Z1 oligonucleotide probe. The subsequent binding of streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase to the bound probe allows for either calorimetric (TMB) or chemiluminescent (ECL) detection. Signals obtained for sample DNAs are then compared to the signals obtained for a series of human DNA standards. For either detection method, forty samples can be quantitated in less than two hours, with a sensitivity of 150 pg. As little as 20 pg of DNA can be quantitated when using chemiluminescent detection with longer film exposures. PCR analysis of several VNTR and STR markers has indicated that optimal typing results are generally obtained within a relatively narrow range of input DNA quantities. Too much input DNA can lead to PCR artifacts such as preferential amplification of smaller alleles, non-specific amplification products, and exaggeration of the DNA synthesis slippage products that are seen with STR markers. Careful quantitation of human genomic DNA prior to PCR can avoid or minimize these problems and ultimately give cleaner, more unambiguous PCR results.

  3. Regional localization of DNA probes on the short arm of chromosome 11 using aniridia-Wilms' tumor-associated deletions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Slater, R. M.; Heyting, C.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Goedde-Salz, E.; Frants, R. R.; van Ommen, G. J.; Pearson, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    We are interested in the precise localization of various DNA probes on the short arm of chromosome 11 for our research on the aniridia-Wilms' tumor association (AWTA), assigned to region 11p13 (Knudson and Strong 1972; Riccardi et al. 1978). For this purpose we have screened lymphocyte DNA and

  4. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of drosphila melanogaster. Progress report, 1976--1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the genetic effect of tritium incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Following a short pulse exposure to tritium-labeled uridine most of the radioactivity appeared in RNA; however, the turnover of radioactivity in tritium-labeled RNA was rapid whereas there was no exchange of tritium from the labeled DNA during spermatogenesis. Furthermore, most of the cytoplasm and most of the RNA in primary spermatocytes was lost during spermatogenesis and thus the mature sperm cell was left with only the DNA labeled. Preliminary experiments did not show a significant level of labeled RNA remaining in the mature sperm cell, whereas labeled DNA was verified after extraction and purification with phenol and enzyme digestion. Preliminary results of genetic tests on the progeny of normal females inseminated with tritium-labeled sperm cells are reported

  5. Stimulatory effect of low dose radionuclide on DNA synthesis and UDS in splenic lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Yang Zhanshan

    1999-12-01

    To study the stimulatory effect on DNA synthesis and unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in splenic lymphocytes induced by low dose enriched uranium 235 U. By using 3 H-TdR incorporation assay technique, the DNA replicative synthesis in PHA and LPS stimulated splenic lymphocytes was observed. By using DNA synthesis inhibitor such as hydroxyurea, the UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in splenic lymphocytes occurred. When the injected low dose of enriched uranium 235 u was 0.1 μg/kg body weight, the transformation capacity was elevated for splenic T lymphocytes, simultaneously the stimulative index increased. The UDS of splenic lymphocytes induced by ultra-violate revealed a statistically significant increase by low dose of enriched uranium 235 U at the range of 0.1-20 μg/kg body weight. A stimulatory action of low dose enriched uranium 235 U on DNA replicative synthesis as well as on UV-induced UDS in splenic lymphocytes was detected

  6. Mismatch discrimination of lipidated DNA and LNA-probes (LiNAs) in hybridization-controlled liposome assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Assays for mismatch discrimination and detection of single nucleotide variations by hybridization-controlled assembly of liposomes, which do not require tedious surface chemistry, are versatile for both DNA and RNA targets. We report herein a comprehensive study on different DNA and LNA (locked...... assay in the context of mismatch discrimination and SNP detection are presented. The advantages of membrane-anchored LiNA-probes compared to chemically attached probes on solid nanoparticles (e.g. gold nanoparticles) are described. Key functionalities such as non-covalent attachment of LiNA probes...... without the need for long spacers and the inherent mobility of membrane-anchored probes in lipid-bilayer membranes will be described for several different probe designs....

  7. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Technique for Copy Number Analysis on Small Amounts of DNA Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina; Andersen, Paal; Larsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique is a sensitive technique for relative quantification of up to 50 different nucleic acid sequences in a single reaction, and the technique is routinely used for copy number analysis in various syndromes and diseases. The aim...... of the study was to exploit the potential of MLPA when the DNA material is limited. The DNA concentration required in standard MLPA analysis is not attainable from dried blood spot samples (DBSS) often used in neonatal screening programs. A novel design of MLPA probes has been developed to permit for MLPA...... analysis on small amounts of DNA. Six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were used in this study. DNA was extracted from both whole blood and DBSS and subjected to MLPA analysis using normal and modified probes. Results were analyzed using GeneMarker and manual Excel analysis. A total...

  8. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S.

    1989-01-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe [5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)] is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection

  9. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Progress report, 1975--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on research in the following areas: determination of mutagenic effects of tritium incorporated into DNA using 32 P, 33 P, and 14 C; dosimetry studies using number of disintegrations per minute per sperm cell; effect of the 5-position of the label of the cytosine moiety on mutation frequency; distribution of labeled thymine and comparison with labeled cytosine and a non-DNA labeled arginine-rich protein; detection of temperature sensitive mutants; induction of mosaics by x radiation; and methods for determining quantitatively the location of tritium in the deoxycytidine moiety

  10. Relationship between internal dosimetry and DNA double strand breaks in lymphocytes after radionuclide therapy; Zusammenhang zwischen physikalischer Dosimetrie und DNA Doppelstrangbruechen in Lymphozyten nach Radionuklidtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Uta

    2015-09-30

    In radionuclide therapy radiopharmaceuticals are administered mostly systemically. Primarily, beta-emitters are used because of their short range in tissue. As a result the radiopharmaceutical distributes within the human body and accumulates in organs and target structures. Thus, the body is irradiated internally, in contrast to external irradiation in radiotherapy. The pattern of the activity distribution within the human body is determined by the physical and chemical properties of the radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, the amount of activity and its accumulation in organs or tissues is essential for the calculation of the absorbed dose which defines the energy deposited in the body by ionizing radiation. During internal or external irradiation, patients are exposed to ionizing radiation which does not only destroy the malignant cells but also damages healthy tissue and cells. This is mainly caused by direct and indirect interaction of the radiation with the DNA which damages the DNA structure. Most frequently, there are single strand breaks and base damages. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are rare; nevertheless, they are the most critical lesions for cells as repairing the damage is difficult. Unrepaired or misrepaired DNA could cause mutations, chromosomal aberrations or lead to cell death. The formation of a DNA DSB in nuclear chromatin results in the rapid phosphorylation of the histone H2 variant H2AX, then called gamma-H2AX. Furthermore, DSBs also recruit the damage sensor 53BP1 to the chromatin surrounding the DSBs, which leads to 53BP1 and gamma-H2AX co-localization in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. By immunofluorescence staining with gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 antibodies those biomarkers can be addressed by microscopically visible DNA damage protein foci, this is also known as the DNA damage focus assay. With progression of DSB repair, gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci disappear. It is assumed that one focus corresponds to one DSB. Therefore, the number of foci per

  11. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  12. Genetic effect of A-bomb radiation- Analysis of minisatellite regions detected by DNA fingerprint probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Mieko

    1999-01-01

    In author's laboratory, screening of mutation in germ cells of A-bomb survivors is under investigation with use of 8 single-locus minisatellite probes and no increase in mutation rate has been detected hitherto. This paper reported results of screening on the minisatellite region, which consisting of short repeated base sequence, using a DNA fingerprint probe for 33.15 core sequence. Subjects were 50 A-bomb survivor families exposed to mean dose of 1.9 Sv (exposed group) or 0 Gy (control), having 64 or 60 children, respectively. DNA was extracted from their B cells established by EB virus and subjected to agarose-gel electrophoresis followed by southern blotting with some improvements for fingerprinting. On the fingerprints, numbers of the band detected in regions of >3.5 kb were 1080 in children of the exposed group (16.9/child) and 1024 (17.1) in the control group, indicating no detectable effect of exposure on the germ cell mutation rate in the region.(K.H.)

  13. Probing DNA in nanopores via tunneling: from sequencing to ``quantum'' analogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-02-01

    Fast and low-cost DNA sequencing methods would revolutionize medicine: a person could have his/her full genome sequenced so that drugs could be tailored to his/her specific illnesses; doctors could know in advance patients' likelihood to develop a given ailment; cures to major diseases could be found faster [1]. However, this goal of ``personalized medicine'' is hampered today by the high cost and slow speed of DNA sequencing methods. In this talk, I will discuss the sequencing protocol we suggest which requires the measurement of the distributions of transverse currents during the translocation of single-stranded DNA into nanopores [2-5]. I will support our conclusions with a combination of molecular dynamics simulations coupled to quantum mechanical calculations of electrical current in experimentally realizable systems [2-5]. I will also discuss recent experiments that support these theoretical predictions. In addition, I will show how this relatively unexplored area of research at the interface between solids, liquids, and biomolecules at the nanometer length scale is a fertile ground to study quantum phenomena that have a classical counterpart, such as ionic quasi-particles, ionic ``quantized'' conductance [6,7] and Coulomb blockade [8]. Work supported in part by NIH. [4pt] [1] M. Zwolak, M. Di Ventra, Physical Approaches to DNA Sequencing and Detection, Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 141 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Zwolak and M. Di Ventra, Electronic signature of DNA nucleotides via transverse transport, Nano Lett. 5, 421 (2005).[0pt] [3] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Fast DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Nano Lett. 6, 779 (2006).[0pt] [4] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Influence of the environment and probes on rapid DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Biophys. J. 93, 2384 (2007).[0pt] [5] M. Krems, M. Zwolak, Y.V. Pershin, and M. Di Ventra, Effect of noise on DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport

  14. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of a Dual Charge on the DNA-Conjugated Redox Probe on DNA Sensing by Short Hairpin Beacons Tethered to Gold Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kékedy-Nagy, László; Shipovskov, Stepan; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2016-08-16

    Charges of redox species can critically affect both the interfacial state of DNA and electrochemistry of DNA-conjugated redox labels and, as a result, the electroanalytical performance of those systems. Here, we show that the kinetics of electron transfer (ET) between the gold electrode and methylene blue (MB) label conjugated to a double-stranded (ds) DNA tethered to gold strongly depend on the charge of the MB molecule, and that affects the performance of genosensors exploiting MB-labeled hairpin DNA beacons. Positively charged MB binds to dsDNA via electrostatic and intercalative/groove binding, and this binding allows the DNA-mediated electrochemistry of MB intercalated into the duplex and, as a result, a complex mode of the electrochemical signal change upon hairpin hybridization to the target DNA, dominated by the "on-off" signal change mode at nanomolar levels of the analyzed DNA. When MB bears an additional carboxylic group, the negative charge provided by this group prevents intimate interactions between MB and DNA, and then the ET in duplexes is limited by the diffusion of the MB-conjugated dsDNA (the phenomenon first shown in Farjami , E. ; Clima , L. ; Gothelf , K. ; Ferapontova , E. E. Anal. Chem. 2011 , 83 , 1594 ) providing the robust "off-on" nanomolar DNA sensing. Those results can be extended to other intercalating redox probes and are of strategic importance for design and development of electrochemical hybridization sensors exploiting DNA nanoswitchable architectures.

  16. A probe-based quantitative PCR assay for detecting Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae in fish tissue and environmental DNA water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Patrick; Sepulveda, Adam; Martin, Renee; Hopper, Lacey

    2017-01-01

    A probe-based quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to detect Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, which causes proliferative kidney disease in salmonid fish, in kidney tissue and environmental DNA (eDNA) water samples. The limits of detection and quantification were 7 and 100 DNA copies for calibration standards and T. bryosalmonae was reliably detected down to 100 copies in tissue and eDNA samples. The assay presented here is a highly sensitive and quantitative tool for detecting T. bryosalmonae with potential applications for tissue diagnostics and environmental detection.

  17. Identity of active methanotrophs in landfill cover soil as revealed by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Bodrossy, Levente; Chen, Yin; Singer, Andrew C; Thompson, Ian P; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-10-01

    A considerable amount of methane produced during decomposition of landfill waste can be oxidized in landfill cover soil by methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. The identity of active methanotrophs in Roscommon landfill cover soil, a slightly acidic peat soil, was assessed by DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Landfill cover soil slurries were incubated with (13)C-labelled methane and under either nutrient-rich nitrate mineral salt medium or water. The identity of active methanotrophs was revealed by analysis of (13)C-labelled DNA fractions. The diversity of functional genes (pmoA and mmoX) and 16S rRNA genes was analyzed using clone libraries, microarrays and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that the cover soil was mainly dominated by Type II methanotrophs closely related to the genera Methylocella and Methylocapsa and to Methylocystis species. These results were supported by analysis of mmoX genes in (13)C-DNA. Analysis of pmoA gene diversity indicated that a significant proportion of active bacteria were also closely related to the Type I methanotrophs, Methylobacter and Methylomonas species. Environmental conditions in the slightly acidic peat soil from Roscommon landfill cover allow establishment of both Type I and Type II methanotrophs.

  18. Identification of the autotrophic denitrifying community in nitrate removal reactors by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Cong, Yuan; Gao, Wei; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    Autotrophic denitrification has attracted increasing attention for wastewater with insufficient organic carbon sources. Nevertheless, in situ identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities in reactors remains challenging. Here, a process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification with high nitrate removal efficiency was presented. Two batch reactors were fed organic-free nitrate influent, with H 13 CO 3 - and H 12 CO 3 - as inorganic carbon sources. DNA-based stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to obtain molecular evidence for autotrophic denitrifying communities. The results showed that the nirS gene was strongly labeled by H 13 CO 3 - , demonstrating that the inorganic carbon source was assimilated by autotrophic denitrifiers. High-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis identified Thiobacillus-like bacteria as the most dominant autotrophic denitrifiers. However, 88% of nirS genes cloned from the 13 C-labeled "heavy" DNA fraction showed low similarity with all culturable denitrifiers. These findings provided functional and taxonomical identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities, facilitating application of autotrophic denitrification process for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  20. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  1. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  2. Development and Validation of A Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Calf Thymus DNA Using a Terbium-Danofloxacin Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Soltani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Analysis of biomolecules is required in many biomedical research areas. A spectrofluorimetric method is proposed for determination of calf thymus DNA (ctDNA based on the fluorescence enhancement of terbium-danofloxacin (Tb3+-Dano in the presence of ctDNA. Methods: A probe with maximum excitation and emission wavelengths of 347 nm and 545 nm, respectively, was developed. The enhanced fluorescence intensity of Tb3+-Dano system was proportional to the concentration of ctDNA. The effective factors and the optimum conditions for the determination of ctDNA were studied. Under the optimum conditions of [Tris buffer]= 0.01 mol L-1 (pH 7.8, [ Tb3+]= 1×10-5 mol L-1 and [Dano]= 5×10-5 mol L-1, the maximum response was achieved. The developed method was evaluated in terms of accuracy, precision and limit of detection. Results: The linear concentration range for quantification of ctDNA was 36-3289 ng mL-1 and the detection limit (S/N=3 was 8 ng mL-1. The concentration of DNA extracted from Escherichia coli as an extracted sample was also determined using the developed probe. The concentration of DNA in extracted sample was determined using UV assay and developed method, the results were satisfactory. Conclusion: The proposed method is a simple, practical and relatively interference free method to follow up the concentrations of ctDNA.

  3. Fluorescent quenching-based quantitative detection of specific DNA/RNA using a BODIPY® FL-labeled probe or primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Shinya; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Kazutaka; Torimura, Masaki; Yokomaku, Toyokazu; Kamagata, Yoichi; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for the quantitative detection of specific DNA or RNA molecules based on the finding that BODIPY® FL fluorescence was quenched by its interaction with a uniquely positioned guanine. This approach makes use of an oligonucleotide probe or primer containing a BODIPY® FL-modified cytosine at its 5′-end. When such a probe was hybridized with a target DNA, its fluorescence was quenched by the guanine in the target, complementary to the modified cytosine, and the quench rate was proportional to the amount of target DNA. This widely applicable technique will be used directly with larger samples or in conjunction with the polymerase chain reaction to quantify small DNA samples. PMID:11239011

  4. Characterization of rat brain NCAM mRNA using DNA oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Gaardsvoll, H; Giladi, E

    1990-01-01

    A number of different isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been identified. The difference between these is due to alternative splicing of a single NCAM gene. In rat brain NCAM mRNAs with sizes of 7.4, 6.7, 5.2, 4.3 and 2.9 kb have been reported. We have synthesized six DNA...... oligonucleotides, that hybridize to different exons in the NCAM gene. Furthermore we have constructed three oligonucleotides, that exclusively hybridize to mRNAs lacking certain exons, by letting them consist of sequences adjacent to both sides of the splice sites. By means of these probes we have characterized...... the five NCAM mRNAs in rat brain....

  5. Application of GelGreen™ in Cesium Chloride Density Gradients for DNA-Stable Isotope Probing Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfeng Gao

    Full Text Available In this study, GelGreen™ was investigated as a replacement for SYBR® Safe to stain DNA in cesium chloride (CsCl density gradients for DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP experiments. Using environmental DNA, the usage of GelGreen™ was optimized for sensitivity compared to SYBR® Safe, its optimal concentration, detection limit for environmental DNA and its application in environmental DNA-SIP assay. Results showed that GelGreen™ was more sensitive than SYBR® Safe, while the optimal dosage (15X concentration needed was approximately one-third of SYBR® Safe, suggesting that its sensitivity was three times more superior than SYBR® Safe. At these optimal parameters, the detection limit of GelGreen™-stained environmental DNA was as low as 0.2 μg, but the usage of 0.5 μg environmental DNA was recommended to produce a more consistent DNA band. In addition, a modified needle extraction procedure was developed to withdraw DNA effectively by fractionating CsCl density gradients into four or five fractions. The successful application of GelGreen™ staining with 13C-labeled DNA from enriched activated sludge suggests that this stain was an excellent alternative of SYBR® Safe in CsCl density gradients for DNA-SIP assays.

  6. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  7. Rapid colorimetric assay for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food samples using LAMP formation of DNA concatemers and gold nanoparticle-DNA probe complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachiralurpan, Sirirat; Sriyapai, Thayat; Areekit, Supatra; Sriyapai, Pichapak; Augkarawaritsawong, Suphitcha; Santiwatanakul, Somchai; Chansiri, Kosum

    2018-04-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a major foodborne pathogen of global health concern. Herein, the rapid diagnosis of L. monocytogenes has been achieved using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) based on the phosphatidylcholine-phospholipase C gene (plcB). Colorimetric detection was then performed through the formation of DNA concatemers and a gold nanoparticle/DNA probe complex (GNP/DNA probe). The overall detection process was accomplished within approximately 1 h with no need for complicated equipment. The limits of detection for L. monocytogenes in the forms of purified genomic DNA and pure culture were 800 fg and 2.82 CFU mL-1, respectively. No cross reactions were observed from closely related bacteria species. The LAMP-GNP/DNA probe assay was applied to the detection of 200 raw chicken meat samples and compared to routine standard methods. The data revealed that the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy were 100%, 90.20% and 97.50%, respectively. The present assay was 100% in conformity with LAMP-agarose gel electrophoresis assay. Five samples that were negative by both assays appeared to have the pathogen at below the level of detection. The assay can be applied as a rapid direct screening method for L. monocytogenes.

  8. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF TYPHA LATIFOLIA (TYPHACEAE) AND THE IMPACT OF POLLUTANTS EXAMINED WITH TANDEM-REPETITIVE DNA PROBES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic diversity at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci was examined in the common cattail, Typha latifolia (Typhaceae), using three synthetic DNA probes composed of tandemly repeated "core" sequences (GACA, GATA, and GCAC). The principal objectives of this investigation w...

  9. The use of AMPPD as an alternative substrate for AP-mediated detection of nonradiolabeled DNA probes in Eucalyptus saligna

    OpenAIRE

    De Moura Campos Pardini, M. I. [UNESP; Wolff, J. L C [UNESP; Lopes, C. R. [UNESP

    1993-01-01

    We present a non-radioactive alternative to Southern's (J. Mol. Biol. 98: 503-517, 1975) DNA-DNA hybridization technique. The use of AMPPD - Disodium 3-(4-Methoxyspiro {1,2-dioxetane-3,2'tricyclo[3.3.1.1(3,7)]decan}-4-yl)phyenyl phosphate as an alternative substrate for AP-mediated detection of digoxigenin-11 dUTP-labeled probes made possible the simple and nonhazardous reuse of blots. We used 0.8 % agarose gels containing 30 mug per lane of Eucalyptus saligna DNA, digested with Eco RI, elect...

  10. Hg(2+) detection using a phosphorothioate RNA probe adsorbed on graphene oxide and a comparison with thymine-rich DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; van Ballegooie, Courtney; Liu, Juewen

    2016-06-07

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal and many DNA-based biosensors have been recently developed for Hg(2+) detection in water. Among them, thymine-rich DNA is the most commonly used for designing Hg(2+) sensors. However, the thymine-Hg(2+) interaction is strongly affected by the buffer conditions. We recently reported a molecular beacon containing phosphorothioate (PS)-modified RNA linkages that can be cleaved by Hg(2+). In this work, the fluorescence quenching and DNA adsorption properties of nano-sized graphene oxide (NGO) were used to develop a new sensor using the PS-RNA chemistry. Three DNA probes, containing one, three and five PS-RNA linkages, respectively, were tested. Finally, a fluorophore-labeled poly-A DNA with five PS-RNA linkages was selected and adsorbed by NGO. In the presence of Hg(2+), the fluorophore was released from NGO due to the cleavage reaction, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement. This sensor is highly selective for Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 8.5 nM Hg(2+). For comparison, a fluorophore-labeled poly-T DNA was also tested, which responded to Hg(2+) more slowly and was inhibited by high NaCl concentrations, while the PS-RNA probe was more tolerant to different buffer conditions. This work indicates a new method for interfacing DNA with NGO for Hg(2+) detection.

  11. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate using a loop DNA probe with low background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunshui; Cai, Zhixiong; Wang, Yiru; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Chen, Xi

    2014-07-15

    A simple, rapid, label-free, and ultrasensitive fluorescence strategy for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection was developed using a loop DNA probe with low background noise. In this strategy, a loop DNA probe, which is the substrate for both ligation and digestion enzyme reaction, was designed. SYBR green I (SG I), a double-stranded specific dye, was applied for the readout fluorescence signal. Exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease III (Exo III), sequence-independent nucleases, were selected to digest the loop DNA probe in order to minimize the background fluorescence signal. As a result, in the absence of ATP, the loop DNA was completely digested by Exo I and Exo III, leading to low background fluorescence owing to the weak electrostatic interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. On the other hand, ATP induced the ligation of the nicking site, and the sealed loop DNA resisted the digestion of Exo I and ExoIII, resulting in a remarkable increase of fluorescence response. Upon background noise reduction, the sensitivity of the ATP determination was improved significantly, and the detection limitation was found to be 1.2 pM, which is much lower than that in almost all the previously reported methods. This strategy has promise for wide application in the determination of ATP.

  12. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of human papillomavirus type 6/11 DNA in conjunctival papillomas by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, P.J.; McDonnell, J.M.; Kessis, T.; Green, W.R.; Shah, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-three conjunctival papillomas and 28 conjunctival dysplasias were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA sequences by in situ hybridization with nick-translated 35 S-labeled HPV probes. Adjacent paraffin sections were hybridized with HPV type 2, 6, 16, and 18 probes at Tm - 17 degrees C. Fifteen tissues, all papillomas, displayed positive hybridization with the HPV-6 probe. Infection with HPV-6 (or the closely related HPV-11) appeared to be responsible for most of the conjunctival papillomas of children and young adults. The presence of genital tract HPV-6 in these lesions suggests that some of the infections were acquired during passage through an infected birth canal. The lack of hybridization in adult conjunctival dysplasias indicates either that HPVs are not associated with this condition or that the probes and the technique utilized were not adequate for demonstration of this association

  14. Spectrophotometric, colorimetric and visually detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ETA gene based gold nanoparticles DNA probe and endonuclease enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Bahram; Kamali, Mehdi; Salouti, Mojtaba; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh

    2018-06-01

    Colorimetric DNA detection is preferred over other methods for clinical molecular diagnosis because it does not require expensive equipment. In the present study, the colorimetric method based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and endonuclease enzyme was used for the detection of P. aeruginosa ETA gene. Firstly, the primers and probe for P. aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA) gene were designed and checked for specificity by the PCR method. Then, GNPs were synthesized using the citrate reduction method and conjugated with the prepared probe to develop the new nano-biosensor. Next, the extracted target DNA of the bacteria was added to GNP-probe complex to check its efficacy for P. aeruginosa ETA gene diagnosis. A decrease in absorbance was seen when GNP-probe-target DNA cleaved into the small fragments of BamHI endonuclease due to the weakened electrostatic interaction between GNPs and the shortened DNA. The right shift of the absorbance peak from 530 to 562 nm occurred after adding the endonuclease. It was measured using a UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy that indicates the existence of the P. aeruginosa ETA gene. Sensitivity was determined in the presence of different concentrations of target DNA of P. aeruginosa. The results obtained from the optimized conditions showed that the absorbance value has linear correlation with concentration of target DNA (R: 0.9850) in the range of 10-50 ng mL-1 with the limit detection of 9.899 ng mL-1. Thus, the specificity of the new method for detection of P. aeruginosa was established in comparison with other bacteria. Additionally, the designed assay was quantitatively applied to detect the P. aeruginosa ETA gene from 103 to 108 CFU mL-1 in real samples with a detection limit of 320 CFU mL-1.

  15. New Concepts of Fluorescent Probes for Specific Detection of DNA Sequences: Bis-Modified Oligonucleotides in Excimer and Exciplex Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbaj A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5’-bispyrene and 3’-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5’-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5'-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing.

  16. New concepts of fluorescent probes for specific detection of DNA sequences: bis-modified oligonucleotides in excimer and exciplex detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbaj, A; Bichenkova, Ev; Walsh, L; Savage, He; Sardarian, Ar; Etchells, Ll; Gulati, A; Hawisa, S; Douglas, Kt

    2009-12-01

    The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5'-bispyrene and 3'-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5'-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5'-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing.

  17. Influence of Divalent Counterions on the Dynamics in DNA as Probed by Using a Minor-Groove Binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sneha; Ahmed, Tasnim; Samanta, Anunay

    2017-08-05

    DNA dynamics, to which water, counterions, and DNA motions contribute, is a topic of considerable interest because it is closely related to the efficiency of biological functions performed by it. Simulation studies and experiments suggest that the counterion dynamics in DNA probed by a minor-groove binder are similar for various monovalent counterions. To date, the influence on DNA dynamics of higher-valence counterions, which are also present around DNA and are known to bind more strongly to it than monovalent ions, has not been studied. Herein we investigated DNA dynamics in the presence of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ , chosen for their relative abundance in cells, by using minor-groove binder 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) as a fluorescence probe. The dynamics, as measured from the time-resolved fluorescence Stokes shifts of DAPI bound to calf thymus DNA on a subpicosecond-to-nanosecond timescale, were found to be very similar in the presence of both the divalent ions and Na + ions. The observation is explained by considering the screening of the electric field of the divalent ion by its hydration shell, preferential binding of the ions to the phosphate groups, and displacement of ions from the minor groove by DAPI due to the stronger binding interaction of the latter. Furthermore, the similarity of our results in the presence of Na + to those reported for smaller oligonucleotides suggests that the chain length of DNA does not influence the DNA dynamics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. PCR associated with hybridization with DNA radioactive probes for diagnosis of asymptomatic infection caused by Leishmania Chagasi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de; Moreno, Elizabeth Castro; Gomes, Rosangela Fatima; Melo, Maria Norma de; Carneiro, Mariangela; Fernandes, Octavio

    2002-01-01

    Detection systems for diagnosis of leishmaniasis based on PCR are very promising due to their sensitivity and specificity. Secondary detection by specific radioactive DNA probes, able to type the PCR amplified products, increase the specificity and raise about tem-fold the sensitivity of the assay. The aim of this work was evaluate PCR and hybridization as a tool to identify Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi (the specie that cause the visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil) infection in asymptomatic persons living in a endemic area. Material and Methods: A group of 226 asymptomatic individuals, living in General Carneiro (MG), was selected. Blood samples were harvested and the DNA extracted from the mononucleate cells. PCR was performed using primers addressed to the kinetoplast DNA minicircles. This protocol gives a positive reaction for all Leishmania species. The amplified products were further hybridized with cloned L.chagasi minicircles labeled with 32 P. Results: were identified 111 samples PCR positive, 2 of them hybridization negative and 133 samples hybridization positive, 24 of them PCR negative. The occurrence of samples with hybridization positive and PCR negative was expected since hybridization, with DNA probes labeled with 32 P, increase the sensitivity of the assay. The samples that presented positive PCR and negative hybridization were probably due the presence of other Leishmania species, likely L. (V.) braziliensis (that produce tegumentary leishmaniasis in the region), since L. (L.) chagasi cloned minicircles were used as hybridization probe. We conclude that this procedure is a valuable tool to access subclinical L. (L.) chagasi infections in epidemiological studies. (author)

  19. Use of a multi-thermal washer for DNA microarrays simplifies probe design and gives robust genotyping assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J.; Poulsen, Lena; Petronis, S.

    2008-01-01

    is called a multi-thermal array washer (MTAW), and it has eight individually controlled heating zones, each of which corresponds to the location of a subarray on a slide. Allele-specific oligonucleotide probes for nine mutations in the beta-globin gene were spotted in eight identical subarrays at positions......DNA microarrays are generally operated at a single condition, which severely limits the freedom of designing probes for allele-specific hybridization assays. Here, we demonstrate a fluidic device for multi-stringency posthybridization washing of microarrays on microscope slides. This device...

  20. Electrochemical DNA probe for Hg(2+) detection based on a triple-helix DNA and Multistage Signal Amplification Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yihe; Ma, Hongmin; Ren, Xiang; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor was developed for detection of Hg(2+). Gold nanoparticles decorated bovine serum albumin reduction of graphene oxide (AuNP-BSA-rGO) were used as subsurface material for the immobilization of triple-helix DNA. The triple-helix DNA containing a thiol labelled single-stranded DNA (sDNA) and a thymine-rich DNA (T-rich DNA), which could be unwinded in the present of Hg(2+) to form more stable thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) complex. T-Hg(2+)-T complex was then removed and the sDNA was left on the electrode. At this time, gold nanoparticle carrying thiol labelled cytosine-rich complementary DNA (cDNA-AuNP) could bind with the free sDNA. Meanwhile, the other free cDNA on AuNP could bind with each other in the present of Ag(+) to form the stable cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine (C-Ag(+)-C) complex and circle amplification. Plenty of C-Ag(+)-C could form silver nanoclusters by electrochemical reduction and the striping signal of Ag could be measured for purpose of the final electrochemical detection of Hg(2+). This sensor could detect Hg(2+) over a wide concentration range from 0.1 to 130nM with a detection limit of 0.03nM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A duplex DNA-gold nanoparticle probe composed as a colorimetric biosensor for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Junho; Choi, Yeonweon; Lee, Ae-Ree; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2016-03-21

    Using duplex DNA-AuNP aggregates, a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, SQUAMOSA Promoter-binding-Like protein 12 (SPL-12), was directly determined by SPL-12-duplex DNA interaction-based colorimetric actions of DNA-Au assemblies. In order to prepare duplex DNA-Au aggregates, thiol-modified DNA 1 and DNA 2 were attached onto the surface of AuNPs, respectively, by the salt-aging method and then the DNA-attached AuNPs were mixed. Duplex-DNA-Au aggregates having the average size of 160 nm diameter and the maximum absorption at 529 nm were able to recognize SPL-12 and reached the equivalent state by the addition of ∼30 equivalents of SPL-12 accompanying a color change from red to blue with a red shift of the maximum absorption at 570 nm. As a result, the aggregation size grew to about 247 nm. Also, at higher temperatures of the mixture of duplex-DNA-Au aggregate solution and SPL-12, the equivalent state was reached rapidly. On the contrary, in the control experiment using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), no absorption band shift of duplex-DNA-Au aggregates was observed.

  2. Fetal sex determination in the first trimester of pregnancy using a Y chromosome-specific DNA probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Y.; Huang, S.; Chen, M.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Dong, J.; Ku, A.; Xu, S.

    1987-05-01

    Prenatal determination of fetal sex is important for the prevention of X-linked disorders such as hemophilia, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The complex procedures of prenatal diagnosis for X-linked disorders are unnecessary if the fetus is female, because usually no clinical symptoms ever appear in female. pY 3.4 probe used in this work for sex determination is a 3.4 kilobase human repeat sequence. The probe is specific for the Y chromosome of males and can be used for sex determination. The other prove pBLUR used in this paper as control is a widely dispersed, highly repeated human Alu family DNA sequence, represented equally in male and female DNA. On the basis of the relative densities of the autoradiographic spots produced by hybridization of fetal DNA with pY3.4 and pBLUR, the sex of fetus can be clearly identified. Further the authors can determine the radioactive intensity (cpm) of the hybridized DNA spots and the ratio of hybridization with Y3.4 to pBLUR (Y3.4/pBLUR x 10). Results show that the hybridization ratio of DNA from chorionic villi of male (1.03 +/- 0.24) is significantly higher than that of female (0.16 +/- 0.09). Therefore, sex determination of the fetus can be made, based on the ratio of pY3.4/pBLUR x 10. If necessary they can also use Southern hybridization with pY 3.4 probe of DNA isolated from chorionic villi to confirm the result of dot hybridization.

  3. Synthesis of novel fluorescent probe Tb(III)-7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex for sensing of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Belal H.M.; Azab, Hassan A.; Fathalla, Walid; Ali, Sherin A.M.

    2013-01-01

    New fluorescent probe Tb(III) (7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin)2(SCN) (C2H5OH)(H2O) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin (CMMC) and Tb(III)–CMMC complex have been measured in different solvents. The interactions of Tb(III)–CMMC complex with calf thymus nucleic acid (CT-DNA) have been investigated using steady state fluorescence measurements. The changes in the fluorescence intensity have been used for the quantitative determination of DNA with LOD of 3.45 ng in methanol–water (9:1, v/v). The association constants of DNA with Tb(III)–CMMC complex was found to be 2.62×1010 M −1 . - Highlights: ► New fluorescent probe Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex has been synthesized and characterized. ► FTIR spectrum of Tb(III)-complex shows a characteristic band for thiocyanate group. ► DNA interaction with Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin has been studied by fluorescence techniques. ► The change in the fluorescence intensity has been used for the quantitative determination of DNA. ► The result was better than most of the well-known methods including the ethidium bromide method.

  4. Synthesis of novel fluorescent probe Tb(III)-7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex for sensing of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Belal H.M., E-mail: belalhussein102@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Azab, Hassan A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Fathalla, Walid [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Port-Said University, Port-Said (Egypt); Ali, Sherin A.M. [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2013-02-15

    New fluorescent probe Tb(III) (7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin)2(SCN) (C2H5OH)(H2O) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin (CMMC) and Tb(III)-CMMC complex have been measured in different solvents. The interactions of Tb(III)-CMMC complex with calf thymus nucleic acid (CT-DNA) have been investigated using steady state fluorescence measurements. The changes in the fluorescence intensity have been used for the quantitative determination of DNA with LOD of 3.45 ng in methanol-water (9:1, v/v). The association constants of DNA with Tb(III)-CMMC complex was found to be 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 1010 M{sup -1}. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New fluorescent probe Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex has been synthesized and characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR spectrum of Tb(III)-complex shows a characteristic band for thiocyanate group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA interaction with Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin has been studied by fluorescence techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The change in the fluorescence intensity has been used for the quantitative determination of DNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result was better than most of the well-known methods including the ethidium bromide method.

  5. DNA imaging and quantification using chemi-luminescent probes; Imagerie et quantification d`ADN par chimiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, G; Redjdal, N; Laniece, P; Siebert, R; Tricoire, H; Valentin, L [Groupe I.P.B., Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    During this interdisciplinary study we have developed an ultra sensitive and reliable imaging system of DNA labelled by chemiluminescence. Based on a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD, the system achieves sensitivities down to 10 fg/mm{sup 2} labelled DNA over a surface area of 25 x 25 cm{sup 2} with a sub-millimeter resolution. Commercially available chemi-luminescent - and enhancer molecules are compared and their reaction conditions optimized for best signal-to-noise ratios. Double labelling was performed to verify quantification with radioactive probes. (authors) 1 fig.

  6. Electronic Detection of DNA Hybridization by Coupling Organic Field-Effect Transistor-Based Sensors and Hairpin-Shaped Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Napoli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the electronic transduction of DNA hybridization is presented by coupling organic charge-modulated field-effect transistors (OCMFETs and hairpin-shaped probes. These probes have shown interesting properties in terms of sensitivity and selectivity in other kinds of assays, in the form of molecular beacons (MBs. Their integration with organic-transistor based sensors, never explored before, paves the way to a new class of low-cost, easy-to-use, and portable genetic sensors with enhanced performances. Thanks to the peculiar characteristics of the employed sensor, measurements can be performed at relatively high ionic strengths, thus optimizing the probes’ functionality without affecting the detection ability of the device. A complete electrical characterization of the sensor is reported, including calibration with different target concentrations in the measurement environment and selectivity evaluation. In particular, DNA hybridization detection for target concentration as low as 100 pM is demonstrated.

  7. Analysis and Design of a Fiber-optic Probe for DNA Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1147-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molau, Nicole [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vail, Curtis [Accu.Photonics, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2018-01-24

    In 1995, a challenge in the field of genetics dealt with the acquisition of efficient DNA sequencing techniques for reading the 3 billion base-pairs that comprised the human genome. AccuPhotonics, Inc. proposed to develop and manufacture a state-of-the-art near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) fiber-optic probe that was expected to increase probe efficiency by two orders of magnitude over the existing state-of-the-art and to improve resolution to 10Å. The detailed design calculation and optimization of electrical properties of the fiber-optic probe tip geometry would be performed at LLNL, using existing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic (EM) codes.

  8. Transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping probed by high-resolution, single-molecule imaging in live E. coli cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Hensel

    Full Text Available DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The "genetic switch" of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences O(R and O(L (separated by 2.3 kb, mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034, play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms.

  9. Mechano-genetic DNA hydrogels as a simple, reconstituted model to probe the effect of active fluctuations on gene transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan; Saleh, Omar

    Active fluctuations - non-directed fluctuations attributable, not to thermal energy, but to non-equilibrium processes - are thought to influence biology by increasing the diffusive motion of biomolecules. Dense DNA regions within cells (i.e. chromatin) are expected to exhibit such phenomena, as they are cross-linked networks that continually experience propagating forces arising from dynamic cellular activity. Additional agitation within these gene-encoding DNA networks could have potential genetic consequences. By changing the local mobility of transcriptional machinery and regulatory proteins towards/from their binding sites, and thereby influencing transcription rates, active fluctuations could prove to be a physical means of modulating gene expression. To begin probing this effect, we construct genetic DNA hydrogels, as a simple, reconstituted model of chromatin, and quantify transcriptional output from these hydrogels in the presence/absence of active fluctuations.

  10. A combined approach of DNA probe and RFLP for family and species identification of larval stages of commercially important aquatic species: A study on the surfclam Spisula solidissima

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.

    fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. An oilgonucleotide sequence designed from the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (nucleotide position 259-276) provided a sensitive probe for the Family Mactridae, to which S. solidissima belongs. DNA of unknown larvae...

  11. In-Situ Single DNA Manipulation with phi 20nm Electron-Beam-Deposited Probe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fujioka, Sota

    2001-01-01

    .... In this method full-time observation of the manipulation is provided for the purpose of keeping the information about where the isolated DNA fragment used to he located in the original DNA fiber...

  12. Dumbbell DNA-templated CuNPs as a nano-fluorescent probe for detection of enzymes involved in ligase-mediated DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Taiping; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Dinggeng; Ye, Xiaosheng; Shangguan, Jingfang; Liu, Jinquan; Yuan, Baoyin; Wang, Kemin

    2017-08-15

    DNA repair processes are responsible for maintaining genome stability. Ligase and polynucleotide kinase (PNK) have important roles in ligase-mediated DNA repair. The development of analytical methods to monitor these enzymes involved in DNA repair pathways is of great interest in biochemistry and biotechnology. In this work, we reported a new strategy for label-free monitoring PNK and ligase activity by using dumbbell-shaped DNA templated copper nanoparticles (CuNPs). In the presence of PNK and ligase, the dumbbell-shaped DNA probe (DP) was locked and could resist the digestion of exonucleases and then served as an efficient template for synthesizing fluorescent CuNPs. However, in the absence of ligase or PNK, the nicked DP could be digested by exonucleases and failed to template fluorescent CuNPs. Therefore, the fluorescence changes of CuNPs could be used to evaluate these enzymes activity. Under the optimal conditions, highly sensitive detection of ligase activity of about 1U/mL and PNK activity down to 0.05U/mL is achieved. To challenge the practical application capability of this strategy, the detection of analyte in dilute cells extracts was also investigated and showed similar linear relationships. In addition to ligase and PNK, this sensing strategy was also extended to the detection of phosphatase, which illustrates the versatility of this strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Probing DNA-stabilized fluorescent silver nanocluster spectral heterogeneity by time-correlated single photon counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro, Miguel; Paolucci, Valentina; Hooley, Emma Nicole

    2016-01-01

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) are promising fluorophores whose photophysical properties and synthesis procedures have received increased attention in the literature. However, depending on the preparation conditions and the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNC samples can host a range...... the spectral heterogeneity of other fluorophores, such as luminescent colloidal nanoparticles, and to assess the reproducibility of a synthetic procedure containing an unknown distribution of emissive species....

  14. Multicolour probes for sequence-specific DNA detection based on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing; Xiang, Dongshan; Zhang, Cuiling; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2013-09-21

    The bifunctionality of graphene oxide (GO) which can highly adsorb single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and effectively quench the emission of organic dyes is reasonably utilized in a multiplexed DNA detection system, achieving sensitive and selective detection of HIV, VV and EV, respectively.

  15. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic spatial bias in DNA microarray hybridization is caused by probe spot position-dependent variability in lateral diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Doris; Berry, David; Haider, Susanne; Horn, Matthias; Wagner, Michael; Stocker, Roman; Loy, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The hybridization of nucleic acid targets with surface-immobilized probes is a widely used assay for the parallel detection of multiple targets in medical and biological research. Despite its widespread application, DNA microarray technology still suffers from several biases and lack of reproducibility, stemming in part from an incomplete understanding of the processes governing surface hybridization. In particular, non-random spatial variations within individual microarray hybridizations are often observed, but the mechanisms underpinning this positional bias remain incompletely explained. This study identifies and rationalizes a systematic spatial bias in the intensity of surface hybridization, characterized by markedly increased signal intensity of spots located at the boundaries of the spotted areas of the microarray slide. Combining observations from a simplified single-probe block array format with predictions from a mathematical model, the mechanism responsible for this bias is found to be a position-dependent variation in lateral diffusion of target molecules. Numerical simulations reveal a strong influence of microarray well geometry on the spatial bias. Reciprocal adjustment of the size of the microarray hybridization chamber to the area of surface-bound probes is a simple and effective measure to minimize or eliminate the diffusion-based bias, resulting in increased uniformity and accuracy of quantitative DNA microarray hybridization.

  17. Double-check probing of DNA bending and unwinding by XPA-RPA: an architectural function in DNA repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Missura, M.; Buterin, T.; Hindges, R.; Hübscher, U.; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Naegeli, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 13 (2001), s. 3554-3564 ISSN 0261-4189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : damage recognition * DNA repair * xeroderma pigmentosum Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 12.450, year: 2001

  18. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes.

  19. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes from a flow-sorted human chromosome 8 library that detect restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S; Starr, T V; Shukin, R J

    1986-01-01

    We have used a recombinant DNA library constructed from flow-sorted human chromosome 8 as a source of single-copy human probes. These probes have been screened for restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) by hybridization to Southern transfers of genomic DNA from five unrelated individuals. We have detected six RFLPs distributed among four probes after screening 741 base pairs for restriction site variation. These RFLPs all behave as codominant Mendelian alleles. Two of the probes detect rare variants, while the other two detect RFLPs with PIC values of .36 and .16. Informative probes will be useful for the construction of a linkage map for chromosome 8 and for the localization of mutant alleles to this chromosome. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2879441

  20. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Progress report, December 15, 1982-July 15, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The molecular changes in DNA of mutations induced at the well-defined locus alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in Drosophila melanogaster were compared between null mutants induced by x-rays, the alkylating agent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and decay of tritium incorporated into specific sites of DNA

  1. A DNA minor groove electronegative potential genome map based on photo-chemical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Hansen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA of the genome contains both sequence information directly relating to the protein and RNA coding as well as functional and structural information relating to protein recognition. Only recently is the importance of DNA shape in this recognition process being fully appreciat...

  2. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA nucleoba...

  3. Probing the Conformational Landscape of DNA Polymerases Using Diffusion-Based Single-Molecule FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohlbein, J.; Kapanidis, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring conformational changes in DNA polymerases using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) has provided new tools for studying fidelity-related mechanisms that promote the rejection of incorrect nucleotides before DNA synthesis. In addition to the previously known open

  4. Preclinical detection of porcine circovirus type 2 infection using an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Huang

    Full Text Available Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 has emerged as one of the most important pathogens affecting swine production globally. Preclinical identification of PCV2 is very important for effective prophylaxis of PCV2-associated diseases. In this study, we developed an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (UNDP-PCR for PCV2 detection. Magnetic microparticles coated with PCV2 specific DNA probes were used to enrich PCV2 DNA from samples, then gold nanoparticles coated with PCV2 specific oligonucleotides were added to form a sandwich nucleic acid-complex. After the complex was formed, the oligonucleotides were released and characterized by PCR. This assay exhibited about 500-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR, with a detection limit of 2 copies of purified PCV2 genomic DNA and 10 viral copies of PCV2 in serum. The assay has a wide detection range for all of PCV2 genotypes with reliable reproducibility. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other related viruses including porcine circovirus type 1, porcine parvovirus, porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and classical swine fever virus. The positive detection rate of PCV2 specific UNDP-PCR in 40 preclinical field samples was 27.5%, which appeared greater than that by conventional and real-time PCR and appeared application potency in evaluation of the viral loads levels of preclinical infection samples. The UNDP-PCR assay reported here can reliably rule out false negative results from antibody-based assays, provide a nucleic acid extraction free, specific, ultrasensitive, economic and rapid diagnosis method for preclinical PCV2 infection in field, which may help prevent large-scale outbreaks.

  5. Perturbations in DNA structure upon interaction with porphyrins revealed by chemical probes, DNA footprinting and molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K G; Neidle, S

    1995-06-01

    The interactions of several porphyrins with a 74 base-pair DNA sequence have been examined by footprinting and chemical protection methods. Tetra-(4-N-methyl-(pyridyl)) porphyrin (TMPy), two of its metal complexes and tetra-(4-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TMAP) bind to closely similar AT-rich sequences. The three TMPy ligands produce modest changes in DNA structure and base accessibility on binding, in contrast to the large-scale conformational changes observed with TMAP. Molecular modelling studies have been performed on TMPy and TMAP bound in the AT-rich minor groove of an oligonucleotide. These have shown that significant structural change is needed to accommodate the bulky trimethyl substituent groups of TMAP, in contrast to the facile minor groove fit of TMPy.

  6. Detecting variants with Metabolic Design, a new software tool to design probes for explorative functional DNA microarray development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravelat Fabrice

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microorganisms display vast diversity, and each one has its own set of genes, cell components and metabolic reactions. To assess their huge unexploited metabolic potential in different ecosystems, we need high throughput tools, such as functional microarrays, that allow the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes. However, most classical functional microarrays use specific probes that monitor only known sequences, and so fail to cover the full microbial gene diversity present in complex environments. We have thus developed an algorithm, implemented in the user-friendly program Metabolic Design, to design efficient explorative probes. Results First we have validated our approach by studying eight enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the model strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis sp. EPA505 using a designed microarray of 8,048 probes. As expected, microarray assays identified the targeted set of genes induced during biodegradation kinetics experiments with various pollutants. We have then confirmed the identity of these new genes by sequencing, and corroborated the quantitative discrimination of our microarray by quantitative real-time PCR. Finally, we have assessed metabolic capacities of microbial communities in soil contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. Results show that our probe design (sensitivity and explorative quality can be used to study a complex environment efficiently. Conclusions We successfully use our microarray to detect gene expression encoding enzymes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation for the model strain. In addition, DNA microarray experiments performed on soil polluted by organic pollutants without prior sequence assumptions demonstrate high specificity and sensitivity for gene detection. Metabolic Design is thus a powerful, efficient tool that can be used to design explorative probes and monitor metabolic pathways in complex environments

  7. Tail-labelling of DNA probes using modified deoxynucleotide triphosphates and terminal deoxynucleotidyl tranferase. Application in electrochemical DNA hybridization and protein-DNA binding assays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pivoňková, Hana; Špaček, Jan; Havran, Luděk; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2011), s. 1366-1371 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA tail- labelling * protein-DNA binding * DNA hybridization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  8. Small molecule probes finely differentiate between various ds- and ss-DNA and RNA by fluorescence, CD and NMR response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crnolatac, Ivo; Rogan, Iva; Majić, Boris; Tomić, Sanja [Division of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Deligeorgiev, Todor [Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sofia (Bulgaria); Horvat, Gordan [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science/Chemistry, Horvatovac 102A, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Makuc, Damjan; Plavec, Janez [Slovenian NMR Centre, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia); EN-FIST Centre of Excellence, Trg Osvobodilne Fronte 13, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pescitelli, Gennaro [Department of Chemistry, University of Pisa, Via Moruzzi 13, Pisa (Italy); Piantanida, Ivo, E-mail: pianta@irb.hr [Division of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2016-10-12

    Two small molecules showed intriguing properties of analytical multipurpose probes, whereby one chromophore gives different signal for many different DNA/RNA by application of several highly sensitive spectroscopic methods. Dyes revealed pronounced fluorescence ratiomeric differentiation between ds-AU-RNA, AT-DNA and GC-DNA in approximate order 10:8:1. Particularly interesting, dyes showed specific fluorimetric response for poly rA even at 10-fold excess of any other ss-RNA, and moreover such emission selectivity is preserved in multicomponent ss-RNA mixtures. The dyes also showed specific chiral recognition of poly rU in respect to the other ss-RNA by induced CD (ICD) pattern in visible range (400–500 nm), which was attributed to the dye-side-chain contribution to binding (confirmed by absence of any ICD band for reference compound lacking side-chain). Most intriguingly, minor difference in the side-chain attached to dye chromophore resulted in opposite sign of dye-ICD pattern, whereby differences in NMR NOESY contacts and proton chemical shifts between two dye/oligo rU complexes combined with MD simulations and CD calculations attributed observed bisignate ICD to the dimeric dye aggregate within oligo rU. - Highlights: • Novel dyes emit fluorescence only for poly rA even at high excess of all other ss-RNA. • Fluorescence response for AT-DNA is 8 times stronger than for GC-DNA. • Florescence induced by ds-RNA is 20% stronger that emission induced by ds-DNA. • Intrinsically non-chiral, dyes show strong and characteristic ICD response for poly rU.

  9. Radionuclide trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition

  10. Probing Conformational Changes of Human DNA Polymerase λ Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jason D.; Brown, Jessica A.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Suo, Zucai

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Crystallographic studies of the C-terminal, DNA polymerase β-like domain of human DNA polymerase lambda (fPolλ) suggested that the catalytic cycle might not involve a large protein domain rearrangement as observed with several replicative DNA polymerases and DNA polymerase β. To examine solution-phase protein conformation changes in fPolλ, which also contains a breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 C-terminal domain and a Proline-rich domain at its N-terminus, we used a mass spectrometry - based protein footprinting approach. In parallel experiments, surface accessibility maps for Arg residues were compared for the free fPolλ versus the binary complex of enzyme•gapped DNA and the ternary complex of enzyme•gapped DNA•dNTP. These experiments suggested that fPolλ does not undergo major conformational changes during the catalysis in the solution phase. Furthermore, the mass spectrometry-based protein footprinting experiments revealed that active site residue R386 was shielded from the surface only in the presence of both a gapped DNA substrate and an incoming nucleotide dNTP. Site-directed mutagenesis and pre-steady state kinetic studies confirmed the importance of R386 for the enzyme activity, and indicated the key role for its guanidino group in stabilizing the negative charges of an incoming nucleotide and the leaving pyrophosphate product. We suggest that such interactions could be shared by and important for catalytic functions of other DNA polymerases. PMID:19467241

  11. Single DNA molecules as probes for interrogating silica surfaces after various chemical treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xia; Wu Zhan; Nie Huagui; Liu Ziling; He Yan; Yeung, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the adsorption of single YOYO-1-labeled λ-DNA molecules at glass surfaces after treatment with various chemical cleaning methods by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The characteristics of these surfaces were further assessed using contact angle (CA) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By recording the real-time dynamic motion of DNA molecules at the liquid/solid interface, subtle differences in adsorption affinities were revealed. The results indicate that the driving force for adsorption of DNA molecules on glass surfaces is mainly hydrophobic interaction. We also found that surface topography plays a role in the adsorption dynamics

  12. Multiply osmium-labeled reporter probes for electrochemical DNA hybridization assays: detection of trinucleotide repeats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Kizek, René; Paleček, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2004), s. 985-994 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA MPO 1H-PK/42; GA AV ČR IAA4004108; GA AV ČR IBS5004355; GA AV ČR KJB4004302; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : electrochemical sensors * DNA hybridization * DNA labeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.251, year: 2004

  13. A New FRET-Based Sensitive DNA Sensor for Medical Diagnostics using PNA Probe and Water-Soluble Blue Light Emitting Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mathur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A reliable, fast, and low-cost biosensor for medical diagnostics using DNA sequence detection has been developed and tested for the detection of the bacterium “Bacillus anthracis.” In this sensor, Poly [9,9-di (6,6′- N, N′ trimethylammonium hexylfluorenyl-2, 7-diyl-alt-co- (1,4-phenylene] dibromide salt (PFP has been taken as cationic conjugated polymer (CCP and PNA attached with fluorescein dye (PNAC∗ as a probe. The basic principle of this sensor is that when a PNAC∗ probe is hybridized with a single strand DNA (ssDNA having complementary sequence, Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET may take place from PFP to the PNAC∗/DNA complex. If the FRET is efficient, the photoluminescence from the PFP will be highly quenched and that from PNAC∗ will be enhanced. On the other hand, if the DNA sequence is noncomplementary to PNA, FRET will not occur.

  14. Development of a PCR/LDR/flow-through hybridization assay using a capillary tube, probe DNA-immobilized magnetic beads and chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommatsu, Manami; Okahashi, Hisamitsu; Ohta, Keisuke; Tamai, Yusuke; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ligase detection reaction (LDR)/flow-through hybridization assay using chemiluminescence (CL) detection was developed for analyzing point mutations in gene fragments with high diagnostic value for colorectal cancers. A flow-through hybridization format using a capillary tube, in which probe DNA-immobilized magnetic beads were packed, provided accelerated hybridization kinetics of target DNA (i.e. LDR product) to the probe DNA. Simple fluid manipulations enabled both allele-specific hybridization and the removal of non-specifically bound DNA in the wash step. Furthermore, the use of CL detection greatly simplified the detection scheme, since CL does not require a light source for excitation of the fluorescent dye tags on the LDR products. Preliminary results demonstrated that this analytical system could detect both homozygous and heterozygous mutations, without the expensive instrumentation and cumbersome procedures required by conventional DNA microarray-based methods.

  15. A DNA Computing Model for the Graph Vertex Coloring Problem Based on a Probe Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The biggest bottleneck in DNA computing is exponential explosion, in which the DNA molecules used as data in information processing grow exponentially with an increase of problem size. To overcome this bottleneck and improve the processing speed, we propose a DNA computing model to solve the graph vertex coloring problem. The main points of the model are as follows: ① The exponential explosion problem is solved by dividing subgraphs, reducing the vertex colors without losing the solutions, and ordering the vertices in subgraphs; and ② the bio-operation times are reduced considerably by a designed parallel polymerase chain reaction (PCR technology that dramatically improves the processing speed. In this article, a 3-colorable graph with 61 vertices is used to illustrate the capability of the DNA computing model. The experiment showed that not only are all the solutions of the graph found, but also more than 99% of false solutions are deleted when the initial solution space is constructed. The powerful computational capability of the model was based on specific reactions among the large number of nanoscale oligonucleotide strands. All these tiny strands are operated by DNA self-assembly and parallel PCR. After thousands of accurate PCR operations, the solutions were found by recognizing, splicing, and assembling. We also prove that the searching capability of this model is up to O(359. By means of an exhaustive search, it would take more than 896 000 years for an electronic computer (5 × 1014 s−1 to achieve this enormous task. This searching capability is the largest among both the electronic and non-electronic computers that have been developed since the DNA computing model was proposed by Adleman’s research group in 2002 (with a searching capability of O(220. Keywords: DNA computing, Graph vertex coloring problem, Polymerase chain reaction

  16. Probing Conformational Changes in Human DNA Topoisomerase IIα by Pulsed Alkylation Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung; Collins, Tammy R. L.; Guan, Ziqiang; Chen, Vincent B.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes for solving DNA topological problems by passing one segment of DNA duplex through a transient double-strand break in a second segment. The reaction requires the enzyme to precisely control DNA cleavage and gate opening coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Using pulsed alkylation mass spectrometry, we were able to monitor the solvent accessibilities around 13 cysteines distributed throughout human topoisomerase IIα by measuring the thiol reactivities with monobromobimane. Most of the measured reactivities are in accordance with the predicted ones based on a homology structural model generated from available crystal structures. However, these results reveal new information for both the residues not covered in the structural model and potential differences between the modeled and solution holoenzyme structures. Furthermore, on the basis of the reactivity changes of several cysteines located at the N-gate and DNA gate, we could monitor the movement of topoisomerase II in the presence of cofactors and detect differences in the DNA gate between two closed clamp enzyme conformations locked by either 5′-adenylyl β,γ-imidodiphosphate or the anticancer drug ICRF-193. PMID:22679013

  17. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rapid reliable diagnostics of DNA mutations are highly desirable in research and clinical assays. Current development in this field goes simultaneously in two directions: 1) high-throughput methods, and 2) portable assays. Non-enzymatic approaches are attractive for both types...... 1000-fold above the potential detection limit. CONCLUSION: Overall, the novel assay we describe could become a new approach to rapid, reliable and enzyme-free diagnostics of cancer or other associated DNA targets. Importantly, stoichiometry of wild type and mutant targets is conserved in our assay...... of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence...

  18. Photoluminescence studies of a Terbium(III) complex as a fluorescent probe for DNA detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan, E-mail: mkhorasani@chem.usb.ac.ir; Noroozifar, Meissam; Niroomand, Sona; Moodi, Asieh

    2013-11-15

    The photoluminescence properties of a Tb(III) complex of the form [Tb(phen){sub 2}Cl{sub 3}·OH{sub 2}] (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) in different solvents are presented. It shows the characteristic luminescence of the corresponding Ln{sup 3+} ion in the visible region. The emission intensity of this complex in coordinating solvent is higher than non-coordinating one. The suggested mechanism for the energy transfer between the ligand and Tb{sup 3+} ion is the intramolecular energy transfer mechanism. The interactions of the Tb(III) complex with fish salmon DNA are studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism study and viscosity measurements. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that DNA strongly quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the complex through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant (K{sub b}) of the above metal complex at 25 °C is determined by the fluorescence titration method and it is found to be (8.06±0.01)×10{sup 3} M{sup −1}. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH{sup 0}>0, ΔS{sup 0}>0 and ΔG{sup 0}<0) indicate that the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in DNA–Tb complex association. The results support the claim that the title complex bonds to FS-DNA by a groove mode. -- Highlights: • Photoluminescence of [Tb(phen){sub 2}Cl{sub 3}·OH{sub 2}] in different solvents are studied. • Tb(III) complex shows good binding affinity to FS DNA with K{sub b}=(8.06±0.01)×10{sup 3} M{sup −1}. • Viscosity of DNA almost unchanged by increasing amount of Tb complex. • CD spectrum of DNA has a little change with increasing amount of Tb complex. • Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding reaction is entropically driven.

  19. Probing the role of intercalating protein sidechains for kink formation in DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Sandmann

    Full Text Available Protein binding can induce DNA kinks, which are for example important to enhance the specificity of the interaction and to facilitate the assembly of multi protein complexes. The respective proteins frequently exhibit amino acid sidechains that intercalate between the DNA base steps at the site of the kink. However, on a molecular level there is only little information available about the role of individual sidechains for kink formation. To unravel structural principles of protein-induced DNA kinking we have performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations of five complexes that varied in their architecture, function, and identity of intercalated residues. Simulations were performed for the DNA complexes of wildtype proteins (Sac7d, Sox-4, CcpA, TFAM, TBP and for mutants, in which the intercalating residues were individually or combined replaced by alanine. The work revealed that for systems with multiple intercalated residues, not all of them are necessarily required for kink formation. In some complexes (Sox-4, TBP, one of the residues proved to be essential for kink formation, whereas the second residue has only a very small effect on the magnitude of the kink. In other systems (e.g. Sac7d each of the intercalated residues proved to be individually capable of conferring a strong kink suggesting a partially redundant role of the intercalating residues. Mutation of the key residues responsible for kinking either resulted in stable complexes with reduced kink angles or caused conformational instability as evidenced by a shift of the kink to an adjacent base step. Thus, MD simulations can help to identify the role of individual inserted residues for kinking, which is not readily apparent from an inspection of the static structures. This information might be helpful for understanding protein-DNA interactions in more detail and for designing proteins with altered DNA binding properties in the future.

  20. "Multicolor" electrochemical labeling of DNA hybridization probes with osmium tetroxide complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Kostečka, Pavel; Trefulka, Mojmír; Havran, Luděk; Paleček, Emil

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 3 (2007), s. 1022-1029 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4004402; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0043; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/04/1325; GA MPO(CZ) 1H-PK/42; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : DNA labeling * osmium tetroxide complexes * DNA hybridization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.287, year: 2007

  1. On the Use of Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Probing Allostery through DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dršata, Tomáš; Zgarbová, M.; Jurečka, P.; Šponer, Jiří; Lankaš, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 4 (2016), s. 874-876 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21893S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : B-DNA * modulation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.656, year: 2016

  2. A COMPARISON OF DNA DAMAGE PROBES IN TWO HMEC LINES WITH X-IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisnewski, C.L.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Rosen, C.J.; Chang, P.Y.; Blakely, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated γH2AXser139 and 53BP1ser25, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infi nite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a fi nite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50cGy X-rays, fi xed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37°C, and processed through immunofl uorescence. Cells were visualized with a fl uorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. The dose and time course will be expanded in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is “normal” and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

  3. A comparison of DNA damage probes in two HMEC lines withX-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisnewski, Christy L.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, ChristoperJ.; Chang, Polly Y.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2007-01-19

    In this study, we investigated {gamma}H2AX{sup ser139} and 53BP1{sup ser25}, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infinite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a finite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50 cGy X-rays, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37 C, and processed through immunofluorescence. Cells were visualized with a fluorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. We will expand the dose and time course in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is 'normal' and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

  4. Effect of structure variation of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe on the performance of displacement-based electrochemical aptamer sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jie; Zhang, Ziping; Jin, Haizhu

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical aptamer-based (E-AB) sensors employing electrode-immobilized, redox-tagged aptamer probes have emerged as a promising platform for the sensitive and quick detection of target analytes ranging from small molecules to proteins. Signal generation in this class of sensor is linked to change in electron transfer efficiency upon binding-induced change in flexibility/conformation of the aptamer probe. Because of this signaling mechanism, signal gains of these sensors can be improved by employing a displacement-based recognition system, which links target binding with a large-scale flexibility/conformation shift from the aptamer-DNA duplex to the single-stranded DNA or the native aptamer. Despite the relatively large number of displacement-based E-AB sensor samples, little attention has been paid to the structure variation of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe. Here we detail the effects of complementary length and position of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe on the performance of a model displacement-based E-AB sensor for ATP. We find that, greater background suppression and signal gain are observed with longer complementary length of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe. However, sensor equilibration time slows monotonically with increasing complementary length; and with too many target binding sites in aptamer sequence being occupied by the complementary DNA, the aptamer-target binding does not occur and no signal gain observed. We also demonstrate that signal gain of the displacement-based E-AB sensor is strongly dependent on the complementary position of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe, with complementary position located at the electrode-attached or redox-tagged end of the duplex probe, larger background suppression and signal increase than that of the middle position are observed. These results highlight the importance of rational structure design of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe and provide new insights into the optimization of displacement-based E-AB sensors. Copyright

  5. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  6. Using DNA-Stable Isotope Probing to Identify MTBE- and TBA-Degrading Microorganisms in Contaminated Groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Katherine C; Sublette, Kerry L; Duncan, Kathleen; Mackay, Douglas M; Scow, Kate M; Ogles, Dora

    2013-01-01

    Although the anaerobic biodegradation of methyl tert -butyl ether (MTBE) and tert -butyl alcohol (TBA) has been documented in the laboratory and the field, knowledge of the microorganisms and mechanisms involved is still lacking. In this study, DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify microorganisms involved in anaerobic fuel oxygenate biodegradation in a sulfate-reducing MTBE and TBA plume. Microorganisms were collected in the field using Bio-Sep® beads amended with 13 C 5 -MTBE, 13 C 1 -MTBE (only methoxy carbon labeled), or 13 C 4 -TBA. 13 C-DNA and 12 C-DNA extracted from the Bio-Sep beads were cloned and 16S rRNA gene sequences were used to identify the indigenous microorganisms involved in degrading the methoxy group of MTBE and the tert -butyl group of MTBE and TBA. Results indicated that microorganisms were actively degrading 13 C-labeled MTBE and TBA in situ and the 13 C was incorporated into their DNA. Several sequences related to known MTBE- and TBA-degraders in the Burkholderiales and the Sphingomonadales orders were detected in all three 13 C clone libraries and were likely to be primary degraders at the site. Sequences related to sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron-reducers, such as Geobacter and Geothrix , were only detected in the clone libraries where MTBE and TBA were fully labeled with 13 C, suggesting that they were involved in processing carbon from the tert -butyl group. Sequences similar to the Pseudomonas genus predominated in the clone library where only the methoxy carbon of MTBE was labeled with 13 C. It is likely that members of this genus were secondary degraders cross-feeding on 13 C-labeled metabolites such as acetate.

  7. Multiplexed microRNA detection using lanthanide-labeled DNA probes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun

    2014-01-01

    coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Three miRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana were analyzed simultaneously with high specificity, and the sensitivity of the method was comparable to radioactive detection (low femtomol range). The perspective of the developed method is highly multiplexed......In the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have drawn increasing attention due to their role in regulation of gene expression. Especially, their potential as biomarkers in disease diagnostics has motivated miRNA research, including the development of simple, accurate, and sensitive detection methods....... The narrow size range of miRNAs (20-24 nucleotides) combined with the chemical properties of conventional reporter tags has hampered the development of multiplexed miRNA assays. In this study, we have used lanthanide-labeled DNA probes for the detection of miRNAs on membranes using laser ablation inductively...

  8. Discovery and validation of DNA hypomethylation biomarkers for liver cancer using HRM-specific probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Stefanska

    Full Text Available Poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC associated with late diagnosis necessitates the development of early diagnostic biomarkers. We have previously delineated the landscape of DNA methylation in HCC patients unraveling the importance of promoter hypomethylation in activation of cancer- and metastasis-driving genes. The purpose of the present study was to test the feasibility that genes that are hypomethylated in HCC could serve as candidate diagnostic markers. We use high resolution melting analysis (HRM as a simple translatable PCR-based method to define methylation states in clinical samples. We tested seven regions selected from the shortlist of genes hypomethylated in HCC and showed that HRM analysis of several of them distinguishes methylation states in liver cancer specimens from normal adjacent liver and chronic hepatitis in the Shanghai area. Such regions were identified within promoters of neuronal membrane glycoprotein M6-B (GPM6B and melanoma antigen family A12 (MAGEA12 genes. Differences in HRM in the immunoglobulin superfamily Fc receptor (FCRL1 separated invasive tumors from less invasive HCC. The identified biomarkers differentiated HCC from chronic hepatitis in another set of samples from Dhaka. Although the main thrust in DNA methylation diagnostics in cancer is on hypermethylated genes, our study for the first time illustrates the potential use of hypomethylated genes as markers for solid tumors. After further validation in a larger cohort, the identified DNA hypomethylated regions can become important candidate biomarkers for liver cancer diagnosis and prognosis, especially in populations with high risk for HCC development.

  9. Coordinate regulation of stromelysin and collagenase genes determined with cDNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, S.M.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Secreted proteinases are required for tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling during wound healing and embryonic growth. Thus, the regulation of the genes of secreted proteinases may serve as an interesting model for growth-controlled genes in general. The authors studied the genes of the secreted proteinases stromelysin and collagenase by using molecularly cloned cDNAs from each proteinase. Stromelysin cDNA was cloned by differential screening of a total cDNA library from rabbit synovial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which yielded a clone of 1.2 kilobase pairs; collagenase cDNA was obtained by cloning reverse transcripts of anti-collagenase-immunoadsorbed polysomal mRNA, which yielded a clone of 0.8 kilobase pairs. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA species of 2.2 and 2.4 kilobases, respectively, were detected on hybridization blots of RNA from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated but not untreated rabbit synovial cells. Expression of stromelysin mRNA was also induced in rabbit alveolar macrophages and rabbit brain capillary endothelial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA were both induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and cytochalasin B at a constant ratio of the two gene products; this suggest coordinate regulation. The fact that induction was blocked after inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide implicates an indirect signal transduction pathway that requires new protein synthesis

  10. TaqMan probe real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the quantification of canine DNA in chicken nugget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Bhassu, Subha; Rashid, Nur Raifana Abdul; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Mohd Desa, Mohd Nasir; Ali, Md Eaqub

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a short-amplicon-based TaqMan probe quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the quantitative detection of canine meat in chicken nuggets, which are very popular across the world, including Malaysia. The assay targeted a 100-bp fragment of canine cytb gene using a canine-specific primer and TaqMan probe. Specificity against 10 different animals and plants species demonstrated threshold cycles (Ct) of 16.13 ± 0.12 to 16.25 ± 0.23 for canine DNA and negative results for the others in a 40-cycle reaction. The assay was tested for the quantification of up to 0.01% canine meat in deliberately spiked chicken nuggets with 99.7% PCR efficiency and 0.995 correlation coefficient. The analysis of the actual and qPCR predicted values showed a high recovery rate (from 87% ± 28% to 112% ± 19%) with a linear regression close to unity (R(2) = 0.999). Finally, samples of three halal-branded commercial chicken nuggets collected from different Malaysian outlets were screened for canine meat, but no contamination was demonstrated.

  11. Expression of proto-oncogenes in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas by in situ hybridization with biotinylated DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Yoshida, Kuniko; Abe, Masumi; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Shiku, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi.

    1989-11-01

    Expression of six proto-oncogenes (fos, myc, myb, Ki-ras, Ha-ras, and N-ras) in 43 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was analyzed by means of in situ hybridization. Biotinylated DNA probes of the six oncogenes and those of the immunoglobulin H-chain (IgH) gene and the T cell receptor β-chain (TCRβ) gene were used. The results of in situ hybridization performed under blind conditions by IgH and TCRβ gene probes were compatible with those of typing by cell surface markers. The nuclear protein-related proto-oncogenes, fos myc, and myb, were expressed in about 70 % - 80 % of all cases regardless of phenotypes, histology or histologic grade. On the contrary, genes of the ras family were expressed in fewer cases except for the Ki-ras gene which was more frequently expressed by cases of the T cell immunophenotype with a high malignancy grade. The results of dot hybridization with RNA extracted from some cases were compatible with those of in situ hybridization, further demonstrating the specificity of in situ hybridization. (author)

  12. Immunoglobulin heavy-chain fluorescence in situ hybridization-chromogenic in situ hybridization DNA probe split signal in the clonality assessment of lymphoproliferative processes on cytological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppa, Pio; Sosa Fernandez, Laura Virginia; Cozzolino, Immacolata; Ronga, Valentina; Genesio, Rita; Salatiello, Maria; Picardi, Marco; Malapelle, Umberto; Troncone, Giancarlo; Vigliar, Elena

    2012-12-25

    The human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) locus at chromosome 14q32 is frequently involved in different translocations of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and the detection of any breakage involving the IGH locus should identify a B-cell NHL. The split-signal IGH fluorescence in situ hybridization-chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH-CISH) DNA probe is a mixture of 2 fluorochrome-labeled DNAs: a green one that binds the telomeric segment and a red one that binds the centromeric segment, both on the IGH breakpoint. In the current study, the authors tested the capability of the IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe to detect IGH translocations and diagnose B-cell lymphoproliferative processes on cytological samples. Fifty cytological specimens from cases of lymphoproliferative processes were tested using the split-signal IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe and the results were compared with light-chain assessment by flow cytometry (FC), IGH status was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and clinicohistological data. The signal score produced comparable results on FISH and CISH analysis and detected 29 positive, 15 negative, and 6 inadequate cases; there were 29 true-positive cases (66%), 9 true-negative cases (20%), 6 false-negative cases (14%), and no false-positive cases (0%). Comparing the sensitivity of the IGH FISH-CISH DNA split probe with FC and PCR, the highest sensitivity was obtained by FC, followed by FISH-CISH and PCR. The split-signal IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe is effective in detecting any translocation involving the IGH locus. This probe can be used on different samples from different B-cell lymphoproliferative processes, although it is not useful for classifying specific entities. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) 2012;. © 2012 American Cancer Society. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  13. Identification of metabolically active methanogens in anaerobic digester by DNA Stable-Isotope Probing using 13C-acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gowdaman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is gaining enormous attention due to the ability to covert organic wastes into biogas, an alternative sustainable energy. Methanogenic community plays a significant role in biogas production and also for proficient functioning of the anaerobic digester. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the methanogen diversity of a food waste anaerobic digester. After endogenous respiration, the digester samples were supplemented with isotopes of acetate to enrich methanogen population, and were analyzed using DNA-SIP (Stable-Isotope Probing. Following separation and fractionation of heavy (13C and light (12C DNA, PCR amplification was carried out using archaeal 16S rRNA gene followed by DGGE analysis. Sequencing of the prominent DGGE bands revealed the dominance of Methanocorpusculum labreanum species belonging to hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, which can produce methane in the presence of H2/CO2 and requires acetate for its growth. This is the first instance where Methanocorpusculum labreanum is being reported as a dominant species in an anaerobic digester operative on food waste.

  14. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Progress report, July 15, 1984-July 15, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    We have found that the most efficient analysis of mutants is carried out by using both the mutant protein and DNA. A sequential analysis of mutants at the molecular level has been developed. We found that of the seven apparently intragenic mutations disclosed, only three had normal southern blots and, as seen in two dimensional gels, only one of these produced a protein with a subunit which had normal molecular weight and electrical charge. The importance of this finding is that the molecular analysis was able to detect deletions missed by conventional genetic analysis even in a well developed genetic test system like Drosophila melanogaster. 4 refs., 1 fig. (DT)

  15. Probing the Absorption and Emission Transition Dipole Moment of DNA Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooley, Emma Nicole; Carro Temboury, Miguel R.; Vosch, Tom André Jos

    2017-01-01

    Using single molecule polarization measurements, we investigate the excitation and emission polarization characteristics of DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters (C24-AgNCs). Although small changes in the polarization generally accompany changes to the emission spectrum, the emission and excitation...... transition dipoles tend to be steady over time and aligned in a similar direction, when immobilized in PVA. The emission transition dipole patterns, observed for C24-AgNCs in defocused wide field imaging, match that of a single emitter. The small changes to the polarization and spectral shifting that were...

  16. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  17. Detection of a new submicroscopic Norrie disease deletion interval with a novel DNA probe isolated by differential Alu PCR fingerprint cloning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, A. A.; Wapenaar, M. C.; Schuurman, E. J.; Diergaarde, P. J.; Lerach, H.; Monaco, A. P.; Bakker, E.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Differential Alu PCR fingerprint cloning was used to isolate a DNA probe from the Xp11.4-->p11.21 region of the human X chromosome. This novel sequence, cpXr318 (DXS742), detects a new submicroscopic deletion interval at the Norrie disease locus (NDP). Combining our data with the consensus genetic

  18. GENETIC VARIATION IN RED RASPBERRIES (RUBUS IDAEUS L.; ROSACEAE) FROM SITES DIFFERING IN ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COMPARED WITH SYNTHETIC TANDEM REPEAT DNA PROBES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two synthetic tandem repetitive DNA probes were used to compare genetic variation at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci among Rubus idaeus L. var. strigosus (Michx.) Maxim. (Rosaceae) individuals sampled at eight sites contaminated by pollutants (N = 39) and eight adjacent...

  19. Using genomic DNA-based probe-selection to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townsend Henrik J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-density oligonucleotide (oligo arrays are a powerful tool for transcript profiling. Arrays based on GeneChip® technology are amongst the most widely used, although GeneChip® arrays are currently available for only a small number of plant and animal species. Thus, we have developed a method to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species and tested the method by analysing the transcriptome of Brassica oleracea L., a species for which no GeneChip® array is available, using a GeneChip® array designed for Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Genomic DNA from B. oleracea was labelled and hybridised to the ATH1-121501 GeneChip® array. Arabidopsis thaliana probe-pairs that hybridised to the B. oleracea genomic DNA on the basis of the perfect-match (PM probe signal were then selected for subsequent B. oleracea transcriptome analysis using a .cel file parser script to generate probe mask files. The transcriptional response of B. oleracea to a mineral nutrient (phosphorus; P stress was quantified using probe mask files generated for a wide range of gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds. An example probe mask file generated with a gDNA hybridisation intensity threshold of 400 removed > 68 % of the available PM probes from the analysis but retained >96 % of available A. thaliana probe-sets. Ninety-nine of these genes were then identified as significantly regulated under P stress in B. oleracea, including the homologues of P stress responsive genes in A. thaliana. Increasing the gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds up to 500 for probe-selection increased the sensitivity of the GeneChip® array to detect regulation of gene expression in B. oleracea under P stress by up to 13-fold. Our open-source software to create probe mask files is freely available http://affymetrix.arabidopsis.info/xspecies/ and may be used to facilitate transcriptomic analyses of a wide range of plant and animal

  20. Typing for HLA-DPB1*03 and HLA-DPB1*06 using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of "new" DPB1*06 variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1989-01-01

    DP gene typing using in vitro DNA amplification combined with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes has recently been reported. The resulting DNA amplification was specific for the HLA-DPB locus. Typing for the individual DPB alleles was exclusively dependent on the hybridizations of the probe...

  1. Increased detectability of somatic changes in the DNA from human tumours after probing with "synthetic" and "genome-derived" hypervariable multilocus probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagoda, P J; Seitz, G; Epplen, J T

    1989-01-01

    intensities were observed. Together the probes 33.15 and (CAC)5/(GTG)5 detected deviating fingerprint patterns in 63% of the colorectal carcinomas investigated. In mammary and stomach carcinomas, only 1/11 and 2/11 tumours, respectively, showed differences with either of the three probes, 33.15, (GACA)4...

  2. High-resolution analysis of 16q22.1 in breast carcinoma using DNA amplifiable probes (multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization technique) and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakha, Emad A; Armour, John A L; Pinder, Sarah E; Paish, Claire E; Ellis, Ian O

    2005-05-01

    Loss of the chromosomal material at 16q22.1 is one of the most frequent genetic aberrations found in both lobular and low-grade nonlobular invasive carcinoma of the breast, indicating the presence of a tumour suppressor gene (TSG) at this region in these tumours. However, the TSG (s) at the 16q22.1 in the more frequent nonlobular carcinomas is still unknown. Multiplex Amplifiable Probe Hybridisation (MAPH) is a simple, accurate and a high-resolution technique that provides an alternative approach to DNA copy-number measurement. The aim of our study was to examine the most likely candidate genes at 16q22.1 using MAPH assay combined with protein expression analysis by immunohistochemistry. We identified deletion at 16q22.1 that involves some or all of these genes. We also noticed that the smallest region of deletion at 16q22.1 could be delineated to a 3 Mb region centromeric to the P-cadherin gene. Apart from the correlation between E-cadherin protein expression and its gene copy number, no correlation was detected between the expression of E2F-4, CTCF, TRF2 or P-cadherin with their gene's copy number. In the malignant tissues, no significant loss or decrease of protein expression of any gene other than E-cadherin was seen in association with any specific tumour type. No expression of VE-cadherin or Ksp-cadherin was detected in the normal and/or malignant tissues of the breast in these cases. However, there was a correlation between increased nuclear expression of E2F-4 and tumours with higher histological grade (p = 0.04) and positive lymph node disease (p = 0.02), suggesting that it may have an oncogenic rather than a tumour suppressor role. The malignant breast tissues also showed abnormal cytoplasmic cellular localisation of CTCF, compared to its expression in the normal parenchymal cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that MAPH is a potential technique for assessment of genomic imbalances in malignant tissues. Although our results support E-cadherin as the

  3. Radionuclide carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carrier is described. It comprises a modified anionic starch derivative with 0.1% to 1.5% by weight of a reducing agent and 1 to 20% by weight of anionic substituents

  4. Revealing the uncultivated majority: combining DNA stable-isotope probing, multiple displacement amplification and metagenomic analyses of uncultivated Methylocystis in acidic peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Dumont, Marc G; Neufeld, Josh D; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; McNamara, Niall P; Ostle, Nick; Briones, Maria J I; Murrell, J Colin

    2008-10-01

    Peatlands represent an enormous carbon reservoir and have a potential impact on the global climate because of the active methanogenesis and methanotrophy in these soils. Uncultivated methanotrophs from seven European peatlands were studied using a combination of molecular methods. Screening for methanotroph diversity using a particulate methane monooxygenase-based diagnostic gene array revealed that Methylocystis-related species were dominant in six of the seven peatlands studied. The abundance and methane oxidation activity of Methylocystis spp. were further confirmed by DNA stable-isotope probing analysis of a sample taken from the Moor House peatland (England). After ultracentrifugation, (13)C-labelled DNA, containing genomic DNA of these Methylocystis spp., was separated from (12)C DNA and subjected to multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to generate sufficient DNA for the preparation of a fosmid metagenomic library. Potential bias of MDA was detected by fingerprint analysis of 16S rRNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for low-template amplification (0.01 ng template). Sufficient template (1-5 ng) was used in MDA to circumvent this bias and chimeric artefacts were minimized by using an enzymatic treatment of MDA-generated DNA with S1 nuclease and DNA polymerase I. Screening of the metagenomic library revealed one fosmid containing methanol dehydrogenase and two fosmids containing 16S rRNA genes from these Methylocystis-related species as well as one fosmid containing a 16S rRNA gene related to that of Methylocella/Methylocapsa. Sequencing of the 14 kb methanol dehydrogenase-containing fosmid allowed the assembly of a gene cluster encoding polypeptides involved in bacterial methanol utilization (mxaFJGIRSAC). This combination of DNA stable-isotope probing, MDA and metagenomics provided access to genomic information of a relatively large DNA fragment of these thus far uncultivated, predominant and active methanotrophs in peatland soil.

  5. ReseqChip: Automated integration of multiple local context probe data from the MitoChip array in mitochondrial DNA sequence assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spang Rainer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Affymetrix MitoChip v2.0 is an oligonucleotide tiling array for the resequencing of the human mitochondrial (mt genome. For each of 16,569 nucleotide positions of the mt genome it holds two sets of four 25-mer probes each that match the heavy and the light strand of a reference mt genome and vary only at their central position to interrogate all four possible alleles. In addition, the MitoChip v2.0 carries alternative local context probes to account for known mtDNA variants. These probes have been neglected in most studies due to the lack of software for their automated analysis. Results We provide ReseqChip, a free software that automates the process of resequencing mtDNA using multiple local context probes on the MitoChip v2.0. ReseqChip significantly improves base call rate and sequence accuracy. ReseqChip is available at http://code.open-bio.org/svnweb/index.cgi/bioperl/browse/bioperl-live/trunk/Bio/Microarray/Tools/. Conclusions ReseqChip allows for the automated consolidation of base calls from alternative local mt genome context probes. It thereby improves the accuracy of resequencing, while reducing the number of non-called bases.

  6. Electrochemical detection of human papillomavirus DNA type 16 using a pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe immobilized on screen-printed carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jampasa, Sakda; Wonsawat, Wanida; Rodthongkum, Nadnudda; Siangproh, Weena; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2014-04-15

    An electrochemical biosensor based on an immobilized anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) probe was successfully developed for the selective detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA. A 14-mer acpcPNA capture probe was designed to recognize a specific 14 nucleotide region of HPV type 16 L1 gene. The redox-active label anthraquinone (AQ) was covalently attached to the N-terminus of the acpcPNA probe through an amide bond. The probe was immobilized onto a chitosan-modified disposable screen-printed carbon electrode via a C-terminal lysine residue using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. Hybridization with the target DNA was studied by measuring the electrochemical signal response of the AQ label using square-wave voltammetric analysis. The calibration curve exhibited a linear range between 0.02 and 12.0 µM with a limit of detection and limit of quantitation of 4 and 14 nM, respectively. This DNA sensing platform was successfully applied to detect the HPV type 16 DNA from a PCR amplified (240 bp fragment of the L1 gene) sample derived from the HPV type 16 positive human cancer cell line (SiHa), and failed to detect the HPV-negative c33a cell line. The sensor probe exhibited very high selectivity for the complementary 14 base oligonucleotide over the non-complementary oligonucleotides with sequences derived from HPV types 18, 31 and 33. The proposed sensor provides an inexpensive tool for the early stage detection of HPV type 16, which is an important biomarker for cervical cancer. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorescent Quantification of DNA Based on Core-Shell Fe3O4@SiO2@Au Nanocomposites and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Yang, Haowen; Liu, Ming; Wu, Dan; Jiang, Hongrong; Zeng, Xin; Elingarami, Sauli; Ll, Zhiyang; Li, Song; Liu, Hongna; He, Nongyue

    2015-02-01

    In this research, a novel method for relative fluorescent quantification of DNA based on Fe3O4@SiO2@Au gold-coated magnetic nanocomposites (GMNPs) and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been developed. With the help of self-assembly, seed-mediated growth and chemical reduction method, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2@Au GMNPs were synthesized. Through modified streptavidin on the GMNPs surface, we obtained a bead chip which can capture the biotinylated probes. Then we designed MLPA probes which were tagged with biotin or Cy3 and target DNA on the basis of human APP gene sequence. The products from the thermostable DNA ligase induced ligation reactions and PCR amplifications were incubated with SA-GMNPs. After washing, magnetic separation, spotting, the fluorescent scanning results showed our method can be used for the relative quantitative analysis of the target DNA in the concentration range of 03004~0.5 µM.

  8. Detection of mutations using microarrays of poly(C)10-poly(T)10 modified DNA probes immobilized on agarose films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufva, Hans Martin; Petersen, Jesper; Stoltenborg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Allele-specific hybridization to a DNA microarray call be a useful method for genotyping patient DNA. In this article, we demonstrate that 13- to 17-base oligonucleotides tagged with a poly(T)10-poly(C)10 tail (TC tag), but otherwise unmodified, can be crosslinked by UV light irradiation to an ag......Allele-specific hybridization to a DNA microarray call be a useful method for genotyping patient DNA. In this article, we demonstrate that 13- to 17-base oligonucleotides tagged with a poly(T)10-poly(C)10 tail (TC tag), but otherwise unmodified, can be crosslinked by UV light irradiation...... to an agarose film grafted onto unmodified glass. Microarrays of TC-tagged probes immobilized on the agarose film can be used to diagnose Mutations in the human P-globin gene, which encodes the beta-chains in hemoglobin. Although the probes differed widely regarding inciting point temperature (similar to 20...... degrees C), a single stringency wash still gave sufficiently high discrimination signals between perfect match and mismatch probes to allow robust mutation detection. In all, 270 genotypings were performed on patient materials, and no genotype was incorrectly classified. Quality control experiments...

  9. A retinoic acid receptor cDNA probe (RAR2) identifies a moderately frequent RFLP on chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bale, A E; Weinberger, C; McBride, O W [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1988-08-11

    RAR2, a 0.72 kb EcoRI, PvuII fragment from the 5{prime} end of the retinoic acid receptor cDNA probe was isolated. PstI identifies a constant band at 0.87 kb and a simple two allele polymorphism with a band at either 3.3 kb (A1) or 2.9 kb (A2). In 38 random blood donors, the frequency of the 3.3 kb allele (A1) was 0.29 and of the 2.9 kb allele (A2) was 0.71. The polymorphic bands and the 0.87 kb constant band segregated with chromosome 17 in 88 human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Co-dominant inheritance was shown in 35 individuals from 5 informative families. Weak constant bands at 6.4 kb, 4.0 kb and 1.4 kb did not cosegregate with the polymorphic bands in somatic cell hybrids and could be eliminated by increasing the wash stringency.

  10. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment.

  11. Norrie disease: linkage analysis using a 4.2-kb RFLP detected by a human ornithine aminotransferase cDNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, J T; Bateman, J B; Cortessis, V; Sparkes, R S; Mohandas, T; Inana, G; Spence, M A

    1989-05-01

    Previous study has shown that the usual DNA marker for Norrie disease, the L1.28 probe which identifies the DXS7 locus, can recombine with the disease locus. In this study, we used a human ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) cDNA which detects OAT-related DNA sequences mapped to the same region on the X chromosome as that of the L1.28 probe to investigate the family with Norrie disease who exhibited the recombinational event. When genomic DNA from this family was digested with the PvuII restriction endonuclease, we found a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of 4.2 kb in size. This fragment was absent in the affected males and cosegregated with the disease locus; we calculated a lod score of 0.602, at theta = 0.00. No deletion could be detected by chromosomal analysis or on Southern blots with other enzymes. These results suggest that one of the OAT-related sequences on the X chromosome may be in close proximity to the Norrie disease locus and represent the first report which indicates that the OAT cDNA may be useful for the identification of carrier status and/or prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Radionuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Chapter 8 presents tables on selected alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray emitters by increasing energy; information on specific activity for selected radionuclides; naturally occurring radionuclides; the natural decay series; and the artificially produced neptunium series. A table of alpha emitters is listed by increasing atomic number and by energy. The table of β emitters presented is useful in identifying β emitters whose energies and possibly half-lives have been determined by standard laboratory techniques. It is also a handy guide to β-emitting isotopes for applications requiring specific half-lives and/or energies. Gamma rays for radionuclides of importance to radiological assessments and radiation protection are listed by increasing energy. The energies and branching ratios are important for radionuclide determinations with gamma spectrometry detectors. This section also presents a table of x-ray energies which are useful for radiochemical analyses. A number of nuclides emit x-rays as part of their decay scheme. These x-rays may be counted with Ar proportional counters, Ge planar or n-type Ge co-axial detectors, or thin crystal NaI(T1) scintillation counters. In both cases, spectral measurements can be made and both qualitative and quantitative information obtained on the sample. Nuclear decay data (energy and probability by radiation type) for more than one hundred radionuclides that are important to health physicists are presented in a schematic manner

  13. Development of techniques using DNA analysis method for detection/analysis of radiation-induced mutation. Development of an useful probe/primer and improvement of detection efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Hideaki; Tsuchida, Kozo; Hashido, Kazuo; Takada, Naoko; Kameoka, Yosuke; Hirata, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    Previously, it was demonstrated that detection of centromere became easy and reliable through fluorescent staining by FISH method using a probe of the sequence preserved in α-satelite DNA. Since it was, however, found inappropriate to detect dicentrics based on the relative amount of DNA probe on each chromosome. A prove which allows homogeneous detection of α-satelite DNA for each chromosome was constructed. A presumed sequence specific to kinetochore, CENP-B box was amplified by PCR method and the product DNA was used as a probe. However, the variation in amounts of probe DNA among chromosomes was decreased by only about 20%. Then, a program for image processing of the results obtained from FISH using α-satelite DNA was constructed to use as a marker for centromere. When compared with detection of abnormal chromosomes stained by the conventional method, calculation efficacy for only detection of centromere was improved by the use of this program. Calculation to discriminate the normal or not was still complicated and the detection efficacy was little improved. Chromosomal abnormalities in lymphocytes were used to detect the effects of radiation. In this method, it is needed to shift the phase of cells into metaphase. The mutation induced by radiation might be often repaired during shifting. To exclude this possibility, DNA extraction was conducted at a low temperature and immediately after exposure to 137 Cs, and a rapid genome detection method was established using the genome DNA. As the model genomes, the following three were used: 1) long chain repeated sequences widely dispersed over chromosome, 2) cluster genes, 3) single copy genes. The effects of radiation were detectable at 1-2 Gy for the long repeated sequences and at 7 Gy for the cluster genes, respectively, whereas no significant effects were observed at any Gy tested for the single copy genes. Amplification was marked in the cells exposed at 1-10 Gy (peak at 4 Gy), suggesting that these regions had

  14. Utility of γH2AX as a molecular marker of DNA double-strand breaks in nuclear medicine: applications to radionuclide therapy employing auger electron-emitting isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Li-Jeen; Orlowski, Christian; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-01-01

    There is an intense interest in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for cancer therapy. In particular, radiopharmaceuticals which involve targeting radionuclides specifically to cancer cells with the use of monoclonal antibodies (radioimmunotherapy) or peptides (targeted radiotherapy) are being widely investigated. For example, the ultra-short range Auger electron-emitting isotopes, which are discussed in this review, are being considered in the context of DNAtargeted radiotherapy. The efficient quantitative evaluation of the levels of damage caused by such potential radiopharmaceuticals is required for assessment of therapeutic efficacy and determination of relevant doses for successful treatment. The DNA double-strand break surrogate marker, γH2AX, has emerged as a useful biomonitor of damage and thus effectiveness of treatment, offering a highly specific and sensitive means of assessment. This review will cover the potential applications of γH2AX in nuclear medicine, in particular radionuclide therapy.

  15. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The status of radionuclide generators for chemical research and applications related to the life sciences and biomedical research are reviewed. Emphasis is placed upon convenient, efficient and rapid separation of short-lived daughter radionuclides in a chemical form suitable for use without further chemical manipulation. The focus is on the production of the parent, the radiochemistry associated with processing the parent and daughter, the selection and the characteristic separation methods, and yields. Quality control considerations are briefly noted. The scope of this review includes selected references to applications of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and the life sciences, particularly in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. The 99 Mo-sup(99m)Tc generator was excluded. 202 references are cited. (orig.)

  16. A Rotational BODIPY Nucleotide: An Environment-Sensitive Fluorescence-Lifetime Probe for DNA Interactions and Applications in Live-Cell Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dziuba, Dmytro; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cebecauer, Marek; Hof, Martin; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2016), s. 174-178 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA ČR(CZ) GC14-03141J Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : DNA * fluorescence spectroscopy * fluorescent probes * nucleosides * time-resolved spectroscopy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry ; BO - Biophysics (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  17. Super-resolution imaging of a 2.5 kb non-repetitive DNA in situ in the nuclear genome using molecular beacon probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yanxiang; Cao, Bo; Ma, Tszshan; Niu, Gang; Huo, Yingdong; Huang, Jiandong; Chen, Danni; Liu, Yi; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Michael Q; Niu, Hanben

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution visualization of short non-repetitive DNA in situ in the nuclear genome is essential for studying looping interactions and chromatin organization in single cells. Recent advances in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using Oligopaint probes have enabled super-resolution imaging of genomic domains with a resolution limit of 4.9 kb. To target shorter elements, we developed a simple FISH method that uses molecular beacon (MB) probes to facilitate the probe-target binding, while minimizing non-specific fluorescence. We used three-dimensional stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (3D-STORM) with optimized imaging conditions to efficiently distinguish sparsely distributed Alexa-647 from background cellular autofluorescence. Utilizing 3D-STORM and only 29–34 individual MB probes, we observed 3D fine-scale nanostructures of 2.5 kb integrated or endogenous unique DNA in situ in human or mouse genome, respectively. We demonstrated our MB-based FISH method was capable of visualizing the so far shortest non-repetitive genomic sequence in 3D at super-resolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21660.001 PMID:28485713

  18. DNA-, RNA-, and Protein-Based Stable-Isotope Probing for High-Throughput Biomarker Analysis of Active Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Eleanor; Taubert, Martin; Coyotzi, Sara; Chen, Yin; Eyice, Özge; Schäfer, Hendrik; Murrell, J Colin; Neufeld, Josh D; Dumont, Marc G

    2017-01-01

    Stable-isotope probing (SIP) enables researchers to target active populations within complex microbial communities, which is achieved by providing growth substrates enriched in heavy isotopes, usually in the form of 13 C, 18 O, or 15 N. After growth on the substrate and subsequent extraction of microbial biomarkers, typically nucleic acids or proteins, the SIP technique is used for the recovery and analysis of isotope-labeled biomarkers from active microbial populations. In the years following the initial development of DNA- and RNA-based SIP, it was common practice to characterize labeled populations by targeted gene analysis. Such approaches usually involved fingerprint-based analyses or sequencing of clone libraries containing 16S rRNA genes or functional marker gene amplicons. Although molecular fingerprinting remains a valuable approach for rapid confirmation of isotope labeling, recent advances in sequencing technology mean that it is possible to obtain affordable and comprehensive amplicon profiles, metagenomes, or metatranscriptomes from SIP experiments. Not only can the abundance of microbial groups be inferred from metagenomes, but researchers can bin, assemble, and explore individual genomes to build hypotheses about the metabolic capabilities of labeled microorganisms. Analysis of labeled mRNA is a more recent advance that can provide independent metatranscriptome-based analysis of active microorganisms. The power of metatranscriptomics is that mRNA abundance often correlates closely with the corresponding activity of encoded enzymes, thus providing insight into microbial metabolism at the time of sampling. Together, these advances have improved the sensitivity of SIP methods and allow the use of labeled substrates at ecologically relevant concentrations. Particularly as methods improve and costs continue to drop, we expect that the integration of SIP with multiple omics-based methods will become prevalent components of microbial ecology studies

  19. A “four-ferrocene” modified stem-loop structure as a probe for sensitive detection and single-base mismatch discrimination of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Grégory; Ripert, Micaël; Farre, Carole; Ansanay-Alex, Salomé; Chaix, Carole

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of a four-ferrocene modified oligonucleotide as a probe for DNA detection with a gold electrode microsystem. This oligonucleotide is synthesized by automated solid-phase synthesis with four successive ferrocene moieties at the 5′-end and a C6-thiol modifier group at the 3′-end. The grafting of this 4Fc-DNA probe on a gold electrode microsystem results in the appearance of the ferrocene redox couple in cyclic voltammetry. The probe sequence is a stem-loop structure that folds efficiently on the electrode, thus optimizing electron transfer. Such architecture serves as sensor for DNA detection which is based on hybridization. The resulting disposable voltammetric sensor allowed direct, reagentless DNA detection in a small volume (20 μL). Electrochemical response upon hybridization with complementary short sequence (30-base length) and long sequence (50-base length) strands was observed by differential pulse voltammetry. Current variations were compared. The longer the sequence, the greater the decrease in current. The system's detection limit was estimated at 3.5 pM (0.07 fmol in 20 μL) with the 50-base length target and provided a dynamic detection range between 3.5 pM and 5 nM. Single mismatch detection showed a good level of sensitivity. The system was regenerated twice with no significant loss of Fc signal. Finally, 1 pM sensitivity was reached with a long chain analog of DNA PCR products of Influenza virus.

  20. Binding of chlorfenvinphos and malathion with DNA and their detection using new sensitive luminescent Tb(III) complex probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azab, Hassan A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, 41522 Ismailia (Egypt); Kamel, Rasha M., E-mail: rashamoka@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez University, 43518 Suez (Egypt)

    2016-02-15

    In this work, the interaction of new luminescent terbium-N(acetoacetyl)-3-allyl-2hydroxybenzaldehyde hydrazone complex in a metal ligand ratio 1:2 in ethanol was studied with different pesticides, using fluorescence technique. The results indicate that the pesticides chlorfenvinphos and malathion exhibit quenching effect on the characteristics emission peak for Tb(III) at λ=545 nm. The luminescence variations values using the probe Tb(III)(HBH){sub 2} fit Stern–Volmer equation, where the detection limits are 4.53 and 9.59 µmol/L for chlorfenvinphos and malathion, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters associated with the interaction of the complex with the two pesticides were calculated, where the reaction is spontaneous through the obtained negative values of free energy change ΔG, and the process is of exothermic nature with decrease in entropy. Hence the nature of forces acting between the complex and pesticide molecules are Vander Val's and hydrogen bond. Also, it was found that the quenching mechanism is static type. Effect of some relevant interferents on the detection of pesticides has been investigated. The new sensing complex was applied to the determination of the pesticides in different real water samples (tap, river, and waste water) with precise recovery. Also, the effect of different concentrations of pesticides on the fluorescence spectrum of DNA was studied. - Highlights: • The method can be used for detection of pesticides in environmental samples. • The DL is 4.53 and 9.59 µmol L{sup −1} for chlorfenvinphos and malathion respectively. • Stern–Volmer studies at different temperatures were studied. • Effect of some interferents on the detection of pesticides has been investigated.

  1. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wollongong Univ.; Tomiyoshi, K.; Sekine, T.

    1997-01-01

    The present status and future directions of research and development on radionuclide generator technology are reported. The recent interest to develop double-neutron capture reactions for production of in vivo generators; neutron rich nuclides for radio-immunotherapeutic pharmaceuticals: and advances with ultra-short lived generators is highlighted. Emphasis is focused on: production of the parent radionuclide; the selection and the evaluation of support materials and eluents with respect to the resultant radiochemical yield of the daughter, and the breakthrough of the radionuclide parent: and, the uses of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, biomedical and industrial applications. The 62 Zn → 62 Cu, 66 Ni → 66 Cu, 103m Rh → 103 Rh, 188 W → 188 Re and the 225 Ac → 221 Fr → 213 Bi generators are predicted to be emphasized for future development. Coverage of the 99 Mo → 99m Tc generator was excluded, as it the subject of another review. The literature search ended June, 1996. (orig.)

  2. Radionuclide scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  3. Development of species-specific rDNA probes for Giardia by multiple fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with immunocytochemical identification of cyst wall antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsen, Stanley L; Jarroll, Edward; Wallis, Peter; van Keulen, Harry

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we describe the development of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes to variable regions in the small subunit of 16S rRNA in three distinct Giardia species. Sense and antisense probes (17-22 mer) to variable regions 1, 3, and 8 were labeled with digoxygenin or selected fluorochomes (FluorX, Cy3, or Cy5). Optimal results were obtained with fluorochome-labeled oligonucleotides for detection of rRNA in Giardia cysts. Specificity of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was shown using RNase digestion and high stringency to diminish the hybridization signal, and oligonucleotide probes for rRNA in Giardia lamblia, Giardia muris, and Giardia ardeae were shown to specifically stain rRNA only within cysts or trophozoites of those species. The fluorescent oligonucleotide specific for rRNA in human isolates of Giardia was positive for ten different strains. A method for simultaneous FISH detection of cysts using fluorescent antibody (genotype marker) and two oligonucleotide probes (species marker) permitted visualization of G. lamblia and G. muris cysts in the same preparation. Testing of an environmental water sample revealed the presence of FISH-positive G. lamblia cysts with a specific rDNA probe for rRNA, while negative cysts were presumed to be of animal or bird origin.

  4. Technical aspects of typing for HLA-DP alleles using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of single base mismatches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells...... was extracted with either a simple salting out method or phenol/chloroform. Both DNAs could be readily used for PCR. The MgC2 concentration of the PCR buffer and the annealing temperature of the thermal cycle of the PCR were the two most important variables. The MgCl2 concentration and the temperature must...... be carefully titrated for each primer pair in the PCR. The influence of mismatches between the primer and the DNA template were studied and we found that, by using primers differing only from each other at the 3' end, cross-amplification of closely homologous alleles could be avoided. Thus, single base...

  5. Reverse sample genome probing, a new technique for identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization, and its application to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil field samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voordouw, G.; Voordouw, J.K.; Karkhoff-Schweizer, R.R.; Fedorak, P.M.; Westlake, D.W.S.

    1991-01-01

    A novel method for identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization is presented. It is based on the fact that, even within a genus, the genomes of different bacteria may have little overall sequence homology. This allows the use of the labeled genomic DNA of a given bacterium (referred to as a standard) to probe for its presence and that of bacteria with highly homologous genomes in total DNA obtained from an environmental sample. Alternatively, total DNA extracted from the sample can be labeled and used to probe filters on which denatured chromosomal DNA from relevant bacterial standards has been spotted. The latter technique is referred to as reverse sample genome probing, since it is the reverse of the usual practice of deriving probes from reference bacteria for analyzing a DNA sample. Reverse sample genome probing allows identification of bacteria in a sample in a single step once a master filter with suitable standards has been developed. Application of reverse sample genome probing to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in 31 samples obtained primarily from oil fields in the province of Alberta has indicated that there are at least 20 genotypically different sulfate-reducing bacteria in these samples

  6. Radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  7. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  8. [Development of a novel real-time PCR method for detection of HSV types 1 and 2 DNA using HybProbe chemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzik, Emilia; Karabin, Karolina; Dzieciątkowski, Tomasz; Majewska, Anna; Przybylski, Maciej; Midak-Siewirska, Anna; Łuczak, Mirosław; Młynarczyk, Grazyna

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 are members of the Alphaherpesviridae subfamily, as they can infect both skin and nerves and develop latent infection within the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. Infections with these viruses are common worldwide and cause wide range of clinical syndromes. Although HSV-1/2 infect healthy children and adults, disease is more severe and extensive in the immunocompromised individuals and/or during neuroinfections. The aim of the study was development of real-time PCR assay for detection and differentiation of herpes simplex viruses type 1 and 2. DNA in clinical samples, using specific dual-channel HybProbe chemistry. The nalytical sensitivity of assay was tested using serial dilutions of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA in range between 10 degrees and 10(-5). (4.35 x 10(5)-4.00 x 10(2) copies/ml and 4.18 x 10(5)-3.82 x 10(2) copies/ml, respectively). Thirty four cell line isolates and sixteen clinical samples taken from a group of adult patients with neurological signs were tested for the presence of HSV-1/2 DNA in the LightCycler instrument. Described in-house real-time PCR assay detected herpesviral DNA in all cell line isolates (31 of them were HSV-1 positive; 3 were HSV-2 positive) and in 10 clinical samples (positive only for HSV-1). The conclusion is that developed HybProbe-based real-time PCR test is very reliable and valuable tool for detection and differentiation of HSV-1/2 viremia in different kind of samples. The high level of sensitivity and accuracy provided by this assay is favorable for the quantification of herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 DNA in clinical specimens, especially during low-copy infections.

  9. Direction of Intercalation of a bis-Ru(II) Complex to DNA Probed by a Minor Groove Binding Molecule 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yoon Jung; Kim, Raeyeong; Chitrapriya, Nataraj; Kim, Seog K.; Bae, Inho [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Direction of intercalation to DNA of the planar dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine ligands (dppz) of a bis-Ru(II) complex namely, [Ru(1,10-phenanthroline){sub 2}dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine]{sup 2+} linkered by a 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane, was investigated by probing the behavior of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) that bound deep in the minor groove. Bis-intercalation of DPPZ resulted in a little blue shift and hyperchromism in DAPI absorption band, and a large decrease in DAPI fluorescence intensity which accompanied by an increase in the dppz emission intensity. Diminishing the intensity of the positive induced circular dichroism (CD) and linear dichroism (LD) were also observed. These spectral changes indicated that insertion of dppz ligand caused the change of the binding mode of DAPI, which probably moved to the exterior of DNA from the minor groove and interacted with the phospghate groups of DNA by electrostatic interaction. At the surface of DNA, DAPI binds at the phosphate groups of DNA by electrostatic attraction. Consequently, this observation indicated that the dppz ligand intercalated from the minor groove.

  10. Enhanced sensitivity of DNA- and rRNA-based stable isotope probing by fractionation and quantitative analysis of isopycnic centrifugation gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Tillmann; Manefield, Mike; Friedrich, Michael W

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids allows the detection and identification of active members of natural microbial populations that are involved in the assimilation of an isotopically labelled compound into nucleic acids. SIP is based on the separation of isotopically labelled DNA or rRNA by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation. We have developed a highly sensitive protocol for the detection of 'light' and 'heavy' nucleic acids in fractions of centrifugation gradients. It involves the fluorometric quantification of total DNA or rRNA, and the quantification of either 16S rRNA genes or 16S rRNA in gradient fractions by real-time PCR with domain-specific primers. Using this approach, we found that fully 13C-labelled DNA or rRNA of Methylobacterium extorquens was quantitatively resolved from unlabelled DNA or rRNA of Methanosarcina barkeri by cesium chloride or cesium trifluoroacetate density gradient centrifugation respectively. However, a constant low background of unspecific nucleic acids was detected in all DNA or rRNA gradient fractions, which is important for the interpretation of environmental SIP results. Consequently, quantitative analysis of gradient fractions provides a higher precision and finer resolution for retrieval of isotopically enriched nucleic acids than possible using ethidium bromide or gradient fractionation combined with fingerprinting analyses. This is a prerequisite for the fine-scale tracing of microbial populations metabolizing 13C-labelled compounds in natural ecosystems.

  11. Flow-Induced Dispersion Analysis for Probing Anti-dsDNA Antibody Binding Heterogeneity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: Toward a New Approach for Diagnosis and Patient Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Pedersen, Morten E; Østergaard, Jesper; Petersen, Nickolaj J; Nielsen, Christoffer T; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jensen, Henrik

    2016-09-20

    Detection of immune responses is important in the diagnosis of many diseases. For example, the detection of circulating autoantibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is used in the diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). It is, however, difficult to reach satisfactory sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy with established assays. Also, existing methodologies for quantification of autoantibodies are challenging to transfer to a point-of-care setting. Here we present the use of flow-induced dispersion analysis (FIDA) for rapid (minutes) measurement of autoantibodies against dsDNA. The assay is based on Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) and is fully automated with the use of standard capillary electrophoresis (CE) based equipment employing fluorescence detection. It is robust toward matrix effects as demonstrated by the direct analysis of samples composed of up to 85% plasma derived from human blood samples, and it allows for flexible exchange of the DNA sequences used to probe for the autoantibodies. Plasma samples from SLE positive patients were analyzed using the new FIDA methodology as well as by standard indirect immunofluorescence and solid-phase immunoassays. Interestingly, the patient antibodies bound DNA sequences with different affinities, suggesting pronounced heterogeneity among autoantibodies produced in SLE. The FIDA based methodology is a new approach for autoantibody detection and holds promise for being used for patient stratification and monitoring of disease activity.

  12. Fusion of GFP to the M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase produces a new probe of Type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Kai; Roberts, Gareth A.; Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H.; Dryden, David T.F.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Successful fusion of GFP to M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase. → GFP located at C-terminal of sequence specificity subunit does not later enzyme activity. → FRET confirms structural model of M.EcoKI bound to DNA. -- Abstract: We describe the fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein to the C-terminus of the HsdS DNA sequence-specificity subunit of the Type I DNA modification methyltransferase M.EcoKI. The fusion expresses well in vivo and assembles with the two HsdM modification subunits. The fusion protein functions as a sequence-specific DNA methyltransferase protecting DNA against digestion by the EcoKI restriction endonuclease. The purified enzyme shows Foerster resonance energy transfer to fluorescently-labelled DNA duplexes containing the target sequence and to fluorescently-labelled ocr protein, a DNA mimic that binds to the M.EcoKI enzyme. Distances determined from the energy transfer experiments corroborate the structural model of M.EcoKI.

  13. DNA Probes Show Genetic Variation in Cyanobacterial Symbionts of the Azolla Fern and a Closer Relationship to Free-Living Nostoc Strains than to Free-Living Anabaena Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazinski, Jacek; Zheng, Qi; Taylor, Rona; Croft, Lynn; Rolfe, Barry G.; Gunning, Brian E. S.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-two isolates of Anabaena azollae derived from seven Azolla species from various geographic and ecological sources were characterized by DNA-DNA hybridization. Cloned DNA fragments derived from the genomic sequences of three different A. azollae isolates were used to detect restriction fragment length polymorphism among all symbiotic anabaenas. DNA clones were radiolabeled and hybridized against southern blot transfers of genomic DNAs of different isolates of A. azollae digested with restriction endonucleases. Eight DNA probes were selected to identify the Anabaena strains tested. Two were strain specific and hybridized only to A. azollae strains isolated from Azolla microphylla or Azolla caroliniana. One DNA probe was section specific (hybridized only to anabaenas isolated from Azolla ferns representing the section Euazolla), and five other probes gave finer discrimination among anabaenas representing various ecotypes of Azolla species. These cloned genomic DNA probes identified 11 different genotypes of A. azollae isolates. These included three endosymbiotic genotypes within Azolla filiculoides species and two genotypes within both A. caroliniana and Azolla pinnata endosymbionts. Although we were not able to discriminate among anabaenas extracted from different ecotypes of Azolla nilotica, Azolla mexicina, Azolla rubra and Azolla microphylla species, each of the endosymbionts was easily identified as a unique genotype. When total DNA isolated from free-living Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 was screened, none of the genomic DNA probes gave detectable positive hybridization. Total DNA of Nostoc cycas PCC7422 hybridized with six of eight genomic DNA fragments. These data imply that the dominant symbiotic organism in association with Azolla spp. is more closely related to Nostoc spp. than to free-living Anabaena spp. Images PMID:16348182

  14. PCR associated with hybridization with DNA radioactive probes for diagnosis of asymptomatic infection caused by Leishmania Chagasi; PCR associado a hibridizacao com sondas radioativas de DNA para a identificacao de infeccao subclinica causada por Leishmania Chagasi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Moreno, Elizabeth Castro [Fundacao Nacional de Saude, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao Regional de Minas Gerais; Gomes, Rosangela Fatima; Melo, Maria Norma de; Carneiro, Mariangela [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Parasitologia; Fernandes, Octavio [Fundacao Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina Tropical

    2002-07-01

    Detection systems for diagnosis of leishmaniasis based on PCR are very promising due to their sensitivity and specificity. Secondary detection by specific radioactive DNA probes, able to type the PCR amplified products, increase the specificity and raise about tem-fold the sensitivity of the assay. The aim of this work was evaluate PCR and hybridization as a tool to identify Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi (the specie that cause the visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil) infection in asymptomatic persons living in a endemic area. Material and Methods: A group of 226 asymptomatic individuals, living in General Carneiro (MG), was selected. Blood samples were harvested and the DNA extracted from the mononucleate cells. PCR was performed using primers addressed to the kinetoplast DNA minicircles. This protocol gives a positive reaction for all Leishmania species. The amplified products were further hybridized with cloned L.chagasi minicircles labeled with {sup 32} P. Results: were identified 111 samples PCR positive, 2 of them hybridization negative and 133 samples hybridization positive, 24 of them PCR negative. The occurrence of samples with hybridization positive and PCR negative was expected since hybridization, with DNA probes labeled with {sup 32} P, increase the sensitivity of the assay. The samples that presented positive PCR and negative hybridization were probably due the presence of other Leishmania species, likely L. (V.) braziliensis (that produce tegumentary leishmaniasis in the region), since L. (L.) chagasi cloned minicircles were used as hybridization probe. We conclude that this procedure is a valuable tool to access subclinical L. (L.) chagasi infections in epidemiological studies. (author)

  15. Diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis with radiolabelled probes: comparison of the kDNA PCR-hybridization with three molecular methods in different clinical samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Aline Leandra C.; Ferreira, Sidney A.; Carregal, Virginia M.; Andrade, Antero Silva R., E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia; Melo, Maria N., E-mail: melo@icb.ufmg.br [Departamento de Parasitologia. Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi is responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil and the dog is the main domestic reservoir. Disease control is based on the elimination of infected animals and the use of a sensitive and specific diagnostic test is necessary. The Brazilian VL control program emphasizes serologic surveys, mainly using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), followed by the elimination of the seropositive dogs. However, these techniques present limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) associated to hybridization with DNA probes labeled with {sup 32}P has been recognized as a valuable tool for Leishmania identification. In this study, the sensitivity of kDNA PCR hybridization method was compared with three other molecular methods: Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Nested PCR (ITS-1nPCR), Leishmania nested PCR (LnPCR) and Seminested kDNA PCR (kDNA snPCR). The comparison was performed in different clinical specimens: conjunctival swab, skin, blood and bone marrow. A group of thirty symptomatic dogs, positive in the parasitological and serological tests, was used. When. The techniques targeting kDNA mini-circles (kDNA snPCR and KDNA PCR-hybridization) showed the worst result for blood samples. The KDNA-PCR hybridization showed the best sensitivity for conjunctival swab. By comparing the samples on the basis of positivity obtained by the sum of all methods, the blood showed the worst outcome (71/120).The bone marrow showed the highest positivity (106/120), followed by conjunctival swab (100/120) and skin (89/120). Since the bone marrow samples are unsuitable for routine epidemiological surveys, the conjunctival swab was recommended because it allows high sensitivity, especially when associated with kDNA PCR hybridization method, and is a noninvasive sampling method. (author)

  16. Diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis with radiolabelled probes: comparison of the kDNA PCR-hybridization with three molecular methods in different clinical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Aline Leandra C.; Ferreira, Sidney A.; Carregal, Virginia M.; Andrade, Antero Silva R.

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi is responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil and the dog is the main domestic reservoir. Disease control is based on the elimination of infected animals and the use of a sensitive and specific diagnostic test is necessary. The Brazilian VL control program emphasizes serologic surveys, mainly using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), followed by the elimination of the seropositive dogs. However, these techniques present limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) associated to hybridization with DNA probes labeled with 32 P has been recognized as a valuable tool for Leishmania identification. In this study, the sensitivity of kDNA PCR hybridization method was compared with three other molecular methods: Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Nested PCR (ITS-1nPCR), Leishmania nested PCR (LnPCR) and Seminested kDNA PCR (kDNA snPCR). The comparison was performed in different clinical specimens: conjunctival swab, skin, blood and bone marrow. A group of thirty symptomatic dogs, positive in the parasitological and serological tests, was used. When. The techniques targeting kDNA mini-circles (kDNA snPCR and KDNA PCR-hybridization) showed the worst result for blood samples. The KDNA-PCR hybridization showed the best sensitivity for conjunctival swab. By comparing the samples on the basis of positivity obtained by the sum of all methods, the blood showed the worst outcome (71/120).The bone marrow showed the highest positivity (106/120), followed by conjunctival swab (100/120) and skin (89/120). Since the bone marrow samples are unsuitable for routine epidemiological surveys, the conjunctival swab was recommended because it allows high sensitivity, especially when associated with kDNA PCR hybridization method, and is a noninvasive sampling method. (author)

  17. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Double-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing fluorophores interacting by energy-transfer mechanisms are essential for modern bioanalysis, molecular diagnostics, and in vivo imaging techniques. Although bright xanthene and cyanine dyes are gaining increased prominence within these fields, little...

  18. Establishment of a novel two-probe real-time PCR for simultaneously quantification of hepatitis B virus DNA and distinguishing genotype B from non-B genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liang, Hongpin; Zeng, Yongbin; Lin, Jinpiao; Liu, Can; Jiang, Ling; Yang, Bin; Ou, Qishui

    2014-11-01

    Establishment of a simple, rapid and economical method for quantification and genotyping of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is of great importance for clinical diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis B patients. We hereby aim to develop a novel two-probe real-time PCR for simultaneous quantification of HBV viral concentration and distinguishing genotype B from non-B genotypes. Conserved primers and TaqMan probes for genotype B and non-B genotypes were designed. The linear range, detection sensitivity, specificity and repeatability of the method were assessed. 539 serum samples from HBV-infected patients were assayed, and the results were compared with commercial HBV quantification and HBV genotyping kits. The detection sensitivity of the two-probe real-time PCR was 500IU/ml; the linear range was 10(3)-10(9)IU/ml, and the intra-assay CVs and inter-assay CVs were between 0.84% and 2.80%. No cross-reaction was observed between genotypes B and non-B. Of the 539 detected samples, 509 samples were HBV DNA positive. The results showed that 54.0% (275/509) of the samples were genotype B, 39.5% (201/509) were genotype non-B and 6.5% (33/509) were mixed genotype. The coincidence rate between the method and a commercial HBV DNA genotyping kit was 95.9% (488/509, kappa=0.923, PDNA qPCR kit were achieved. A novel two-probe real-time PCR method for simultaneous quantification of HBV viral concentration and distinguishing genotype B from non-B genotypes was established. The assay was sensitive, specific and reproducible which can be applied to areas prevalent with HBV genotypes B and C, especially in China. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. HindIII RFLP on chromosome 8 detected with a calbindin 27 kDa cDNA probe, HBSC21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmentier, M; Vassart, G

    1988-10-11

    A 1.8 kb for EcoRI fragment of the human calbindin cDNA clone HBSC21 was subcloned into M13mp18 and used as a probe. HindIII identifies a 2 allele polymorphism with a band at 4.7 kb (A1) and a band at 4.3 kb (A2). A constant band is located at 5.3 kb. The calbindin 27 kDa gene was assigned to chromosome 8 using chinese hamster-human and mouse-human cell hybrids. Co-dominant segregation was demonstrated in 3 families (total of 20 individuals).

  20. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  1. Direct immobilization of DNA probes on non-modified plastics by UV irradiation and integration in microfluidic devices for rapid bioassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sun; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Dufva, Martin

    2012-01-01

    that simple UV irradiation can be used to directly immobilize poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA oligonucleotide probes on many different types of plastics without any surface modification. On average, five- and fourfold improvement in immobilization and hybridization efficiency have been achieved compared to surface......DNA microarrays have become one of the most powerful tools in the field of genomics and medical diagnosis. Recently, there has been increased interest in combining microfluidics with microarrays since this approach offers advantages in terms of portability, reduced analysis time, low consumption...... of reagents, and increased system integration. Polymers are widely used for microfluidic systems, but fabrication of microarrays on such materials often requires complicated chemical surface modifications, which hinders the integration of microarrays into microfluidic systems. In this paper, we demonstrate...

  2. Using AFM to probe the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids mediated by Ca(2+): the role of surface pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Sánchez-Treviño, Alda Yadira; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-28

    Complexation of DNA with lipids is currently being developed as an alternative to classical vectors based on viruses. Most of the research to date focuses on cationic lipids owing to their spontaneous complexation with DNA. Nonetheless, recent investigations have revealed that cationic lipids induce a large number of adverse effects on DNA delivery. Precisely, the lower cytotoxicity of anionic lipids accounts for their use as a promising alternative. However, the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids (mediated by cations) is still in early stages and is not yet well understood. In order to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the complexation of anionic lipids and DNA we proposed a combined methodology based on the surface pressure-area isotherms, Gibbs elasticity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These techniques allow elucidation of the role of the surface pressure in the complexation and visualization of the interfacial aggregates for the first time. We demonstrate that the DNA complexes with negatively charged model monolayers (DPPC/DPPS 4 : 1) only in the presence of Ca(2+), but is expelled at very high surface pressures. Also, according to the Gibbs elasticity plot, the complexation of lipids and DNA implies a whole fluidisation of the monolayer and a completely different phase transition map in the presence of DNA and Ca(2+). AFM imaging allows identification for the first time of specific morphologies associated with different packing densities. At low surface coverage, a branched net like structure is observed whereas at high surface pressure fibers formed of interfacial aggregates appear. In summary, Ca(2+) mediates the interaction between DNA and negatively charged lipids and also the conformation of the ternary system depends on the surface pressure. Such observations are important new generic features of the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids.

  3. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for loW--level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements

  4. Detection of endonuclease III- and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-sensitive base modifications in γ-irradiated DNA and cells by the aldehyde reactive probe (ARP) assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin Ali, M.; Kurisu, Satofumi; Yoshioka, Yoshihiro; Terato, Hiroaki; Ohyama, Yoshihiko; Ide Hiroshi; Kubo, Kihei

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing radiation generates diverse DNA lesions that differentially induce cell death and mutations. In the present study, calf thymus DNA (400 μg/ml) and HeLa cells were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays, and abasic (AP) sites and endonuclease (Endo) III- and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (hOGG1)-sensitive base modifications in DNA were quantitated by the aldehyde reactive probe (ARP) assay. The irradiation of calf thymus DNA in phosphate buffer generated 91 Endo III- and 100 hOGG1-sensitive base modifications and 110 AP sites per 10 6 base pairs (bp) per Gy. The yield of the lesions in Tris buffer was 41- to 91-fold lower than that in phosphate, demonstrating a radioprotective effect of Tris. The HeLa cell chromosomal DNA contained 12 Endo III- and 3.8 hOGG1-sensitive base modifications and less than 1 AP sites per 10 6 bp as endogenous damage, and their level was increased by irradiation. The yields of the damage at 1 Gy (roughly equivalent to the lethal dose of HeLa cells [1.6-1.8 Gy]) were 0.13 Endo III, 0.091 hOGG1, and 0.065 AP sites per 10 6 bp, showing that irradiation with a lethal dose brought about only a marginal increase in base damage relative to an endogenous one. A comparison of the present data with those reported for DNA strand breaks supports the primary importance of double-strand breaks and clustered lesions as lethal damages formed by ionizing radiation. (author)

  5. Probing the role of interfacial waters in protein-DNA recognition using a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shen; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    When proteins bind to their DNA target sites, ordered water molecules are often present at the protein-DNA interface bridging protein and DNA through hydrogen bonds. What is the role of these ordered interfacial waters? Are they important determinants of the specificity of DNA sequence recognition, or do they act in binding in a primarily non-specific manner, by improving packing of the interface, shielding unfavorable electrostatic interactions, and solvating unsatisfied polar groups that are inaccessible to bulk solvent? When modeling details of structure and binding preferences, can fully implicit solvent models be fruitfully applied to protein-DNA interfaces, or must the individualistic properties of these interfacial waters be accounted for? To address these questions, we have developed a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model that specifically accounts for the locations and orientations of small numbers of DNA-bound water molecules while treating the majority of the solvent implicitly. Comparing the performance of this model to its fully implicit counterpart, we find that explicit treatment of interfacial waters results in a modest but significant improvement in protein sidechain placement and DNA sequence recovery. Base-by-base comparison of the performance of the two models highlights DNA sequence positions whose recognition may be dependent on interfacial water. Our study offers large-scale statistical evidence for the role of ordered water for protein DNA recognition, together with detailed examination of several well-characterized systems. In addition, our approach provides a template for modeling explicit water molecules at interfaces that should be extensible to other systems. PMID:23444044

  6. Flow-Induced Dispersion Analysis for Probing Anti-dsDNA Antibody Binding Heterogeneity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Pedersen, Morten E; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Detection of immune responses is important in the diagnosis of many diseases. For example, the detection of circulating autoantibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is used in the diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). It is, however, difficult to reach satisfactory sensitivity......, the patient antibodies bound DNA sequences with different affinities, suggesting pronounced heterogeneity among autoantibodies produced in SLE. The FIDA based methodology is a new approach for autoantibody detection and holds promise for being used for patient stratification and monitoring of disease activity....

  7. Induced Förster resonance energy transfer by encapsulation of DNA-scaffold based probes inside a plant virus based protein cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Mark V.; Overeem, Nico J.; Singhai, Gaurav; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.

    2018-05-01

    Insight into the assembly and disassembly of viruses can play a crucial role in developing cures for viral diseases. Specialized fluorescent probes can benefit the study of interactions within viruses, especially during cell studies. In this work, we developed a strategy based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the assembly of viruses without labeling the exterior of viruses. Instead, we exploit their encapsulation of nucleic cargo, using three different fluorescent ATTO dyes linked to single-stranded DNA oligomers, which are hybridised to a longer DNA strand. FRET is induced upon assembly of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, which forms monodisperse icosahedral particles of about 22 nm, thereby increasing the FRET efficiency by a factor of 8. Additionally, encapsulation of the dyes in virus-like particles induces a two-step FRET. When the formed constructs are disassembled, this FRET signal is fully reduced to the value before encapsulation. This reversible behavior makes the system a good probe for studying viral assembly and disassembly. It, furthermore, shows that multi-component supramolecular materials are stabilized in the confinement of a protein cage.

  8. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Żurek-Biesiada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015 [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei.

  9. Hematopoietic Lineage Transcriptome Stability and Representation in PAXgeneTM Collected Peripheral Blood Utilising SPIA Single-Stranded cDNA Probes for Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Kennedy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood as a surrogate tissue for transcriptome profiling holds great promise for the discovery of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers, particularly when target tissues of disease are not readily available. To maximize the reliability of gene expression data generated from clinical blood samples, both the sample collection and the microarray probe generation methods should be optimized to provide stabilized, reproducible and representative gene expression profiles faithfully representing the transcriptional profiles of the constituent blood cell types present in the circulation. Given the increasing innovation in this field in recent years, we investigated a combination of methodological advances in both RNA stabilisation and microarray probe generation with the goal of achieving robust, reliable and representative transcriptional profiles from whole blood. To assess the whole blood profiles, the transcriptomes of purified blood cell types were measured and compared with the global transcriptomes measured in whole blood. The results demonstrate that a combination of PAXgeneTM RNA stabilising technology and single-stranded cDNA probe generation afforded by the NuGEN Ovation RNA amplification system V2TM enables an approach that yields faithful representation of specific hematopoietic cell lineage transcriptomes in whole blood without the necessity for prior sample fractionation, cell enrichment or globin reduction. Storage stability assessments of the PAXgeneTM blood samples also advocate a short, fixed room temperature storage time for all PAXgeneTM blood samples collected for the purposes of global transcriptional profiling in clinical studies.

  10. Hematopoietic Lineage Transcriptome Stability and Representation in PAXgene Collected Peripheral Blood Utilising SPIA Single-Stranded cDNA Probes for Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Laura; Vass, J Keith; Haggart, D Ross; Moore, Steve; Burczynski, Michael E; Crowther, Dan; Miele, Gino

    2008-08-25

    Peripheral blood as a surrogate tissue for transcriptome profiling holds great promise for the discovery of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers, particularly when target tissues of disease are not readily available. To maximize the reliability of gene expression data generated from clinical blood samples, both the sample collection and the microarray probe generation methods should be optimized to provide stabilized, reproducible and representative gene expression profiles faithfully representing the transcriptional profiles of the constituent blood cell types present in the circulation. Given the increasing innovation in this field in recent years, we investigated a combination of methodological advances in both RNA stabilisation and microarray probe generation with the goal of achieving robust, reliable and representative transcriptional profiles from whole blood. To assess the whole blood profiles, the transcriptomes of purified blood cell types were measured and compared with the global transcriptomes measured in whole blood. The results demonstrate that a combination of PAXgene() RNA stabilising technology and single-stranded cDNA probe generation afforded by the NuGEN Ovation RNA amplification system V2() enables an approach that yields faithful representation of specific hematopoietic cell lineage transcriptomes in whole blood without the necessity for prior sample fractionation, cell enrichment or globin reduction. Storage stability assessments of the PAXgene() blood samples also advocate a short, fixed room temperature storage time for all PAXgene() blood samples collected for the purposes of global transcriptional profiling in clinical studies.

  11. Hematopoietic Lineage Transcriptome Stability and Representation in PAXgene™ Collected Peripheral Blood Utilising SPIA Single-Stranded cDNA Probes for Microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Laura; Vass, J. Keith; Haggart, D. Ross; Moore, Steve; Burczynski, Michael E.; Crowther, Dan; Miele, Gino

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral blood as a surrogate tissue for transcriptome profiling holds great promise for the discovery of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers, particularly when target tissues of disease are not readily available. To maximize the reliability of gene expression data generated from clinical blood samples, both the sample collection and the microarray probe generation methods should be optimized to provide stabilized, reproducible and representative gene expression profiles faithfully representing the transcriptional profiles of the constituent blood cell types present in the circulation. Given the increasing innovation in this field in recent years, we investigated a combination of methodological advances in both RNA stabilisation and microarray probe generation with the goal of achieving robust, reliable and representative transcriptional profiles from whole blood. To assess the whole blood profiles, the transcriptomes of purified blood cell types were measured and compared with the global transcriptomes measured in whole blood. The results demonstrate that a combination of PAXgene™ RNA stabilising technology and single-stranded cDNA probe generation afforded by the NuGEN Ovation RNA amplification system V2™ enables an approach that yields faithful representation of specific hematopoietic cell lineage transcriptomes in whole blood without the necessity for prior sample fractionation, cell enrichment or globin reduction. Storage stability assessments of the PAXgene™ blood samples also advocate a short, fixed room temperature storage time for all PAXgene™ blood samples collected for the purposes of global transcriptional profiling in clinical studies. PMID:19578521

  12. Detection of alien chromatin introgression from Thinopyrum into wheat using S genomic DNA as a probe--a landmark approach for Thinopyrum genome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of alien genetic variation from the genus Thinopyrum through chromosome engineering into wheat is a valuable and proven technique for wheat improvement. A number of economically important traits have been transferred into wheat as single genes, chromosome arms or entire chromosomes. Successful transfers can be greatly assisted by the precise identification of alien chromatin in the recipient progenies. Chromosome identification and characterization are useful for genetic manipulation and transfer in wheat breeding following chromosome engineering. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using an S genomic DNA probe from the diploid species Pseudoroegneria has proven to be a powerful diagnostic cytogenetic tool for monitoring the transfer of many promising agronomic traits from Thinopyrum. This specific S genomic probe not only allows the direct determination of the chromosome composition in wheat-Thinopyrum hybrids, but also can separate the Th. intermedium chromosomes into the J, J(S) and S genomes. The J(S) genome, which consists of a modified J genome chromosome distinguished by S genomic sequences of Pseudoroegneria near the centromere and telomere, carries many disease and mite resistance genes. Utilization of this S genomic probe leads to a better understanding of genomic affinities between Thinopyrum and wheat, and provides a molecular cytogenetic marker for monitoring the transfer of alien Thinopyrum agronomic traits into wheat recipient lines. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Use of a repetitive DNA probe to type clinical and environmental isolates of Aspergillus flavus from a cluster of cutaneous infections in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, M J; Lasker, B A; McNeil, M M; Shelton, M; Warnock, D W; Reiss, E

    2000-10-01

    Aspergillus flavus is second to A. fumigatus as a cause of invasive aspergillosis, but no standard method exists for molecular typing of strains from human sources. A repetitive DNA sequence cloned from A. flavus and subcloned into a pUC19 vector, pAF28, was used to type 18 isolates from diverse clinical, environmental, and geographic sources. The restriction fragment length polymorphisms generated with EcoRI- or PstI-digested genomic DNA and probed with digoxigenin-labeled pAF28 revealed complete concordance between patterns. Eighteen distinct fingerprints were observed. The probe was used to investigate two cases of cutaneous A. flavus infection in low-birth-weight infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Both infants were transported by the same ambulance and crew to the NICU on the same day. A. flavus strains of the same genotype were isolated from both infants, from a roll of tape used to fasten their umbilical catheters, from a canvas bag used to store the tape in the ambulance, and from the tape tray in the ambulance isolette. These cases highlight the need to consider exposures in critically ill neonates that might occur during their transport to the NICU and for stringent infection control practices. The hybridization profiles of strains from a second cluster of invasive A. flavus infections in two pediatric hematology-oncology patients revealed a genotype common to strains from a definite case patient and a health care worker. A probable case patient was infected with a strain with a genotype different from that of the strain from the definite case patient but highly related to that of an environmental isolate. The high degree of discrimination and reproducibility obtained with the pAF28 probe underscores its utility for typing clinical and environmental isolates of A. flavus.

  14. Bacteria capable of degrading anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene as revealed by DNA based stable-isotope probing in a forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mengke [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jiang, Longfei [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Zhang, Dayi [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Luo, Chunling, E-mail: clluo@gig.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yu, Zhiqiang [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yin, Hua [College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Gan [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Investigate PAHs degraders in forest carbon-rich soils via DNA-SIP. • Rhodanobacter is identified to metabolite anthracene for the first time. • The first fluoranthene degrader belongs to Acidobacteria. • Different functions of PAHs degraders in forest soils from contaminated soils. - Abstract: Information on microorganisms possessing the ability to metabolize different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in complex environments helps in understanding PAHs behavior in natural environment and developing bioremediation strategies. In the present study, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was applied to investigate degraders of PAHs in a forest soil with the addition of individually {sup 13}C-labeled phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene. Three distinct phylotypes were identified as the active phenanthrene-, anthracene- and fluoranthene-degrading bacteria. The putative phenanthrene degraders were classified as belonging to the genus Sphingomona. For anthracene, bacteria of the genus Rhodanobacter were the putative degraders, and in the microcosm amended with fluoranthene, the putative degraders were identified as belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria. Our results from DNA-SIP are the first to directly link Rhodanobacter- and Acidobacteria-related bacteria with anthracene and fluoranthene degradation, respectively. The results also illustrate the specificity and diversity of three- and four-ring PAHs degraders in forest soil, contributes to our understanding on natural PAHs biodegradation processes, and also proves the feasibility and practicality of DNA-based SIP for linking functions with identity especially uncultured microorganisms in complex microbial biota.

  15. Evaluation of autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizers associated with granular activated carbon used for drinking water purification by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia; Kasuga, Ikuro; Kurisu, Futoshi; Furumai, Hiroaki; Shigeeda, Takaaki

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification is an important biological function of granular activated carbon (GAC) used in advanced drinking water purification processes. Newly discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have challenged the traditional understanding of ammonia oxidation, which considered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) as the sole ammonia-oxidizers. Previous studies demonstrated the predominance of AOA on GAC, but the contributions of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation remain unclear. In the present study, DNA-stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to investigate the autotrophic growth of AOA and AOB associated with GAC at two different ammonium concentrations (0.14 mg N/L and 1.4 mg N/L). GAC samples collected from three full-scale drinking water purification plants in Tokyo, Japan, had different abundance of AOA and AOB. These samples were fed continuously with ammonium and (13)C-bicarbonate for 14 days. The DNA-SIP analysis demonstrated that only AOA assimilated (13)C-bicarbonate at low ammonium concentration, whereas AOA and AOB exhibited autotrophic growth at high ammonium concentration. This indicates that a lower ammonium concentration is preferable for AOA growth. Since AOA could not grow without ammonium, their autotrophic growth was coupled with ammonia oxidation. Overall, our results point towards an important role of AOA in nitrification in GAC filters treating low concentration of ammonium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High throughput screening of human subtelomeric DNA for copy number changes using multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation (MAPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollox, E J; Atia, T; Cross, G; Parkin, T; Armour, J A L

    2002-11-01

    Subtelomeric regions of the human genome are gene rich, with a high level of sequence polymorphism. A number of clinical conditions, including learning disability, have been attributed to subtelomeric deletions or duplications, but screening for deletion in these regions using conventional cytogenetic methods and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is laborious. Here we report that a new method, multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation (MAPH), can be used to screen for copy number at subtelomeric regions. We have constructed a set of MAPH probes with each subtelomeric region represented at least once, so that one gel lane can assay copy number at all chromosome ends in one person. Each probe has been sequenced and, where possible, its position relative to the telomere determined by comparison with mapped clones. The sensitivity of the probes has been characterised on a series of cytogenetically verified positive controls and 83 normal controls were used to assess the frequency of polymorphic copy number with no apparent phenotypic effect. We have also used MAPH to test a cohort of 37 people selected from males referred for fragile X syndrome testing and found six changes that were confirmed by dosage PCR. MAPH can be used to screen subtelomeric regions of chromosomes for deletions and duplications before confirmation by FISH or dosage PCR. The high throughput nature of this technique allows it to be used for large scale screening of subtelomeric copy number, before confirmation by FISH. In practice, the availability of a rapid and efficient screen may allow subtelomeric analysis to be applied to a wider selection of patients than is currently possible using FISH alone.

  17. The effect of 111In radionuclide distance and auger electron energy on direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks: a Monte Carlo study using Geant4 toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroozfar, Behnaz; Raisali, Gholamreza; Alirezapour, Behrouz; Mirzaii, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the effect of 111 In position and Auger electron energy on direct induction of DSBs was investigated. The Geant4-DNA simulation toolkit was applied using a simple B-DNA form extracted from PDBlib library. First, the simulation was performed for electrons with energies of 111 In and equal emission probabilities to find the most effective electron energies. Then, 111 In Auger electrons' actual spectrum was considered and their contribution in DSB induction analysed. The results showed that the most effective electron energy is 183 eV, but due to the higher emission probability of 350 eV electrons, most of the DSBs were induced by the latter electrons. Also, it was observed that most of the DSBs are induced by electrons emitted within 4 nm of the central axis of the DNA and were mainly due to breaks with <4 base pairs distance in opposing strands. Whilst, when 111 In atoms are very close to the DNA, 1.3 DSBs have been obtained per decay of 111 In atoms. The results show that the most effective Auger electrons are the 350 eV electrons from 111 In atoms with <4 nm distance from the central axis of the DNA which induce ∼1.3 DSBs per decay when bound to the DNA. This value seems reasonable when compared with the reported experimental data.

  18. Recombinant DNA probe (PheA12) from the hc-(ERBA) gene on chromosome 3 detects a high frequency RFLP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bale, A E; Usala, S; Weinberger, C; Weintraub, B D; McBride, O W [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1988-08-11

    A cDNA probe (phe A12), a 1.5 kb fragment, was obtained by screening a gt10 library with the v-erb-A gene, subcloned into pUC 8. BamHI identifies constant bands at 23 kb, 21 kb, 13 kb, and 7.0 kb and a simple two-allele polymorphism with a band at either 5.3 kb (A1) or 2.8 kb (A2). EcoRV identifies constant bands at 15 kb and 8.9 kb and two separate two-allele polymorphisms--13.5 kb (B1) vs. 10.5 kb (B2) and 3.3 kb (C1) vs. 1.6 kb (C2). It was mapped to chromosome 3 using laser sorted chromosomes. Co-dominant inheritance and cosegregation of BamHI and EcoRV polymorphism was demonstrated in 20 individuals in one large kindred.

  19. An XmnI RFLP detected with a cDNA probe for the CYP2C gene locus on chromosome 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, A C; Spurr, N K [Clare Hall Laboratories, Herts (England); Meehan, R R; Miles, J S; Wolf, C R [Univ. Department of Biochemistry, Edinburgh (England)

    1989-06-12

    A 700 bp fragment of the cDNA clone for the human cytochrome P450 gene cloned in pUC9 at the PstI restriction site. XmnI detects a two allele polymorphism with bands at 10.00 kb (A1), 4.8 kb (A2) and constants bands at 13.0, 8.3, 4.6, 3.1, 2.8, 2.5, 2.3, 2.2, 1.8 and 1.5 kb. A total of 16 unrelated individuals of Caucasian origin were screened for A1 (.625) and A2 (.375). The probe was assigned to chromosome 10q24.1-q24.3 using a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. Co-dominant inheritance was observed in 3 families from CEPH, K1329 2 K1331 and K1333.

  20. Simultaneous use of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay and flow cytometric DNA ploidy analysis in patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Núñez, Virginia; Galo-Hooker, Evelyn; Pérez-Romano, Beatriz; Duque, Ricardo E; Ruiz-Arguelles, Alejandro; Garcés-Eisele, Javier

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to simultaneously use multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay and flow cytometric DNA ploidy analysis (FPA) to detect aneuploidy in patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia. MLPA assay and propidium iodide FPA were used to test samples from 53 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia referred to our laboratory for immunophenotyping. Results were compared by nonparametric statistics. The combined use of both methods significantly increased the rate of detection of aneuploidy as compared to that obtained by each method alone. The limitations of one method are somehow countervailed by the other and vice versa. MPLA and FPA yield different yet complementary information concerning aneuploidy in acute leukemia. The simultaneous use of both methods might be recommended in the clinical setting. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  1. Determination of DNA by solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence enhancing method based on the Morin.SiO2 luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiaming; Yang Tianlong; Gao Fei; Hu Lixiang; He Hangxia; Liu Qinying; Liu Zhenbo; Huang Xiaomei; Zhu Guohui

    2006-01-01

    Sodium carbonate (Na 2 SiO 3 ) as the precursor, was mixed with Morin organic dye to synthesize silicon dioxide luminescent nanoparticles containing Morin (Morin.SiO 2 ) by sol-gel method. The particle sizes of SiO 2 .nH 2 O and Morin.SiO 2 were both 50 nm, measured with TEM (transmission electron microscope). Morin.SiO 2 modified by HS-CH 2 COOH could be dissolved by water. In the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine)-HCl buffer solution, Pd 2+ could coordinate with Morin in Morin.SiO 2 to form complex Pd 2+ -Morin.SiO 2 , which could emit phosphorescence on polyamide membrane. And DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) could cause a sharp enhancement of the room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) intensity of complex Pd 2+ -Morin.SiO 2 . Thus a new method of solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence (SS-RTP) enhancing for the determination of DNA was established based on the Morin.SiO 2 luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe. The ΔIp is directly proportional to the content of DNA in the range of 4.00-1000.0 fg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 0.010-2.50 ng ml -1 ). The regression equation of working curve was ΔIp = 21.13 + 0.2076m DNA (fg spot -1 ) (r = 0.9990) and the detection limit was 0.61 fg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 1.5 pg ml -1 ). This method had a wide linear range, high sensitivity, convenience, rapidity and only a little sample was needed. Samples containing 0.10 and 25.0 ng ml -1 DNA were measured repeatedly for 11 times and RSDs were 3.2 and 4.1% (n = 11), respectively, which indicated that the method had a good repeatability. Disturbance of common ions, such as Mg 2+ , K + , and Ca 2+ , was small, and there was no disturbance in the presence of protein and RNA. This method has been applied to the determination of DNA in nectar successfully

  2. Direct Probing of Solvent Accessibility and Mobility at the Binding Interface of Polymerase (Dpo4)-DNA Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Yangzhong; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Luyuan; Fowler, Jason D.; Qiu, Weihong; Wang, Lijuan; Suo, Zucai; Zhong, Dongping

    2013-01-01

    Water plays essential structural and dynamical roles in protein-DNA recognition through contributing to enthalpic or entropic stabilization of binding complex and by mediating intermolecular interactions and fluctuations for biological function. These interfacial water molecules are confined by the binding partners in nanospace but in many cases they are highly mobile and exchange with outside bulk solution. Here, we report our studies of the interfacial water dynamics in the binary and terna...

  3. Combination of ICP-MS, capillary electrophoresis, and their hyphenation for probing Ru(III) metallodrug-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foteeva, Lidia S; Matczuk, Magdalena; Pawlak, Katarzyna; Aleksenko, Svetlana S; Nosenko, Sergey V; Karandashev, Vasily K; Jarosz, Maciej; Timerbaev, Andrei R

    2017-03-01

    Determination of the DNA-binding reactivity and affinity is an important part of a successful program for the selection of metallodrug candidates. For such assaying, a range of complementary analytical techniques was proposed and tested here using one of few anticancer metal-based drugs that are currently in clinical trials, indazolium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III), and a DNA oligonucleotide. A high reactivity of the Ru drug was confirmed in affinity capillary electrophoresis (CE) mode, where adduct formation takes place in situ (i.e., in the capillary filled with an oligonucleotide-containing electrolyte). To further characterize the binding kinetics, a drug-oligonucleotide mixture was incubated for a different period of time, followed by ultrafiltration separation into two different in molecular weight fractions (>3 and ICP-MS), revealing that at least two DNA adducts exist at equilibrium conditions. Using standalone ICP-MS, dominant equilibrium amount of the bound ruthenium was found to occur in a fraction of 5-10 kDa, which includes the oligonucleotide (ca. 6 kDa). Importantly, in all three assays, the drug was used for the first time in in-vitro studies, not in the intact form but as its active species released from the transferrin adduct at simulated cancer cytosolic conditions. This circumstance makes the established analytical platform promising to provide a detailed view on metallodrug targeting, including other possible biomolecules and ex vivo samples.

  4. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi Sublineage in Human Samples from a North-East Argentina Area by Hybridization with DNA Probes and Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Cristina; Lorenz, Virginia; Ortiz, Silvia; Gonzalez, Verónica; Racca, Andrea; Bontempi, Iván; Manattini, Silvia; Solari, Aldo; Marcipar, Iván

    2010-01-01

    We have evaluated blood samples of chronic and congenital Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients from the city of Reconquista located in the northeast of Argentina where no information was previously obtained about the genotype of infecting parasites. Fourteen samples of congenital and 19 chronical patients were analyzed by hybridization with DNA probes of minicircle hypervariable regions (mHVR). In congenital patients, 50% had single infections with TcIId, 7% single infections with TcIIe, 29% mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 7% had mixed infections with TcIId/b and 7% TcIId/b, respectively. In Chronical patients, 52% had single infections with TcIId, 11% single infections with TcIIe, 26% had mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 11% had non-identified genotypes. With these samples, we evaluated the minicircle lineage-specific polymerase chain reaction assay (MLS-PCR), which involves a nested PCR to HVR minicircle sequences and we found a correlation with hybridization probes of 96.4% for TcIId and 54.8% for TcIIe. PMID:20064998

  5. A unique dual recognition hairpin probe mediated fluorescence amplification method for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase and endonuclease IV activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yushu; Yan, Ping; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-07

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and endonuclease IV (Endo IV) play cooperative roles in uracil base-excision repair (UBER) and inactivity of either will interrupt the UBER to cause disease. Detection of UDG and Endo IV activities is crucial to evaluate the UBER process in fundamental research and diagnostic application. Here, a unique dual recognition hairpin probe mediated fluorescence amplification method was developed for sensitively and selectively detecting UDG and Endo IV activities. For detecting UDG activity, the uracil base in the probe was excised by the target enzyme to generate an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site, achieving the UDG recognition. Then, the AP site was cleaved by a tool enzyme Endo IV, releasing a primer to trigger rolling circle amplification (RCA) reaction. Finally, the RCA reaction produced numerous repeated G-quadruplex sequences, which interacted with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX to generate an enhanced fluorescence signal. Alternatively, for detecting Endo IV activity, the uracil base in the probe was first converted into an AP site by a tool enzyme UDG. Next, the AP site was cleaved by the target enzyme, achieving the Endo IV recognition. The signal was then generated and amplified in the same way as those in the UDG activity assay. The detection limits were as low as 0.00017 U mL(-1) for UDG and 0.11 U mL(-1) for Endo IV, respectively. Moreover, UDG and Endo IV can be well distinguished from their analogs. This method is beneficial for properly evaluating the UBER process in function studies and disease prognoses.

  6. A fluorescent DNA based probe for Hg(II) based on thymine-Hg(II)-thymine interaction and enrichment via magnetized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Ke; Hu, Liu-Yin; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Huang, Da-Wei; Zeng, Guang-Ming

    2018-03-03

    The authors describe a fluorometric assay for the determination of Hg(II). A naphthalimide derivative is used as a label for a thymine (T) rich ssDNA, and graphene oxide magnetized with Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles acts as a quencher and preconcentrators. In the absence of Hg(II), the labeled ssDNA does not separate from the magnetized graphene oxide. As a result, fluorescence is fully quenched. In the presence of Hg(II), a T-Hg(II)-T link is formed dues to the highly affinity between T and Hg(II). Hence, fluorescence is restored. The assay has a linear response in the 1.0 to 10.0 nM Hg(II) concentration range, and a 0.65 nM detection limit. The method is selective and sensitive. It was applied to the analysis of spiked environmental water samples, and data agreed well with those obtained by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Graphical abstract Strategy of a fluorescent probe for detecting Hg(II). The method has a 0.65 nM detection limit and is selective. MGO: magnetized graphene oxide, AHN: a fluorescent derivative of naphthalimide.

  7. Identification of metabolically active bacteria in the gut of the generalist Spodoptera littoralis via DNA stable isotope probing using 13C-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yongqi; Arias-Cordero, Erika M; Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-11-13

    Guts of most insects are inhabited by complex communities of symbiotic nonpathogenic bacteria. Within such microbial communities it is possible to identify commensal or mutualistic bacteria species. The latter ones, have been observed to serve multiple functions to the insect, i.e. helping in insect reproduction(1), boosting the immune response(2), pheromone production(3), as well as nutrition, including the synthesis of essential amino acids(4,) among others.     Due to the importance of these associations, many efforts have been made to characterize the communities down to the individual members. However, most of these efforts were either based on cultivation methods or relied on the generation of 16S rRNA gene fragments which were sequenced for final identification. Unfortunately, these approaches only identified the bacterial species present in the gut and provided no information on the metabolic activity of the microorganisms. To characterize the metabolically active bacterial species in the gut of an insect, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) in vivo employing (13)C-glucose as a universal substrate. This is a promising culture-free technique that allows the linkage of microbial phylogenies to their particular metabolic activity. This is possible by tracking stable, isotope labeled atoms from substrates into microbial biomarkers, such as DNA and RNA(5). The incorporation of (13)C isotopes into DNA increases the density of the labeled DNA compared to the unlabeled ((12)C) one. In the end, the (13)C-labeled DNA or RNA is separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation from the (12)C-unlabeled similar one(6). Subsequent molecular analysis of the separated nucleic acid isotopomers provides the connection between metabolic activity and identity of the species. Here, we present the protocol used to characterize the metabolically active bacteria in the gut of a generalist insect (our model system), Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). The

  8. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A.; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA, USA), and from a rare A. fundyense ‘red tide’ that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase (‘2C’) A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells' nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore, we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may

  9. Magnetic immunoassay using CdSe/ZnS quantum dots as fluorescent probes to detect the level of DNA methyltransferase 1 in human serum sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu F

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fei Yu,1,* Ya-min Xiong,1,* Song-cheng Yu,1 Lei-liang He,1 Shan-shan Niu,1 Yu-ming Wu,1 Jie Liu,1 Ling-bo Qu,2 Li-e Liu,1 Yong-jun Wu1 1College of Public Health, 2College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1, a dominant enzyme responsible for the transfer of a methyl group from the universal methyl donor to the 5-position of cytosine residues in DNA, is essential for mammalian development and closely related to cancer and a variety of age-related chronic diseases. DNMT1 has become a useful biomarker in early disease diagnosis and a potential therapeutic target in cancer therapy and drug development. However, till now, most of the studies on DNA methyltransferase (MTase detection have focused on the prokaryote MTase and its activity.Methods: A magnetic fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay (FLISA using CdSe/ZnS quantum dots as fluorescent probes was proposed for the rapid and sensitive detection of the DNMT1 level in this study. Key factors that affect the precision and accuracy of the determination of DNMT1 were optimized.Results: Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection was 0.1 ng/mL, the linear range was 0.1–1,500 ng/mL, the recovery was 91.67%–106.50%, and the relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-assays were respectively 5.45%–11.29% and 7.03%–11.25%. The cross-reactivity rates with DNA methyltransferases 3a and 3b were only 4.0% and 9.4%, respectively. Furthermore, FLISA was successfully used to detect the levels of DNMT1 in human serum samples, and compared with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kits. The results revealed that there was a good correlation between FLISA and commercial ELISA kits (correlation coefficient r=0.866, p=0.001. The linear scope of FLISA was broader than ELISA, and the measurement time was much shorter

  10. Detection of {open_quotes}cryptic{close_quotes}karyotypic rearrangements in closely related primate species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using human subtelomeric DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblom, J.J. [California State University-Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Specific human subtelomeric DNA probes were used to reveal cryptic chromosomal rearrangements that cannot be detected by conventional high resolution cytogenetic techniques, or by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization using whole chromosome paint analysis. Two cosmids containing different subtelomeric DNA sequences were derived from human chromosome 19 and designated as 7501 and 16432. Cosmid 7501 was hybridized to chromosomes from humans, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. In humans, 7501 consistently labeled chromosomes 3q, 15q, and 19p. Additional chromosomes were labeled in different individuals, indicating a polymorphic distribution of this sequence in the human genome. In contrast, 7501 consistently and strongly labeled only the q arm terminus of chromosome 3 in both chimp and gorilla. The identification of the chromosome was made by two-color FISH analysis using human chromosome 4-specific paint and homologous to human chromosome 4. None of the human subjects showed labeling of chromosome 4 with 7501. This finding suggests that in the course of human evolution, subsequent to the divergence of humans and African apes, a cryptic translocation occurred between the ancestral human chromosome 4 and one or more of the other human chromosomes that now contain this DNA segment. In orangutan, 7501 labeled a single acrocentric chromosome pair, a distinctly different chromosome than that labeled in chimp and gorilla. Comparison of chromosome sites labeled with cosmid 16432 showed the distribution of signals on chromosome 1q arm is the same for humans and chimp, but different in the gorilla. Humans and chimps show distinct labeling on sites 1q terminus and 1q41-42. In gorilla, there is instead a large cluster of intense signal near the terminus of 1q that clearly does not extend all the way to the terminus. A paracentric inversion or an unequal cross-over event may account for the observed difference between these species.

  11. Assessment of the degree of contamination of rat germ cell preparations using specific cDNA probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaris R.F.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports showing a decrease in sperm count in men have brought new concerns about male infertility. Animal models have been widely used to provide some relevant information about the human male gamete, and extrapolations are made to men and to the clinical context. The present study assesses one of the methods used for separation of germ cells of the adult rat testis, namely centrifugal elutriation followed by density gradients (Percoll®. This method was chosen since it presents the best results for cell purity in separating germ cells from the rat testis. A comparison between continuous and discontinuous Percoll® gradients was performed in order to identify the best type of gradient to separate the cells. Maximal cell purity was obtained for spermatocytes (81 ± 8.2%, mean ± SEM and spermatids (84 ± 2.6% using centrifugal elutriation followed by continuous Percoll® gradients. A significant difference in purity was observed between elongating spermatids harvested from continuous Percoll® gradients and from discontinuous gradients. Molecular analysis was used to assess cell contamination by employing specific probes, namely transition protein 2 (TP2, mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase II (COX II, and sulfated glycoprotein 1 (SGP1. Molecular analysis of the samples demonstrated that morphological criteria are efficient in characterizing the main composition of the cell suspension, but are not reliable for identifying minimal contamination from other cells. Reliable cell purity data should be established using molecular analysis

  12. Analysis of α-particle induced incomplete chromosome aberrations, using pan-centro metric and pan-telomeric DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestres, M.; Schmid, E.; Stephan, G.; Barrios, L.; Caballin, M. R.; Barquinero, J. F.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study has been the evaluation of the incompleteness of α-particle induced chromosome aberrations by the simultaneous detection of all centromeres and telomeres present in human lymphocytes. For this purpose attached lymphocytes were irradiated at doses of 0.2, 0.5,0.7 and 1 Gy in a ''241Am source. FISH techniques were applied using pan-centromeric and pan-telomeric probes. All abnormal cells were digitalised and analysed using a Cytovision FISH workstation. A total of 378 incomplete chromosomes plus incomplete acentrics was found. Cases with more than 92 telomeres were not detected. The ratio between total incomplete elements and multicentrics was 1.00. The total number of acentric fragments was 822; 57% of then were complete fragments ace (+.+), 26% incomplete fragments ace (+,-), and 17% interstitial fragment ace (-.-). The percentage of incomplete aberrations is higher after high-LET than described for low-LET exposure. The results seem to indicate that compared to low-LET. after α-particle exposure it is more likely to repair the centromere-containing elements. (Author) 30 refs

  13. A light-up probe targeting for Bcl-2 2345 G-quadruplex DNA with carbazole TO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yingchun; Lin, Dayong; Tang, Yalin; Fei, Xuening; Wang, Cuihong; Zhang, Baolian; Zhou, Jianguo

    2018-02-01

    As its significant role, the selective recognition of G-quadruplex with specific structures and functions is important in biological and medicinal chemistry. Carbazole derivatives have been reported as a kind of fluorescent probe with many excellent optical properties. In the present study, the fluorescence of the dye (carbazole TO) increased almost 70 fold in the presence of bcl-2 2345 G4 compared to that alone in aqueous buffer condition with almost no fluorescence and 10-30 fold than those in the presence of other DNAs. The binding study results by activity inhibition of G4/Hemin peroxidase experiment, NMR titration and molecular docking simulation showed the high affinity and selectivity to bcl-2 2345 G4 arises from its end-stacking interaction with G-quartet. It is said that a facile approach with excellent sensitive, good selectivity and quick response for bcl-2 2345 G-quadruplex was developed and may be used for antitumor recognition or antitumor agents.

  14. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.E.; Horrill, A.D.; Howard, B.J.; Lowe, V.P.W.; Parkinson, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in grazed and ungrazed saltmarshes; incorporation of radionuclides by sheep grazing on an estuarine saltmarsh; inland transfer of radionuclides by birds feeding in the estuaries and saltmarshes at Ravenglass; radionuclides in contrasting types of coastal pastures and taken up by individual plant species found in west Cumbria; procedures developed and used for the measurement of alpha and gamma emitters in environmental materials. (U.K.)

  15. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  16. A comparison of stable-isotope probing of DNA and phospholipid fatty acids to study prokaryotic functional diversity in sulfate-reducing marine sediment enrichment slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Gordon; Watt, Lynsey C; Rinna, Joachim; Fry, John C; Evershed, Richard P; Parkes, R John; Weightman, Andrew J

    2006-09-01

    Marine sediment slurries enriched for anaerobic, sulfate-reducing prokaryotic communities utilizing glucose and acetate were used to provide the first comparison between stable-isotope probing (SIP) of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and DNA (16S rRNA and dsrA genes) biomarkers. Different 13C-labelled substrates (glucose, acetate and pyruvate) at low concentrations (100 microM) were used over a 7-day incubation to follow and identify carbon flow into different members of the community. Limited changes in total PLFA and bacterial 16S rRNA gene DGGE profiles over 7 days suggested the presence of a stable bacterial community. A broad range of PLFA were rapidly labelled (within 12 h) in the 13C-glucose slurry but this changed with time, suggesting the presence of an active glucose-utilizing population and later development of another population able to utilize glucose metabolites. The identity of the major glucose-utilizers was unclear as 13C-enriched PLFA were common (16:0, 16:1, 18:1omega7, highest incorporation) and there was little difference between 12C- and 13C-DNA 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles. Seemingly glucose, a readily utilizable substrate, resulted in widespread incorporation consistent with the higher extent of 13C-incorporation (approximately 10 times) into PLFA compared with 13C-acetate or 13C-pyruvate. 13C-PLFA in the 13C-acetate and 13C-pyruvate slurries were similar to each other and to those that developed in the 13C-glucose slurry after 4 days. These were more diagnostic, with branched odd-chain fatty acids (i15:0, a15:0 and 15:1omega6) possibly indicating the presence of Desulfococcus or Desulfosarcina sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sequences related to these SRB were in the 13C-acetate-DNA dsrA gene library. The 13C-acetate-DNA 16S rRNA gene library also contained sequences closely related to SRB, but these were the acetate-utilizing Desulfobacter sp., as well as a broad range of uncultured Bacteria. In

  17. Identification of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA)-utilizing organisms in BioGAC reactors using 13C-DNA stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslett, Denise; Haas, Joseph; Hyman, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Biodegradation of the gasoline oxygenates methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE) can cause tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) to accumulate in gasoline-impacted environments. One remediation option for TBA-contaminated groundwater involves oxygenated granulated activated carbon (GAC) reactors that have been self-inoculated by indigenous TBA-degrading microorganisms in ground water extracted from contaminated aquifers. Identification of these organisms is important for understanding the range of TBA-metabolizing organisms in nature and for determining whether self-inoculation of similar reactors is likely to occur at other sites. In this study (13)C-DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify TBA-utilizing organisms in samples of self-inoculated BioGAC reactors operated at sites in New York and California. Based on 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences, all TBA-utilizing organisms identified were members of the Burkholderiales order of the β-proteobacteria. Organisms similar to Cupriavidus and Methylibium were observed in both reactor samples while organisms similar to Polaromonas and Rhodoferax were unique to the reactor sample from New York. Organisms similar to Hydrogenophaga and Paucibacter strains were only detected in the reactor sample from California. We also analyzed our samples for the presence of several genes previously implicated in TBA oxidation by pure cultures of bacteria. Genes Mpe_B0532, B0541, B0555, and B0561 were all detected in (13)C-metagenomic DNA from both reactors and deduced amino acid sequences suggested these genes all encode highly conserved enzymes. One gene (Mpe_B0555) encodes a putative phthalate dioxygenase-like enzyme that may be particularly appropriate for determining the potential for TBA oxidation in contaminated environmental samples.

  18. Excited-State Dynamics of a DNA Duplex in a Deep Eutectic Solvent Probed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Harpe, Kimberly; Kohl, Forrest R; Zhang, Yuyuan; Kohler, Bern

    2018-03-08

    To better understand how the solvent influences excited-state deactivation in DNA strands, femtosecond time-resolved IR (fs-TRIR) pump-probe measurements were performed on a d(AT) 9 ·d(AT) 9 duplex dissolved in a deep eutectic solvent (DES) made from choline chloride and ethylene glycol in a 1:2 mol ratio. This solvent, known as ethaline, is a member of a class of ionic liquids capable of solubilizing DNA with minimal disruption to its secondary structure. UV melting analysis reveals that the duplex studied here melts at 18 °C in ethaline compared to 50 °C in aqueous solution. Ethaline has an excellent transparency window that facilitates TRIR measurements in the double-bond stretching region. Transient spectra recorded in deuterated ethaline at room temperature indicate that photoinduced intrastrand charge transfer occurs from A to T, yielding the same exciplex state previously detected in aqueous solution. This state decays via charge recombination with a lifetime of 380 ± 10 ps compared to the 300 ± 10 ps lifetime measured earlier in D 2 O solution. The TRIR data strongly suggest that the long-lived exciplex forms exclusively in the solvated duplex, and not in the denatured single strands, which appear to have little, if any, base stacking. The longer lifetime of the exciplex state in the DES compared to aqueous solution is suggested to arise from reduced stabilization of the charge transfer state, resulting in slower charge recombination on account of Marcus inverted behavior.

  19. Development of a carbazole-based fluorescence probe for G-quadruplex DNA: The importance of side-group effect on binding specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Qi; Ren, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Lian, Guang-Chang; Chen, Ting-Ting; Ci, Yang; Li, Hong-Yao

    2018-06-01

    G-quadruplex DNAs are highly prevalent in the human genome and involved in many important biological processes. However, many aspects of their biological mechanism and significance still need to be elucidated. Therefore, the development of fluorescent probes for G-quadruplex detection is important for the basic research. We report here on the development of small molecular dyes designed on the basis of carbazole scaffold by introducing styrene-like substituents at its 9-position, for the purpose of G-quadruplex recognition. Results revealed that the side group on the carbazole scaffold was very important for their ability to selectively recognize G-quadruplex DNA structures. 1a with the pyridine side group displayed excellent fluorescence signal turn-on property for the specific discrimination of G-quadruplex DNAs against other nucleic acids. The characteristics of 1a were further investigated with UV-vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence, circular dichroism, FID assay and molecular docking to validate the selectivity, sensitivity and detailed binding mode toward G-quadruplex DNAs.

  20. Identification of novel potential acetate-oxidizing bacteria in an acetate-fed methanogenic chemostat based on DNA stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Zhong; Gou, Min; Yi, Yue; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Tang, Yue-Qin

    2018-05-11

    Acetate is a significant intermediate of anaerobic fermentation. There are two pathways for converting acetate to CH 4 and CO 2 : acetoclastic methanogenesis by acetoclastic methanogens, and syntrophic acetate oxidation by acetate-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Detailed investigations of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) should contribute to the elucidation of the microbial mechanisms of methanogenesis. In this study, we investigated the major phylogenetic groups of acetate-utilizing bacteria (AUB) in a mesophilic methanogenic chemostat fed with acetate as the sole carbon source by using DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) technology. The results indicated that acetoclastic methanogenesis and acetate oxidization/hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis coexisted in the mesophilic chemostat fed with acetate, operated at a dilution rate of 0.1 d -1 . OTU Ace13(9-17) (KU869530), Ace13(9-4) (KU667241), and Ace13(9-23) (KU667236), assigned to the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were probably potential SAOB in the chemostat, which needs further investigation. Species in the phyla Proteobacteria, Deferribacteres, Acidobacteria, Spirochaetes and Actinobacteria were probably capable of utilizing acetate for their growth. Methanoculleus was likely to be the preferred hydrogenotrophic methanogen for syntrophy with AOB in the chemostat.

  1. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  2. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  3. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  4. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function

  5. Radionuclide diagnosis of pulmonary capillary protein leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutzig, H.; Sturm, J.A.; Schober, O.; Nerlich, M.L.; Kant, C.J.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary extravascular albumin extra-vasation in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome can be quantified with radionuclide techniques. While imaging procedures with a computerized gamma camera will allow reproducible ROIs, this will be the main limitation in nonimaging measurements with small scintillation probes. Repeated positioning by one operator results in a mean spatial variation of position of about 2 cm and a variation in count rate of 25%. For the estimation of PCPL the small probes must be positioned under scintigraphic control. Under these conditions the results of both techniques are identical. The upper limit of normal was estimated to be 1 x E-5/sec. The standard deviation abnormal measurements was about 10%. The pulmonary capillary protein leakage can be quantified by radionuclide techniques with good accuracy, using the combination of imaging and nonimaging techniques. (orig.) [de

  6. Characterization of Growing Soil Bacterial Communities across a pH gradient Using H218O DNA-Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty-Bernard, A. T.; Schwartz, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have established consistent relationships between pH and bacterial diversity and community structure in soils from site-specific to landscape scales. However, these studies rely on DNA or PLFA extraction techniques from bulk soils that encompass metabolically active and inactive, or dormant, communities, and loose DNA. Dormant cells may comprise up to 80% of total live cells. If dormant cells dominate a particular environment, it is possible that previous interpretations of the soil variables assumed to drive communities could be profoundly affected. We used H218O stable isotope probing and bar-coded illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to monitor the response of actively growing communities to changes in soil pH in a soil microcosm over 14 days. This substrate-independent approach has several advantages over 13C or 15N-labelled molecules in that all growing bacteria should be able to make use of water, allowing characterization of whole communities. We hypothesized that Acidobacteria would increasingly dominate the growing community and that Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes would decline, given previously established responses by these taxa to soil pH. Instead, we observed the reverse. Actinobacteria abundance increased three-fold from 26 to 76% of the overall community as soil pH fell from pH 5.6 to pH 4.6. Shifts in community structure and decreases in diversity with declining soil pH were essentially driven by two families, Streptomyceaca and Microbacteracea, which collectively increased from 2 to 40% of the entire community. In contrast, Acidobacteria as a whole declined although numbers of subdivision 1 remained stable across all soil pH levels. We suggest that the brief incubation period in this SIP study selected for growth of acid-tolerant Actinobacteria over Acidobacteria. Taxa within Actinomycetales have been readily cultured over short time frames, suggesting rapid growth patterns. Conversely, taxa within Acidobacteria have been

  7. A novel probe density controllable electrochemiluminescence biosensor for ultra-sensitive detection of Hg2+ based on DNA hybridization optimization with gold nanoparticles array patterned self-assembly platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenhua; Zhang, An; Chen, Yunsheng; Chen, Zixuan; Chen, Yaowen; Lu, Fushen; Chen, Zhanguang

    2013-11-15

    Biosensor based on DNA hybridization holds great potential to get higher sensitivity as the optimal DNA hybridization efficiency can be achieved by controlling the distribution and orientation of probe strands on the transducer surface. In this work, an innovative strategy is reported to tap the sensitivity potential of current electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensing system by dispersedly anchoring the DNA beacons on the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) array which was electrodeposited on the glassy carbon electrode surface, rather than simply sprawling the coil-like strands onto planar gold surface. The strategy was developed by designing a "signal-on" ECL biosensing switch fabricated on the GNPs nanopatterned electrode surface for enhanced ultra-sensitivity detection of Hg(2+). A 57-mer hairpin-DNA labeled with ferrocene as ECL quencher and a 13-mer DNA labeled with Ru(bpy)3(2+) as reporter were hybridized to construct the signal generator in off-state. A 31-mer thymine (T)-rich capture-DNA was introduced to form T-T mismatches with the loop sequence of the hairpin-DNA in the presence of Hg(2+) and induce the stem-loop open, meanwhile the ECL "signal-on" was triggered. The peak sensitivity with the lowest detection limit of 0.1 nM was achieved with the optimal GNPs number density while exorbitant GNPs deposition resulted in sensitivity deterioration for the biosensor. We expect the present strategy could lead the renovation of the existing probe-immobilized ECL genosensor design to get an even higher sensitivity in ultralow level of target detection such as the identification of genetic diseases and disorders in basic research and clinical application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Marine biogeochemistry of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides entering the ocean from runoff, fallout, or deliberate release rapidly become involved in marine biogeochemical cycles. Sources, sinks and transport of radionuclides and analogue elements are discussed with emphasis placed on how these elements interact with marine organisms. Water, food and sediments are the source terms from which marine biota acquire radionuclides. Uptake from water occurs by surface adsorption, absorption across body surfaces, or a combination of both. Radionuclides ingested with food are either assimilated into tissue or excreted. The relative importance of the food and water pathway in uptake varies with the radionuclide and the conditions under which exposure occurs. Evidence suggests that, compared to the water and food pathways, bioavailability of sediment-bound radionuclides is low. Bioaccumulation processes are controlled by many environmental and intrinsic factors including exposure time, physical-chemical form of the radionuclide, salinity, temperature, competitive effects with other elements, organism size, physiology, life cycle and feeding habits. Once accumulated, radionuclides are transported actively by vertical and horizontal movements of organisms and passively by release of biogenic products, e.g., soluble excreta, feces, molts and eggs. Through feeding activities, particles containing radionuclides are ''packaged'' into larger aggregates which are redistributed upon release. Most radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to such particles but are remineralized as they sink and/or decompose. In the pelagic zones, sinking aggregates can further scavenge particle-reactive elements thus removing them from the surface layers and transporting them to depth. Evidence from both radiotracer experiments and in situ sediment trap studies is presented which illustrates the importance of biological scavenging in controlling the distribution of radionuclides in the water column. (author)

  9. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocock, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the distribution and movement of radionuclides in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems in north-west England with particular emphasis on inputs to, and outputs from ecosystems; on plant and soil aspects; and on radionuclides in fallout and in discharges by the nuclear industry. (author)

  10. Long-Term Prognostic Effects of Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus DNA by Minor Groove Binder-Probe Real-Time Quantitative PCR on Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.-C.; Wang, W.-Y.; Liang, W.-M.; Chou, H.-Y.; Jan, J.-S.; Jiang, R.-S.; Wang, J.-Y.; Twu, C.-W.; Liang, K.-L.; Chao, Jeffrey; Shen, W.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term prognostic impact of plasma Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA concentration measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTQ-PCR) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Epstein-Barr virus DNA was retrospectively measured from stock plasma of 152 biopsy-proven NPC patients with Stage II-IV (M0) disease with a RTQ-PCR using the minor groove binder-probe. All patients received CCRT with a median follow-up of 78 months. We divided patients into three subgroups: (1) low pretreatment EBV DNA (<1,500 copies/mL) and undetectable posttreatment EBV DNA (pre-L/post-U) (2) high pretreatment EBV DNA (≥1,500 copies/mL) and undetectable posttreatment EBV DNA (pre-H/post-U), and (3) low or high pretreatment EBV DNA and detectable posttreatment EBV DNA (pre-L or H/post-D) for prognostic analyses. Results: Epstein-Barr virus DNA (median concentration, 573 copies/mL; interquartile range, 197-3,074) was detected in the pretreatment plasma of 94.1% (143/152) of patients. After treatment, plasma EBV DNA decreased or remained 0 for all patients and was detectable in 31 patients (20.4%) with a median concentration 0 copy/mL (interquartile range, 0-0). The 5-year overall survival rates of the pre-L/post-U, pre-H/post-U, and pre-L or H/post-D subgroups were 87.2%, 71.0%, and 38.7%, respectively (p < 0.0001). The relapse-free survival showed similar results with corresponding rates of 85.6%, 75.9%, and 26.9%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Multivariate Cox analysis confirmed the superior effects of plasma EBV DNA compared to other clinical parameters in prognosis prediction. Conclusion: Plasma EBV DNA is the most valuable prognostic factor for NPC. More chemotherapy should be considered for patients with persistently detectable EBV DNA after CCRT

  11. Radionuclide diagnostics of right ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaorska-Rajca, J.

    1993-01-01

    Difficulties in evaluating the right ventricle function motivate to making research into new non-invasive methods. Four radionuclide methods that are used to access the right ventricle have been discussed in this paper: first-pass angiocardiography, gated equilibrium ventriculography with red blood cells labelled in vivo technetium- 99 Tc, ventriculography with radioactive xenon 133 and a computerized single probe. Advantages and disadvantages of using each method have been discussed. RNV 99m Tc method has been recognized as the best one to evaluate RV function. Results of the right ventricle assessment in patients have been discussed in the following clinical groups: chronic cor pulmonale (CP), chronic lung disease without pulmonary arterial hypertension (LD), coronary artery disease (CAD), in patients after infarction (IMA and IMi), dilated cardiomyopathy (KZ) and valvular heart diseases (Wm and Wa). Abnormals in right ventricle function occur with different intensity in all groups, although they no specificity. The highest abnormality occurs in patients with KZ, CP, IMi and Wm, the lowest one - in patients with CAD. Abnormalities are higher in patients with congestive heart failure. In most pathological groups the right ventricle dysfunction is connected with the left ventricle insufficiency. The interdependence between the dysfunction of both ventricles is differs in particular diseases. Assessment of right ventricle function with radionuclide methods plays an important role in diagnosis and control therapy of cardiopulmonary diseases. (author). 385 refs, 48 figs, 6 tabs

  12. Process for encapsulating radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, L.E.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclides are immobilized in virtually an insoluble form by reacting at a temperature of at least 90 0 C as an aqueous alkaline mixture having a solution pH of at least 10, containing a source of silicon, the radionuclide waste, and a metal cation. The molar ratio of silicon to the metal cation is on the order of unity to produce a gel from which complex metalosilicates crystallize to entrap the radionuclides within the resultant condensed crystal lattice. The product is a silicious stone-like material which is virtually insoluble and nonleachable in alkaline or neutral environment. One embodiment provides for the formation of the complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by gel formation with subsequent calcination to the solid product; another embodiment utilizes a hydrothermal process, either above ground or deep within basalt caverns, at greater than atmospheric pressures and a temperature between 90 and 500 0 C to form complex metalo-silicates, such as strontium aluminosilicate. Another embodiment provides for the formation of complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by slurrying an alkaline mixture of bentonite or kaolinite with a source of silicon and the radionuclide waste in salt form. In each of the embodiments a mobile system is achieved whereby the metalo-silicate constituents reorient into a condensed crystal lattice forming a cage structure with the condensed metalo-silicate lattice which completely surrounds the radionuclide and traps the radionuclide therein; thus rendering the radionuclide virtually insoluble

  13. DNA double-strand break measurement in mammalian cells by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: an approach using restriction enzymes and gene probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loebrich, M.; Ikpeme, S.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    DNA samples prepared from human SP 3 cells, which had not been exposed to various doses of X-ray, were treated with NotI restriction endonuclease before being run in a contour-clamped homogeneous electrophoresis system. The restriction enzyme cuts the DNA at defined positions delivering DNA sizes which can be resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In order to investigate only one of the DNA fragments, a human lactoferrin cDNA, pHL-41, was hybridized to the DNA separated by PFGE. As a result, only the DNA fragment which contains the hybridized gene was detected resulting in a one-band pattern. The decrease of this band was found to be exponential with increasing radiation dose. From the slope, a double-strand break induction rate of (6.3±0.7) x 10 -3 /Mbp/Gy was deduced for 80 kV X-rays. (Author)

  14. Foodstuffs, radionuclides, monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisikov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination of water and food stuffs as a result of the Chernobyl accident and permissible contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs are considered in brief. A method of radiation monitoring of food stuffs and water for the radionuclides mentioned is suggested. The method permits employment of the simplest and cheapest radiometric equipment for analysis, whole the high degree of radionuclide concentration using fiber sorbents permits using the instrumentation without expensive shields against external radiation. A description of ion-exchange unit for radiation monitoring of liquid samples of food stuffs or water, is provided [ru

  15. Generator for radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisner, P.S.; Forrest, T.R.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radionuclide generator of the kind in which a parent radionuclide, adsorbed on a column of particulate material, generates a daughter radionuclide which is periodically removed from the column. This invention is particularly concerned with technetium generators using single collection vials. The generator comprises a column, a first reservoir for the eluent, a second reservoir to contain the volume of eluent required for a single elution, and means connecting the first reservoir to the second reservoir and the second reservoir to the column. Such a generator is particularly suitable for operation by vacuum elution

  16. An inexpensive and simple method for thermally stable immobilization of DNA on an unmodified glass surface: UV linking of poly(T)10-poly(C)10-tagged DNA probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðnason, Haukur; Dufva, Hans Martin; Bang, Dang Duong

    2008-01-01

    be linked by UV light irradiation onto a plain, unmodified glass surface. Probes immobilized onto unmodified glass microscope slides performed similarly to probes bound to commercial amino-silane-coated slides and had comparable detection limits. The TC-tagged probes linked to unmodified glass did not show...... any significant decrease in hybridization performance after a 20 min incubation in water at 100 degrees C prior to rehybridization, indicating a covalent bond between the TC tag and unmodified glass. The probes were used in thermal minisequencing cycling reactions. Furthermore, the TC tag improved...

  17. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aquino de Muro, Marilena; Rapley, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  18. Novel synthetic approach to asymmetric monocationic trimethine cyanine dyes derived from N-ethyl quinolinum moiety. Combined fluorescent and ICD probes for AT-DNA labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurutos, Atanas [Department of Pharmaceutical and Applied Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Crnolatac, Ivo; Orehovec, Iva [Laboratory for Study of Interactions of Biomacromolecules, Division of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Gadjev, Nikolai [Department of Pharmaceutical and Applied Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Piantanida, Ivo, E-mail: pianta@irb.hr [Laboratory for Study of Interactions of Biomacromolecules, Division of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Deligeorgiev, Todor, E-mail: ohtak@chem.uni-sofia.bg [Department of Pharmaceutical and Applied Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-06-15

    Two asymmetric monocationic trimethine cyanine dyes were obtained via condensation reaction between 2-methylbenzothialolium salts containing various (aliphatic and benzyl) substituents on the nitrogen atom of the benzothiazolic chromophore, and 1-ethyl−4-(2-(phenylamine)vinyl)quinolin−1-ium iodide, by a novel improved method at room temperature under mild conditions. Both compounds bind non-covalently to double stranded DNA and RNA by micromolar affinity, but give highly selective fluorescent response>650 nm for only AT-DNA sequences at excess of DNA over dye, combined with equally AT-DNA selective ICD response at dye/DNA crowded conditions (r{sub [dye]/[AT-DNA]}>0.2)-namely ICD bands (attributed to dye-dimer formation) allow determination of AT-DNA at submicromolar concentrations. Selectivity was attributed to particular steric properties of AT-DNA minor groove in respect to other studied ds-DNA/RNA. Comparison of aliphatic- and benzyl- dye showed that only aliphatic- derivative revealed ICD band upon binding to AU-RNA major groove and short AT-sequences in mixed sequence (ct-)DNA.

  19. Radionuclides in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tousset, J.

    1984-01-01

    Applications of radionuclides in analytical chemistry are reviewed in this article: tracers, radioactive sources and activation analysis. Examples are given in all these fields and it is concluded that these methods should be used more widely [fr

  20. Radionuclide Basics: Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Radiation Protection Contact Us Share Radionuclide Basics: Iodine Iodine (chemical symbol I) is a chemical element. ... in the environment Iodine sources Iodine and health Iodine in the Environment All 37 isotopes of iodine ...

  1. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  2. Abscess detection with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide studies may aid in the diagnosis and localization of intra-abdominal infections. Despite the introduction of new radiographic and ultrasound methods, there are several clinical situations in which radionuclide scans have proved useful. Those include detection of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, evaluation of liver abscess, differentiation between pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess, evaluation of fever of unknown origin, and evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease. Each clinical situation is discussed separately here

  3. DNA Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  4. Localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant{sup ®} DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe: A new approach to study nuclear nanostructure at single molecule resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika [Laboratory of Cell Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków (Poland); Szczurek, Aleksander T. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Prakash, Kirti [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mohana, Giriram K. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lee, Hyun-Keun [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Roignant, Jean-Yves [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Birk, Udo J. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Dobrucki, Jurek W., E-mail: jerzy.dobrucki@uj.edu.pl [Laboratory of Cell Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków (Poland); Cremer, Christoph, E-mail: c.cremer@imb-mainz.de [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Higher order chromatin structure is not only required to compact and spatially arrange long chromatids within a nucleus, but have also important functional roles, including control of gene expression and DNA processing. However, studies of chromatin nanostructures cannot be performed using conventional widefield and confocal microscopy because of the limited optical resolution. Various methods of superresolution microscopy have been described to overcome this difficulty, like structured illumination and single molecule localization microscopy. We report here that the standard DNA dye Vybrant{sup ®} DyeCycle™ Violet can be used to provide single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) images of DNA in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells. This SMLM method enabled optical isolation and localization of large numbers of DNA-bound molecules, usually in excess of 10{sup 6} signals in one cell nucleus. The technique yielded high-quality images of nuclear DNA density, revealing subdiffraction chromatin structures of the size in the order of 100 nm; the interchromatin compartment was visualized at unprecedented optical resolution. The approach offers several advantages over previously described high resolution DNA imaging methods, including high specificity, an ability to record images using a single wavelength excitation, and a higher density of single molecule signals than reported in previous SMLM studies. The method is compatible with DNA/multicolor SMLM imaging which employs simple staining methods suited also for conventional optical microscopy. - Highlights: • Super-resolution imaging of nuclear DNA with Vybrant Violet and blue excitation. • 90nm resolution images of DNA structures in optically thick eukaryotic nuclei. • Enhanced resolution confirms the existence of DNA-free regions inside the nucleus. • Optimized imaging conditions enable multicolor super-resolution imaging.

  5. Radionuclide fixation mechanisms in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, S.

    1991-01-01

    In the safety evaluation of the radioactive waste disposal in geological environment, the mass balance equation for radionuclide migration is given. The sorption of radionuclides by geological formations is conventionally represented by the retardation of the radionuclides as compared with water movement. In order to quantify the sorption of radionuclides by rocks and sediments, the distribution ratio is used. In order to study quantitatively the long term behavior of waste radionuclides in geological environment, besides the distribution ratio concept in short term, slower radionuclide retention reaction involving mineral transformation should be considered. The development of microspectroscopic method for long term reaction path modeling, the behavior of iron during granite and water interaction, the reduction precipitation of radionuclides, radionuclide migration pathways, and the representative scheme of radionuclide migration and fixation in rocks are discussed. (K.I.)

  6. Radioactivity: radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.E.; Baratta, E.J.; Jelinek, C.F.

    1977-01-01

    The results are summarized of the analysis for strontium-90, cesium-137, iodine-131, ruthenium-106, and potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, in samples of total diet and selected import commodities in the foods compliance program of the Food and Drug Administration. On the basis of the radionuclide intake guidelines established by the Federal Radiation Council (FRC), the low content of radionuclides found in the total diet samples for fiscal years 1973 and 1974 demonstrates the need for surveillance only at the present level. The low levels of radionuclides found in a limited number of edible imported commodities indicate that their contribution to the total diet would not increase the levels of these radionuclides above those recommended for only periodic surveillance by the FRC. The potassium levels, determined from potassium-40 activity, found in meats and fish agree with the value for normal muscle tissue for the reference man reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. Of the other commodities, nuts contained the highest levels, while sugar, beverages, and processed foods contained the lowest levels of potassium. Although cesium and potassium are chemical analogs with similar metabolic properties, because of their variable content in some leafy samples as a result of surface contamination, a correlation between cesium-137 levels and the cesium-137-to-potassium ratio was inconclusive

  7. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  8. Binding modes and pathway of RHPS4 to human telomeric G-quadruplex and duplex DNA probed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Kelly; Siddiquei, Farzana; Wu, Chun

    2017-07-19

    RHPS4, a potent binder to human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex, shows high efficacy in tumor cell growth inhibition. However, it's preferential binding to DNA G-quadruplex over DNA duplex (about 10 fold) remains to be improved toward its clinical application. A high resolution structure of the single-stranded telomeric DNA G-quadruplexes, or B-DNA duplex, in complex with RHPS4 is not available yet, and the binding nature of this ligand to these DNA forms remains to be elusive. In this study, we carried out 40 μs molecular dynamics binding simulations with a free ligand to decipher the binding pathway of RHPS4 to a DNA duplex and three G-quadruplex folders (parallel, antiparallel and hybrid) of the human telomeric DNA sequence. The most stable binding mode identified for the duplex, parallel, antiparallel and hybrid G-quadruplexes is an intercalation, bottom stacking, top intercalation and bottom intercalation mode, respectively. The intercalation mode with similar binding strength to both the duplex and the G-quadruplexes, explains the lack of binding selectivity of RHPS4 to the G-quadruplex form. Therefore, a ligand modification that destabilizes the duplex intercalation mode but stabilizes the G-quadruplex intercalation mode will improve the binding selectivity toward G-quadruplex. The intercalation mode of RHPS4 to both the duplex and the antiparallel and the hybrid G-quadruplex follows a base flipping-insertion mechanism rather than an open-insertion mechanism. The groove binding, the side binding and the intercalation with flipping out of base were observed to be intermediate states before the full intercalation state with paired bases.

  9. Radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains data on the levels of radionuclides in the UK foodchain. Most data derive from monitoring programmes that exist around nuclear sites, and in some cases date back to the 1960s. Some comparative data from site operator and government-run programmes are included. Data from monitoring undertaken after the Chernobyl accident are summarised. General monitoring of the foodchain for both artificial and natural radionuclides, and the results of relevant government-sponsored research are also described. The report includes basic information on radioactivity in the environment, radiation protection standards and describes what measures are taken to routinely monitor the foodchain and assess public risk. (Author)

  10. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  11. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersahin, Devrim, E-mail: devrimersahin@yahoo.com; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, 333 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2011-10-11

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  12. Radionuclide deposition control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for controlling the deposition, on to the surfaces of reactor components, of the radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from a liquid stream containing the radionuclides. The method consists of disposing a getter material (nickel) in the liquid stream, and a non-getter material (tantalum, tungsten or molybdenum) as a coating on the surfaces where deposition is not desired. The process is described with special reference to its use in the coolant circuit in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. (U.K.)

  13. Radionuclide examination in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streda, A.; Kolar, J.; Valesova, M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of twenty years of experience with the use of radionuclides in bone and articular rheumatic diseases indications for such examinations are summed up. The main advantage of the use of radionuclide methods is that they bring forward early diagnosis of tissue reconstruction which can thus be detected at the stage of microstructural changes. They also provide earlier and more reliable detection of the degree of the pathological process than is provided by X-ray examination. In some cases scintiscan may also be found useful as a method for following up the results of treatment of rheumatic diseases. (author)

  14. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose

  15. Electrochemical detection of DNA binding by tumor suppressor p53 protein using osmium-labeled oligonucleotide probes and catalytic hydrogen evolution at the mercury electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němcová, Kateřina; Šebest, Peter; Havran, Luděk; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 406, č. 24 (2014), s. 5843-5852 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2076; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemical analysis * Labeled probes * Osmium complex Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  16. Radionuclides in corals of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loria M, L.G.; Banichevich, A.; Cortes, T.

    1998-01-01

    Using Low Level Spectrometry they have evaluated the activity (Kq/kg) of 40 K, the gamma emisor daugther of 238 U and 232 Th and the presence of arificial isotopes due to anthropogenic contamination. The probes used are coral as biodynamic captors. The results show a presence between low and mittel of natural isotopes compared to other accumulation processes like sedimentation in soil and agricultural production. The Caribbean side show a higher activity than the Pacific for 40 K and a similar for 226 Ra. Results show low activity for artificial radionuclides with short lif ( 137 Cs). (author) [es

  17. Electroactive crown ester-Cu2+ complex with in-situ modification at molecular beacon probe serving as a facile electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of CaMV 35s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Fengping; Liao, Xiaolei; Gao, Feng; Qiu, Weiwei; Wang, Qingxiang

    2017-06-15

    A novel electrochemical DNA biosensor has been facilely constructed by in-situ assembly of electroactive 4'-aminobenzo-18-crown-6-copper(II) complex (AbC-Cu 2+ ) on the free terminal of the hairpin-structured molecule beacon. The 3'-SH modified molecule beacon probe was first immobilized on the gold electrode (AuE) surface through self-assembly chemistry of Au-S bond. Then the crow ester of AbC was covalently coupled with 5'-COOH on the molecule beacon, and served as a platform to attach the Cu 2+ by coordination with ether bond (-O-) of the crown cycle. Thus, an electroactive molecule beacon-based biosensing interface was constructed. In comparison with conventional methods for preparation of electroactive molecule beacon, the approach presented in this work is much simpler, reagent- and labor-saving. Selectivity study shows that the in-situ fabricated electroactive molecule beacon remains excellent recognition ability of pristine molecule beacon probe to well differentiate various DNA fragments. The target DNA can be quantatively determined over the range from 0.10pM to 0.50nM. The detection limit of 0.060pM was estimated based on signal-to-noise ratio of 3. When the biosensor was applied for the detection cauliflower mosaic virus 35s (CaMV 35s) in soybean extraction samples, satisfactory results are achieved. This work opens a new strategy for facilely fabricating electrochemical sensing interface, which also shows great potential in aptasensor and immurosensor fabrication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pyrrolo-dC modified duplex DNA as a novel probe for the sensitive assay of base excision repair enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Yeol; Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2017-12-15

    We develop a novel approach to determine formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) activity by taking advantage of the unique fluorescence property of pyrrolo-dC (PdC) positioned opposite to 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) in duplex DNA. In its initial state, PdC in duplex DNA undergoes the efficient stacking and collisional quenching interactions, showing the low fluorescence signal. In contrast, the presence of Fpg, which specifically removes 8-oxoG and incises resulting apurinic (AP) site, transforms duplex DNA into single-stranded (ss) DNAs. As a result, the intrinsic fluorescence signal of PdC in ssDNA is recovered to exhibit the significantly enhanced fluorescence signal. Based on this Fpg-dependent fluorescence response of PdC, we could reliably determine Fpg activity down to 1.25U/ml with a linear response from 0 to 50U/ml. In addition, the diagnostic capability of this strategy was successfully demonstrated by reliably assaying Fpg activity in human blood serum, showing its great potential in the practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Taking radionuclides to heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleynhans, P.H.T.; Lotter, M.G.; Van Aswegen, A.; Minnaar, P.C.; Iturralde, M.; Herbst, C.P.; Marx, D.

    1980-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is a main cause of death in South Africa. Non-invasive ECG gated radionuclide bloodpool imaging plays an increasingly useful role in the evalution of the function of the heart as a pump, and the extent of heart muscle perfusion defects is further pinpointed by invasive krypton-81m studies to improve patient management

  20. Radionuclides deposition over Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourchet, M.; Magand, O.; Frezzotti, M.; Ekaykin, A.; Winther, J.-G.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive map of the distribution patterns for both natural and artificial radionuclides over Antarctica has been established. This work integrates the results of several decades of international programs focusing on the analysis of natural and artificial radionuclides in snow and ice cores from this polar region. The mean value (37±20 Bq m -2 ) of 241 Pu total deposition over 28 stations is determined from the gamma emissions of its daughter 241 Am, presenting a long half-life (432.7 yrs). Detailed profiles and distributions of 241 Pu in ice cores make it possible to clearly distinguish between the atmospheric thermonuclear tests of the fifties and sixties. Strong relationships are also found between radionuclide data ( 137 Cs with respect to 241 Pu and 210 Pb with respect to 137 Cs), make it possible to estimate the total deposition or natural fluxes of these radionuclides. Total deposition of 137 Cs over Antarctica is estimated at 760 TBq, based on results from the 90-180 deg. East sector. Given the irregular distribution of sampling sites, more ice cores and snow samples must be analyzed in other sectors of Antarctica to check the validity of this figure

  1. Soil burden by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.E.H.; Wenzel, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural radioactivity - half-lifes and radiation type of man-made nuclides, radionuclide behaviour in soils, effects on soil condition and soil functions are described. The only mode of decontamination is by decay and thus primarily dependent on the half-life of nuclides

  2. Radionuclides in house dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Dodd, N J; Hammond, D J

    1985-04-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  3. Radionuclide body function imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    A transverse radionuclide scan field imaging apparatus is claimed. It comprises: a plurality of highly focused closely laterally adjacent collimators arranged inwardly focused in an array which surrounds a scan field, each collimator being moveable relative to its adjacent collimator; means for rotating the array about the scan field and means for imparting travel to the collimators

  4. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Il An, Gwang; Park, Se-Il; Oh, Jungmin; Kim, Hong Joo; Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung; Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Jaetae; Welch, Michael J.; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [ 32 P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy β + /β - particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [ 32 P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic β + or β - particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  5. Serial assessment of doxorubicin cardiomyopathy with the computerized scintillation probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strashun, A.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Horowitz, S.F.

    1982-01-01

    Cardiac function was serially monitored in 55 patients receiving adriamycin chemotherapy over 18 months with quantitative radionuclide assessment by both a nonimaging computerized scintillation probe and gamma camera-computer imaging. Interval ejection fraction change was comparable with both techniques and predicted incipient cardiotoxicity. Probe data revealed ejection fraction decline was antedated by decline left ventricular emptying and filling rates

  6. Radionuclide cardiography in medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strangfeld, D.; Mohnike, W.; Schmidt, J.; Heine, H.; Correns, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compendium on all aspects of radionuclide diagnostics concerning cardiovascular system diseases. Starting with introductory remarks on the control of cardiovascular diseases the contribution of radionuclide cardiology to functional cardiovascular diagnostics as well as pathophysiological and pathobiochemical aspects of radiocardiography are outlined. Radiopharmaceuticals used in radiocardiography, physical and technical problems in application of radionuclides and their measuring techniques are discussed. In individual chapters radionuclide ventriculography, myocardial scintiscanning, circulatory diagnostics, radionuclide diagnostics of arterial hypertension, of thrombosis and in vitro diagnostics of thrombophilia are treated in the framework of clinical medicine

  7. Quantification of Paratrichodorus allius in DNA extracted from soil using TaqMan probe and SYBR green real-time PCR assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ectoparasitic stubby root nematode Paratrichodorus allius transmits Tobacco rattle virus, which causes corky ringspot disease resulting in significant economic losses in the potato industry. This study developed a diagnostic method for direct quantification of P. allius from soil DNA using a Taq...

  8. A DNA probe combination for improved detection of MLL/11q23 breakpoints by double-color interphase-FISH in acute leukemias.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergh, A. von; Emanuel, B.; Zelderen-Bhola, S. van; Smetsers, A.F.C.M.; Soest, R. van; Stul, M.; Vranckx, H.; Schuuring, E.; Hagemeijer, A.; Kluin, P.

    2000-01-01

    Reciprocal translocations involving the MLL gene on chromosome band 11q23 have been observed in both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In AML, identification of MLL breakpoints is an important prognostic factor. Breakpoints are clustered in an 8 kb DNA fragment

  9. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  10. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  11. Probing DNA interactions with proteins using a single-molecule toolbox: inside the cell, in a test tube and in a computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J M; Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-interacting proteins have roles in multiple processes, many operating as molecular machines which undergo dynamic meta-stable transitions to bring about their biological function. To fully understand this molecular heterogeneity, DNA and the proteins that bind to it must ideally be interrogated at a single molecule level in their native in vivo environments, in a time-resolved manner, fast enough to sample the molecular transitions across the free-energy landscape. Progress has been made over the past decade in utilizing cutting-edge tools of the physical sciences to address challenging biological questions concerning the function and modes of action of several different proteins which bind to DNA. These physiologically relevant assays are technically challenging but can be complemented by powerful and often more tractable in vitro experiments which confer advantages of the chemical environment with enhanced detection signal-to-noise of molecular signatures and transition events. In the present paper, we discuss a range of techniques we have developed to monitor DNA-protein interactions in vivo, in vitro and in silico. These include bespoke single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques to elucidate the architecture and dynamics of the bacterial replisome and the structural maintenance of bacterial chromosomes, as well as new computational tools to extract single-molecule molecular signatures from live cells to monitor stoichiometry, spatial localization and mobility in living cells. We also discuss recent developments from our laboratory made in vitro, complementing these in vivo studies, which combine optical and magnetic tweezers to manipulate and image single molecules of DNA, with and without bound protein, in a new super-resolution fluorescence microscope.

  12. Radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    The sources of the presence of radionuclides in food are presented: natural radiation and artificial radiation. The transfer of radionuclides through food chains, intakes of radionuclides to the body with its partners effective doses and typical consumption of basic foods of a rural adult population are exposed as main topics. Also the radiation doses from natural sources and exposure to man by ingestion of contaminated food with radionuclides of artificial origin are shown. The contribution of the food ingestion to the man exposure depends on: characteristics of radionuclide, natural conditions, farming practices and eating habits of the population. The principal international organizations in charge of setting guide levels for radionuclides in food are mentioned: standards, rules and the monitoring. It establishes that a guide is necessary for the food monitoring; the alone CODEX ALIMENTARIUS is applicable to emergency situations and the generic action levels proposed by the CODEX not satisfy all needs (no guiding international levels for planned or existing situations such as NORM). There are handled mainly socio-economic and political aspects. Among the actions to be taken are: to assure a public comprehensive information over the risk evaluation in food; to reinforce the collaboration among the different international organizations (WHO, IAEA, ICRP, EC) in relation with the food of set; to give follow-up to the control of the drinkable water and NORM's presence in the food. In addition, it is possible to create the necessary mechanisms to reduce the number of irrelevant measures and bureaucratic useless steps (certificates); to promote the exchange between the different institutions involved in the topic of the food, with relation to the acquired experiences and learned lessons. Likewise, it might examine the possibility of a multidisciplinary approximation (radioactive and not radioactive pollutants); to elaborate a technical guide to assure the

  13. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Prouty

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  14. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  15. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  16. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement

  17. Problems connected with the use of oligonucleotide probes with a high degree of degeneracy. Identification of mRNA and of cDNA clones corresponding to the gene of the. cap alpha. -subunit of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, K.E.; Grishin, A.V.; Arsenyan, S.G.; Broude, N.E.; Grinkevich, V.A.; Filippova, L.Yu.; Severtsova, I.V.; Modyanov, N.N.

    1986-10-01

    To identify and search for nucleotide sequences containing the structural part of the gene of the ..cap alpha..-subunit of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase, 17-membered oligonucleotide probes corresponding to the peptide Lys-Asp-Ala-Phe-Gln-Asn have been synthesized. It has been shown that, with a 64-fold degeneracyd, the 17-membered probe is suitable only for the identification of a specific sequence in mRNA. To search for clones containing cDNA fragments, preliminary fractionation of the probes with the aid of HPLC or the resynthesis of groups of oligonucleotides with a lower degeneracy is necessary.

  18. Fukushima Daiichi Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jankovsky, Zachary Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Radionuclide inventories are generated to permit detailed analyses of the Fukushima Daiichi meltdowns. This is necessary information for severe accident calculations, dose calculations, and source term and consequence analyses. Inventories are calculated using SCALE6 and compared to values predicted by international researchers supporting the OECD/NEA's Benchmark Study on the Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF). Both sets of inventory information are acceptable for best-estimate analyses of the Fukushima reactors. Consistent nuclear information for severe accident codes, including radionuclide class masses and core decay powers, are also derived from the SCALE6 analyses. Key nuclide activity ratios are calculated as functions of burnup and nuclear data in order to explore the utility for nuclear forensics and support future decommissioning efforts.

  19. Radionuclide table. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, Jean; Perolat, J.-P.; Lagoutine, Frederic; Le Gallic, Yves.

    The evaluation of the following 29 radionuclides is presented: 22 Na, 24 Na, sup(24m)Na, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 57 Co, 58 Co, sup(58m)Co, 60 Co, sup(60m)Co, 75 Se, 103 Ru, sup(103m)Rh, sup(110m)Ag- 110 Ag, 109 Cd, 125 Sb, sup(125mTe), 125 I, 133 Xe, sup(133m)Xe, 131 Cs, 134 Cs, sup(134m)Cs, 139 Ce, 144 Ce- 144 Pr, 144 Pr, 169 Er, 186 Re, 203 Hg. The introduction contains a brief description of radioactive processes and the evaluation rules followed. The best values and associated uncertainties are given for each radionuclide for the major parameters of the decay scheme and the radiation intensities emitted, together with a decay table. Gamma, X-rays and sometimes conversion electron spectra are also provided [fr

  20. Determination of DNA by solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence enhancing method based on the Morin.SiO{sub 2} luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jiaming [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)]. E-mail: zzsyliujiaming@163.com; Yang Tianlong [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Gao Fei [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Hu Lixiang [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); He Hangxia [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Liu Qinying [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Liu Zhenbo [Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Fujian College of Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou 350003 (China); Huang Xiaomei [Department of Food and Chemical Engineering, Zhangzhou Institute of Technology, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zhu Guohui [Department of Food and Chemical Engineering, Zhangzhou Institute of Technology, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2006-03-02

    Sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) as the precursor, was mixed with Morin organic dye to synthesize silicon dioxide luminescent nanoparticles containing Morin (Morin.SiO{sub 2}) by sol-gel method. The particle sizes of SiO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O and Morin.SiO{sub 2} were both 50 nm, measured with TEM (transmission electron microscope). Morin.SiO{sub 2} modified by HS-CH{sub 2}COOH could be dissolved by water. In the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine)-HCl buffer solution, Pd{sup 2+} could coordinate with Morin in Morin.SiO{sub 2} to form complex Pd{sup 2+}-Morin.SiO{sub 2}, which could emit phosphorescence on polyamide membrane. And DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) could cause a sharp enhancement of the room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) intensity of complex Pd{sup 2+}-Morin.SiO{sub 2}. Thus a new method of solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence (SS-RTP) enhancing for the determination of DNA was established based on the Morin.SiO{sub 2} luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe. The {delta}Ip is directly proportional to the content of DNA in the range of 4.00-1000.0 fg spot{sup -1} (corresponding concentration: 0.010-2.50 ng ml{sup -1}). The regression equation of working curve was {delta}Ip = 21.13 + 0.2076m{sub DNA} (fg spot{sup -1}) (r = 0.9990) and the detection limit was 0.61 fg spot{sup -1} (corresponding concentration: 1.5 pg ml{sup -1}). This method had a wide linear range, high sensitivity, convenience, rapidity and only a little sample was needed. Samples containing 0.10 and 25.0 ng ml{sup -1} DNA were measured repeatedly for 11 times and RSDs were 3.2 and 4.1% (n = 11), respectively, which indicated that the method had a good repeatability. Disturbance of common ions, such as Mg{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+}, was small, and there was no disturbance in the presence of protein and RNA. This method has been applied to the determination of DNA in nectar successfully.

  1. Radionuclide co-precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Sandino, A.

    1987-12-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the minor components of the spent fuel matrix has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Two different situations have been studied: Part I, the near field scenario, where the release and migration of the minor components is dependent on the solubility behaviour of UO 2 (s); Part II, the far field, where the solubility and transport of the radionuclides is related to the major geochemical processes occurring. (orig.)

  2. Radionuclide fate and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The studies reported here deal with the full range of contaminant behavior and fate, from the initial physicochemical factors that govern radionuclide availability in terrestrial and aquatic environments to studies of contaminant transport by biological means. By design, we focus more on the biologically and chemically mediated transport processes and food-chain pathways than on the purely physical forms of contaminant transport, such as transport by wind and water

  3. Geochemistry and radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretically, the geochemical barrier can provide a major line of defense in protecting the biosphere from the hazards of nuclear waste. The most likely processes involved are easily identified. Preliminary investigations using computer modeling techniques suggest that retardation is an effective control on radionuclide concentrations. Ion exchange reactions slow radionuclide migration and allow more time for radioactive decay and dispersion. For some radionuclides, solubility alone may limit concentrations to less than the maximum permissible now considered acceptable by the Federal Government. The effectiveness of the geochemical barrier is ultimately related to the repository site characteristics. Theory alone tells us that geochemical controls will be most efficient in an environment that provides for maximum ion exchange and the precipitation of insoluble compounds. In site selection, consideration should be given to rock barriers with high ion exchange capacity that might also act as semi-permeable membranes. Also important in evaluating the site's potential for effective geochemical controls are the oxidation potentials, pH and salinity of the groundwater

  4. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.J.; Kennedy, V.H.; Nelson, A.

    1983-06-01

    A bibliographical database has been developed to provide quick access to research and background literature in the field of radioecology. This is a development of an earlier database described by Nelson (Bocock 1981). ITE's particular fields of interest have led to a subject bias in the bibliography towards studies in Cumbria, especially those concerned with radionuclides originating from the reprocessing plant at Sellafield, and towards ecological research studies that are complementary to radionuclide studies. Other subjects covered, include the chemistry of radionuclides, budgets and transfers within ecosystems and techniques for the analysis of environmental samples. ITE's research objectives have led to the establishment of a specialized database which is intended to complement rather than compete with the large international databases made available by suppliers such as IRS-DIALTECH or DIALOG. Currently the database holds about 1900 references which are stored on a 2 1/2 megabyte hard disk on a Digital PDP11/34 computer operating under a time shared system. The references follow a standard format. (author)

  5. Radionuclides in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Teruyuki

    2001-01-01

    The concentration and accumulation of radionuclides in marine organisms were explained in this paper. Secular change of the radioactivity concentration of 137 Cs in seaweed in coastal area of Japan showed more than 5Bq/kg-fresh in the first half of 1960, but decreased less than 1 Bq/kg-fresh after then and attained to less than 0.1 Bq/kg-fresh in 1990s. However, the value increased a while in 1986, which indicated the effect of Chernobyl accident. The accident increased 137 Cs of shellfish near Japan. The concentration of 239+240 Pu was the lowest value in muscles of fish, but increased from 1.7 to 42.3 mBq/kg wet wt in seaweed in 1999. 99 Tc concentration of seaweed showed from 100 to 1000 times as much as that of seawater. Radionuclides in the Irish Sea are originated from Sellafield reprocessing plant. The concentration factors of macro-algae and surface water fish (IAEA,1985) were shown. Analytical results of U in 61 kinds of marine organs showed that the concentration was different in the part of organ. The higher concentration of U was observed in hard tissue of fish. The concentration factor was different between chemical substances with the same radionuclides. (S.Y.)

  6. Proficiency testing for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faanhof, A.; Kotze, O.; Louw, I.

    2010-01-01

    Proficiency testing in general is only useful when it suites a certain purpose. With regards to radionuclides basically three fields of interest can be identified: (I)Foodstuffs-Introduced in the early 1960's to monitor the fall-out of nuclear tests and eventually the pathway to foodstuffs fit for human consumption. The demand for analysis increased substantially after the Chernobyl accident. (II) Natural radioactivity-Associated with mining and mineral processing of uranium and thorium baring mineral resources throughout the world where the radionuclides from the natural uranium and thorium decay series are found to pose concern for professional and public exposure. (III) Artificial radioactivity-This category covers mostly the long-lived nuclides generated by nuclear fission of the fuel used in nuclear power plants, research reactors and nuclear bomb tests. All three categories require a specific approach for laboratories to test their ability to analyze specific radio nuclides of interest in a variety of matrices. In this lecture I will give a compiled overview of the required radioanalytical skills, analysis sensitivity needed and radionuclides of interest, with more specific emphasis on QAQC of water sources and the recommended monitoring approach. And provide information on available reference materials and organizations/institutes that provide regular exercises for participating laboratories. I will also briefly communicate on the advantages and disadvantages of ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation for test laboratories, which is these days a prerequisite in national and international trade especially where foodstuffs and mineral products are concerned.

  7. Radionuclides in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadev, V.

    1980-01-01

    The three main areas of application of radionuclides in thyroid disease will be reviewed. Firstly thyroid radionuclide imaging in thyroid swellings, in relationship to lumps in the neck and ectopic thyroid tissue such as retrosternal goitre, and lingual goitre will be described. Future developments in the field including tomographic scanning, using the coded aperture method, and fluorescent scans and ultrasound are reviewed. The second area of application is the assessment and evaluation of thyroid function and the therapy of Grave's Disease and Plummer's Disease using radioiodine. The importance of careful collection of the line of treatment, results of treatment locally and the follow-up of patients after radioiodine therapy will be described. The third area of application is in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Investigation of thyroid swelling, and the diagnosis of functioning metastases are reported. The therapeutic iodine scan as the sole evidence of functioning metastatic involvement is recorded. Histological thyroid cancer appears to be increasingly encountered in clinical practice and the plan of management in relation to choice of cases for therapeutic scanning is discussed with case reports. Lastly the role of whole body scanning in relationship to biochemical markers is compared. In the changing field of nuclear medicine radionuclide applications in thyroid disease have remained pre-eminent and this is an attempt to reassess its role in the light of newer developments and local experience in the Institute of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  8. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  9. Optical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, J.; Decaudin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The probe includes optical means of refractive index n, refracting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n1>n and reflecting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n2 [fr

  10. Radionuclide Incorporation and Long Term Performance of Apatite Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianwei [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Lian, Jie [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-01-04

    This project aims to combines state-of-the-art experimental and characterization techniques with atomistic simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. With an initial focus on long-lived I-129 and other radionuclides such as Cs, Sr in apatite structure, specific research objectives include the atomic scale understanding of: (1) incorporation behavior of the radionuclides and their effects on the crystal chemistry and phase stability; (2) stability and microstructure evolution of designed waste forms under coupled temperature and radiation environments; (3) incorporation and migration energetics of radionuclides and release behaviors as probed by DFT and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations; and (4) chemical durability as measured in dissolution experiments for long term performance evaluation and model validation.

  11. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  12. Probe for the mutagenic activity of the carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl: synthesis and characterization of an M13mp10 genome containing the major carcinogen-DNA adduct at a unique site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasko, D.D.; Basu, A.K.; Kadlubar, F.F.; Evans, F.E.; Lay, J.O. Jr.; Essigmann, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The duplex genome of Escherichia coli virus M13mp10 was modified at a unique site to contain N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG/sup 8-ABP/), the major carcinogen-DNA adduct of the human bladder carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl. A tetradeoxynucleotide containing a single dG/sup 8-ABP/ residue was synthesized by reacting 5'-d(TpGpCpA)-3' with N-acetoxy-N-(trifluoroacetyl)-4-aminobiphenyl, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography purification of the principal reaction product 5'-d(TpG/sup 8-ABP/pCpA)-3' (yield 15-30%). Characterization by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry confirmed the structure as an intact 4-aminobiphenyl-modified tetranucleotide, while 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy established the site of substitution and the existence of ring stacking between the carcinogen residue and DNA bases. Experiments in which the tetranucleotides were 5' end labeled with [ 32 P]phosphate revealed the following: 1)the adducted oligomer, when incubated in a 1000-fold molar excess in the presence of T4 DNA ligase and ATP, was found to be incorporated into the gapped DNA molecules with an efficiency of approximately 30%, as compared to the unadducted d(pTpGpCpA), which was incorporated with 60% ligation efficiency; 2)radioactivity from the 5' end of each tetranucleotide was physically mapped to a restriction fragment that contained the PstI site and represented 0.2% of the genome; 3) the presence of the lesion within the PstI recognition site inhibited the ability of PstI to cleave the genome at this site; 4)in genomes in which ligation occurred, T4 DNA ligase was capable of covalently joining both modified and unmodified tetranucleotides to the gapped structures on both the 5' and the 3' ends with at least 90% efficiency. On the basis of these and other data, the dG/sup 8-ABP/-modified genome was judged to be a useful probe for investigation of site-specific mutagenesis in E. coli

  13. Experimental conical-head abutment screws on the microbial leakage through the implant-abutment interface: an in vitro analysis using target-specific DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Murillo S; do Nascimento, Cássio; Dos Santos, Carla G P; Pires, Isabela M; Pedrazzi, Vinícius

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to identify and quantify up to 38 microbial species from human saliva penetrating through the implant-abutment interface in two different implant connections, external hexagon and tri-channel internal connection, both with conventional flat-head or experimental conical-head abutment screws. Forty-eight two-part implants with external hexagon (EH; n = 24) or tri-channel internal (TI; n = 24) connections were investigated. Abutments were attached to implants with conventional flat-head or experimental conical-head screws. After saliva incubation, Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was used to identify and quantify up to 38 bacterial colonizing the internal parts of the implants. Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Bonferroni's post-tests for multiple comparisons was used for statistical analysis. Twenty-four of thirty-eight species, including putative periodontal pathogens, were found colonizing the inner surfaces of both EH and TI implants. Peptostreptococcus anaerobios (P = 0.003), Prevotella melaninogenica (P abutment screws have impacted the microbial leakage through the implant-abutment interface. Implants attached with experimental conical-head abutment screws showed lower counts of microorganisms when compared with conventional flat-head screws. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Chapter 2. Radionuclides in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter of textbook of radioecology for university students. In this chapter authors deal with role of radionuclides in the biosphere. Chapter consists of next parts: (1) Natural radionuclides in biosphere; (2) Man-made radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) Ecologically important radionuclides; (4) Natural background; (5) Radiotoxicity and (6) Paths of transfer of radionuclides from the source to human

  15. Radionuclide diagnosis of emergency states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishmukhametov, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Solution of emergency state radionuclide diagnostics from the technical point of view is provided by the application of the mobile quick-operating equipment in combination with computers, by the use of radionuclides with acceptable for emergency medicine characteristics and by development of radionuclide investigation data propcessing express-method. Medical developments include the study of acute disease and injury radioisotope semiotics, different indication diagnostic value determining, comparison of the results, obtained during radionuclide investigation, with clinicolaboratory and instrumental data, separation of methodical complex series

  16. History of medical radionuclide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radionuclide production for medical use originally was incidental to isotope discoveries by physicists and chemists. Once the available radionuclides were identified they were evaluated for potential medical use. Hevesy first used 32P in 1935 to study phosphorous metabolism in rats. Since that time, the development of cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and nuclear reactors have produced hundreds of radionuclides for potential medical use. The history of medical radionuclide production represents an evolutionary, interdisciplinary development of applied nuclear technology. Today the technology is represented by a mature industry and provides medical benefits to millions of patients annually.

  17. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  18. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  19. Osteopetrosis: Radiological & Radionuclide Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis

  20. Modifying radionuclide effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasser, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    This project involves a study of the relationship of physiological and environmental factors to the metabolism and effects of radionuclides. We have studied placental transfer and suckling as pathways of americium entry into the newborn or juvenile rat. Rats were injected intravenously with 5 μCi of 241 Am while nulliparous (30 days prior to mating), pregnant (day 19 of gestation), or lactating (1 day after parturition), and subsequent litters were killed to determine 241 Am retention. A deficit in reproductive performance was observed in the group injected before mating, as evidenced by reduced number and weight of offspring

  1. Radionuclides in the sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1971-07-01

    Water covers a little more than two-thirds of the earth's surface. What is thrown into the sea from a ship may be washed up on a shore thousands of miles away; wastes discharged into the seas or into rivers flowing into them can affect marine life and possibly also the health of man. The study, prevention and control of pollution of the seas and oceans by radionuclides introduced as by-products of man's use of nuclear energy is thus of global interest. (author)

  2. Sherlock Holmes for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitzer, C.

    2002-01-01

    At the end of 2001 ARC Seibersdorf research has taken the management of the first worldwide certified laboratory to control the realization of the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Altogether there will be 16 CTBT certified laboratories worldwide; therefore a global network of radionuclides measurements stations and test laboratories as well as seismic, radiation and hydroacustic measurements stations is necessary . In the future air samples will be taken from these stations and analyzed in one of these certified laboratories, when appears the suspicion that an atomic test was carried out. (nevyjel)

  3. Tools for Ultraspecific Probe/Primer Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fofanov, Yurly

    2006-01-01

    .... Our approach will deliver DNA probes and PCR primers that have an unprecedentedly low probability of false positives or confusion by environmental background, and which resist evasion by threat agent engineering...

  4. Probing the phylogenetic relationships of a few newly recorded intertidal zoanthids of Gujarat coast (India) with mtDNA COI sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sneha; Poriya, Paresh; Kundu, Rahul

    2016-11-01

    The present study reports the phylogenetic relationship of six zoanthid species belonging to three genera, Isaurus, Palythoa, and Zoanthus identified using systematic computational analysis of mtDNA gene sequences. All six species are first recorded from the coasts of Kathiawar Peninsula, India. Genus: Isaurus is represented by Isaurus tuberculatus, genus Zoanthus is represented by Zoanthus kuroshio and Zoanthus sansibaricus, while genus Palythoa is represented by Palythoa tuberculosa, P. sp. JVK-2006 and Palythoa heliodiscus. Results of the present study revealed that among the various species observed along the coastline, a minimum of 99% sequence divergence and a maximum of 96% sequence divergence were seen. An interspecific divergence of 1-4% and negligible intraspecific divergence was observed. These results not only highlighted the efficiency of the COI gene region in species identification but also demonstrated the genetic variability of zoanthids along the Saurashtra coastline of the west coast of India.

  5. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K. [Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Whole-slide imaging is a robust alternative to traditional fluorescent microscopy for fluorescence in situ hybridization imaging using break-apart DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Camille; Guérin, Maxime; Frenois, François-Xavier; Thuries, Valérie; Jalabert, Laurence; Brousset, Pierre; Valmary-Degano, Séverine

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization is an indispensable technique used in routine pathology and for theranostic purposes. Because fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques require sophisticated microscopic workstations and long procedures of image acquisition with sometimes subjective and poorly reproducible results, we decided to test a whole-slide imaging system as an alternative approach. In this study, we used the latest generation of Pannoramic 250 Flash digital microscopes (P250 Flash digital microscopes; 3DHISTECH, Budapest, Hungary) to digitize fluorescence in situ hybridization slides of diffuse large B cells lymphoma cases for detecting MYC rearrangement. The P250 Flash digital microscope was found to be precise with better definition of split signals in cells containing MYC rearrangement with fewer truncated signals as compared to traditional fluorescence microscopy. This digital technique is easier thanks to the preview function, which allows almost immediate identification of the tumor area, and the panning and zooming functionalities as well as a shorter acquisition time. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses using the digital technique appeared to be more reproducible between pathologists. Finally, the digital technique also allowed prolonged conservation of photos. In conclusion, whole-slide imaging technologies represent rapid, robust, and highly sensitive methods for interpreting fluorescence in situ hybridization slides with break-apart probes. In addition, these techniques offer an easier way to interpret the signals and allow definitive storage of the images for pathology expert networks or e-learning databases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, G.; Du, Yong [Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals since the 1940s. The radionuclides originally used, including 131I and 32P, are still in use. The role of the physicist in radionuclide therapy encompasses radiation protection, imaging and dosimetry. Radiation protection is of particular importance given the high activities of the unsealed sources that are often administered, and must take into account medical staff, comforters and carers, and, as patients are discharged while still retaining activity, members of the public. Regulations concerning acceptable levels of exposure vary from country to country. If the administered radiopharmaceutical is a γ emitter, then imaging can be performed which may be either qualitative or quantitative. While a regular system of quality control must be in place to prevent misinterpretation of image data, qualitative imaging does not usually rely on the image corrections necessary to determine the absolute levels of activity that are localized in the patient. Accurate quantitative imaging is dependent on these corrections and can permit the distribution of absorbed doses delivered to the patient to be determined with sufficient accuracy to be clinically beneficial.

  8. Intervention procedures for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    As in the case of smoking and lung cancer, for large radionuclide releases, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. On the other hand, we feel compelled to do something sensible after an accident even if the principal benefit of intervention may be to comfort the population at risk. Of course, for populations near the site of an accident, evacuation should be considered, but it is unreasonable to apply this measure to distant populations, e.g., large segments of the European community could not be moved about as we observe the shifting of a radioactive cloud in response to changing winds. If the radionuclides are delivered as particulates, bringing people indoors and employing primitive air filters can temporarily reduce exposures, but these stratagems are not very effective against gaseous or volatile elements. What, then, can be done for populations downwind of a radioactive release whose air, water, and/or food supply are, or are about to become contaminated? 5 refs

  9. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Some parameters of radionuclide kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokof'ev, O.N.; Smirnov, V.A.; Belen'kij, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical values of the rates of radionuclide absorption into, and elimination from, bovine organs were determined. Kinetic rate constants of radionuclides such as 89 Sr, 99 Mo, 131 I, 132 Tl, and 140 Be were calculated. The calculations were done for muscle, liver, and kidney

  11. Radionuclide - Soil Organic Matter Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between soil organic matter, i.e. humic and fulvic acids, and radionuclides of primary interest to shallow land burial of low activity solid waste have been reviewed and to some extent studied experimentally. The radionuclides considered in the present study comprise cesium, strontium...

  12. Chapter 13. Radionuclides in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter of textbook of radioecology for university students. In this chapter authors deal with problems connected with using of radionuclides in medicine. Methods of treatment with using of radionuclides are reviewed. Chapter consists of next parts: (1) Remotion of thyroid gland; (2) Treatment of cerebrally tumour in nuclear reactor; (3) Artificial heart

  13. Comparison of two DNA targets for the diagnosis of Toxoplasmosis by real-time PCR using fluorescence resonance energy transfer hybridization probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernault Pauline

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasmosis is an infectious disease caused by the parasitic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. It is endemic worldwide and, depending on the geographic location, 15 to 85% of the human population are asymptomatically infected. Routine diagnosis is based on serology. The parasite has emerged as a major opportunistic pathogen for immunocompromised patients, in whom it can cause life-threatening disease. Moreover, when a pregnant woman develops a primary Toxoplasma gondii infection, the parasite may be transmitted to the fetus and cause serious damnage. For these two subpopulations, a rapid and accurate diagnosis is required to initiate treatment. Serological diagnosis of active infection is unreliable because reactivation is not always accompanied by changes in antibody levels, and the presence of IgM does not necessarily indicate recent infection. Application of quantitative PCR has evolved as a sensitive, specific, and rapid method for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in amniotic fluid, blood, tissue samples, and cerebrospinal fluid. Methods Two separate, real-time fluorescence PCR assays were designed and evaluated with clinical samples. The first, targeting the 35-fold repeated B1 gene, and a second, targeting a newly described multicopy genomic fragment of Toxoplasma gondii. Amplicons of different intragenic copies were analyzed for sequence heterogeneity. Results Comparative LightCycler experiments were conducted with a dilution series of Toxoplasma gondii genomic DNA, 5 reference strains, and 51 Toxoplasma gondii-positive amniotic fluid samples revealing a 10 to 100-fold higher sensitivity for the PCR assay targeting the newly described 529-bp repeat element of Toxoplasma gondii. Conclusion We have developed a quantitative LightCycler PCR protocol which offer rapid cycling with real-time, sequence-specific detection of amplicons. Results of quantitative PCR demonstrate that the 529-bp repeat element is repeated more

  14. Probes of eukaryotic DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II-I. Binding of 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-6-mercaptopurine to the elongation subsite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J M; Kimball, A P

    1982-08-15

    9-beta-D-Arabinofuranosyl-6-mercaptopurine (ara-6-MP) was used to affinity-label wheat germ DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (or B) (nucleosidetriphosphate:RNA nucleotidyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.6). This nucleoside analogue was found to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to [3H]UMP incorporation. Natural substrates protected the enzyme from inactivation by ara-6-MP when the enzyme was preincubated with excess concentrations of substrates, suggesting that the inhibitor binds at the elongation subsite. The inhibitor bound the catalytic center of the enzyme with a stoichiometry of 0.6:1. The sulfhydryl reagent, dithiothreitol, reversed the inhibition by ara-6-MP, suggesting that the 6-thiol group of the inhibitor was interacting closely with an essential cysteine residue in the catalytic center of the enzyme. Chromatographic analysis of the pronase-digestion products of the RNA polymerase II-ara-6-MP complex also showed that ara-6-MP had bound a cysteine residue. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the denatured [6-35S]ara-6-MP-labeled RNA polymerase II revealed that over 80% of the radioactivity was associated with the IIb subunit of the enzyme.

  15. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  16. Effect of cycloheximide and actinomycin D on radionuclide 235U-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Qiang; Zhang Lansheng; Zhu Shoupeng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The mechanism of apoptosis induced by radionuclide 235 U was studied. Methods: MTT and JAM assay were used to analyse the cell viability and quantification of fragmented DNA. Results: The inhibitor of protein cycloheximide (CHX), and the inhibitor of RNA synthesis, actinomycin D. cannot inhibit the apoptosis induced by 235 U, but CHX can partly inhibit apoptotic cells DNA fragmentation. Conclusion: The pathway of apoptosis induced by radionuclide 235 U is different from X-and γ-ray external irradiation, protein synthesis is not essential for it, but synthetic endonuclease is necessary for DNA fragmentation of apoptotic cells

  17. A semi-automated magnetic capture probe based DNA extraction and real-time PCR method applied in the Swedish surveillance of Echinococcus multilocularis in red fox (Vulpes vulpes) faecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Mats; Hagström, Åsa; Armua-Fernandez, Maria Teresa; Wahlström, Helene; Ågren, Erik Olof; Miller, Andrea; Holmberg, Anders; Lukacs, Morten; Casulli, Adriano; Deplazes, Peter; Juremalm, Mikael

    2014-12-19

    Following the first finding of Echinococcus multilocularis in Sweden in 2011, 2985 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were analysed by the segmental sedimentation and counting technique. This is a labour intensive method and requires handling of the whole carcass of the fox, resulting in a costly analysis. In an effort to reduce the cost of labour and sample handling, an alternative method has been developed. The method is sensitive and partially automated for detection of E. multilocularis in faecal samples. The method has been used in the Swedish E. multilocularis monitoring program for 2012-2013 on more than 2000 faecal samples. We describe a new semi-automated magnetic capture probe DNA extraction method and real time hydrolysis probe polymerase chain reaction assay (MC-PCR) for the detection of E. multilocularis DNA in faecal samples from red fox. The diagnostic sensitivity was determined by validating the new method against the sedimentation and counting technique in fox samples collected in Switzerland where E. multilocularis is highly endemic. Of 177 foxes analysed by the sedimentation and counting technique, E. multilocularis was detected in 93 animals. Eighty-two (88%, 95% C.I 79.8-93.9) of these were positive in the MC-PCR. In foxes with more than 100 worms, the MC-PCR was positive in 44 out of 46 (95.7%) cases. The two MC-PCR negative samples originated from foxes with only immature E. multilocularis worms. In foxes with 100 worms or less, (n = 47), 38 (80.9%) were positive in the MC-PCR. The diagnostic specificity of the MC-PCR was evaluated using fox scats collected within the Swedish screening. Of 2158 samples analysed, two were positive. This implies that the specificity is at least 99.9% (C.I. = 99.7-100). The MC-PCR proved to have a high sensitivity and a very high specificity. The test is partially automated but also possible to perform manually if desired. The test is well suited for nationwide E. multilocularis surveillance programs where sampling

  18. Radionuclide transverse section imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    A radioisotope scanning apparatus for use in nuclear medicine is described in detail. The apparatus enables the quantification and spatial location of the radioactivity in a body section of a patient to be determined with high sensitivity. It consists of an array of highly focussed collimators arranged such that adjacent collimators move in the same circumferential but opposite radial directions. The explicit movements of the gantry are described in detail and may be controlled by a general purpose computer. The use of highly focussed collimators allows both a reasonable solid angle of acceptance and also high target to background images; additionally, dual radionuclide pharmaceutical studies can be performed simultaneously. It is claimed that the high sensitivity of the system permits the early diagnosis of pathological changes and the images obtained show accurately the location and shape of physiological abnormalities. (UK)

  19. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  20. Deep sea radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanisch, G.; Vobach, M.

    1993-01-01

    Every year since 1979, either in sping or in summer, the fishing research vessel 'Walther Herwig' goes to the North Atlantic disposal areas of solid radioactive wastes, and, for comparative purposes, to other areas, in order to collect water samples, plankton and nekton, and, from the deep sea bed, sediment samples and benthos organisms. In addition to data on the radionuclide contents of various media, information about the plankton, nekton and benthos organisms living in those areas and about their biomasses could be gathered. The investigations are aimed at acquiring scientifically founded knowledge of the uptake of radioactive substances by microorganisms, and their migration from the sea bottom to the areas used by man. (orig.) [de

  1. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases

  2. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon [School of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases.

  3. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laul, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The U-234 and Th-230 radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10 4 to 10 5 in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas and geothermal brine from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na + and Cl - ions and RaCl 2 is soluble in brines. Pb-210 is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The U-234/Th-230 ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. 19 refs., 3 figs

  4. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laul, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The 234 U and 230 Th radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10 4 to 10 5 in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas, and geothermal brine form the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na + and Cl - ions, and RaCl 2 is soluble in brines. 210 Pb is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The 234 U/ 230 Th ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. (author) 19 refs.; 3 figs

  5. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  6. Radionuclide calibrators performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Ramirez, E.; Zeledon Fonseca, P.; Jimenez Cordero, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide calibrators are used to estimate accurately activity prior to administration to a patient, so it is very important that this equipment meets its performance requirements. The purpose of this paper is to compare the commercially available 'Calicheck' (Calcorp. Inc), used to assess linearity, versus the well-known source decay method, and also to show our results after performing several recommended quality control tests. The parameters that we wanted to evaluate were carried on using the Capintec CRC-15R and CRC-15 β radionuclide calibrators. The evaluated tests were: high voltage, display, zero adjust, background, reproducibility, source constancy, accuracy, precision and linearity. The first six tests were evaluated on the daily practice, here we analyzed the 2007 recorded data; and the last three were evaluated once a year. During the daily evaluation both calibrators performance were satisfactory comparing with the manufacture's requirements. The accuracy test show result within the ± 10% allowed for a field instrument. Precision performance is within the ± 1 % allowed. On the other hand, the linearity test shows that using the source decay method the relative coefficient is 0.9998, for both equipment and using the Calicheck the relative coefficient is 0.997. However, looking the percentage of error, during the 'Calicheck' test, its range goes from 0.0 % up to -25.35%, and using the source decay method, the range goes from 0.0 % up to -31.05 %, taking into account both instruments. Checking the 'Calicheck' results we can see that the results varying randomly, but using the source decay method the percentage of error increase as the source activity decrease. We conclude that both devices meet its manufactures requirements, in the case of the linearity using the decay method, decreasing the activity source, increasing the percentage of error, this may happen because of the equipment age. (author)

  7. Radionuclide therapy for true polycythemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasieva, N.I.; Grushka, G.V.; Vasiliev, L.Ya.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: True polycythemia (Vaquez' disease) is the disease of the hemopoietic system of an unknown origin accompanied by increase of erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood with absolute and relative increase in the mass of circulating erythrocytes. True polycythemia is treated with bloodletting and myelosuppressing drugs. This treatment is not always effective. A special place among myelo-depressants is occupied by P-32. Its main therapeutic effect is mediated by the participation in the metabolic processes. Besides DNA damage with beta-radiation, P-32 incorporation by DNA followed by decay and transformation to a stable sulphur isotope (S-32) results in the damage of the structure of nucleic acids, which is main mechanism of cellular proliferation inhibition. Therefore, P-32 is considered a powerful myelosuppressive agent. The indication to P-32 administration is true polycythemia, which, in contrast to secondary polycythemia accompanying numerous diseases, requires special cytostatic treatment. The study involved 152 patients with true polycythemia (76 men and 76 women aged 48) treated with P-32. The treatment was administered in case when bloodletting proved to be ineffective and hematocrit level exceeded 75%. P-32 was administered orally in 100 ml of 10% glucose solution on an empty stomach at a dose of 37-111 MBq with a 4-10-day intervals (mean 6 days). The blood count was checked for 12 weeks. If the number of thrombocytes and leukocytes decreased less than by 25% and the level of hematocrit did not normalize, repeated P-32 treatments were performed. In 13 (8.6%) patients, haematocrit parameters became normal after a single P-32 administration, in 15 (9.9%) patients two treatments with P-32 were necessary to normalize the blood count. In 134 (88.1%) cases P-32 treatment was administered more then two times (maximum 10 treatments). Total P-32 activity ranged from 37 to 740 MBq. Of all the patients who were administered P- 32 treatment, hematological

  8. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quine, T.A.; Walling, D.

    1998-01-01

    Geomorphologists have shown increasing interest in environmental radionuclides since pioneering studies by Ritchie and McHenry in the USA and Campbell, Longmore and Loughran in Australia. Environmental radionuclides have attracted this interest because they provide geomorphologists with the means to trace sediment movement within the landscape. They, therefore, facilitate investigation of subjects at the core of geomorphology, namely the rates and patterns of landscape change. Most attention has been focussed on the artificial radionuclide caesium-137 ( 137 Cs) but more recently potential applications of the natural radionuclides lead-210 ( 210 Pb) and beryllium-7( 7 Be) have been investigated (Walling et al., 1995; Wallbrink and Murray, 1996a, 1996b). The origin, characteristics and applications of these radionuclides are summarised. These radionuclides are of value as sediment tracers because of three important characteristics: a strong affinity for sediment; a global distribution and the possibility of measurement at low concentration. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides provide unique access to detailed qualitative data concerning landscape change over a range of timescales

  9. Automated design of genomic Southern blot probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiyama Noboru H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sothern blotting is a DNA analysis technique that has found widespread application in molecular biology. It has been used for gene discovery and mapping and has diagnostic and forensic applications, including mutation detection in patient samples and DNA fingerprinting in criminal investigations. Southern blotting has been employed as the definitive method for detecting transgene integration, and successful homologous recombination in gene targeting experiments. The technique employs a labeled DNA probe to detect a specific DNA sequence in a complex DNA sample that has been separated by restriction-digest and gel electrophoresis. Critically for the technique to succeed the probe must be unique to the target locus so as not to cross-hybridize to other endogenous DNA within the sample. Investigators routinely employ a manual approach to probe design. A genome browser is used to extract DNA sequence from the locus of interest, which is searched against the target genome using a BLAST-like tool. Ideally a single perfect match is obtained to the target, with little cross-reactivity caused by homologous DNA sequence present in the genome and/or repetitive and low-complexity elements in the candidate probe. This is a labor intensive process often requiring several attempts to find a suitable probe for laboratory testing. Results We have written an informatic pipeline to automatically design genomic Sothern blot probes that specifically attempts to optimize the resultant probe, employing a brute-force strategy of generating many candidate probes of acceptable length in the user-specified design window, searching all against the target genome, then scoring and ranking the candidates by uniqueness and repetitive DNA element content. Using these in silico measures we can automatically design probes that we predict to perform as well, or better, than our previous manual designs, while considerably reducing design time. We went on to

  10. Radionuclides in Canada goose eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickard, W.H.; Sweany, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    Low levels of radionuclides were measured in Canada goose eggs taken from deserted nests from Columbia River islands on the Energy Research and Development Administration's Hanford Reservation. Potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, was the most abundant radionuclide measured in egg contents and egg shell. Strontium-90 was incorporated into egg shells and cesium-137 into inner egg contents. Manganese-54, cobalt-60, and zinc-65 were more abundant in inner egg contents than in egg shell. Cerium-144 was detected in egg shell but not in inner shell

  11. Radionuclide migration in water reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionova, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    Toxicity degree and radiation effect of different radionuclides depend on multiple factors, whose interaction can strengthen or weaken the effects through the mechanism of nuclide accumulation by hydrobiontes. Stage of development of an aquatic organism, its age, mass and sex as well as lifetime and residence time of the organism in the given medium are of importance. The radionuclide build up depends on illumination, locale of the bioobject residence, on the residence nature. The concentration of radionuclides in aquatic organisms and bionts survival depend on a season, temperature of the residence medium, as well as salinity and mineral composition of water influence

  12. Artificial radionuclides in soil, flora and fauna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marej, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Sources and ways of soil contamination by radionuclides, as well as the main regularities of radionuclide behaviour in soils, are discussed. Ways of radionuclide uptake by plants are discussed in detail, since radionuclide contamination of vegetation, and agricultural plants and pastures in particular, is one of the main factors, determining sanitary value of environmental contamination by radioactive substances

  13. Radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, O.; Ruth, C.; Samanek, M.

    1990-01-01

    The use of radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology is discussed for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial function and perfusion, regional lung perfusion and ventilation, and for measuring central and peripheral hemodynamics. (H.W.). 16 refs

  14. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  15. Radionuclides in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, J.H.; Schmidt, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclides in the Food Chain reviews past experience in meeting the challenge of radionuclide contamination of foodstuffs and water sources and, in the wake of the reactor accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, presents current concepts and programs relating to measurement, surveillance, effects, risk management, evaluation guidelines, and control and regulatory activities. This volume, based on a symposium sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute in association with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, which brought together both radiation experts and food industry policymakers, examines such vital topics as structural problems in large-scale crisis-managment systems; dose assessment from man-made sources; international recommendations on radiation protection; airborne contamination, as well as aquatic and soilborne radionuclides; food-chain contamination from testing nuclear devices; long-term health effects of radionuclides in food and water supplies; and use of mathematical models in risk assessment and management. (orig.)

  16. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  17. Surface diffusion of sorbed radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bond, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Surface diffusion has in the past been invoked to explain rates of radionuclide migration which were greater than those predicted. Results were generally open to interpretation but the possible existence of surface diffusion, whereby sorbed radionuclides could potentially migrate at much enhanced rates, necessitated investigation. In this work through-diffusion experiments have shown that although surface diffusion does exist for some nuclides, the magnitude of the phenomenon is not sufficient to affect repository safety assessment modelling. (author)

  18. Radionuclide generators for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.D.; Molinski, V.J.; Hupf, H.B.; Kramer, H.

    1983-10-01

    This document reviews the chemical literature of those radionuclide generators that have gained or appear to possess utility in medical imaging. The text represents a conscientious effort to peruse the scientific literature through 1980. The intent of this work is to provide a reference point for the investigator who is interested in the development of a particular generator system and the refinements which have been reported. Moreover, the incorporation of the particular daughter radionuclide into a suitable radiodiagnostic agent is presented

  19. Radionuclide migration in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demir, M [Ingenieurgesellschaft Bonnenberg und Drescher, Juelich (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-01-01

    Unplanned releases from a nuclear installation - e.g., leakage from a storage tank or other incident - can result in the escape of contaminants such as U, Pu, Cs, Sr, T etc. Nuclide transport through the ground is governed by characteristics of the subsurface hydrology and the specific nuclides under consideration. Unsaturated soil layers result in a transport rate so low as to negligible. Radionuclides reaching the ground water are assumed to endanger human life because of potential uncontrolled ingestion. The most dangerous nuclides are long-lived and not absorbed, or very poorly absorbed, in the soil. During migration of nuclides through saturated soil layers, the concentration can be reduced by dilution. Preliminary results indicate that tritium is spread with ground water velocity. Its concentration can be reduced only by diffusion, dispersion and radioactive decay. Alpha-emitters are strongly retained velocities of alpha-emitters are approximately one thousandth (10/sup -3/) that of T. Transport velocities of Cs and Sr are approximately one hundreth (10/sup -2/) and one tenth (10/sup -1/) that of T respectively.

  20. Radionuclide migration in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, M.

    1979-01-01

    Unplanned releases from a nuclear installation - e.g., leakage from a storage tank or other incident - can result in the escape of contaminants such as U, Pu, Cs, Sr, T etc. Nuclide transport through the ground is governed by characteristics of the subsurface hydrology and the specific nuclides under consideration. Unsaturated soil layers result in a transport rate so low as to negligible. Radionuclides reaching the ground water are assumed to endanger human life because of potential uncontrolled ingestion. The most dangerous nuclides are long-lived and not absorbed, or very poorly absorbed, in the soil. During migration of nuclides through saturated soil layers, the concentration can be reduced by dilution. Preliminary results indicate that tritium is spread with ground water velocity. Its concentration can be reduced only by diffusion, dispersion and radioactive decay. Alpha-emitters are strongly retained velocities of alpha-emitters are approximately one thousandth (10 -3 ) that of T. Transport velocities of Cs and Sr are approximately one hundreth (10 -2 ) and one tenth (10 -1 ) that of T respectively. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  2. Radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Dayem, H.

    1992-01-01

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  3. Radionuclides migration or isolation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulhoat, P.; Grambow, B.; Simoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    After 20 years of research, the chemical behaviour of actinides and fission products in nuclear waste disposal environments is much better understood. Consistent thermodynamic data have been gathered and allow much more accurate previsions. Through the considerable development of analytical spectroscopy, including time resolved laser fluorescence and X ray absorption, a better understanding of the chemical reactivity (complexation, sorption) of actinides and fission products at a molecular scale has been possible. Chemically reducing conditions are found in most selected disposal host rock formations, generally chosen for their high sorption capacity (clays); such conditions favour the chemical confinement of most radionuclides through precipitation or sorption. Low permeability host rocks participate to this confinement, as convective fluxes are lower than diffusive fluxes. The most recent performance assessment exercises have taken into account the recent progress of knowledge in the chemical evolution of the near field. They show that the dose rates at the outlet are far lower than existing recommendations for normal and most altered evolution scenarios. (authors)

  4. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-01-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific

  5. Radionuclide brain scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Dayem, H

    1993-12-31

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ``allied advances`` with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  6. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  7. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, G.

    2001-01-01

    While it is known that therapeutic effects of radionuclides are due to absorbed radiation dose and to radiosensitivity, individual dosimetry in 'Gy' is practiced rarely in clinical Nuclear Medicine but 'doses' are described in 'mCi' or 'MBq', which is only indirectly related to 'Gy' in the target. To estimate 'Gy', the volume of the target, maximum concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in it and residence time should be assessed individually. These parameters can be obtained usually only with difficulty, involving possibly also quantitative SPET or PET, modern imaging techniques (sonography, CT, MRT), substitution of y- or positron emitting radiotracers for β - emitting radiopharmaceuticals as well as whole-body distribution studies. Residence time can be estimated by obtaining data on biological half-life of a comparable tracer and transfer of these data in the physical characteristics of the therapeutic agent. With all these possibilities for gross dosimetry the establishment of a dose-response-relation should be possible. As distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in lesions is frequently inhomogenous and microdosimetric conditions are difficult to assess in vivo as yet, it could be observed since decades that empirically set, sometimes 'fixed' doses (mCi or MBq) can also be successful in many diseases. Detailed dosimetric studies, however, are work- and cost-intensive. Nevertheless, one should be aware at a time when more sophisticated therapeutic possibilities in Nuclear Medicine arise, that we should try to estimate radiation dose (Gy) in our new methods even as differences in individual radiosensitivity cannot be assessed yet and studies to define individual radiosensitivity in lesions should be encouraged. (author)

  9. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab

  10. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  11. Radionuclide injury to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Sanders, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequently observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. 88 references

  12. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  13. Method of preparing radionuclide doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperus, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of preparing aliquot dosea of a tracer material useful in diagnostic nuclear medicine comprising: storing discrete quantities of a lyophilized radionuclide carrier in separate tubular containers from which air and moisture is excluded, selecting from the tubular containers a container in which is stored a carrier appropriate for a nuclear diagnostic test to be performed, interposing the selected container between the needle and the barrel of a hypodermic syringe, and drawing a predetermined amount of a liquid containing a radionuclide tracer in known concentration into the hypodermic syringe barrel through the hypodermic needle and through the selected container to dissolve the discrete quantity of lyophilized carrier therein to combine the carrier with the radionuclide tracer to form an aliquot dose of nuclear diagnostic tracer material, as needed

  14. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of 223 Ra and 225 Ac, from a radionuclide ''cow'' of 227 Ac or 229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ''cow'' forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ''cow'' from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ''cow''. In one embodiment the radionuclide ''cow'' is the 227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a 227 Th and the product radionuclide is the 223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the 227 Ac and retains the 227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ''cow'' is the 229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a 225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the 225 Ac and the 225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the 229 Th and passes the 225 Ra/Ac. 8 figs

  15. Producing new radionuclides for medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaut, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Arronax cyclotron, a new particle accelerator dedicated to the production of radionuclides for medicine and research has been commissioned in Nantes (France). Because of its unique features: an energy of 70 MeV and an intensity of 750 μA, Arronax will produce radionuclides that can not be produce in present cyclotrons. Among others it will produce Strontium-82 and Germanium-68 that are the precursors for Rubidium-82 and Gallium-68 respectively. 20 per cent of the research works will be dedicated to other domains like radioactive wastes, the radiation biological damage and the radiation damage on electronic devices. (A.C.)

  16. Radionuclide migration in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbreau, A.; Heremans, R.; Skytte Jensen, B.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal into geological formation is based on the capacity of rocks to confine radioactivity for a long period of time. Radionuclide migration from the repository to the environment depends on different mechanisms and phenomena whose two main ones are groundwater flow and the retention and ion-exchange property of rocks. Many studies are underway presently in EEC countries concerning hydrodynamic characteristics of deep geological formations as well as in radionuclide retention capacity and modelling. Important results have already been achieved which show the complexity of some phenomena and further studies shall principally be developed taking into account real conditions of the repository and its environment

  17. Automatic alignment of radionuclide images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    The variability of the position, dimensions and orientation of a radionuclide image within the field of view of a gamma camera hampers attempts to analyse the image numerically. This paper describes a method of using a set of training images of a particular type, in this case right lateral brain images, to define the likely variations in the position, dimensions and orientation for that type of image and to provide alignment data for a program that automatically aligns new images of the specified type to a standard position, size and orientation. Examples are given of the use of this method on three types of radionuclide image. (author)

  18. Radionuclide techniques for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.J.; Moody, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past decade, many of the prime indications for radionuclide brain scanning have become instead indications for CCT, and nuclear medicine studies of the brain have assumed more of a complementary, supportive role. However, there is great promise for improvement in central nervous system radionuclide applications with advances anticipated in both radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation. Nuclear medicine is continuing to function as a powerful research tool and, in the relatively near future, may regain its role as a major clinical test of the central nervous system

  19. Determination of alpha radionuclides in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, L.; Matel, L.; Rosskopfova, O.

    2001-01-01

    In atmospheric water, external water and undercurrent the occurrence of radionuclides is usual. It is an important factor of quality of the environment. Plants ingest radionuclides from water and with they everyone. And it arises radioactivity infest food-chain. Radiotoxicity of this radionuclides is very deer sometimes. The sensitive radiochemical procedures for their determination are necessarily important. The poster presents the combined procedure used at our laboratory for determination of alpha radionuclides in biological samples. (authors)

  20. Study on the immunological and genetic effects induced by internal exposure to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Wang Liuyi; Luan Meiling

    1995-02-01

    The immune system is the important part of defense mechanism in organism. Studies have demonstrated the high radiosensitivity of the immunocytes to internal radionuclide exposure. It is evident that serious functional disturbances and morphological changes of immune organs are induced by internal contamination of radionuclides, including suppression of division and proliferation of immunocytes, induction of irreversible sequelae, leading to injurious effects on both central and peripheral immune organs. In order to study the consequences of the injuries of genetic material caused by internal contamination of radionuclides, researches have developed from the harmful effects on parental generation to those on the offspring. The present paper reports the study on the genetic injuries of somatic and germ cells induced by internal radionuclide exposure. Emphasis is placed on the molecular basis of radio-genetic effect and the relations of the molecular basis of DNA injury to gene mutation and chromosome aberration

  1. Genetic effects of decay by electron capture of radionuclides in yeasts cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracheva, L.M.; Korolev, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Regularities of genetic effect on the yeast cell Saccharomyces cerevisiae, incorporated radionuclides decaying according to the scheme of k-capture- 7 Be, 54 Mn, 85 Sr are studied. It is known that this type of decay models the ionization of internal electron shells of atoms which is most probable when a cell is affected by external ionizing radiation. It is shown that the decay of radionuclides connecting with a DNA molecule in a cell according to the scheme of D-capture brings about a strong lethal effect. The relative mutagenic efficiency is much lower than that for gamma-radiation and many radionuclides decaying according to the scheme of B-decay. In the mutation spectrum induced by these radionuclides the increase in the number of mutations of the reading frame shift type is observed

  2. Naturally occurring radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djujic, I.

    1995-01-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides are the major source of radiation exposure to humans. The principal way of natural radiation exposure is the inhalation of 222 Rn decay products (about 85% of the total). The remainder is equally divided between internally deposited radionuclides, cosmic and terrestrial sources. In the present study, the content of 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th and 238 U in representative food samples (milk, pork, beef, potatoes, wheat and corn flour) and samples of different food items that do not represent entire national production but provide interesting additional data for approximative calculation of naturally occurring radionuclide intake is presented. Daily weight of food eaten, participation of food groups, as well as daily intake by food of mentioned naturally occurring radionuclides in the Serbian diet was obtained on the base of house hold budget surveys. The result obtained for daily intake estimates in mBq for Serbian population are 78.1 ( 40 K), 38.2( 210 Pb), 52.3( 226 Ra), 2.0( 230 Th) and 12.5( 238 U). (author)

  3. 100 Years of radionuclide metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, S.M.; Arnold, D.; Chauvenet, B.; Collé, R.; De Felice, P.; García-Toraño, E.; Wätjen, U.

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of radionuclide metrology at national standards institutes started in 1913 with the certification by Curie, Rutherford and Meyer of the first primary standards of radium. In early years, radium was a valuable commodity and the aim of the standards was largely to facilitate trade. The focus later changed to providing standards for the new wide range of radionuclides, so that radioactivity could be used for healthcare and industrial applications while minimising the risk to patients, workers and the environment. National measurement institutes responded to the changing demands by developing new techniques for realising primary standards of radioactivity. Looking ahead, there are likely to be demands for standards for new radionuclides used in nuclear medicine, an expansion of the scope of the field into quantitative imaging to facilitate accurate patient dosimetry for nuclear medicine, and an increasing need for accurate standards for radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics. - Highlights: • The driving forces for the development of radionuclide metrology. • Radium standards to facilitate trade of this valuable commodity in the early years. • After 1950, focus changes to healthcare and industrial applications. • National Measurement Institutes develop new techniques, standards, and disseminate the best practice in measurement. • Challenges in nuclear medicine, radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics

  4. Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Lehto, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    Written by chemists for chemists, this is a comprehensive guide to the important radionuclides as well as techniques for their separation and analysis. It introduces readers to the important laboratory techniques and methodologies in the field, providing practical instructions on how to handle nuclear waste and radioactivity in the environment.

  5. Radionuclide migration studies in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumo, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    In this work a brief description about retention and migration parameters of radionuclides in soil, including main methods to determine the distribution coefficient (K) are given. Some of several factors that can act on the migration are also mentioned. (author) [pt

  6. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

    1984-09-12

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  7. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  8. Probe Techniques. Introductory Remarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emeleus, K. G. [School of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1968-04-15

    In this brief introduction to the session on probes, the history of theii development is first touched on briefly. Reference is then made to the significance of the work to be described by Medicus, for conductivity and recombination calculations, and by Lam and Su, for a wide range of medium and higher pressure plasmas. Finally, a number of other probe topics are mentioned, including multiple probes; probes in electronegative plasmas; resonance probes; probes in noisy discharges; probes as oscillation detectors; use of probes where space-charge is not negligible. (author)

  9. Status report on radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    At the suggestion of the Federal Minstry of the Interior, in June 1978, a group of scientists from several institutions who are active in the field of radionuclide transfer or are interested in these problems got together. During the discussions of the work team, especially the transfer soil/plants was emphasized. Then the work team set up a status report on the transfer of the radionuclides relevant in the sense of the radiation protection act. The nuclides H 3 and C14, the isotopes of the Sr, J, and Cs, Tc99, the so-called corrosion nuclides Mn54, Fe59, co-isotopes and Zn65, and isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm were regarded as important for a possible radiation exposition. Recent investigations revealed that also the natural radionuclides Ra226, Po210, and Pb210 should be covered by the investigations. The goal of this status report is to present the level of knowledge on the transfer of these radionuclides to man in a brief form, giving hints at the most important literature. It was requested by the Federal Ministry of the Interior, as fas as possible, to indicate transfer factors which are necessary for the radio-occology act to be decreed according to Para. 45 of the radiation protection act. Another goal of the report was to show the gap in the knowledge on the radio nuclide transfer. This was thought to help to create a basis for the decisions of the Federal Ministry concerning the support of other investigation projects in the field of transfer of radionuclides. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of host rocks, secondary minerals, and fluids would affect the transport of radionuclides from a previously proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Minerals in the Yucca Mountain tuffs that are important for retarding radionuclides include clinoptilolite and mordenite (zeolites), clay minerals, and iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides. Water compositions along flow paths beneath Yucca Mountain are controlled by dissolution reactions, silica and calcite precipitation, and ion-exchange reactions. Radionuclide concentrations along flow paths from a repository could be limited by (1) low waste-form dissolution rates, (2) low radionuclide solubility, and (3) radionuclide sorption onto geological media.

  11. Radionuclide transfer from mother to embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toader, M.; Vasilache, R.A.; Scridon, R.; Toader, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The transfer of radionuclides from mother to embryo is still a matter of high interest. Therefore, the relation was investigated between the amount of radionuclides in the embryo and the dietary intake of the mother, this for two scenarios: a recurrent intake of variable amounts of radionuclides, and a long-term intake of a relatively constant amount of radionuclides, the radionuclide being 137 Cs. In the first case, the amount of radionuclides present in the embryo increases with the age of the embryo and with the intake of the mother. In the second case, no correlation could be found between the age of the embryo and its radioactive content; only the correlation between the intake of the mother and the radionuclide content of the embryo remained. (A.K.)

  12. Probe design for expression arrays using OligoWiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Since all measurements from a DNA microarray is dependant on the probes used, a good choice of probes is of vital importa nce when designing custom micro-arrays. This chapter describes how to de sign expression arrays using the “ OligoWiz ” software suite. The general desired features of good...... probes and the issues which probe design must address are introduced and a conceptual (rather than mathematical) description of how OligoWiz scores the quality of th e potential probes is presented. This is followed by a detailed step-by-step guide to designing expression arrays with OligoWiz....

  13. Theory and Application of DNA Histogram Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, Charles Bruce

    The underlying principles and assumptions associated with DNA histograms are discussed along with the characteristics of fluorescent probes. Information theory was described and used to calculate the information content of a DNA histogram. Two major types of DNA histogram analyses are proposed: parametric and nonparametric analysis. Three levels…

  14. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  15. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  16. Choice of radionuclides for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, S.J.; Jungerman, J.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Cole, W.C.; Meares, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    Innumerable questions need to be answered and obstacles overcome before radioimmunotherapy can be generally successful in cancer patients. Major developments have greatly enhanced the likelihood of success. The important development of appropriate radionuclides and radiochemistry for this therapy must be intimately linked with the biological and biochemical realities. All aspects must be considered, such as the specific nature of the antigenic target, the pharmacokinetics of the antibody fragment carrier, the capability of in vivo quantitation of tumor uptake and turnover time, as well as total body kinetics. With this knowledge, then, practical radiochemistry methods can be integrated with the suitable radionuclide choices, and production methods can be developed which will deliver effective and dependable products for patient therapy

  17. Radionuclide transfer in terrestrial animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiGregorio, D.; Kitchings, T.; Van Voris, P.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis of dispersion of radionuclides in terrestrial food chains, generally, is a series of equations identifying the fractional input and outflow rates from trophic level to trophic level. Data that are prerequisite inputs for these food chain transport models include: (1) identification of specific transport pathway, (2) assimilation at each pathway link, and (3) the turnover rate or retention function by successive receptor species in the appropriate food chain. In this report, assimilation coefficients, biological half-lives, and excretion rates for a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species and radionuclides have been compiled from an extensive search of the available literature. Using the information accumulated from the literature, correlations of nuclide metabolism and body weight are also discussed. (author)

  18. Applications of radionuclides in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1955-01-01

    After a brief recall of a few concepts (mass number, charge and beams properties) and the description of used detectors (ionization chamber, Geiger-Mueller counter, scintillation counters), some radionuclides applications are described. In a first part, the well-developed applications are presented in three distinct groups: continuous applications such as β and γ gauges (determination hydrogen content of an hydrocarbon and content of an emulsion; discharge of static electricity), discontinuous applications such as radiography and autoradiography, wear or manufacture problems (distribution of a fungicide on tobacco) and finally, applications in research laboratories such as diffusion, exchange and solubility. It also describes the applications which are still in development such as the action of beams on matter (reticulation and degradation of polymers, monomers polymerisation, cold sterilization). In conclusion, few advices on the opportunity of such applications and the choice of the radionuclides are given. (M.P.)

  19. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palestr, Christopher J.; North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY; Love, Charito

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of 'complicating osteomyelitis' such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose. (author)

  20. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  1. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palestr, Christopher J. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; E-mail: palestro@lij.edu; Love, Charito [North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2007-09-15

    Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of 'complicating osteomyelitis' such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose. (author)

  2. Terrestrial pathways of radionuclide particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, F.W.; Ng, Y.C.

    1981-01-01

    Formulations are developed for computing potential human intake of 13 radionuclides via the terrestrial food chains. The formulations are an extension of the NRC methodology. Specific regional crop and livestock transfer and fractional distribution data from the southern part of the U.S.A. are provided and used in the computation of comparative values with those computed by means of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 formulations. In the development of the model, emphasis was also placed on identifying the various time-delay compartments of the food chains and accounting for all of the activity initially deposited. For all radionuclides considered, except 137 Cs, the new formulations predict lower potential intakes from the total of all food chains combined than do the comparable Regulatory Guide formulations by as much as a factor of 40. For 137 Cs the new formulations predict 10% higher potential intakes. (author)

  3. Radionuclide cinematography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.E.; Sigel, H.; Geffers, H.; Bitter, F.; Meyer, G.; Kampmann, H.; Stauch, M.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclide cinematography is described as a procedure making use of radiation-level variations above the heart after equipartitioning of sup(99m)Tc-labelled human serum albumin in the blood pool. Regional ventricular and vestibular variations are phase-shifted. This procedure permits delineation of aneurysmas with interphasic course, cicatrization of the cardiac wall not producing any cyclical variation. The study included normal subjects and 16 patients with full course infarction. Characteristic disturbances of motility distribution were found in all cases of scarred or aneurysmic alterations in the frontal and side walls of the left ventricle. The procedure was unable to detect two small infarction scars on the rear wall. The possibility of using radionuclide cinematography to prove coronary insufficiency as well as a comparison with other methods are discussed

  4. Radionuclide 252Cf neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolevatov, Yu.I.; Trykov, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of radionuclide neutron sourses of 252 Cf base with the activity from 10 6 to 10 9 n/s have been investigated. Energetic distributions of neutrons and gamma-radiation have been presented. The results obtained have been compared with other data available. The hardness parameter of the neutron spectrum for the energy range from 3 to 15 MeV is 1.4 +- 0.02 MeV

  5. Radionuclide diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, J.J.; Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL

    1980-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum can be detected with a high degree of accuracy by radionuclide scintigraphy using technetium-99m pertechnetate. The technique is without risk and should precede roentgenographic studies when the diagnosis is suspected. The method is described and the causes for false positive and false negative examinations are discussed. False negatives are rare and false positives are usually secondary to other surgical entities. Overall accuracy is 85 to 90%. (orig.) [de

  6. Radionuclides for therapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, H.; Noelpp, U.; Triller, K.J.; Steffen, R.

    1986-01-01

    Progress in angiographic techniques has been a gradual evolutionary development which now permits the selective and superselective access to a tumor's vascular bed. A diagnostic angiographic procedure can be supplemented by a one-step, quick application of embolizing radioactive material. This endoarterial radionuclide embolizing tumor therapy has the maximum selectivity among radiotherapeutic methods, with the highest radiation doses to the tumor and neglectible exposure of normal tissue. Spread of radioactivity by diffusion or leaching can be prevented

  7. Radionuclide dispersion in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Amorim, E.S. do; Panetta, J.

    1979-05-01

    The instantaneous liberation of radionuclides in the atmosphere is studied in three dimensions, according to the formalism of the diffusion theory. The analytical solution, expose to gravitational and an atmospherical effects, is combined with the discretization of space and time in the calculation of levels of exposure. A typical inventory (for a PWR) was considered in the calculation of immersion doses, and the results permitted a comparative analysis among the different existing models. (Author) [pt

  8. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  9. Radionuclide evaluation of renal transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong; Zhao Deshan

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide renal imaging and plasma clearance methods can quickly quantitate renal blood flow and function in renal transplants. They can diagnose acute tubular necrosis and rejection, renal scar, surgical complications such as urine leaks, obstruction and renal artery stenosis after renal transplants. At the same time they can assess the therapy effect of renal transplant complications and can also predict renal transplant survival from early post-operative function studies

  10. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs

  11. Radionuclide daughter inventory generator code: DIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Sharp, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The Daughter Inventory Generator (DIG) code accepts a tabulation of radionuclide initially present in a waste stream, specified as amounts present either by mass or by activity, and produces a tabulation of radionuclides present after a user-specified elapsed time. This resultant radionuclide inventory characterizes wastes that have undergone daughter ingrowth during subsequent processes, such as leaching and transport, and includes daughter radionuclides that should be considered in these subsequent processes or for inclusion in a pollutant source term. Output of the DIG code also summarizes radionuclide decay constants. The DIG code was developed specifically to assist the user of the PRESTO-II methodology and code in preparing data sets and accounting for possible daughter ingrowth in wastes buried in shallow-land disposal areas. The DIG code is also useful in preparing data sets for the PRESTO-EPA code. Daughter ingrowth in buried radionuclides and in radionuclides that have been leached from the wastes and are undergoing hydrologic transport are considered, and the quantities of daughter radionuclide are calculated. Radionuclide decay constants generated by DIG and included in the DIG output are required in the PRESTO-II code input data set. The DIG accesses some subroutines written for use with the CRRIS system and accesses files containing radionuclide data compiled by D.C. Kocher. 11 refs

  12. Radionuclide migration test using undisturbed aerated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Ohtsuka, Yoshiro; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1988-01-01

    As one of the most important part of safety assessment on the shallow land disposal of lowlevel radioactive waste, the radionuclide migration was studied using undisturbed soil samples, in order to evaluate an exact radionuclide migration in an aerated soil layer. Soil samples used in the migration test were coastal sand and loamy soil which form typical surface soil layers in Japan. The aqueous solution containing 60 CoCl 2 , 85 SrCl 2 and 137 CsCl was fed into the soil column and concentration of each radionuclide both in effluent and in soil was measured. Large amount of radionuclides was adsorbed on the surface of soil column and small amount of radionuclides moved deep into the soil column. Difference in the radionuclide profile was observed in the low concentration portion particularly. It is that some fractions of 60 Co and 137 Cs are stable in non-ionic form and move downward through the soil column together with water. The radionuclide distribution in the surface of soil column can be fairly predicted with a conventional migration equation for ionic radionuclides. As a result of radionuclide adsorption, both aerated soil layers of coastal sand and loamy soil have large barrier ability on the radionuclide migration through the ground. (author)

  13. Metabolism of radionuclides in domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, E.; Leising, C.

    1986-01-01

    The reactor accident at Chernobyl has shown that shortly after the contamination of the environment radionuclides can be found in animal products. The main contamination pathways of domestic animas are: uptake of radionuclides by foodstuffs; uptake of radionuclides by contaminated drinking water; uptake of radionuclides by inhalation; uptake of radionuclides through skin; uptake of radionuclides by ingestion of soil particles. Generally the uptake of radionuclides by food is the dominant exposure pathway. In rare cases the inhalation of radionuclides or the uptake by drinking water may be of importance. The metabolism of incorporated radionuclides is comparable to the respective metabolism of essential mass or trace elements or heavy metals. Radioisotopes of essential elements are for instance iron 55, manganese 54, cobalt 58 and cobalt 60. Other elements are typical antagonists to essential elements, e.g. strontium 90 is an antagonist to calcium or cesium 137 to potassium. Lead 210 and plutonium 239 behave similarly as heavy metals. Generally the knowledge of the metabolism of trace and mass elements, of antagonistic and synergistic elements and heavy metals can be applied to these radionuclides

  14. Dendrimer-based biosensor for chemiluminescent detection of DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Hun, X.; Qing, H.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a highly sensitive chemiluminescent (CL) biosensor for the sequence-specific detection of DNA using a novel bio barcode DNA probe modified with gold nanoparticles that were covered with a dendrimer. The modified probe is composed of gold nanoparticles, a dendrimer, the CL reagent, and the DNA. The capture probe DNA was immobilized on magnetic beads covered with gold. It first hybridizes with the target DNA and then with one terminal end of the signal DNA on the barcoded DNA probe. CL was generated by adding H 2 O 2 and Co(II) ions as the catalyst. The immobilization of dendrimer onto the gold nanoparticles can significantly enhance sensitivity and gives a detection limit of 6 fmol L -1 of target DNA. (author)

  15. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lane A.; Ryan, Jack L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

  16. Phytoremediation of radionuclides: an emerging alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shraddha

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of nuclear power industry, nuclear weapon testing, dismantling of existing nuclear weapons and occasional accidents have contributed to an enhancement in the level of radionuclides in the environment. The radionuclides due to their long half life and transfer through the food chain effect adversely to normal biological systems. Hence, it is essential to effectively remove the radionuclides from contaminated soils and solutions. Phytoremediation - the use of plants for remediation of toxic metals and radionuclides has been recognized as an aesthetically pleasing, low cost and environment friendly in situ method. Phytoremediation is an umbrella term which covers several plant based approaches. Plants have shown the potential of remediation of these radionuclides from spiked solutions, low level nuclear waste and soil. Various aspects of phytoremediation as well as potential of various plants for remediation of radionuclides will be discussed here. (author)

  17. Radionuclide transport processes in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    Some major principles and the status of knowledge concerning the transport of radionuclides through terrestrial ecosystems are reviewed. Fundamental processes which control the flow of radionuclides between ecosystem components such as air, soil, plants, and animals are described, with emphasis on deposition, resuspension, plant uptake, ingestion, and assimilation. Properties of radionuclides, organisms, and ecosystems are examined in relation to their influence on the accumulation of radioactive materials by plants and animals. The effects of the physicochemical nature of the radionuclide; morphology, physiology, and behavior of the organism; and soil, nutrient, and trophic characteristics of the ecosystem are highlighted. Observations in natural ecosystems on radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 131 I, 3 H, and 239 Pu are used to illustrate current concepts. An assessment of the degree to which the processes controlling radionuclide behavior are understood and of our ability to simulate and predict such behavior with computerized models is offered. Finally, brief comments are made on research needs

  18. Radionuclides in the study of marine processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, P.J.; Woodhead, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, the radioactive properties of the naturally occurring radionuclides have been used to determine their distributions in the marine environment and, more generally, to gain an understanding of the dynamic processes which control their behaviour in attaining these distributions. More recently the inputs from human activities of both natural and artificial (i.e. man-made) radionuclides have provided additional opportunities for the study of marine processes on local, regional and global scales. The primary objective of the symposium is to provide a forum for an open discussion of the insights concerning processes in the marine environment which can be gained from studies of radionuclide behaviour. Papers have been grouped within the following principal themes; the uses of radionuclides as tracers of water transport; scavenging and particulate transport processes in the oceans as deduced from radionuclide behaviour; processes in the seabed and radionuclides in biological systems. (Author)

  19. Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S.; Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R.

    1994-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., 60 Co and 106 Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters

  20. Genotoxic endpoints in the earthworms sub-lethal assay to evaluate natural soils contaminated by metals and radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenco, Joana I., E-mail: joanalourenco@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth O., E-mail: ruthp@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Silva, Ana C., E-mail: ana.cmj@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Morgado, Jose M., E-mail: jmtmorgado@gmail.com [Centro de Histocompatibilidade do Centro, Praceta Prof. Mota Pinto, Edificio S. Jeronimo, 4o piso, Apartado 9041, 3001-301 Coimbra (Portugal); Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: fernando.carvalho@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Oliveira, Joao M., E-mail: joaomota@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Malta, Margarida P., E-mail: margm@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Paiva, Artur A., E-mail: apaiva@histocentro.min-saude.pt [Centro de Histocompatibilidade do Centro, Praceta Prof. Mota Pinto, Edificio S. Jeronimo, 4o piso, Apartado 9041, 3001-301 Coimbra (Portugal); Mendo, Sonia A., E-mail: smendo@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Goncalves, Fernando J., E-mail: fjmg@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-02-15

    Eisenia andrei was exposed, for 56 days, to a contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine and to the natural reference soil LUFA 2.2. The organisms were sampled after 0, 1, 2, 7, 14 and 56 days of exposure, to assess metals bioaccumulation, coelomocytes DNA integrity and cytotoxicity. Radionuclides bioaccumulation and growth were also determined at 0 h, 14 and 56 days of exposure. Results have shown the bioaccumulation of metals and radionuclides, as well as, growth reduction, DNA damages and cytotoxicity in earthworms exposed to contaminated soil. The usefulness of the comet assay and flow cytometry, to evaluate the toxicity of contaminants such as metals and radionuclides in earthworms are herein reported. We also demonstrated that DNA strand breakage and immune cells frequency are important endpoints to be employed in the earthworm reproduction assay, for the evaluation of soil geno and cytotoxicity, as part of the risk assessment of contaminated areas. This is the first study that integrates DNA damage and cytotoxicity evaluation, growth and bioaccumulation of metals and radionuclides in a sub lethal assay, for earthworms exposed to soil contaminated with metals and radionuclides.

  1. Genotoxic endpoints in the earthworms sub-lethal assay to evaluate natural soils contaminated by metals and radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenco, Joana I.; Pereira, Ruth O.; Silva, Ana C.; Morgado, Jose M.; Carvalho, Fernando P.; Oliveira, Joao M.; Malta, Margarida P.; Paiva, Artur A.; Mendo, Sonia A.; Goncalves, Fernando J.

    2011-01-01

    Eisenia andrei was exposed, for 56 days, to a contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine and to the natural reference soil LUFA 2.2. The organisms were sampled after 0, 1, 2, 7, 14 and 56 days of exposure, to assess metals bioaccumulation, coelomocytes DNA integrity and cytotoxicity. Radionuclides bioaccumulation and growth were also determined at 0 h, 14 and 56 days of exposure. Results have shown the bioaccumulation of metals and radionuclides, as well as, growth reduction, DNA damages and cytotoxicity in earthworms exposed to contaminated soil. The usefulness of the comet assay and flow cytometry, to evaluate the toxicity of contaminants such as metals and radionuclides in earthworms are herein reported. We also demonstrated that DNA strand breakage and immune cells frequency are important endpoints to be employed in the earthworm reproduction assay, for the evaluation of soil geno and cytotoxicity, as part of the risk assessment of contaminated areas. This is the first study that integrates DNA damage and cytotoxicity evaluation, growth and bioaccumulation of metals and radionuclides in a sub lethal assay, for earthworms exposed to soil contaminated with metals and radionuclides.

  2. Production of radionuclides with generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khujaev, S.; Egamediev, S.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The radionuclide generator provides a convenient means for researchers and clinicians to obtain a source of radionuclides without dependence on nuclear facilities (nuclear reactor or cyclotron). It should be noted that radionuclide generator technique yields products of very high purity and it offers moreover the only possible way of obtaining very short-lived radionuclides for practical applications. Therefore at present radionuclide generators have found important uses in nuclear medicine. This talk reviews the development of preparation methods for radionuclide generators of current interest: 99 Mo- 99m Tc, 188 W- 188 Re and 68 Ge- 68 Ga. 99 Mo- 99m Tc generator. 99m Tc is presently the most widely used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The reason for such a preeminent position of 99m Tc in clinical uses is its extremely favorable nuclear properties with γ-energy of 140 keV and short half-life of 6 hours. Chromatographic generator of 99 Mo- 99m Tc based on aluminium oxide using as eluent of isotonic saline solution, containing nitrate-ions has been produced in INP AS RU. However, the main disadvantage of this generator is that the eluent-saline solution contains some amount of nitrate-ions. Nitrate-ions added to maximize and stabilize 99m Tc yields would interfere with the chemical reactions which involve Sn(II) reduction of the pertechnetate ion and which are used subsequently in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. Therefore we proposed the new method for preliminary treatment of aluminium oxide by the external gamma (Co-60) irradiation. It is found that the aluminium oxide has got electron-acceptor properties after gamma-irradiation. Adsorption of 99 Mo radionuclide as isopolymolybdate on gamma-irradiated aluminium oxide is very high and molybdenum is firmly retained. Adsorption capacity of gamma-irradiated aluminium oxide at pH 2-4 is 60-80 mg Mo per gram of Al 2 O 3 . The yields of 99m Tc from experimental generators remained high

  3. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  4. DKPRO: A radionuclide decay and reprocessing code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, D.; Schmittroth, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    The DKPRO code solves the general problem of modeling complex nuclear wastes streams using ORIGEN2 radionuclide production files. There is a continuing need for estimates of Hanford radionuclides. Physical measurements are one basis; calculational estimates, the approach represented here, are another. Given a known nuclear fuel history, it is relatively straightforward to calculate radionuclide inventories with codes such as the widely-used Oak Ridge National Laboratory code ORIGEN2

  5. Radionuclide usage survey 1979-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.J.

    1980-08-01

    Details of a survey by the Life Sciences Working Group of the International Committee for Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM) on radionuclide usage by medical physicists in 11 countries are presented. The results indicate that the radionuclide which will be of most significance in the future will be F-18, Fe-52, Ga-67, Ga-68, Kr-81m, Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, Xe-127 and Tl-201, (U.K.)

  6. Preparation of porous materials for radionuclides capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajzikova, Anna; Smrcek, Stanislav; Kozempel, Jan; Vlk, Martin; Barta, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Porous materials showing promise for radionuclide capture from water at contaminated sites were prepared. Nanoporous materials (size of pores 1-100 nm) and some polymers are well suited to this purpose owing their affinity for selected radionuclides. Nanoporous metal oxides and silica gel with styrene-divinylbenzene-TODGA-modified surface were prepared, characterized and tested for radionuclide ( 227 Ac, 227 Th, 223 Ra) capture efficiency. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of five DNA quantification methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hedman, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Six commercial preparations of human genomic DNA were quantified using five quantification methods: UV spectrometry, SYBR-Green dye staining, slot blot hybridization with the probe D17Z1, Quantifiler Human DNA Quantification kit and RB1 rt-PCR. All methods measured higher DNA concentrations than...... Quantification kit in two experiments. The measured DNA concentrations with Quantifiler were 125 and 160% higher than expected based on the manufacturers' information. When the Quantifiler human DNA standard (Raji cell line) was replaced by the commercial human DNA preparation G147A (Promega) to generate the DNA...... standard curve in the Quantifiler Human DNA Quantification kit, the DNA quantification results of the human DNA preparations were 31% higher than expected based on the manufacturers' information. The results indicate a calibration problem with the Quantifiler human DNA standard for its use...

  8. Environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.

    1982-01-01

    The environmental behaviour of the radionuclides making the major contribution to man's irradiation through diet is described. The following stages are emphasized: transfer of radionuclides to plants; transfer of radionuclides to animals; metabolism of inhaled or ingested radionuclides in animals providing food for man; transfer of radionuclides through the aquatic environment; application of food chain models. (43 references)

  9. Radionuclide accumulation peculiarities demonstrated by vegetable varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruk, A.V.; Goncharenko, G.G.; Kilchevsky, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on ecological and genetic aspects of radionuclide accumulation demonstrated by a number of vegetable varieties. The researches resulted in determining the cabbage varieties which were characterised by the minimal level of radionuclide accumulation. It was shown that the above varieties manifested the relation between radionuclide accumulation and morphobiological characteristics such as vegetation period duration and yield criteria. The study specified the genotypes with high ecological stability as regards to radionuclide accumulation: 'Beloruskaya 85' cabbage and 'Dokhodny' tomato showed the best response to Cs 137, while 'Beloruskaya 85', 'Rusinovka', 'Amager 611' cabbage varieties and 'Sprint' tomato showed the minimal level of Sr 90 accumulation. (authors)

  10. Therapy for incorporated radionuclides: scope and need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, V.H.

    1981-03-01

    In the United States the recent termination of funding for research on therapy for incorporated radionuclides has virtually halted progress on improved or new agents and procedures for removing radioactivity from the body. Research was eliminated, but is still needed on new removal agents, improved delivery system, in vitro test systems, and the toxicology of treatments. For many radionuclides, no adequate therapy exists. The relationship between radionuclide removal and reduction in cancer risk is still unanswered. Without proper research support, needed improvements in the treatment for incorporated radionuclides in the US are uncertain

  11. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Yazbi, Amira F.; Loppnow, Glen R.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay for positive detection of DNA damage. •Recognition of undamaged DNA via hybridization to a hairpin probe. •Terbium(III) fluorescence reports the amount of damage by binding to ssDNA. •Tb/hairpin is a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probe for DNA damage. -- Abstract: Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb 3+ ). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb 3+ emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb 3+ /hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb 3+ , producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb 3+ /hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb 3+ /hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36 ± 1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage

  12. Radionuclide transport through heteogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadermann, J.

    1980-01-01

    One-dimensional radionuclide migration for conevective water transport with sorption and longitudinal dispersion is investigated. A semianalytic solution for layered media with piecewise constant parametes can be written when taking into account mass conservation and approximate flux conservation at interlayer boundaries. The solution is analytic in the first layer and allows for a recursive calculation in the following layers. Scaling laws for the relevant parameters can be formulated. Numerical examples exhibit the importance of at least a single highly sorbing layer. Small values of dispersivity may not lead to a conservative estimate of conservation at the geological column's end

  13. Radionuclide transfer to meadow vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, N.; Matsko, N.; Zhebrakova, I.; Montik, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the paper results of radioecological monitoring of natural plant populations in the 30 km zone of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Polesky State Radioecological Reserve) during the period from 1987 to 1998 are presented. The level of radiation background in experimental areas varied from 0.1 to 30 mR/h that correspond to the total soil activity of 300-24000 kBq/m 2 (for May 1997). Monitoring was carried out including the radionuclide migration in natural plant complexes and transfer of 137 Cs between some plant organs. Refs. 3 (author)

  14. Dosimetry of incorporated transuranic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loessner, V.

    1983-01-01

    Modern in vivo and in vitro techniques for detecting transuranic radionuclides within the human body are described with special emphasis on multiparameter measuring methods developed at the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection. Furthermore, problems related to calibration and interpretation of measuring data are discussed and new methods presented for the calculation of committed dose equivalents on the basis of data from ICRP Publication 30. Also included is an introductory chapter on radiobiological fundamentals of intake, translocation and metabolism of these nuclides. (author)

  15. Dietary intake of natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Briggs, J L; Bradley, E J [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (UK)

    1984-09-01

    The levels of the natural radionuclides, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 were measured in food samples collected for a National Food Survey, thus reflecting current consumption patterns in the UK. Daily intakes of radium-226, lead-210 and inferred values of polonium-210 were calculated for 20 food groups. From these data, the annual effective dose equivalents from radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 in the UK diet were estimated to be 3..mu..Sv, 41..mu..Sv and 13..mu..Sv respectively.

  16. Dietary intake of natural radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith-Briggs, J.L.; Bradley, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    The levels of the natural radionuclides, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 were measured in food samples collected for a National Food Survey, thus reflecting current consumption patterns in the UK. Daily intakes of radium-226, lead-210 and inferred values of polonium-210 were calculated for 20 food groups. From these data, the annual effective dose equivalents from radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 in the UK diet were estimated to be 3μSv, 41μSv and 13μSv respectively. (U.K.)

  17. Enhanced peptide nucleic acid binding to supercoiled DNA: possible implications for DNA "breathing" dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, T; Nielsen, Peter E.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of DNA topology on peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding was studied. Formation of sequence-specific PNA2/dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) complexes was monitored by a potassium permanganate probing/primer extension assay. At low ionic strengths, the binding of PNA was 2-3 times more...

  18. Intrinsically radiolabelled [59Fe]-SPIONs for dual MRI/radionuclide detection

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, David; Sun, Minghao; Yang, Likun; McDonagh, Philip R; Corwin, Frank; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Wang, Li; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Thadigiri, Celina; Lamichhane, Narottam; Zweit, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Towards the development of iron oxide nanoparticles with intrinsically incorporated radionuclides for dual Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) and more recently of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (SPECT/MRI), we have developed intrinsically radiolabeled [59Fe]-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles ([59Fe]-SPIONs) as a proof of concept for an intrinsic dual probe strategy. 59Fe was incorporated into Fe3O4 nanoparticle cry...

  19. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Park, Hyun Soo

    2003-04-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. This project is composed of 6 subjects such as data production required for safety assessments, sorption properties and mechanisms, nuclide migration in the fractured rock, colloid formation and migration, nuclide speciation in deep geological environments, and total evaluation of geochemical behaviors considering multi-factors. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  20. Miscellaneous applications of radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.; Freeman, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    The procedures discussed in this chapter are either developmental, in limited clinical use, or frankly moribund. A number of radionuclide imaging techniques have proved disappointing when approached from a purely anatomic point of view. This is particularly evident to our colleagues with the explosive growth of the noninvasive imaging procedures, magnetic resonance imaging (NMR), CT, and ultrasound, and the introduction of the less invasive digital radiographic approach to vascular opacification, all of which are capable of providing exquisite anatomic or tissue detail beyond the reach of current or reasonably priced nuclear medicine imaging systems. Yet, most nuclear medicine procedures possess the unique advantage of portraying a physiologic function without interfering with that function. Moreover, the procedures can be employed under conditions of stress, which are likely to bring out pathophysiologic abnormalities that remain masked when unchallenged. Information concerning form without functional data has less meaning than both together. The physiologic information inherent in nuclear medicine imaging may often provide not only key diagnostic information but also illuminate a therapeutic trail. Yet, it is often slighted in favor of the anatomic quest. While mastery of the nuances of imaging details remains critical, radionuclide image interpretation must rest upon a firm physiologic foundation. For this reason, this chapter emphasizes the physiologic approach