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Sample records for radiologists examine simple

  1. Examinations for radiologists. 1250 examination questions, with comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albes, G.

    2007-01-01

    The first section presents self-tests and learning tips for a realistic assessment and optimisation of students' learning styles. Rhetoric and communicative competences are looked into, and hints are given on how to organize ones's documents. The second section contains more than 1250 examination questions from all fields of radiology, with which examination situations can be simulated for self-studies. The student is shown how to provide structured answers to complex questions, how to solve clinical problems step by step, how to assess facts, to develop key statements, etc. (orig.)

  2. Frequency of recommendations for additional imaging in diagnostic ultrasound examinations: Evaluation of radiologist, technologist, and other examination-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Nathaniel E; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Babb, James S; Macari, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate the effect of the radiologist, technologist, and other examination-related factors on the frequency of recommendations for additional imaging (RAI) during sonographic (US) interpretation. We retrospectively reviewed 719 US reports from a single academic medical center for the presence of RAI. All studies had been interpreted by one of three abdominal radiologists. Examinations were performed at an outpatient radiology facility with no onsite radiologist (n = 299) or at an inpatient emergency department or hospital-based outpatient setting that had an onsite radiologist (n = 420). Possible associations between the frequency of RAI and the presence of an onsite radiologist, location of the examination, body part or region imaged, patient age, technologist performing the exam, and radiologist reading the exam were evaluated. There were significant differences between each pair of radiologists in terms of overall frequency of RAI (p technologists (13.6%-40.0%, p = 0.03). However, other factors such as patient age, patient sex, US unit, patient location, and radiologist location were not associated with the frequency of RAI (p = 0.15-0.93). The individual radiologist and technologist influenced the frequency of RAI for US examinations, whereas other examination-related factors did not. The observed substantial variability in RAI between radiologists and technologists warrants further study, with consideration of strategies to optimize RAI within US reports. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Observer agreement in the reporting of knee and lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations: Selectively trained MR radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brealey, S., E-mail: stephen.brealey@york.ac.uk [Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Piper, K., E-mail: keith.piper@canterbury.ac.uk [Department of Allied Health Professions, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU (United Kingdom); King, D., E-mail: david.g.king@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Bland, M., E-mail: martin.bland@york.ac.uk [Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Caddick, J., E-mail: Julie.Caddick@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Campbell, P., E-mail: peter.campbell@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Gibbon, A., E-mail: anthony.j.gibbon@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Highland, A., E-mail: Adrian.Highland@sth.nhs.uk [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Herries Road, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom); Jenkins, N., E-mail: neil.jenkins@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Petty, D., E-mail: daniel.petty@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Warren, D., E-mail: david.warren@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess agreement between trained radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist when reporting on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the knee and lumbar spine and to examine the subsequent effect of discordant reports on patient management and outcome. Methods: At York Hospital two MR radiographers, two consultant radiologists and an index radiologist reported on a prospective, random sample of 326 MRI examinations. The radiographers reported in clinical practice conditions and the radiologists during clinical practice. An independent consultant radiologist compared these reports with the index radiologist report for agreement. Orthopaedic surgeons then assessed whether the discordance between reports was clinically important. Results: Overall observer agreement with the index radiologist was comparable between observers and ranged from 54% to 58%; for the knee it was 46–57% and for the lumbar spine was 56–66%. There was a very small observed difference of 0.6% (95% CI −11.9 to 13.0) in mean agreement between the radiographers and radiologists (P = 0.860). For the knee, lumbar spine and overall, radiographers’ discordant reports, when compared with the index radiologist, were less likely to have a clinically important effect on patient outcome than the radiologists’ discordant reports. Less than 10% of observer's reports were sufficiently discordant with the index radiologist's reports to be clinically important. Conclusion: Carefully selected MR radiographers with postgraduate education and training reported in clinical practice conditions on specific MRI examinations of the knee and lumbar spine to a level of agreement comparable with non-musculoskeletal consultant radiologists.

  4. Observer agreement in the reporting of knee and lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations: Selectively trained MR radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brealey, S.; Piper, K.; King, D.; Bland, M.; Caddick, J.; Campbell, P.; Gibbon, A.; Highland, A.; Jenkins, N.; Petty, D.; Warren, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess agreement between trained radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist when reporting on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the knee and lumbar spine and to examine the subsequent effect of discordant reports on patient management and outcome. Methods: At York Hospital two MR radiographers, two consultant radiologists and an index radiologist reported on a prospective, random sample of 326 MRI examinations. The radiographers reported in clinical practice conditions and the radiologists during clinical practice. An independent consultant radiologist compared these reports with the index radiologist report for agreement. Orthopaedic surgeons then assessed whether the discordance between reports was clinically important. Results: Overall observer agreement with the index radiologist was comparable between observers and ranged from 54% to 58%; for the knee it was 46–57% and for the lumbar spine was 56–66%. There was a very small observed difference of 0.6% (95% CI −11.9 to 13.0) in mean agreement between the radiographers and radiologists (P = 0.860). For the knee, lumbar spine and overall, radiographers’ discordant reports, when compared with the index radiologist, were less likely to have a clinically important effect on patient outcome than the radiologists’ discordant reports. Less than 10% of observer's reports were sufficiently discordant with the index radiologist's reports to be clinically important. Conclusion: Carefully selected MR radiographers with postgraduate education and training reported in clinical practice conditions on specific MRI examinations of the knee and lumbar spine to a level of agreement comparable with non-musculoskeletal consultant radiologists

  5. Radiologists' knowledge and perceptions of the impact of contrast-induced nephropathy and its risk factors when performing computed tomography examinations: A survey of European radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddan, Donal; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The past decade has seen a proliferation in the number of CT procedures. As increasing numbers of elderly patients with multiple comorbidities undergo contrast media (CM)-enhanced procedures, more patients are at risk for contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Objectives: To understand whether radiologists are sufficiently aware of the incidence, impact and risk factors of CIN, and whether they are taking sufficient measures to prevent CIN among patients undergoing CT. Materials and methods: A telephone or online survey was conducted in 2005 with 509 radiologists from 10 European countries. Participants had a minimum of 3 years' experience and performed at least 50 CT scans per week. Results: Most (88%) radiologists believed that CIN is an important issue. While 45% identify that a patient is experiencing CIN when the serum creatinine level increases >25% (0.5 mg/dL) from baseline within 48 h, the remainder used criteria that might lead to significant under-diagnosis. Most (72%) radiologists believed that CIN is associated with increased morbidity; 56% did not believe that it is associated with increased mortality. Most respondents agreed that pre-existing renal impairment (97%), dehydration (90%) and diabetes (89%) were risk factors for CIN; however, 26%, 30% and 46%, respectively, did not identify advanced age, CM dose or congestive cardiac failure as risk factors. Only 7% of radiologists thought they were always made aware of CIN associated with their cases and 28% never consulted a nephrologist to discuss patients at risk of CIN or who had developed CIN. Conclusion: There is highly variable awareness of the definition, impact and risk factors for CIN among European radiologists. Data regarding the importance of CIN in CT are limited. Improved efforts are required to better educate radiologists and referring physicians and to institute appropriate protocols to identify at-risk patients and prevent CIN

  6. Radiologists' knowledge and perceptions of the impact of contrast-induced nephropathy and its risk factors when performing computed tomography examinations: A survey of European radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddan, Donal [University College Galway Hospitals, Unit 7, Merlin Park Hospital, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: donal.reddan@mailn.hse.ie; Fishman, Elliot K. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Background: The past decade has seen a proliferation in the number of CT procedures. As increasing numbers of elderly patients with multiple comorbidities undergo contrast media (CM)-enhanced procedures, more patients are at risk for contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Objectives: To understand whether radiologists are sufficiently aware of the incidence, impact and risk factors of CIN, and whether they are taking sufficient measures to prevent CIN among patients undergoing CT. Materials and methods: A telephone or online survey was conducted in 2005 with 509 radiologists from 10 European countries. Participants had a minimum of 3 years' experience and performed at least 50 CT scans per week. Results: Most (88%) radiologists believed that CIN is an important issue. While 45% identify that a patient is experiencing CIN when the serum creatinine level increases >25% (0.5 mg/dL) from baseline within 48 h, the remainder used criteria that might lead to significant under-diagnosis. Most (72%) radiologists believed that CIN is associated with increased morbidity; 56% did not believe that it is associated with increased mortality. Most respondents agreed that pre-existing renal impairment (97%), dehydration (90%) and diabetes (89%) were risk factors for CIN; however, 26%, 30% and 46%, respectively, did not identify advanced age, CM dose or congestive cardiac failure as risk factors. Only 7% of radiologists thought they were always made aware of CIN associated with their cases and 28% never consulted a nephrologist to discuss patients at risk of CIN or who had developed CIN. Conclusion: There is highly variable awareness of the definition, impact and risk factors for CIN among European radiologists. Data regarding the importance of CIN in CT are limited. Improved efforts are required to better educate radiologists and referring physicians and to institute appropriate protocols to identify at-risk patients and prevent CIN.

  7. Requesting diagnostic imaging examinations: a position paper of the Canadian Association of Radiologists. Special article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolberg, H.O.; Hynes, D.M.; Rainbow, A.J.; Moran, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The present document is directed at physicians who request diagnostic imaging examinations. Many of the imaging examinations currently requested are not useful in managing clinical problems. The intention is to provide general guidelines for the prescription of appropriate imaging examinations. This document does not address the use of specific imaging modalities in particular clinical situations. The purpose is to help doctors make the best use of the imaging examination by providing general guidelines to assist in deciding upon the most appropriate situation in which to use the examination. Similar guidelines for the prescription of diagnostic x-ray examinations have been suggested previously. (author). 19 refs.,

  8. Second-opinion interpretations of gynecologic oncologic MRI examinations by sub-specialized radiologists influence patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhman, Yulia; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Sosa, Ramon E.; Hricak, Hedvig; Sala, Evis; D'Anastasi, Melvin; Micco, Maura; Scelzo, Chiara; Nougaret, Stephanie; Chi, Dennis S.; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R.

    2016-01-01

    To determine if second-opinion review of gynaecologic oncologic (GynOnc) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by sub-specialized radiologists impacts patient care. 469 second-opinion MRI interpretations rendered by GynOnc radiologists were retrospectively compared to the initial outside reports. Two gynaecologic surgeons, blinded to the reports' origins, reviewed all cases with discrepancies between initial and second-opinion MRI reports and recorded whether these discrepancies would have led to a change in patient management defined as a change in treatment approach, counselling, or referral. Histopathology or minimum 6-month imaging follow-up were used to establish the diagnosis. Second-opinion review of GynOnc MRIs would theoretically have affected management in 94/469 (20 %) and 101/469 (21.5 %) patients for surgeons 1 and 2, respectively. Specifically, second-opinion review would have theoretically altered treatment approach in 71/469 (15.1 %) and 60/469 (12.8 %) patients for surgeons 1 and 2, respectively. According to surgeons 1 and 2, these treatment changes would have prevented unnecessary surgery in 35 (7.5 %) and 31 (6.6 %) patients, respectively, and changed surgical procedure type/extent in 19 (4.1 %) and 12 (2.5 %) patients, respectively. Second-opinion interpretations were correct in 103 (83 %) of 124 cases with clinically relevant discrepancies between initial and second-opinion reports. Expert second-opinion review of GynOnc MRI influences patient care. (orig.)

  9. Radiologists' responses to inadequate referrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Hofmann, Bjoern Morten; Espeland, Ansgar

    2010-01-01

    To investigate radiologists' responses to inadequate imaging referrals. A survey was mailed to Norwegian radiologists; 69% responded. They graded the frequencies of actions related to referrals with ambiguous indications or inappropriate examination choices and the contribution of factors preventing and not preventing an examination of doubtful usefulness from being performed as requested. Ninety-five percent (344/361) reported daily or weekly actions related to inadequate referrals. Actions differed among subspecialties. The most frequent were contacting the referrer to clarify the clinical problem and checking test results/information in the medical records. Both actions were more frequent among registrars than specialists and among hospital radiologists than institute radiologists. Institute radiologists were more likely to ask the patient for additional information and to examine the patient clinically. Factors rated as contributing most to prevent doubtful examinations were high risk of serious complications/side effects, high radiation dose and low patient age. Factors facilitating doubtful examinations included respect for the referrer's judgment, patient/next-of-kin wants the examination, patient has arrived, unreachable referrer, and time pressure. In summary, radiologists facing inadequate referrals considered patient safety and sought more information. Vetting referrals on arrival, easier access to referring clinicians, and time for radiologists to handle inadequate referrals may contribute to improved use of imaging. (orig.)

  10. The internet for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caramella, D.; Pavone, P.

    1999-01-01

    This book provides information on all aspects of the Internet of interest to radiologists. It also provides non-experts with all the information necessary to profit from the Internet and to explore the different possibilities offered by the www. Its use should be recommended to all radiologists who use the Internet. (orig.)

  11. Radiologists' responses to inadequate referrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke [Oslo University College, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Section for Medical Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1130, Blindern, Oslo (Norway); Hofmann, Bjoern Morten [University of Oslo, Section for Medical Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1130, Blindern, Oslo (Norway); Gjoevik University College, Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjoevik (Norway); Espeland, Ansgar [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Radiology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-05-15

    To investigate radiologists' responses to inadequate imaging referrals. A survey was mailed to Norwegian radiologists; 69% responded. They graded the frequencies of actions related to referrals with ambiguous indications or inappropriate examination choices and the contribution of factors preventing and not preventing an examination of doubtful usefulness from being performed as requested. Ninety-five percent (344/361) reported daily or weekly actions related to inadequate referrals. Actions differed among subspecialties. The most frequent were contacting the referrer to clarify the clinical problem and checking test results/information in the medical records. Both actions were more frequent among registrars than specialists and among hospital radiologists than institute radiologists. Institute radiologists were more likely to ask the patient for additional information and to examine the patient clinically. Factors rated as contributing most to prevent doubtful examinations were high risk of serious complications/side effects, high radiation dose and low patient age. Factors facilitating doubtful examinations included respect for the referrer's judgment, patient/next-of-kin wants the examination, patient has arrived, unreachable referrer, and time pressure. In summary, radiologists facing inadequate referrals considered patient safety and sought more information. Vetting referrals on arrival, easier access to referring clinicians, and time for radiologists to handle inadequate referrals may contribute to improved use of imaging. (orig.)

  12. A radiologist`s guide to the imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Pt. 1. General considerations, physical examination as applied to real-time sonography and radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerscovich, E.O. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 2516 Stockton Blvd., Ticon II Building, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States)

    1997-07-07

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) has a broad spectrum of presentation with the minor findings resolving spontaneously and the most severe ones resulting in disability, if not diagnosed early in life. Diagnosis in the first few months of life allows conservative treatment with complete resolution in most cases. Suspicion of DDH is based on ethnic, family, and pregnancy history, and on physical examination of the newborn. Imaging assists in the diagnosis and follows the treatment. Different modalities have their own advantages and disadvantages. This article deals with the description of the disease, risk factors, statistics, the physical examination as applied to real-time sonography, and imaging (plain radiography, arthrography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging). (orig.). With 26 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Job stress and satisfaction among clinical radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, J.; Ramirez, A.J.; Field, S.; Richards, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS: Consultant radiologists appear to be at greater risk of burnout than consultants working in other specialties. The aim of this study was to examine sources of stress and satisfaction at work for radiologists and hospital consultants in other specialties in order to try to understand this difference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A postal questionnaire survey of psychiatric morbidity (12-item General Health Questionnaire), burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and sources of job stress and satisfaction (study-specific questionnaires) was carried out among a random sample of 882 hospital consultants working in radiology and three other specialties (surgery, gastroenterology and oncology). RESULTS: The most stressful aspect of work for radiologists was work overload. Inadequacies in current staffing and facilities and concerns about funding were also major sources of stress, as were impositions made on radiologists by other clinicians. The most important sources of satisfaction for radiologists were their relationships with patients and being perceived to do their job well by colleagues. Importantly, radiologists reported less satisfaction than the other specialists from many of the aspects of work measured. A greater proportion of radiologists than other specialists felt insufficiently trained in communication skills [80% (n = 168) vs 47% (n = 310);P < 0.001] and management skills [84% (n = 179) vs 76% (n = 506);P < 0.05]. CONCLUSION: These data highlight aspects of radiologists' work which need to be tackled in order to reduce their stress and increase their satisfaction, and thereby their risk of burnout. Graham, J. (2000)

  14. IOTA Simple Rules in Differentiating between Benign and Malignant Adnexal Masses by Non-expert Examiners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinnangwattana, Dangcheewan; Vichak-Ururote, Linlada; Tontivuthikul, Paponrad; Charoenratana, Cholaros; Lerthiranwong, Thitikarn; Tongsong, Theera

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of IOTA simple rules in predicting malignant adnexal tumors by non-expert examiners. Five obstetric/gynecologic residents, who had never performed gynecologic ultrasound examination by themselves before, were trained for IOTA simple rules by an experienced examiner. One trained resident performed ultrasound examinations including IOTA simple rules on 100 women, who were scheduled for surgery due to ovarian masses, within 24 hours of surgery. The gold standard diagnosis was based on pathological or operative findings. The five-trained residents performed IOTA simple rules on 30 patients for evaluation of inter-observer variability. A total of 100 patients underwent ultrasound examination for the IOTA simple rules. Of them, IOTA simple rules could be applied in 94 (94%) masses including 71 (71.0%) benign masses and 29 (29.0%) malignant masses. The diagnostic performance of IOTA simple rules showed sensitivity of 89.3% (95%CI, 77.8%; 100.7%), specificity 83.3% (95%CI, 74.3%; 92.3%). Inter-observer variability was analyzed using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Kappa indices of the four pairs of raters are 0.713-0.884 (0.722, 0.827, 0.713, and 0.884). IOTA simple rules have high diagnostic performance in discriminating adnexal masses even when are applied by non-expert sonographers, though a training course may be required. Nevertheless, they should be further tested by a greater number of general practitioners before widely use.

  15. The radiologist as defendant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    As the diagnostic radiologist has evolved through medical history, his role has changed from one of a technical expert to that of a respected part of the medical team, possessing extraordinary knowledge and skills in use of the most expensive and complex instrumentation in the health care delivery system. The rapid advances in radiological technology and instrumentation have enabled radiologists to assume a more primary role in medical care. Subspecialties such as ultrasound, computed tomography, digital radiography, and magnetic resonance imaging have emerged over the past decade as invaluable resources in medical diagnosis, and the radiologist, as the expert in these fields, has moved into view. As he assumes his rapidly evolving role, so too must he be prepared to bear the legal pressures that will most likely increase in proportion to the technical advances, as well as his changing role

  16. Physicians, radiologists, and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, W.F.

    1973-01-01

    Factors involved in quality control in medical x-ray examinations to achieve the least possible exposure to the patient are discussed. It would be hoped that film quality will remain in the position of paramount importance that it must in order to achieve the greatest amount of diagnostic information on each radiographic examination. At the same time, it is hoped that this can be done by further reducing the exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation by the methods that have been discussed; namely, education of the physician, radiologist, and technologist, modern protective equipment and departmental construction, efficient collimation whether automatic or manual, calibration and output measurement of the radiographic and fluoroscopic units, ongoing programs of education within each department of radiographic facility, film badge monitoring, education of and cooperation with the nonradiologic physician, and hopefully, more intensive programs by the National and State Bureaus and Departments of Radiological Health in education and encouragement to the medical community. (U.S.)

  17. A simple program to reduce the stress associated with NRC nuclear operator examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajwau, T.; Chardos, S.

    1988-01-01

    The NRC license for nuclear reactor operators requires periodic written examinations to demonstrate ongoing technical competency. Poor performance raises a competency question and can affect the individuals' careers. Accordingly, the exams can be highly stressful events. Stress has been demonstrated to affect memory, perception, other cognitive attitudes, and test performance. The phenomenon of test anxiety is well known. Instead of a generic, broadly focused stress management approach, a sharply focused, two-part program was developed for TVA operators scheduled to take the NRC examination. The first part was presented early in preparatory training, and the second part was given just prior to the examination. The first part consisted of a simple model of stress found in exams, early warning signs of test stress, and tactics of stress management that were practical to use during the NRC exam itself

  18. Mini-gastric bypass to control morbid obesity and diabetes mellitus: What radiologists need to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seong Sook; Hwang, Ji Young; Hur, Kyung Yul [Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Laparoscopic mini-gastric bypass surgery is a safe and simple surgical intervention for treating morbid obesity and diabetes mellitus and is now being performed more frequently. Radiologists must be critical in their postoperative evaluation of these patients. In this pictorial review, we explain and illustrate the surgical technique, normal postoperative anatomy, and associated complications as seen on imaging examinations, including fluoroscopy and computed tomography.

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript ... by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’ ...

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  3. Research by pediatric radiologists - past accomplishments and future opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effmann, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pediatric radiologists have made numerous and important contributions to the body of medical knowledge. This essay reviews aspects of biomedical and radiological research, analyses the state of scholarship in pediatric radiology today, and examines future research opportunities. The author's research interest in cardiopulmonary malformations and in the use of murine models of human disease serve to illustrate of but one of many investigative areas open to academic pediatric radiologists. Finally, the application process for NIH funding is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  4. Occupational radiation risk to radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of the most important publications dealing with attempts to estimate the occupational radiation risk to radiologists by comparing data on their mortality from leukemia and other forms of cancer with respective data for other physicians who were not occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. (author)

  5. Examining the Simple View of Reading among Subgroups of Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Ryan Ponce

    2015-01-01

    The Simple View of Reading (SVR; Gough & Tunmer, 1986; Hoover & Gough, 1990) has a longstanding history as a model of reading comprehension, but it has mostly been applied to native English speakers. The SVR posits reading comprehension is a function of the interaction between word-level reading skills and oral language skills. It has been…

  6. Examining the Simple View of Reading Model for United States High School Spanish Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Richard; Patton, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The Simple View of Reading (SVR) model, which posits that reading comprehension is the product of word decoding and language comprehension that make independent contributions to reading skill, has been found to explain the acquisition of first language (L1) reading and second language (L2) reading in young English language learners (ELLs).…

  7. Extremity doses to interventional radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wihtby, M.; Martin, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiologists performing interventional procedures are often required to stand close to the patient's side when carrying out manipulations under fluoroscopic control. This can result in their extremities receiving a high radiation dose, due to scattered radiation. These doses are sometimes high enough to warrant that the radiologist in question be designated a classified radiation worker. Classification in the UK is a result of any worker receiving or likely to receive in the course of their duties in excess of 3/10ths of any annual dose limit (500mSv to extremities, skin). The doses to the legs of radiologists have received less attention than those to the hands, however the doses may be high, due to the proximity of the legs and feet to scattered radiation. The legs can be exposed to a relatively high level of scattered radiation as the radiation in produced from scatter of the un attenuated beam from the bottom of the patient couch. The routine monitoring of extremity doses in interventional radiology is difficult due to several factors. Firstly a wide range of interventional procedures in undertaken in every radiology department, and these procedures require many different techniques, equipment and skills. This means that the position the radiologist adopts in relation to scattering medium and therefore their exposure, depends heavily on the type of procedure. As the hands which manipulate the catheters within the patient are often located close to the patients side and to the area under irradiation, the distribution of dose across the hands can be variable, with very high localised doses, making routine monitoring difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude and distribution of dose to the hands and legs of interventional radiologists carrying out a wide range of both diagnostic and therapeutic interventional procedures. To ascertain the most effective method of monitoring the highest dose in accordance with the Basic safety standards

  8. A new approach for simple radioisotope cisternography examination in cerebrospinal fluid leakage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Hiromitsu; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Achmad, Arifudin; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Fujimaki, Hiroya; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new quantitative interpretation technique of radioisotope cisternography (RIC) for the diagnosis of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia (SCH). RIC studies performed for suspected SCH were evaluated. (111)In-DTPA RIC images were taken at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 24-h after radioisotope injection following the current protocol. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected on 3-h images to include brain, spine, bladder or the whole body. The accumulative radioactivity counts were calculated for quantitative analysis. Final diagnoses of SCH were established based on the diagnostic criteria recently proposed by Schievink and colleagues. Thirty-five patients were focused on. Twenty-one (60.0%) patients were diagnosed as having SCH according to the Schievink criteria. On the 3-h images, direct cerebrospinal fluid leakage sign was detected in nine of 21 SCH patients (42.9%), as well as three patients with suspected iatrogenic leakage. Compared to non-SCH patients, SCH patients showed higher bladder accumulation at 3-h images (P = 0.0002), and higher brain clearance between the 6- and 24-h images (P leakage was not observed. 1- and 6-h images did not provide any additional information in any patients. A new simple ROI setting method, in which only the 3-h whole body and 24-h brain images were necessary, was sufficient to diagnose SCH.

  9. The radiologist's responsibilities for the radiation protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etard, C.

    2010-01-01

    The obligations of the radiologist for the radiation protection of patients include a review of the appropriateness of the examination and optimization of the protocol. Both internal and external quality assurance programs are mandatory. The specific tasks and their frequency are defined by the AFSSAPS. The radiology report of procedures performed over radiosensitive regions must include the delivered dose. The imaging technique must be optimized based on published guidelines or law for the most frequent examinations. All radiologists should be familiar with radiation protection. Incidents should be reported to the Nuclear Safety Authority. (author)

  10. Fractal Analysis of Radiologists Visual Scanning Pattern in Screening Mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamudun, Folami T [ORNL; Yoon, Hong-Jun [ORNL; Hudson, Kathy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Morin-Ducote, Garnetta [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators have investigated radiologists visual scanning patterns with respect to features such as total time examining a case, time to initially hit true lesions, number of hits, etc. The purpose of this study was to examine the complexity of the radiologists visual scanning pattern when viewing 4-view mammographic cases, as they typically do in clinical practice. Gaze data were collected from 10 readers (3 breast imaging experts and 7 radiology residents) while reviewing 100 screening mammograms (24 normal, 26 benign, 50 malignant). The radiologists scanpaths across the 4 mammographic views were mapped to a single 2-D image plane. Then, fractal analysis was applied on the derived scanpaths using the box counting method. For each case, the complexity of each radiologist s scanpath was estimated using fractal dimension. The association between gaze complexity, case pathology, case density, and radiologist experience was evaluated using 3 factor fixed effects ANOVA. ANOVA showed that case pathology, breast density, and experience level are all independent predictors of the visual scanning pattern complexity. Visual scanning patterns are significantly different for benign and malignant cases than for normal cases as well as when breast parenchyma density changes.

  11. Electronic Health Record-Driven Workflow for Diagnostic Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeslin, Matthew G; Gaskin, Cree M

    2016-01-01

    In most settings, radiologists maintain a high-throughput practice in which efficiency is crucial. The conversion from film-based to digital study interpretation and data storage launched the era of PACS-driven workflow, leading to significant gains in speed. The advent of electronic health records improved radiologists' access to patient data; however, many still find this aspect of workflow to be relatively cumbersome. Nevertheless, the ability to guide a diagnostic interpretation with clinical information, beyond that provided in the examination indication, can add significantly to the specificity of a radiologist's interpretation. Responsibilities of the radiologist include, but are not limited to, protocoling examinations, interpreting studies, chart review, peer review, writing notes, placing orders, and communicating with referring providers. Most of the aforementioned activities are not PACS-centric and require a login to one or more additional applications. Consolidation of these tasks for completion through a single interface can simplify workflow, save time, and potentially reduce the incidence of errors. Here, the authors describe diagnostic radiology workflow that leverages the electronic health record to significantly add to a radiologist's ability to be part of the health care team, provide relevant interpretations, and improve efficiency and quality. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigating links between emotional intelligence and observer performance by radiologists in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sarah J.; Brennan, Patrick C.; Cumming, Steven; MacKay, Stuart J.; McEntee, Mark F.; Keane, Kevin; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R.

    2014-03-01

    A novel direction of radiology research is better understanding the links between cognitive and personality factors and radiologists' accuracy and performance. This study examines relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) scores and observer performance by radiologists in breast cancer detection. Three separate samples were collected with Australian and US breast imaging radiologists. The radiologists were asked to undertake a mammographic interpretation task to identify malignant breast lesions and localise them, in addition to use a confidence rating scale to report confidence in the decision. Following this activity, the radiologists were administered the EI Trait (TEIQue-SF) questionnaire. The Trait EI test gives a Global EI score and 4 sub-scores in Well-being, Self-Control, Emotionality and Sociability. Sample 1 (Sydney 2012) radiologists were divided into 2 experience bands; radiologists practicing emotionality" and "sociability" to Location Sensitivity and JAFROC. Our preliminary results indicate EI is correlated to observer performance in lesser experienced radiologists. It is suggested that tasks perceived as more difficult by less experienced radiologists may evoke more emotion (uncertainty, frustration, pressure). As experience increases, radiologists may develop an ability to control their emotions or emotional intelligence becomes less important in decision making.

  13. Measuring and managing radiologist workload: measuring radiologist reporting times using data from a Radiology Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, Ian A.; MacDonald, Sharon L.S.; Floyd, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, there has been no objective method of measuring the time required for radiologists to produce reports during normal work. We have created a technique for semi-automated measurement of radiologist reporting time, and through it produced a robust set of absolute time requirements and relative value units for consultant reporting of diagnostic examinations in our hospital. A large sample of reporting times, recorded automatically by the Radiology Information System (COMRAD, Software Innovations, Christchurch, New Zealand) along with the description of each examination being reported, was placed in a database. Analysis was confined to diagnostic reporting by consultant radiologists. A spreadsheet was produced, listing the total number and the frequency of reporting times of each distinct examination. Outliers with exceptionally long report times (more than 10min for plain radiography, 30min for ultrasound, or 60min for CT or MRI with some exceptions) were culled; this removed 9.5% of the total. Complex CTs requiring separate workstation time were assigned times by consensus. The median time for the remainder of each sample was the assigned absolute reporting time in minutes and seconds. Relative value units were calculated using the reporting time for a single view department chest X-ray of 1min 38s including verifying a report made using speech recognition software. A schedule of absolute and relative values, based on over 179,000 reports, forms Table 2 of this paper. The technique provides a schedule of reporting times with reduced subjective input, which is more robust than existing systems for measuring reporting time.

  14. Who collects professional fees for neuroradiology interpretation, radiologists or nonradiologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiarz, Lukasz S; Yousem, David M; Parker, Laurence; Rao, Vijay

    2012-07-01

    An increasing portion of imaging studies are performed by nonradiologists, especially for modalities with the highest relative value units. The aim of this study was to examine the trends in neuroradiologic interpretation among radiologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, and other specialists within the Medicare population. The number of neuroradiologic studies interpreted by radiologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, and other specialists in the inpatient, hospital outpatient, and private office settings was determined from the CMS Physician/Supplier Procedure Summary Master Files for 1996 to 2010. Studies billed through professional and global charges were aggregated. Utilization rates and utilization rate compound annual growth rates were computed by specialty and by imaging study. In 1996, radiologists interpreted 4,802,490 (93.7%) CMS neuroradiologic procedures, neurologists 77,312 (1.5%), neurosurgeons 9,825 (0.19%), and other specialists 234,423 (4.6%). In 2010, radiologists interpreted 11,476,376 (93.5%) procedures, neurologists 101,172 (0.8%), neurosurgeons 20,697 (0.17%), and other specialists 680,786 (5.5%). Neurology and neurosurgery lost market share at all sites. Radiology's share increased in the inpatient (from 94.8% to 98.7%) and hospital outpatient (from 95% to 98.7%) settings but decreased in the private office setting (from 88.2% to 73.1%). Lost market share was captured by the other CMS specialty categories, including independent diagnostic testing facilities and multidisciplinary groups, many of which included radiologists. There was marked growth (140%) in neuroradiologic studies between 1996 and 2010 in the Medicare patient population. Radiologists' share of the total neuroradiologic interpretations remained unchanged and constituted 93.5% in 2010. Radiology's market share has shown growth in the inpatient and hospital outpatient sectors but not the private office sector, where independent diagnostic testing facilities, multidisciplinary

  15. On occupational-appointment demands on radiation hygiene for medical radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usol'tsev, V.I.; Kuzin, V.I.; Tselikov, N.V.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the work was to determine occupational requirements on radiation hygiene for medical radiologists. To solve the problem using questionnaire, personal conversations with doctors, analysis of basis control and examinations volume and character of work on radiation hygiene were studied in 510 medical radiologists. Occupational requirements for these specialists were worked out on the basis the obtained data. 4 refs

  16. Violence against radiologists. II: Psychosocial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A

    2012-09-01

    Violence against radiologists is a growing problem. This study evaluated the psychosocial factors associated with this phenomenon. A questionnaire was administered to 992 Italian radiologists. Physical violence experienced in the previous 12-month period was associated with the radiologist's poor mental health [odds ratio (OR) 1.11] and overcommitment to work (OR 1.06), whereas radiologists in good physical health (OR 0.64), with job satisfaction (OR 0.96) and with overall happiness (OR 0.67) were less exposed. Nonphysical abuse was equally associated with the radiologist's poor mental health (OR 1.10) and overcommitment (OR 1.14) and negatively associated with physical health (OR 0.54), job satisfaction (OR 0.96), happiness (OR 0.81), organisational justice (OR 0.94) and social support (OR 0.80). Preventive intervention against violence in the workplace should improve workplace organisation and relationships between workers.

  17. MRI of the prostate in Germany. Online survey among radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Reiser, M.; Mueller-Lisse, U.L.

    2015-01-01

    To assess structural, technical, and communicative aspects of dedicated MR examinations of the prostate (MRP) offered by radiologists in Germany. We conducted an eight-item online survey among members of the German Radiology Society (DRG). Radiological institutions were asked about their structure, i. e., either hospital department (HD) or private practice (PP), number of board-certified radiologists, postal regions, number of MRPs in 2011, MR technology and MR sequences applied, ways to communicate results, and feedback from referring physicians on results of subsequent tests and procedures. Submissions were cleared of redundancies and anonymized. Differences in the number of positive replies to each item were statistically significant at p < 0.05 for two-tailed testing in 2 x 2 tables. The survey represented board-certified radiologists in 128 institutions (63 HDs and 65 PPs) in 67/95 German postal regions (71 %). Almost two-thirds of institutions performed 11 to 50 MRPs in 2011, more often at 1.5 T (116/128, 91 %) than at 3.0 T (36/128, 28 %), and most frequently with surface coils (1.5 T, 88/116, 76 %; 3.0 T, 34/36, 94 %; chi-square, 1.9736, 0.1 < p < 0.25). About two-thirds of 1.5 T users and 90 % of 3.0 T users applied at least one functional MR modality (diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, or MR spectroscopy) for MRP. Reports including graphic representations of the prostate were applied by 21/128 institutions (16 %). Clinical feedback after MRP to radiologists other than upon their own request was infrequent (HDs, 32 - 45 %, PPs, 18 - 32 %). MRP was a widely available, small-volume examination among radiologists in Germany in 2011. The technology mainstay was a 1.5 T surface coil examination including at least one functional MR modality. Dedicated reporting and feedback mechanisms for quality control were underdeveloped.

  18. MRI of the prostate in Germany. Online survey among radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Reiser, M. [Univ. Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Lewerich, B. [Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft, Geschaeftsstelle, Berlin (Germany); Mueller-Lisse, U.L. [Interdisziplinaeres Onkologisches Zentrum Muenchen (IOZ) (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Scherr, M.K. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik, Dept. of Radiology, Murnau (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    To assess structural, technical, and communicative aspects of dedicated MR examinations of the prostate (MRP) offered by radiologists in Germany. We conducted an eight-item online survey among members of the German Radiology Society (DRG). Radiological institutions were asked about their structure, i. e., either hospital department (HD) or private practice (PP), number of board-certified radiologists, postal regions, number of MRPs in 2011, MR technology and MR sequences applied, ways to communicate results, and feedback from referring physicians on results of subsequent tests and procedures. Submissions were cleared of redundancies and anonymized. Differences in the number of positive replies to each item were statistically significant at p < 0.05 for two-tailed testing in 2 x 2 tables. The survey represented board-certified radiologists in 128 institutions (63 HDs and 65 PPs) in 67/95 German postal regions (71 %). Almost two-thirds of institutions performed 11 to 50 MRPs in 2011, more often at 1.5 T (116/128, 91 %) than at 3.0 T (36/128, 28 %), and most frequently with surface coils (1.5 T, 88/116, 76 %; 3.0 T, 34/36, 94 %; chi-square, 1.9736, 0.1 < p < 0.25). About two-thirds of 1.5 T users and 90 % of 3.0 T users applied at least one functional MR modality (diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, or MR spectroscopy) for MRP. Reports including graphic representations of the prostate were applied by 21/128 institutions (16 %). Clinical feedback after MRP to radiologists other than upon their own request was infrequent (HDs, 32 - 45 %, PPs, 18 - 32 %). MRP was a widely available, small-volume examination among radiologists in Germany in 2011. The technology mainstay was a 1.5 T surface coil examination including at least one functional MR modality. Dedicated reporting and feedback mechanisms for quality control were underdeveloped.

  19. Effect of radiologists' diagnostic work-up volume on interpretive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Diana S M; Anderson, Melissa L; Smith, Robert A; Carney, Patricia A; Miglioretti, Diana L; Monsees, Barbara S; Sickles, Edward A; Taplin, Stephen H; Geller, Berta M; Yankaskas, Bonnie C; Onega, Tracy L

    2014-11-01

    To examine radiologists' screening performance in relation to the number of diagnostic work-ups performed after abnormal findings are discovered at screening mammography by the same radiologist or by different radiologists. In an institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant study, the authors linked 651 671 screening mammograms interpreted from 2002 to 2006 by 96 radiologists in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium to cancer registries (standard of reference) to evaluate the performance of screening mammography (sensitivity, false-positive rate [ FPR false-positive rate ], and cancer detection rate [ CDR cancer detection rate ]). Logistic regression was used to assess the association between the volume of recalled screening mammograms ("own" mammograms, where the radiologist who interpreted the diagnostic image was the same radiologist who had interpreted the screening image, and "any" mammograms, where the radiologist who interpreted the diagnostic image may or may not have been the radiologist who interpreted the screening image) and screening performance and whether the association between total annual volume and performance differed according to the volume of diagnostic work-up. Annually, 38% of radiologists performed the diagnostic work-up for 25 or fewer of their own recalled screening mammograms, 24% performed the work-up for 0-50, and 39% performed the work-up for more than 50. For the work-up of recalled screening mammograms from any radiologist, 24% of radiologists performed the work-up for 0-50 mammograms, 32% performed the work-up for 51-125, and 44% performed the work-up for more than 125. With increasing numbers of radiologist work-ups for their own recalled mammograms, the sensitivity (P = .039), FPR false-positive rate (P = .004), and CDR cancer detection rate (P women recalled per cancer detected from 17.4 for 25 or fewer mammograms to 24.6 for more than 50 mammograms. Increases in work-ups for any radiologist yielded significant

  20. Social media for radiologists: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranschaert, Erik R; van Ooijen, P M A; Lee, Simon; Ratib, Osman; Parizel, P M

    2015-12-01

    Social media, which can be defined as dynamic and interactive online communication forums, are becoming increasingly popular, not only for the general public but also for radiologists. In addition to assisting radiologists in finding useful profession-related information and interactive educational material in all kinds of formats, they can also contribute towards improving communication with peers, clinicians, and patients. The growing use of social networking in healthcare also has an impact on the visibility and engagement of radiologists in the online virtual community. Although many radiologists are already using social media, a large number of our colleagues are still unaware of the wide spectrum of useful information and interaction available via social media and of the added value these platforms can bring to daily practice. For many, the risk of mixing professional and private data by using social media creates a feeling of insecurity, which still keeps radiologists from using them. In this overview we aim to provide information on the potential benefits, challenges, and inherent risks of social media for radiologists. We will provide a summary of the different types of social media that can be of value for radiologists, including useful tips on how to use them safely and efficiently. • Online social networking enhances communication and collaboration between peers • Social media facilitate access to educational and scientific information • Recommendations and guidelines from policymakers and professional organisations are needed • Applications are desired for efficient and secure exchange of medical images in social media.

  1. Radiation biology for pediatric radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation result primarily from damage to DNA. There are three effects of concern to the radiologist that determine the need for radiation protection and the dose principle of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). (1) Heritable effects. These were thought to be most important in the 1950s, but concern has declined in recent years. The current ICRP risk estimate is very small at 0.2%/Sv. (2) Effects on the developing embryo and fetus include weight retardation, congenital anomalies, microcephaly and mental retardation. During the sensitive period of 8 to 15 weeks of gestation, the risk estimate for mental retardation is very high at 40%/Sv, but because it is a deterministic effect, there is likely to be a threshold of about 200 mSv. (3) Carcinogenesis is considered to be the most important consequence of low doses of radiation, with a risk of fatal cancer of about 5%/Sv, and is therefore of most concern in radiology. Our knowledge of radiation carcinogenesis comes principally from the 60-year study of the A-bomb survivors. The use of radiation for diagnostic purposes has increased dramatically in recent years. The annual collective population dose has increased by 750% since 1980 to 930,000 person Sv. One of the principal reasons is the burgeoning use of CT scans. In 2006, more than 60 million CT scans were performed in the U.S., with about 6 million of them in children. As a rule of thumb, an abdominal CT scan in a 1-year-old child results in a life-time mortality risk of about one in a thousand. While the risk to the individual is small and acceptable when the scan is clinically justified, even a small risk when multiplied by an increasingly large number is likely to produce a significant public health concern. It is for this reason that every effort should be made to reduce the doses associated with procedures such as CT scans, particularly in children, in the spirit of ALARA. (orig.)

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot Fishman, a radiologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital ... of your body and to identify abnormalities and disease. If you’re scheduled for an MRA scan, ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot Fishman, a radiologist ... question you might have, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time and for your ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  5. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskov, L; Abild, A; Christensen, A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital....

  6. Business of radiology: financial fundamentals for radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medverd, Jonathan R; Prabhu, Somnath J; Lam, Diana L

    2013-11-01

    The purposes of this article are to provide a primer on financial statements and to review several financial concepts that are at the foundation of the business of medicine. For radiologists to effectively contribute to the leadership and management of their practices, it is imperative that they understand the business aspects of radiology. Radiologists' understanding and participation in practice management may also facilitate job satisfaction and assist the provision of optimal patient care.

  7. Nuisance levels of noise effects radiologists' performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Coffey, Amina; Ryan, John; O'Beirne, Aaron; Toomey, Rachel; Evanoff, Micheal; Manning, David; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to measure the sound levels in Irish x-ray departments. The study then established whether these levels of noise have an impact on radiologists performance Noise levels were recorded 10 times within each of 14 environments in 4 hospitals, 11 of which were locations where radiologic images are judged. Thirty chest images were then presented to 26 senior radiologists, who were asked to detect up to three nodular lesions within 30 posteroanterior chest x-ray images in the absence and presence of noise at amplitude demonstrated in the clinical environment. The results demonstrated that noise amplitudes rarely exceeded that encountered with normal conversation with the maximum mean value for an image-viewing environment being 56.1 dB. This level of noise had no impact on the ability of radiologists to identify chest lesions with figure of merits of 0.68, 0.69, and 0.68 with noise and 0.65, 0.68, and 0.67 without noise for chest radiologists, non-chest radiologists, and all radiologists, respectively. the difference in their performance using the DBM MRMC method was significantly better with noise than in the absence of noise at the 90% confidence interval (p=0.077). Further studies are required to establish whether other aspects of diagnosis are impaired such as recall and attention and the effects of more unexpected noise on performance.

  8. Work stress in radiologists. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A; Magnavita, G; Mammi, F; Mirk, P; Roccia, K; Bergamaschi, A

    2008-04-01

    We studied occupational stress and its psychosocial effects in a sample of Italian radiologists and radiotherapists: Radiologists and radiotherapists attending two medical conferences were invited to complete a questionnaire comprising four sections investigating the risk of occupational stress (organisational discomfort, Karasek's Job Content Questionnaire, Siegrist's Effort-Reward Imbalance, Warr's Job Satisfaction) and four sections investigating the health effects of such stress (Goldberg's Anxiety and Depression Scales, General Health Questionnaire, Lifestyles Questionnaire). Radiologists and radiotherapists generally expressed high levels of control, reward and satisfaction. However, 38.5% complained of severe organisational discomfort, 24% reported job strain, 28% reported effort/reward imbalance and 25% were dissatisfied. Female radiologists and radiotherapists showed higher levels of organisational discomfort than their male colleagues. Younger and less experienced radiologists and radiotherapists had higher strain scores than their older and more experienced colleagues. A significant correlation was observed between stress predictors and the effects of stress on health, including depression and anxiety, psychological distress and unhealthy lifestyles. Radiologists and radiotherapists are exposed to major occupational stress factors, and a significant percentage of them suffer from workplace stress. A special effort is required to prevent this condition.

  9. A radiologist's guide to the imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Pt. 1. General considerations, physical examination as applied to real-time sonography and radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerscovich, E.O.

    1997-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) has a broad spectrum of presentation with the minor findings resolving spontaneously and the most severe ones resulting in disability, if not diagnosed early in life. Diagnosis in the first few months of life allows conservative treatment with complete resolution in most cases. Suspicion of DDH is based on ethnic, family, and pregnancy history, and on physical examination of the newborn. Imaging assists in the diagnosis and follows the treatment. Different modalities have their own advantages and disadvantages. This article deals with the description of the disease, risk factors, statistics, the physical examination as applied to real-time sonography, and imaging (plain radiography, arthrography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging). (orig.). With 26 figs., 1 tab

  10. How changes in a radiologist's technique can reduce patient dose in barium enema studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in a radiologist's technique, especially utilising digital technology, can lead to substantial dose savings in barium enema examinations. Data will be provided showing a 20% saving with only minimal change in technique. (author)

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... into the bloodstream, inhaled or swallowed. The radiotracer travels through the area being examined and gives off ... Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight May is American Stroke Month Recently posted: ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... into the bloodstream, inhaled or swallowed. The radiotracer travels through the area being examined and gives off ... Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of ...

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures use small amounts of radioactive materials – called radiotracers – that are typically injected into the bloodstream, inhaled or swallowed. The radiotracer travels through the area being examined and gives off energy in the ...

  14. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is used to screen the large intestine or colon for cancer and growths called polyps. This procedure uses low-dose CT or CAT scanning to produce pictures of the colon and the rectum. During the examination, a small ...

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through the area being examined and gives off energy in the form of gamma rays which are detected by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’re scheduled for a nuclear medicine exam, there are several things you can ...

  16. Dose reduction - the radiologist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.G.B.

    1984-01-01

    The magnitude of the exposure to ionising radiation dominates radiological practice in only three fields, i.e. foetal radiography, mammography and computed tomography. The balance between risk and benefit are briefly examined. The types of hazard considered are carcinogenesis, genetic injury and organogenesis. Ways of achieving a reduction of the dose to the patient are also briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  17. Recent advances in neonatology - new tasks for the radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebermass, K.; Birnbacher, R.; Weninger, M.; Pollak, A.

    2000-01-01

    Modern neonatology comprises care for a growing number of infants with congenital abnormalities and an increasing number of premature born infants. The survival rates of premature infants have increased dramatically during the past decade. This increase in survival rates can be attributed to improved prenatal and obstetric management and to advances in neonatal intensive care medicine. Radiological support: Neonatology has become a pediatric subspeciality of its own resulting in the demand for an equally specialised radiological support. Therefore, the availability of a children's radiologist for radiological and sonographic examinations is mandatory (24 hours a day) for optimal patient care on a neonatal intensive care unit. A good cooperation between radiologist and neonatologist in neonatal intensive care medicine is therefore warranted. (orig.) [de

  18. The Royal College of Radiologists Breast Group breast imaging classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, A.J.; Ridley, N.T.; Rubin, G.; Wallis, M.G.; Gilbert, F.J.; Michell, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Standardisation of the classification of breast imaging reports will improve communication between the referrer and the radiologist and avoid ambiguity, which may otherwise lead to mismanagement of patients. Following wide consultation, Royal College of Radiologists Breast Group has produced a scoring system for the classification of breast imaging. This will facilitate audit and the development of nationally agreed standards for the investigation of women with breast disease. This five-point system is as follows: 1, normal; 2, benign findings; 3, indeterminate/probably benign findings; 4, findings suspicious of malignancy; 5, findings highly suspicious of malignancy. It is recommended that this be used in the reporting of all breast imaging examinations in the UK.

  19. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L., E-mail: samuel.brady@stjude.org; Kaufman, Robert A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Mirro, Amy E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  20. Computer-aided detection (CAD) in mammography: Does it help the junior or the senior radiologist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balleyguier, Corinne; Kinkel, Karen; Fermanian, Jacques; Malan, Sebastien; Djen, Germaine; Taourel, Patrice; Helenon, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system on the ability of a junior and senior radiologist to detect breast cancers on mammograms, and to determine the potential of CAD as a teaching tool in mammography. Methods: Hundred biopsy-proven cancers and 100 normal mammograms were randomly analyzed by a CAD system. The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of the CAD system were calculated. In the second phase, to simulate daily practice, 110 mammograms (97 normal or with benign lesions, and 13 cancers) were examined independently by a junior and a senior radiologist, with and without CAD. Interpretations were standardized according to BI-RADS classification. Sensitivity, Specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated for each session. Results: For the senior radiologist, Se slightly improved from 76.9 to 84.6% after CAD analysis (NS) (one case of clustered microcalcifications case overlooked by the senior radiologist was detected by CAD). Sp, PPV and PNV did not change significantly. For the junior radiologist, Se improved from 61.9 to 84.6% (significant change). Three cancers overlooked by the junior radiologist were detected by CAD. Sp was unchanged. Conclusion: CAD mammography proved more useful for the junior than for the senior radiologist, improving sensitivity. The CAD system may represent a useful educational tool for mammography

  1. Age-specific effective doses for pediatric MSCT examinations at a large children's hospital using DLP conversion coefficients: a simple estimation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Wang, Bo

    2008-01-01

    There is a need for an easily accessible method for effective dose estimation in pediatric CT. To estimate effective doses for a variety of pediatric neurological and body CT examinations in five age groups using recently published age- and region-specific dose length product (DLP) to effective dose conversion coefficients. A retrospective review was performed of 1,431 consecutive CT scans over a 12-week period using age- and weight-adjusted CT protocols. Age- and region-specific DLP to effective dose conversion coefficients were applied to console-displayed DLP data. Effective dose estimates for single-phase head CT scans in neonatal, and 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old age groups were 4.2, 3.6, 2.4, 2.0 and 1.4 mSv, respectively. For abdomen/pelvis CT scans the corresponding effective doses were 13.1, 11.1, 8.4, 8.9 and 5.9 mSv. The range of pediatric CT effective doses is wide, from ultralow dose protocols (<1 mSv) to extended-coverage body examinations (10-15 mSv). Age- and region-specific pediatric DLP to effective dose conversion coefficients provide an accessible and user-friendly method for estimating pediatric CT effective doses that is available to radiologists working without medical physics support. (orig.)

  2. Questions of an otorhinolaryngologist to a radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theopold, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    The otorhinolaryngologist expects the radiologist to answer very quickly in emergencies such as complications of inflammatory processes of the paranasal accessory sinuses, diseases, tumours, and skull traumatology. Aspects of conventional X-ray diagnosis, X-ray tomography, and computerized tomography are discussed. (APR) [de

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  4. Prevalence of burnout among musculoskeletal radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Felix S.; Porrino, Jack A.; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Relyea-Chew, Annemarie [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Mulcahy, Michael J. [Central Washington University, Department of Sociology, Ellensburg, WA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Burnout is a job-related psychological syndrome with three aspects: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and perceived lack of personal accomplishment. Burnout is associated with deleterious effects on both workers and their work. When burnout affects physicians, their well-being, longevity, and care of patients are at risk. Recent studies concerning physician burnout treat specialists such as radiologists as one group. We studied burnout in musculoskeletal (MSK) subspecialist radiologists. An institutional review board exemption was obtained. Society of Skeletal Radiology members received invitations to an anonymous survey that included questions from the Maslach Burnout Inventory trademark (MBI) measuring all three aspects of burnout. The response rate was 36.4% (433/1190). The prevalence of emotional exhaustion was 61.7% (255/413), of depersonalization 53.3% (219/411), and of perceived lack of personal accomplishment 39.6% (161/407). Only 19.5% (79/405) of MSK radiologists reported no burnout, while 80.5% (326/405) reported burnout along one or more dimensions. For all three dimensions, the prevalence was higher and the mean severity was worse for private practice compared with academic practice. The prevalence of burnout was affected more by practice setting than by gender. Burnout prevalence and severity also varied systematically with years since completion of training. Among MSK radiologists, we found a much higher prevalence and greater severity of burnout than has been previously reported for radiologists and other physicians. There were differences in prevalence and severity of burnout among practice settings, genders, and longevity cohorts. (orig.)

  5. Prevalence of burnout among musculoskeletal radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, Felix S.; Porrino, Jack A.; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Relyea-Chew, Annemarie; Mulcahy, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Burnout is a job-related psychological syndrome with three aspects: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and perceived lack of personal accomplishment. Burnout is associated with deleterious effects on both workers and their work. When burnout affects physicians, their well-being, longevity, and care of patients are at risk. Recent studies concerning physician burnout treat specialists such as radiologists as one group. We studied burnout in musculoskeletal (MSK) subspecialist radiologists. An institutional review board exemption was obtained. Society of Skeletal Radiology members received invitations to an anonymous survey that included questions from the Maslach Burnout Inventory trademark (MBI) measuring all three aspects of burnout. The response rate was 36.4% (433/1190). The prevalence of emotional exhaustion was 61.7% (255/413), of depersonalization 53.3% (219/411), and of perceived lack of personal accomplishment 39.6% (161/407). Only 19.5% (79/405) of MSK radiologists reported no burnout, while 80.5% (326/405) reported burnout along one or more dimensions. For all three dimensions, the prevalence was higher and the mean severity was worse for private practice compared with academic practice. The prevalence of burnout was affected more by practice setting than by gender. Burnout prevalence and severity also varied systematically with years since completion of training. Among MSK radiologists, we found a much higher prevalence and greater severity of burnout than has been previously reported for radiologists and other physicians. There were differences in prevalence and severity of burnout among practice settings, genders, and longevity cohorts. (orig.)

  6. Impact of Breast Reader Assessment Strategy on mammographic radiologists' test reading performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Wasfi I; Rawashdeh, Mohammad A; Lewis, Sarah J; McEntee, Mark F; Lee, Warwick; Tapia, Kriscia; Brennan, Patrick C

    2016-06-01

    The detection of breast cancer is somewhat limited by human factors, and thus there is a need to improve reader performance. This study assesses whether radiologists who regularly undertake the education in the form of the Breast Reader Assessment Strategy (BREAST) demonstrate any changes in mammography interpretation performance over time. In 2011, 2012 and 2013, 14 radiologists independently assessed a year-specific BREAST mammographic test-set. Radiologists read a different single test-set once each year, with each comprising 60 digital mammogram cases. Radiologists marked the location of suspected lesions without computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) and assigned a confidence rating of 2 for benign and 3-5 for malignant lesions. The mean sensitivity, specificity, location sensitivity, JAFROC FOM and ROC AUC were calculated. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the readings for the 14 radiologists across the 3 years. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to assess comparison between pairs of years. Relationships between changes in performance and radiologist characteristics were examined using a Spearman's test. Significant increases were noted in mean sensitivity (P = 0.01), specificity (P = 0.01), location sensitivity (P = 0.001) and JAFROC FOM (P = 0.001) between 2011 and 2012. Between 2012 and 2013, significant improvements were noted in mean sensitivity (P = 0.003), specificity (P = 0.002), location sensitivity (P = 0.02), JAFROC FOM (P = 0.005) and ROC AUC (P = 0.008). No statistically significant correlations were shown between the levels of improvement and radiologists' characteristics. Radiologists' who undertake the BREAST programme demonstrate significant improvements in test-set performance during a 3-year period, highlighting the value of ongoing education through the use of test-set. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. Indices of agreement between neurosurgeons and a radiologist in interpreting tomography scans in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Jules Carlos; Pereira, Júlio Leonardo Barbosa; Albuquerque, Lucas Alverne Freitas de; Carvalho, Gervásio Teles Cardos de; Dias, Patrícia; Dias, Laura; Bicalho, Marcos; Magalhães, Pollyana; Dellaretti, Marcos

    2015-08-01

    The power of interpretation in the analysis of cranial computed tomography (CCT) among neurosurgeons and radiologists has rarely been studied. This study aimed to assess the rate of agreement in the interpretation of CCTs between neurosurgeons and a radiologist in an emergency department. 227 CCT were independently analyzed by two neurosurgeons (NS1 and NS2) and a radiologist (RAD). The level of agreement in interpreting the examination was studied. The Kappa values obtained between NS1 and NS2 and RAD were considered nearly perfect and substantial agreement. The highest levels of agreement when evaluating abnormalities were observed in the identification of tumors, hydrocephalus and intracranial hematomas. The worst levels of agreement were observed for leukoaraiosis and reduced brain volume. For diseases in which the emergency room procedure must be determined, agreement in the interpretation of CCTs between the radiologist and neurosurgeons was satisfactory.

  8. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Natalia Delage; Couto, Caroline Laurita Batista; Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition. (author)

  9. Mergers and acquisitions for the radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishon, Howard B

    2008-05-01

    In 2006 and the first half of 2007, the rapid pace of global activity contributed to the popularity of mergers and acquisitions (M&A). In fact, the medical imaging industry has a significant history in M&A as well. Along with the expectation of continued growth in medical imaging utilization and other industry trends, radiologists may become more involved in M&A transactions. There is little in the radiology literature dealing with the logistics and pitfalls of M&A. This article is an introduction for radiologists who might consider buying or selling their practices or merging with strategic partners. Although there are significant differences in the approaches of buy or sell situations compared with mergers, they do share several concepts that are outlined. One key to success in M&A transactions is the "process" or approach, which is described with some practical guidelines. Some basic terms and suggestions are also presented for reference.

  10. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Delage Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition.

  11. Critical analysis of radiologist-patient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K J; Tarico, V S; Smith, W L; Altmaier, E M; Franken, E A

    1987-05-01

    A critical incident interview technique was used to identify features of radiologist-patient interactions considered effective and ineffective by patients. During structured interviews with 35 radiology patients and five patients' parents, three general categories of physician behavior were described: attention to patient comfort, explanation of procedure and results, and interpersonal sensitivity. The findings indicated that patients are sensitive to physicians' interpersonal styles and that they want physicians to explain procedures and results in an understandable manner and to monitor their well-being during procedures. The sample size of the study is small; thus further confirmation is needed. However, the implications for training residents and practicing radiologists in these behaviors are important in the current competitive medical milieu.

  12. Mortality of British radiologists. A lecture Note+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, R.

    2005-01-01

    The precautions introduced after the first 23 years experience of the use of x-rays for medical diagnosis proved adequate to eliminate the acute hazards of exposure, but it was much longer before it was realized that small doses that did not produce any acute effect could increase the risk of cancer. British radiologists who took up the specialty at different periods have, therefore, been studied to see if the risk has now been adequately controlled. Four groups have been studied starting respectively before 1921, in 1921-34, 1935-54, and 1955-77, corresponding approximately to periods when different limits of exposure were applied. Altogether 2698 male radiologists have been identified and all but 27 followed successfully to emigration, death, or survival to January 1 st 1997. Of the 1198 who had died, 228 are known to have died of cancer. Two problems arise in evaluating the carcinogenic hazard to which they were exposed: the assessment of the doses received and the selection of an appropriate control group with which to compare their mortality. The most appropriate comparison group would seem to be medical practitioners in general. In comparison with them, radiologists entering in the first 3 periods had increased risks of death from cancer though appreciably less than would have been predicted from the expected effect of the radiation they had received. Those who joined in the latest period had a relatively reduced risk, irrespective of any effect of the small dose of radiation they are likely to have received. Independent evidence suggests, however, that since 1951 radiologists have smoked less than other doctors and the lower than predicted risk in the groups exposed since 1920 is limited to smoking related cancers, the mortality from other cancers being higher than in doctors generally. In assessing the risk of occupational exposure to radiation, life-style has to be taken into consideration, as well as dose of radiation. (author)

  13. Practical Approaches to Quality Improvement for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aine Marie; Cronin, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Continuous quality improvement is a fundamental attribute of high-performing health care systems. Quality improvement is an essential component of health care, with the current emphasis on adding value. It is also a regulatory requirement, with reimbursements increasingly being linked to practice performance metrics. Practice quality improvement efforts must be demonstrated for credentialing purposes and for certification of radiologists in practice. Continuous quality improvement must occur for radiologists to remain competitive in an increasingly diverse health care market. This review provides an introduction to the main approaches available to undertake practice quality improvement, which will be useful for busy radiologists. Quality improvement plays multiple roles in radiology services, including ensuring and improving patient safety, providing a framework for implementing and improving processes to increase efficiency and reduce waste, analyzing and depicting performance data, monitoring performance and implementing change, enabling personnel assessment and development through continued education, and optimizing customer service and patient outcomes. The quality improvement approaches and underlying principles overlap, which is not surprising given that they all align with good patient care. The application of these principles to radiology practices not only benefits patients but also enhances practice performance through promotion of teamwork and achievement of goals. © RSNA, 2015.

  14. Improving the radiologist-CAD interaction : designing for appropriate trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, W.; Cnossen, F.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) has great potential to improve radiologists' diagnostic performance. However, the reported performance of the radiologist-CAD team is lower than what might be expected based on the performance of the radiologist and the CAD system in isolation. This indicates that the

  15. A simple method to retrospectively estimate patient dose-area product for chest tomosynthesis examinations performed using VolumeRAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Båth, Magnus; Söderman, Christina; Svalkvist, Angelica

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate a method of retrospectively estimating the dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) from digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data available in the scout image. DICOM data were retrieved for 20 patients undergoing chest tomosynthesis using VolumeRAD. Using information about how the exposure parameters for the tomosynthesis examination are determined by the scout image, a correction factor for the adjustment in field size with projection angle was determined. The correction factor was used to estimate the DAP for 20 additional chest tomosynthesis examinations from DICOM data available in the scout images, which was compared with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs acquired during the tomosynthesis examination. A field size correction factor of 0.935 was determined. Applying the developed method using this factor, the average difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was 0.2%, with a standard deviation of 0.8%. However, the difference was not normally distributed and the maximum error was only 1.0%. The validity and reliability of the presented method were thus very high. A method to estimate the DAP of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system from DICOM data in the scout image was developed and validated. As the scout image normally is the only image connected to the tomosynthesis examination stored in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) containing dose data, the method may be of value for retrospectively estimating patient dose in clinical use of chest tomosynthesis.

  16. A simple method to retrospectively estimate patient dose-area product for chest tomosynthesis examinations performed using VolumeRAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Båth, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.bath@vgregion.se; Svalkvist, Angelica [Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg SE-413 45, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg SE-413 45 (Sweden); Söderman, Christina [Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg SE-413 45 (Sweden)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate a method of retrospectively estimating the dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) from digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data available in the scout image. Methods: DICOM data were retrieved for 20 patients undergoing chest tomosynthesis using VolumeRAD. Using information about how the exposure parameters for the tomosynthesis examination are determined by the scout image, a correction factor for the adjustment in field size with projection angle was determined. The correction factor was used to estimate the DAP for 20 additional chest tomosynthesis examinations from DICOM data available in the scout images, which was compared with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs acquired during the tomosynthesis examination. Results: A field size correction factor of 0.935 was determined. Applying the developed method using this factor, the average difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was 0.2%, with a standard deviation of 0.8%. However, the difference was not normally distributed and the maximum error was only 1.0%. The validity and reliability of the presented method were thus very high. Conclusions: A method to estimate the DAP of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system from DICOM data in the scout image was developed and validated. As the scout image normally is the only image connected to the tomosynthesis examination stored in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) containing dose data, the method may be of value for retrospectively estimating patient dose in clinical use of chest tomosynthesis.

  17. A simple method to retrospectively estimate patient dose-area product for chest tomosynthesis examinations performed using VolumeRAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Båth, Magnus; Svalkvist, Angelica; Söderman, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate a method of retrospectively estimating the dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) from digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data available in the scout image. Methods: DICOM data were retrieved for 20 patients undergoing chest tomosynthesis using VolumeRAD. Using information about how the exposure parameters for the tomosynthesis examination are determined by the scout image, a correction factor for the adjustment in field size with projection angle was determined. The correction factor was used to estimate the DAP for 20 additional chest tomosynthesis examinations from DICOM data available in the scout images, which was compared with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs acquired during the tomosynthesis examination. Results: A field size correction factor of 0.935 was determined. Applying the developed method using this factor, the average difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was 0.2%, with a standard deviation of 0.8%. However, the difference was not normally distributed and the maximum error was only 1.0%. The validity and reliability of the presented method were thus very high. Conclusions: A method to estimate the DAP of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system from DICOM data in the scout image was developed and validated. As the scout image normally is the only image connected to the tomosynthesis examination stored in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) containing dose data, the method may be of value for retrospectively estimating patient dose in clinical use of chest tomosynthesis

  18. Assessing Doses to Interventional Radiologists Using a Personal Dosimeter Worn Over a Protective Apron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranden, E.; Widmark, A.; Sekse, T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Interventional radiologists receive significant radiation doses, and it is important to have simple methods for routine monitoring of their exposure. Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a dosimeter worn outside the protective apron for assessments of dose to interventional radiologists. Material and Methods: Assessments of effective dose versus dose to dosimeters worn outside the protective apron were achieved by phantom measurements. Doses outside and under the apron were assessed by phantom measurements and measurements on eight radiologists wearing two routine dosimeters for a 2-month period during ordinary working conditions. Finger doses for the same radiologists were recorded using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD; DXT-RAD Extremity dosimeters). Results: Typical values for the ratio between effective dose and dosimeter dose were found to be about 0.02 when the radiologist used a thyroid shield and about 0.03 without. The ratio between the dose to the dosimeter under and outside a protective apron was found to be less than 0.04. There was very good correlation between finger dose and dosimeter dose. Conclusion: A personal dosimeter worn outside a protective apron is a good screening device for dose to the eyes and fingers as well as for effective dose, even though the effective dose is grossly overestimated. Relatively high dose to the fingers and eyes remains undetected by a dosimeter worn under the apron

  19. Assessing Doses to Interventional Radiologists Using a Personal Dosimeter Worn Over a Protective Apron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stranden, E.; Widmark, A.; Sekse, T. (Buskerud Univ. College, Drammen (Norway))

    2008-05-15

    Background: Interventional radiologists receive significant radiation doses, and it is important to have simple methods for routine monitoring of their exposure. Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a dosimeter worn outside the protective apron for assessments of dose to interventional radiologists. Material and Methods: Assessments of effective dose versus dose to dosimeters worn outside the protective apron were achieved by phantom measurements. Doses outside and under the apron were assessed by phantom measurements and measurements on eight radiologists wearing two routine dosimeters for a 2-month period during ordinary working conditions. Finger doses for the same radiologists were recorded using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD; DXT-RAD Extremity dosimeters). Results: Typical values for the ratio between effective dose and dosimeter dose were found to be about 0.02 when the radiologist used a thyroid shield and about 0.03 without. The ratio between the dose to the dosimeter under and outside a protective apron was found to be less than 0.04. There was very good correlation between finger dose and dosimeter dose. Conclusion: A personal dosimeter worn outside a protective apron is a good screening device for dose to the eyes and fingers as well as for effective dose, even though the effective dose is grossly overestimated. Relatively high dose to the fingers and eyes remains undetected by a dosimeter worn under the apron

  20. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-12-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractures. The two modalities were compared in terms of effectiveness based on simple radiographic readings and US examination results. We also investigated the factors that influenced the effectiveness of US examination. Rib fractures were detected on radiography in 69 patients (34.3%) but not in 132 patients. Rib fractures were diagnosed by using US examination in 160 patients (84.6%). Of the 132 patients who showed no rib fractures on radiography, 92 showed rib fractures on US. Among the 69 patients of rib fracture detected on radiography, 33 had additional rib fractures detected on US. Of the patients, 76 (37.8%) had identical radiographic and US results, and 125 (62.2%) had fractures detected on US that were previously undetected on radiography or additional fractures detected on US. Age, duration until US examination, and fracture location were not significant influencing factors. However, in the group without detected fractures on radiography, US showed a more significant effectiveness than in the group with detected fractures on radiography ( P =0.003). US examination could detect unnoticed rib fractures on simple radiography. US examination is especially more effective in the group without detected fractures on radiography. More attention should be paid to patients with chest trauma who have no detected fractures on radiography.

  1. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-01-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractu...

  2. Preliminary reports in the emergency department: is a subspecialist radiologist more accurate than a radiology resident?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstetter, Barton F; Morgan, Matthew B; Nesbit, Chadd E; Phillips, Jinnah A; Lionetti, David M; Chang, Paul J; Towers, Jeffrey D

    2007-02-01

    To determine whether emergency department (ED) preliminary reports rendered by subspecialist attending radiologists who are reading outside their field of expertise are more accurate than reports rendered by radiology residents, and to compare error rates between radiologists and nonradiologists in the ED setting. The study was performed at a large academic medical center with a busy ED. An electronic preliminary report generator was used in the ED to capture preliminary interpretations rendered in a clinical setting by radiology residents, junior attendings (within 2 years of taking their oral boards), senior attendings, and ED clinicians between August 1999 and November 2004. Each preliminary report was later reviewed by a final interpreting radiologist, and the preliminary interpretation was adjudicated for the presence of substantial discordances, defined as a difference in interpretation that might immediately impact the care of the patient. Of the 612,890 preliminary reports in the database, 65,780 (11%) met inclusion criteria for this study. A log-linear analysis was used to assess the effects of modality and type of author on preliminary report error rates. ED clinicians had significantly higher error rates when compared with any type of radiologist, regardless of modality. Within the radiologists, residents and junior attendings had lower error rates than did senior attendings, but the differences were not statistically significant. Subspecialized attending radiologists who interpret ED examinations outside their area of expertise have error rates similar to those of radiology residents. Nonradiologists have significantly higher error rates than radiologists and radiology residents when interpreting examinations in the ED.

  3. Efficacy of repeated 5-fluorouracil needling for failing and failed filtering surgeries based on simple gonioscopic examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashad MA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad A RashadOphthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: To evaluate the success rate of a modified bleb needling technique in eyes with previous glaucoma surgery that had elevated intraocular pressure.Methods: A retrospective study of 24 eyes of 24 patients that underwent repeated bleb needling performed for failing and failed blebs on slit lamp with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU injections on demand. This was performed after gonioscopic examination to define levels of filtration block.Results: There was significant reduction of mean IOP from 36.91 mmHg to 14.73 mmHg at the final follow-up (P < 0.001. The overall success rate was 92%.Conclusion: Repeated needling with adjunctive 5-FU proved a highly effective, safe alternative to revive filtration surgery rather than another medication or surgery.Keywords: bleb, failure, 5-FU, needling, gonioscopy

  4. A simple framework for assessing technical skills in a resident observed structured clinical examination (OSCE): vaginal laceration repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Abigail Ford; Lerner, Veronica; Zabar, Sondra R; Szyld, Demian

    2013-01-01

    Educators of trainees in procedure-based specialties need focused assessment tools that are valid, objective, and assess technical skills in a realistic context. A framework for hybrid assessment using standardized patient scenarios and bench skills testing might facilitate evaluation of competency. Seven PGY-1 obstetrics and gynecology residents participated in a hybrid assessment that used observed structured clinical examination (OSCE) by a standardized patient who had sustained a vaginal laceration during vaginal delivery. The residents elicited a history and counseled the patient, and then completed a laceration repair on a pelvic model. The residents were rated on their performance in the scenario, which included issues of cultural competency, rapport-building, patient counseling. The technical skills were videotaped and rated using a modified global assessment form by 2 faculty members on a 3-point scale from "not done" to "partly done" to "well-done." Residents also completed a subjective assessment of the station. Mean technical performance of the residents on the technical skills was 55% "well-done," with a range of 20%-90%. The assessment identified 3 residents as below the mean, and 1 resident with areas of deficiency. Subjective assessment by the residents was that juggling the technical, cognitive, and affective components of the examination was challenging. Technical skills can be included in a case-based assessment using scenarios that address a range of cognitive and affective skills required of physicians. Results may help training programs assess individuals' abilities as well as identify program needs for curricular improvement. This framework might be useful in setting standards for competency and identifying poor performers. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233

  6. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  7. Hypervascular mediastinal masses: Action points for radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Fernanda C.; Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice; Madan, Rachna, E-mail: rmadan@partners.org

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •An algorithm combining clinical data and radiology features of hypervascular mediastinal masses is proposed to determine further evaluation and subsequently guide treatment. •Characteristic features and known association with syndromes and genetic mutations assists in achieving a diagnosis. •MRI and functional imaging can be very helpful in the evaluation of hypervascular mediastinal masses. •Identification of hypervascularity within mediastinal masses should alert the radiologist and clinician and an attempt should be made to preferably avoid percutaneous CT guided biopsies and attempt tissue sampling surgically with better control of post procedure hemorrhage. -- Abstract: Hypervascular mediastinal masses are a distinct group of rare diseases that include a subset of benign and malignant entities. Characteristic features and known association with syndromes and genetic mutations assist in achieving a diagnosis. Imaging allows an understanding of the vascularity of the lesion and should alert the radiologist and clinician to potential hemorrhagic complications and avoid percutaneous CT guided biopsies. In such cases, pre-procedure embolization and surgical biopsy maybe considered for better control of post procedure hemorrhage. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the clinical features and radiologic spectrum of hypervascular mediastinal masses, and discuss the associated clinical and genetic syndromes. We will present an imaging algorithm to determine further evaluation and subsequently guide treatment.

  8. Hypervascular mediastinal masses: Action points for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Fernanda C.; Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice; Madan, Rachna

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •An algorithm combining clinical data and radiology features of hypervascular mediastinal masses is proposed to determine further evaluation and subsequently guide treatment. •Characteristic features and known association with syndromes and genetic mutations assists in achieving a diagnosis. •MRI and functional imaging can be very helpful in the evaluation of hypervascular mediastinal masses. •Identification of hypervascularity within mediastinal masses should alert the radiologist and clinician and an attempt should be made to preferably avoid percutaneous CT guided biopsies and attempt tissue sampling surgically with better control of post procedure hemorrhage. -- Abstract: Hypervascular mediastinal masses are a distinct group of rare diseases that include a subset of benign and malignant entities. Characteristic features and known association with syndromes and genetic mutations assist in achieving a diagnosis. Imaging allows an understanding of the vascularity of the lesion and should alert the radiologist and clinician to potential hemorrhagic complications and avoid percutaneous CT guided biopsies. In such cases, pre-procedure embolization and surgical biopsy maybe considered for better control of post procedure hemorrhage. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the clinical features and radiologic spectrum of hypervascular mediastinal masses, and discuss the associated clinical and genetic syndromes. We will present an imaging algorithm to determine further evaluation and subsequently guide treatment

  9. Radiologist and angiographic procedures. Absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tryhus, M.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Kelsey, C.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation dose absorbed by the angiographer during angiographic procedures is of vital importance to the radiologist. Nevertheless, most articles on the subject are incomplete, and few measure gonadal dose. In this study, three TLDs were used for each of the following sites: radiologist's eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without shielding apron, and hands. The average dose during carotid angiograms was 2.6, 4.1, 0.4, 4.7, and 7.1 mrads to the eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without .5 mm of lead shielding, and hands, respectively. Average dose during abdominal and peripheral vascular angiographic procedures was 5.2, 7.5, 1.2, 8.5, and 39.9 mrads to the eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without shielding, and hands, respectively. A literature review demonstrates a significant reduction in radiation dose to the angiographer after the advent of automated injectors. Our measured doses for carotid angiography are compatible with contemporary reported values. There was poor correlation with fluoroscopy time and measured dose to the angiographer

  10. Deep Learning: A Primer for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, Gabriel; Cheng, Phillip M; Vorontsov, Eugene; Drozdzal, Michal; Turcotte, Simon; Pal, Christopher J; Kadoury, Samuel; Tang, An

    2017-01-01

    Deep learning is a class of machine learning methods that are gaining success and attracting interest in many domains, including computer vision, speech recognition, natural language processing, and playing games. Deep learning methods produce a mapping from raw inputs to desired outputs (eg, image classes). Unlike traditional machine learning methods, which require hand-engineered feature extraction from inputs, deep learning methods learn these features directly from data. With the advent of large datasets and increased computing power, these methods can produce models with exceptional performance. These models are multilayer artificial neural networks, loosely inspired by biologic neural systems. Weighted connections between nodes (neurons) in the network are iteratively adjusted based on example pairs of inputs and target outputs by back-propagating a corrective error signal through the network. For computer vision tasks, convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have proven to be effective. Recently, several clinical applications of CNNs have been proposed and studied in radiology for classification, detection, and segmentation tasks. This article reviews the key concepts of deep learning for clinical radiologists, discusses technical requirements, describes emerging applications in clinical radiology, and outlines limitations and future directions in this field. Radiologists should become familiar with the principles and potential applications of deep learning in medical imaging. © RSNA, 2017.

  11. Evaluation and management of patients with peripheral artery disease by interventional radiologists: current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Ethan A; Murphy, Timothy P; Dhangana, Raj; Soares, Gregory M; Ahn, Sun H; Dubel, Gregory J

    2008-05-01

    Traditionally, surgeons have served as primary consultants for patients with peripheral vascular disease for whom revascularization is considered. An important component of care for patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) is risk factor management. The present study was undertaken to determine current management practices of interventional radiologists for patients with PAD and compare them to published data for vascular surgeons. If PAD patient management practices are similar, this would support direct referral of PAD patients who are considered for revascularization from primary care doctors to interventional radiologists. An online survey was administered to full members of the Society of Interventional Radiology with e-mail addresses on file. Filtering was done to examine and compare interactions among several responses. The margin of error for the survey was +/-2%, based on 95% CIs for the entire surveyed population (N=2,371). Seventy-five percent of respondents see PAD patients in ambulatory office settings. Only eight percent see themselves as the physician responsible for risk factor management, similar to reported results of vascular surgeons (10%). Other variables examined, such as frequency of inquiring about Framingham risk factors, indicate similar practices to those previously reported for vascular surgeons. For interventional radiologists who accept direct referrals for medical management of patients with PAD, disease management by interventional radiologists is similar to that previously reported for vascular surgeons. This supports the role of interventional radiologists who accept direct referrals of patients with PAD as primary consultants to primary care doctors.

  12. Fetal Intelligent Navigation Echocardiography (FINE): a novel method for rapid, simple, and automatic examination of the fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto

    2013-09-01

    To describe a novel method (Fetal Intelligent Navigation Echocardiography (FINE)) for visualization of standard fetal echocardiography views from volume datasets obtained with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) and application of 'intelligent navigation' technology. We developed a method to: 1) demonstrate nine cardiac diagnostic planes; and 2) spontaneously navigate the anatomy surrounding each of the nine cardiac diagnostic planes (Virtual Intelligent Sonographer Assistance (VIS-Assistance®)). The method consists of marking seven anatomical structures of the fetal heart. The following echocardiography views are then automatically generated: 1) four chamber; 2) five chamber; 3) left ventricular outflow tract; 4) short-axis view of great vessels/right ventricular outflow tract; 5) three vessels and trachea; 6) abdomen/stomach; 7) ductal arch; 8) aortic arch; and 9) superior and inferior vena cava. The FINE method was tested in a separate set of 50 STIC volumes of normal hearts (18.6-37.2 weeks of gestation), and visualization rates for fetal echocardiography views using diagnostic planes and/or VIS-Assistance® were calculated. To examine the feasibility of identifying abnormal cardiac anatomy, we tested the method in four cases with proven congenital heart defects (coarctation of aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of great vessels and pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum). In normal cases, the FINE method was able to generate nine fetal echocardiography views using: 1) diagnostic planes in 78-100% of cases; 2) VIS-Assistance® in 98-100% of cases; and 3) a combination of diagnostic planes and/or VIS-Assistance® in 98-100% of cases. In all four abnormal cases, the FINE method demonstrated evidence of abnormal fetal cardiac anatomy. The FINE method can be used to visualize nine standard fetal echocardiography views in normal hearts by applying 'intelligent navigation' technology to STIC volume datasets. This method can simplify

  13. Survey of image quality and patient dose in simple radiographic examinations: establishing guidance levels and comparison with international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manatrakul, N.; Bunsoong, T.; Krisanachinda, A.; Suwanpradit, P.; Rungruengthanakit, P.; Kanchart, S.; Chaiwong, Rajikorn; Tsapakig, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate image quality and patient dose for commonly radiographic examinations in Thailand, to establish national reference or guidance levels (GL) and compare with international standards, as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project on Radiation Protection of Patients and Medical Exposure Control (RAS/9/034 and RAS/9/047). Materials and Methods: Film reject rate analysis, image quality and patient dose assessment before and after Quality Control (QC) implementation were investigated in 8 X-ray machines in 4 hospitals. Air kerma (in mGy) at 1 meter focus-detector-distance for different kVp settings for each X-ray machines were measured using an ionization chamber under standardized condition. The entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) for Chest PA, Lumbar spine AP, Lumbar spine LAT, Pelvis AP, Abdomen AP, Skull AP and Skull LAT were calculated for at least 10 adult patients of average body mass (60 to 80 kg) for each projection. The obtained values were compared with international standards. Results: The highest film rejection rate reduction recorded after corrective actions from 9.15% to 6.8%. Mean ESAK values were less than international standards both before and after QC implementation in all projections but Chest PA projection. Maximum ESAK in Chest PA projection before corrective action was 0.55 mGy which was higher than the IAEA GL of 0.2 mGy. However, it was reduced to 0.25 mGy after QC tests on X- ray machine and using high kilovoltage (kV) technique. Conclusion: Proposed national GL of Thailand were obtained by estimating the 3rd quartile of the whole sample: Chest PA: 0.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine AP: 2.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine LAT: 6.3 mGy, Pelvis AP: 1.8 mGy, Abdomen: 1.5 mGy, Skull PA: 1.3 mGy and Skull LAT: 0.9 mGy. (author)

  14. Rule induction performance in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's dementia: examining the role of simple and biconditional rule learning processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterman, Joukje M; Heringa, Sophie M; Kessels, Roy P C; Biessels, Geert Jan; Koek, Huiberdina L; Maes, Joseph H R; van den Berg, Esther

    2017-04-01

    Rule induction tests such as the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test require executive control processes, but also the learning and memorization of simple stimulus-response rules. In this study, we examined the contribution of diminished learning and memorization of simple rules to complex rule induction test performance in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Twenty-six aMCI patients, 39 AD patients, and 32 control participants were included. A task was used in which the memory load and the complexity of the rules were independently manipulated. This task consisted of three conditions: a simple two-rule learning condition (Condition 1), a simple four-rule learning condition (inducing an increase in memory load, Condition 2), and a complex biconditional four-rule learning condition-inducing an increase in complexity and, hence, executive control load (Condition 3). Performance of AD patients declined disproportionately when the number of simple rules that had to be memorized increased (from Condition 1 to 2). An additional increment in complexity (from Condition 2 to 3) did not, however, disproportionately affect performance of the patients. Performance of the aMCI patients did not differ from that of the control participants. In the patient group, correlation analysis showed that memory performance correlated with Condition 1 performance, whereas executive task performance correlated with Condition 2 performance. These results indicate that the reduced learning and memorization of underlying task rules explains a significant part of the diminished complex rule induction performance commonly reported in AD, although results from the correlation analysis suggest involvement of executive control functions as well. Taken together, these findings suggest that care is needed when interpreting rule induction task performance in terms of executive function deficits in these patients.

  15. Coronary anomalies: what the radiologist should know*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Priscilla Ornellas; Andrade, Joalbo; Monção, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies comprise a diverse group of malformations, some of them asymptomatic with a benign course, and the others related to symptoms as chest pain and sudden death. Such anomalies may be classified as follows: 1) anomalies of origination and course; 2) anomalies of intrinsic coronary arterial anatomy; 3) anomalies of coronary termination. The origin and the proximal course of anomalous coronary arteries are the main prognostic factors, and interarterial course or a coronary artery is considered to be malignant due its association with increased risk of sudden death. Coronary computed tomography angiography has become the reference method for such an assessment as it detects not only anomalies in origination of these arteries, but also its course in relation to other mediastinal structures, which plays a relevant role in the definition of the therapeutic management. Finally, it is essential for radiologists to recognize and characterize such anomalies. PMID:26379322

  16. Virtual colonoscopy training and accreditation: a national survey of radiologist experience and attitudes in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burling, D.; Moore, A.; Taylor, S.; La Porte, S.; Marshall, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Expert consensus recommends directed training and possibly in the future, formal accreditation before independent virtual colonoscopy (VC) reporting. We surveyed radiologists' experience of VC training, compared with barium enema, and assessed attitudes towards accreditation. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was sent to 78 consultant radiologists from 72 centres (65 National Health Service hospitals; seven independent primary screening centres) offering a VC service. Results: Fifty-four (69%) eligible radiologists responded. They had interpreted 18,152 examinations (range 3-1500) in total versus 232,350 (13 times more) barium enemas. Twenty-two (41%) deemed their VC training as inadequate [including five (45%) of screening centre radiologists], and only 14 (26%) had attended a training workshop due to lack of availability (54%) or financial/study leave constraints (24%). Eleven (20%) radiologists routinely double-reported VC examinations versus 37 (69%) barium enemas, yet 21 (39%) considered requirements for VC training were greater than barium enema. Thirty-eight (70%) favoured accreditation beyond internal audit for VC versus 15(28%) for barium enema. Of these 38, seven (18%) favoured 'one-off,' and 18 (47%) periodic testing, with 16 (42%) favouring external audit alone or in combination with testing. Overall, 42 (78%) considered specific accreditation for reporting screening examinations appropriate and 45 (83%) respondents preferred a national radiological organization to regulate such a scheme. Conclusion: There is wide variability in reporting experience and recommendations for VC training have not been widely adopted, in part due to limited access to dedicated workshops. UK radiologists are generally in favour of VC accreditation, governed by a national radiology organization

  17. Computer hardware for radiologists: Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit I

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Computers are an integral part of modern radiology equipment. In the first half of this two-part article, we dwelt upon some fundamental concepts regarding computer hardware, covering components like motherboard, central processing unit (CPU, chipset, random access memory (RAM, and memory modules. In this article, we describe the remaining computer hardware components that are of relevance to radiology. "Storage drive" is a term describing a "memory" hardware used to store data for later retrieval. Commonly used storage drives are hard drives, floppy drives, optical drives, flash drives, and network drives. The capacity of a hard drive is dependent on many factors, including the number of disk sides, number of tracks per side, number of sectors on each track, and the amount of data that can be stored in each sector. "Drive interfaces" connect hard drives and optical drives to a computer. The connections of such drives require both a power cable and a data cable. The four most popular "input/output devices" used commonly with computers are the printer, monitor, mouse, and keyboard. The "bus" is a built-in electronic signal pathway in the motherboard to permit efficient and uninterrupted data transfer. A motherboard can have several buses, including the system bus, the PCI express bus, the PCI bus, the AGP bus, and the (outdated ISA bus. "Ports" are the location at which external devices are connected to a computer motherboard. All commonly used peripheral devices, such as printers, scanners, and portable drives, need ports. A working knowledge of computers is necessary for the radiologist if the workflow is to realize its full potential and, besides, this knowledge will prepare the radiologist for the coming innovations in the ′ever increasing′ digital future.

  18. Computer hardware for radiologists: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrajit, IK; Alam, A

    2010-01-01

    Computers are an integral part of modern radiology equipment. In the first half of this two-part article, we dwelt upon some fundamental concepts regarding computer hardware, covering components like motherboard, central processing unit (CPU), chipset, random access memory (RAM), and memory modules. In this article, we describe the remaining computer hardware components that are of relevance to radiology. “Storage drive” is a term describing a “memory” hardware used to store data for later retrieval. Commonly used storage drives are hard drives, floppy drives, optical drives, flash drives, and network drives. The capacity of a hard drive is dependent on many factors, including the number of disk sides, number of tracks per side, number of sectors on each track, and the amount of data that can be stored in each sector. “Drive interfaces” connect hard drives and optical drives to a computer. The connections of such drives require both a power cable and a data cable. The four most popular “input/output devices” used commonly with computers are the printer, monitor, mouse, and keyboard. The “bus” is a built-in electronic signal pathway in the motherboard to permit efficient and uninterrupted data transfer. A motherboard can have several buses, including the system bus, the PCI express bus, the PCI bus, the AGP bus, and the (outdated) ISA bus. “Ports” are the location at which external devices are connected to a computer motherboard. All commonly used peripheral devices, such as printers, scanners, and portable drives, need ports. A working knowledge of computers is necessary for the radiologist if the workflow is to realize its full potential and, besides, this knowledge will prepare the radiologist for the coming innovations in the ‘ever increasing’ digital future

  19. Physician rating websites: do radiologists have an online presence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kirven; Hawkins, C Matthew; Hughes, Danny R; Patel, Kishen; Gogia, Navdeep; Sekhar, Aarti; Duszak, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Given that patient satisfaction and provider transparency intersect on online physician-rating websites, we aimed to assess radiologist representation on these increasingly popular sites. From a directory of all Medicare participating physicians, we randomly selected 1,000 self-designated diagnostic radiologists and manually extracted their rating information from five popular online physician-review websites (HealthGrades, Healthcare Reviews, RateMDs, Kudzu, and Yelp). Using automated web "data-scraping" techniques, we separately extracted all radiologist and nonradiologist rating information from a single amenable site (Healthcare Reviews). Rating characteristics were analyzed. Of 1,000 sampled self-designated diagnostic radiologists representing all 50 states, only 197 (19.7%) were profiled on any of the five online physician-review websites. Only 24 (2.4%) were rated on two of the sites, and none was profiled on ≥3 sites. Of all 6,775 physicians listed on a single electronically interrogated site, only 30 (0.4%) were radiologists. With 28,555 (5.2%) of all 547,849 Medicare-participating physicians identified as diagnostic radiologists, radiologists were thus significantly underrepresented online (P < .0001). Although reviewed radiologists and nonradiologists were rated online by similar numbers of patients (1.13 ± 0.43 versus 1.03 ± 0.22, P = .22), radiologists were rated (on a low to high score of 1 to 10) significantly higher than nonradiologists (median 8.5 versus 5, P = .04). Most diagnostic radiologists are not profiled on common online physician-rating websites, and they are significantly underrepresented compared with nonradiologists. Reviewed radiologists, however, scored favorably. Given the potential for patient satisfaction scores and public domain information to affect referrals and future value-based payments, initiatives to enhance radiologists' online presence are advised. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by

  20. Diagnostic Performance on Low Dose Computed Tomography For Acute Appendicitis Among Attending and Resident Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chih-Chen; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wu; Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Patricia Wanping; Irama, Wiwan; Chen, Wei Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) techniques can reduce exposure to radiation. Several previous studies have shown that radiation dose reduction in LDCT does not decrease the diagnostic performance for appendicitis among attending radiologists. But, the LDCT diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis in radiology residents with variable training levels has not been well discussed. To compare inter-observer and intra-observer differences of diagnostic performance on non-enhanced LDCT (NE-LDCT) and contrast-enhanced standard dose CT (CE-SDCT) for acute appendicitis among attending and resident radiologists. This retrospective study included 101 patients with suspected acute appendicitis who underwent NE-LDCT and CE-SDCT. The CT examinations were interpreted and recorded on a five-point scale independently by three attending radiologists and three residents with 4, 1 and 1 years of training. Diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis of all readers on both examinations was represented by area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Inter-observer and intra-observer AUC values were compared using Jackknife FROC software on both modalities. The diagnostic accuracy of each reader on NE-LDCT was compared with body mass index (BMI) subgroups and noise using independent T test. Diagnostic performances for acute appendicitis were not statistically different for attending radiologists at both examinations. Better performance was noted on the CE-SDCT with a borderline significant difference (P = 0.05) for senior radiology resident. No statistical difference of AUC values was observed between attending radiologists and fourth year resident on both examinations. Statistically signifi@@cant differences of AUC values were observed between attending radiologists and first year residents (P = 0.001 ~ 0.018) on NE-LDCT. Diagnostic accuracies of acute appendicitis on NE-LDCT for each reader were not significantly related to BMI or noise. Attending radiologists

  1. Radiologists' Training, Experience, and Attitudes About Elder Abuse Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Tony; Bloemen, Elizabeth M; Harpe, Jasmin; Sanchez, Allen M; Mennitt, Kevin W; McCarthy, Thomas J; Nicola, Refky; Murphy, Kieran; LoFaso, Veronica M; Flomenbaum, Neal; Lachs, Mark S

    2016-12-01

    Elder abuse is underrecognized, and identification of subtle cases requires a high index of suspicion among all health care providers. Because many geriatric injury victims undergo radiographic imaging, diagnostic radiologists may be well positioned to identify injury patterns suggestive of abuse. Little is known about radiologists' experience with elder abuse. Our goal was to describe knowledge, attitudes, training, and practice experience in elder abuse detection among diagnostic radiologists. We conducted 19 interviews with diagnostic radiologists at a large urban academic medical center using a semistructured format. Data from these sessions were coded and analyzed to identify themes. Only two radiologists reported any formal or informal training in elder abuse detection. All subjects believed they had missed cases of elder abuse. Even experienced radiologists reported never having received a request from a referring physician to assess images for evidence suggestive of elder abuse. All subjects reported a desire for additional elder abuse training. Also, subjects identified radiographic findings or patterns potentially suggestive of elder abuse, including high-energy injuries such as upper rib fractures, injuries in multiple stages of healing, and injuries inconsistent with reported mechanism. Radiologists are uniquely positioned to identify elder abuse. Though training in detection is currently lacking, providers expressed a desire for increased knowledge. In addition, radiologists were able to identify radiographic findings suggestive of elder abuse. On the basis of these findings, we plan to conduct additional studies to define pathognomonic injury patterns and to explore how to empower radiologists to incorporate detection into their practice.

  2. Effect of voice recognition on radiologist reporting time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhan, S.N.; Coblentz, C.L.; Norman, G.R.; Ali, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect that voice recognition (VR) has on radiologist reporting efficiency in a clinical setting and to identify variables associated with faster reporting time. Five radiologists were observed during the routine reporting of 402 plain radiograph studies using either VR (n 217) or conventional dictation (CD) (n = 185). Two radiologists were observed reporting 66 computed tomography (CT) studies using either VR (n - 39) or CD (n - 27). The time spent per reporting cycle, defined as the radiologist's time spent on a study from report finalization to the subsequent report finalization, was compared. As well, characteristics about the radiologist and their reporting style were collected and correlated against reporting time. For plain radiographs, radiologists took 134% (P = 0.048) more time to produce reports using VR, but there was significant variability between radiologists. Significant association with faster reporting times using VR included: English as a first language (r-0.24), use of a template (r -0.34), use of a headset microphone (r -0.46), and increased experience with VR (r -0.43). Experience as a staff radiologist and having previous study for comparison did not correlate with reporting time. For CT, there was no significant difference in reporting time identified between VR and CD (P 0.61). Overall, VR slightly decreases the reporting efficiency of radiologists. However, efficiency may be improved if English is a first language, a headset microphone, and macros and templates are use. (author)

  3. Who should be performing routine abdominal ultrasound? A prospective double-blind study comparing the accuracy of radiologist and radiographer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, A.; Lockyer, H.; Virjee, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To compare the accuracy of radiographers and radiologists in routine abdominal ultrasound. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred consecutive patients attending for routine abdominal ultrasound were included. Each patient was examined by both a radiographer and radiologist. Both operators noted their findings and wrote a concluding report without conferring. Reports were compared. Where there was disagreement the patient was either re-examined by another radiologist or had further investigation. RESULTS: Of 100 patients, 52 were men and 48 were women. The age range was 19-88 years (median 52 years). Thirty-seven patients had renal tract ultrasound, one had an aortic ultrasound and 62 had general upper abdominal ultrasound. In 44 cases both operators reported the examination as normal. In 49 cases both operators reported the examinations as abnormal and there was complete agreement between the operators. In seven cases there was not complete agreement between operators. Three of these disagreements were considered minor and four major. In three of the seven cases the radiographer was correct, and in four the radiologist was correct. CONCLUSION: Experienced radiographers and radiologists are highly accurate in performing and interpreting routine abdominal sonography. Both operators missed a small minority of abnormalities. There was no statistically significant difference in the accuracy of radiographers and radiologist. Leslie, A. (2000)

  4. Radiographer and radiologist perception error in reporting double contrast barium enemas: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Alison M.; Mannion, Richard A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The practice of radiographers performing double contrast barium enemas (DCBE) is now widespread and in many centres the radiographer's opinion is, at least, contributing to a dual reporting system [Bewell J, Chapman AH. Radiographer performed barium enemas - results of a survey to assess progress. Radiography 1996;2:199-205; Leslie A, Virjee JP. Detection of colorectal carcinoma on double contrast barium enema when double reporting is routinely performed: an audit of current practice. Clin Radiol 2001;57:184-7; Culpan DG, Mitchell AJ, Hughes S, Nutman M, Chapman AH. Double contrast barium enema sensitivity: a comparison of studies by radiographers and radiologists. Clin Radiol 2002;57:604-7]. To ensure this change in practice does not lead to an increase in reporting errors, this study aimed to compare the perception abilities of radiographers with those of radiologists. Methods: Three gastro-intestinal (GI) radiographers and three consultant radiologists independently reported on a selection of 50 DCBE examinations, including the level of certainty in their comments for each examination. A blinded comparison of the results with an independent 'standard report' was recorded. Results: The results demonstrate there was no significant difference in perception error for any of the levels of certainty, for single reporting, for double reading by a radiographer/radiologist or by two radiologists. Conclusions: The study shows that radiographers can perceive abnormalities on DCBE at similar sensitivities and specificities as radiologists. While the participants in the study may be typical of a district general hospital, the nature of the study gives it limited external validity. As a pilot, the results demonstrate that, with slight modification, the methodology could be used for a larger study

  5. Double contrast barium enema sensitivity: A comparison of studies by radiographers and radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culpan, D.G.; Mitchell, A.J.; Hughes, S.; Nutman, M.; Chapman, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: A retrospective study of histologically proven cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) was performed to assess whether the sensitivity of the radiographer-performed double contrast barium enema (DCBE) differed from that of the radiologist-performed study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Histologically proven cases of CRC were reviewed over a 3-year period to ascertain whether: the diagnosis had been made by DCBE in the 3 years before histological diagnosis; the lesion had been correctly diagnosed; the examination had been performed by a radiologist or radiographer. RESULTS: In the 3-year period there were 478 cases with histologically proven CRC. Of these, 239 (50%) had undergone DCBE as the initial radiological investigation of the colon. Sixty-four examinations had been performed by radiographers. A correct diagnosis was made in 58 cases (90.6%), the report was equivocal in one case (1.6%), there were four false-negatives (6.25%), and one case was abandoned (1.6%). One hundred and seventy-five examinations were performed by radiologists. A correct diagnosis was made in 157 cases (89.7%), the report was equivocal in one case (0.6%), there were 16 false-negatives (9.1%), and one case was abandoned (0.6%). CONCLUSION: A sensitivity of 90.6% for radiographer-performed studies compared favourably with 89.7% for radiologist-performed studies and supports the practice of radiographers undertaking barium enemas. Culpan, D.G. et al. (2002)

  6. A radiologist's guide to small bowel and multivisceral transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, E.M.; Upponi, S.S.; See, T.C.; Cheow, H.K.; Sivaprakasam, R.; Butler, A.J.; Whitley, S.

    2013-01-01

    This review will describe the indications for the various small bowel containing transplants. The importance of early referral will be highlighted. Radiologists play a central role in assessing these complex patients prior to transplantation. Furthermore, in the postoperative period, radiologists play an important part in diagnosing and treating complications

  7. First-trimester emergencies: a radiologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Catherine H; Wortman, Jeremy R; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S; Sodickson, Aaron D; Doubilet, Peter M; Khurana, Bharti

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to help the practitioner ensure early diagnosis and response to emergencies in the first trimester by reviewing anatomy of the developing embryo, highlighting the sonographic appearance of common first-trimester emergencies, and discussing key management pathways for treating emergent cases. First-trimester fetal development is a stepwise process that can be challenging to evaluate in the emergency department (ED) setting. This is due, in part, to the complex anatomy of early pregnancy, subtlety of the sonographic findings, and the fact that fewer than half of patients with ectopic pregnancy present with the classic clinical findings of a positive pregnancy test, vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, and tender adnexa. Ultrasound (US) has been the primary approach to diagnostic imaging of first-trimester emergencies, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) playing a supportive role in a small minority of cases. Familiarity with the sonographic findings diagnostic of and suspicious for early pregnancy failure, ectopic pregnancy, retained products of conception, gestational trophoblastic disease, failed intrauterine devices, and complications associated with assisted reproductive technology (ART) is critical for any emergency radiologist. Evaluation of first-trimester emergencies is challenging, and knowledge of key imaging findings and familiarity with management pathways are needed to ensure early diagnosis and response.

  8. Diagnostic performance of radiographers as compared to radiologists in magnetic resonance colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijta, F.M.; Florie, J.; Jensch, S.; Bipat, S.; Nievelstein, R.A.J.; Poulus, M.; Thomassen-de Graaf, M.A.; Montauban van Swijndregt, A.D.; Stoker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of radiographers compared to radiologists in the detection of colorectal lesions in MR colonography. Material and methods: 159 patients at increased risk of colorectal cancer were included. Four different experienced observers, one MR radiologist, one radiologist in training and two radiographers evaluated all MR colonography examinations. The protocol included T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in prone and supine position. Colonoscopy was used as reference standard. Mean sensitivity rates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined on a per-patient and per-polyp basis, segmented by size (≥6 mm and ≥10 mm). Specificity was calculated on a per-patient basis. The McNemar and chi-square (χ 2 ) test was used to determine significant differences. Results: At colonoscopy 74 patients (47%) had normal findings; 23 patients had 40 polyps with a size ≥6 mm. In 10 patients at least 1 polyp ≥10 mm was found (20 polyps in total). Similar sensitivities for patients with lesions ≥10 mm were found for radiologists and radiographers (65% (95%CI: 44-86%) vs. 50% (95%CI: 28-72%)) (p = n.s.). For lesions ≥10 mm combined per-patient specificity for radiologists and radiographers was 96% (95%CI: 94-98%) and 73% (95%CI: 68-79%) (p < 0.0001). Combined per-patient sensitivity for lesions ≥6 mm differed significantly between both groups of observers (57% (95%CI: 42-71%) vs. 33% (95%CI: 19-46%)) (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Radiographers have comparable sensitivity but lower specificity relative to radiologists in the detection of colorectal lesions ≥10 mm at MR colonography. Adequate training in evaluating MR colonography is necessary, especially for readers with no prior experience with colonography.

  9. Personal and Network Dynamics in Performance of Knowledge Workers: A Study of Australian Breast Radiologists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedamir Tavakoli Taba

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a theoretical model based upon previous studies about personal and social network dynamics of job performance. We provide empirical support for this model using real-world data within the context of the Australian radiology profession. An examination of radiologists' professional network topology through structural-positional and relational dimensions and radiologists' personal characteristics in terms of knowledge, experience and self-esteem is provided. Thirty one breast imaging radiologists completed a purpose designed questionnaire regarding their network characteristics and personal attributes. These radiologists also independently read a test set of 60 mammographic cases: 20 cases with cancer and 40 normal cases. A Jackknife free response operating characteristic (JAFROC method was used to measure the performance of the radiologists' in detecting breast cancers.Correlational analyses showed that reader performance was positively correlated with the social network variables of degree centrality and effective size, but negatively correlated with constraint and hierarchy. For personal characteristics, the number of mammograms read per year and self-esteem (self-evaluation positively correlated with reader performance. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that the combination of number of mammograms read per year and network's effective size, hierarchy and tie strength was the best fitting model, explaining 63.4% of the variance in reader performance. The results from this study indicate the positive relationship between reading high volumes of cases by radiologists and expertise development, but also strongly emphasise the association between effective social/professional interactions and informal knowledge sharing with high performance.

  10. Does radiation exposure produce a protective effect among radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.M.; Sternberg, A.; Elliott, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The mortality experience of radiologists compared to that of other physician specialists demonstrates an increased risk of cancer deaths as well as deaths from all causes among physicians practicing in the early years of this century. However, for the radiologists who joined specialty societies after 1940, the age pattern of deaths has changed. Whereas among early entrants, young radiologists had higher mortality rates than those of other specialists; among later entrants, the young radiologists have lower mortality. However, as these later-entrant radiologists age, their rates appear to exceed those of other specialists. Although the level of radiation exposure is unknown, physicians in more recent years usually have lower cumulative doses. Lower radiation exposure may be one of a number of possible explanatory factors for the cross-over from protected to higher risk status as these physicians age

  11. The Prospective External Validation of International Ovarian Tumor Analysis (IOTA) Simple Rules in the Hands of Level I and II Examiners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafel, A; Banas, T; Nocun, A; Wiechec, M; Jach, R; Ludwin, A; Kabzinska-Turek, M; Pietrus, M; Pitynski, K

    2016-10-01

    Objective: To externally validate the International Ovarian Tumor Analysis (IOTA) Simple Rules (SR) by examiners with different levels of sonographic experience defined by the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) and to assess the morphological ultrasound features of the adnexal tumors classified as inconclusive based on IOTA SR. Materials and Methods: In the two-year prospective study adnexal tumors were assessed preoperatively with transvaginal ultrasound by examiners with different levels of experience (level 1- IOTA SR1, level 2-IOTA SR2). Additionally, an expert (level 3) evaluated all tumors by subjective assessment (SA). If the rules could not be applied, the tumors were considered inconclusive. The final diagnosis was based on the histopathological result of the removed mass. The diagnostic performance measures for the assessed model were sensitivity, specificity, negative (LR-) and positive(LR+) likelihood ratios, accuracy (ACC) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). Results: 226 women with adnexal tumors scheduled for surgery were included in the stutdy. The prevalence of malignancy was 36.3 % in the group of all studied tumors and was 52.5 % in the inconclusive group (n = 40) (p = 0.215). Fewer tumors were classified as inconclusive by level 2 examiners compared to level 1 examiners [20 (8.8 %) vs. 40 (17.7 %); p = 0.008], resulting from the discrepancy in the evaluation of acoustic shadows and the vascularization within the tumor. For level 1 examiners a diagnostic strategy using IOTA SR1 +MA (assuming malignancy when SR inconclusive) achieved a sensitivity, specificity and DOR of 96.3 %, 81.9 %, 13.624 respectively. For level 2 examiners the diagnostic strategy for IOTA SR2 +MA achieved a sensitivity, specificity and DOR of 95.1 %, 89.6 %, 137,143, respectively. Adding SA by an expert (or level 3 examiner) when IOTA SR were not applicable improved the specificity of the test and

  12. A Simple Technique for Shoulder Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna-Serna, J.D.; Redondo, M.V.; Martinez, F.; Reus, M.; Alonso, J.; Parrilla, A.; Campos, P.A. [Virgen de la Arrixaca Univ. Hospital, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To present a systematic approach to teaching a technique for arthrography of the shoulder. Using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates, precise sites for puncture can be identified and the need for fluoroscopic guidance obviated. Material and Methods: Forty-six glenohumeral arthrograms were performed in 45 patients; in 1 case involving examination of both shoulders. The stages of the technique are described in detail, as are the fundamental aspects of achieving an effective glenohumeral injection. Pain intensity was measured in all patients using a verbal description scale. Results: Shoulder arthrography was successful in all cases. Average time taken for the procedure was 7 min, with no difference in the respective times required by an experienced radiologist and a resident. The procedure was well tolerated by most patients, with slight discomfort being observed in a very few cases. Conclusion: The arthrographic technique used in this study is simple, safe, rapid, and reproducible, and has the advantage of precise localization of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure described in this study can be of help in teaching residents and can reduce the learning curve for radiologists with no experience in arthrographic methods. It also reduces the time of exposure to fluoroscopy Keywords: Arthrography, joint, shoulder.

  13. Association between Radiologists' Experience and Accuracy in Interpreting Screening Mammograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristany Maria-Teresa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiologists have been observed to differ, sometimes substantially, both in their interpretations of mammograms and in their recommendations for follow-up. The aim of this study was to determine how factors related to radiologists' experience affect the accuracy of mammogram readings. Methods We selected a random sample of screening mammograms from a population-based breast cancer screening program. The sample was composed of 30 women with histopathologically-confirmed breast cancer and 170 women without breast cancer after a 2-year follow-up (the proportion of cancers was oversampled. These 200 mammograms were read by 21 radiologists routinely interpreting mammograms, with different amount of experience, and by seven readers who did not routinely interpret mammograms. All readers were blinded to the results of the screening. A positive assessment was considered when a BI-RADS III, 0, IV, V was reported (additional evaluation required. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated through sensitivity and specificity. Results Average specificity was higher in radiologists routinely interpreting mammograms with regard to radiologists who did not (66% vs 56%; p Conclusion Among radiologists who read routinely, volume is not associated with better performance when interpreting screening mammograms, although specificity decreased in radiologists not routinely reading mammograms. Follow-up of cases for which further workup is recommended might reduce variability in mammogram readings and improve the quality of breast cancer screening programs.

  14. Image quality preferences among radiographers and radiologists. A conjoint analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ween, Borgny; Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Hamilton, Glenys A.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality preferences among radiographers and radiologists. The radiographers' preferences are mainly related to technical parameters, whereas radiologists assess image quality based on diagnostic value. Methods: A conjoint analysis was undertaken to survey image quality preferences; the study included 37 respondents: 19 radiographers and 18 radiologists. Digital urograms were post-processed into 8 images with different properties of image quality for 3 different patients. The respondents were asked to rank the images according to their personally perceived subjective image quality. Results: Nearly half of the radiographers and radiologists were consistent in their ranking of the image characterised as 'very best image quality'. The analysis showed, moreover, that chosen filtration level and image intensity were responsible for 72% and 28% of the preferences, respectively. The corresponding figures for each of the two professions were 76% and 24% for the radiographers, and 68% and 32% for the radiologists. In addition, there were larger variations in image preferences among the radiologists, as compared to the radiographers. Conclusions: Radiographers revealed a more consistent preference than the radiologists with respect to image quality. There is a potential for image quality improvement by developing sets of image property criteria

  15. Radiation protection knowledge among radiologists in northwest Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macía-Suárez, D; Sánchez-Rodríguez, E

    2018-05-16

    To estimate radiologistś level of knowledge of and their implication in radioprotection. An anonymous and supervised survey was conducted during a work meeting. Of the 65 questionnaires handed out, 63 were returned. In general, the radiologists surveyed considered their level of knowledge to be low, and it was statistically demonstrated (P = 0.018) that the level of knowledge they believed they had was related to the number of correct answers. The level of knowledge that radiologists believed they had was also related (p knowledge about radiation protection. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of radiologists' expertise on screen results decisions in a CT lung cancer screening trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Jong, Pim A. de; Mali, Willem P.; Groen, Harry J.M.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of radiological expertise on screen result decisions in a CT lung cancer screening trial. In the NELSON lung cancer screening trial, the baseline CT result was based on the largest lung nodule's volume. The protocol allowed radiologists to manually adjust screen results in cases of high suspicion of benign or malignant nodule nature. Participants whose baseline CT result was based on a solid or part-solid nodule were included in this study. Adjustments by radiologists at baseline were evaluated. Histology was the reference for diagnosis or to confirm benignity and stability on subsequent CT examinations. A total of 3,318 participants (2,796 male, median age 58.0 years) were included. In 195 participants (5.9 %) the initial baseline screen result was adjusted by the radiologist. Adjustment was downwards from positive or indeterminate to negative in two and 119 participants, respectively, and from positive to indeterminate in 65 participants. None of these nodules turned out to be malignant. In 9/195 participants (4.6 %) the screen result was adjusted upwards from negative to indeterminate or indeterminate to positive; two nodules were malignant. In one in 20 cases of baseline lung cancer screening, nodules were reclassified by the radiologist, leading to a reduction of false-positive screen results. (orig.)

  17. Impact of a voice recognition system on report cycle time and radiologist reading time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melson, David L.; Brophy, Robert; Blaine, G. James; Jost, R. Gilbert; Brink, Gary S.

    1998-07-01

    Because of its exciting potential to improve clinical service, as well as reduce costs, a voice recognition system for radiological dictation was recently installed at our institution. This system will be clinically successful if it dramatically reduces radiology report turnaround time without substantially affecting radiologist dictation and editing time. This report summarizes an observer study currently under way in which radiologist reporting times using the traditional transcription system and the voice recognition system are compared. Four radiologists are observed interpreting portable intensive care unit (ICU) chest examinations at a workstation in the chest reading area. Data are recorded with the radiologists using the transcription system and using the voice recognition system. The measurements distinguish between time spent performing clerical tasks and time spent actually dictating the report. Editing time and the number of corrections made are recorded. Additionally, statistics are gathered to assess the voice recognition system's impact on the report cycle time -- the time from report dictation to availability of an edited and finalized report -- and the length of reports.

  18. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) interpretation: discrepancy rates among experienced radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abujudeh, Hani H.; Boland, Giles W.; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Rabiner, Pavel; Thrall, James H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Halpern, Elkarn F.; Gazelle, G.S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Institute for Technology Assessment, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    To assess the discrepancy rate for the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations among experienced radiologists. Ninety abdominal and pelvic CT examinations reported by three experienced radiologists who specialize in abdominal imaging were randomly selected from the radiological database. The same radiologists, blinded to previous interpretation, were asked to re-interpret 60 examinations: 30 of their previous interpretations and 30 interpreted by others. All reports were assessed for the degree of discrepancy between initial and repeat interpretations according to a three-level scoring system: no discrepancy, minor, or major discrepancy. Inter- and intrareader discrepancy rates and causes were evaluated. CT examinations included in the investigation were performed on 90 patients (43 men, mean age 59 years, SD 14, range 19-88) for the following indications: follow-up/evaluation of malignancy (69/90, 77%), pancreatitis (5/90, 6%), urinary tract stone (4/90, 4%) or other (12/90, 13%). Interobserver and intraobserver major discrepancy rates were 26 and 32%, respectively. Major discrepancies were due to missed findings, different opinions regarding interval change of clinically significant findings, and the presence of recommendation. Major discrepancy of between 26 and 32% was observed in the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT examinations. (orig.)

  19. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) interpretation: discrepancy rates among experienced radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abujudeh, Hani H.; Boland, Giles W.; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Rabiner, Pavel; Thrall, James H.; Halpern, Elkarn F.; Gazelle, G.S.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the discrepancy rate for the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations among experienced radiologists. Ninety abdominal and pelvic CT examinations reported by three experienced radiologists who specialize in abdominal imaging were randomly selected from the radiological database. The same radiologists, blinded to previous interpretation, were asked to re-interpret 60 examinations: 30 of their previous interpretations and 30 interpreted by others. All reports were assessed for the degree of discrepancy between initial and repeat interpretations according to a three-level scoring system: no discrepancy, minor, or major discrepancy. Inter- and intrareader discrepancy rates and causes were evaluated. CT examinations included in the investigation were performed on 90 patients (43 men, mean age 59 years, SD 14, range 19-88) for the following indications: follow-up/evaluation of malignancy (69/90, 77%), pancreatitis (5/90, 6%), urinary tract stone (4/90, 4%) or other (12/90, 13%). Interobserver and intraobserver major discrepancy rates were 26 and 32%, respectively. Major discrepancies were due to missed findings, different opinions regarding interval change of clinically significant findings, and the presence of recommendation. Major discrepancy of between 26 and 32% was observed in the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT examinations. (orig.)

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... things you can do to prepare for the examination. First of all, discuss with your doctor any ... devices may malfunction or cause problems during the examination. Most MRI exams are relatively painless. However, some ...

  1. Book Review: Radiology where there are no radiologists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. "Radiology Where There Are no Radiologists" "Manual of Radiographic interpretation for General Practitioners" Palmer, ps., Cockshott, WP., Hegedus v., Samuel, E.: WHO Basic Radiological System WHO, Geneva, 1985 (SFr. 23) ...

  2. Logistics of Three-dimensional Printing: Primer for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgdon, Taryn; Danrad, Raman; Patel, Midhir J; Smith, Stacy E; Richardson, Michael L; Ballard, David H; Ali, Sayed; Trace, Anthony Paul; DeBenedectis, Carolynn M; Zygmont, Matthew E; Lenchik, Leon; Decker, Summer J

    2018-01-01

    The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on three-dimensional (3D) printing presents a review of the logistic considerations for establishing a clinical service using this new technology, specifically focused on implications for radiology. Specific topics include printer selection for 3D printing, software selection, creating a 3D model for printing, providing a 3D printing service, research directions, and opportunities for radiologists to be involved in 3D printing. A thorough understanding of the technology and its capabilities is necessary as the field of 3D printing continues to grow. Radiologists are in the unique position to guide this emerging technology and its use in the clinical arena. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Artificial Intelligence: Threat or Boon to Radiologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recht, Michael; Bryan, R Nick

    2017-11-01

    The development and integration of machine learning/artificial intelligence into routine clinical practice will significantly alter the current practice of radiology. Changes in reimbursement and practice patterns will also continue to affect radiology. But rather than being a significant threat to radiologists, we believe these changes, particularly machine learning/artificial intelligence, will be a boon to radiologists by increasing their value, efficiency, accuracy, and personal satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationships between radiologists and clinicians: Results from three surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Palma, L.; Stacul, F.; Meduri, S.; Geitung, J. Te.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To analyse reasons for and the nature of clinico-radiological contacts and their clinical impact. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three different surveys were performed. (1) Data concerning contacts between staff radiologists (n = 20) and clinicians during 10 consecutive working days were collected; (2) staff clinicians (n = 174) filled in a questionnaire asking for their opinions about relationships with radiologists; (3) staff radiologists collected data about contacts with clinicians related to more urgent/complicated cases. Radiologists assessed the clinical impact of the radiological procedure and of the consultation. RESULTS: (1) During 220 working days 20 radiologists had a mean of 3.95 contacts per day (48.2% personal contacts, 51.8% telephone contacts), amounting to a personal total of 21.65 min per day. These contacts amounted to a total of 7.08 h per day, roughly one whole-time equivalent radiologist. (2) These consultations helped to refine the diagnostic strategy often (12.6%) or sometimes (71.4%) and to alter therapeutic decisions often (10.4%) or sometimes (56.6%). (3) The initial clinical diagnosis was changed in 50% of cases and the therapy was substantially changed on the basis of further radiological investigations and clinical-radiological discussion in 60% of cases. CONCLUSION: Clinical-radiological consultations are time consuming but have a beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic impact. Dalla Palma, L. (2000)

  5. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Practice Patterns Following 2011 FDA Approval: A Survey of Breast Imaging Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yiming; Babb, James S; Toth, Hildegard K; Moy, Linda; Heller, Samantha L

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate uptake, patterns of use, and perception of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) among practicing breast radiologists. Institutional Review Board exemption was obtained for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant electronic survey, sent to 7023 breast radiologists identified via the Radiological Society of North America database. Respondents were asked of their geographic location and practice type. DBT users reported length of use, selection criteria, interpretive sequences, recall rate, and reading time. Radiologist satisfaction with DBT as a diagnostic tool was assessed (1-5 scale). There were 1156 (16.5%) responders, 65.8% from the United States and 34.2% from abroad. Of these, 749 (68.6%) use DBT; 22.6% in academia, 56.5% private, and 21% other. Participants are equally likely to report use of DBT if they worked in academics versus in private practice (78.2% [169 of 216] vs 71% [423 of 596]) (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 0.87-1.40; P = 1.000). Of nonusers, 43% (147 of 343) plan to adopt DBT. No US regional differences in uptake were observed (P = 1.000). Although 59.3% (416 of 702) of DBT users include synthetic 2D (s2D) for interpretation, only 24.2% (170 of 702) use s2D alone. Majority (66%; 441 of 672) do not perform DBT-guided procedures. Radiologist (76.6%) (544 of 710) satisfaction with DBT as a diagnostic tool is high (score ≥ 4/5). DBT is being adopted worldwide across all practice types, yet variations in examination indication, patient selection, utilization of s2D images, and access to DBT-guided procedures persist, highlighting the need for consensus and standardization. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Follow up on a workloaded interventional radiologist's occupational radiation doses - a study case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketner, D.; Ofer, A.; Engel, A.

    2004-01-01

    During many interventional procedures, patients' radiation doses are high, affecting radiologist's radiation doses. We checked occupational doses of a workloaded interventional radiologist during seven years

  7. The radiologist's responsibilities for the radiation protection of patients; Obligations du radiologue pour la radioprotection des patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etard, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2010-11-15

    The obligations of the radiologist for the radiation protection of patients include a review of the appropriateness of the examination and optimization of the protocol. Both internal and external quality assurance programs are mandatory. The specific tasks and their frequency are defined by the AFSSAPS. The radiology report of procedures performed over radiosensitive regions must include the delivered dose. The imaging technique must be optimized based on published guidelines or law for the most frequent examinations. All radiologists should be familiar with radiation protection. Incidents should be reported to the Nuclear Safety Authority. (author)

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you can do to prepare for the examination. First of all, discuss with your doctor any serious ... Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate ...

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... MRA scan, there are several things you can do to prepare for the examination. First of all, ... To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking to this ...

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... an MRA scan, there are several things you can do to prepare for the examination. First of ... medical devices implanted in your body as these can interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI ...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ... examine blood vessels in key areas of your body and to identify abnormalities and disease. If you’ ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  13. Computer-aided detection of pulmonary embolism: Influence on radiologists' detection performance with respect to vessel segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Marco; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Helm, Anita; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Bakai, Annemarie; Salganicoff, Marcos; Liang, Jianming; Wolf, Matthias; Stanzel, Sven

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the sensitivity of a CAD software prototype for the detection of pulmonary embolism in MDCT chest examinations with regard to vessel level and to assess the influence on radiologists' detection performance. Forty-three patients with suspected PE were included in this retrospective study. MDCT chest examinations with a standard PE protocol were acquired at a 16-slice MDCT. All patient data were read by three radiologists (R1, R2, R3), and all thrombi were marked. A CAD prototype software was applied to all datasets, and each finding of the software was analyzed with regard to vessel level. The standard of reference was assessed in a consensus read. Sensitivity for the radiologists and CAD software was assessed. Thirty-three patients were positive for PE, with a total of 215 thrombi. The mean overall sensitivity for the CAD software alone was 83% (specificity, 80%). Radiologist sensitivity was 77% = R3, 82% = R2, and R1 = 87%. With the aid of the CAD software, sensitivities increased to 98% (R1), 93% (R2), and 92% (R3) (p<0.0001). CAD performance at the lobar level was 87%, at the segmental 90% and at the subsegmental 77%. With the use of CAD for PE, the detection performance of radiologists can be improved. (orig.)

  14. MO-E-17A-04: Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE) Provides a Simple Method to Calculate Organ Dose for Pediatric CT Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B; Brady, S; Kaufman, R; Mirro, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) mean age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE

  15. MO-E-17A-04: Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE) Provides a Simple Method to Calculate Organ Dose for Pediatric CT Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B; Brady, S; Kaufman, R [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Mirro, A [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) mean age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.

  16. Social networks and expertise development for Australian breast radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba, Seyedamir Tavakoli; Hossain, Liaquat; Willis, Karen; Lewis, Sarah

    2017-02-11

    In this study, we explore the nexus between social networks and expertise development of Australian breast radiologists. Background literature has shown that a lack of appropriate social networks and interaction among certain professional group(s) may be an obstacle for knowledge acquisition, information flow and expertise sharing. To date there have not been any systematic studies investigating how social networks and expertise development are interconnected and whether this leads to improved performance for breast radiologists. This study explores the value of social networks in building expertise alongside with other constructs of performance for the Australian radiology workforce using semi-structured in-depth interviews with 17 breast radiologists. The findings from this study emphasise the influences of knowledge transfer and learning through social networks and interactions as well as knowledge acquisition and development through experience and feedback. The results also show that accessibility to learning resources and a variety of timely feedback on performance through the information and communication technologies (ICT) is likely to facilitate improved performance and build social support. We argue that radiologists' and, in particular, breast radiologists' work performance, needs to be explored not only through individual numerical characteristics but also by analysing the social context and peer support networks in which they operate and we identify multidisciplinary care as a core entity of social learning.

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the examination. First of all, discuss with your doctor any serious health problems, recent surgeries and allergies. If you’re female and there’s a possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, ...

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the examination. First of all, discuss with your doctor any serious health problems, recent surgeries and allergies. If you’re female and there’s a possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, ...

  19. Radiation exposure of radiologists during angiography: Dose measurements outside the lead apron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H.; Przetak, C.; Teubert, G.; Ewen, K.; Moedder, U.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide practical information to angiographers concerning radiation exposure to body parts not covered by lead aprons. Individual doses to the neck and hands of radiologists measured in micro-Sieverts were obtained during the course of 80 angiographies of various types. The number of diagnostic and interventional procedures, which might lead to exceeding permissible doses, have been calculated. Possibilities of estimating doses during angiography by means of parameters such as screening times were examined statistically. Especially with regard to the hands, estimations of the doses are insufficient (correlation r=0.21). Radiologists who undertake much angiographic and particularly interventional work may reach exposure levels requiring protective measures in addition to lead aprons. (orig.) [de

  20. Quality of referral: What information should be included in a request for diagnostic imaging when a patient is referred to a clinical radiologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Pitman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Referral to a clinical radiologist is the prime means of communication between the referrer and the radiologist. Current Australian and New Zealand government regulations do not prescribe what clinical information should be included in a referral. This work presents a qualitative compilation of clinical radiologist opinion, relevant professional recommendations, governmental regulatory positions and prior work on diagnostic error to synthesise recommendations on what clinical information should be included in a referral. Recommended requirements on what clinical information should be included in a referral to a clinical radiologist are as follows: an unambiguous referral; identity of the patient; identity of the referrer; and sufficient clinical detail to justify performance of the diagnostic imaging examination and to confirm appropriate choice of the examination and modality. Recommended guideline on the content of clinical detail clarifies when the information provided in a referral meets these requirements. High-quality information provided in a referral allows the clinical radiologist to ensure that exposure of patients to medical radiation is justified. It also minimises the incidence of perceptual and interpretational diagnostic error. Recommended requirements and guideline on the clinical detail to be provided in a referral to a clinical radiologist have been formulated for professional debate and adoption. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Applying a social network analysis (SNA) approach to understanding radiologists' performance in reading mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli Taba, Seyedamir; Hossain, Liaquat; Heard, Robert; Brennan, Patrick; Lee, Warwick; Lewis, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Rationale and objectives: Observer performance has been widely studied through examining the characteristics of individuals. Applying a systems perspective, while understanding of the system's output, requires a study of the interactions between observers. This research explains a mixed methods approach to applying a social network analysis (SNA), together with a more traditional approach of examining personal/ individual characteristics in understanding observer performance in mammography. Materials and Methods: Using social networks theories and measures in order to understand observer performance, we designed a social networks survey instrument for collecting personal and network data about observers involved in mammography performance studies. We present the results of a study by our group where 31 Australian breast radiologists originally reviewed 60 mammographic cases (comprising of 20 abnormal and 40 normal cases) and then completed an online questionnaire about their social networks and personal characteristics. A jackknife free response operating characteristic (JAFROC) method was used to measure performance of radiologists. JAFROC was tested against various personal and network measures to verify the theoretical model. Results: The results from this study suggest a strong association between social networks and observer performance for Australian radiologists. Network factors accounted for 48% of variance in observer performance, in comparison to 15.5% for the personal characteristics for this study group. Conclusion: This study suggest a strong new direction for research into improving observer performance. Future studies in observer performance should consider social networks' influence as part of their research paradigm, with equal or greater vigour than traditional constructs of personal characteristics.

  2. Admission Privileges and Clinical Responsibilities for Interventional Radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad, E-mail: mk00@aub.edu.lb [The American University of Beirut Medical Center, IR Division, The Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Lebanon)

    2015-04-15

    Although clinical involvement by interventional radiologists in the care of their patients was advocated at the inception of the specialty, the change into the clinical paradigm has been slow and patchy for reasons related to pattern of practice, financial remuneration or absence of training. The case for the value of clinical responsibilities has been made in a number of publications and the consequences of not doing so have been manifest in the erosion of the role of the interventional radiologists particularly in the fields of peripheral vascular and neuro intervention. With the recent recognition of interventional radiology (IR) as a primary specialty in the USA and the formation of IR division in the Union of European Medical Specialists and subsequent recognition of the subspecialty in many European countries, it is appropriate to relook at the issue and emphasize the need for measures to promote the clinical role of the interventional radiologist.

  3. Admission Privileges and Clinical Responsibilities for Interventional Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2015-01-01

    Although clinical involvement by interventional radiologists in the care of their patients was advocated at the inception of the specialty, the change into the clinical paradigm has been slow and patchy for reasons related to pattern of practice, financial remuneration or absence of training. The case for the value of clinical responsibilities has been made in a number of publications and the consequences of not doing so have been manifest in the erosion of the role of the interventional radiologists particularly in the fields of peripheral vascular and neuro intervention. With the recent recognition of interventional radiology (IR) as a primary specialty in the USA and the formation of IR division in the Union of European Medical Specialists and subsequent recognition of the subspecialty in many European countries, it is appropriate to relook at the issue and emphasize the need for measures to promote the clinical role of the interventional radiologist

  4. Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranschaert, Erik R; Van Ooijen, Peter M A; McGinty, Geraldine B; Parizel, Paul M

    2016-08-01

    The growing use of social media is transforming the way health care professionals (HCPs) are communicating. In this changing environment, it could be useful to outline the usage of social media by radiologists in all its facets and on an international level. The main objective of the RANSOM survey was to investigate how radiologists are using social media and what is their attitude towards them. The second goal was to discern differences in tendencies among American and European radiologists. An international survey was launched on SurveyMonkey ( https://www.surveymonkey.com ) asking questions about the platforms they prefer, about the advantages, disadvantages, and risks, and about the main incentives and barriers to use social media. A total of 477 radiologists participated in the survey, of which 277 from Europe and 127 from North America. The results show that 85 % of all survey participants are using social media, mostly for a mixture of private and professional reasons. Facebook is the most popular platform for general purposes, whereas LinkedIn and Twitter are more popular for professional usage. The most important reason for not using social media is an unwillingness to mix private and professional matters. Eighty-two percent of all participants are aware of the educational opportunities offered by social media. The survey results underline the need to increase radiologists' skills in using social media efficiently and safely. There is also a need to create clear guidelines regarding the online and social media presence of radiologists to maximize the potential benefits of engaging with social media.

  5. Quality and Efficiency Improvement Tools for Every Radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudla, Alexei U; Brook, Olga R

    2018-03-20

    In an era of value-based medicine, data-driven quality improvement is more important than ever to ensure safe and efficient imaging services. Familiarity with high-value tools enables all radiologists to successfully engage in quality and efficiency improvement. In this article, we review the model for improvement, strategies for measurement, and common practical tools with real-life examples that include Run chart, Control chart (Shewhart chart), Fishbone (Cause-and-Effect or Ishikawa) diagram, Pareto chart, 5 Whys, and Root Cause Analysis. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. HOW DO RADIOLOGISTS USE THE HUMAN SEARCH ENGINE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jeremy M.; Evans, Karla K.; Drew, Trafton; Aizenman, Avigael; Josephs, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Radiologists perform many ‘visual search tasks’ in which they look for one or more instances of one or more types of target item in a medical image (e.g. cancer screening). To understand and improve how radiologists do such tasks, it must be understood how the human ‘search engine’ works. This article briefly reviews some of the relevant work into this aspect of medical image perception. Questions include how attention and the eyes are guided in radiologic search? How is global (image-wide) information used in search? How might properties of human vision and human cognition lead to errors in radiologic search? PMID:26656078

  7. Why radiologists lose their hospital contracts: is your contract secure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroff, Lawrence R

    2010-03-01

    Previously, a hospital contract meant tenure for the incumbent group of radiologists; however, those days are long gone. Exclusive contracts have morphed into exclusive contracts with carve-outs. Turf erosion has become a fact of life for radiology practices. Now radiologists are losing their hospital contracts in record numbers. Group size, though helpful for a variety of reasons, does not ensure that a practice will be secure in its hospital setting. The reasons that groups lose their hospital contracts are varied, and in this paper, the author discusses the most common ones. Suggestions to help practices avoid this unfortunate fate are presented.

  8. How do radiologists use the human search engine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, Jeremy M.; Evans, Karla K.; Drew, Trafton; Aizenman, Avigael; Josephs, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Radiologists perform many 'visual search tasks' in which they look for one or more instances of one or more types of target item in a medical image (e.g. cancer screening). To understand and improve how radiologists do such tasks, it must be understood how the human 'search engine' works. This article briefly reviews some of the relevant work into this aspect of medical image perception. Questions include how attention and the eyes are guided in radiologic search? How is global (image-wide) information used in search? How might properties of human vision and human cognition lead to errors in radiologic search? (authors)

  9. Role of the radiologist in the management of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Murtagh, F.R.; Chatfield, R.; Kori, S.; Kavanagh, J.; Clark, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Radiologists are taking an expanding role in the management of pain. The procedures most commonly used at our institution are facet blocks, peripheral nerve blocks, peripheral nerve ablations, ganglion ablations, chemoinfusions, chemoembolizations, and embolizations alone. CT is used for the facet, ganglion, and peripheral nerve procedures. The techniques for these procedures will be stressed, as meticulous technique is imperative. The radiologist must work closely with the attending clinician to determine both the neurologic level and to monitor therapy. The University of South Florida pain team flow sheet and pain evaluation method is presented

  10. Pressure injectors for radiologists: A review and what is new

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrajit, Inna K; Sivasankar, Rajeev; D’Souza, John; Pant, Rochan; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, PI

    2015-01-01

    Pressure Injectors are used routinely in diagnostic and interventional radiology. Advances in medical science and technology have made it is imperative for both diagnostic as well as interventional radiologists to have a thorough understanding of the various aspects of pressure injectors. Further, as many radiologists may not be fully conversant with injections into ports, central lines and PICCs, it is important to familiarize oneself with the same. It is also important to follow stringent operating protocols during the use of pressure injectors to prevent complications such as contrast extravastion, sepsis and air embolism. This article aims to update existing knowledge base in this respect

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder: dependence on the level of training of the performing radiologist for diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, John S. [University of Toronto, Division of Orthopaedics, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Andreisek, Gustav [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); University Hospital Zuerich, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Harvey, Edward J. [McGill University, Division of Orthopaedics, MUHC - Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wolin, Preston [Center for Athletic Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Discrepancies were identified between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical findings in patients who had MR imaging examinations evaluated by community-based general radiologists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MR imaging examinations of the shoulder with regard to the training level of the performing radiologist. A review of patient charts identified 238 patients (male/female, 175/63; mean age, 40.4 years) in whom 250 arthroscopies were performed and who underwent MR imaging or direct MR arthrography in either a community-based or hospital-based institution prior to surgery. All MR imaging and surgical reports were reviewed and the diagnostic performance for the detection of labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions was determined. Kappa and Student's t test analyses were performed in a subset of cases in which initial community-based MR images were re-evaluated by hospital-based musculoskeletal radiologists, to determine the interobserver agreement and any differences in image interpretation. The diagnostic performance of community-based general radiologists was lower than that of hospital-based sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists. A sub-analysis of re-evaluated cases showed that musculoskeletal radiologists performed better. {kappa} values were 0.208, 0.396, 0.376, and 0.788 for labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions (t test statistics: p =<0.001, 0.004, 0.019, and 0.235). Our results indicate that the diagnostic performance of MR imaging and MR arthrography of the shoulder depends on the training level of the performing radiologist, with sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists having a better diagnostic performance than general radiologists. (orig.)

  12. Job satisfaction of radiologists in Germany. Status quo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitzel, K.I.; Grosse, C.; Reiser, M.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Ertl, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate the work-related satisfaction of radiologists and its influencing factors in Germany. Materials and Methods: For this purpose an invitational letter for an online opinion survey was sent to all member physicians of the Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft in 2008. 1200 questionnaires were completed (response rate 21 %) and evaluated statistically. Results: 81.7 % of radiologists declared themselves as being 'very' or 'rather satisfied'. The level of satisfaction was largely independent of age, gender, status, salary or family status. It increased over the last 5 years for 37.5 % of participants and decreased for 24.8 %. Nevertheless, 72 % of respondents indicated that they would not choose to specialize in radiology again. The main reason given was the workload. 65.6 % deemed it to be 'considerably' or 'rather too high'. Concomitantly, more than 70 % of respondents indicated that the workload had increased 'a lot' or 'rather'. Further reasons for not wanting to select the radiological profession again were 'unfavorable working hours' and 'unsatisfactory career perspectives'. Conclusion: The job satisfaction of radiologists in Germany is generally very high in spite of the perception of an extensive and frequently increasing workload. The high workload was the dominant factor against a renewed selection of the field of radiology. These data have to be interpreted in light of the current lack of residents and trained radiologists in Germany to counteract the trend toward emigration. (orig.)

  13. Medico-legal claims against English radiologists: 1995–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, S F S

    2009-01-01

    A list of claims against radiologists from 1995–2006 was obtained from the NHS Litigation Authority. It shows a total of 440 claims. The largest number of claims (199) related to delayed or missed diagnoses of cancer, and 73 claims related to breast radiology. There is a trend for a mild increase in the number of claims each year. 30 claims were made after a false-positive diagnosis of cancer. Just under £8.5 million has so far been paid in damages, with a further £5 million in legal fees. A claim for multiple missed diagnoses of breast cancer led to a pay-out of £464 000 (£673 000 after legal fees); the largest sum awarded following a delay in the diagnosis of an individual cancer was £300 000. The subtle legal distinction between error and negligence is reviewed here. The reason why breast radiologists are more likely to be sued than any other type of British radiologist is also discussed, along with the implications for UK radiological practice, particularly in light of the recent Chief Medical Officer's report on revalidation. A method is proposed that may protect radiologists from allegations of clinical negligence in the future. PMID:19470570

  14. Medico-legal claims against English radiologists: 1995-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, S F S

    2009-12-01

    A list of claims against radiologists from 1995-2006 was obtained from the NHS Litigation Authority. It shows a total of 440 claims. The largest number of claims (199) related to delayed or missed diagnoses of cancer, and 73 claims related to breast radiology. There is a trend for a mild increase in the number of claims each year. 30 claims were made after a false-positive diagnosis of cancer. Just under pound8.5 million has so far been paid in damages, with a further pound5 million in legal fees. A claim for multiple missed diagnoses of breast cancer led to a pay-out of pound464 000 ( pound673 000 after legal fees); the largest sum awarded following a delay in the diagnosis of an individual cancer was pound300 000. The subtle legal distinction between error and negligence is reviewed here. The reason why breast radiologists are more likely to be sued than any other type of British radiologist is also discussed, along with the implications for UK radiological practice, particularly in light of the recent Chief Medical Officer's report on revalidation. A method is proposed that may protect radiologists from allegations of clinical negligence in the future.

  15. Radiologist perceptions of radiographer role development in Scotland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, Lesley J. [School of Health Sciences, Robert Gordon University, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Garthdee Road, Garthdee, Aberdeen AB10 7QG (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: l.forsyth@rgu.ac.uk; Robertson, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: e.m.robertson@arh.grampian.scot.nhs.uk

    2007-02-15

    Aim: To survey the perceptions of the Scottish radiology community in relation to radiographer role development. Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to all consultant radiologists recorded on the NHS Scotland database of consultants. Results: Response rate was 63%. (i) Respondents considered increased professional standing of radiographers, best use of manpower resources, reduced pressure on the service and improved recruitment and retention, as positive advantages of radiographer development. (ii) The potential impact on radiology specialist registrar training, lack of clear medico-legal responsibilities and radiographers recognising the limitations of their abilities were identified as the main areas of radiologist anxiety. (iii) Fifty-seven percent did not consider current post-registration radiography education and training resources adequate to underpin the requirement of developed roles. (iv) Barriers to radiographer development were identified as lack of radiography and radiology staff, suitable education, financial constraints, traditional views and resistance to change. (v) Eighty-two percent reported support for radiographer role development and willingness to participate actively in developments. Conclusion: Despite reservations Scottish radiologists are supportive of the development of radiography colleagues, however, guidance is required on the medico-legal and accountability aspects of radiographers assuming new roles. Radiologist involvement in education and training for new roles may increase their confidence and trust in radiographers to work within the limitations of their competency and training.

  16. Evaluation of the occupational doses of interventional radiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Gerritjan; Velders, Xandra L.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Reekers, Jim A.; Piek, Jan J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is a linear relation between the doses measured above and those measured under the lead apron of the radiologists performing interventional procedures. To monitor radiation exposure the International Commission of Radiological Protection

  17. Dental panoramic tomography: an approach for the general radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeddinghaus, R.; Whyte, A.

    2006-01-01

    Dental panoramic tomography is commonly presented to radiologists with no dental training for interpretation. An overview of the technique, basic anatomy and nomenclature and common pathology is presented with examples to show the anatomy and nomenclature, the artefacts and common pathology

  18. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists.

  19. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  20. Radiologists' preferences for just-in-time learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Charles E; Ehlers, Kevin C; Wood, Beverly P

    2006-09-01

    Effective learning can occur at the point of care, when opportunities arise to acquire information and apply it to a clinical problem. To assess interest in point-of-care learning, we conducted a survey to explore radiologists' attitudes and preferences regarding the use of just-in-time learning (JITL) in radiology. Following Institutional Review Board approval, we invited 104 current radiology residents and 86 radiologists in practice to participate in a 12-item Internet-based survey to assess their attitudes toward just-in-time learning. Voluntary participation in the survey was solicited by e-mail; respondents completed the survey on a web-based form. Seventy-nine physicians completed the questionnaire, including 47 radiology residents and 32 radiologists in practice; the overall response rate was 42%. Respondents generally expressed a strong interest for JITL: 96% indicated a willingness to try such a system, and 38% indicated that they definitely would use a JITL system. They expressed a preference for learning interventions of 5-10 min in length. Current and recent radiology trainees have expressed a strong interest in just-in-time learning. The information from this survey should be useful in pursuing the design of learning interventions and systems for delivering just-in-time learning to radiologists.

  1. Radiologist perceptions of radiographer role development in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, Lesley J.; Robertson, Elizabeth M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To survey the perceptions of the Scottish radiology community in relation to radiographer role development. Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to all consultant radiologists recorded on the NHS Scotland database of consultants. Results: Response rate was 63%. (i) Respondents considered increased professional standing of radiographers, best use of manpower resources, reduced pressure on the service and improved recruitment and retention, as positive advantages of radiographer development. (ii) The potential impact on radiology specialist registrar training, lack of clear medico-legal responsibilities and radiographers recognising the limitations of their abilities were identified as the main areas of radiologist anxiety. (iii) Fifty-seven percent did not consider current post-registration radiography education and training resources adequate to underpin the requirement of developed roles. (iv) Barriers to radiographer development were identified as lack of radiography and radiology staff, suitable education, financial constraints, traditional views and resistance to change. (v) Eighty-two percent reported support for radiographer role development and willingness to participate actively in developments. Conclusion: Despite reservations Scottish radiologists are supportive of the development of radiography colleagues, however, guidance is required on the medico-legal and accountability aspects of radiographers assuming new roles. Radiologist involvement in education and training for new roles may increase their confidence and trust in radiographers to work within the limitations of their competency and training

  2. Radiologists' Usage of Social Media : Results of the RANSOM Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranschaert, Erik R.; Van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; McGinty, Geraldine B.; Parizel, Paul M.

    The growing use of social media is transforming the way health care professionals (HCPs) are communicating. In this changing environment, it could be useful to outline the usage of social media by radiologists in all its facets and on an international level. The main objective of the RANSOM survey

  3. Chemotherapy Agents: A Primer for the Interventional Radiologist

    OpenAIRE

    Mihlon, Frank; Ray, Charles E.; Messersmith, Wells

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the basic principles of cancer chemotherapy and provide an overview of each of the general classes of chemotherapeutic agents with a target audience of interventional radiologists in mind. Special attention is paid to agents used in regional chemotherapy as well as agents commonly included in systemic chemotherapeutic regimens for patients who also require regional chemotherapy.

  4. Personal Branding: A Primer for Radiology Trainees and Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Vivek; Patel, Amy K; Moriarity, Andrew K; Canon, Cheri L

    2017-07-01

    A radiologist's personal brand is a composite of many parts in one's professional life. In an age where work quality and digital footprints are tracked and measured more than ever before, it behooves radiologists to develop and curate their own individual brands in effective ways. Personal branding consists of the decisions we make, both consciously and unconsciously, which affect our reputation and the likelihood of seeking our services in the future for both patients and referring providers. As hospital systems are increasingly adjusting their systems to cater to better patient experiences, it is imperative that radiologists similarly adjust our practice patterns to accommodate the needs of the new paradigm of value-based care. It is no longer sufficient to only practice excellent clinical radiology; one's service experience to clinical providers, report quality, and digital presence must all be robust and compelling. Defining your brand and promoting your vision and quality standards have become as important to radiologists' future as keeping up with advancements in radiologic technology. One must select the proper platforms and types of interactions in which to engage from available social media options. Developing a consistent brand and presence in the work setting, on social media accounts, and in professional organizations at the local, national, and international levels is the ultimate goal. At present, very little, if any, formal training is provided on personal branding skills such as these in current residency curricula, and it is critical for radiologists to fill their gaps in knowledge through additional means. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiologists and Social Media: Do Not Forget About Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Rebecca L; Jalilvand, Aryan; Kunjummen, Jean; Gilliland, Lea; Duszak, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Facebook (Facebook, Inc, Menlo Park, California, USA) is the most popular social networking platform worldwide. Facebook groups are virtual communities of people who share a common interest. Breast Imaging Radiologists is a Facebook group for radiologists with an interest in breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to analyze the membership and activity of the Breast Imaging Radiologists Facebook group (BIRFG) for 2 years since its inception. Using both the Grytics (www.grytics.com) and Sociograph (www.sociograph.io) analytic engines, the activity of the BIRFG was analyzed retrospectively from its inception on February 11, 2015, through February 12, 2017. Activity data were exported for further qualitative and quantitative analysis using Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, Washington, USA). Member demographic data were obtained by querying public Facebook profiles, US News Doctor Finder (US News & World Report, Washington, DC, USA), Doximity (Doximity, San Francisco, California, USA), and Google (Google Inc, Mountain View, California, USA). Membership grew from 1 to 774 over the study period, and 84% of the members were female. There were 493 posts, 3,253 comments, and 1,732 reactions; 92% of posts received either comments or reactions. Each post received an average of 6.6 comments, and 55% of members were active over the study period. There was an increase in all measures of activity from year 1 to year 2. Our findings indicate that radiologists find value in using Facebook groups as a forum to network and exchange information about breast imaging. This may be generalizable to other radiology subspecialties. Given the popularity and accessibility of Facebook for personal use, it may prove a more comfortable social medium for radiologists to interact professionally. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A simple method to minimize spillage on retrograde examination of the bowel in patients with an ileostomy or colostomy: technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torreggiani, W.C.; Lyburn, I.D.; Harris, A.C.; Zwirewich, C.V. [Vancouver General Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Abdominal Div., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    Retrograde examination of the bowel in patients with an ileostomy or colostomy is a well-described technique and is still widely practised in most radiology departments. The procedure is useful for examining the bowel for evidence of strictures, obstruction, hernias or local disease recurrence. The technique may also be used to delineate gut anatomy before ileostomy or colostomy reversal. (author)

  7. A simple method to minimize spillage on retrograde examination of the bowel in patients with an ileostomy or colostomy: technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torreggiani, W.C.; Lyburn, I.D.; Harris, A.C.; Zwirewich, C.V.

    2001-01-01

    Retrograde examination of the bowel in patients with an ileostomy or colostomy is a well-described technique and is still widely practised in most radiology departments. The procedure is useful for examining the bowel for evidence of strictures, obstruction, hernias or local disease recurrence. The technique may also be used to delineate gut anatomy before ileostomy or colostomy reversal. (author)

  8. Simple machines

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Just how simple are simple machines? With our ready-to-use resource, they are simple to teach and easy to learn! Chocked full of information and activities, we begin with a look at force, motion and work, and examples of simple machines in daily life are given. With this background, we move on to different kinds of simple machines including: Levers, Inclined Planes, Wedges, Screws, Pulleys, and Wheels and Axles. An exploration of some compound machines follows, such as the can opener. Our resource is a real time-saver as all the reading passages, student activities are provided. Presented in s

  9. Does Direct Radiologist-Patient Verbal Communication Affect Follow-Up Compliance of Probably Benign Assessments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Melissa S; Neal, Colleen H; Klein, Katherine A; Noroozian, Mitra; Patterson, Stephanie K; Helvie, Mark A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether direct verbal communication of results by a radiologist affected follow-up compliance rates for probably benign breast imaging findings. This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. A retrospective search identified all patients from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010 who had breast findings newly assessed as probably benign (BI-RADS category 3). Patients were categorized by whether the radiologist or the technologist verbally communicated the result and follow-up recommendation. Patient adherence to 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up imaging recommendations was recorded. Compliance data were available for 770 of 819 patients in the study. Overall compliance was 83.0% (639 of 770) for 6-month examinations, 68.1% (524 of 770) for 6- and 12-month examinations, and 57.4% (442 of 770) for 6-, 12-, and 24-month examinations. For patients who initially underwent diagnostic mammography alone, there was no significant difference in compliance between those who had and those who did not have radiologist-patient communication (6 months, 81.9% vs 80.8% [P = .83]; 6 and 12 months, 70.8% vs 67.3% [P = .58]; 6, 12, and 24 months, 54.2% vs 58.4% [P = .53]). For patients who initially underwent diagnostic mammography alone versus ultrasound with or without diagnostic mammography, there was no significant difference in compliance (6 months, 81.1% vs 84.3% [P = .24]; 6 and 12 months, 68.1% vs 68.0% [P = .96]; 6, 12, and 24 months, 57.4% vs 57.4% [P = .00]). High initial compliance was achieved by radiologist or technologist verbal communication of findings and recommendations. Direct communication by the radiologist did not increase compliance compared with communication by a technologist. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists); Mammadiagnostik fuer MTRA/RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann

    2014-07-01

    The text book on mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists) covers the following issues: Anatomy, development and physiology of mammary glands; tumor development an breast cancer risk; pathology, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography: physical-technical fundamentals; mammography: analogue technique; mammography: digital technique; mammography: quality assurance; mammography: legal questions and radiation protection; mammography: new developments; mammography: setting technique; mammography: use and appraisal; mamma-sonography: technique and methodology; mamma-sonography: assignment and appraisal, mamma-NMR: technique and methodology; mamma-NMR: assignment and appraisal lymph node diagnostics; mamma interventions; biopsy; mamma interventions: marking examination concepts; therapeutic concepts; hygienic concepts; communication and interaction.

  11. Accuracy and efficiency of radiologists reporting CT studies from a multiscreen electronic workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, W.D.; Lawson, T.L.; Erickson, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a limited picture archiving communication system linking, a via fiber optic cable, two computed tomographic (CT) scanners, and a double-screen (1,000-line monitors) display station with a 600-megabyte image memory evaluated for accuracy and efficiency in the generation of a radiology report. Twenty preselected CT studies (an average of 30 images per study, ten with prior examination for comparison) in cases with pathologically or clinically proved diagnoses were read by five radiologists, in random order, from both the electronic display console and conventional multiformat images. All cases were reread after 1-month interval in a different random order viewing sequence and the opposite viewing modality

  12. HOW DO RADIOLOGISTS USE THE HUMAN SEARCH ENGINE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jeremy M; Evans, Karla K; Drew, Trafton; Aizenman, Avigael; Josephs, Emilie

    2016-06-01

    Radiologists perform many 'visual search tasks' in which they look for one or more instances of one or more types of target item in a medical image (e.g. cancer screening). To understand and improve how radiologists do such tasks, it must be understood how the human 'search engine' works. This article briefly reviews some of the relevant work into this aspect of medical image perception. Questions include how attention and the eyes are guided in radiologic search? How is global (image-wide) information used in search? How might properties of human vision and human cognition lead to errors in radiologic search? © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Inborn errors of metabolism for the diagnostic radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriksz, Chris J. [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Clinical Inherited Metabolic Disorders, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Inherited metabolic disorders are becoming more important with the increasing availability of diagnostic methods and therapies for these conditions. The radiologist has become an important link in making the diagnosis or collaborating with the specialist centre to diagnose these disorders and monitor effects of therapy. The modes of presentation, disease-specific groups, classic radiological features and investigations are explored in this article to try and give the general radiologist some crucial background knowledge. The following presentations are covered: acute intoxication, hypoglycaemia, developmental delay and storage features. Specific groups of disorders covered are the abnormalities of intermediary metabolism, disorders of fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis, mitochondrial disorders, lysosomal storage disorders, and, briefly, other groups such as peroxisomal disorders, disorders of glycosylation, and creatine synthesis disorders. New advances and the demands for monitoring are also briefly explored. (orig.)

  14. Inborn errors of metabolism for the diagnostic radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriksz, Chris J.

    2009-01-01

    Inherited metabolic disorders are becoming more important with the increasing availability of diagnostic methods and therapies for these conditions. The radiologist has become an important link in making the diagnosis or collaborating with the specialist centre to diagnose these disorders and monitor effects of therapy. The modes of presentation, disease-specific groups, classic radiological features and investigations are explored in this article to try and give the general radiologist some crucial background knowledge. The following presentations are covered: acute intoxication, hypoglycaemia, developmental delay and storage features. Specific groups of disorders covered are the abnormalities of intermediary metabolism, disorders of fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis, mitochondrial disorders, lysosomal storage disorders, and, briefly, other groups such as peroxisomal disorders, disorders of glycosylation, and creatine synthesis disorders. New advances and the demands for monitoring are also briefly explored. (orig.)

  15. Breast cancer staging: the role of the radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trop, I.; David, J.; Lalonde, L.

    2005-01-01

    The role of the breast radiologist has evolved over the past years, with an increasing involvement in patient care. Improvements in diagnostic technology and surgical techniques allow for better preoperative staging and surgeries with decreased morbidity. This article reviews the elements of investigation that are important to the surgeon and oncologist in optimizing care for the newly diagnosed breast cancer patient, with the 6th edition of the TNM classification of the American Joint Committee on Cancer used as a reference. (author)

  16. Software Aids for radiologists: Part 1, Useful Photoshop skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Joel A; Thapa, Mahesh M

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the use of several essential techniques and tools in Adobe Photoshop image-editing software. The techniques shown expand on those previously described in the radiologic literature. Radiologists, especially those with minimal experience with image-editing software, can quickly apply a few essential Photoshop tools to minimize the frustration that can result from attempting to navigate a complex user interface.

  17. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  18. Do Radiologists Want/Need Training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhammer, F.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreases morbidity and mortality following cardiopulmonary arrest. Radiologists are frequently confronted with severely ill patients, who may deteriorate at any time. Furthermore, they have to be aware of life-threatening reactions towards contrast media. This study was designed to assess experience and self-estimation of German-speaking radiologists in CPR and cardiac defibrillation (CD). Material and Methods: 650 German-speaking radiologists were audited by a specially designed questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. The answers were expected to be re-mailed within a 2-month period. Results: The response rate was 12.6%. 72.8% of the responders had performed at least 1 CPR (range 9.5 ± 13.1) and 37% at least 1 CD. 67.9% had had opportunities to attend training courses, which had been utilized by 41.8% of them. The last training of the responders was more than 2 years ago in 69.2% and more than 5 years ago in 37%. Of all responders 75.6% expressed the need for further education. Conclusion: The small response rate indicates the small importance of CPR in the subpopulation surveyed. The vast majority of the responders, however, showed interest in basic and advanced life support and advocated regular updates. It seems reasonable that radiological Dept. themselves should organize courses in order to cope with their specific situations

  19. Do Radiologists Want/Need Training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellhammer, F. [St. Katharinen Hospital, Frechen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreases morbidity and mortality following cardiopulmonary arrest. Radiologists are frequently confronted with severely ill patients, who may deteriorate at any time. Furthermore, they have to be aware of life-threatening reactions towards contrast media. This study was designed to assess experience and self-estimation of German-speaking radiologists in CPR and cardiac defibrillation (CD). Material and Methods: 650 German-speaking radiologists were audited by a specially designed questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. The answers were expected to be re-mailed within a 2-month period. Results: The response rate was 12.6%. 72.8% of the responders had performed at least 1 CPR (range 9.5 {+-} 13.1) and 37% at least 1 CD. 67.9% had had opportunities to attend training courses, which had been utilized by 41.8% of them. The last training of the responders was more than 2 years ago in 69.2% and more than 5 years ago in 37%. Of all responders 75.6% expressed the need for further education. Conclusion: The small response rate indicates the small importance of CPR in the subpopulation surveyed. The vast majority of the responders, however, showed interest in basic and advanced life support and advocated regular updates. It seems reasonable that radiological Dept. themselves should organize courses in order to cope with their specific situations.

  20. Accuracy and interobserver agreement between MR-non-expert radiologists and MR-experts in reading MRI for suspected appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M.N., E-mail: m.m.leeuwenburgh@amc.uva.nl [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wiarda, Bart M. [Department of Radiology, Alkmaar Medical Center, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Jensch, Sebastiaan [Department of Radiology, Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wouter van Es, H. [Department of Radiology, Sint Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Stockmann, Hein B.A.C. [Department of Surgery, Kennemer Gasthuis, Haarlem (Netherlands); Gratama, Jan Willem C. [Department of Radiology, Gelre Hospitals, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Cobben, Lodewijk P.J. [Department of Radiology, Haaglanden Medical Center, Leidschendam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M.M. [Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    Objective: To compare accuracy and interobserver agreement between radiologists with limited experience in the evaluation of abdominal MRI (non-experts), and radiologists with longer MR reading experience (experts), in reading MRI in patients with suspected appendicitis. Methods: MR imaging was performed in 223 adult patients with suspected appendicitis and read independently by two members of a team of eight MR-inexperienced radiologists, who were trained with 100 MR examinations previous to this study (non-expert reading). Expert reading was performed by two radiologists with a larger abdominal MR experience (>500 examinations) in consensus. A final diagnosis was assigned after three months based on all available information, except MRI findings. We estimated MRI sensitivity and specificity for appendicitis and for all urgent diagnoses separately. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using kappa statistics. Results: Urgent diagnoses were assigned to 147 of 223 patients; 117 had appendicitis. Sensitivity for appendicitis was 0.89 by MR-non-expert radiologists and 0.97 in MR-expert reading (p = 0.01). Specificity was 0.83 for MR-non-experts versus 0.93 for MR-expert reading (p = 0.002). MR-experts and MR-non-experts agreed on appendicitis in 89% of cases (kappa 0.78). Accuracy in detecting urgent diagnoses was significantly lower in MR-non-experts compared to MR-expert reading: sensitivity 0.84 versus 0.95 (p < 0.001) and specificity 0.71 versus 0.82 (p = 0.03), respectively. Agreement on urgent diagnoses was 83% (kappa 0.63). Conclusion: MR-non-experts have sufficient sensitivity in reading MRI in patients with suspected appendicitis, with good agreement with MR-expert reading, but accuracy of MR-expert reading was higher.

  1. Accuracy and interobserver agreement between MR-non-expert radiologists and MR-experts in reading MRI for suspected appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M.N.; Wiarda, Bart M.; Jensch, Sebastiaan; Wouter van Es, H.; Stockmann, Hein B.A.C.; Gratama, Jan Willem C.; Cobben, Lodewijk P.J.; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Stoker, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare accuracy and interobserver agreement between radiologists with limited experience in the evaluation of abdominal MRI (non-experts), and radiologists with longer MR reading experience (experts), in reading MRI in patients with suspected appendicitis. Methods: MR imaging was performed in 223 adult patients with suspected appendicitis and read independently by two members of a team of eight MR-inexperienced radiologists, who were trained with 100 MR examinations previous to this study (non-expert reading). Expert reading was performed by two radiologists with a larger abdominal MR experience (>500 examinations) in consensus. A final diagnosis was assigned after three months based on all available information, except MRI findings. We estimated MRI sensitivity and specificity for appendicitis and for all urgent diagnoses separately. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using kappa statistics. Results: Urgent diagnoses were assigned to 147 of 223 patients; 117 had appendicitis. Sensitivity for appendicitis was 0.89 by MR-non-expert radiologists and 0.97 in MR-expert reading (p = 0.01). Specificity was 0.83 for MR-non-experts versus 0.93 for MR-expert reading (p = 0.002). MR-experts and MR-non-experts agreed on appendicitis in 89% of cases (kappa 0.78). Accuracy in detecting urgent diagnoses was significantly lower in MR-non-experts compared to MR-expert reading: sensitivity 0.84 versus 0.95 (p < 0.001) and specificity 0.71 versus 0.82 (p = 0.03), respectively. Agreement on urgent diagnoses was 83% (kappa 0.63). Conclusion: MR-non-experts have sufficient sensitivity in reading MRI in patients with suspected appendicitis, with good agreement with MR-expert reading, but accuracy of MR-expert reading was higher

  2. The impact of radiologists' expertise on screen results decisions in a CT lung cancer screening trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen / University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de; Mali, Willem P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Groen, Harry J.M. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-11-04

    To evaluate the impact of radiological expertise on screen result decisions in a CT lung cancer screening trial. In the NELSON lung cancer screening trial, the baseline CT result was based on the largest lung nodule's volume. The protocol allowed radiologists to manually adjust screen results in cases of high suspicion of benign or malignant nodule nature. Participants whose baseline CT result was based on a solid or part-solid nodule were included in this study. Adjustments by radiologists at baseline were evaluated. Histology was the reference for diagnosis or to confirm benignity and stability on subsequent CT examinations. A total of 3,318 participants (2,796 male, median age 58.0 years) were included. In 195 participants (5.9 %) the initial baseline screen result was adjusted by the radiologist. Adjustment was downwards from positive or indeterminate to negative in two and 119 participants, respectively, and from positive to indeterminate in 65 participants. None of these nodules turned out to be malignant. In 9/195 participants (4.6 %) the screen result was adjusted upwards from negative to indeterminate or indeterminate to positive; two nodules were malignant. In one in 20 cases of baseline lung cancer screening, nodules were reclassified by the radiologist, leading to a reduction of false-positive screen results. (orig.)

  3. Occupational burnout among radiographers, sonographers and radiologists in Australia and New Zealand: Findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nabita; Knight, Kellie; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn; Akroyd, Duane; Adams, Robert D; Schneider, Michal E

    2017-06-01

    Evidence demonstrates that health care professionals are more prone to burnout than other professionals due to the emotionally taxing interactions they have with their patients on a daily basis. The aims of this study were to measure occupational burnout levels among sonographers, radiographers and radiologists and to examine predictors of burnout according to demographic characteristics. A cross-sectional online survey was administered in 2010 to radiographers, sonographers and radiologists who were members of the following professional bodies: Australian Institute of Radiography, Australian Sonographers Association and The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to measure burnout levels for each profession. Data were analysed using SPSS Ver 20 (IBM, Chicago, IL, USA) statistical software. A total of 613 radiographers, 121 sonographers and 35 radiologists participated in the survey. Radiographers, sonographers and radiologists had a high mean (±SD) burnout score for emotional exhaustion (39.9 ± 8.5, 42.2 ± 8.5 and 44.9 ± 7.1 respectively) and depersonalization (18.9 ± 5.5, 20.3 ± 5.8 and 20.6 ± 5.6) compared to MBI norms. Radiographers also had low personal achievement (30.8 ± 5.5) compared to MBI norms. Radiographers and sonographers who were male, worked >10 hours overtime and spent <10% of their time training students per week had significantly higher depersonalization scores (p < 0.05). Burnout levels among radiographers, sonographers and radiologists are high and likely to vary according to some demographic and work-related factors. Further research is needed to examine ways to alleviate burnout in these professions so that loss of experienced staff due to burnout can be minimized and quality of patient care can be maintained. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Examining Differences in Within- and Between-Person Simple Structures of an Engineering Qualification Test Using Multilevel MIMIC Structural Equation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tsaousis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study sought to meet three aims: (a to understand the optimal factor structure of the Professional Engineering (ProfEng test, a measure aiming to assess competency in engineering, within a multilevel (nested perspective; (b to examine the psychometric measurement invariance of the ProfEng test across levels due to nesting and across gender at the person level, and, (c to examine the internal consistency of the engineering competency measure at both levels in the analysis. Data involved 1,696 individuals across 21 universities who took a national licensure test as part of the professional accreditation process to obtain a work permit and practice the engineering profession in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Data were analyzed by use of Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling (MLSEM. Results indicated that a 2-factor model at both levels of analysis provided the best fit to the data. We also examined violation of measurement invariance across clusters (cluster bias. Results showed that all factor loadings were invariant across levels, suggesting the presence of strong measurement invariance. Last, invariance across gender was tested by use of the MIMIC multilevel model. Results pointed to the existence of significant differences between genders on levels of personal and professional skills with females having higher levels on personal skills and males on professional. Estimates of internal consistency reliability also varied markedly due to nesting. It is concluded that ignoring a multilevel structure is associated with errors and inaccuracies in the measurement of person abilities as both measurement wise and precision wise the multilevel model provides increased accuracy at each level in the analysis.

  5. Bladder cancer treatment response assessment with radiomic, clinical, and radiologist semantic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Marshall N.; Cha, Kenny H.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Paramagul, Chintana; Alva, Ajjai; Weizer, Alon Z.

    2018-02-01

    We are developing a decision support system for assisting clinicians in assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer. Accurate treatment response assessment is crucial for identifying responders and improving quality of life for non-responders. An objective machine learning decision support system may help reduce variability and inaccuracy in treatment response assessment. We developed a predictive model to assess the likelihood that a patient will respond based on image and clinical features. With IRB approval, we retrospectively collected a data set of pre- and post- treatment CT scans along with clinical information from surgical pathology from 98 patients. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier was used to predict the likelihood that a patient would respond to treatment based on radiomic features extracted from CT urography (CTU), a radiologist's semantic feature, and a clinical feature extracted from surgical and pathology reports. The classification accuracy was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) with a leave-one-case-out cross validation. The classification accuracy was compared for the systems based on radiomic features, clinical feature, and radiologist's semantic feature. For the system based on only radiomic features the AUC was 0.75. With the addition of clinical information from examination under anesthesia (EUA) the AUC was improved to 0.78. Our study demonstrated the potential of designing a decision support system to assist in treatment response assessment. The combination of clinical features, radiologist semantic features and CTU radiomic features improved the performance of the classifier and the accuracy of treatment response assessment.

  6. Breast Density Estimation with Fully Automated Volumetric Method: Comparison to Radiologists' Assessment by BI-RADS Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tulika; Sharma, Madhurima; Singla, Veenu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to calculate mammographic breast density with a fully automated volumetric breast density measurement method and to compare it to breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) breast density categories assigned by two radiologists. A total of 476 full-field digital mammography examinations with standard mediolateral oblique and craniocaudal views were evaluated by two blinded radiologists and BI-RADS density categories were assigned. Using a fully automated software, mean fibroglandular tissue volume, mean breast volume, and mean volumetric breast density were calculated. Based on percentage volumetric breast density, a volumetric density grade was assigned from 1 to 4. The weighted overall kappa was 0.895 (almost perfect agreement) for the two radiologists' BI-RADS density estimates. A statistically significant difference was seen in mean volumetric breast density among the BI-RADS density categories. With increased BI-RADS density category, increase in mean volumetric breast density was also seen (P BI-RADS categories and volumetric density grading by fully automated software (ρ = 0.728, P BI-RADS density category by two observers showed fair agreement (κ = 0.398 and 0.388, respectively). In our study, a good correlation was seen between density grading using fully automated volumetric method and density grading using BI-RADS density categories assigned by the two radiologists. Thus, the fully automated volumetric method may be used to quantify breast density on routine mammography. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of the Occupational Doses of Interventional Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuipers, Gerritjan; Velders, Xandra L.; Winter, Robbert J. de; Reekers, Jim A.; Piek, Jan J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is a linear relation between the doses measured above and those measured under the lead apron of the radiologists performing interventional procedures. To monitor radiation exposure the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends the use of a single dosimeter under the protective apron. To determine the exposure more accurately an additional dosimeter is recommended above the protective apron. The exposure of eight radiologists was monitored with two personal dosimeters during 3 consecutive years. To measure the doses uniformly the two dosimeters were worn in a special holder attached to the lead apron. The two personal dosimeters were replaced every 4 weeks on the same day. The doses above and under the protective aprons of seven radiologists did not differ significantly. A significant lower dose above and under the protective apron was measured for one of the radiologists. During a 4-week period the average dose measured above the lead apron was 3.44 mSv (median, 3.05 mSv), while that under the 0.25-mm lead apron was 0.12 mSv (median, 0.1 mSv). The coefficients of the regression line result in the equation Y = 0.036X - 0.004, with Y as the dose under the lead apron and X as the dose above the lead apron. The statistical analysis of the data established a linear relation between the doses above and those under the lead apron (R 2 = 0.59). Before the special holder was introduced it was not possible to derive a relation between the doses above and those under the lead apron, as the doses were measured at varying places above and under the lead apron. There is no evidence that the effective dose can be estimated more accurately when an additional dosimeter is used. The present study revealed a threshold before doses under the lead apron were measured. Due to the threshold it can be concluded that the doses under the lead apron will not be underestimated easily when doses above the

  8. Pediatric anesthesia and neurotoxicity. What the radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Katherine; Nickerson, Joshua P.; Higgins, Timothy [The University of Vermont College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Burlington, VT (United States); Williams, Robert K. [The University of Vermont College of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Burlington, VT (United States)

    2018-01-15

    The use of cross-sectional imaging in the pediatric population continues to rise, particularly the use of MRI. Limiting motion artifact requires cooperative subjects who do not move during imaging, so there has been an increase in the need for pediatric sedation or anesthesia. Over the last decade, concern has increased that exposure to anesthesia might be associated with long-term cognitive deficits. In this review we report current understanding of the effects of anesthesia on the pediatric population, with special focus on long-term developmental and cognitive outcomes, and suggest how radiologists can use new technologies or imaging strategies to mitigate or minimize these potential risks. (orig.)

  9. Pediatric anesthesia and neurotoxicity. What the radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Katherine; Nickerson, Joshua P.; Higgins, Timothy; Williams, Robert K.

    2018-01-01

    The use of cross-sectional imaging in the pediatric population continues to rise, particularly the use of MRI. Limiting motion artifact requires cooperative subjects who do not move during imaging, so there has been an increase in the need for pediatric sedation or anesthesia. Over the last decade, concern has increased that exposure to anesthesia might be associated with long-term cognitive deficits. In this review we report current understanding of the effects of anesthesia on the pediatric population, with special focus on long-term developmental and cognitive outcomes, and suggest how radiologists can use new technologies or imaging strategies to mitigate or minimize these potential risks. (orig.)

  10. The tibial nerve compression test for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis-A simple and reliable physical examination for use by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shu; Nakano, Atsushi; Kin, Akihiro; Baba, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Yoshitaka; Neo, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and suitability of the 'Tibial Nerve Compression Test (TNCT)' as a screening tool for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS). A total of 108 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital for surgical treatment or diagnosis of LSS were included in this study. Fifty healthy volunteers were examined as a control group. The severity of tenderness was scored (tenderness score) and measured on a visual analogue scale (P-VAS score). These scores were compared between the LSS and control groups. Moreover, they were compared before and after the operation among operated patients. The positive tenderness rate was significantly higher (92.6% [100/108]) in the LSS group than in the control group (30% [15/50]). The sensitivity and specificity of TNCT (95% confidence interval) were 0.93 (0.88-0.96) and 0.70 (0.61-0.77), respectively. Positive tenderness rates and P-VAS scores were significantly higher in the LSS group (p Test is a useful screening tool for LSS diagnosis in a primary care setting. Level II, diagnostic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Simple prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Han M, Partin AW. Simple prostatectomy: open and robot-assisted laparoscopic approaches. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  12. Simple unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, W.A.; Zepeda, A.

    1987-08-01

    We present the results obtained from our systematic search of a simple Lie group that unifies weak and electromagnetic interactions in a single truly unified theory. We work with fractionally charged quarks, and allow for particles and antiparticles to belong to the same irreducible representation. We found that models based on SU(6), SU(7), SU(8) and SU(10) are viable candidates for simple unification. (author). 23 refs

  13. National examination of Brazilian residents and specialization trainees in radiology and diagnostic imaging: a tool for evaluating the qualifications of future radiologists Prova Nacional dos Residentes e Especializandos em Radiologia e Diagnóstico por Imagem no Brasil: instrumento de avaliação da qualificação do futuro radiologista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alves Moreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This is a study of performance based on an In-training Examination for Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging targeting residents (R and specialization trainees (ST in Radiology. The radiological training may differ between R and ST in some centers. The authors present their experience and thoughts regarding the first three years of application of the In-training Examination administered by The Brazilian College of Radiology. METHODS: Three hundred and eight-six tests were analyzed in 1999, 715 in 2000, and 731 in 2001. The yearly tests consisted of multiple-choice answers, some with interpretation of digital images, and were divided into 9 specialties: neurology, thorax, physics, pediatrics, digestive system, urinary system, musculoskeletal system, mammography, and gynecology-obstetrics. Each specialty was analyzed separately. The tests were given simultaneously in 12 Brazilian cities. The subspecialty scores of examinees at different stages of training were compared (1st, 2nd, and 3rd year residents and specialization trainees, by the Kruskal-Wallis test (P0.05. Generally, in 2000 and 2001, R achieved higher scores than ST (POBJETIVO: Estudo comparativo entre o desempenho dos residentes e especializandos em radiologia por meio da Prova Nacional dos Residentes e Especializandos em Radiologia e Diagnóstico por Imagem (PNRERADI, durante os três primeiros anos de sua aplicação. O ensino nos centros de formação em radiodiagnóstico pode diferir entre residentes e especializandos. MÉTODOS: Foram analisadas 386 provas em 1999, 715 em 2000 e 731 em 2001. As provas foram divididas em nove subespecialidades: neurologia, tórax, digestivo, física, pediatria, urinário, músculo-esquelético, mamografia e ginecologia-obstetrícia, cada uma delas avaliada separadamente, constando de testes de múltipla escolha, algumas com interpretação de imagens digitalizadas. As provas foram aplicadas simultaneamente em 12 cidades distribuídas no territ

  14. Acute abdominal emergencies: What radiologist have to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Acute abdominal pathology is an important cause of emergency admissions, generally putting pressure to obtain a quick and correct diagnosis. This may lead to the simultaneous use of concurrent imaging techniques, where the diagnostic accuracy may be operator dependent. It is important to the radiologist to understand how, when and why medical imaging should be used for each clinical context under appreciation. Imaging protocols should be optimally set in order not to miss the most important, bur subtle diagnostic signs. Radiologist should be conversant in all aspects of this emergency situation including the ability to provide minimally invasive treatment option, such as access drainage or vascular embolization. Although multidetector computed tomography is considered the workhorse in the diagnostic management, imaging alternatives must be kept in mind, especially tailored to the available equipment and the experience of the investigator team. Learning objectives: to describe the advantages and shortcomings of the different imaging techniques; to understand the value of the diagnostic information and the way this can change patient management; to describe and propose an effective diagnostic imaging strategy for the assessment of acute abdominal pain

  15. Drug smuggling by body packing: what radiologists should know about it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergan, Klaus; Kofler, Karl; Oser, Wolfgang

    2004-04-01

    Body packing is a distinct method for smuggling drugs. What radiologists need to know is discussed in this pictorial review. Radiologists are confronted with diagnostic imaging of body packers because of two main reasons: complications of body packing and identifying drug packets within the gastrointestinal tract. The standard examination used is plain X-ray of the abdomen in an upright and a supine position. Computed tomography is occasionally used but nevertheless described as a very accurate diagnostic tool. Ultrasound and MR imaging do not play an important role in that field. Depending on the purity of the drug, three different forms of attenuation have been described: hashish is denser than stool; cocaine appears similar to stool; and heroin has a gaseous transparence. The packets are of a round to oval form, usually of a particular uniformity and rarely confused with scybala if arranged like a pearl chain; therefore, plain X-ray is the method of choice to detect drug-filled packets within the gastrointestinal tract of body packers.

  16. Ocular health among radiologists in the age of PACS: is it time for our profession to open its eyes to this issue in light of existing European legislation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2012-12-01

    The regular use of visual display units (VDUs) at work has been shown to cause the development of a constellation of symptoms ranging from dry eyes to temporary myopia. European workers who use VDUs are now protected under detailed legislation enacted by the European Union (Directive 90\\/270\\/EEC). The use of picture archiving and communications systems, which are almost ubiquitous in European countries, means that, as a profession, radiologists fall under the remit of this legislation. This paper aims to assess the impact that full implementation of this law would have on a radiologist\\'s practice and to more broadly examine the issue of eye care as an occupational health issue in radiology. The authors conclude that eye care in the setting of regular VDU use among radiologists is an important quality control and occupational health issue. There is a clear legal basis requiring employers to provide regular eye examinations and reporting breaks. In the absence of leadership from employers on this issue individual radiologists have a responsibility to ensure that their work practices reflect the legal situation and minimise the effect of eye strain on their performance.

  17. Radiologic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoeni, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The radiographic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract has been changed drastically by the introduction of endoscopic procedures that are now widely available. However, the diagnostic approach to the small bowel remains largely unchanged. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are occasionally employed but are not primary imaging modalities for small bowel disease. Even though small bowel endoscopes are available, they are infrequently used, and no scientific paper on their employment has been published. Barium studies are still the mainstay for evaluating patients with suspected small bowel abnormalities. This paper discusses the anatomy and physiology of the small bowel and lists the various types of barium and pharmacologic aids used for examining it. The different radiographic methods for examining the small bowel with barium, including SBFT, dedicated SBFT, enteroclysis, peroral pneumocolon (PPC), and retrograde small bowel examination, are described and put into perspective. To some degree such an undertaking must be a personal opinion, but certain conclusions can be made based on the available literature and practical experience. This analysis is based on the assumption that all the various barium techniques are performed with equal expertise by the individual radiologist, thus excluding bias from unfamiliarity with certain aspects of a procedure, such as intubation or skilled compression during fluoroscopy. Also, the use of water-soluble contrast material, CT, and MRI for evaluating suspected small bowel abnormalities is outlined

  18. In-Person Communication Between Radiologists and Acute Care Surgeons Leads to Significant Alterations in Surgical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Elliot C; Alam, Hasan B; Brown, Richard K J; Stojanovska, Jadranka; Davenport, Matthew S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if direct in-person communication between an acute care surgical team and radiologists alters surgical decision making. Informed consent was waived for this institutional review board-exempt, HIPAA-compliant, prospective quality improvement study. From January 29, 2015 to December 10, 2015, semiweekly rounds lasting approximately 60 min were held between the on-call acute care surgery team (attending surgeon, chief resident, and residents) and one of three expert abdominal radiologists. A comprehensive imaging review was performed of recent and comparison examinations for cases selected by the surgeons in which medical and/or surgical decision making was pending. All reviewed examinations had available finalized reports known to the surgical team. RADPEER interradiologist concordance scores were assigned to all reviewed examinations. The impression and plan of the attending surgeon were recorded before and after each in-person review. One hundred patients were reviewed with 11 attending surgeons. The in-person meetings led to changes in surgeons' diagnostic impressions in 43% (43 of 100) and changes in medical and/or surgical planning in 43% (43 of 100; 20 acute changes, 23 nonacute changes, 19 changes in operative management) of cases. There were major discrepancies (RADPEER score ≥3) between the impression of the reviewing radiologist and the written report in 11% of cases (11 of 100). Targeted in-person collaboration between radiologists and acute care surgeons is associated with substantial and frequent changes in patient management, even when the original written report contains all necessary data. The primary mechanism seems to be promotion of a shared mental model that facilitates the exchange of complex information. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The inter-observer variability of breast density scoring between mammography technologists and breast radiologists and its effect on the rate of adjuvant ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Roei D; Savir, Avital; Gheorghiu, David; Weinstein, Yuliana; Abadi-Korek, Ifat; Shabshin, Nogah

    2016-05-01

    This study assesses the inter-observer variability of mammographic breast density scoring (BDS) between technologists and radiologists and evaluates the effect of technologist patient referral on the load of adjuvant ultrasounds. In this IRB approved study, a retrospective analysis of 503 prospectively acquired, random mammograms was performed between January and March 2014. Each mammogram was evaluated for BDS independently and blindly by both the performing technologist and the interpreting radiologist. Statistical calculation of the Spearman correlation coefficient and weighted kappa were obtained to evaluate the inter-observer variability between technologists and radiologists and to examine whether it relates to the technologist's seniority or women's age. The effect on the load of adjuvant ultrasounds was evaluated. 10 mammography technologists and 7 breast radiologists participated in this study. BDS agreement levels between technologists and radiologists were in the fair to moderate range (kappa values: 0.3-0.45, Spearman coefficient values: 0.59-0.65). The technologists markedly over-graded the density compared to the radiologists in all the subsets evaluated. Comparison between low and high-density groups demonstrated a similar trend of over-grading by technologists, who graded 51% of the women as having dense breasts (scores 3-4) compared to 27% of the women graded as such by the radiologists. This trend of over grading breast density by technologists was unrelated to the women's age or to the technologists' seniority. Mammography technologists over-grade breast density. Technologists' referral to an adjuvant ultrasound leads to redundant ultrasound studies, unnecessary breast biopsies, costs and increased patient anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Scattered radiation dose to radiologist's cornea, thyroid and gonads while performing some x-ray fluoroscopic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougle, Arun

    1993-01-01

    The mankind has been immensely benefited from discovery of X-ray and it has found wide spread application in diagnosis and treatment. Radiation is harmful and can produce somatic and genetic effects in the exposed person. International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has recommended a system of dose limitation based on principle of ALARA. All the efforts should be made to keep the radiation dose to the radiation worker as low as possible. Fluoroscopy gives maximum dose to the patient and staff and hence we have attempted to quantify the scattered radiation dose to the cornea, thyroid and gonads of the radiologist performing fluoroscopic examinations such as barium meal, barium swallow, barium enema, myelography, histerosalpingography and fracture reduction. Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method using CaSO 4 :Dy TLD disc was employed for these measurements. Use of lead apron has reduced the dose to radiologist's gonad. (author). 3 refs., 4 tabs

  1. The role of the interventional radiologist in enteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given, M F; Lyon, S M; Lee, M J

    2004-01-01

    The provision of enteral nutrition through the placement of gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy tubes is a well-established procedure. Traditionally, these catheters have been placed either surgically or endoscopically; however, over the past two decades interventional radiologists have increasingly performed these procedures successfully. The perceived advantages of this route lie in the reported lower morbidity and mortality rates. In addition, percutaneous radiologically guided (PRG) catheters may be placed in certain subgroups of patients in whom it would be technically difficult or impossible by other routes, e.g., patients with head and neck or oesophageal tumours. The aim of this review is to describe the techniques of radiologically placed gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy, discuss its indications and contraindications, describe any associated potential complications and compare PRG results with the more established techniques of open surgical and endoscopic placement. We also describe some recent procedural and catheter modifications.

  2. The Canadian Association of Radiologists national standards for technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Unlike any other technological development before it, teleradiology is revolutionizing the diagnostic medical imaging field by enabling broad access to radiological images. Images can today be transmitted between departments or between hospitals. Doctors in remote areas can share images with specialists in larger centres for consultation. Physicians can access hospital records from their office or home computer. Teleradiology also offers valuable educational opportunities. Like other technologies, however, the implementation and continuing development of teleradiology requires careful consideration of issues related to image quality, patient care, security of patient records, and other important matters. The following standard was prepared by the CAR Expert Advisory Panel on Teleradiology Standards in collaboration with the Ontario Association of Radiologists Teleradiology Committee to provide a model for teleradiology applications. The standard is based upon U.S. standards prepared by the American College of Radiology. (author). 21 refs

  3. Clinical Applications of 3D Printing: Primer for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, David H; Trace, Anthony Paul; Ali, Sayed; Hodgdon, Taryn; Zygmont, Matthew E; DeBenedectis, Carolynn M; Smith, Stacy E; Richardson, Michael L; Patel, Midhir J; Decker, Summer J; Lenchik, Leon

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing refers to a number of manufacturing technologies that create physical models from digital information. Radiology is poised to advance the application of 3D printing in health care because our specialty has an established history of acquiring and managing the digital information needed to create such models. The 3D Printing Task Force of the Radiology Research Alliance presents a review of the clinical applications of this burgeoning technology, with a focus on the opportunities for radiology. Topics include uses for treatment planning, medical education, and procedural simulation, as well as patient education. Challenges for creating custom implantable devices including financial and regulatory processes for clinical application are reviewed. Precedent procedures that may translate to this new technology are discussed. The task force identifies research opportunities needed to document the value of 3D printing as it relates to patient care. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gastric bands: What the general radiologist should know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, D.; Pearce, O.; Somers, S.; Higginson, A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in the UK is increasing, it is estimated that in England 24% of men and 25% of women are obese. 1,2 In recent years bariatric surgery has become increasingly common and is effective in producing long-term weight loss. 4,5 The most popular form of bariatric surgery in Europe is laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). 6 Radiologists play a key role assessing the normal function of bands, adjusting their filling under fluoroscopic guidance, and in recognizing and managing complications. This review will describe the general principles of LAGB; how they are assessed, how to recognize the most common complications, an overview of the appearances of the bands used in the UK, and novel developments in their use and design

  5. The role of the interventional radiologist in enteral alimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Given, M.F.; Lyon, S.M.; Lee, M.J. [Department of Academic Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, St. Stephen' s Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2004-01-01

    The provision of enteral nutrition through the placement of gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy tubes is a well-established procedure. Traditionally, these catheters have been placed either surgically or endoscopically; however, over the past two decades interventional radiologists have increasingly performed these procedures successfully. The perceived advantages of this route lie in the reported lower morbidity and mortality rates. In addition, percutaneous radiologically guided (PRG) catheters may be placed in certain subgroups of patients in whom it would be technically difficult or impossible by other routes, e.g., patients with head and neck or oesophageal tumours. The aim of this review is to describe the techniques of radiologically placed gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy, discuss its indications and contraindications, describe any associated potential complications and compare PRG results with the more established techniques of open surgical and endoscopic placement. We also describe some recent procedural and catheter modifications. (orig.)

  6. PACS or the future of the radiologist's working place

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Ebrecht, D.

    1988-01-01

    PACS (picture archiving and communication systems) is a synonym for the replacement of the traditional photographic film by means of technologies that will communicate and store images exclusively in digital form. Digital mass storage will replace the film archives and will be linked to all image sources by means of a data communication network. More significantly, PACS will also introduce a novel type of image-evaluation modality, the diagnostic image work station. Images will be displayed on TV monitors. In addition, a variety of support functions will become available for image handling and processing. The replacement of the light box by a digital work station will definitely cause dramatic changes in the radiologist's work. (orig.) [de

  7. Importance of training on clinical thinking and clinical competence to interventional radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ke; Zhong Hongshan

    2010-01-01

    Although the history of Interventional Radiology is no longer than 50 years, interventional techniques have been dramatically developed. Interventional radiologists have been responsible for much of the medical innovations and development of the minimally invasive procedures that are commonplace today to treat many complicated diseases as physicians. But the education backgrounds of interventional radiologist in China are different. Therefore, we should be aware that the job of an interventional radiologist is totally different from that of a diagnostic radiologist. It is very important to train interventional radiologists for improving their clinical thinking and clinical competence. Herein, we propose our suggestions on how to improve the clinical thinking and clinical competence of interventional radiologists. In this paper we also systemically introduce the accurate and proper treatment procedures which should be strictly followed in clinical work and,meanwhile, the perioperative patients care is emphasized. (authors)

  8. An audit of ultrasonography performed and reported by trainee radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, K C; Marchie, T T; Eze, C U

    2009-01-01

    Proforma information, instructions and procedures of training in radiology are lacking in Nigeria. To describe the errors in ultrasonography performed by unsupervised trainee radiologists. The radiology records of all ultrasound scans (USS) carried out and all reports that came back to the unit of the authors on account of misdiagnosis, doubtful diagnosis, misinformation or error in the reports were studied. The patients with the returned reports were rescanned where available by consultants and the collected data analysed. A total of 4680 patients had ultrasound studies without supervision resulting in 605 (12.93%) queried reports. The USS scans of 235 (5.02%) patients were repeated with consultants in attendance resulting in significant change in reports of 95 (2.03%) patients. Analysis of the request cards of 605 queried reports showed omission of relevant clinical information 463 (76.53%), outright wrong information 65 (10.73%),and unconventional abbreviations 139 (22.98%), while 493 (81.49%) were completed by a nurse, medical student or junior resident. Typographical errors comprised 174 (28.76%) of the 605 queried reports. False negative error was the highest type of error seen in 55 (57.89%) of the 95 patients with significant change in their report after repeat scan as lesions not detected were not documented. Trainee radiologists make significant errors in carrying out and reporting ultrasonography without adequate direct supervision of the study by their training consultants. Majority of the errors originate from lack of accurate filling of the patients request cards by the requesting physicians, lack of adequate preparation for the intended study, and typographical errors in writing reports. False negative reports are by far the greatest cause of errors recorded as lesions not detected were not documented.

  9. Emergencies in radiology: a survey of radiologist and radiology trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, Simon; Naidoo, Parmanand

    2014-01-01

    Emergencies in radiology are infrequent but potentially lethal. Australian and New Zealand radiologists are advised to undergo resuscitation training at least every three years; however, little is known about their experience and confidence in managing common emergencies relevant to their clinical practice. This paper describes the current experience and confidence of radiologists and radiology trainees in Australia and New Zealand in the management of common medical emergencies. A cross-sectional online survey of trainees and fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiology collected data on training and learning preferences relating to resuscitation and life-support skills, access to emergency medical care, and knowledge, confidence and ability in managing a variety of medical emergencies. There were 602 responses to the survey (response rate 23.4%). The majority of respondents were interested in learning more about the management of contrast reactions, cardiac arrest, ischaemic chest pain and basic life support. Self-rated knowledge, confidence and ability were higher in respondents who had completed life-support training within the previous three years. In this group, however, more than 40% rated their ability at managing contrast reactions as poor or fair, while more than 60% rated their ability as poor or fair for management of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and dosing of adrenaline. Preferred resuscitation training modalities included simulation, small-group tutorials and workshops. Self-reported level of skill and expertise in the management of potential emergencies in radiology is suboptimal among a large number of respondents. Consideration should be given to addressing this by improving access to specific training.

  10. Mortality from cancer and all causes among British radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.G.; Doll, R.

    1981-01-01

    The mortality of men who joined a British radiological society between 1897 and 1954 has been compared with that of (i) all men in England and Wales, (ii) men in social class 1, and (iii) male medical practitioners. Radiologists who entered the profession before 1921 suffered a death rate from cancer 75% higher than that of medical practitioners. Among these men there was a statistically significant excess of deaths from cancers of the pancreas (6 against 1.9 expected), lung (8 against 3.7), and skin (6 against 0.8), and from leukaemia (4 against 0.7). There were 72 deaths from cancer among men who entered the study after 1920 and 68.6 deaths were expected, based upon rates among medical practitioners. For no individual cancer site did the observed number of deaths exceed the expected number. There was some evidence, however, that the ratio of observed to expected cancer increased with the duration of time that men were included in the study. Among those followed for more than 30 years there were 30 deaths against 22.1 expected. It is not possible to make a close estimate of the dose of radiation received by the men in this study, but those who entered between 1920 and 1945 could have received an accumulated whole-body dose of the order of 1-5 Gy(100 to 500 rad). For all non-cancer causes of death combined, the death rate among radiologists is lower than that among all men in England and Wales, men in social class 1, and male medical practitioners. The data offer no support for the concept of a non-specific aging effect of radiation. (author)

  11. Radiologists' leading position in image-guided therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmberger, Thomas; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Pereira, Philippe; Gillams, Alice; Martínez, Jose; Lammer, Johannes; Malagari, Katarina; Gangi, Afshin; de Baere, Thierry; Adam, E Jane; Rasch, Coen; Budach, Volker; Reekers, Jim A

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are related to, or performed under, some kind of imaging. Such imaging may be direct inspection (as in open surgery) or indirect inspection as in endoscopy or laparoscopy. Common to all these techniques is the transformation of optical and visible information to a monitor or the eye of the operator. Image-guided therapy (IGT) differs by using processed imaging data acquired before, during and after a wide range of different imaging techniques. This means that the planning, performing and monitoring, as well as the control of the therapeutic procedure, are based and dependent on the "virtual reality" provided by imaging investigations. Since most of such imaging involves radiology in the broadest sense, there is a need to characterise IGT in more detail. In this paper, the technical, medico-legal and medico-political issues will be discussed. The focus will be put on state-of-the-art imaging, technical developments, methodological and legal requisites concerning radiation protection and licensing, speciality-specific limitations and crossing specialty borders, definition of technical and quality standards, and finally to the issue of awareness of IGT within the medical and public community. The specialty-specific knowledge should confer radiologists with a significant role in the overall responsibility for the imaging-related processes in various non-radiological specialties. These processes may encompass purchase, servicing, quality management, radiation protection and documentation, also taking responsibility for the definition and compliance with the legal requirements regarding all radiological imaging performed by non-radiologists.

  12. Patient Evaluation and Preparation in Vascular and Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know (Part 1: Patient Assessment and Laboratory Tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: btaslakian@gmail.com [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Sebaaly, Mikhael Georges, E-mail: ms246@aub.edu.lb; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad, E-mail: mk00@aub.edu.lb [American University of Beirut Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Lebanon)

    2016-03-15

    Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care after the procedure is completed. After patient referral, contact with the referring physician and multidisciplinary team approach is vital. In addition, clinical history, physical examination, as well as full understanding of the pre-procedural laboratory results and imaging findings can guide the interventional radiologist to implement the most appropriate management plan, avoid unnecessary procedures, and prevent complications to achieve a successful outcome. We provide a comprehensive, methodical review of pre-procedural care and management in patients undergoing vascular and interventional radiology procedures.

  13. Patient Evaluation and Preparation in Vascular and Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know (Part 1: Patient Assessment and Laboratory Tests)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taslakian, Bedros; Sebaaly, Mikhael Georges; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care after the procedure is completed. After patient referral, contact with the referring physician and multidisciplinary team approach is vital. In addition, clinical history, physical examination, as well as full understanding of the pre-procedural laboratory results and imaging findings can guide the interventional radiologist to implement the most appropriate management plan, avoid unnecessary procedures, and prevent complications to achieve a successful outcome. We provide a comprehensive, methodical review of pre-procedural care and management in patients undergoing vascular and interventional radiology procedures

  14. Prevalence of cancer risk factors among women radiologists and radiology assistants in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samerdokiene, V.; Kurtinaitis, J.; Atkocius, V. and others

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study potential cancer risk factors among radiologists and non-radiologists in Lithuania. Cancer risk factors were investigated among female medical staff at the departments of ionizing (243, 33.33%) and non-ionizing environment (486, 66.67%). The questionnaire covered the diet, lifestyle, reproductive factors as well as the demographic and physical characteristics. Univariate analysis was done separately for physicians and nurses. Each of risk factors was evaluated in stratified analysis for unequal ORs using Mantel-Haenszel estimate control for age and occupation. Evaluation of features of risk factors among radiologists vs. non-radiologists has shown that smoking was most the prevalent risk factor among radiologists and radiology assistants. Despite the relatively low prevalence, the questionnaire data showed the higher frequency of smoking among radiologists (OR = 2.78, 95% CI 1.12-6.87) and radiology assistants (OR = 2.25, 95% 1.38-3.66) compared to non-radiologists. The prevalence of non-users and occasional users was 74% to 66%, respectively. Alcohol use by smoking among radiologists was influenced insignificantly. The cohort of radiologists in Lithuania offer an opportunity for obtaining direct observational evidence on health effects associated with chronic low-dose radiation exposure. The data on possible cancer risk factors can be helpful for validation of the risks in future. (author)

  15. Preliminary investigation of the interaction between radiologists and digital radiologic work stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, L.L.; McNeill, K.M.; Maloney, K.; Mockbee, B.

    1987-01-01

    Using a work station built in the authors' department, they conducted an investigation into the interaction between radiologist and a digital radiologic work station. A survey provided information regarding the experience of 18 radiologists with digital technology and their expectations of its benefits. They ranked the potential attributes of digital work stations, with spatial resolution first, followed by contrast resolution, ease of use, speed, ease of learning, and cost. Observation of the radiologists' interaction with the work station has provided recommendations for implementation of functions. The authors conclude that radiologic work station user interfaces must be intuitive and support the radiologist's task without increasing the time or effort required for the task

  16. Interobserver agreement of radiologists assessing the response of rectal cancers to preoperative chemoradiation using the MRI tumour regression grading (mrTRG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, M.R.S.; Gormly, K.L.; Bhoday, J.; Balyansikova, S.; Battersby, N.J.; Chand, M.; Rao, S.; Tekkis, P.; Abulafi, A.M.; Brown, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tumour regression grading (mrTRG) scale can be taught effectively resulting in a clinically reasonable interobserver agreement (>0.4; moderate to near perfect agreement). Materials and methods: This study examines the interobserver agreement of mrTRG, between 35 radiologists and a central reviewer. Two workshops were organised for radiologists to assess regression of rectal cancers on MRI staging scans. A range of mrTRGs on 12 patient scans were used for assessment. Results: Kappa agreement ranged from 0.14–0.82 with a median value of 0.57 (95% CI: 0.37–0.77) indicating good overall agreement. Eight (26%) radiologists had very good/near perfect agreement (κ>0.8). Six (19%) radiologists had good agreement (0.8≥κ>0.6) and a further 12 (39%) had moderate agreement (0.6≥κ>0.4). Five (16%) radiologists had a fair agreement (0.4≥κ>0.2) and two had poor agreement (0.2>κ). There was a tendency towards good agreement (skewness: 0.92). In 65.9% and 90% of cases the radiologists were able to correctly highlight good and poor responders, respectively. Conclusions: The assessment of the response of rectal cancers to chemoradiation therapy may be performed effectively using mrTRG. Radiologists can be taught the mrTRG scale. Even with minimal training, good agreement with the central reviewer along with effective differentiation between good and intermediate/poor responders can be achieved. Focus should be on facilitating the identification of good responders. It is predicted that with more intensive interactive case-based learning a κ>0.8 is likely to be achieved. Testing and retesting is recommended. - Highlights: • Inter-observer agreement of radiologists was assessed using MRI rectal tumour regression scale. • Kappa agreement had a median value of 0.57 (95% CI: 0.37–0.77) indicating an overall good agreement. • In 65.9% and 90% of cases the radiologists were able to correctly highlight

  17. Making the invisible visible: a qualitative study of the values, attitudes and norms of radiologists relating to radiation safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridell, Kent; Ekberg, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    Some shortcomings regarding safety have emerged in inspections by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority of Swedish radiology departments which perform 5.4 million radiological examinations and 100 000 nuclear scans annually. To ensure safety in the healthcare system and to build a strong environment of radiation protection for patients (and for employees) there must be a strong culture of safety. To understand an organization's behaviour, decisions and actions it is important to study its cultural values. The aims of this study were to discuss how values, attitudes and norms affect radiologists' decisions as well as how they influence the implementation of various radiation protection measures. To investigate this, focus group interviews and in-depth individual interviews were performed in a sample from a number of radiology departments at hospitals in Sweden. The results show that the core value was derived from the patients' perspective with the focus on the knowledge that he or she has come to the healthcare system for a particular reason: to discover disease or, in the best case, to be declared healthy. The majority attitudes were based on experiences associated with aspects that the radiologist could not influence. This often concerns increased pressure on radiology investigations from clinics in the various operational units. Under the concept of norms, the radiologists in the study requested that the development of regulations and guidelines should be connected to issues of justification for various radiological queries.

  18. Direct Interactive Public Education by Breast Radiologists About Screening Mammography: Impact on Anxiety and Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyon; Hardesty, Lara A; Kunzler, Nathan M; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety has been called a "harm" of screening mammography. The authors provided direct, interactive education to lay audiences and measured these sessions' impact on anxiety and any increased understanding of breast cancer screening. Academic breast radiologist provided seven 1-hour sessions of structured lectures and question-and-answer periods. Lay language and radiologic images were used to discuss disease background, screening guidelines, and areas of debate. One hundred seventeen participants (mean age, 45 ± 15 years) completed voluntary, anonymous, institutional review board-approved pre and postsession questionnaires relaying their attitudes regarding screening and the impact of the sessions. Results are summarized descriptively. Mean reported anxiety regarding screening (on a scale ranging from 1-5; 1 = no anxiety) was 2.5 ± 1.3. Anxiety was attributed to unknown results (56.4%), anticipation of pain (21.8%), known risk factors (14.5%), general uncertainty (12.7%), waiting for results (9.1%), possibility of more procedures (3.6%), and personal breast cancer history (3.6%). Ninety-seven percent reported that immediate results would lower anxiety (78% of those women indicated a 75%-100% decrease in anxiety); 93% reported that radiologist consultation with images would lower anxiety (75.6% indicated a 75%-100% decrease in anxiety). After the lecture, women reported (on a scale ranging from 1-5) increased understanding of the topic (4.7 ± 0.6), encouragement to screen (4.6 ± 0.7), and reduced anxiety (4.0 ± 1.1). Ninety-seven percent to 100% provided correct responses to these questions: rationale for screening in the absence of family history, recall does not equate to cancer diagnosis, benefit of prior films, and continued importance of physical examination. Attendees of radiologist-provided direct public lectures reported decreased anxiety and improved knowledge regarding screening mammography. The resultant reduced anxiety ("harm") and educational

  19. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement of ligamentous injuries on conventional MRI after simple elbow dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schnetzke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective of this study was to assess the interobserver and intraobserver agreement on ligamentous injuries on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in acute simple elbow dislocation. The secondary objectives were to determine the interobserver agreement on the assessment of joint congruity, joint effusion, loose bodies and chondral lesions on conventional MRI. Methods Conventional MRIs (1.5 Tesla, elbow specific surface coil of 30 patients (40.7 years; range 14–72 with simple elbow dislocations were evaluated by four blinded examiners. An analysis of the interobserver agreement of all raters and for several subgroups (radiologists, orthopaedics, experienced, non-experienced was performed. The examiners assessed the integrity (intact, partial tear, complete tear of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL, medial collateral ligament (MCL, extensor and flexor tendons, as well as the presence of joint congruity, joint effusion, loose bodies and chondral lesions. Agreement strength, correlation and proportion of exact agreement were determined for interobserver agreement, and intraobserver agreement analyses. Results Interobserver agreement of all examiners was fair to moderate for collateral ligaments (LCL: 0.441, MCL: 0.275. Exact agreement of all raters was found in 33.3% for the LCL and in 26.7% for the MCL. The both experienced examiners showed highest agreement strength for the LCL (0.619 and the radiologists showed highest agreement strength for the MCL (0.627, the proportion of exact agreement was 60.0% in both categories. A high proportion of exact agreement regarding joint congruity (90%, joint effusion (100%, loose bodies (96.7% and chondral lesion (80% was found among the radiologists. The evaluation of the intraobserver agreement revealed slight to substantial agreement (0.227 to 0.718 for the collateral ligaments. Conclusions This study shows difficulties in the evaluation of ligaments by

  20. Systematic Layout Planning of a Radiology Reporting Area to Optimize Radiologists' Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Guilherme Brittes; Fogliatto, Flavio Sanson; Cardoso, Ricardo Bertoglio; Torres, Felipe Soares; Faccin, Carlo Sasso; Dora, José Miguel

    2018-04-01

    Optimizing radiologists' performance is a major priority for managers of health services/systems, since the radiologists' reporting activity imposes a severe constraint on radiology productivity. Despite that, methods to optimize radiologists' reporting workplace layout are scarce in the literature. This study was performed in the Radiology Division (RD) of an 850-bed University-based general hospital. The analysis of the reporting workplace layout was carried out using the systematic layout planning (SLP) method, in association with cluster analysis as a complementary tool in early stages of SLP. Radiologists, architects, and hospital managers were the stakeholders consulted for the completion of different stages of the layout planning process. A step-by-step description of the proposed methodology to plan an RD reporting layout is presented. Clusters of radiologists were defined using types of exams reported and their frequency of occurrence as clustering variables. Sectors with high degree of interaction were placed in proximity in the new RD layout, with separation of noisy and quiet areas. Four reporting cells were positioned in the quiet area, grouping radiologists by subspecialty, as follows: cluster 1-abdomen; cluster 2-musculoskeletal; cluster 3-neurological, vascular and head & neck; cluster 4-thoracic and cardiac. The creation of reporting cells has the potential to limit unplanned interruptions and enhance the exchange of knowledge and information within cells, joining radiologists with the same expertise. That should lead to improvements in productivity, allowing managers to more easily monitor radiologists' performance.

  1. Experiences with a self-test for Dutch breast screening radiologists: lessons learnt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J. M. H.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; Pijnappel, R. M.; Broeders, M. J. M.; den Heeten, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate a self-test for Dutch breast screening radiologists introduced as part of the national quality assurance programme. A total of 144 radiologists were invited to complete a test-set of 60 screening mammograms (20 malignancies). Participants assigned findings such as location, lesion type

  2. Are UK radiologists satisfied with the training and support received in suspected child abuse?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, R.S.; Nwachuckwu, C.; Pervaiz, A.; Wallace, C.; Landes, C.; Offiah, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine current practice and perceptions of the adequacy of training and support received for the reporting of skeletal surveys in suspected physical child abuse. Materials and methods: A list of telephone numbers of UK hospitals with a radiology department was obtained from Royal College of Radiologists. One hundred hospitals were then randomly selected for inclusion in the survey. An 18-item questionnaire was successfully administered to consultant radiologists from 84 departments. Results: Sixty-one percent of departments had a named radiologist to report their skeletal surveys, 16% assigned surveys to a random radiologist, and 23% referred them elsewhere. Only 52% of departments had a dedicated paediatric radiologist, thus in a significant proportion of departments (25%) initial reports on skeletal surveys for physical abuse were provided by non-paediatric radiologists. Fifteen percent did not have ready access to a paediatric radiology opinion. Sixty-one percent thought that the service could be improved. Expert evidence was provided by 5% of respondents. Seventy-three percent would never consider providing expert evidence, even if given adequate radiology and/or legal training. Conclusion: The survey shows significant dissatisfaction amongst consultant radiologists with the current service, confirms a low number of paediatric radiologists taking on this work, and suggests the potential to increase numbers of radiology child abuse experts by 27% if given improved training and support. Appropriate service and education strategies should be implemented.

  3. Are UK radiologists satisfied with the training and support received in suspected child abuse?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, R.S. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Nwachuckwu, C. [Department of Paediatrics, Whipps Cross Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Pervaiz, A. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Wallace, C.; Landes, C. [Department of Radiology, Royal Liverpool Childrens NHS Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Offiah, A.C. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: OffiaA@gosh.nhs.uk

    2009-07-15

    Aim: To determine current practice and perceptions of the adequacy of training and support received for the reporting of skeletal surveys in suspected physical child abuse. Materials and methods: A list of telephone numbers of UK hospitals with a radiology department was obtained from Royal College of Radiologists. One hundred hospitals were then randomly selected for inclusion in the survey. An 18-item questionnaire was successfully administered to consultant radiologists from 84 departments. Results: Sixty-one percent of departments had a named radiologist to report their skeletal surveys, 16% assigned surveys to a random radiologist, and 23% referred them elsewhere. Only 52% of departments had a dedicated paediatric radiologist, thus in a significant proportion of departments (25%) initial reports on skeletal surveys for physical abuse were provided by non-paediatric radiologists. Fifteen percent did not have ready access to a paediatric radiology opinion. Sixty-one percent thought that the service could be improved. Expert evidence was provided by 5% of respondents. Seventy-three percent would never consider providing expert evidence, even if given adequate radiology and/or legal training. Conclusion: The survey shows significant dissatisfaction amongst consultant radiologists with the current service, confirms a low number of paediatric radiologists taking on this work, and suggests the potential to increase numbers of radiology child abuse experts by 27% if given improved training and support. Appropriate service and education strategies should be implemented.

  4. Preliminary assessment of the dose to the interventional radiologist in fluoro-CT-guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, M. F.; Alves, J. G.; Sarmento, S.; Santos, J. A. M.; Sousa, M. J.; Gouvea, M.; Oliveira, A. D.; Cardoso, J. V.; Santos, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the occupational dose to the intervention radiologist received in fluoroscopy computerised tomography (CT) used to guide the collection of lung and bone biopsies is presented. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the capability of the reading system as well as of the available whole-body (WB) and extremity dosemeters used in routine monthly monitoring periods to measure per procedure dose values. The intervention radiologist was allocated 10 WB detectors (LiF: Mg, Ti, TLD-100) placed at chest and abdomen levels above and below the lead apron, and at both right and left arms, knees and feet. A special glove was developed with casings for the insertion of 11 extremity detectors (LiF:Mg, Cu, P, TLD-100H) for the identification of the most highly exposed fingers. The H p (10) dose values received above the lead apron (ranged 0.20-0.02 mSv) depend mainly on the duration of the examination and on the placement of physician relative to the beam, while values below the apron are relatively low. The left arm seems to receive a higher dose value. H p (0.07) values to the hand (ranged 36.30-0.06 mSv) show that the index, middle and ring fingers are the most highly exposed. In this study, the wrist dose was negligible compared with the finger dose. These results are preliminary and further studies are needed to better characterise the dose assessment in CT fluoroscopy. (authors)

  5. Lung volume reduction of pulmonary emphysema: the radiologist task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Gianluca; Silva, Mario; Sverzellati, Nicola

    2016-03-01

    Several lung volume reduction (LVR) techniques have been increasingly evaluated in patients with advanced pulmonary emphysema, especially in the last decade. Radiologist plays a pivotal role in the characterization of parenchymal damage and, thus, assessment of eligibility criteria. This review aims to discuss the most common LVR techniques, namely LVR surgery, endobronchial valves, and coils LVR, with emphasis on the role of computed tomography (CT). Several trials have recently highlighted the importance of regional quantification of emphysema by computerized CT-based segmentation of hyperlucent parenchyma, which is strongly recommended for candidates to any LVR treatment. In particular, emphysema distribution pattern and fissures integrity are evaluated to tailor the choice of the most appropriate LVR technique. Furthermore, a number of CT measures have been tested for the personalization of treatment, according to imaging detected heterogeneity of parenchymal disease. CT characterization of heterogeneous parenchymal abnormalities provides criteria for selection of the preferable treatment in each patient and improves outcome of LVR as reflected by better quality of life, higher exercise tolerance, and lower mortality.

  6. Role of radiologists in CAD life-cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietka, Ewa; Kawa, Jacek; Spinczyk, Dominik; Badura, Pawel; Wieclawek, Wojciech; Czajkowska, Joanna; Rudzki, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    A modern CAD (computer-aided diagnosis) system development involves a multidisciplinary team whose members are experts in medical and technical fields. This study indicates the activities of medical experts at various stages of the CAD design, testing, and implementation. Those stages include a medical analysis of the diagnostic problem, data collection, image analysis, evaluation, and clinical verification. At each stage the physicians knowledge and experience are indispensable. The final implementation involves integration with the existing Picture Archiving and Communication System. The term CAD life-cycle describes an overall process of the design, testing, and implementation of a system that in its final form assists the radiologists in their daily clinical routine. Four CAD systems (applied to the bone age assessment, Multiple Sclerosis detection, lung nodule detection, and pneumothorax measurement) developed in our laboratory are given as examples of how consecutive stages are developed by the multidisciplinary team. Specific advantages of the CAD implementation that include the daily clinical routine as well as research and education activities are discussed.

  7. [Which foot deformities should be radiologist be familiar with?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stillfried, E

    2018-05-01

    Most deformities of the foot are visible at birth and can be diagnosed without imaging. They can be divided into congenital flexible, congenital structural and acquired foot deformities. The most common congenital flexible foot deformity in children is the metatarsus adductus, which usually requires no long-term therapy. Regarding congenital structural deformities, such as the clubfoot and talus verticalis, plaster therapy should be started during the first week of life, so that by the end of the first year of life and the beginning of the verticalization, a pain-free resilient foot with normal function is present. Imaging is usually only necessary if a relapse arises. Coalitio of the tarsal bones is often visible only in the course of growth through the development of a rigid flatfoot and always requires imaging to confirm the diagnosis. This article is intended to give the radiologist an overview of the most important deformities and to inform about their course and therapy.

  8. What every radiologist should know about paediatric echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorantin, Erich; Heinzl, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) occur in less than one percent of all newborns. Echocardiography represents the imaging modality of choice for morphological and functional assessment. In childhood the different CHD types can be diagnosed trustfully and can be performed bedside. In the follow-up of CHD cross sectional imaging plays an important role and therefore it is essential for the radiologist to know the features, challenges and limitations of echocardiography. Within this review article a systematic approach for morphological and functional assessment of the heart will is given along with representative example images. In addition, typical echocardiographic findings in common CHD is presented. In older children, adolescents and grown-ups with CHD (GUCH) echocardiography suffers from limitations – partially due to skeletal deformations and lung emphysema. In particular right ventricular function assessment is not always possible by echocardiography. Therefore strengths and limitations of echocardiography will be discussed the role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (cCT) emphasized

  9. What every radiologist should know about paediatric echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorantin, Erich, E-mail: erich.sorantin@medunigraz.at [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Medical University Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 34, A-8036 Graz (Austria); Heinzl, Bernd [Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Medical University Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 34, A-8036 Graz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) occur in less than one percent of all newborns. Echocardiography represents the imaging modality of choice for morphological and functional assessment. In childhood the different CHD types can be diagnosed trustfully and can be performed bedside. In the follow-up of CHD cross sectional imaging plays an important role and therefore it is essential for the radiologist to know the features, challenges and limitations of echocardiography. Within this review article a systematic approach for morphological and functional assessment of the heart will is given along with representative example images. In addition, typical echocardiographic findings in common CHD is presented. In older children, adolescents and grown-ups with CHD (GUCH) echocardiography suffers from limitations – partially due to skeletal deformations and lung emphysema. In particular right ventricular function assessment is not always possible by echocardiography. Therefore strengths and limitations of echocardiography will be discussed the role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (cCT) emphasized.

  10. Role of radiologists in CAD life-cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietka, Ewa, E-mail: ewa.pietka@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Computer Science, ul. Akademicka 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Kawa, Jacek, E-mail: jacek.kawa@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Computer Science, ul. Akademicka 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Spinczyk, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.spinczyk@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Computer Science, ul. Akademicka 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Badura, Pawel, E-mail: pawel.badura@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Computer Science, ul. Akademicka 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Wieclawek, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.wieclawek@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Computer Science, ul. Akademicka 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Czajkowska, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.czajkowska@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Computer Science, ul. Akademicka 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Rudzki, Marcin, E-mail: marcin.rudzki@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Computer Science, ul. Akademicka 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2011-05-15

    A modern CAD (computer-aided diagnosis) system development involves a multidisciplinary team whose members are experts in medical and technical fields. This study indicates the activities of medical experts at various stages of the CAD design, testing, and implementation. Those stages include a medical analysis of the diagnostic problem, data collection, image analysis, evaluation, and clinical verification. At each stage the physicians knowledge and experience are indispensable. The final implementation involves integration with the existing Picture Archiving and Communication System. The term CAD life-cycle describes an overall process of the design, testing, and implementation of a system that in its final form assists the radiologists in their daily clinical routine. Four CAD systems (applied to the bone age assessment, Multiple Sclerosis detection, lung nodule detection, and pneumothorax measurement) developed in our laboratory are given as examples of how consecutive stages are developed by the multidisciplinary team. Specific advantages of the CAD implementation that include the daily clinical routine as well as research and education activities are discussed.

  11. Radiographers supporting radiologists in the interpretation of screening mammography: a viable strategy to meet the shortage in the number of radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Smith, Robert A.; Carranza-Flores, María de la Luz; Bogart, Andy; Martínez-Matsushita, Louis; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Montemayor-Varela, Ernesto; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Martínez-Montañez, Olga G.; Uscanga-Sánchez, Santos R.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    An alternative approach to the traditional model of radiologists interpreting screening mammography is necessary due to the shortage of radiologists to interpret screening mammograms in many countries. We evaluated the performance of 15 Mexican radiographers, also known as radiologic technologists, in the interpretation of screening mammography after a 6 months training period in a screening setting. Fifteen radiographers received 6 months standardized training with radiologists in the interpretation of screening mammography using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) system. A challenging test set of 110 cases developed by the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium was used to evaluate their performance. We estimated sensitivity, specificity, false positive rates, likelihood ratio of a positive test (LR+) and the area under the subject-specific Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for diagnostic accuracy. A mathematical model simulating the consequences in costs and performance of two hypothetical scenarios compared to the status quo in which a radiologist reads all screening mammograms was also performed. Radiographer’s sensitivity was comparable to the sensitivity scores achieved by U.S. radiologists who took the test but their false-positive rate was higher. Median sensitivity was 73.3 % (Interquartile range, IQR: 46.7–86.7 %) and the median false positive rate was 49.5 % (IQR: 34.7–57.9 %). The median LR+ was 1.4 (IQR: 1.3-1.7 %) and the median AUC was 0.6 (IQR: 0.6–0.7). A scenario in which a radiographer reads all mammograms first, and a radiologist reads only those that were difficult for the radiographer, was more cost-effective than a scenario in which either the radiographer or radiologist reads all mammograms. Given the comparable sensitivity achieved by Mexican radiographers and U.S. radiologists on a test set, screening mammography interpretation by radiographers appears to be a possible adjunct to radiologists

  12. WE-G-19A-01: Radiologists and Medical Physicists: Working Together to Achieve Common Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A; Ma, J; Steele, J; Choi, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    It is vitally important that medical physicists understand the clinical questions that radiologists are trying to answer with patient images. Knowledge of the types of information the radiologist needs helps medical physicists configure imaging protocols that appropriately balance radiation dose, time, and image quality. The ability to communicate with radiologists and understand medical terminology, anatomy, and physiology is key to creating such imaging protocols. In this session, radiologists will present clinical cases and describe the information they are seeking in the clinical images. Medical physicists will then discuss how imaging protocols are configured. Learning Objectives: Understand the types of information that radiologists seek in medical images. Apply this understanding in configuring the imaging equipment to deliver this information. Develop strategies for working with physician colleagues.

  13. WE-G-19A-01: Radiologists and Medical Physicists: Working Together to Achieve Common Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A; Ma, J; Steele, J; Choi, H

    2014-01-01

    It is vitally important that medical physicists understand the clinical questions that radiologists are trying to answer with patient images. Knowledge of the types of information the radiologist needs helps medical physicists configure imaging protocols that appropriately balance radiation dose, time, and image quality. The ability to communicate with radiologists and understand medical terminology, anatomy, and physiology is key to creating such imaging protocols. In this session, radiologists will present clinical cases and describe the information they are seeking in the clinical images. Medical physicists will then discuss how imaging protocols are configured. Learning Objectives: Understand the types of information that radiologists seek in medical images. Apply this understanding in configuring the imaging equipment to deliver this information. Develop strategies for working with physician colleagues

  14. Reading a radiologist's mind: monitoring rising and falling interest levels while scanning chest x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, Mohammad; Patel, Ameet; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Black, John A., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Radiological images constitute a special class of images that are captured (or computed) specifically for the purpose of diagnosing patients. However, because these are not "natural" images, radiologists must be trained to interpret them through a process called "perceptual learning". However, because perceptual learning is implicit, experienced radiologists may sometimes find it difficult to explicitly (i.e. verbally) train less experienced colleagues. As a result, current methods of training can take years before a new radiologist is fully competent to independently interpret medical images. We hypothesize that eye tracking technology (coupled with multimedia technology) can be used to accelerate the process of perceptual training, through a Hebbian learning process. This would be accomplished by providing a radiologist-in-training with real-time feedback as he/she is fixating on important regions of an image. Of course this requires that the training system have information about what regions of an image are important - information that could presumably be solicited from experienced radiologists. However, our previous work has suggested that experienced radiologists are not always aware of those regions of an image that attract their attention, but are not clinically significant - information that is very important to a radiologist in training. This paper discusses a study in which local entropy computations were done on scan path data, and were found to provide a quantitative measure of the moment-by-moment interest level of radiologists as they scanned chest x-rays. The results also showed a striking contrast between the moment-by-moment deployment of attention between experienced radiologists and radiologists in training.

  15. The Proposed MACRA/MIPS Threshold for Patient-Facing Encounters: What It Means for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Hirsch, Joshua A; Allen, Bibb; Wang, Wenyi; Hughes, Danny R; Nicola, Gregory N

    2017-03-01

    In implementing the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), CMS will provide special considerations to physicians with infrequent face-to-face patient encounters by reweighting MIPS performance categories to account for the unique circumstances facing these providers. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of varying criteria on the fraction of radiologists who are likely to receive special considerations for performance assessment under MIPS. Data from the 2014 Medicare Physician and Other Supplier file for 28,710 diagnostic radiologists were used to determine the fraction of radiologists meeting various proposed criteria for receiving special considerations. For each definition, the fraction of patient-facing encounters among all billed codes was determined for those radiologists not receiving special considerations. When using the criterion proposed by CMS that physicians will receive special considerations if billing ≤25 evaluation and management services or surgical codes, 72.0% of diagnostic radiologists would receive special considerations, though such encounters would represent only 2.1% of billed codes among remaining diagnostic radiologists without special considerations. If CMS were to apply an alternative criterion of billing ≤100 evaluation and management codes exclusively, 98.8% of diagnostic radiologists would receive special considerations. At this threshold, patient-facing encounters would represent approximately 10% of billed codes among remaining radiologists without special considerations. The current CMS proposed criterion for special considerations would result in a considerable fraction of radiologists being evaluated on the basis of measures that are not reflective of their practice and beyond their direct control. Alternative criteria could help ensure that radiologists are provided a fair opportunity for success in performance review under the MIPS. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier

  16. Sports Injuries about the Hip: What the Radiologist Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, Tarek M; Belair, Jeffrey A; McCarthy, Eoghan J; Roedl, Johannes B; Morrison, William B

    2016-10-01

    Injuries of the hip and surrounding structures represent a complex and commonly encountered scenario in athletes, with improper diagnosis serving as a cause of delayed return to play or progression to a more serious injury. As such, radiologists play an essential role in guiding management of athletic injuries. Familiarity with hip anatomy and the advantages and limitations of various imaging modalities is of paramount importance for accurate and timely diagnosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is often the modality of choice for evaluating many of the injuries discussed, although preliminary evaluation with conventional radiography and use of other imaging modalities such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography, and bone scintigraphy may be supplementary or preferred in certain situations. Stress fractures, thigh splints, and posterior hip dislocations are important structural injuries to consider in the athlete, initially imaged with radiographs and often best diagnosed with MR imaging. Apophyseal injuries are particularly important to consider in young athletes and may be acute or related to chronic repetitive microtrauma. Femoroacetabular impingement has been implicated in development of labral tears and cartilage abnormalities. Tear of the ligamentum teres is now recognized as a potential cause of hip pain and instability, best evaluated with MR arthrography. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome encompasses a group of conditions leading to lateral hip pain, with US playing an increasingly important role for both evaluation and image-guided treatment. Muscle injuries and athletic pubalgia are common in athletes. Lastly, snapping hip syndrome and Morel-Lavallée lesions are two less common but nonetheless important considerations. © RSNA, 2016.

  17. The advantages, disadvantages, and policies for part-time radiologists: report of the ACR Commission on Human Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Coleman, Beverly G; Recht, Michael P; Bluth, Edward I

    2014-07-01

    The employment of part-time radiologists (PTRs) has both advantages and disadvantages in various practice settings. The authors examine the pros and cons of PTRs and review the literature regarding PTRs both within and outside the specialty of radiology. The complexity of this issue is manifested in our inability to reach consensus on many policy issues for PTRs. Nevertheless, this article should be helpful in offering an objective, nonbiased background to initiating a discussion on employing PTRs in various radiology practices. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigating the Link Between Radiologists Gaze, Diagnostic Decision, and Image Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Paquit, Vincent C [ORNL; Krupinski, Elizabeth [University of Arizona

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate machine learning for linking image content, human perception, cognition, and error in the diagnostic interpretation of mammograms. Methods: Gaze data and diagnostic decisions were collected from six radiologists who reviewed 20 screening mammograms while wearing a head-mounted eye-tracker. Texture analysis was performed in mammographic regions that attracted radiologists attention and in all abnormal regions. Machine learning algorithms were investigated to develop predictive models that link: (i) image content with gaze, (ii) image content and gaze with cognition, and (iii) image content, gaze, and cognition with diagnostic error. Both group-based and individualized models were explored. Results: By pooling the data from all radiologists machine learning produced highly accurate predictive models linking image content, gaze, cognition, and error. Merging radiologists gaze metrics and cognitive opinions with computer-extracted image features identified 59% of the radiologists diagnostic errors while confirming 96.2% of their correct diagnoses. The radiologists individual errors could be adequately predicted by modeling the behavior of their peers. However, personalized tuning appears to be beneficial in many cases to capture more accurately individual behavior. Conclusions: Machine learning algorithms combining image features with radiologists gaze data and diagnostic decisions can be effectively developed to recognize cognitive and perceptual errors associated with the diagnostic interpretation of mammograms.

  19. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs: A comparative plain film-reading performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buskov, L.; Abild, A.; Christensen, A.; Holm, O.; Hansen, C.; Christensen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital. Materials and methods: Plain radiographs of the appendicular skeleton from 1000 consecutive emergency room patients were included in the study: 500 primarily reported by radiographers and 500 by trainee radiologists. The final reporting was subsequently undertaken by a consultant radiologist in consensus with an orthopaedic surgeon. Two observers classified reports as either true positive/negative or false positive/negative based on the final report, which was considered the reference standard. To evaluate the severity of incorrect primary reports, errors were graded into three categories concerning clinical impact and erroneous reports graded as the most severe category were subsequently analysed. Mann–Whitney and Chi-squared tests were used to compare differences and associations between radiographers versus trainee radiologists regarding film reporting. Results: The sensitivity for correct diagnosis was 99% for reporting radiographers and 94% for trainee radiologists. The specificity was found to be 97% for reporting radiographers and 99% for trainee radiologists. Radiographers missed significantly fewer fractures (n = 2) than trainee radiologists (n = 14; p = 0.006) but had a higher, but not significant, degree of overcalling. No significant difference was found between groups regarding clinical impact of incorrect reporting. Conclusion: Trained radiographers report accident radiographs of the extremities with high accuracy and constitute a qualified resource to help meet increasing workload and demands in quality standards.

  20. Radiographers and radiologists reporting plain radiograph requests from accident and emergency and general practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brealey, S.D.; King, D.G.; Hahn, S.; Crowe, M.; Williams, P.; Rutter, P.; Crane, S.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess selectively trained radiographers and consultant radiologists reporting plain radiographs for the Accident and Emergency Department (A and E) and general practitioners (GPs) within a typical hospital setting. METHODS: Two radiographers, a group of eight consultant radiologists, and a reference standard radiologist independently reported under controlled conditions a retrospectively selected, random, stratified sample of 400 A and E and 400 GP plain radiographs. An independent consultant radiologist judged whether the radiographer and radiologist reports agreed with the reference standard report. Clinicians then assessed whether radiographer and radiologist incorrect reports affected confidence in their diagnosis and treatment plans, and patient outcome. RESULTS: For A and E and GP plain radiographs, respectively, there was a 1% (95% confidence interval (CI) -2 to 5) and 4% (95% CI -1 to 8) difference in reporting accuracy between the two professional groups. For both A and E and GP cases there was an 8% difference in the clinicians' confidence in their diagnosis based on radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. For A and E and GP cases, respectively, there was a 2% and 8% difference in the clinicians' confidence in their management plans based on radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. For A and E and GP cases, respectively, there was a 1% and 11% difference in effect on patient outcome of radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. CONCLUSION: There is the potential to extend the reporting role of selectively trained radiographers to include plain radiographs for all A and E and GP patients. Further research conducted during clinical practice at a number of sites is recommended

  1. Nonresearch Industry Payments to Radiologists: Characteristics and Associations With Regional Medical Imaging Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabi, Nima; Junn, Jacqueline C; Xing, Minzhi; Hemingway, Jennifer; Hughes, Danny R; Duszak, Richard

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate characteristics of nonresearch industry payments to radiologists and associations with regional diagnostic imaging utilization. Using 2014 CMS Open Payment data, all disclosed nonresearch-related industry payments to radiologists were identified. Health Resources and Services Administration Area Health Resources Files were used to identify actual and population-weighted numbers of radiologists by state. Utilizing the 5% random beneficiary sample CMS Research Identifiable Files from 2014, average Medicare imaging spending per beneficiary in each state was calculated. Average frequency and dollar amounts of nonresearch nonroyalty payments to radiologists were calculated at the state level. Using the Pearson correlation coefficient, the relationship between frequency and amounts of nonresearch payments to radiologists versus per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending was evaluated at the state level. Overall, 2,008 radiologists (1,670 diagnostic, 338 interventional) received nonresearch nonroyalty payments from industry, representing 5.2% of all 38,857 radiologists nationwide. A total of 4,975 individual transfers translated to 2.5 ± 1.3 discrete payments per receiving radiologist with a mean of $432 ± $1,976 (median $26; range $1-$34,050). Food and beverage expenses constituted the vast majority of disclosed transfers (4,111; 83%), followed by travel and lodging (444; 9%), consulting fees (279; 6%), and educational expenses (51; 1%). Considerable geographic variation in payments was observed, ranging from 0% of radiologists in Vermont to 12.9% in the District of Columbia. No correlation was identified between average per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending and the proportion of nonresearch-funded radiologists in each state (r = 0.06). Similarly, no correlation was identified between average per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending and the average nonresearch transfer amount to radiologists in each state (r = -0.08). In 2014, only a small minority of

  2. Improving the false-negative rate of CT in acute appendicitis-Reassessment of CT images by body imaging radiologists: A blinded prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poortman, Pieter; Lohle, Paul N.M.; Schoemaker, Cees M.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Oostvogel, Henk J.M.; Lange-de Klerk, Elly S.M. de; Hamming, Jaap F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) analyzed by individual radiology staff members and body imaging radiologists in a non-academic teaching hospital for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: In a prospective study 199 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were examined with unenhanced CT. CT images were pre-operatively analyzed by one of the 12 members of the radiology staff. In a later stage two body imaging radiologist reassessed all CT images without knowledge of the surgical findings and without knowledge of the primary CT diagnosis. The results, independently reported, were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: In 132 patients (66%) acute appendicitis was found at surgery, in 67 patients (34%) a normal appendix was found. The sensitivity of the primary CT analysis and of the reassessment was 76% and 88%, respectively; the specificity was 84% and 87%; the positive predictive value was 90% and 93%; the negative predictive value was 64% and 78%; and the accuracy was 78% and 87%. Conclusion: Reassessment of CT images for acute appendicitis by body imaging radiologists results in a significant improvement of sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy. To prevent false-negative interpretation of CT images in acute appendicitis the expertise of the attending radiologist should be considered.

  3. Improving the false-negative rate of CT in acute appendicitis-Reassessment of CT images by body imaging radiologists: A blinded prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortman, Pieter [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: ppoortman@wlz.nl; Lohle, Paul N.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: plohle@elisabeth.nl; Schoemaker, Cees M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: mcschoemaker@elisabeth.nl; Cuesta, Miguel A. [Department of Surgery, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: ma.cuesta@vumc.nl; Oostvogel, Henk J.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.oostvogel@elisabeth.nl; Lange-de Klerk, Elly S.M. de [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: esm.delange@vumc.nl; Hamming, Jaap F. [Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.f.hamming@lumc.nl

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) analyzed by individual radiology staff members and body imaging radiologists in a non-academic teaching hospital for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: In a prospective study 199 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were examined with unenhanced CT. CT images were pre-operatively analyzed by one of the 12 members of the radiology staff. In a later stage two body imaging radiologist reassessed all CT images without knowledge of the surgical findings and without knowledge of the primary CT diagnosis. The results, independently reported, were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: In 132 patients (66%) acute appendicitis was found at surgery, in 67 patients (34%) a normal appendix was found. The sensitivity of the primary CT analysis and of the reassessment was 76% and 88%, respectively; the specificity was 84% and 87%; the positive predictive value was 90% and 93%; the negative predictive value was 64% and 78%; and the accuracy was 78% and 87%. Conclusion: Reassessment of CT images for acute appendicitis by body imaging radiologists results in a significant improvement of sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy. To prevent false-negative interpretation of CT images in acute appendicitis the expertise of the attending radiologist should be considered.

  4. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  5. Interdisciplinary shock-room care: tasks for the radiologist from the viewpoint of the trauma surgeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutschler, W.; Kanz, K.G.

    2002-01-01

    Efficient resuscitation of major trauma requests an interdisciplinary communication between trauma surgeons, anaesthesiologists and radiologists. Trauma outcome is significantly influenced by horizontal trauma team organisation and coherence to clinical algorithms, which allow fast diagnosis and intervention. A radiologist present on patients arrival in the trauma room provides a major impact on trauma care. Nevertheless optimal integration in the trauma team implies profound knowledge of the priorities of advanced trauma life support and trauma algorithms. His or her involvement is not limited to patient care only, also active participation in trauma room design, interdisciplinary algorithm development and trauma research are essential tasks for radiologists devoted to emergency radiology. Based on the pathophysiology of polytrauma and the structure of German trauma system, current concepts and proven clinical algorithms with special regard to the radiologist and his duties and tasks will are presented. (orig.) [de

  6. Toward Augmented Radiologists: Changes in Radiology Education in the Era of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajmir, Shahein H; Alkasab, Tarik K

    2018-06-01

    Radiology practice will be altered by the coming of artificial intelligence, and the process of learning in radiology will be similarly affected. In the short term, radiologists will need to understand the first wave of artificially intelligent tools, how they can help them improve their practice, and be able to effectively supervise their use. Radiology training programs will need to develop curricula to help trainees acquire the knowledge to carry out this new supervisory duty of radiologists. In the longer term, artificially intelligent software assistants could have a transformative effect on the training of residents and fellows, and offer new opportunities to bring learning into the ongoing practice of attending radiologists. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Can Radiologists Learn From Airport Baggage Screening?: A Survey About Using Fictional Patients for Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Andrew; Callen, Andrew L; Marcovici, Peter; Naeger, David M; Mongan, John; Webb, Emily M

    2018-02-01

    For both airport baggage screeners and radiologists, low target prevalence is associated with low detection rate, a phenomenon known as "prevalence effect." In airport baggage screening, the target prevalence is artificially increased with fictional weapons that are digitally superimposed on real baggage. This strategy improves the detection rate of real weapons and also allows airport supervisors to monitor screener performance. A similar strategy using fictional patients could be applied in radiology. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to review the psychophysics literature regarding low target prevalence and (2) to survey radiologists' attitudes toward using fictional patients as a quality assurance tool. We reviewed the psychophysics literature on low target prevalence and airport x-ray baggage screeners. An online survey was e-mailed to all members of the Association of University Radiologists to determine their attitudes toward using fictional patients in radiology. Of the 1503 Association of University Radiologists member recipients, there were 153 respondents (10% response rate). When asked whether the use of fictional patients was a good idea, the responses were as follows: disagree (44%), neutral (25%), and agree (31%). The most frequent concern was the time taken away from doing clinical work (89% of the respondents). The psychophysics literature supports the use of fictional targets to mitigate the prevalence effect. However, the use of fictional patients is not a popular idea among academic radiologists. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reading screening mammograms – Attitudes among radiologists and radiographers about skill mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Lena Westphal; Brodersen, John

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Because of shortage of personnel for the Danish mammography screening programme, the aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of radiologists and radiographers towards a future implementation of radiographers reading screening mammograms. Materials and methods: Seven combined phenomenological and hermeneutical interviews with radiographers and radiologists were performed. Stratified selection was used for sampling of informants. The interviews were analysed against theory about quality, organization and profession. Results: Quality related possibilities: radiographers do routinely measure the performance quality, radiographers obtain sufficient reading qualifications, and skill mix improves quality. Quality related obstacles: radiologists do not routinely measure performance quality. Organization related possibilities: shortage of radiologists, positive attitudes of managers, and improved working relations. Organization related obstacles: shortage of radiographers and negative attitudes of managers. Professional related possibilities: positive experience with skill mix. Professional related obstacles: worries about negative consequences for the training of radiologists, and resistance against handing over tasks to another profession. Conclusion: Attitudes towards radiographers reading screening mammograms are attached to either quality-, organisational or professional perspectives. Radiographers are capable of learning to read mammograms at sufficient performance level but routine measurement of performance quality is essential. Resistance against skill mix may be caused by an emotionally conditioned fear of losing demarcations. The main motive for skill mix is improvement of the utilization of resources. No evidence was found regarding the organisational and financial consequences of skill mix. Despite of this all radiologists and radiographers experienced with skill mix were strong advocates for reading radiographers.

  9. The relationship between oncologists and peripheral hospital radiologists in the north-west of England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bungay, Peter M.; Carrington, Bernadette M.; Corgie, Delphine; Eardley, Anne

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To audit the relationship between Cancer Centre oncologists visiting peripheral hospitals and peripheral hospital radiologists by assessing (i) oncologists' knowledge of local radiological services; (ii) oncologists' perceptions of peripheral radiological services; (iii) peripheral radiologist's perceptions of oncologists; (iv) barriers to communication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A postal questionnaire was sent to all radiology departments visited by an oncologist, and to all medical and clinical oncologists from two regional oncology centres. RESULTS: The response rate was 100% (21 peripheral hospital radiology departments and all 35 oncologists). (i) Oncologists' knowledge of peripheral hospital imaging modalities was limited (especially MRI and intervention). (ii) 72% of oncologists rated the peripheral hospital radiology service as excellent or good, 46% rated the radiology report quality excellent to good. Deficiencies in oncological reports were identified. (iii) 44% of radiologists thought the oncologist did not relate well with the local radiology department. 50% of radiologists did not know the visiting oncologist's specialist interest. (iv) 69% of oncologists did not regularly attend peripheral hospital clinico-radiological meetings. Lack of written and oral information was hampering both specialities. CONCLUSION: Communication between oncologists and the local radiology department should include: (1) information about local radiology services for visiting oncologists (including trainees) and on the oncology team for radiologists; (2) standardized report content; (3) improved clinical information for radiologists; (4) regular clinico-radiological meetings. Bungay, P.M. et al. (2002)

  10. Breast Density Legislation in New England: A Survey Study of Practicing Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Ana P; DiFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to assess radiologists' knowledge about breast density legislation as well as perceived practice changes resulting from the enactment of breast density legislation. This is an institutional review board-exempt anonymous email survey of 523 members of the New England Roentgen Ray Society. In addition to radiologist demographics, survey questions addressed radiologist knowledge of breast density legislation, knowledge of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer, recommendations for supplemental screening, and perceived practice changes resulting from density notification legislation. Of the 523 members, 96 responded, yielding an 18% response rate. Seventy-three percent of respondents practiced in a state with breast density legislation. Sixty-nine percent felt that breast density notification increased patient anxiety about breast cancer, but also increased patient (74%) and provider (66%) understanding of the effect of breast density on mammographic sensitivity. Radiologist knowledge of the relative risk of breast cancer when comparing breasts of different density was variable. Considerable confusion and controversy regarding breast density persists, even among practicing radiologists. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of the guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma with reference CT films for improving the proficiency of radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huashi, E-mail: zhouhua@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture, 910-1193 (Japan); Tamura, Taro, E-mail: tarou@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture, 910-1193 (Japan); Kusaka, Yukinori, E-mail: kusakayk@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture, 910-1193 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi, E-mail: nsuganuma@kochi-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi University School of Medicine (Japan); Subhannachart, Ponglada, E-mail: pongladas@gmail.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi, 11000 (Thailand); Vijitsanguan, Chomphunut, E-mail: Chompoo_vj@yahoo.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi, 11000 (Thailand); Noisiri, Weeraya, E-mail: weeraya_tat@yahoo.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi, 11000 (Thailand); Hering, Kurt G., E-mail: k.g.hering@t-online.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Radiooncology and Nuclear Medicine, Radiological Clinic, Miner' s Hospital, Radiologische Klinik, Lansppaschaftskranhaus Dortmund, Wieckesweg 27, 44309, Dortmund (Germany); Akira, Masanori, E-mail: akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai, Osaka, 591-8555 (Japan); Itoh, Harumi, E-mail: hitoh@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture, 910-1193 (Japan); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki Matsuoka, Eiheizi-cho, Fukui Prefecture, 910-1193 (Japan); and others

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the developed guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma for improving radiologists’ reading proficiency. Materials and Methods: Three radiologists independently read the CT films of 22 cases including definite mesothelioma and non-mesothelioma cases at two times before and after studying the malignant pleural mesothelioma CT Guideline. The sensitivity and specificity for mesothelioma were calculated and compared between the 1st and 2nd trials. The kappa statistics was examined for agreement with experts for mesothelioma probability and for mesothelioma features recorded by three radiologists. Results: After studying the mesothelioma CT Guideline, the sensitivity for mesothelioma shown by the three radiologists at the 2nd trial was 100%, 100% and 80%, which were higher than 80%, 85% and 60% at the 1st trial, respectively. The average kappa for agreement between radiologists and experts on dichotomized mesothelioma probability were 0.69 (good) at the 2nd trial vs. 0.38 (fair) at the 1st trial. The average kappa for the agreement with experts for each of 7 features by three radiologists were 0.52–0.80 at the 2nd trial, which were significantly higher than 0.34–0.58 at the 1st trial (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test: P < 0.01), and as to five features “unilateral pleural effusion”, “nodular pleural thickening”, “tumoral encasement of lung”, “mediastinal pleural thickening”, and “diminished lung”, they achieved good agreement with average kappa of 0.61–0.80. Conclusion: The developed mesothelioma CT Guideline was suggested to have substantial effect in improving the radiologists’ proficiency for reading CT images of mesothelioma, and may contribute to accurate diagnosis of mesothelioma.

  12. Evaluation of the efficacy of the guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma with reference CT films for improving the proficiency of radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Huashi; Tamura, Taro; Kusaka, Yukinori; Suganuma, Narufumi; Subhannachart, Ponglada; Vijitsanguan, Chomphunut; Noisiri, Weeraya; Hering, Kurt G.; Akira, Masanori; Itoh, Harumi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the developed guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma for improving radiologists’ reading proficiency. Materials and Methods: Three radiologists independently read the CT films of 22 cases including definite mesothelioma and non-mesothelioma cases at two times before and after studying the malignant pleural mesothelioma CT Guideline. The sensitivity and specificity for mesothelioma were calculated and compared between the 1st and 2nd trials. The kappa statistics was examined for agreement with experts for mesothelioma probability and for mesothelioma features recorded by three radiologists. Results: After studying the mesothelioma CT Guideline, the sensitivity for mesothelioma shown by the three radiologists at the 2nd trial was 100%, 100% and 80%, which were higher than 80%, 85% and 60% at the 1st trial, respectively. The average kappa for agreement between radiologists and experts on dichotomized mesothelioma probability were 0.69 (good) at the 2nd trial vs. 0.38 (fair) at the 1st trial. The average kappa for the agreement with experts for each of 7 features by three radiologists were 0.52–0.80 at the 2nd trial, which were significantly higher than 0.34–0.58 at the 1st trial (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test: P < 0.01), and as to five features “unilateral pleural effusion”, “nodular pleural thickening”, “tumoral encasement of lung”, “mediastinal pleural thickening”, and “diminished lung”, they achieved good agreement with average kappa of 0.61–0.80. Conclusion: The developed mesothelioma CT Guideline was suggested to have substantial effect in improving the radiologists’ proficiency for reading CT images of mesothelioma, and may contribute to accurate diagnosis of mesothelioma

  13. Recent advances in neonatology - new tasks for the radiologist; Entwicklungen in der Neonatologie. Anforderungen an den Radiologen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebermass, K.; Birnbacher, R.; Weninger, M.; Pollak, A. [Abt. fuer Neonatologie, angeborene Stoerungen und Intensivmedizin, Universitaetsklinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-01-01

    Modern neonatology comprises care for a growing number of infants with congenital abnormalities and an increasing number of premature born infants. The survival rates of premature infants have increased dramatically during the past decade. This increase in survival rates can be attributed to improved prenatal and obstetric management and to advances in neonatal intensive care medicine. Radiological support: Neonatology has become a pediatric subspeciality of its own resulting in the demand for an equally specialised radiological support. Therefore, the availability of a children's radiologist for radiological and sonographic examinations is mandatory (24 hours a day) for optimal patient care on a neonatal intensive care unit. A good cooperation between radiologist and neonatologist in neonatal intensive care medicine is therefore warranted. (orig.) [German] Die moderne Neugeborenenintensivmedizin umfasst neben den typischen neonatalen Krankheitsbildern eine wachsende Zahl kleiner Fruehgeborener mit einem Geburtsgewicht <1500 g und eine, durch verbesserte praenatale Diagnostik, zunehmend groesser werdende Gruppe von Kindern mit komplexen Fehlbildungen. Anforderungen an den Radiologen: Diese Entwicklungen stellen auch an den Radiologen neue Anforderungen; neben der zunehmenden Zahl an Fruehgeborenen und ihren speziellen Krankheitsbildern ist auch die Abklaerung von speziellen, beim Intensivpatienten auftretenden Problemen erforderlich. Durch die meist gegebene Dringlichkeit der radiologischen Abklaerung ist die Verfuegbarkeit eines Kinderradiologen rund um die Uhr unabdingbar. Zudem muessen fahrbare Roentgen- und Ultraschallgeraete zur Verfuegung stehen, um eine Diagnostik direkt am Krankenbett zu ermoeglichen. Diskussion: An einer Neugeborenenintensivstation ist daher eine enge Zusammenarbeit mit dem Kinderradiologen unbedingt notwendig. (orig.)

  14. Imaging features of iBalance, a new high tibial osteotomy: what the radiologist needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaia, Erin FitzGerald; Burke, Christopher J; Alaia, Michael J; Strauss, Eric J; Ciavarra, Gina A; Rossi, Ignacio; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka

    2017-01-01

    To describe the post-surgical imaging appearance and complications of high tibial osteotomy in patients with the iBalance implant system (iHTO; Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA). Retrospective, institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant review of imaging after 24 iBalance procedures was performed with attention to: correction of varus malalignment, healing at the osteotomy site, resorption of the osteoinductive compound, and complications. Immediate correction of the varus deformity was present in all cases. Lobular radiolucency was present in all cases, more pronounced on the lateral knee radiograph, simulating infection or erosive disease. Four radiographic signs of healing were observed: blurring at the opposing osteotomy bony margins and at the osteoinductive compound and the adjacent bone interface, callus formation, and resorption of the osteoinductive compound. Complications were present in 33 % of cases, including fracture through the lateral tibial cortex (21 %), genu varum recurrence (8 %), painful exuberant bone formation (4 %), persistent pain, requiring total knee arthroplasty (4 %), and non-union (after >6 months' follow-up), with suspected infection (4 %). Radiologists should be aware of the normal radiographic appearance following iBalance high tibial osteotomy, which may be confused with infection. Radiologists should also be aware of potential post-operative complications and compare all post-operative radiographs with the immediate post-operative examination to detect collapse of the osteotomy site and recurrence of varus angulation.

  15. MACRA, MIPS, and the New Medicare Quality Payment Program: An Update for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Nicola, Gregory N; Allen, Bibb; Hughes, Danny R; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-03-01

    The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015 advances the goal of tying Medicare payments to quality and value. In April 2016, CMS published an initial proposed rule for MACRA, renaming it the Quality Payment Program (QPP). Under QPP, clinicians receive payments through either advanced alternative payment models or the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), a consolidation of existing federal performance programs that applies positive or negative adjustments to fee-for-service payments. Most physicians will participate in MIPS. This review highlights implications of the QPP and MIPS for radiologists. Although MIPS incorporates radiology-specific quality measures, radiologists will also be required to participate in other practice improvement activities, including patient engagement. Recognizing physicians' unique practice patterns, MIPS will provide special considerations in performance evaluation for physicians with limited face-to-face patient interaction. Although such considerations will affect radiologists' likelihood of success under QPP, many practitioners will be ineligible for the considerations under currently proposed criteria. Reporting using qualified clinical data registries will benefit radiologists' performance by allowing expanded arrays of MIPS and non-MIPS specialty-specific measures. A group practice reporting option will substantially reduce administrative burden but introduce new challenges by requiring uniform determination of patient-facing status and performance measurement for all of the group's physicians (diagnostic radiologists, interventional radiologists, and nonradiologists) under the same taxpayer identification number. Given that the initial MIPS performance period begins in 2017, radiologists must begin preparing for QPP and taking actions to ensure their future success under this new quality-based payment system. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Sex Differences in Radiologist Salary in U.S. Public Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Neena; Blumenthal, Daniel M; Smith, Stacy E; Ip, Ivan K; Khorasani, Ramin

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate salary differences between male and female academic radiologists at U.S. medical schools. Laws in several U.S. states mandate public release of government records, including salary information of state employees. From online salary data published by 12 states, we extracted the salaries of all academic radiologists at 24 public medical schools during 2011-2013 (n = 573 radiologists). In this institutional review board-approved cross-sectional study, we linked these data to a physician database with information on physician sex, age, faculty rank, years since residency, clinical trial involvement, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, scientific publications, and clinical volume measured by 2013 Medicare payments. Sex difference in salary, the primary outcome, was estimated using a multilevel logistic regression adjusting for these factors. Among 573 academic radiologists, 171 (29.8%) were women. Female radiologists were younger (48.5 vs 51.6 years, p = 0.001) and more likely to be assistant professors (50.9% [87/171] vs 40.8% [164/402], p = 0.026). Salaries between men and women were similar in unadjusted analyses ($290,660 vs $289,797; absolute difference, $863; 95% CI, -$18,363 to $20,090), and remained so after adjusting for age, faculty rank, years since residency, clinical trial involvement, publications, total Medicare payments, NIH funding, and graduation from a highly ranked medical school. Among academic radiologists employed at 24 U.S. public medical schools, male and female radiologists had similar annual salaries both before and after adjusting for several variables known to influence salary among academic physicians.

  17. We have much in common: the similar inter-generational work preferences and career satisfaction among practicing radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarity, Andrew K; Brown, Manuel L; Schultz, Lonni R

    2014-04-01

    There are many reported generational differences regarding workplace motivators, but these have not been previously studied in radiologists. The aim of this study was to assess for generational differences in workplace satisfaction and desired workplace characteristics among practicing radiologists. An electronic survey distributed to ACR, Society of Chairs of Academic Radiology Departments, and Association of Program Directors in Radiology members generated 1,577 responses from baby boom (BG) and generation X (GX) radiologists in active practice. Nineteen workplace characteristics and their associations with workplace satisfaction were tested in a univariate analysis using χ(2) tests and in a multiple logistic regression model to test for associations with satisfaction. Workplace satisfaction among BG and GX radiologists was 78% and 80%, respectively. Both generations reported higher satisfaction if they were optimistic about the future of radiology (87% of BG vs 85% of GX radiologists), believed the difference in the desired versus expected age of retirement was narrow (1.5 ± 3.3 years for BG radiologists vs 3.0 ± 4.1 years for GX radiologists), felt that social interactions in the workplace were important (81% of BG vs 83% of GX radiologists), and believed that professionalism in their peers was important (79% of BG vs 82% of GX radiologists). BG radiologists were more satisfied if they valued staff diversity, while GX radiologists were more satisfied if they felt that job security and the amount of compensation were important. There was no significant association of satisfaction with generation, gender, practice setting, or additional administrative work. Workplace satisfaction among practicing radiologists remains high but has decreased compared with prior surveys. The two dominant generations of practicing radiologists have similar workplace satisfaction rates and desired workplace characteristics. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published

  18. 'Whatever happened to the class of 2000?' An outcome survey of potential interventional radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, A.A.; Adam, A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To find out what final career choices were made by trainee doctors who had indicated a strong interest in pursuing a career in interventional radiology and to establish the reasons behind their final career choice. Methods: Eighty-eight doctors who attended a meeting in 2000 designed to promote interventional radiology as a career were questioned as to whether the meeting influenced their potential career choices and then further surveyed via postal questionnaire 5 years later to find out their eventual career choices. Of the 88 doctors who attended, 56 were radiology trainees and 32 were training in either medical or surgical specialties. There were 25 women and 63 men. Results: Five years after the meeting, six are now interventional radiologists (6.8%) though four of these are still in a 6th year interventional radiology fellowship. A further 12 (13.6%) are systems based, predominantly diagnostic radiologists with an interest in intervention. Thirty-two (43.2%) are diagnostic radiologists who undertake little or no therapeutic intervention. Of the 32 non-radiologists who attended the meeting only three entered radiology and are still in training. Conclusions: Interventional radiology is a popular initial career choice amongst trainee doctors. However, only a small number eventually pursue the specialty. If the manpower shortage of interventional radiologists is to be addressed, there needs to be improvements in training, accreditation, career opportunities and working conditions

  19. Malpractice suits in chest radiology: an evaluation of the histories of 8265 radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephen R; Patel, Ronak H; Yang, Lily; Lelkes, Valdis M; Castro, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to present rates of claims, causes of error, percentage of cases resulting in a judgment, and average payments made by radiologists in chest-related malpractice cases in a survey of 8265 radiologists. The malpractice histories of 8265 radiologists were evaluated from the credentialing files of One-Call Medical Inc., a preferred provider organization for computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging in workers' compensation cases. Of the 8265 radiologists, 2680 (32.4%) had at least 1 malpractice suit. Of those who were sued, the rate of claims was 55.1 per 1000 person years. The rate of thorax-related suits was 6.6 claims per 1000 radiology practice years (95% confidence interval, 6.0-7.2). There were 496 suits encompassing 48 different causes. Errors in diagnosis comprised 78.0% of the causes. Failure to diagnose lung cancer was by far the most frequent diagnostic error, representing 211 cases or 42.5%. Of the 496 cases, an outcome was known in 417. Sixty-one percent of these were settled in favor of the plaintiff, with a mean payment of $277,230 (95% confidence interval, 226,967-338,614). Errors in diagnosis, and among them failure to diagnose lung cancer, were by far the most common reasons for initiating a malpractice suit against radiologists related to the thorax and its contents.

  20. Job satisfaction, income, workload, workplace, and demographics of Japanese radiologists in the 2008 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Miyuki; Mizunuma, Kimiyoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo; Yasunaga, Hideo; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to verify radiologists' demographics and job satisfaction in Japan and analyze factors affecting job satisfaction. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to 7,491 eligible radiologists between April and June 2008. The questionnaire consisted of items concerning participants' demographics and job satisfaction. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to analyze the impact of practice environments on radiologists' overall job satisfaction. There were 3,986 (53%) valid responses. In 2008, 67.7% of radiologists reported being extremely or somewhat satisfied with their job. With regard to changes in job satisfaction over the previous 5 years, 45.8% felt much increased or somewhat increased satisfaction, whereas 18.8% felt somewhat decreased or much decreased. The significant factors associated with overall job satisfaction were annual income (p<0.01) and working at larger hospitals (500 or more beds) (p<0.01). Older age (p<0.01) and night duty (p<0.01) was significantly related to dissatisfaction. The main reasons for increasing job satisfaction over 5 years were interest and lifestyle, whereas the strongest reason for decreasing job satisfaction was workload. This survey revealed Japanese radiologists had a high level of job satisfaction. (author)

  1. A survey on visual information search behavior and requirements of radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markonis, D; Holzer, M; Dungs, S; Vargas, A; Langs, G; Kriewel, S; Müller, H

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to learn more on the image use and search requirements of radiologists. These requirements will then be taken into account to develop a new search system for images and associated meta data search in the Khresmoi project. Observations of the radiology workflow, case discussions and a literature review were performed to construct a survey form that was given online and in paper form to radiologists. Eye tracking was performed on a radiology viewing station to analyze typical tasks and to complement the survey. In total 34 radiologists answered the survey online or on paper. Image search was mentioned as a frequent and common task, particularly for finding cases of interest for differential diagnosis. Sources of information besides the Internet are books and discussions with colleagues. Search for images is unsuccessful in around 25% of the cases, stopping the search after around 10 minutes. The most common reason for failure is that target images are considered rare. Important additions for search requested in the survey are filtering by pathology and modality, as well as search for visually similar images and cases. Few radiologists are familiar with visual retrieval but they desire the option to upload images for searching similar ones. Image search is common in radiology but few radiologists are fully aware of visual information retrieval. Taking into account the many unsuccessful searches and time spent for this, a good image search could improve the situation and help in clinical practice.

  2. Is direct radiologist supervision of abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, V. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom); Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom); Halligan, S. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.halligan@imperial.ac.uk; Anderson, J.M. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom); Hugill, J. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom); Leonard, A. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Northwick Park and St Mark' s Hospitals, Harrow (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of direct radiological supervision of patients attending for abdominal CT by assessing the frequency of protocol alteration subsequent to radiologist review of the images obtained. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective questionnaire-based observational study was performed of 187 consecutive patients undergoing abdominal CT. The CT protocol was determined by a radiologist in advance, with reference to the request form. Any subsequent change in the prescribed study that was contingent on radiologist review of the images obtained was documented on the questionnaire. Comparison was made with a second (control) group of 100 patients undergoing cranial CT. RESULTS: A protocol change was undertaken following radiologist review of the CT images of 17 (9%) of the group undergoing abdominal CT, compared with 14 (14%) of the group undergoing cranial CT. In the abdominal CT group, further scanning was performed for lesion characterization, to guide a subsequent interventional procedure, because of inadequate anatomical coverage or to evaluate an unexpected lung tumour. There was no significant difference in proportions between the two groups (p=0.23). CONCLUSION: When abdominal and cranial CT studies were compared, there was no significant difference in the proportion of studies requiring a change in the prescribed protocol following radiologist review of the images obtained. There was no evidence to suggest that abdominal CT was any less suited to protocol.

  3. Job satisfaction, income, workload, workplace, and demographics of Japanese radiologists in the 2008 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Miyuki; Mizunuma, Kimiyoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo; Yasunaga, Hideo; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to verify radiologists' demographics and job satisfaction in Japan and analyze factors affecting job satisfaction. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to 7,491 eligible radiologists between April and June 2008. The questionnaire consisted of items concerning participants' demographics and job satisfaction. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to analyze the impact of practice environments on radiologists' overall job satisfaction. There were 3,986 (53 %) valid responses. In 2008, 67.7 % of radiologists reported being extremely or somewhat satisfied with their job. With regard to changes in job satisfaction over the previous 5 years, 45.8 % felt much increased or somewhat increased satisfaction, whereas 18.8 % felt somewhat decreased or much decreased. The significant factors associated with overall job satisfaction were annual income (p job satisfaction over 5 years were interest and lifestyle, whereas the strongest reason for decreasing job satisfaction was workload. This survey revealed Japanese radiologists had a high level of job satisfaction.

  4. Standalone computer-aided detection compared to radiologists' performance for the detection of mammographic masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hupse, Rianne; Samulski, Maurice; Imhof-Tas, Mechli W.; Karssemeijer, Nico; Lobbes, Marc; Boetes, Carla; Heeten, Ard den; Beijerinck, David; Pijnappel, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    We developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) system aimed at decision support for detection of malignant masses and architectural distortions in mammograms. The effect of this system on radiologists' performance depends strongly on its standalone performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the standalone performance of this CAD system to that of radiologists. In a retrospective study, nine certified screening radiologists and three residents read 200 digital screening mammograms without the use of CAD. Performances of the individual readers and of CAD were computed as the true-positive fraction (TPF) at a false-positive fraction of 0.05 and 0.2. Differences were analysed using an independent one-sample t-test. At a false-positive fraction of 0.05, the performance of CAD (TPF = 0.487) was similar to that of the certified screening radiologists (TPF = 0.518, P = 0.17). At a false-positive fraction of 0.2, CAD performance (TPF = 0.620) was significantly lower than the radiologist performance (TPF = 0.736, P <0.001). Compared to the residents, CAD performance was similar for all false-positive fractions. The sensitivity of CAD at a high specificity was comparable to that of human readers. These results show potential for CAD to be used as an independent reader in breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  5. Obligation of the radiologist to obtain informed consent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narr, H

    1983-06-01

    The hazards involved in radiological examinations, especially with contrast media containing iodine, have led to the following postulations: Anamnesis must be thorough and detailed, especially with a view to allergic reactions and other contra-indications. If severe or lethal affections are suspected, preliminary examinations are necessary in those cases where sufficiently reliable findings are not available. Preliminary testing and reaction prophylaxis should be carried out if necessary. The same applies to general premedication. The information talk as well as the operative procedure must be carried out by the responsible attending physician. Only those contrast media should be applied that are commonly used and well-tested. Contrast media must not be injected for test purposes. Special mention must be made of complications that will surprise the non-expert patient, complications that may lead to incidents requiring treatment, and complications that may be fatal. Information is necessary if severe and long-term damage may occur. Information even on hardly possible and infrequent complications is particularly necessary in those cases where the diagnostic intervention does not justify hopes of healing or even saving the patient. As far as particularly hazardous methods of examination are concerned, it may be better, especially with patients of advanced age, not to carry out any such examination unless there is a vital or absolute indication.

  6. Radiological skull diagnosing - questions of the neurosurgeon to the radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlbusch, R.; Hamburger, C.; Ringel, K.

    1982-01-01

    A well-adjusted overall picture of the skull is very important to the neurosurgeon for diagnosis and therapy. Without an overall picture of the skull the neurosurgeon is hardly likely to begin a trepanation. There are, however, still same questions open in radiological diagnostics. A solution of the problem might be offered soon by computerized radiography which might even replace the conventional X-ray examination of the skull. The radiological CT-total skeletal examination of polytraumatised patients, which can be carried out in 30 seconds by modern CT equipment makes it possible to also obtain overall pictures of the skull and the upper cervical vertebral column. An advantage in addition to the fast information is the significant reduction of the radiation exposure in comparison to conventional methods. (orig./APR) [de

  7. Changes in Breast Density Reporting Patterns of Radiologists After Publication of the 5th Edition BI-RADS Guidelines: A Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Abid; Leddy, Rebecca; Lewis, Madelene; Cluver, Abbie; Ackerman, Susan; Pavic, Dag; Collins, Heather

    2017-10-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the impact of 5th edition BI-RADS breast density assessment guidelines on density reporting patterns in our clinical practice. PenRad reporting system was used to collect mammographic breast density data reported by five radiologists: 16,907 density assignments using 5th edition BI-RADS guidelines were compared with 19,066 density assessments using 4th edition guidelines. Changes in the density assessment pattern were noted between the 4th and 5th edition guidelines, and agreement in density distribution was compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient. A chi-square analysis was conducted for each reader to examine the change in the proportion of dense versus nondense assignments and on each category type to examine specific changes in proportion of density assignments from the 4th to the 5th edition. All reported p values are two-sided, and statistical significance was considered at the p densities (p < 0.001), 2.6% increase in heterogeneously dense (p < 0.001), and 0.4% decrease in extremely dense assessments (p = 0.15). Comparing the dense with nondense categories, there was a 2.3% overall increase in the dense assessments (p < 0.001) using 5th edition guidelines, mainly in the heterogeneously dense category. Two radiologists showed increased dense assessments (p < 0.001) using the 5th edition, and three radiologists showed no change (p = 0.39, 0.67, and 0.76). There was an overall increase in the dense assessments using the 5th edition, but individual radiologists in our clinical practice showed a variable adaptation to new guidelines.

  8. Preliminary report of an intervention to improve mammography skills of radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Orsi, C.J.; Karellas, A.; Costanza, M.E.; Gaw, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary report of an intervention to improve mammography skills of radiologists. Although implementation of the screening guidelines has not occurred as readily as had been anticipated, use of mammograms is increasing. As the demand for this relatively new technology increases, both the availability of the test and the quality of the test done are valid concerns. Until recently, few radiology training programs provided trainees with opportunities to develop these skills. As a result, few radiologists who have been in practice more than five years have had formal training in the interpretation of mammograms. Thus providing practicing radiologists with the opportunities to develop skills in mammographic interpretation will serve to increase both availability and quality of mammographic exams

  9. The role of a consultant radiologist - are patients still in the dark?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, L.; Griffin, N.; McDonald, S.; Vargas, H.; Hampson, F.; Sinnatamby, R. [Cambridge University Teaching Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Vasconcelos, J.C. [University of Cambridge, Centre for Applied Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Little is known regarding public awareness of the roles and responsibilities of a consultant radiologist. Between 1 April and 20 May 2008, 916 outpatients attending our radiology department completed a questionnaire addressing this issue. We found public perception variable. Thirty-six percent of respondents thought we were responsible for choosing appropriate imaging; only 65% perceived that we reported studies. Another 38% felt that we did not play an important role in their treatment, and 38% considered that we were not part of their medical team. Thirty-two percent of respondents preferred their hospital consultant to give them their imaging results, with 17% preferring this to come from the radiologist. There is significant under-appreciation of the roles and responsibilities of a consultant radiologist. It is important that we educate the public to ensure that future health policy reflects the increasingly central role imaging plays in health-care delivery. (orig.)

  10. Expanding the use of Microsoft PowerPoint. An overview for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Most radiologists need to give a lecture, present research or speak at a scientific meeting at some stage in their career. In our technologically advanced world, electronic presentations have become the norm and are almost universally expected. Microsoft PowerPoint is by far and away the most commonly used computer-based presentation package. As a result most radiologists have developed at least a modicum of PowerPoint expertise but many lack the time or inclination to develop these skills further. The purpose of this article is to explain how to expand the use of PowerPoint with freely available resources from the internet, to highlight websites where useful information on advanced PowerPoint techniques can be found, and to discuss extended functions of PowerPoint likely to be of interest to radiologists such as poster design

  11. Health issues and the practicing radiologist: defining concepts and developing recommendations for leave options and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbrun, Marta E; Bender, Claire E; Truong, Hang B; Bluth, Edward I

    2013-09-01

    Radiologists today are faced with the challenges of maintaining and balancing individual and family health needs and the demands of the workplace. To provide the highest quality and safest care of our patients, a corresponding ethos of support for a healthy workforce is required. There is a paucity of targeted information describing protections for and maintenance of the health of the practicing radiologist, in both private and academic settings. However, a review of existing family and medical leave policies may be helpful to practice leaders and practicing radiologists as a platform for the development of strategic workforce plans. This writing, by members of the ACR Commission on Human Resources, addresses the following areas: (1) medical leave, (2) maternity and/or paternity leave, and (3) disability. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Acceptance of medical apps and e‑books among German radiologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleder, S; Dendl, L M; Niessen, C; Stroszczynski, C; Schreyer, A G

    2017-09-01

    Smartphones, tablet PCs, mobile applications (apps) and electronic book files (e-books) affect our lives in private and job-related settings. The aim of this study was to analyze the behavior of radiologists on smartphones, tablet PCs and e‑books and to investigate its effect on their daily work. An online survey containing of 23 questions was conducted using Survey Monkey© ( www.surveymonkey.com ). The invitation to the survey was done using the newsletter of the German Radiological Society (DRG). The acquired data was automatically stored by the software and then analyzed using descriptive statistics. In total, 104 radiologists (29% female) participated in the online survey. Of these, 93% and 96.5% owned a smartphone or a tablet PC, respectively, and 72% and 67% used medical apps and e‑books, respectively. Through their use, 31% found moderate and 41% found enormous improvement in their daily work. A majority of participating radiologists would be willing to pay an increased user fee for optimized apps or e‑books. With currently only moderate individual benefit of mobile medical apps and e‑books, there is a widespread need for optimally configured apps and e‑books with a correspondingly high market potential. (1) Radiologists use smartphones (93%) or tablet PCs (96.5%); (2) 72% of radiologists use a smartphone or tablet PC for medical material; (3) 53% of radiologists report significant assistance from or a high value of the mobile medical applications used; (4) There is a willingness to pay a license fee for optimized mobile applications or e‑books.

  13. Reading screening mammograms - Attitudes among radiologists and radiographers about skill mix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Lena Westphal; Brodersen, John

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Because of shortage of personnel for the Danish mammography screening programme, the aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of radiologists and radiographers towards a future implementation of radiographers reading screening mammograms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven...... of managers, and improved working relations. Organization related obstacles: shortage of radiographers and negative attitudes of managers. Professional related possibilities: positive experience with skill mix. Professional related obstacles: worries about negative consequences for the training...... and financial consequences of skill mix. Despite of this all radiologists and radiographers experienced with skill mix were strong advocates for reading radiographers....

  14. The 'Battered-Child-Syndrome': The view of the pediatric radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greinacher, I.; Troeger, J.

    1982-01-01

    The diagnosis of the Battered-Child-Syndrome (BSC) is made by the pediatrician and the radiologist. The recognition of this entity by the radiologist is possible because of the high frequency of the typical skeletal lesions. This skeletal changes are illustrated by X-ray pictures and bone scans. Not only skeletal trauma can be discovered but also visceral injuries may be combined and diagnosed in the BCS. For the detection of all changes in the BCS nowadays all possible imaging procedures should be used. Some forensic problems in this field are added. (orig.)

  15. The U.S. Radiologist Workforce: An Analysis of Temporal and Geographic Variation by Using Large National Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Hughes, Danny R; Duszak, Richard

    2016-04-01

    To determine recent trends related to temporal as well as national and statewide geographic variation in the U.S. radiologist and radiology resident workforce. This retrospective HIPAA-compliant study was exempted from the internal review board. Federal Area Health Resources Files and Medicare 5% research identifiable files were used to compute parameters related to the radiologist workforce. Geographic variation and annual temporal trends were analyzed. Pearson and Spearman correlations were assessed. Nationally, the number of radiology trainees increased 84.2% from a nadir in 1997 (3080 trainees) to 2011 (5674 trainees) and showed high state-to-state variation (range, 0-678 trainees in 2011). However, total radiologists nationally increased 39.2% from 1995 (27 906 radiologists) to 2011 (38 875 radiologists), and radiologists per 100 000 population nationally increased by 7.5% from 1995 (10.62%) to 2011 (11.42%), while showing high state-to-state variation (highest-to-lowest state ratio of 4.3). Radiologists' share of the overall physician workforce declined nationally by 8.8% from 1995 (4.0%) to 2011 (3.7%), with moderate state-to-state variation (highest-to-lowest state ratio of 1.7). Radiology trainee numbers exhibited weak-to-moderate positive state-by-state correlation with radiologists per 100 000 population (r = 0.292-0.532), but moderate-to-strong inverse correlation with the percentage of radiologists in rural practice (r = -0.464 to -0.635). Although the number of radiology trainees dramatically increased, radiologists per 100 000 population increased only slightly, and radiologists' share of the overall physician workforce declined. State-to-state variations in radiologist and radiology resident workforces are high, which suggests a potential role for geographic redistribution rather than changes in the overall workforce size.

  16. Women as radiologists: are there barriers to entry and advancement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephen R; Barry, Maureen; Chaudhry, Hamaira; Hubbi, Basil

    2006-02-01

    In consideration of the fact that women constitute only 25% of radiology residents, even though they constitute 45% of medical students, this study was conducted to determine if the trend of women choosing radiology as a career differs from that for other medical specialties and if there are differences on the basis of the gender of program directors or geographic location. The authors also wished to determine if constraints exist that prevent women from advancing into positions of leadership in radiology. The percentage of women in each of the 186 radiology residency programs was compiled to determine the mean and standard deviation of women represented and from those data to examine if there were patterns of exclusion related to program size, location, or the gender of program directors. The membership and committee lists of the ACR and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) were examined to gauge the participation of women as leaders in these 2 organizations, as were the mastheads of Radiology and the American Journal of Roentgenology. The number of female chairs of academic departments was also examined. Over the past decade, the percentage of women in diagnostic radiology residencies has remained remarkably constant at or slightly above 25%. There was no discernable prejudice against women applicants by program size, location, or program director gender. In both the ACR and the RSNA, women are represented in positions of leadership approximately in proportion to their percentage in the general membership. Journal mastheads have fewer women than might be expected given the participation of women in academic radiology. There are a small but increasing number of women chairing academic radiology departments. The relatively low percentage of women in diagnostic radiology residencies is not a reflection of the gender of program directors. Women are represented in positions of influence and authority in major organizations in American radiology in

  17. Simple Kidney Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Simple Kidney Cysts What are simple kidney cysts? Simple kidney cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled ... that form in the kidneys. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  18. The right scan, for the right patient, at the right time: The reorganization of major trauma service provision in England and its implications for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.J.; West, A.T.H.

    2013-01-01

    Major trauma services in England are currently undergoing a radical overhaul with the formation of regional trauma networks and designated major trauma centres (MTCs). Radiology is scheduled to play a key role within major trauma care both in terms of 24/7 access to whole body computed tomography (WBCT) and interventional radiology (IR) services, as well as providing immediate expert imaging guidance to the trauma team. This review examines the rationale behind trauma networks, as well as drawing attention to the new Royal College of Radiologists' standards for major trauma imaging. It attempts to address radiologists' understandable concerns about the inappropriate use of WBCT, radiation dose, and intravenous contrast medium risks. Reporting whole-body CT for trauma patients is difficult, covering multiple body regions, with great pressure to provide a rapid and accurate report to the trauma team. The benefits of standardized reports, dual-radiologist reporting, and the use of organ injury severity grading are explored to aid succinct communication of findings and further guide patient management

  19. Potential radiation doses likely to be received by the radiologists and para medical staff in an hospital in Pakistan. (G. M. counter, survey meter measurements )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Zeb, J.; Iqbal, S.; Orfi, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    Potential radiation doses likely to received by the radiologists and paramedical staff in a typical hospital in Pakistan have been measured using a very sensitive radiation survey meter (FAG FH40F2) employing in Geiger Muller counter (FHZ 120] as a role which is extendable up to 4 meters in length. The measurements have been compared with internationally accepted Maximum Permissible Radiation Dos Level (MPDL). Radiation dose rates measured on the hands of two radiologist during fluoroscopy examination of the patient were of the order of 1 m Sv.h/sup -1/ and 540 u Sv. h/sup -1/ which were 400% to 21% higher than the MPDL (250 u Sv. h/sup -1/). Radiation dose rates measured on the chest of the nurses were 300 and 50 u Sv. h/sup -1/, which were 3000% to 500% higher than those of MPDL(10 u Sv. h/sup -1/). Such high dose rates present a serious situation from radiation damage point of view and deserve attention of the hospital management and of national regulatory authority so as to minimize the potential radiation doses to the radiologists and paramedical staff. As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept should be implemented in the health sector. (author)

  20. Potential radiation doses likely to be received by the radiologists and paramedical staff in typical hospital in Pakistan (GM counter, survey meter measurements) (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Zeb, J.; Iqbal, S.; Orfi, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Potential radiation doses likely to be received by the radiologists and para medical staff in a typical hospital in Pakistan have been measured using a very sensitive radiation survey meter (FAG FH40F2) employing a Geiger Muller counter (FHZ120) as a probe which is a probe extend able up to 4 meters in length. These measurements have been compared with internationally accepted Maximum Permissible Radiation Dose Level (MPDL). Radiation dose rates measured on the hands of two radiologists during fluoroscopy examination of the patient were of the order of 1mSv.h/sup -1/ and 540 mu Sv.h/sup -1/ which were 400% to 216% times higher than the MPDL (250 mu Sv.h/sup -1/). Radiation dose rates measured on the chest and neck were 300 and 50 mu Sv.h/sup -1/, which were 3000% to 500% times higher than those of MPDL (10 mu Sv.h/sup -1/. Such high dose rates present a serious situation and deserve attention of the hospital management and of national regulatory authority so as to minimize the potential radiation doses to the radiologists and para medical staff. As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept should be implemented in the health sector. (author)

  1. Image quality - physical and diagnostic parameters. The radiologist's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stender, H.St.

    1985-01-01

    The quality of a radiograph is determined by the diagnostic information it provides. This depends upon the visual detection of diagnostically relevant structures. The technical radiographic requirements are dependent upon the physical measurements and the physiological and optical conditions. Such physical factors as spatial resolution, contrast and noise are quantitative measurements, which must be oriented to the qualitative visual characteristics of the radiograph. The influence of subjective perception and complexity of structural noise on the detectability of details and structures particularly demands attention. Since radiographic quality depends upon the detection of diagnostically relevant structure and features, it is important to define these parameters on the basis of extensive radiographic analysis and the corresponding clinical findings. The diagnostically relevant radiographic parameters and image details and critical structures have been worked out for the examination of the lungs, colon, stomach, urinary tract and skeleton. Good image quality requires coordination of the physical-technical parameters with the visual ability of the observer, since only in this way can the diagnostic information be represented with sufficient clarity. (author)

  2. Reject analysis: A comparison of radiographer and radiologist perceptions of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the potential differences in perceptions of image quality between radiographers and radiologists in a large UK hospital and the subsequent impact this has on image rejection. Image rejection, while sometimes necessary, often leads to an increased radiation dose to the patient due to the need to repeat. Moreover, this translates into increased waiting times, departmental costs, and lower patient satisfaction. Adopting a mixed methods approach, this paper first seeks to quantify the differences in radiographer and radiologist perceptions and second establish the underlying causes of such differences through a quantitative and qualitative investigation respectively. Using a standardized psychometric scale of a GP lateral knee, the study reveals significant differences in the perceptions of quality and rejection rates between radiographers and radiologists driven by a conflict in the evaluation criteria used. The study has significant implications for improving departmental performance and proposes a potential solution for reducing reject rates and image repeats. - Highlights: • Significant differences are found to exist in perceptions of image quality. • Differences in perceptions of image quality directly influence reject rates. • Radiographers judge images on technical criteria. • Radiologists judge images on diagnostic criteria. • Results suggest better communication could reduce reject rates.

  3. Radiologists' preferences for digital mammographic display. The International Digital Mammography Development Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, E D; Cole, E B; Major, S; Zong, S; Hemminger, B M; Muller, K E; Johnston, R E; Walsh, R; Conant, E; Fajardo, L L; Feig, S A; Nishikawa, R M; Yaffe, M J; Williams, M B; Aylward, S R

    2000-09-01

    To determine the preferences of radiologists among eight different image processing algorithms applied to digital mammograms obtained for screening and diagnostic imaging tasks. Twenty-eight images representing histologically proved masses or calcifications were obtained by using three clinically available digital mammographic units. Images were processed and printed on film by using manual intensity windowing, histogram-based intensity windowing, mixture model intensity windowing, peripheral equalization, multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA), contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization, Trex processing, and unsharp masking. Twelve radiologists compared the processed digital images with screen-film mammograms obtained in the same patient for breast cancer screening and breast lesion diagnosis. For the screening task, screen-film mammograms were preferred to all digital presentations, but the acceptability of images processed with Trex and MUSICA algorithms were not significantly different. All printed digital images were preferred to screen-film radiographs in the diagnosis of masses; mammograms processed with unsharp masking were significantly preferred. For the diagnosis of calcifications, no processed digital mammogram was preferred to screen-film mammograms. When digital mammograms were preferred to screen-film mammograms, radiologists selected different digital processing algorithms for each of three mammographic reading tasks and for different lesion types. Soft-copy display will eventually allow radiologists to select among these options more easily.

  4. Do the terms "proximal" and "distal" cause confusion amongst radiologists and other clinicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillicorn, C J

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the use of the terms "proximal" and "distal", and what respondents think the terms mean, when applied to certain structures within the trunk, notably the veins and the biliary tract. Fifty-three respondents were interviewed using simplified anatomical diagrams. Respondents were asked what terms they would use to describe sites at opposite ends of the superior vena cava (SVC), internal jugular vein (IJV), common bile duct (CBD), and pancreatic duct. They were also asked which end of each of these structures they would think was being referred to if they read a radiological report that used these terms. The terms "proximal" and "distal" were used by at least 50% of all respondents, and, specifically, at least 60% of radiologists at all four anatomical sites. Eighty-five percent (n=45) of all respondents and 100% (n=24) of radiologists agreed that the term "proximal" CBD referred to its superior end. However, at the other sites there was marked disagreement, 67% (n=16) of radiologists thought the superior SVC and superior IJV were "proximal", 33% (n=8) thought they were "distal". There was a 54% (n=13) to 46% (n=11) split amongst radiologists as to which end of the pancreatic duct was "proximal". The terms "proximal" and "distal" are the most frequently used terms to describe positions in veins and the biliary system, but there is widespread confusion about their meaning, which could lead to medical error and ultimately patient harm. The use of alternative terms is advised.

  5. The relationship between back pain and lead apron use in radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Novelline, R.A. (Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego (Unites States))

    1992-01-01

    Anecdotal experience has suggested that back pain in radiologists may result from extensive wearing of lead aprons. To investigate this possibility, the authors sent questionnaires to 688 radiologists in various subspecialties whose use of lead aprons varied from none to moderate to extensive. The questionnaire included both objective items that quantitated apron use and back pain and subjective items that asked, for example, if the respondent believed that lead aprons were responsible for his or her back pain. They received 236 responses (34% response rate). Objective data from those radiologists who had experienced no back pain before wearing a lead apron (179 radiologists, 26% of those surveyed) were tabulated; respondents were grouped according to age, time spent wearing a lead apron, and degree of back pain. Odds ratios were calculated. Answers to subjective questions for all respondents were tabulated. Back pain was reported by 52% of those who estimated their lead apron use at greater than or equal to 10 hr per week, the mean response, as opposed to 46% of those who wore lead aprons fewer than 10 hr a week. These and related results were not statistically significant. Our study does not prove that wearing a lead apron is a significant risk factor for the development of back pain.

  6. Teleradiology in Southeast Iran: Evaluating the Views of Senior Executives and Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Erfannia, Leila; Sancholi, Mahboobe; Salmani, Fatemeh; Sarsarshahi, Aida

    Teleradiology is considered as one of the important forms of telemedicine. Positive views of the users and providers of these services play an important role in its successful implementations. The aim of this study was to investigate the views of radiologists used in the radiology departments of teaching hospitals in the Zahedan University of Medical Sciences through teleradiology, as well as evaluate the executive possibility of teleradiology in these hospitals by the views of chief executive officer and comparison between these two views. The current cross-sectional research was performed in 2014 at Zahedan teaching hospitals. The views of 13 chief executive officers on the possibility of the execution of teleradiology and 26 radiologists on the teleradiology process were evaluated by means of two valid and reliable questionnaires. The results of the research revealed that most of the radiologists had knowledge of and positive opinions about teleradiology. Conversely, the view by chief executive officers was that implementation of these processes was not possible in the studied hospitals. Dealing with some issues including data security, controlling or restricting access to clinical information of patients during the process of teleradiology, the possibility of legal protection for the participating radiologists, constitution of executive teams in the organization along with the financial supports, and, subsequently, invitation of the supports from the chief executive officers as the main sponsors of teleradiology implementation in the teaching hospitals are all guidelines for improvement of the successful implementation of teleradiology.

  7. Digital teaching files – a useful teaching tool for the modern radiologist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiologists have always collected copies of model examples and interesting cases encountered in daily practice to use for teaching purposes.1,2 A collection of teaching files is an important resource for medical education and the dissemination of knowledge in radiology. Furthermore, the presence of a radiological ...

  8. Is Value-Driven Health Care an Unfunded Mandate for Radiologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Geraldine

    2016-02-01

    The goals of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) can be summed up by the Triple Aim, as defined by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement: Improve population health, optimize the patient experience, and reduce the costs of care. Despite recent reimbursement reductions, radiologists have increasing opportunities to participate in value-based payment programs and should leverage those opportunities.

  9. The relationship between back pain and lead apron use in radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Novelline, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Anecdotal experience has suggested that back pain in radiologists may result from extensive wearing of lead aprons. To investigate this possibility, the authors sent questionnaires to 688 radiologists in various subspecialties whose use of lead aprons varied from none to moderate to extensive. The questionnaire included both objective items that quantitated apron use and back pain and subjective items that asked, for example, if the respondent believed that lead aprons were responsible for his or her back pain. They received 236 responses (34% response rate). Objective data from those radiologists who had experienced no back pain before wearing a lead apron (179 radiologists, 26% of those surveyed) were tabulated; respondents were grouped according to age, time spent wearing a lead apron, and degree of back pain. Odds ratios were calculated. Answers to subjective questions for all respondents were tabulated. Back pain was reported by 52% of those who estimated their lead apron use at greater than or equal to 10 hr per week, the mean response, as opposed to 46% of those who wore lead aprons fewer than 10 hr a week. These and related results were not statistically significant. Our study does not prove that wearing a lead apron is a significant risk factor for the development of back pain

  10. Lung Volume Reduction in Pulmonary Emphysema from the Radiologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doellinger, F; Huebner, R H; Kuhnigk, J M; Poellinger, A

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary emphysema causes decrease in lung function due to irreversible dilatation of intrapulmonary air spaces, which is linked to high morbidity and mortality. Lung volume reduction (LVR) is an invasive therapeutical option for pulmonary emphysema in order to improve ventilation mechanics. LVR can be carried out by lung resection surgery or different minimally invasive endoscopical procedures. All LVR-options require mandatory preinterventional evaluation to detect hyperinflated dysfunctional lung areas as target structures for treatment. Quantitative computed tomography can determine the volume percentage of emphysematous lung and its topographical distribution based on the lung's radiodensity. Modern techniques allow for lobebased quantification that facilitates treatment planning. Clinical tests still play the most important role in post-interventional therapy monitoring, but CT is crucial in the detection of postoperative complications and foreshadows the method's high potential in sophisticated experimental studies. Within the last ten years, LVR with endobronchial valves has become an extensively researched minimally-invasive treatment option. However, this therapy is considerably complicated by the frequent occurrence of functional interlobar shunts. The presence of "collateral ventilation" has to be ruled out prior to valve implantations, as the presence of these extraanatomical connections between different lobes may jeopardize the success of therapy. Recent experimental studies evaluated the automatic detection of incomplete lobar fissures from CT scans, because they are considered to be a predictor for the existence of shunts. To date, these methods are yet to show acceptable results. Today, surgical and various minimal invasive methods of lung volume reduction are in use. Radiological and nuclear medical examinations are helpful in the evaluation of an appropriate lung area. Imaging can detect periinterventional complications. Reduction of lung

  11. Determination of the Absorbed Doses in Shanks of Interventional Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Szczepanski, K.; Tulik, P.; Obryk, B.

    2008-01-01

    Complicated procedures of interventional radiology require usually a much longer investigation time, comparing to the conventional radiography. Moreover, interventional radiology procedures require the presence of the medical staff next to the patient in order to perform the procedure. This results in higher risk for health professionals. Even though these persons reasonably keep away from the primary X ray beam, they are under the effects of scatter radiation due to the interaction of the primary beam with the patient. The protection aprons, thyroid protectors and shielding glasses are used in order to minimize the doses for the staff, but lower parts of legs remain usually unprotected and the absorbed doses in shanks are not recorded. The paper presents the measured values of the absorbed dose in lower extremities of medical staff, involved in the procedures of interventional radiology, completed with the measurements of air kerma under the patient table. Measurements were performed in one of big hospitals in Warsaw during all the procedures performed in six weeks. Majority of the procedures constituted angioplasty or angioplasty with vascular stenting, uterine fibroid embolization and cholangiography. In the angioplasty procedure, imaging techniques are used to guide a balloon-tipped catheter into an artery and advance it to where the vessel is narrow or blocked. The balloon is then inflated to open the vessel, deflated and removed. In vascular stenting, which is often performed with angioplasty, a small wire mesh tube (a stent) is permanently placed in the newly opened artery to help it remain open. In a uterine fibroid embolization procedure, the image guidance is used in order to place an embolic agent (synthetic material) inside one or more of the blood vessels that supply the fibroid tumors with blood. As a result, these vessels become occluded, or closed off, and the fibroid tissue shrinks. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography is a way of examining

  12. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement and Retrieval Rates among Radiologists and Nonradiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guez, David; Hansberry, David R; Eschelman, David J; Gonsalves, Carin F; Parker, Laurence; Rao, Vijay M; Levin, David C

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement and retrieval rates among radiologists, vascular surgeons, cardiologists, other surgeons, and all other health care providers for Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries in the years 2012-2015. The nationwide Medicare Physician/Supplier Procedure Summary Master Files were used to determine the volume and utilization rate of IVC filter placement, IVC filter repositioning, and IVC filter retrieval, which correspond to procedure codes 37191, 37192, and 37193, respectively. Procedural code 37193 was not available before 2012, so data were reviewed for the years 2012-2015. The total volume of Medicare IVC filter placement decreased from 57,785 in 2012 to 44,378 in 2015, with radiologists responsible for 60% of all filter placements. Volume of IVC filter placement declined across all specialties, including radiologists, who placed 33,744 in 2012 and 27,957 in 2015. In contrast, total retrieval of IVC filters increased from 4,060 removals in 2012 to 6,166 in 2015. Retrieval rate per 100,000 Medicare beneficiaries increased from 11 in 2012 to 16 in 2015. Radiologists removed the bulk of the filters: 64% in both 2012 and 2015. Vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and other surgeons retrieved, respectively, 20%, 10%, and 5% of all IVC filters in 2012 and 22%, 9%, and 5% in 2015. From 2012 to 2015, IVC filter placement steadily decreased across all specialties. Retrieval rate of IVC filters continued to rise over the same period. Radiologists were responsible for the majority of IVC filter placements and retrievals. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Defining the abdominal radiologist based on the current U.S. job market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David H; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2018-03-24

    The purpose of the study is to characterize current practice patterns of abdominal radiologists based on work descriptions within job postings on numerous national radiology specialty websites. Job postings for either "abdominal" or "body" radiologists were searched weekly on five society websites (SAR, SCBT-MR, ARRS, ACR, RSNA) over a 1-year period. Postings were reviewed for various characteristics. Nine hundred and sixteen total ads for 341 unique abdominal radiologist positions were reviewed (34.6% academic, 64.2% private practice, 1.2% other). Postings occurred most commonly in March (12.3%) and least commonly in November (4.8%). States with most positions were Florida (27), California (26), and New York (24). Of postings delineating expectations of specific abdominal modalities, 67.4% mentioned MRI, 58.5% ultrasound, 41.1% fluoroscopy, 14.3% PET, and 54.0% interventions. Additional non-abdominal expectations included general radiology (28.7%), breast imaging (21.1%), and general nuclear medicine (9.7%). Additional skills included prostate MRI (7.0%), OBGYN ultrasound (5.0%), and CT colonoscopy (2.6%). 79.2% required an abdominal imaging fellowship (specifically a body MRI fellowship in 4.1%). By using job postings for abdominal radiologists, we have taken a practical approach to characterizing the current status of this subspecialty, reflecting recent job expectations and requirements. The large majority of positions required a body fellowship, and the positions commonly entailed a variety of skills beyond non-invasive diagnostic abdominal imaging. Of note, expectations of considerable minorities of positions included abdominal interventions, general radiology, and breast imaging. These insights may guide the development of abdominal radiology fellowships and mini-fellowships, as well as assist radiologists entering or returning to the job market.

  14. Computer-aided detection system for chest radiography: reducing report turnaround times of examinations with abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, E-Fong; Liu, Gin-Chung; Lee, Lo-Yeh; Tsai, Huei-Yi; Jaw, Twei-Shiun

    2015-06-01

    The ability to give high priority to examinations with pathological findings could be very useful to radiologists with large work lists who wish to first evaluate the most critical studies. A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for identifying chest examinations with abnormalities has therefore been developed. To evaluate the effectiveness of a CAD system on report turnaround times of chest examinations with abnormalities. The CAD system was designed to automatically mark chest examinations with possible abnormalities in the work list of radiologists interpreting chest examinations. The system evaluation was performed in two phases: two radiologists interpreted the chest examinations without CAD in phase 1 and with CAD in phase 2. The time information recorded by the radiology information system was then used to calculate the turnaround times. All chest examinations were reviewed by two other radiologists and were divided into normal and abnormal groups. The turnaround times for the examinations with pathological findings with and without the CAD system assistance were compared. The sensitivity and specificity of the CAD for chest abnormalities were 0.790 and 0.697, respectively, and use of the CAD system decreased the turnaround time for chest examinations with abnormalities by 44%. The turnaround times required for radiologists to identify chest examinations with abnormalities could be reduced by using the CAD system. This system could be useful for radiologists with large work lists who wish to first evaluate the most critical studies. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Quality control of outpatient imaging examinations in North Rhine-Westphalia. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, B.; Boettge, M.; Reinecke, T.; Zaehringer, M.; Smekal, U. v.; Winnekendonk, G.; Lackner, K.; Coburger, S.; Lehmacher, W.; Harnischmacher, U.; Luengen, M.; Lauterbach, K.W.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: In the state of North-Rhine Westphalia (NRW), Germany, a survey was conducted on radiologic examinations ordered by general practitioners (GPs). Part I of this study aims to collect characteristic epidemiological data and to assess structural quality. Materials and methods: All GPs in NRW were asked to cooperate. Participating GPs filled out a questionnaire for each patient. The patients recorded the symptoms prompting the imaging examinations. The radiologists or other physicians performing the examinations were asked to provide the images and written reports and to complete a questionnaire. Two university radiologists documented the pertinent test data from the submitted images and written records. Independently of each other, five university radiologists anonymously reviewed the image quality of each examination using structured questionnaires. Results: A total of 920 patients gave their informed consent and participated. Questionnaires from 787 patients, 852 GPs and 611 radiologists or other interpreting physicians as well as the complete survey data from 530 examinations were available. Of 1503 examinations, conventional radiography made up 52%, sonography 17%, computed tomography (CT) 13% and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 5%. Most indications involved the musculoskeletal (37%) and respiratory systems (24%). Physicians without board certification in radiology interpreted 1% of the CT examinations, 26% of the radiographic examinations and 71% of the sonographic examinations. Of the 174 self-referrals, 1% involved CT, 33% conventional radiography and 66% sonography. Written reports were available for 95% of all 469 examinations performed by radiologists and 74% of all 127 examinations conducted by non-radiologists. Only 44% of the 23 sonographic studies were self-referrals by the patient's GP. On average, the radiographic techniques were acceptable in terms of diagnostic information and radiation hygiene. Conventional radiographs were better exposed

  16. The Royal Australian College of Radiologists (RACR) survey of reactions to intravenous ionic and non-ionic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Royal Australian College of Radiologists (RACR) expressed concern as to medico-legal implications of the continued use of conventional ionic contrast media in view of the availability of the new low-osmolar media. The new agents had demonstrated significant advantages and it was anticipated that their use would be associated with a lower incidence of undesirable reactions and deaths. However, these new media are significantly more expensive than conventional ionic media and complete changes to these agents has considerable implications for health budgets. Since it was the view of the RACR that there was insufficient information available of the incidence of reactions in clinical use to justify a complete change, a prospective survey of reations to intravenous contrast media injections was initiated. Particpants were issued a simple form, which required for each patient a record of the presence or absence of risk factors, wether ionic or non-ionic contrast media were used, and of the severity of eventual reactions. The results of about 170.000 patients were reported. The survey demonstrated the relative safety of non-ionic media for intravenous use. Despite the relative high cost of these media the continued use of conventional ionic media will become increasingly difficult to justify. (H.W.). 9 refs.; 4 tabs

  17. Assessment of Volumetric versus Manual Measurement in Disseminated Testicular Cancer; No Difference in Assessment between Non-Radiologists and Genitourinary Radiologist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Öztürk

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of semi-automatic volumetric measurement of retroperitoneal lymph node metastases in testicular cancer (TC patients treated with chemotherapy versus the standardized manual measurements based on RECIST criteria.21 TC patients with retroperitoneal lymph node metastases of testicular cancer were studied with a CT scan of chest and abdomen before and after cisplatin based chemotherapy. Three readers, a surgical resident, a radiological technician and a radiologist, assessed tumor response independently using computerized volumetric analysis with Vitrea software® and manual measurement according to RECIST criteria (version 1.1. Intra- and inter-rater variability were evaluated with intra class correlations and Bland-Altman analysis.Assessment of intra observer and inter observer variance proved non-significant in both measurement modalities. In particularly all intraclass correlation (ICC values for the volumetric analysis were > .99 per observer and between observers. There was minimal bias in agreement for manual as well as volumetric analysis.In this study volumetric measurement using Vitrea software® appears to be a reliable, reproducible method to measure initial tumor volume of retroperitoneal lymph node metastases of testicular cancer after chemotherapy. Both measurement methods can be performed by experienced non-radiologists as well.

  18. X-ray examinations during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Hospital Sao Luiz, Sao Paulo, SP; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo UNIFESP/EPM, SP

    2005-01-01

    X-ray examinations may be necessary during pregnancy for an accurate diagnosis and adequate treatment administration. In these cases, the exposure to ionizing radiation and its effects on the fetus are a major concern to the patient and to the clinician. In fact, most of these examinations are safe and do not represent a significant risk to the fetus. However, the radiologist must know the potential risks to be able to instruct all personnel involved in the care of the patient. (author)

  19. Crossing simple resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances

  20. Crossing simple resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  1. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know; Implante coclear: o que o radiologista precisa saber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Natalia Delage; Couto, Caroline Laurita Batista; Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira, E-mail: nataliadelagegomes@gmail.com [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-05-15

    Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition. (author)

  2. MR imaging of the pelvis: a guide to incidental musculoskeletal findings for abdominal radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Girish, Gandikota; Kaza, Ravi K; Jacobson, Jon; Fessell, David; Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David

    2014-08-01

    Occasionally patients who undergo magnetic resonance imaging for presumed pelvic disease demonstrate unexpected musculoskeletal imaging findings in the imaged field. Such incidental findings can be challenging to the abdominal radiologist, who may not be familiar with their appearance or know the appropriate diagnostic considerations. Findings can include both normal and abnormal bone marrow, osseous abnormalities such as Paget's disease, avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, stress and insufficiency fractures, and athletic pubalgia, benign neoplasms such as enchondroma and bone island, malignant processes such as metastasis and chondrosarcoma, soft tissue processes such as abscess, nerve-related tumors, and chordoma, joint- and bursal-related processes such as sacroiliitis, iliopsoas bursitis, greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and labral tears, and iatrogenic processes such as bone graft or bone biopsy. Though not all-encompassing, this essay will help abdominal radiologists to identify and describe this variety of pelvic musculoskeletal conditions, understand key radiologic findings, and synthesize a differential diagnosis when appropriate.

  3. Cardiac drugs used in cross-sectional cardiac imaging: what the radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, P.; Nicol, E.D.; Harden, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    The demand for cross-sectional imaging of the heart is increasing dramatically and in many centres these imaging techniques are being performed by radiologists. Although radiologists are familiar with the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to generate high-quality images and with using contrast agents, many are less familiar with administering the drugs necessary to perform CT coronary angiography and cardiac MR reliably. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the indications for and the contraindications to administering cardiac drugs in cross-sectional imaging departments. We also outline the complications that may be encountered and provide advice on how to treat these complications when they occur.

  4. Radiologist's exposition during the radioscopy of the digestive tract in esophagus-gastro-duodenum studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanez, O.; Blanco, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of personal dosimetry confirm that one of the most exposed groups to the ionizing radiations is those of Radiologists who work with radioscopy of the digestive tract. However, the particular conditions of the exposition complicate the interpretation of the reading for the values obtained on the dosimeter. In order to improve such interpretation, it has done simultaneous measurements with the routine dosimeter and with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) of lithium fluoride(LiF). It has selected eight places on the worker's body and located such dosimeters, so that the dose was integrated during thirty studies. It could verify that, if the dosimeter is located in agreement with the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection(ICRP), the reading overestimates in several times the dose in whole body(or effective dose). It has also considered that the amount of such procedures done by the radiologist is limited in this case, by the effective dose

  5. Job satisfaction of radiologists in Germany. Status quo; Berufszufriedenheit von Radiologen in Deutschland. Aktueller Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitzel, K.I.; Grosse, C.; Reiser, M.; Ertl-Wagner, B. [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen LMU, Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Kliniksche Radiologie; Ertl, L. [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen LMU, Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate the work-related satisfaction of radiologists and its influencing factors in Germany. Materials and Methods: For this purpose an invitational letter for an online opinion survey was sent to all member physicians of the Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft in 2008. 1200 questionnaires were completed (response rate 21 %) and evaluated statistically. Results: 81.7 % of radiologists declared themselves as being 'very' or 'rather satisfied'. The level of satisfaction was largely independent of age, gender, status, salary or family status. It increased over the last 5 years for 37.5 % of participants and decreased for 24.8 %. Nevertheless, 72 % of respondents indicated that they would not choose to specialize in radiology again. The main reason given was the workload. 65.6 % deemed it to be 'considerably' or 'rather too high'. Concomitantly, more than 70 % of respondents indicated that the workload had increased 'a lot' or 'rather'. Further reasons for not wanting to select the radiological profession again were 'unfavorable working hours' and 'unsatisfactory career perspectives'. Conclusion: The job satisfaction of radiologists in Germany is generally very high in spite of the perception of an extensive and frequently increasing workload. The high workload was the dominant factor against a renewed selection of the field of radiology. These data have to be interpreted in light of the current lack of residents and trained radiologists in Germany to counteract the trend toward emigration. (orig.)

  6. The Evolution of Enterprise Imaging and the Role of the Radiologist in the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersilge, Cheryl A

    2017-10-01

    The concept of enterprise imaging is part of the next frontier in the evolution of health care technology. Incorporating all medical images into a single location integrated with electronic medical records supports care coordination and the ideal of a comprehensive longitudinal medical record. Radiologists have tremendous value to offer in support of the new concept of enterprise imaging, which extends outside the radiology department to encompass all image producers in a health care enterprise.

  7. Do the terms 'proximal' and 'distal' cause confusion amongst radiologists and other clinicians?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillicorn, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the use of the terms 'proximal' and 'distal', and what respondents think the terms mean, when applied to certain structures within the trunk, notably the veins and the biliary tract. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three respondents were interviewed using simplified anatomical diagrams. Respondents were asked what terms they would use to describe sites at opposite ends of the superior vena cava (SVC), internal jugular vein (IJV), common bile duct (CBD), and pancreatic duct. They were also asked which end of each of these structures they would think was being referred to if they read a radiological report that used these terms. Results: The terms 'proximal' and 'distal' were used by at least 50% of all respondents, and, specifically, at least 60% of radiologists at all four anatomical sites. Eighty-five percent (n = 45) of all respondents and 100% (n = 24) of radiologists agreed that the term 'proximal' CBD referred to its superior end. However, at the other sites there was marked disagreement, 67% (n = 16) of radiologists thought the superior SVC and superior IJV were 'proximal', 33% (n = 8) thought they were 'distal'. There was a 54% (n = 13) to 46% (n = 11) split amongst radiologists as to which end of the pancreatic duct was 'proximal'. Conclusion: The terms 'proximal' and 'distal' are the most frequently used terms to describe positions in veins and the biliary system, but there is widespread confusion about their meaning, which could lead to medical error and ultimately patient harm. The use of alternative terms is advised

  8. The dictated report and the radiologist's ethos. An inextricable relationship: Pitfalls to avoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Radiologists’ reputation as expert image interpreters are in large measured defined by the content of their written reports. Habitually use of terms that reveal a lack of decisiveness will serve to diminish their esteem in the minds of their referrers. Recurrent resort expression to such as questionable, suspicious, cannot rule out, and clinical correlation requested when frequently deployed are examples of phrases that can have a negative effect on the radiologist's ethos

  9. Main lines of reorganization of the system of postgraduate training of radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, A.S.; Kostromina, K.N.; Datsenko, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have summed up the experience accumulated over 20 years at the Chair of Clinical Radiology of the Central Order of Lenin Institute of Advanced Medical Training. Doctors majoring in this field, usually radiologists at the age over 35 when their creative initiative is on a decrease. Therfore the authors have proposed numerous measures aimed at the improvement of the system of training in radiology and an increase in the number of young specialists

  10. Regional variation in Medicare payments for medical imaging: radiologists versus nonradiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, David A; Nsiah, Eugene; Hughes, Danny R; Duszak, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article was to study regional variation in Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) payments for medical imaging to radiologists compared with nonradiologists. Using a 5% random sample of all Medicare enrollees, which covered approximately 2.5 million Part B beneficiaries in 2011, total professional-only, technical-only, and global MPFS spending was calculated on a state-by-state and United States Census Bureau regional basis for all Medicare Berenson-Eggers Type of Service-defined medical imaging services. Payments to radiologists versus nonradiologists were identified and variation was analyzed. Nationally, mean MPFS medical imaging spending per Medicare beneficiary was $207.17 ($95.71 [46.2%] to radiologists vs $111.46 [53.8%] to nonradiologists). Of professional-only (typically interpretation) payments, 20.6% went to nonradiologists. Of technical-only (typically owned equipment) payments, 84.9% went to nonradiologists. Of global (both professional and technical) payments, 70.1% went to nonradiologists. The percentage of MPFS medical imaging spending on nonradiologists ranged from 32% (Minnesota) to 69.5% (South Carolina). The percentage of MPFS payments for medical imaging to nonradiologists exceeded those to radiologists in 58.8% of states. The relative percentage of MPFS payments to nonradiologists was highest in the South (58.5%) and lowest in the Northeast (48.0%). Nationally, 53.8% of MPFS payments for medical imaging services are made to nonradiologists, who claim a majority of MPFS payments in most states dominated by noninterpretive payments. This majority spending on nonradiologists may have implications in bundled and capitated payment models for radiology services. Medical imaging payment policy initiatives must consider the roles of all provider groups and associated regional variation.

  11. 1000-Case Reader Study of Radiologists' Performance in Interpretation of Automated Breast Volume Scanner Images with a Computer-Aided Detection System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojing; Bao, Lingyun; Tan, Yanjuan; Zhu, Luoxi; Kong, Fanlei; Wang, Wei

    2018-05-28

    The objective of our study was to assess, in a reader study, radiologists' performance in interpretation of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) images with the aid of a computer-aided detection (CADe) system. Our study is a retrospective observer study with the purpose of investigating the effectiveness of using a CADe system as an aid for radiologists in interpretation of ABVS images. The multiple-reader, multiple-case study was designed to compare the diagnostic performance of radiologists with and without CADe. The study included 1000 cases selected from ABVS examinations in our institution in 2012. Among those cases were 206 malignant, 486 benign and 308 normal cases. The cancer cases were consecutive; the benign and normal cases were randomly selected. All malignant and benign cases were confirmed by biopsy or surgery, and normal cases were confirmed by 2-y follow-up. Reader performance was compared in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, the reading time per case for each reader was recorded. Nine radiologists from our institution participated in the study. Three had more than 8 y of ultrasound experience and more than 4 y of ABVS experience (group A); 3 had more than 5 y of ultrasound experience (group B), and 3 had more than 1 y of ultrasound experience (group C). Both group B and group C had no ABVS experience. The CADe system used was the QVCAD System (QView Medical, Inc., Los Altos, CA, USA). It is designed to aid radiologists in searching for suspicious areas in ABVS images. CADe results are presented to the reader simultaneously with the ABVS images; that is, the radiologists read the ABVS images concurrently with the CADe results. The cases were randomly assigned for each reader into two equal-size groups, 1 and 2. Initially the readers read their group 1 cases with the aid of CADe and their group 2 cases without CADe. After a 1-mo washout period, they re-read their group 1

  12. Feasibility of using a biowatch to monitor GSR as a measure of radiologists' stress and fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; MacKinnon, Lea; Reiner, Bruce I.

    2015-03-01

    We have been investigating the impact of fatigue on diagnostic performance of radiologists interpreting medical images. In previous studies we found evidence that eye strain could be objectively measured and that it correlates highly with degradations in diagnostic accuracy as radiologists work long hours. Eye strain however can be difficult to measure in a non-invasive and continuous manner over the work day so we have been investigating other ways to measure physiological stress and fatigue. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of using a commercially available biowatch to measure galvanic skin response (GSR), a well known indicator of stress. 10 radiology residents wore the biowatch for about 8 hours during their normal work day and data were automatically collected at 10 Hz. They completed the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI) at the start and finish of the day. GSR values (microsiemens) ranged from 0.14 to 38.27 with an average of 0.50 (0.28 median). Overall GSR tended to be fairly constant as the day progressed, but there were definite spikes indicating higher levels of stress. SOFI scores indicated greater levels of fatigue and stress at the end of the work day. Although further work is needed, GSR measurements obtained via an easy to wear watch may provide a means to monitor stress/fatigue and alert radiologists when to take a break from interpreting images to avoid making errors.

  13. Testing of the assisting software for radiologists analysing head CT images: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, Petr; Mitropolskii, Nikolai; Kukkola, Katri; Gretsch, Monika; Koivisto, Vesa-Matti; Lindgren, Ilkka; Saunavaara, Jani; Reponen, Jarmo; Mäkynen, Anssi

    2017-12-11

    Assessing a plan for user testing and evaluation of the assisting software developed for radiologists. Test plan was assessed in experimental testing, where users performed reporting on head computed tomography studies with the aid of the software developed. The user testing included usability tests, questionnaires, and interviews. In addition, search relevance was assessed on the basis of user opinions. The testing demonstrated weaknesses in the initial plan and enabled improvements. Results showed that the software has acceptable usability level but some minor fixes are needed before larger-scale pilot testing. The research also proved that it is possible even for radiologists with under a year's experience to perform reporting of non-obvious cases when assisted by the software developed. Due to the small number of test users, it was impossible to assess effects on diagnosis quality. The results of the tests performed showed that the test plan designed is useful, and answers to the key research questions should be forthcoming after testing with more radiologists. The preliminary testing revealed opportunities to improve test plan and flow, thereby illustrating that arranging preliminary test sessions prior to any complex scenarios is beneficial.

  14. Diagnosis of IPA in HIV: The role of the chest X-ray and radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaspel, Uta; Denning, David W.; Lemke, Arne J.; Roettgen, Rainer; Bittner, Roland; Oestmann, Joerg W.; Greene, Reginald; Schuermann, Dirk; Maschmeyer, Georg; Ruhnke, Markus; Herbrecht, Raoul; Ribaud, Patricia; Lortholary, Olivier; Zonderland, Harmien; Rabe, Klaus F.; Neumann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    The role of clinical information and chest film for the discrimination between invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) and its differential diagnoses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was studied. The diagnostic performance of clinical information and chest film alone and in combination was studied for eight internists and eight radiologists with regular exposure to IPA patients. The multicenter case sample consisted of 25 patients with proven IPA and 25 with other pulmonary diseases typical for HIV. The cases were presented on a CD-ROM. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) methodology was employed. With clinical information alone, internists achieved the highest diagnostic performance (area under curve/AUC=0.84). Viewing the chest films did not contribute to their performance (AUC=0.80, P=0.26). The radiologist's performance on the basis of viewing the chest film (AUC=0.75) increased significantly (P=0.012) when clinical information (AUC=0.83) was supplied. IPA cases with characteristic radiological appearance were correctly identified in 90% with chest film. For radiologists with regular exposure to HIV patients, chest films hold relevant information and contribute to the determination in cases with characteristic radiological appearance. Overall and especially in cases with less characteristic radiological appearance, they have significant profit from full access to the clinical data. For internists with regular exposure to HIV patients, chest films do not provide information essential for the verification or differentiation of potential IPA. (orig.)

  15. Improved cancer detection in automated breast ultrasound by radiologists using Computer Aided Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelst, J.C.M. van, E-mail: Jan.vanZelst@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Tan, T.; Platel, B. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jong, M. de [Jeroen Bosch Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, ‘s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, A. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Mourits, M. [Jeroen Bosch Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, ‘s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Grivegnee, A. [Jules Bordet Institute, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Borelli, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Karssemeijer, N.; Mann, R.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Objective: To investigate the effect of dedicated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) software for automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) on the performance of radiologists screening for breast cancer. Methods: 90 ABUS views of 90 patients were randomly selected from a multi-institutional archive of cases collected between 2010 and 2013. This dataset included normal cases (n = 40) with >1 year of follow up, benign (n = 30) lesions that were either biopsied or remained stable, and malignant lesions (n = 20). Six readers evaluated all cases with and without CAD in two sessions. CAD-software included conventional CAD-marks and an intelligent minimum intensity projection of the breast tissue. Readers reported using a likelihood-of-malignancy scale from 0 to 100. Alternative free-response ROC analysis was used to measure the performance. Results: Without CAD, the average area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the readers was 0.77 and significantly improved with CAD to 0.84 (p = 0.001). Sensitivity of all readers improved (range 5.2–10.6%) by using CAD but specificity decreased in four out of six readers (range 1.4–5.7%). No significant difference was observed in the AUC between experienced radiologists and residents both with and without CAD. Conclusions: Dedicated CAD-software for ABUS has the potential to improve the cancer detection rates of radiologists screening for breast cancer.

  16. Imaging Findings in Elder Abuse: A Role for Radiologists in Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Natalie Z; Rosen, Tony; Sanchez, Allen M; Bloemen, Elizabeth M; Mennitt, Kevin W; Hentel, Keith; Nicola, Refky; Murphy, Kieran J; LoFaso, Veronica M; Flomenbaum, Neal E; Lachs, Mark S

    2017-02-01

    Emergency department assessment represents a critical but often missed opportunity to identify elder abuse, which is common and has serious consequences. Among emergency care providers, diagnostic radiologists are optimally positioned to raise suspicion for mistreatment when reviewing imaging of geriatric injury victims. However, little literature exists describing relevant injury patterns, and most radiologists currently receive neither formal nor informal training in elder abuse identification. We present 2 cases to begin characterisation of the radiographic findings in elder abuse. Findings from these cases demonstrate similarities to suspicious findings in child abuse including high-energy fractures that are inconsistent with reported mechanisms and the coexistence of acute and chronic injuries. Specific injuries uncommon to accidental injury are also noted, including a distal ulnar diaphyseal fracture. We hope to raise awareness of elder abuse among diagnostic radiologists to encourage future large-scale research, increased focus on chronic osseous findings, and the addition of elder abuse to differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Improved cancer detection in automated breast ultrasound by radiologists using Computer Aided Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelst, J.C.M. van; Tan, T.; Platel, B.; Jong, M. de; Steenbakkers, A.; Mourits, M.; Grivegnee, A.; Borelli, C.; Karssemeijer, N.; Mann, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of dedicated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) software for automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) on the performance of radiologists screening for breast cancer. Methods: 90 ABUS views of 90 patients were randomly selected from a multi-institutional archive of cases collected between 2010 and 2013. This dataset included normal cases (n = 40) with >1 year of follow up, benign (n = 30) lesions that were either biopsied or remained stable, and malignant lesions (n = 20). Six readers evaluated all cases with and without CAD in two sessions. CAD-software included conventional CAD-marks and an intelligent minimum intensity projection of the breast tissue. Readers reported using a likelihood-of-malignancy scale from 0 to 100. Alternative free-response ROC analysis was used to measure the performance. Results: Without CAD, the average area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the readers was 0.77 and significantly improved with CAD to 0.84 (p = 0.001). Sensitivity of all readers improved (range 5.2–10.6%) by using CAD but specificity decreased in four out of six readers (range 1.4–5.7%). No significant difference was observed in the AUC between experienced radiologists and residents both with and without CAD. Conclusions: Dedicated CAD-software for ABUS has the potential to improve the cancer detection rates of radiologists screening for breast cancer.

  18. Shielding effect of lead glasses on radiologists' eye lens exposure in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-01-01

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm"2-sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm"2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm"2 per glass) lens are recommended (authors)

  19. Canadian Association of Radiologists White Paper on Artificial Intelligence in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Tam, Roger; Cadrin-Chênevert, Alexandre; Guest, Will; Chong, Jaron; Barfett, Joseph; Chepelev, Leonid; Cairns, Robyn; Mitchell, J Ross; Cicero, Mark D; Poudrette, Manuel Gaudreau; Jaremko, Jacob L; Reinhold, Caroline; Gallix, Benoit; Gray, Bruce; Geis, Raym

    2018-05-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is rapidly moving from an experimental phase to an implementation phase in many fields, including medicine. The combination of improved availability of large datasets, increasing computing power, and advances in learning algorithms has created major performance breakthroughs in the development of AI applications. In the last 5 years, AI techniques known as deep learning have delivered rapidly improving performance in image recognition, caption generation, and speech recognition. Radiology, in particular, is a prime candidate for early adoption of these techniques. It is anticipated that the implementation of AI in radiology over the next decade will significantly improve the quality, value, and depth of radiology's contribution to patient care and population health, and will revolutionize radiologists' workflows. The Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) is the national voice of radiology committed to promoting the highest standards in patient-centered imaging, lifelong learning, and research. The CAR has created an AI working group with the mandate to discuss and deliberate on practice, policy, and patient care issues related to the introduction and implementation of AI in imaging. This white paper provides recommendations for the CAR derived from deliberations between members of the AI working group. This white paper on AI in radiology will inform CAR members and policymakers on key terminology, educational needs of members, research and development, partnerships, potential clinical applications, implementation, structure and governance, role of radiologists, and potential impact of AI on radiology in Canada. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Shielding Effect of Lead Glasses on Radiologists' Eye Lens Exposure in Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-04-20

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm2-sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm2 per glass) lens are recommended. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Geographic Distribution of Radiologists and Utilization of Teleradiology in Japan: A Longitudinal Analysis Based on National Census Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masatoshi; Koike, Soichi; Kashima, Saori; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Japan has the most CT and MRI scanners per unit population in the world, and as these technologies spread, their geographic distribution is becoming equalized. In contrast, the number of radiologists per unit population in Japan is the lowest among OECD countries and their geographic distribution is unknown. Likewise, little is known about the use of teleradiology, which can compensate for the uneven distribution of radiologists. Based on the Survey of Physicians, Dentists and Pharmacists and the Static Survey of Medical Institutions by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, a dataset of radiologists and CT and MRI utilizations in each of Japan's 1811 municipalities was created. The inter-municipality equity of the number of radiologists was evaluated using Gini coefficient. Logistic regression analysis, based on Static Survey data, was performed to evaluate the association between hospital location and teleradiology use. Between 2006 and 2012 the number of radiologists increased by 21.7%, but the Gini coefficient remained unchanged. The number of radiologists per 1,000 CT (MRI) utilizations decreased by 17.9% (1.0%); the number was highest in metropolis and lowest in town/village and the disparity has widened from 1.9 to 2.2 (1.6 to 2.0) times. The number of hospitals and clinics using teleradiology has increased (by 69.6% and 18.1%, respectively). Hospitals located in towns/villages (odds ratio 1.61; 95% confidence interval 1.26-2.07) were more likely to use teleradiology than those in metropolises. Contrary to the CT and MRI distributions, radiologist distribution has not been evened out by the increase in their number; in other words, the distribution of radiologists was not affected by market-derived spatial competition force. As a consequence, the gap of the radiologist shortage between urban and rural areas is increasing. Teleradiology, which is one way to ameliorate this gap, should be encouraged.

  2. Variations in screening outcome among pairs of screening radiologists at non-blinded double reading of screening mammograms: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompenhouwer, E. G.; Duijm, L. E. M.; Voogd, A. C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Nederend, J.; Jansen, F. H.; Broeders, M. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial inter-observer variability in screening mammography interpretation has been reported at single reading. However, screening results of pairs of screening radiologists have not yet been published. We determined variations in screening performances among pairs of screening radiologists at

  3. The causes of medical malpractice suits against radiologists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Jeremy S; Baker, Stephen R; Patel, Ronak; Luk, Lyndon; Castro, Alejandro

    2013-02-01

    To determine the most frequent causes of malpractice suits as derived from credentialing data of 8401 radiologists. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of New Jersey Medical School. A total of 8401 radiologists in 47 states participating in the network of One-Call Medical, a broker for computed tomographic/magnetic resonance studies in workers' compensation cases, were required to provide their malpractice history as part of their credentialing application. Of these, 2624 (31%) radiologists had at least one claim in their career. In each enrollee's credentialing file, if there was a claim against the enrollee there was a narrative regarding each malpractice case from which, in most instances, a primary allegation could be discerned. Among the 4793 cases, an alleged cause could be derived from the narrative in 4043 (84%). Statistical analysis was performed with Stata 12 (2011; Stata, College Station, Tex) software. The most common general cause was error in diagnosis (14.83 claims per 1000 person-years [95% confidence interval {CI}: 14.19, 15.51]). In this category, breast cancer was the most frequently missed diagnosis (3.57 claims per 1000 person-years [95% CI: 3.26, 3.91]), followed by nonspinal fractures (2.49 claims per 1000 person-years [95% CI: 2.28, 2.72]), spinal fractures (1.32 claims per 1000 person-years [95% CI: 1.16, 1.49]), lung cancer (1.26 claims per 1000 person-years [95% CI: 1.11, 1.42]), and vascular disease (1.08 claims per 1000 person-years [95% CI: 0.93, 1.24]). The category next in frequency was procedural complications (1.76 claims per 1000 person-years [95% CI: 1.58, 1.96]), followed by inadequate communication with either patient (0.40 claim per 1000 person-years [95% CI: 0.32, 0.50]) or referrer (0.71 claim per 1000 person-years [95% CI: 0.60, 0.84]). Radiologists had only a peripheral role in 0.92 claim per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 0.77, 1.10). Failure to recommend additional testing was a rare cause (0.41 claim

  4. Digital platform for improving non-radiologists' and radiologists' interpretation of chest radiographs for suspected tuberculosis - a method for supporting task-shifting in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semakula-Katende, Namakula S.; Lucas, Susan [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Witwatersrand (South Africa); Andronikou, Savvas [University of Bristol, Department of Radiology/CRIC Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Shifting X-ray interpretation to non-radiologists can help to address radiologist shortages in developing countries. To determine the change in accuracy of non-radiologists and radiologists for the radiographic diagnosis of paediatric tuberculosis after a short skill-development course. Participants interpreted 15 paediatric chest radiographs before and after a 30-minute course using three possible responses: (1) diagnostic for tuberculosis, (2) abnormal but inconclusive for diagnosis of tuberculosis and (3) normal. We compared proportions of correct diagnoses, sensitivity, and specificity, before and after the course. We included 256 participants comprising 229 non-radiologists (134 radiographers, 32 paediatricians, 39 Medecins Sans Frontieres clinicians and 24 physicians including paediatricians) and 27 radiologists. Mean change proportions of correct diagnosis ranged from -27% to 53% for individuals and 9% to 20% for groups. All groups showed a statistically significant improvement. Mean change in diagnostic sensitivity ranged from -38% to 100% for individuals and from 16% to 41% for groups. All groups showed a statistically significant improvement. Mean change in specificity ranged from -57% to 57% for individuals and from -15% to -4% for groups. The decrease was statistically significant for physicians, paediatricians and radiographers. The course resulted in increased correct diagnoses and improved sensitivity at the expense of specificity. (orig.)

  5. Quantifying the Extent of Emphysema : Factors Associated with Radiologists' Estimations and Quantitative Indices of Emphysema Severity Using the ECLIPSE Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietema, Hester A.; Mueller, Nestor L.; Fauerbach, Paola V. Nasute; Sharma, Sanjay; Edwards, Lisa D.; Camp, Pat G.; Coxson, Harvey O.

    Rationale and Objectives: This study investigated what factors radiologists take into account when estimating emphysema severity and assessed quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements of low attenuation areas. Materials and Methods: CT scans and spirometry were obtained on 1519 chronic

  6. What the Rheumatologist Is Looking for and What the Radiologist Should Know in Imaging for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teh, James; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines what the rheumatologist is looking for and wants to know in the clinical diagnosis and imaging of rheumatoid arthritis, and what the radiologist should know to facilitate this....

  7. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, R A; Islamy, M R F; Khairurrijal; Munir, M M; Latief, H; Irsyam, M

    2016-01-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM. (paper)

  8. PACS administrators' and radiologists' perspective on the importance of features for PACS selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vivek; Narra, Vamsi R; Joshi, Kailash; Lee, Kyootai; Melson, David

    2014-08-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) play a critical role in radiology. This paper presents the criteria important to PACS administrators for selecting a PACS. A set of criteria are identified and organized into an integrative hierarchical framework. Survey responses from 48 administrators are used to identify the relative weights of these criteria through an analytical hierarchy process. The five main dimensions for PACS selection in order of importance are system continuity and functionality, system performance and architecture, user interface for workflow management, user interface for image manipulation, and display quality. Among the subdimensions, the highest weights were assessed for security, backup, and continuity; tools for continuous performance monitoring; support for multispecialty images; and voice recognition/transcription. PACS administrators' preferences were generally in line with that of previously reported results for radiologists. Both groups assigned the highest priority to ensuring business continuity and preventing loss of data through features such as security, backup, downtime prevention, and tools for continuous PACS performance monitoring. PACS administrators' next high priorities were support for multispecialty images, image retrieval speeds from short-term and long-term storage, real-time monitoring, and architectural issues of compatibility and integration with other products. Thus, next to ensuring business continuity, administrators' focus was on issues that impact their ability to deliver services and support. On the other hand, radiologists gave high priorities to voice recognition, transcription, and reporting; structured reporting; and convenience and responsiveness in manipulation of images. Thus, radiologists' focus appears to be on issues that may impact their productivity, effort, and accuracy.

  9. Radiologist agreement on the quantification of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Milene Carneiro Barbosa de, E-mail: milenebrito7@gmail.com [Clinica da Imagem do Tocantins, Araguaia, TO (Brazil); Ota, Mauricio Kenji [Fundacao Instituto de Pesquisa e Estudos de Diagnostico por Imagem (FIDI), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Leitao Filho, Fernando Sergio Studart [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes [Grupo Fleury, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate radiologist agreement on the quantification of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Materials and Methods: The HRCT scans of 43 patients with bronchiectasis were analyzed by two radiologists, who used a scoring system to grade the findings. Kappa (κ) values and overall agreement were calculated. Results: For the measurement and appearance of bronchiectasis, the interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.45 and κ = 0.43, respectively), as was the intraobserver agreement (κ = 0.54 and κ = 0.47, respectively). Agreement on the presence of mucous plugging was fair, for central distribution (overall interobserver agreement of 68.3% and κ = 0.39 for intraobserver agreement) and for peripheral distribution (κ = 0.34 and κ = 0.35 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). The agreement was also fair for peri bronchial thickening (κ = 0.21 and κ = 0.30 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). There was fair interobserver and intraobserver agreement on the detection of opacities (κ = 0.39 and 71.9%, respectively), ground-glass attenuation (64.3% and κ = 0.24, respectively), and cysts/bullae (κ = 0.47 and κ = 0.44, respectively). Qualitative analysis of the HRCT findings of bronchiectasis and the resulting individual patient scores showed that there was an excellent correlation between the observers (intra class correlation coefficient of 0.85 and 0.81 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). Conclusion: In the interpretation of HRCT findings of bronchiectasis, radiologist agreement appears to be fair. In our final analysis of the findings using the proposed score, we observed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreement. (author)

  10. Imaging Algorithms for Evaluating Suspected Rotator Cuff Disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jon A.; Benson, Carol B.; Bancroft, Laura W.; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M.; Miller, Theodore T.; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Thiele, Ralf G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Wise, James N.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23401583

  11. Radiologist agreement on the quantification of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Milene Carneiro Barbosa de; Ota, Mauricio Kenji; Leitao Filho, Fernando Sergio Studart; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate radiologist agreement on the quantification of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Materials and Methods: The HRCT scans of 43 patients with bronchiectasis were analyzed by two radiologists, who used a scoring system to grade the findings. Kappa (κ) values and overall agreement were calculated. Results: For the measurement and appearance of bronchiectasis, the interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.45 and κ = 0.43, respectively), as was the intraobserver agreement (κ = 0.54 and κ = 0.47, respectively). Agreement on the presence of mucous plugging was fair, for central distribution (overall interobserver agreement of 68.3% and κ = 0.39 for intraobserver agreement) and for peripheral distribution (κ = 0.34 and κ = 0.35 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). The agreement was also fair for peri bronchial thickening (κ = 0.21 and κ = 0.30 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). There was fair interobserver and intraobserver agreement on the detection of opacities (κ = 0.39 and 71.9%, respectively), ground-glass attenuation (64.3% and κ = 0.24, respectively), and cysts/bullae (κ = 0.47 and κ = 0.44, respectively). Qualitative analysis of the HRCT findings of bronchiectasis and the resulting individual patient scores showed that there was an excellent correlation between the observers (intra class correlation coefficient of 0.85 and 0.81 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). Conclusion: In the interpretation of HRCT findings of bronchiectasis, radiologist agreement appears to be fair. In our final analysis of the findings using the proposed score, we observed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreement. (author)

  12. Referring Physicians' Tendency to Collaborate With Radiologists in Managing Contrast Media-Related Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İmamoğlu, Hakan; Doğan, Serap; Erdoğan, Nuri

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the tendency of referring physicians to collaborate with radiologists in managing contrast media (CM)-related risk factors. The study was conducted at a single academic hospital. Among 150 referring physicians from various specialties, 51 referring physicians (34%) responded to the invitation letter asking for an interview with a radiologist. During the interview, a modified form of the Control Preferences Scale was administered, in which there were five preferences (each displayed on a separate card) that ranged from the fully active to fully passive involvement of referring physicians in managing CM-related risk factors. A descriptive analysis was performed through categorization of the results depending on the respondents' two most preferred roles. Thirty-six referring physicians (70.5%) preferred a collaborative role, and 15 (29.4%) preferred a noncollaborative role (i.e., remained on either the fully active or fully passive side). Among the referring physicians who preferred a collaborative role, the most common response (n = 15 [29.4%]) was collaborative-active. Referring physicians at the authors' institution have basic cognitive and motivational-affective tone toward collaboration in future teamwork aimed at the management of CM-related risk factors. A modified form of the Control Preferences Scale, as in this study, can be used to investigate the tendency of referring physicians to collaborate with radiologists. The results are discussed from ethical and legal perspectives. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of surgical portosystemic shunts and associated complications: The diagnostic and therapeutic role of radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: btaslakian@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Faraj, Walid, E-mail: wf07@aub.edu.lb [Department of General Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Khalife, Mohammad, E-mail: mk12@aub.edu.lb [Department of General Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad, E-mail: mk00@aub.edu.lb [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); El-Merhi, Fadi, E-mail: fe19@aub.edu.lb [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Saade, Charbel, E-mail: cs39@aub.edu.lb [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Hallal, Ali, E-mail: ah05@aub.edu.lb [Department of General Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Haydar, Ali, E-mail: ah24@aub.edu.lb [Department of Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020—PO Box: 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Portal hypertension is the pathological increase in portal venous pressure. • Surgical portosystemic shunting is an accepted methods to decrease portal venous pressure. • Surgical portosystemic shunts are divided into selective and nonselective. • Shunt thrombosis is a serious complication, resulting in shunt dysfunction. • Imaging is essential in the assessment of the shunt function and anatomy. - Abstract: Surgical portosystemic shunting, the formation of a vascular connection between the portal and systemic venous circulation, has been used as a treatment to reduce portal venous pressure. Although the use of portosystemic shunt surgery in the management of portal hypertension has declined during the past decade in favour of alternative therapies, and subsequently surgeons and radiologists became less familiar with the procedure, it remains a well-established treatment. Knowledge of different types of surgical portosystemic shunts, their pathophysiology and complications will help radiologists improve communication with surgeons and enhance their understanding of the diagnostic and therapeutic role of radiology in the assessment and management of these shunts. Optimal assessment of the shunt is essential to determine its patency and allow timely intervention. Both non-invasive and invasive imaging modalities complement each other in the evaluation of surgical portosystemic shunts. Interventional radiology plays an important role in the management of complications, such as shunt thrombosis and stenosis. This article describes the various types of surgical portosystemic shunts, explains the anatomy and pathophysiology of these shunts, illustrates the pearls and pitfalls of different imaging modalities in the assessment of these shunts and demonstrates the role of radiologists in the interventional management of complications.

  14. Assessment of surgical portosystemic shunts and associated complications: The diagnostic and therapeutic role of radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taslakian, Bedros; Faraj, Walid; Khalife, Mohammad; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad; El-Merhi, Fadi; Saade, Charbel; Hallal, Ali; Haydar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Portal hypertension is the pathological increase in portal venous pressure. • Surgical portosystemic shunting is an accepted methods to decrease portal venous pressure. • Surgical portosystemic shunts are divided into selective and nonselective. • Shunt thrombosis is a serious complication, resulting in shunt dysfunction. • Imaging is essential in the assessment of the shunt function and anatomy. - Abstract: Surgical portosystemic shunting, the formation of a vascular connection between the portal and systemic venous circulation, has been used as a treatment to reduce portal venous pressure. Although the use of portosystemic shunt surgery in the management of portal hypertension has declined during the past decade in favour of alternative therapies, and subsequently surgeons and radiologists became less familiar with the procedure, it remains a well-established treatment. Knowledge of different types of surgical portosystemic shunts, their pathophysiology and complications will help radiologists improve communication with surgeons and enhance their understanding of the diagnostic and therapeutic role of radiology in the assessment and management of these shunts. Optimal assessment of the shunt is essential to determine its patency and allow timely intervention. Both non-invasive and invasive imaging modalities complement each other in the evaluation of surgical portosystemic shunts. Interventional radiology plays an important role in the management of complications, such as shunt thrombosis and stenosis. This article describes the various types of surgical portosystemic shunts, explains the anatomy and pathophysiology of these shunts, illustrates the pearls and pitfalls of different imaging modalities in the assessment of these shunts and demonstrates the role of radiologists in the interventional management of complications

  15. Exploring the Usability of Mobile Apps Supporting Radiologists' Training in Diagnostic Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Soon; Aro, Michael R; Lage, Kraig J; Ingalls, Kevin L; Sindhwani, Vivek; Markey, Mia K

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a usability evaluation of mobile apps for supporting education and training in radiologic diagnostic decision-making processes. Of 381 mobile apps available at two major stores (Google Play and iTunes), eight iOS apps were selected for laboratory-based usability tests. Six staff radiologists completed eight app-specific task sets, using a think-aloud strategy. The triangular methods approach included quantitative performance measures, System Usability Scale (SUS), and qualitative thematic analysis using heuristic usability principles of usability issues. Overall, radiologists achieved higher than 70% success, with favorable SUS scores, in completing the tasks for seven of the eight apps. However, task success rate and SUS score had a weak relation (r = 0.23), indicating that the perceived usability may not reflect the holistic usability of the app. Task analysis and self-report revealed 108 usability issues, which were condensed to 55 unique issues and categorized by nine usability themes and mapped to ten usability heuristics. Nonintuitive functionality (eg, nonintuitive or misleading labels) was the most frequent theme observed, leading to inefficient navigation. These usability findings were consistent with the 13 improvements the radiologists suggested. This study demonstrates the feasibility of usability evaluation of radiology mobile apps and suggests potential improvements in the development of radiology mobile apps. This study also suggests that proficiency with mobile devices may not be equivalent to being an expert user, proficient in using the apps. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lung nodule detection in pediatric chest CT: quantitative relationship between image quality and radiologist performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Barnhart, Huiman X; Gaca, Ana Maria; Hollingsworth, Caroline L; Maxfield, Charles M; Carrico, Caroline W T; Colsher, James G; Frush, Donald P

    2011-05-01

    To determine the quantitative relationship between image quality and radiologist performance in detecting small lung nodules in pediatric CT. The study included clinical chest CT images of 30 pediatric patients (0-16 years) scanned at tube currents of 55-180 mA. Calibrated noise addition software was used to simulate cases at three nominal mA settings: 70, 35, and 17.5 mA, resulting in quantum noise of 7-32 Hounsfield Unit (HU). Using a validated nodule simulation technique, lung nodules with diameters of 3-5 mm and peak contrasts of 200-500 HU were inserted into the cases, which were then randomized and rated independently by four experienced pediatric radiologists for nodule presence on a continuous scale from 0 (definitely absent) to 100 (definitely present). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) data were analyzed to quantify the relationship between diagnostic accuracy (area under the ROC curve, AUC) and image quality (the product of nodule peak contrast and displayed diameter to noise ratio, CDNR display). AUC increased rapidly from 0.70 to 0.87 when CDNR display increased from 60 to 130 mm, followed by a slow increase to 0.94 when CDNR display further increased to 257 mm. For the average nodule diameter (4 mm) and contrast (350 HU), AUC decreased from 0.93 to 0.71 with noise increased from 7 to 28 HU. We quantified the relationship between image quality and the performance of radiologists in detecting lung nodules in pediatric CT. The relationship can guide CT protocol design to achieve the desired diagnostic performance at the lowest radiation dose.

  17. Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma: Role of the Radiologist in the Era of Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagare, Atul B; Krajewski, Katherine M; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2017-08-01

    For the past decade, advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been at the forefront of oncologic innovation. Our rapidly evolving understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of RCC has revolutionized the management of advanced RCC; 10 novel molecular targeted agents and immune checkpoint inhibitor have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of advanced RCC in a little over a decade. Amid this progress, imaging has assumed a central role in metastatic surveillance and follow-up of advanced RCC. State-of-the-art knowledge of the molecular basis of RCC and its treatment and imaging will help ensure that the radiology community remains relevant and central in the care of patients with advanced RCC. This article will review developments in management of advanced RCC from a radiologist's perspective to highlight our clinical role. It will describe how the underlying molecular mechanisms of RCC provide specific targets for novel anticancer agents. The relationship between the mechanisms of action of these novel anticancer agents and the imaging appearance of tumor response will be discussed, along with the available tumor response criteria and their strengths and weaknesses, thus assisting radiologists in response assessment in the setting of clinical trials or routine practice. The class- and drug-specific toxicities and complications associated with the novel anticancer agents will be summarized, since these are frequently missed or misinterpreted and require the radiologist's input in prompt detection and management. The potential role of radiogenomics and texture analysis in the management of advanced RCC will also be discussed. © RSNA, 2017.

  18. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible: through a radiologist's eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.S.; Thakur, M.H.; Dholam, K.; Mahajan, A.; Arya, S.; Juvekar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck malignancies constitute a major cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. Radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the management of these tumours; however, it has associated complications, with mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN) being one of the gravest orofacial complications. Early diagnosis, extent evaluation, and detection of complications of ORN are imperative for instituting an appropriate management protocol. ORN can closely mimic tumour recurrence, the differentiation of which has obvious clinical implications. The purpose of the present review is to acquaint the radiologist with the imaging features of mandibular ORN and the ways to differentiate ORN from tumour recurrence

  19. Novel Method to Improve Radiologist Agreement in Interpretation of Serial Chest Radiographs in the ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine whether a novel method and device, called a variable attenuation plate (VAP, which equalizes chest radiographic appearance and allows for synchronization of manual image windowing with comparison studies, would improve consistency in interpretation. Materials and Methods: Research ethics board approved the prospective cohort pilot study, which included 50 patients in the intensive care unit (ICU undergoing two serial chest radiographs with a VAP placed on each one of them. The VAP allowed for equalization of density and contrast between the patients′ serial chest radiographs. Three radiologists interpreted all the studies with and without the use of VAP. Kappa and percent agreement was used to calculate agreement between radiologists′ interpretations with and without the plate. Results: Radiologist agreement was substantially higher with the VAP method, as compared to that with the non-VAP method. Kappa values between Radiologists A and B, A and C, and B and C were 46%, 55%, and 51%, respectively, which improved to 73%, 81%, and 66%, respectively, with the use of VAP. Discrepant report impressions (i.e., one radiologist′s impression of unchanged versus one or both of the other radiologists stating improved or worsened in their impression ranged from 24 to 28.6% without the use of VAP and from 10 to 16% with the use of VAP (χ2 = 7.454, P < 0.01. Opposing views (i.e., one radiologist′s impression of improved and one of the others stating disease progression or vice versa were reported in 7 (12% cases in the non-VAP group and 4 (7% cases in the VAP group (χ2 = 0.85, P = 0.54. Conclusion: Numerous factors play a role in image acquisition and image quality, which can contribute to poor consistency and reliability of portable chest radiographic interpretations. Radiologists′ agreement of image interpretation can be improved by use of a novel method consisting of a VAP and associated software and has the potential

  20. Deciding why and when to use CT in children: a radiologist's perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frush, Donald P. [1905 McGovern-Davison Children' s Health Center, Duke University Medical Center, Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Defining what is appropriate or inappropriate with respect to CT scanning is challenging. There are a variety of influences on scan utilization in children, some more widely recognized and acknowledged than others. It is important to understand the contribution of these elements as we move toward improved utilization. This must be through partnerships and shared efforts and accountability. These efforts include improved resources such as consensus appropriateness criteria and guidelines including decision rules and support. But there also need to be trench-based strategies on the part of practicing radiologists to model cooperative behavior rather than blame-centered behavior. (orig.)

  1. How Radiologists Think: Understanding Fast and Slow Thought Processing and How It Can Improve Our Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gijp, Anouk; Webb, Emily M; Naeger, David M

    2017-06-01

    Scholars have identified two distinct ways of thinking. This "Dual Process Theory" distinguishes a fast, nonanalytical way of thinking, called "System 1," and a slow, analytical way of thinking, referred to as "System 2." In radiology, we use both methods when interpreting and reporting images, and both should ideally be emphasized when educating our trainees. This review provides practical tips for improving radiology education, by enhancing System 1 and System 2 thinking among our trainees. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Understanding the internet, website design and intranet development: a primer for radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perriss, R.W. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Graham, R.N.J. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Scarsbrook, A.F. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andyscarsbrook1@aol.com

    2006-05-15

    The internet has become an essential part of daily life for almost all radiologists and yet few fully understand how this works or how best to harness the technology within the workplace. This article will explore the basics of computer networking which has allowed the internet to become a valuable resource. In addition, the process of designing and implementing a website or intranet site for the benefit of radiology departmental administration and education will be discussed. The options of how to develop a website, what to include, and how to achieve this using easy to use, freely available and low-cost software will also be explored.

  3. The adult cystic fibrosis patient with abdominal pain: what the radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liong, S.Y.; Awad, D. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jones, A.M. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sukumar, S.A., E-mail: Sathi.Sukumar@uhsm.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    As the life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients continues to increase, abdominal manifestations of CF are increasingly being encountered by clinicians and radiologists. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of adult CF patients with abdominal pain as a cause is often not discernable clinically. Accurate diagnosis is crucial in these patients as some causes may be managed conservatively, whilst others may require surgical intervention. In this review, we describe clinical presentation, imaging findings, and management of adult CF patients presenting with abdominal pain.

  4. Understanding the internet, website design and intranet development: a primer for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriss, R.W.; Graham, R.N.J.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    The internet has become an essential part of daily life for almost all radiologists and yet few fully understand how this works or how best to harness the technology within the workplace. This article will explore the basics of computer networking which has allowed the internet to become a valuable resource. In addition, the process of designing and implementing a website or intranet site for the benefit of radiology departmental administration and education will be discussed. The options of how to develop a website, what to include, and how to achieve this using easy to use, freely available and low-cost software will also be explored

  5. Current concepts in non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor soft tissue sarcomas: A primer for radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baheti, Akahay D. [Dept. of Radiology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India); Tirumani, Harika [Dept. of Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock (United States); O' Neill, Alibhe; Jagannathan, Jyothi P. [Dept. of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose classification and management continues to evolve with better understanding of their biologic behavior. The 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) has revised their classification based on new immunohistochemical and cytogenetic data. In this article, we will provide a brief overview of the revised WHO classification of soft tissue tumors, discuss in detail the radiology and management of the two most common adult non-GIST STS, namely liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma, and review some of the emerging histology-driven targeted therapies in non-GIST STS, focusing on the role of the radiologist.

  6. Current concepts in non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor soft tissue sarcomas: A primer for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baheti, Akahay D.; Tirumani, Harika; O'Neill, Alibhe; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose classification and management continues to evolve with better understanding of their biologic behavior. The 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) has revised their classification based on new immunohistochemical and cytogenetic data. In this article, we will provide a brief overview of the revised WHO classification of soft tissue tumors, discuss in detail the radiology and management of the two most common adult non-GIST STS, namely liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma, and review some of the emerging histology-driven targeted therapies in non-GIST STS, focusing on the role of the radiologist

  7. Deciding why and when to use CT in children: a radiologist's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frush, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Defining what is appropriate or inappropriate with respect to CT scanning is challenging. There are a variety of influences on scan utilization in children, some more widely recognized and acknowledged than others. It is important to understand the contribution of these elements as we move toward improved utilization. This must be through partnerships and shared efforts and accountability. These efforts include improved resources such as consensus appropriateness criteria and guidelines including decision rules and support. But there also need to be trench-based strategies on the part of practicing radiologists to model cooperative behavior rather than blame-centered behavior. (orig.)

  8. Retrospective review of thoracic neural damage during lung ablation - what the interventional radiologist needs to know about neural thoracic anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonie, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Canella, Mathieu [Centre Hospitalier Pau, Department of Radiology (France); Cornelis, Francois; Catena, Vittorio; Descat, Edouard [Institut Bergonie, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Brouste, Veronique [Institut Bergonie, Clinical and Epidemiological Research Unit (France); Montaudon, Michel [CHU Haut Leveque, Department of Radiology (France)

    2013-12-15

    Background and Purpose: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is associated with low neural morbidity compared with surgery, which commonly causes debilitating long-term pain. The purpose was to review the thoracic neural anatomy relevant to percutaneous RFA and to retrospectively review symptomatic nerve injury after lung RFA at our institution. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined all symptomatic nerve injuries occurring after computed tomography (CT)-guided RFA treatment of lung tumors for 462 patients/509 procedures/708 lesions treated at our large tertiary referral centre during 10 years. Results: Eight patients experienced neurological complications after heating during the RFA procedure. These complications occurred in the phrenic (n = 1), brachial (n = 3), left recurrent (n = 1), and intercostal nerves (n = 2) and the stellate ganglion (n = 1). Three were grade 2, four grade 3 and one grade 4 injuries (CTCAE v3). Conclusion: Although rare, neurological complications can occur after RFA, and they can occasionally be severe. To prevent these complications, it is important for the interventional radiologist to be aware of the anatomy of nervous structures and to attempt to identify nerves on CT scans during the RFA procedure. Creating a pneumothorax can be useful to avoid nerve damage and related clinical complications.

  9. Simple arithmetic: not so simple for highly math anxious individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyesang; Sprute, Lisa; Maloney, Erin A; Beilock, Sian L; Berman, Marc G

    2017-12-01

    Fluency with simple arithmetic, typically achieved in early elementary school, is thought to be one of the building blocks of mathematical competence. Behavioral studies with adults indicate that math anxiety (feelings of tension or apprehension about math) is associated with poor performance on cognitively demanding math problems. However, it remains unclear whether there are fundamental differences in how high and low math anxious individuals approach overlearned simple arithmetic problems that are less reliant on cognitive control. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural correlates of simple arithmetic performance across high and low math anxious individuals. We implemented a partial least squares analysis, a data-driven, multivariate analysis method to measure distributed patterns of whole-brain activity associated with performance. Despite overall high simple arithmetic performance across high and low math anxious individuals, performance was differentially dependent on the fronto-parietal attentional network as a function of math anxiety. Specifically, low-compared to high-math anxious individuals perform better when they activate this network less-a potential indication of more automatic problem-solving. These findings suggest that low and high math anxious individuals approach even the most fundamental math problems differently. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Radiologists' Performance for Detecting Lesions and the Interobserver Variability of Automated Whole Breast Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Choi, Jae Jung; Lee, Ji Hye; Song, Byung Joo; Choe, Byung Joo; Park, Sarah; Kim, Hyunbin

    2013-01-01

    To compare the detection performance of the automated whole breast ultrasound (AWUS) with that of the hand-held breast ultrasound (HHUS) and to evaluate the interobserver variability in the interpretation of the AWUS. AWUS was performed in 38 breast cancer patients. A total of 66 lesions were included: 38 breast cancers, 12 additional malignancies and 16 benign lesions. Three breast radiologists independently reviewed the AWUS data and analyzed the breast lesions according to the BI-RADS classification. The detection rate of malignancies was 98.0% for HHUS and 90.0%, 88.0% and 96.0% for the three readers of the AWUS. The sensitivity and the specificity were 98.0% and 62.5% in HHUS, 90.0% and 87.5% for reader 1, 88.0% and 81.3% for reader 2, and 96.0% and 93.8% for reader 3, in AWUS. There was no significant difference in the radiologists' detection performance, sensitivity and specificity (p > 0.05) between the two modalities. The interobserver agreement was fair to good for the ultrasonographic features, categorization, size, and the location of breast masses. AWUS is thought to be useful for detecting breast lesions. In comparison with HHUS, AWUS shows no significant difference in the detection rate, sensitivity and the specificity, with high degrees of interobserver agreement

  11. Cephalometric landmark variability among orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durao, Ana Paula Reis; Ferreira, Afonso P. [Dept.of Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Morosolli, Aline [Dept.of Surgery, Dentistry School, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pittayapat, Pisha [Dept.of Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Bolstad, Napat [Dept.of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromso (Norway); Jacobs, Reinhilde [Dept.of Oral Imaging Center, OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Dept. of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The aim this study was to compare the accuracy of orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists in identifying 17 commonly used cephalometric landmarks, and to determine the extent of variability associated with each of those landmarks. Twenty digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were evaluated by two groups of dental specialists, and 17 cephalometric landmarks were identified. The x and y coordinates of each landmark were recorded. The mean value for each landmark was considered the best estimate and used as the standard. Variation in measurements of the distance between landmarks and measurements of the angles associated with certain landmarks was also assessed by a subset of two observers, and intraobserver and interobserver agreement were evaluated. Intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent for intraobserver agreement, but only good for interobserver agreement. The least reliable landmark for orthodontists was the gnathion (Gn) point (standard deviation [SD], 5.92 mm), while the orbitale (Or) was the least reliable landmark (SD, 4.41 mm) for dentomaxillofacial radiologists. Furthermore, the condylion (Co)-Gn plane was the least consistent (SD, 4.43 mm). We established that some landmarks were not as reproducible as others, both horizontally and vertically. The most consistently identified landmark in both groups was the lower incisor border, while the least reliable points were Co, Gn, Or, and the anterior nasal spine. Overall, a lower level of reproducibility in the identification of cephalometric landmarks was observed among orthodontists.

  12. Radiologists need to be aware of secondary central venous stenosis in patients with SAPHO syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mizuho; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Shinozaki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hideharu [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shimotsuke, Tochigi (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    We aimed to define central venous stenosis (CVS) caused by sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis as a feature of synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome on routine contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The relationship between SAPHO syndrome and CVS without venous thrombosis caused by anterior chest wall compression has not been investigated. Therefore, the present study evaluated CVS in patients with SAPHO syndrome at our hospital. We retrospectively reviewed contrast-enhanced CT images of ten patients with suspected or diagnosed SAPHO syndrome between January 2007 and November 2015. The patients were assessed by contrast-enhanced CT using 16-, 64- or 128-detector row scanners. Two radiologists independently assessed the presence of CVS or obstruction and SAPHO syndrome in a retrospective review of CT images. Six of the ten patients had findings of CVS with SAPHO syndrome. The mean diameter and patency rate at the site of CVS were 1.88 mm and 27.2%, respectively. Stenosis was more significant in terms of the mean diameter of CVS sites than of stenotic sites that crossed the anteroposterior vein (p < 0.05). Radiologists who routinely assess contrast-enhanced CT images should be aware that sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis with SAPHO syndrome could cause secondary CVS. (orig.)

  13. Cephalometric landmark variability among orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durao, Ana Paula Reis; Ferreira, Afonso P.; Morosolli, Aline; Pittayapat, Pisha; Bolstad, Napat; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-01-01

    The aim this study was to compare the accuracy of orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists in identifying 17 commonly used cephalometric landmarks, and to determine the extent of variability associated with each of those landmarks. Twenty digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were evaluated by two groups of dental specialists, and 17 cephalometric landmarks were identified. The x and y coordinates of each landmark were recorded. The mean value for each landmark was considered the best estimate and used as the standard. Variation in measurements of the distance between landmarks and measurements of the angles associated with certain landmarks was also assessed by a subset of two observers, and intraobserver and interobserver agreement were evaluated. Intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent for intraobserver agreement, but only good for interobserver agreement. The least reliable landmark for orthodontists was the gnathion (Gn) point (standard deviation [SD], 5.92 mm), while the orbitale (Or) was the least reliable landmark (SD, 4.41 mm) for dentomaxillofacial radiologists. Furthermore, the condylion (Co)-Gn plane was the least consistent (SD, 4.43 mm). We established that some landmarks were not as reproducible as others, both horizontally and vertically. The most consistently identified landmark in both groups was the lower incisor border, while the least reliable points were Co, Gn, Or, and the anterior nasal spine. Overall, a lower level of reproducibility in the identification of cephalometric landmarks was observed among orthodontists

  14. [Marketing mix in a radiology department: challenges for future radiologists in management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claikens, B

    1998-08-01

    Radiology has gained an enviable position among medial specialities. Developments in new technology expand its horizons and the volume of radiologic imaging techniques and procedures increase far more than the overall growth in health care services. In this position radiology has become a prime target for restrictions, cutbacks, controlled financing in an area of managed care and new national health care policy based on partially fixed budgets. Future health care takers have to choose the best available diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Evidence based medicine, cost-utility analysis, diagnostic performance analysis, patient outcome analysis, technology assessment and guidelines for practice are means to guide us through our obligatory choice. Our major objective is to use the most performant available imaging technique or intervention to achieve the best possible outcome for our patient at lower possible costs. A strategic response from radiologists is required to meet the imperatives of this new management situation. They must do far more than interpret imaging procedures. They must work as efficient managers of imaging resources, organise their practices and define their marketing-strategies using the different, so-called, marketing-mix elements. The challenges will be great but the rewards are worth our best efforts. In this article we highlight the marketing responsibilities of future radiologists and their clinical practice in this new socio-economic environment and we present different useful marketing tools.

  15. Safe Use of Contrast Media: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Katrina R; Moriarity, Andrew K; Langer, Jessica M

    2015-10-01

    Iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media are used on a daily basis in most radiology practices. These agents often are essential to providing accurate diagnoses, and are nearly always safe and effective when administered correctly. However, reactions to contrast media do occur and can be life threatening. Therefore, it is critical for faculty and staff to know how reactions to contrast agents manifest and how to treat them promptly. The decline in renal function seen occasionally after intravenous administration of iodinated contrast agents is poorly understood and likely multifactorial, and its association with the contrast medium may be overemphasized. However, it is important that radiologists be aware of current understanding and strategies to decrease the incidence of renal dysfunction. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a skin disease, is an adverse reaction related to use of some gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with chronic renal failure. The types of gadolinium most often associated with this condition and the indications for withholding gadolinium are important and are discussed in this article. The use of enteric contrast agents and contrast agents during pregnancy and nursing are reviewed briefly. Current knowledge for safe use of contrast media and key concepts that all radiologists should know are summarized in this review. © RSNA, 2015.

  16. Computed tomography for preoperative planning in total hip arthroplasty: what radiologists need to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppertz, Alexander [Charite - University Hospitals Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Imaging Science Institute Charite, Berlin (Germany); Radmer, Sebastian [Proendo, Orthopedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Hospitals Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Roessler, Torsten [Klinikum Ernst von Bergmann, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Potsdam (Germany); Sparmann, Martin [Proendo, Orthopedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    The number of total hip arthroplasties is continuously rising. Although less invasive surgical techniques, sophisticated component design, and intraoperative navigation techniques have been introduced, the rate of peri- and postoperative complications, including dislocations, fractures, nerve palsies, and infections, is still a major clinical problem. Better patient outcome, faster recovery and rehabilitation, and shorter operation times therefore remain to be accomplished. A promising strategy is to use minimally invasive techniques in conjunction with modular implants, aimed at independently reconstructing femoral offset and leg length on the basis of highly accurate preoperative planning. Plain radiographs have clear limitations for the correct estimation of hip joint geometry and bone quality. Three-dimensional assessment based on computed tomography (CT) allows optimizing the choice and positions of implants and anticipating difficulties to be encountered during surgery. Postoperative CT is used to monitor operative translation and plays a role in arthroplastic quality management. Radiologists should be familiar with the needs of orthopedic surgeons in terms of CT acquisition, post-processing, and data transfer. The CT protocol should be optimized to enhance image quality and reduce radiation exposure. When dedicated orthopedic CT protocols and state-of-the-art scanner hardware are used, radiation exposure can be decreased to a level just marginally higher than that of conventional preoperative radiography. Surgeons and radiologists should use similar terminology to avoid misunderstanding and inaccuracies in the transfer of preoperative planning. (orig.)

  17. Planning and performing spine surgery with CT/MPR: A primer for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, P.; Kerber, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Few things are more discouraging to a surgeon than the patient who has continued bitter complaints after spine surgery. We often show our discouragement by refusing even to name these patients;instead we depersonalize them, calling them ''failed backs.'' The most common cause of the failed-back syndrome is probably an error in the original decision to operate. Many patients have unsolved psychosocial problems that the surgeon may not recognize. Even though we are critical of this lapse in surgical judgment, the most experienced and cautious physician occasionally makes these mistakes. Not all failed backs are psychosocial in origin. The advent of computerized tomography with multiplanar reconstruction (CT/MPR) has demonstrated several large and important subsets of patients whose operation has failed not for psychosocial reasons but for a lack of appreciation of unrecognized pathology. In a small minority of cases, the surgeon has operated on the wrong interspace. In most, though, important pathology was overlooked and not operated on because the technology to see it was unavailable. In order that the radiologist can better understand the problems encountered by the surgeon, the authors now review the most common of these problems and outline how specific abnormalities are diagnosed and treated. The evaluation of back disease is a complex undertaking, and the partnership between radiologist and surgeon is an essential one

  18. Radiologists' Performance for Detecting Lesions and the Interobserver Variability of Automated Whole Breast Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Choi, Jae Jung; Lee, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Byung Joo; Choe, Byung Joo [Department of General Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sarah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyunbin [CMC Clinical Research Coordinating Center, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To compare the detection performance of the automated whole breast ultrasound (AWUS) with that of the hand-held breast ultrasound (HHUS) and to evaluate the interobserver variability in the interpretation of the AWUS. AWUS was performed in 38 breast cancer patients. A total of 66 lesions were included: 38 breast cancers, 12 additional malignancies and 16 benign lesions. Three breast radiologists independently reviewed the AWUS data and analyzed the breast lesions according to the BI-RADS classification. The detection rate of malignancies was 98.0% for HHUS and 90.0%, 88.0% and 96.0% for the three readers of the AWUS. The sensitivity and the specificity were 98.0% and 62.5% in HHUS, 90.0% and 87.5% for reader 1, 88.0% and 81.3% for reader 2, and 96.0% and 93.8% for reader 3, in AWUS. There was no significant difference in the radiologists' detection performance, sensitivity and specificity (p > 0.05) between the two modalities. The interobserver agreement was fair to good for the ultrasonographic features, categorization, size, and the location of breast masses. AWUS is thought to be useful for detecting breast lesions. In comparison with HHUS, AWUS shows no significant difference in the detection rate, sensitivity and the specificity, with high degrees of interobserver agreement.

  19. Evaluation of chromosomal aberrations in radiologists and medical radiographers chronically exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuba, V.; Rozgaj, R.; Jazbec, A.

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are fairly reliable indicators of damage induced by ionising radiation. This study included 180 radiologists and medical radiographers (technicians) and 90 controls who were not occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. All exposed subjects were routinely monitored with film badge, and none was exposed to a radiation dose exceeding the limit for occupational exposure recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Two hundred metaphases for each person were scored. The frequencies of acentric fragments, dicentrics, ring chromosomes and chromosomal exchanges were determined and compared to those obtained in the control group. Chromosome aberrations were analysed using Poisson regression for profession, age, sex, smoking and years of exposure. Age, smoking, diagnostic exposure to X-rays and occupation were found to correlate with the occurrence of acentric fragments. The influence of exposure duration on the frequency of acentric fragments was greater in medical radiographers than in radiologists. Smoking and sex were found to correlate with the occurrence of dicentric chromosomes, which were more common in men than in women. As chromosome aberrations exceeded the expected level with respect to the absorbed dose, our findings confirm the importance of chromosome analysis as a part of regular medical check-up of subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation.(author)

  20. Evaluation of non-radiologist physicians' knowledge on aspects related to ionizing radiation in imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrigano, Renata Rodrigues; Abrao, Karen Cristine; Regacini, Rodrigo; Puchnick, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to assess the non-radiologist physicians' knowledge on the use of ionizing radiation in imaging. Materials and Methods: cross-sectional study utilizing an anonymous questionnaire responded by physicians in clinical and surgical specialties, divided into two parts as follows: one including questions about the physicians' characteristics, frequency of imaging studies requests and participation in professional updating events, and another part including multiple choice questions approaching general knowledge about radiation, optimization principles and radioprotection. Results: from a total of 309 questionnaires, 120 (38.8%) were responded, 50% by physicians in surgical specialties and 50% in clinical specialties; respectively 45% and 2.5% of physicians responded that magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography use ionizing radiation. Overall, the average grade was higher for surgical specialists with no significant difference, except for the question about exposure in pregnant women (p = 0.047). Physicians who are professionally updated, particularly those attending clinical meetings (p = 0.050) and participating in teaching activities (p = 0.047), showed statistically superior knowledge about ionizing radiation as compared with others. Conclusion: the non-radiologist physicians' is heterogeneous and in some points needs to be improved. Multidisciplinary clinical meetings and teaching activities are important ways to disseminate information on the subject. (author)

  1. How do radiologists do it? The influence of experience and training on searching for chest nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, David; Ethell, Susan; Donovan, Tim; Crawford, Trevor

    2006-01-01

    Four observer groups with different levels of expertise were tested to investigate the nature of expert performance. The task was the detection and localisation of significant pulmonary nodules in postero-anterior views of the chest. One hundred and twenty digitised chest images were used. The observer groups were 8 experienced radiologists, 5 experienced radiographers before and after six months training in chest image interpretation, and 8 undergraduate radiography students. Eye tracking was carried out to investigate differences in visual search strategies between observers. Detection performance was measured with an Alternate Free Response Operating Characteristic technique. Performance measures showed the experienced group of radiologists plus radiographers after training were better at the task than the remainder (t-test p = 0.046). Differences were shown in the eye-tracking parameters between the groups: saccadic amplitude (ANOVA p 0.00047), number of fixations before and after training (t-test p = 0.041), and scrutiny time per decision and per film for the experienced versus the inexperienced observers (t-test p = 0.02). Visual coverage reduced with increasing level of experience but this result did not reach significance. Generally there were distinct differences in the search strategies between the experienced and inexperienced observers and we discuss the significance of these findings. We believe the results support some recent theoretical models of expert performance and that the findings may prove to be helpful in 'fast-track' educational programmes of image interpretation for non-radiology practitioners

  2. How do radiologists do it? The influence of experience and training on searching for chest nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, David [Department of Medical Imaging Sciences, St Martin' s College, Lancaster LA1 3JD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: d.manning@ucsm.ac.uk; Ethell, Susan [Department of Medical Imaging Sciences, St Martin' s College, Lancaster LA1 3JD (United Kingdom); Donovan, Tim [Department of Medical Imaging Sciences, St Martin' s College, Lancaster LA1 3JD (United Kingdom); Crawford, Trevor [Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    Four observer groups with different levels of expertise were tested to investigate the nature of expert performance. The task was the detection and localisation of significant pulmonary nodules in postero-anterior views of the chest. One hundred and twenty digitised chest images were used. The observer groups were 8 experienced radiologists, 5 experienced radiographers before and after six months training in chest image interpretation, and 8 undergraduate radiography students. Eye tracking was carried out to investigate differences in visual search strategies between observers. Detection performance was measured with an Alternate Free Response Operating Characteristic technique. Performance measures showed the experienced group of radiologists plus radiographers after training were better at the task than the remainder (t-test p = 0.046). Differences were shown in the eye-tracking parameters between the groups: saccadic amplitude (ANOVA p 0.00047), number of fixations before and after training (t-test p = 0.041), and scrutiny time per decision and per film for the experienced versus the inexperienced observers (t-test p = 0.02). Visual coverage reduced with increasing level of experience but this result did not reach significance. Generally there were distinct differences in the search strategies between the experienced and inexperienced observers and we discuss the significance of these findings. We believe the results support some recent theoretical models of expert performance and that the findings may prove to be helpful in 'fast-track' educational programmes of image interpretation for non-radiology practitioners.

  3. Radiation exposure of radiologists during angiography: Dose measurements outside the lead apron; Die Strahlenexposition des Radiologen bei Angiographien: Dosismessungen ausserhalb der Bleischuerze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany); Przetak, C. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany); Teubert, G. [Landesanstalt fuer Arbeitsschutz, Duesseldorf (Germany); Ewen, K. [Landesanstalt fuer Arbeitsschutz, Duesseldorf (Germany); Moedder, U. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany)

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to provide practical information to angiographers concerning radiation exposure to body parts not covered by lead aprons. Individual doses to the neck and hands of radiologists measured in micro-Sieverts were obtained during the course of 80 angiographies of various types. The number of diagnostic and interventional procedures, which might lead to exceeding permissible doses, have been calculated. Possibilities of estimating doses during angiography by means of parameters such as screening times were examined statistically. Especially with regard to the hands, estimations of the doses are insufficient (correlation r=0.21). Radiologists who undertake much angiographic and particularly interventional work may reach exposure levels requiring protective measures in addition to lead aprons. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieser Studie ist es, dem angiographierenden Radiologen praktische Anhaltspunkte zur Einschaetzung der Strahlenexposition der nicht von der Bleischuerze abgedeckten Koerperteile zu geben. Bei 80 Angiographien aus einem breiten klinischen Spektrum wurden Einzeldosen in Mikro-Sievert an Hals und Hand des Radiologen gemessen. Fuer bestimmte Gruppen von diagnostischen und interventionellen Angiographien wurde die Anzahl der Untersuchungen hochgerechnet, die zu einer Ueberschreitung der Grenzwerte fuehren koennte. Die Moeglichkeit einer Schaetzung der Dosis anhand von Parametern der Angiographie, wie z.B. der Durchleuchtungszeit, wurde korrelationsstatistisch geprueft. Besonders fuer die Haende ist eine Schaetzung unzureichend (r=0,21). Kontinuierlich und viel angiographiende Radiologen koennen im diagnostischen, aber eher noch im interventionellen Bereich eine Groessenordnung erreichen, die Vorsichtsmassnahmen oder Zusatzmessungen ausserhalb der Bleischuerze sinnvoll erscheinen laesst. (orig.)

  4. A dedicated BI-RADS training programme: Effect on the inter-observer variation among screening radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmers, J.M.H.; Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Heeten, G.J. den; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was introduced in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme to improve communication between medical specialists. Following introduction, a substantial variation in the use of the BI-RADS lexicon for final assessment categories was noted among screening radiologists. We set up a dedicated training programme to reduce this variation. This study evaluates whether this programme was effective. Materials and methods: Two comparable test sets were read before and after completion of the training programme. Each set contained 30 screening mammograms of referred women selected from screening practice. The sets were read by 25 experienced and 30 new screening radiologists. Cohen's kappa (κ) was used to calculate the inter-observer agreement. The BI-RADS 2003 version was implemented in the screening programme as the BI-RADS 2008 version requires the availability of diagnostic work-up, and this is unavailable. Results: The inter-observer agreement of all participating radiologists (n = 55) with the expert panel increased from a pre-training κ-value of 0.44 to a post-training κ-value of 0.48 (p = 0.14). The inter-observer agreement of the new screening radiologists (n = 30) with the expert panel increased from κ = 0.41 to κ = 0.50 (p = 0.01), whereas there was no difference in agreement among the 25 experienced radiologists (from κ = 0.48 to κ = 0.46, p = 0.60). Conclusion: Our training programme in the BI-RADS lexicon resulted in a significant improvement of agreement among new screening radiologists. Overall, the agreement among radiologists was moderate (guidelines Landis and Koch). This is in line with results found in the literature

  5. An observer study comparing spot imaging regions selected by radiologists and a computer for an automated stereo spot mammography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lydick, Justin T.; Gandra, Chaitanya R.; Chen, Nelson G.; Helvie, Mark A.; Bailey, Janet E.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Paramagul, Chintana; Blane, Caroline E.; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas A.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing an automated stereo spot mammography technique for improved imaging of suspicious dense regions within digital mammograms. The technique entails the acquisition of a full-field digital mammogram, automated detection of a suspicious dense region within that mammogram by a computer aided detection (CAD) program, and acquisition of a stereo pair of images with automated collimation to the suspicious region. The latter stereo spot image is obtained within seconds of the original full-field mammogram, without releasing the compression paddle. The spot image is viewed on a stereo video display. A critical element of this technique is the automated detection of suspicious regions for spot imaging. We performed an observer study to compare the suspicious regions selected by radiologists with those selected by a CAD program developed at the University of Michigan. True regions of interest (TROIs) were separately determined by one of the radiologists who reviewed the original mammograms, biopsy images, and histology results. We compared the radiologist and computer-selected regions of interest (ROIs) to the TROIs. Both the radiologists and the computer were allowed to select up to 3 regions in each of 200 images (mixture of 100 CC and 100 MLO views). We computed overlap indices (the overlap index is defined as the ratio of the area of intersection to the area of interest) to quantify the agreement between the selected regions in each image. The averages of the largest overlap indices per image for the 5 radiologist-to-computer comparisons were directly related to the average number of regions per image traced by the radiologists (about 50% for 1 region/image, 84% for 2 regions/image and 96% for 3 regions/image). The average of the overlap indices with all of the TROIs was 73% for CAD and 76.8%+/-10.0% for the radiologists. This study indicates that the CAD determined ROIs could potentially be useful for a screening technique that includes stereo spot

  6. Oxygen Transport: A Simple Model for Study and Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaar, Kermit A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an oxygen transport model computer program (written in Applesoft BASIC) which uses such variables as amount of time lapse from beginning of the simulation, arterial blood oxygen concentration, alveolar oxygen pressure, and venous blood oxygen concentration and pressure. Includes information on obtaining the program and its documentation.…

  7. Simple WZW currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, J.

    1990-08-01

    A complete classification of simple currents of WZW theory is obtained. The proof is based on an analysis of the quantum dimensions of the primary fields. Simple currents are precisely the primaries with unit quantum dimension; for WZW theories explicit formulae for the quantum dimensions can be derived so that an identification of the fields with unit quantum dimension is possible. (author). 19 refs.; 2 tabs

  8. Implementation of a Point-of-Care Radiologist-Technologist Communication Tool in a Quality Assurance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Leonard; Elnajjar, Pierre; Nyman, C Gregory; Mair, Thomas; Juluru, Krishna

    2017-07-01

    We implemented an Image Quality Reporting and Tracking Solution (IQuaRTS), directly linked from the PACS, to improve communication between radiologists and technologists. IQuaRTS launched in May 2015. We compared MRI issues filed in the period before IQuaRTS implementation (May-September 2014) using a manual system with MRI issues filed in the IQuaRTS period (May-September 2015). The unpaired t test was used for analysis. For assessment of overall results in the IQuaRTS period alone, all issues filed across all modalities were included. Summary statistics and charts were generated using Excel and Tableau. For MRI issues, the number of issues filed during the IQuaRTS period was 498 (2.5% of overall MRI examination volume) compared with 78 issues filed during the period before IQuaRTS implementation (0.4% of total examination volume) (p = 0.0001), representing a 625% relative increase. Tickets that documented excellent work were 8%. Other issues included images not pushed to PACS (20%), film library issues (19%), and documentation or labeling (8%). Of the issues filed, 55% were MRI-related and 25% were CT-related. The issues were stratified across six sites within our institution. Staff requiring additional training could be readily identified, and 80% of the issues were resolved within 72 hours. IQuaRTS is a cost-effective online issue reporting tool that enables robust data collection and analytics to be incorporated into quality improvement programs. One limitation of the system is that it must be implemented in an environment where staff are receptive to quality improvement.

  9. Is the application of CAD useful for radiologists for passing the official tests required for outpatient breast imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malich, A.; Beier, A.; Gorna, R.; Bank, P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: to analyze whether currently available CAD systems meet the diagnostic requirements for passing screening tests (first reader CAD) and to analyze whether the additional usage of CAD systems provides significant support for the diagnosing radiologist on the basis of official screening test cases (second reading by CAD). Material and methods: 200 images of 100 mammographies of 50 patients of an official screening test case collection were analyzed double-blind with and without CAD printouts (iCAD, U.S.A.) by three radiologists: one experienced in breast analysis and CAD application, one experienced in mammography analysis but inexperienced in CAD usage, one with minimal experience with breast analysis and CAD application. All radiologists measured the largest diameter of any malignant mass. The mean value of these calculations was correlated to the largest diameter given by CAD prompts. Results: the mean sensitivity and specificity increased slightly as a result of the additional usage of CAD (1 and 0.6%, resp.). Both values are not statistically significant. The highest effect was measured for the radiologist with CAD experience, while no effect was measured for the inexperienced radiologist. CAD met the sensitivity requirements but not the specificity criteria (96 and 20.3%, resp.). The sizes given by CAD prompts corresponded significantly with the real sizes (r = 0.45, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  10. 35 Years of Experience From the American Association for Women Radiologists: Increasing the Visibility of Women in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalluto, Lucy B; Arleo, Elizabeth K; Macura, Katarzyna J; Rumack, Carol M

    2017-03-01

    Women radiologists remain in minority, unchanged for the past several decades. In 1981, the American Association for Women Radiologists (AAWR) was founded to address the problems that women radiologists were experiencing in being subordinate to male radiologists in the workplace and at the national level in organizations with respect to political power and financial compensation, as well as additional issues unique to women in radiology. The AAWR defined goals to meet the needs of women in radiology: improve the visibility of women radiologists, advance the professional and academic standing of women in radiology, and identify and address issues faced by women in radiology. AAWR efforts have included providing opportunities for career development and award recognition, hosting educational programs at national meetings, and publishing numerous manuscripts on issues faced by women in radiology. The AAWR recognizes that although there has been significant progress in the standing of women in radiology over the past 35 years, there is much room for improvement. The AAWR will continue to advocate for the needs of women in radiology. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How well do we prepare pediatric radiologists regarding child abuse? Results of a survey of recently trained fellows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, Debra J.; Lonergan, Gael J.; Mendelson, Kenneth L.

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric radiologists serve an important role in the radiologic diagnosis, investigation, and in legal proceedings in cases of child abuse. The Society for Pediatric Radiology should evaluate and insure the adequacy of training of pediatric radiologists for this important role. The Society for Pediatric Radiology Committee on Child Abuse, 2002, conducted a 24-question survey to evaluate the scope and perceived adequacy of training received by pediatric radiology fellows regarding the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse and the associated legal process. Eighty-four surveys were mailed to radiologists who had completed a year in pediatric radiology fellowship training during the years 1999 and 2000. There were 33 surveys returned for an overall response of 39%. Respondents' perception of adequacy of training was best for the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse. The majority perceived they were not well trained in the investigative and legal processes regarding child abuse. The majority would welcome standardized training. Current pediatric radiology training programs do not sufficiently prepare pediatric radiologists for their role in the legal system regarding child abuse. A standardized program to train pediatric radiologists about the imaging diagnosis of child abuse and their role in the legal system is recommended. (orig.)

  12. How well do we prepare pediatric radiologists regarding child abuse? Results of a survey of recently trained fellows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Debra J.; Lonergan, Gael J. [Austin Radiological Association, 6101 West Courtyard Drive, Bldg. 5, TX 78730, Austin (United States); Mendelson, Kenneth L. [South Shore Hospital, Weymouth, Massachusetts (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric radiologists serve an important role in the radiologic diagnosis, investigation, and in legal proceedings in cases of child abuse. The Society for Pediatric Radiology should evaluate and insure the adequacy of training of pediatric radiologists for this important role. The Society for Pediatric Radiology Committee on Child Abuse, 2002, conducted a 24-question survey to evaluate the scope and perceived adequacy of training received by pediatric radiology fellows regarding the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse and the associated legal process. Eighty-four surveys were mailed to radiologists who had completed a year in pediatric radiology fellowship training during the years 1999 and 2000. There were 33 surveys returned for an overall response of 39%. Respondents' perception of adequacy of training was best for the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse. The majority perceived they were not well trained in the investigative and legal processes regarding child abuse. The majority would welcome standardized training. Current pediatric radiology training programs do not sufficiently prepare pediatric radiologists for their role in the legal system regarding child abuse. A standardized program to train pediatric radiologists about the imaging diagnosis of child abuse and their role in the legal system is recommended. (orig.)

  13. Current opinion on clip placement after breast biopsy: A survey of practising radiologists in France and Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin-Naggara, I.; Jalaguier-Coudray, A.; Chopier, J.; Tardivon, A.; Trop, I.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate current practice regarding clip placement after breast biopsy. Materials and methods: In June 2011, an online survey instrument was designed using an Internet-based survey site ( (www.surveymonkey.com)) to assess practices and opinions of breast radiologists regarding clip placement after breast biopsy. Radiologists were asked to give personal practice data, describe their current practice regarding clip deployment under stereotactic, ultrasonographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance, and describe what steps are taken to ensure quality control with regards to clip deployment. Results: The response rate was 29.9% in France (131 respondents) and 46.7% in Quebec (50 respondents). The great majority of respondents used breast markers in their practice (92.1% in France and 96% in Quebec). In both countries, most reported deploying a clip after percutaneous biopsy under stereotactic or MRI guidance. Regarding clip deployment under ultrasonography, 38% of Quebec radiologists systematically placed a marker after each biopsy, whereas 30% of French radiologists never placed a marker in this situation, mainly due to its cost. Finally, 56.4% of radiologists in France and 54% in Quebec considered that their practice regarding clip deployment after breast percutaneous biopsy had changed in the last 5 years. Conclusion: There continues to be variations in the use of biopsy clips after imaging-guided biopsies, particularly with regards to sonographic techniques. These variations are likely to decrease over time, with the standardization of relatively new investigation protocols

  14. Strategy as simple rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, K M; Sull, D N

    2001-01-01

    The success of Yahoo!, eBay, Enron, and other companies that have become adept at morphing to meet the demands of changing markets can't be explained using traditional thinking about competitive strategy. These companies have succeeded by pursuing constantly evolving strategies in market spaces that were considered unattractive according to traditional measures. In this article--the third in an HBR series by Kathleen Eisenhardt and Donald Sull on strategy in the new economy--the authors ask, what are the sources of competitive advantage in high-velocity markets? The secret, they say, is strategy as simple rules. The companies know that the greatest opportunities for competitive advantage lie in market confusion, but they recognize the need for a few crucial strategic processes and a few simple rules. In traditional strategy, advantage comes from exploiting resources or stable market positions. In strategy as simple rules, advantage comes from successfully seizing fleeting opportunities. Key strategic processes, such as product innovation, partnering, or spinout creation, place the company where the flow of opportunities is greatest. Simple rules then provide the guidelines within which managers can pursue such opportunities. Simple rules, which grow out of experience, fall into five broad categories: how- to rules, boundary conditions, priority rules, timing rules, and exit rules. Companies with simple-rules strategies must follow the rules religiously and avoid the temptation to change them too frequently. A consistent strategy helps managers sort through opportunities and gain short-term advantage by exploiting the attractive ones. In stable markets, managers rely on complicated strategies built on detailed predictions of the future. But when business is complicated, strategy should be simple.

  15. Work-Related Injuries of Radiologists and Possible Ergonomic Solutions: Recommendations From the ACR Commission on Human Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Gordon; Bluth, Edward I; Bender, Claire E; Parikh, Jay R

    2017-10-01

    Increasingly, radiologists' workplaces revolve around PACS and digital imaging. Use of these technologies can lead to repetitive strain injuries, many of which can be exacerbated by specific features of a radiology practice environment. Ergonomic approaches, such as proper reading room structure, lighting, temperature, noise, and equipment setup, can help decrease the frequency and severity of repetitive strain injuries and improve radiologist productivity. However, ergonomic approaches are complex, include all aspects of the radiology practice environment, and are best implemented along with proper training of the practicing radiologists. The ergonomic approaches considered most important by members of the ACR Commission on Human Resources are presented in this report, and this information may serve as an aid in departmental planning. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The corner of the gastroenterologist: What colonoscopy can do, what to ask to radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennato, Raffaele; Balzano, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Colonoscopy is the diagnostic technique of choice for most colonic diseases and allows to explore the entire colonic mucosal surface and to visualize the mucosa of terminal ileum. When it is done with appropriate indications, significantly more clinically relevant diagnoses are made. Moreover, colonoscopy keeps an operative role in the treatment of some acute and chronic colonic diseases and it is the most effective colorectal cancer screening modality. The endoscopic exploration of colon is not infallible and presents rare complications. Programs of endoscopic training and practice, monitoring of quality indicators and continuous technological development are improving endoscopic diagnostic and therapeutic role. Appropriate indications for colonoscopy, its limits and complications and questions for the radiologist are discussed

  17. Neonatal brain MRI: how reliable is the radiologist's eye?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, B. [A. Trousseau Hospital APHP, Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); LTCI, CNRS, Telecom ParisTech, Universite Paris-Saclay, Paris (France); Antoni, G.; Teglas, J.P. [INSERM, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Reproduction and Child Development, Villejuif (France); Bloch, I. [LTCI, CNRS, Telecom ParisTech, Universite Paris-Saclay, Paris (France); Adamsbaum, C. [Paris Sud University, Pediatric Radiology Department Bicetre Hospital APHP, Faculty of Medicine, Paris (France)

    2016-02-15

    White matter (WM) analysis in neonatal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is challenging, as demonstrated by the issue of diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI). We evaluated the reliability of the radiologist's eye in this context. Three experienced observers graded the WM signal intensity on axial T2-weighted 1.5T images from 60 different premature newborns on 2 occasions 4 weeks apart with a semi-quantitative classification under identical viewing conditions. The intra- and inter-observer correlation coefficients were fair to moderate (Fleiss' kappa between 0.21 and 0.60). This is a serious limitation of which we need to be aware, as it can lead to contradictory conclusions in the challenging context of term-equivalent age brain MRI in premature infants. These results highlight the need for a semiautomatic tool to help in objectively analyzing MRI signal intensity in the neonatal brain. (orig.)

  18. ERCP-the role of radiologist or what the endoscopist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manova, G.; Totev, M.

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an interdisciplinary endoscopic-radiologic method for diagnosis and treatment of the diseases of the biliary and pancreatic ducts. The procedure requires an excellent technical experience and high professional qualification of the medical team. The cannulation of the papilla of Vater and the contrast imaging of the hepatobiliary tree and the pancreatic duct need co-operation between the radiologist and endoscopist for interpretation of the findings - malignant or benign stenosis, choledocholithiasis, iatrogenic lesions. The undertaken endoscopic therapeutic procedures are performed under fluoroscopic guidance as well as the subsequent assessment of their effective - stone extraction, stent placement, etc. The good collaboration of the team during each stage of the procedure can guarantee its success. (authors)

  19. Measuring and managing radiologist productivity, part 2: beyond the clinical numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszak, Richard; Muroff, Lawrence R

    2010-07-01

    Radiology practices endeavoring to measure physician productivity, identify and motivate performance outliers, and develop equitable management strategies and policies often encounter numerous challenges. Nonetheless, such efforts are often necessary, in both private and academic settings, for a variety of professional, financial, and personnel reasons. Part 1 of this series detailed metrics for evaluating radiologist productivity and reviewed published benchmarks, focusing on clinical work. This segment expands that discussion to evaluating nonclinical administrative and academic efforts, along with professionalism and quality, outlining advantages and disadvantages of addressing differential productivity, and introducing potential models for practices seeking to motivate physicians on the basis of both their clinical and nonclinical endeavors. Copyright 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Measuring and managing radiologist productivity, part 1: clinical metrics and benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszak, Richard; Muroff, Lawrence R

    2010-06-01

    Physician productivity disparities are not uncommonly debated within radiology groups, sometimes in a contentious manner. Attempts to measure productivity, identify and motivate outliers, and develop equitable management policies can present challenges to private and academic practices alike but are often necessary for a variety of professional, financial, and personnel reasons. This is the first of a two-part series that will detail metrics for evaluating radiologist productivity and review published benchmarks, focusing primarily on clinical work. Issues and limitations that may prevent successful implementation of measurement systems are explored. Part 2 will expand that discussion to evaluating nonclinical administrative and academic activities, outlining advantages and disadvantages of addressing differential productivity, and introducing potential models for practices seeking to motivate physicians on the basis of both clinical and nonclinical work.

  1. Evolving cancer classification in the era of personalized medicine: A primer for radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Alibhe C.; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H. [Dept. of of Imaging, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Traditionally tumors were classified based on anatomic location but now specific genetic mutations in cancers are leading to treatment of tumors with molecular targeted therapies. This has led to a paradigm shift in the classification and treatment of cancer. Tumors treated with molecular targeted therapies often show morphological changes rather than change in size and are associated with class specific and drug specific toxicities, different from those encountered with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. It is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the new cancer classification and the various treatment strategies employed, in order to effectively communicate and participate in the multi-disciplinary care. In this paper we will focus on lung cancer as a prototype of the new molecular classification.

  2. Diagnosis of venous disorders; A challenge for the radiologist. Die radiologische Diagnostik von Venenerkrankungen; Eine Herausforderung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minar, E. (Abt. Angiologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Innere Medizin 2, Vienna (Austria))

    1993-09-01

    Limited accuracy in the clinic diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (VT) makes such diagnostic tests such as duplex sonography or venography necessary. Exact information on the age and extent of the thrombus are necessary for the clinician to optimize the therapeutric management. The correct diagnosis of calf vein thrombosis and of recurrent VT in patients with postphlebitis changes also has implications for treatment. After exclusion of thrombosis, the radiologist should evaluate the leg for other possible causes of symptoms besides VT. Investigation of the venous sytem also has a role in the diagnosis in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. In patients with chronic venous insuffficiency the deep venous system should assessed for patency and venous valve function. The superficial veins should be differentiated in segments with sufficient or insufficient venous valves, and it is also necessary to look for insufficiency of the perforrating veins. In patients with superficial phlebitis there is risk of propagation into the deep venous system. (orig.)

  3. Cost analysis and the practicing radiologist/manager: an introduction to managerial accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, H P; Yin, D

    1996-06-01

    Cost analysis is inherently one of the most tedious tasks falling on the shoulders of any manager. In today's world, whether in a service business such as radiology or medicine or in a product line such as car manufacturing, accurate cost analysis is critical to all aspects of management: marketing, competitive strategy, quality control, human resource management, accounting (financial), and operations management, to name but a few. This is a topic that we will explore with the intention of giving the radiologist/manager the understanding and the basic skills to use cost analysis efficiently, making sure that major financial decisions are being made with adequate cost information, and showing that cost accounting is really managerial accounting in that it pays little attention to the bottom line of financial statements but places much more emphasis on equipping managers with the information to determine budgets, prices, salaries, and incentives and influences capital budgeting decisions through an understanding of product profitability rather than firm profitability.

  4. The radiologist's professional radiation risk in the view of international epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1980-01-01

    Publications of the past 30 years on the problem of professional radiation risk of the radiologist were analysed. Because of the low extent of possible damaging effects to be expected only those results of epidemiological papers were considered for the quantification of this risk which were based on large collectives. The radiation-induced malignant neoplasms as the decisive risk are in the focus of consideration. The decrease in radiation-induced professional leukemias and carcinomas, which is statistically clearly demonstrated, is described. The remaining, though only minimal, risk on the conditions of present radiation protection, which can be concluded from theoretical considerations and epidemiological knowledge, is discussed in detail. Finally, the importance of certain partial exposures of the body with respect to non-stochastic radiation effects on eyes and skin is referred to. (author)

  5. Ultrasound assessment of the fetal biophysical profile: What does an radiologist need to know?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes Filho, Helio Antonio; Araujo Junior, Edward; Marcondes Machado Nardozza, Luciano; Linhares Dias da Costa, Lavoisier; Fernandes Moron, Antonio; Mattar, Rosiane

    2008-01-01

    Proposed by Frank Manning about 26 years ago, fetal biophysical profile has been incorporated to the propaedeutics of non-invasive fetal well being assessment in high-risk gestations. Despite the existence of other methods for assessing fetal vitality, as Doppler flowmetry, the biophysical profile continues to be important in estimating the risk of hypoxia and perinatal morbimortality for those fetuses. In the present article, the authors review the regulatory mechanisms of fetal biophysical activities, as well as physiological and pathological factors that interfere with them. The main objective of the study is to discuss the present and important aspects of the method, and the practical applications and interpretation of its findings, in order to help radiologists improve their knowledge in this specific area of fetal ultrasonography

  6. The 28. Congress of the Scientific Society of US radiologists and oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslegin, I.A.; Zolotkov, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Some reports of the 28th Congress of the Scientific Society of US Radiologists and Oncologists are reviewed. Promising effect of hyperthermia and irradiation in case of superficial tumors (recurrences and metastases of mammary gland carcinoma in thoracic wall) and limited potentialities in case of internal tumors are pointed out. A matter of interest is a series of reports on ten-year controlled clinical investigations and radiotherapy in comparison with radical mastectomy at early stages of mammary gland carcinoma. The reports contain information on application of principally new methods of X-ray, combined, complex and medicinal treatment of tumor of many localizations. Some radiotherapeutic methods were renewed, in particular, method of high dose interoperational irradiation

  7. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  8. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  9. Radiation exposure of the radiologist's eye lens during CT-guided interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Philipp; Kröpil, Patric; Buchbender, Christian; Aissa, Joel; Lanzman, Rotem S; Heusner, Till A; Ewen, Klaus; Antoch, Gerald; Fürst, Günther

    2014-02-01

    In the past decade the number of computed tomography (CT)-guided procedures performed by interventional radiologists have increased, leading to a significantly higher radiation exposure of the interventionalist's eye lens. Because of growing concern that there is a stochastic effect for the development of lens opacification, eye lens dose reduction for operators and patients should be of maximal interest. To determine the interventionalist's equivalent eye lens dose during CT-guided interventions and to relate the results to the maximum of the recommended equivalent dose limit. During 89 CT-guided interventions (e.g. biopsies, drainage procedures, etc.) measurements of eye lens' radiation doses were obtained from a dedicated dosimeter system for scattered radiation. The sensor of the personal dosimeter system was clipped onto the side of the lead glasses which was located nearest to the CT gantry. After the procedure, radiation dose (µSv), dose rate (µSv/min) and the total exposure time (s) were recorded. For all 89 interventions, the median total exposure lens dose was 3.3 µSv (range, 0.03-218.9 µSv) for a median exposure time of 26.2 s (range, 1.1-94.0 s). The median dose rate was 13.9 µSv/min (range, 1.1-335.5 µSv/min). Estimating 50-200 CT-guided interventions per year performed by one interventionalist, the median dose of the eye lens of the interventional radiologist does not exceed the maximum of the ICRP-recommended equivalent eye lens dose limit of 20 mSv per year.

  10. Image-guided chemoport insertion by interventional radiologists: A single-center experience on periprocedural complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaacob, Yazmin; Nguyen, Dang V; Mohamed, Zahiah; Ralib, A Razali A; Zakaria, Rozman; Muda, Sobri

    2013-01-01

    To report our early experience in image-guided chemoport insertions by interventional radiologists. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary center with 161 chemoport insertions done from June 2008 to June 2010. The chemoports were inserted either at the angiography suite or at the mobile operation theater unit. Ninety percent of the chemoports had right internal jugular vein (IJV) as the entry site. Other entry sites included the left IJV, subclavian veins and the inferior vena cava. Immediate and early complications were recorded. All insertions were performed under image guidance with the aid of ultrasound and fluoroscopy. The technical success rate was 99.4%. In terms of immediate complications, there were only two cases of arterial puncture that resolved with local compression. No pneumothorax or air embolism was documented. Twenty-six early complications were recorded. The most common early complication was catheter blockage (12/161; 7.4%), followed by catheter-related infection (9/161; 5.6%). Other complications were catheter malposition, venous thrombosis and catheter dislodgement or leak. A total of 11 (6.8%) chemoports had to be removed within 30 days; most of them were due to infections that failed to respond to systemic antibiotic therapy. In terms of place of procedure, there were no significant differences in complication rates between the angiography suite and the mobile operation theater unit. Image-guided chemoport insertion by interventional radiologist gives low periprocedural complication rates. Using right IJV as the entry site, the image guidance gives good success rate with least complication

  11. Inter-radiologist agreement for CT scoring of pediatric splenic injuries and effect on an established clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschied, Jessica R; Mazza, Michael B; Davenport, Matthew; Chong, Suzanne T; Smith, Ethan A; Hoff, Carrie N; Ladino-Torres, Maria F; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh; Ehrlich, Peter F; Dillman, Jonathan R

    2016-02-01

    The American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) advocates for the use of a clinical practice guideline to direct management of hemodynamically stable pediatric spleen injuries. The clinical practice guideline is based on the CT score of the spleen injury according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) CT scoring system. To determine the potential effect of radiologist agreement for CT scoring of pediatric spleen injuries on an established APSA clinical practice guideline. We retrospectively analyzed blunt splenic injuries occurring in children from January 2007 to January 2012 at a single level 1 trauma center (n = 90). Abdominal CT exams performed at clinical presentation were reviewed by four radiologists who documented the following: (1) splenic injury grade (AAST system), (2) arterial extravasation and (3) pseudoaneurysm. Inter-rater agreement for AAST injury grade was assessed using the multi-rater Fleiss kappa and Kendall coefficient of concordance. Inter-rater agreement was assessed using weighted (AAST injury grade) or prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted (binary measures) kappa statistics; 95% confidence intervals were calculated. We evaluated the hypothetical effect of radiologist disagreement on an established APSA clinical practice guideline. Inter-rater agreement was good for absolute AAST injury grade (kappa: 0.64 [0.59–0.69]) and excellent for relative AAST injury grade (Kendall w: 0.90). All radiologists agreed on the AAST grade in 52% of cases. Based on an established clinical practice guideline, radiologist disagreement could have changed the decision for intensive care management in 11% (10/90) of children, changed the length of hospital stay in 44% (40/90), and changed the time to return to normal activity in 44% (40/90). Radiologist agreement when assigning splenic AAST injury grades is less than perfect, and disagreements have the potential to change management in a substantial number of pediatric patients.

  12. Variations in management of mild prenatal hydronephrosis among maternal-fetal medicine obstetricians, and pediatric urologists and radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetta, Vitor C; Rosman, Brian M; Bromley, Bryan; Shipp, Thomas D; Chow, Jeanne S; Campbell, Jeffrey B; Herndon, C D Anthony; Passerotti, Carlo C; Cendron, Marc; Retik, Alan B; Nguyen, Hiep T

    2012-11-01

    There are no current guidelines for diagnosing and managing mild prenatal hydronephrosis. Variations in physician approach make it difficult to analyze outcomes and establish optimal management. We determined the variability of diagnostic approach and management regarding prenatal hydronephrosis among maternal-fetal medicine obstetricians, pediatric urologists and pediatric radiologists. Online surveys were sent to mailing lists for national societies for each specialty. Participants were surveyed regarding criteria for diagnosing mild prenatal hydronephrosis and recommendations for postnatal management, including use of antibiotic prophylaxis, followup scheduling and type of followup imaging. A total of 308 maternal-fetal medicine obstetricians, 126 pediatric urologists and 112 pediatric radiologists responded. Pediatric urologists and radiologists were divided between Society for Fetal Urology criteria and use of anteroposterior pelvic diameter for diagnosis, while maternal-fetal medicine obstetricians preferred using the latter. For postnatal evaluation radiologists preferred using personal criteria, while urologists preferred using anteroposterior pelvic diameter or Society for Fetal Urology grading system. There was wide variation in the use of antibiotic prophylaxis among pediatric urologists. Regarding the use of voiding cystourethrography/radionuclide cystography in patients with prenatal hydronephrosis, neither urologists nor radiologists were consistent in their recommendations. Finally, there was no agreement on length of followup for mild prenatal hydronephrosis. We observed a lack of uniformity regarding grading criteria in diagnosing hydronephrosis prenatally and postnatally among maternal-fetal medicine obstetricians, pediatric urologists and pediatric radiologists. There was also a lack of agreement on the management of mild intermittent prenatal hydronephrosis, resulting in these cases being managed inconsistently. A unified set of guidelines for

  13. Inter-radiologist agreement for CT scoring of pediatric splenic injuries and effect on an established clinical practice guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leschied, Jessica R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Ladino-Torres, Maria F.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Mazza, Michael B.; Chong, Suzanne T.; Hoff, Carrie N.; Davenport, Matthew S.; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh; Ehrlich, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    The American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) advocates for the use of a clinical practice guideline to direct management of hemodynamically stable pediatric spleen injuries. The clinical practice guideline is based on the CT score of the spleen injury according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) CT scoring system. To determine the potential effect of radiologist agreement for CT scoring of pediatric spleen injuries on an established APSA clinical practice guideline. We retrospectively analyzed blunt splenic injuries occurring in children from January 2007 to January 2012 at a single level 1 trauma center (n = 90). Abdominal CT exams performed at clinical presentation were reviewed by four radiologists who documented the following: (1) splenic injury grade (AAST system), (2) arterial extravasation and (3) pseudoaneurysm. Inter-rater agreement for AAST injury grade was assessed using the multi-rater Fleiss kappa and Kendall coefficient of concordance. Inter-rater agreement was assessed using weighted (AAST injury grade) or prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted (binary measures) kappa statistics; 95% confidence intervals were calculated. We evaluated the hypothetical effect of radiologist disagreement on an established APSA clinical practice guideline. Inter-rater agreement was good for absolute AAST injury grade (kappa: 0.64 [0.59-0.69]) and excellent for relative AAST injury grade (Kendall w: 0.90). All radiologists agreed on the AAST grade in 52% of cases. Based on an established clinical practice guideline, radiologist disagreement could have changed the decision for intensive care management in 11% (10/90) of children, changed the length of hospital stay in 44% (40/90), and changed the time to return to normal activity in 44% (40/90). Radiologist agreement when assigning splenic AAST injury grades is less than perfect, and disagreements have the potential to change management in a substantial number of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  14. Improvement in Detection of Wrong-Patient Errors When Radiologists Include Patient Photographs in Their Interpretation of Portable Chest Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tridandapani, Srini; Olsen, Kevin; Bhatti, Pamela

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether facial photographs obtained simultaneously with radiographs improve radiologists' detection rate of wrong-patient errors, when they are explicitly asked to include the photographs in their evaluation. Radiograph-photograph combinations were obtained from 28 patients at the time of portable chest radiography imaging. From these, pairs of radiographs were generated. Each unique pair consisted of one new and one old (comparison) radiograph. Twelve pairs of mismatched radiographs (i.e., pairs containing radiographs of different patients) were also generated. In phase 1 of the study, 5 blinded radiologist observers were asked to interpret 20 pairs of radiographs without the photographs. In phase 2, each radiologist interpreted another 20 pairs of radiographs with the photographs. Radiologist observers were not instructed about the purpose of the photographs but were asked to include the photographs in their review. The detection rate of mismatched errors was recorded along with the interpretation time for each session for each observer. The two-tailed Fisher exact test was used to evaluate differences in mismatch detection rates between the two phases. A p value of error detection rates without (0/20 = 0%) and with (17/18 = 94.4%) photographs were different (p = 0.0001). The average interpretation times for the set of 20 radiographs were 26.45 (SD 8.69) and 20.55 (SD 3.40) min, for phase 1 and phase 2, respectively (two-tailed Student t test, p = 0.1911). When radiologists include simultaneously obtained photographs in their review of portable chest radiographs, there is a significant improvement in the detection of labeling errors. No statistically significant difference in interpretation time was observed. This may lead to improved patient safety without affecting radiologists' throughput.

  15. Inter-radiologist agreement for CT scoring of pediatric splenic injuries and effect on an established clinical practice guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschied, Jessica R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Ladino-Torres, Maria F.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mazza, Michael B.; Chong, Suzanne T.; Hoff, Carrie N. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Emergency Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Davenport, Matthew S. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Abdominal Imaging, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Khalatbari, Shokoufeh [University of Michigan, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ehrlich, Peter F. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Surgery, Section of Pediatric Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) advocates for the use of a clinical practice guideline to direct management of hemodynamically stable pediatric spleen injuries. The clinical practice guideline is based on the CT score of the spleen injury according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) CT scoring system. To determine the potential effect of radiologist agreement for CT scoring of pediatric spleen injuries on an established APSA clinical practice guideline. We retrospectively analyzed blunt splenic injuries occurring in children from January 2007 to January 2012 at a single level 1 trauma center (n = 90). Abdominal CT exams performed at clinical presentation were reviewed by four radiologists who documented the following: (1) splenic injury grade (AAST system), (2) arterial extravasation and (3) pseudoaneurysm. Inter-rater agreement for AAST injury grade was assessed using the multi-rater Fleiss kappa and Kendall coefficient of concordance. Inter-rater agreement was assessed using weighted (AAST injury grade) or prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted (binary measures) kappa statistics; 95% confidence intervals were calculated. We evaluated the hypothetical effect of radiologist disagreement on an established APSA clinical practice guideline. Inter-rater agreement was good for absolute AAST injury grade (kappa: 0.64 [0.59-0.69]) and excellent for relative AAST injury grade (Kendall w: 0.90). All radiologists agreed on the AAST grade in 52% of cases. Based on an established clinical practice guideline, radiologist disagreement could have changed the decision for intensive care management in 11% (10/90) of children, changed the length of hospital stay in 44% (40/90), and changed the time to return to normal activity in 44% (40/90). Radiologist agreement when assigning splenic AAST injury grades is less than perfect, and disagreements have the potential to change management in a substantial number of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  16. Excel 2010 Made Simple

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Abbott

    2011-01-01

    Get the most out of Excel 2010 with Excel 2010 Made Simple - learn the key features, understand what's new, and utilize dozens of time-saving tips and tricks to get your job done. Over 500 screen visuals and clear-cut instructions guide you through the features of Excel 2010, from formulas and charts to navigating around a worksheet and understanding Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) and macros. Excel 2010 Made Simple takes a practical and highly effective approach to using Excel 2010, showing you the best way to complete your most common spreadsheet tasks. You'll learn how to input, format,

  17. Droids Made Simple

    CERN Document Server

    Mazo, Gary

    2011-01-01

    If you have a Droid series smartphone - Droid, Droid X, Droid 2, or Droid 2 Global - and are eager to get the most out of your device, Droids Made Simple is perfect for you. Authors Martin Trautschold, Gary Mazo and Marziah Karch guide you through all of the features, tips, and tricks using their proven combination of clear instructions and detailed visuals. With hundreds of annotated screenshots and step-by-step directions, Droids Made Simple will transform you into a Droid expert, improving your productivity, and most importantly, helping you take advantage of all of the cool features that c

  18. Clusters in simple fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sator, N.

    2003-01-01

    This article concerns the correspondence between thermodynamics and the morphology of simple fluids in terms of clusters. Definitions of clusters providing a geometric interpretation of the liquid-gas phase transition are reviewed with an eye to establishing their physical relevance. The author emphasizes their main features and basic hypotheses, and shows how these definitions lead to a recent approach based on self-bound clusters. Although theoretical, this tutorial review is also addressed to readers interested in experimental aspects of clustering in simple fluids

  19. Association "Les Simples"

    OpenAIRE

    Thouzery, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Fondée par les producteurs du Syndicat Inter-Massifs pour la Production et l’Économie des Simples (S.I.M.P.L.E.S), l’association base son action sur la recherche et le maintien d’une production de qualité (herboristerie et préparations à base de plantes) qui prend en compte le respect de l’environnement et la pérennité des petits producteurs en zone de montagne. Actions de formation Stages de découverte de la flore médicinale sauvage, Stages de culture et transformation des plantes médicinale...

  20. A simple electron multiplexer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L; Akjouj, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Al-Wahsh, H; Zielinski, P

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple multiplexing device made of two atomic chains coupled by two other transition metal atoms. We show that this simple atomic device can transfer electrons at a given energy from one wire to the other, leaving all other electron states unaffected. Closed-form relations between the transmission coefficients and the inter-atomic distances are given to optimize the desired directional electron ejection. Such devices can be adsorbed on insulating substrates and characterized by current surface technologies. (letter to the editor)

  1. Burnout of Radiologists: Frequency, Risk Factors, and Remedies: A Report of the ACR Commission on Human Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Parikh, Jay R; Bluth, Edward I; Dutton, Sharon C; Recht, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Burnout is a concern for radiologists. The burnout rate is greater among diagnostic radiologists than the mean for all physicians, while radiation oncologists have a slightly lower burnout rate. Burnout can result in unprofessional behavior, thoughts of suicide, premature retirement, and errors in patient care. Strategies to reduce burnout include addressing the sources of job dissatisfaction, instilling lifestyle balance, finding reasons to work other than money, improving money management, developing a support group, and seeking help when needed. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Health Care Price Transparency and Communication: Implications for Radiologists and Patients in an Era of Expanding Shared Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Carlos, Ruth C; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Duszak, Richard

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature on communicating transparency in health care pricing, both overall and specifically for medical imaging. Focus is also placed on the imperatives and initiatives that will increasingly impact radiologists and their patients. Most Americans seek transparency in health care pricing, yet such discussions occur in fewer than half of patient encounters. Although price transparency tools can help decrease health care spending, most are used infrequently and most lack information about quality. Given the high costs associated with many imaging services, radiologists should be aware of such initiatives to optimize patient engagement and informed shared decision making.

  3. The impact of trained radiographers as concurrent readers on performance and reading time of experienced radiologists in the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Arjun; Screaton, Nicholas J.; Clements, Leigh; Holemans, John A.; Jones, Diane; Barton, Bruce; Gartland, Natalie; Hansell, David M.; Devaraj, Anand; Duffy, Stephen W.; Baldwin, David R.; Field, John K.

    2018-01-01

    To compare radiologists' performance reading CTs independently with their performance using radiographers as concurrent readers in lung cancer screening. 369 consecutive baseline CTs performed for the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) trial were double-read by radiologists reading either independently or concurrently with a radiographer. In concurrent reading, the radiologist reviewed radiographer-identified nodules and then detected any additional nodules. Radiologists recorded their independent and concurrent reading times. For each radiologist, sensitivity, average false-positive detections (FPs) per case and mean reading times for each method were calculated. 694 nodules in 246/369 (66.7%) studies comprised the reference standard. Radiologists' mean sensitivity and average FPs per case both increased with concurrent reading compared to independent reading (90.8 ± 5.6% vs. 77.5 ± 11.2%, and 0.60 ± 0.53 vs. 0.33 ± 0.20, respectively; p < 0.05 for 3/4 and 2/4 radiologists, respectively). The mean reading times per case decreased from 9.1 ± 2.3 min with independent reading to 7.2 ± 1.0 min with concurrent reading, decreasing significantly for 3/4 radiologists (p < 0.05). The majority of radiologists demonstrated improved sensitivity, a small increase in FP detections and a statistically significantly reduced reading time using radiographers as concurrent readers. (orig.)

  4. The impact of trained radiographers as concurrent readers on performance and reading time of experienced radiologists in the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Arjun [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Screaton, Nicholas J.; Clements, Leigh [Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Holemans, John A.; Jones, Diane [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Department of Radiology, Liverpool, Merseyside (United Kingdom); Barton, Bruce; Gartland, Natalie; Hansell, David M.; Devaraj, Anand [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Duffy, Stephen W. [Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Baldwin, David R. [Nottingham University Hospitals, Respiratory Medicine Unit, David Evans Research Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Field, John K. [The University of Liverpool, Roy Castle Lung Cancer Research Programme, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2018-01-15

    To compare radiologists' performance reading CTs independently with their performance using radiographers as concurrent readers in lung cancer screening. 369 consecutive baseline CTs performed for the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) trial were double-read by radiologists reading either independently or concurrently with a radiographer. In concurrent reading, the radiologist reviewed radiographer-identified nodules and then detected any additional nodules. Radiologists recorded their independent and concurrent reading times. For each radiologist, sensitivity, average false-positive detections (FPs) per case and mean reading times for each method were calculated. 694 nodules in 246/369 (66.7%) studies comprised the reference standard. Radiologists' mean sensitivity and average FPs per case both increased with concurrent reading compared to independent reading (90.8 ± 5.6% vs. 77.5 ± 11.2%, and 0.60 ± 0.53 vs. 0.33 ± 0.20, respectively; p < 0.05 for 3/4 and 2/4 radiologists, respectively). The mean reading times per case decreased from 9.1 ± 2.3 min with independent reading to 7.2 ± 1.0 min with concurrent reading, decreasing significantly for 3/4 radiologists (p < 0.05). The majority of radiologists demonstrated improved sensitivity, a small increase in FP detections and a statistically significantly reduced reading time using radiographers as concurrent readers. (orig.)

  5. Congenital seminal vesicle cyst accompanying with ipsilateral renal agenesis in an adolescent patient: A pediatric radiologist approach to Zinner’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Burak Özkan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A fifteen-year-old boy who had complaints of left sided pelvic pain with known ipsilateral left renal agenesia was referred to pediatric radiology department. Incidentally, his sonography examination revealed a dilated tubular structure located in the retro-vesicular region from cephalic to prostate. Contrast enhanced pelvic MRI showed a huge seminal vesicle cyst which is over 6 cm without a mass effect near the aspect border of the prostate and bladder. The patient was diagnosed with Zinner syndrome. The patient doesn’t have new complaint with no definite increase in the diameter of the cyst. In this case presentation we are discussing the Zinner syndrome’s imaging findings from a pediatric radiologist approach with a brief review of the literature.

  6. Simple Driving Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mads

    2002-01-01

    -like language. Our aim is to extract a simple notion of driving and show that even in this tamed form it has much of the power of more general notions of driving. Our driving technique may be used to simplify functional programs which use function composition and will often be able to remove intermediate data...

  7. A Simple Tiltmeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, M. G.; Harrison, D. R.; Edwards, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Bubble vial with external aluminum-foil electrodes is sensing element for simple indicating tiltmeter. To measure bubble displacement, bridge circuit detects difference in capacitance between two sensing electrodes and reference electrode. Tiltmeter was developed for experiment on forecasting seismic events by changes in Earth's magnetic field.

  8. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  9. Structure of simple liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blain, J.F.

    1969-01-01

    The results obtained by application to argon and sodium of the two important methods of studying the structure of liquids: scattering of X-rays and neutrons, are presented on one hand. On the other hand the principal models employed for reconstituting the structure of simple liquids are exposed: mathematical models, lattice models and their derived models, experimental models. (author) [fr

  10. Simple mathematical fireworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Luca, R; Faella, O

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical fireworks are reproduced in two dimensions by means of simple notions in kinematics and Newtonian mechanics. Extension of the analysis in three dimensions is proposed and the geometric figures the falling tiny particles make on the ground after explosion are determined. (paper)

  11. simple sequence repeat (SSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, 78 mapped simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers representing 11 linkage groups of adzuki bean were evaluated for transferability to mungbean and related Vigna spp. 41 markers amplified characteristic bands in at least one Vigna species. The transferability percentage across the genotypes ranged ...

  12. A Simple Wave Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  13. A simple method of measuring tibial tubercle to trochlear groove distance on MRI: description of a novel and reliable technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Christopher L; Heidenreich, Mark J; Dahm, Diane L; Bond, Jeffrey R; Collins, Mark S; Krych, Aaron J

    2016-03-01

    Tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance is a variable that helps guide surgical decision-making in patients with patellar instability. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy and reliability of an MRI TT-TG measuring technique using a simple external alignment method to a previously validated gold standard technique that requires advanced software read by radiologists. TT-TG was calculated by MRI on 59 knees with a clinical diagnosis of patellar instability in a blinded and randomized fashion by two musculoskeletal radiologists using advanced software and by two orthopaedists using the study technique which utilizes measurements taken on a simple electronic imaging platform. Interrater reliability between the two radiologists and the two orthopaedists and intermethods reliability between the two techniques were calculated using interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). ICC and CCC values greater than 0.75 were considered to represent excellent agreement. The mean TT-TG distance was 14.7 mm (Standard Deviation (SD) 4.87 mm) and 15.4 mm (SD 5.41) as measured by the radiologists and orthopaedists, respectively. Excellent interobserver agreement was noted between the radiologists (ICC 0.941; CCC 0.941), the orthopaedists (ICC 0.978; CCC 0.976), and the two techniques (ICC 0.941; CCC 0.933). The simple TT-TG distance measurement technique analysed in this study resulted in excellent agreement and reliability as compared to the gold standard technique. This method can predictably be performed by orthopaedic surgeons without advanced radiologic software. II.

  14. A Study of Simple Diffraction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn

    In this paper two simple methods for cabinet edge diffraction are examined. Calculations with both models are compared with more sophisticated theoretical models and with measured data. The parameters involved are studied and their importance for normal loudspeaker box designs is examined....

  15. Staff dosimetry and risk assessment during digestive and angiographic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, J.; Osteaux, M.

    2001-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation in medical applications involves not only a risk for the patient, but also for the staff which executed the related examinations. The dose to the forehead, neck, fingers and wrist of a radiologist and an assisting nurse were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters during angiographic and digestive examinations respectively. Dose to eye lenses and effective dose were estimated for a working period of one year. Effective doses were under the established limit of 20 mSv per year. Nurse eye lens dose was higher than the limit of 150 mSv. Differences of a factor of 3.8 were observed between nurse and radiologist doses. Angiographic procedures are considered as high risk examinations, however, digestive examinations can have a higher risk than interventional procedures. (author)

  16. NATO mission in Kosovo: historical backgrounds and informations of working as radiologist in the German field hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelk, M.; Danz, B.

    2005-01-01

    The first part of this article describes how the NATO mission in Kosovo came into existence and focuses on the historical background and ethnical problems. The second part deals with the working conditions of a radiologist in the German field hospital in Prizren and focuses on the personnel and technical equipment in the radiological department. (orig.) [de

  17. Performance of computer-aided diagnosis for detection of lacunar infarcts on brain MR images: ROC analysis of radiologists' detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Y.; Yokoyama, R.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H.; Asano, T.; Kato, H.; Hoshi, H.; Yamakawa, H.; Iwama, T.; Ando, H.; Yamakawa, H.

    2007-01-01

    The detection and management of asymptomatic lacunar infarcts on magnetic resonance (MR) images are important tasks for radiologists to ensure the prevention of sever cerebral infarctions. However, accurate identification of lacunar infarcts is a difficult. Therefore, we developed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for detection of lacunar infarcts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiologists' performance in detection of lacunar infarcts without and with use of CAD scheme. 30 T1- and 30 T2- weighted images obtained from 30 patients were used for an observer study, which were consisted of 15 cases with a single lacunar infarct and 15 cases without any lacunar infarct. Six radiologists participated in the observer study. They interpreted lacunar infarcts first without and then with use of the scheme. For all six observers, average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value was increased from 0.920 to 0.965 when they used the computer output. This CAD scheme might have the potential to improve the accuracy of radiologists' performance in the detection of lacunar infarcts on MR images. (orig.)

  18. Effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubizarreta Alberdi, Raquel; Llanes, Ana B.F.; Ortega, Raquel Almazan; Exposito, Ruben Roman; Collado, Jose M.V.; Oliveres, Xavier Castells; Queiro Verdes, Teresa; Natal Ramos, Carmen; Sanz, Maria Ederra; Salas Trejo, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in population-based breast cancer screening programmes. We evaluated 1,440,384 single-read screening mammograms, corresponding to 471,112 women aged 45-69 years participating in four Spanish programmes between 1990 and 2006. The mammograms were interpreted by 72 radiologists. The overall percentage of false-positive results was 5.85% and that for false-positives resulting in an invasive procedure was 0.38%. Both the risk of false-positives overall and of false-positives leading to an invasive procedure significantly decreased (p 14,999 mammograms with respect to the reference category (<500). The risk of both categories of false-positives was also significantly reduced (p < 0.001) as radiologists' years of experience increased: OR 0.96 and OR 0.84, respectively, for 1 year's experience and OR 0.72 and OR 0.73, respectively, for more than 4 years' experience with regard to the category of <1 year's experience. Radiologist experience is a determining factor in the risk of a false-positive result in breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  19. Computed tomography use in minor head injury: attitudes and practices of emergency physicians, neurosurgeons, and radiologists in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özan, Ebru; Ataç, Gökçe Kaan

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to determine the attitudes and practices of emergency physicians (EPs), neurosurgeons, and radiologists in Turkey regarding computed tomography (CT) use for adults with minor head injury (MHI). This cross-sectional study was conducted between August 2015 and October 2016 after obtaining the approval of the institutional ethical committee. The purpose of this study was disclosed to the participants prior to beginning the survey. The study was performed conducting a questionnaire via e-mail on three groups of participants including EPs, neurosurgeons, and radiologists. Participants comprised academic staff at university hospitals as well as department chiefs, specialists, and residents working at university, government, and private hospitals, all of whom are in charge of evaluating MHI patients. A total of 607 participants including 201 (33.1%) EPs, 179 (29.5%) neurosurgeons, and 227 (37.4%) radiologists responded to the survey; 31% of the participants reported awareness and 27.3% reported use of head CT rules in MHI. Awareness and use of the rules were most prominent in EPs group, while the lowest rates were observed in radiologists group (pprotection or on patient dose from imaging are the common reasons for this practice pattern.

  20. Volumetry of Artificial Pulmonary Nodules in Ex Vivo Porcine Lungs: Comparison of Semi-automated Volumetry and Radiologists' Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ju Hyeon; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Song Soo; Jeon, Ho Sang; Lee, Hyun Ju; Park, Noh Hyuck; Cho, Gyu Seong

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of MSCT, the detection rate of small pulmonary nodules is markedly greater. However, there is no definite diagnostic clue to differentiate between malignant and benign nodules, except for the interval growth in small nodule less than 1 cm in diameter. We evaluated the accuracy of computer aided volumetry (CAV) and compared it with 4 radiologists' measurement. Fifteen artificial nodules that were embedded in the ex vivo porcine lung were scanned by MSCT. The diameters and volumes of nodules were independently measured three times, at 5-day intervals, and by four radiologists as well as by CAV. We evaluated the accuracy of the measurements on the basis of the true diameter and volume of the nodules. Using a paired t-test and a Bland-Altman plot, we evaluated whether there was a statistically significant difference between the radiologists' measurements and the CAV. The accuracy of the manual measurements by radiologists revealed a statistically significant difference from the true diameter and volume of the artificial nodules (p 0.01) The results of this study suggest that CAV is an accurate and useful tool to evaluate the volume of pulmonary nodules and can eventually be used to differentiate malignant and benign nodules as well as evaluate the therapeutic response of lung cancer

  1. The opinion and experiences of Dutch orthopedic surgeons and radiologists about diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging in primary care: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; Franken, Nicole; Beumer, Annechien; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2014-04-01

    The use of diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound (DMUS) in primary health care has increased in the recent years. Nevertheless, there are hardly any data concerning the reliability, accuracy and treatment consequences of DMUS used by physical therapists or general practitioners. Moreover, there are no papers published about how orthopedic surgeons or radiologists deal with the results of DMUS performed in primary care. Therefore, our aim is to evaluate the opinion, possible advantages or disadvantages and experiences of Dutch orthopedic surgeons and radiologists about DMUS in primary care. A cross-sectional survey in which respondents completed a self-developed questionnaire to determine their opinion, experiences, advantages, disadvantages of performing DMUS in primary care. Questionnaires were sent to 838 Dutch orthopedic surgeons and radiologists of which 213 were returned (response rate 25.4%). Our respondents saw no additional value for health care for diagnostic DMUS in primary care. DMUSs were generally repeated in secondary care. They perceived more disadvantages than advantages of performing DMUS in primary care. Mentioned disadvantages were: 'false positive results' (71.4%), 'lack of experience' (70%), 'insufficient education' (69.5%), not able to relate the outcomes of DMUS with other forms of diagnostic imaging' (65.7%), and 'false negative results' (65.3%). Radiologists and orthopedic surgeons sampled in the Netherlands show low trust in DMUS knowledge of physical therapists and general practitioners. The results should be interpreted with caution because of the small response rate and the lack of representativeness to other countries. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Complexity is simple!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, William; Montero, Miguel

    2018-02-01

    In this note we investigate the role of Lloyd's computational bound in holographic complexity. Our goal is to translate the assumptions behind Lloyd's proof into the bulk language. In particular, we discuss the distinction between orthogonalizing and `simple' gates and argue that these notions are useful for diagnosing holographic complexity. We show that large black holes constructed from series circuits necessarily employ simple gates, and thus do not satisfy Lloyd's assumptions. We also estimate the degree of parallel processing required in this case for elementary gates to orthogonalize. Finally, we show that for small black holes at fixed chemical potential, the orthogonalization condition is satisfied near the phase transition, supporting a possible argument for the Weak Gravity Conjecture first advocated in [1].

  3. Unicameral (simple) bone cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Rafath; Eady, John L

    2006-09-01

    Since their original description by Virchow, simple bone cysts have been studied repeatedly. Although these defects are not true neoplasms, simple bone cysts may create major structural defects of the humerus, femur, and os calcis. They are commonly discovered incidentally when x-rays are taken for other reasons or on presentation due to a pathologic fracture. Various treatment strategies have been employed, but the only reliable predictor of success of any treatment strategy is the age of the patient; those being older than 10 years of age heal their cysts at a higher rate than those under age 10. The goal of management is the formation of a bone that can withstand the stresses of use by the patient without evidence of continued bone destruction as determined by serial radiographic follow-up. The goal is not a normal-appearing x-ray, but a functionally stable bone.

  4. Information technology made simple

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Roger

    1991-01-01

    Information Technology: Made Simple covers the full range of information technology topics, including more traditional subjects such as programming languages, data processing, and systems analysis. The book discusses information revolution, including topics about microchips, information processing operations, analog and digital systems, information processing system, and systems analysis. The text also describes computers, computer hardware, microprocessors, and microcomputers. The peripheral devices connected to the central processing unit; the main types of system software; application soft

  5. Modern mathematics made simple

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Modern Mathematics: Made Simple presents topics in modern mathematics, from elementary mathematical logic and switching circuits to multibase arithmetic and finite systems. Sets and relations, vectors and matrices, tesselations, and linear programming are also discussed.Comprised of 12 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to sets and basic operations on sets, as well as solving problems with Venn diagrams. The discussion then turns to elementary mathematical logic, with emphasis on inductive and deductive reasoning; conjunctions and disjunctions; compound statements and conditional

  6. TU-D-209-07: Monte Carlo Assessment of Dose to the Lens of the Eye of Radiologist Using Realistic Phantoms and Eyeglass Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Lin, H [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Gao, Y; Caracappa, P [RPI, Troy, NY (United States); Wang, Y; Huo, W; Pi, Y; Feng, M; Chen, Z [USTC, Hefei, Anhui (China); Dauer, L [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, New York, NY (United States); Thornton, R; Dauer, Z; Alvarado, K [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); St Germain, J [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, New York, NY (United States); Solomon, S [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); USTC, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study how eyeglass design features and postures of the interventional radiologist affect the radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Methods: A mesh-based deformable phantom, consisting of an ultra-fine eye model, was used to simulate postures of a radiologist in fluoroscopically guided interventional procedure (facing the patient, 45 degree to the left, and 45 degree to the right). Various eyewear design features were studied, including the shape, lead-equivalent thickness, and separation from the face. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the X-ray source used for the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization procedure (The X-ray tube is located 35 cm from the ground, emitting X-rays toward to the ceiling; Field size is 40cm X 40cm; X-ray tube voltage is 90 kVp). Experiments were also performed using dosimeter placed on a physical phantom behind eyeglasses. Results: Without protective eyewear, the radiologist’s eye lens can receive an annual dose equivalent of about 80 mSv. When wearing a pair of lead eyeglasses with lead-equivalent of 0.5-mm Pb, the annual dose equivalent of the eye lens is reduced to 31.47 mSv, but both exceed the new ICRP limit of 20 mSv. A face shield with a lead-equivalent of 0.125-mm Pb in the shape of a semi-cylinder (13cm in radius and 20-cm in height) would further reduce the exposure to the lens of the eye. Examination of postures and eyeglass features reveal surprising information, including that the glass-to-eye separation also plays an important role in the dose to the eye lens from scattered X-ray from underneath and the side. Results are in general agreement with measurements. Conclusion: There is an urgent need to further understand the relationship between the radiation environment and the radiologist’s eyewear and posture in order to provide necessary protection to the interventional radiologists under newly reduced dose limits.

  7. TU-D-209-07: Monte Carlo Assessment of Dose to the Lens of the Eye of Radiologist Using Realistic Phantoms and Eyeglass Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X; Lin, H; Gao, Y; Caracappa, P; Wang, Y; Huo, W; Pi, Y; Feng, M; Chen, Z; Dauer, L; Thornton, R; Dauer, Z; Alvarado, K; St Germain, J; Solomon, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study how eyeglass design features and postures of the interventional radiologist affect the radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Methods: A mesh-based deformable phantom, consisting of an ultra-fine eye model, was used to simulate postures of a radiologist in fluoroscopically guided interventional procedure (facing the patient, 45 degree to the left, and 45 degree to the right). Various eyewear design features were studied, including the shape, lead-equivalent thickness, and separation from the face. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the X-ray source used for the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization procedure (The X-ray tube is located 35 cm from the ground, emitting X-rays toward to the ceiling; Field size is 40cm X 40cm; X-ray tube voltage is 90 kVp). Experiments were also performed using dosimeter placed on a physical phantom behind eyeglasses. Results: Without protective eyewear, the radiologist’s eye lens can receive an annual dose equivalent of about 80 mSv. When wearing a pair of lead eyeglasses with lead-equivalent of 0.5-mm Pb, the annual dose equivalent of the eye lens is reduced to 31.47 mSv, but both exceed the new ICRP limit of 20 mSv. A face shield with a lead-equivalent of 0.125-mm Pb in the shape of a semi-cylinder (13cm in radius and 20-cm in height) would further reduce the exposure to the lens of the eye. Examination of postures and eyeglass features reveal surprising information, including that the glass-to-eye separation also plays an important role in the dose to the eye lens from scattered X-ray from underneath and the side. Results are in general agreement with measurements. Conclusion: There is an urgent need to further understand the relationship between the radiation environment and the radiologist’s eyewear and posture in order to provide necessary protection to the interventional radiologists under newly reduced dose limits.

  8. Single reading with computer-aided detection performed by selected radiologists in a breast cancer screening program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargalló, Xavier, E-mail: xbarga@clinic.cat [Department of Radiology (CDIC), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, C/ Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Santamaría, Gorane; Amo, Montse del; Arguis, Pedro [Department of Radiology (CDIC), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, C/ Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Ríos, José [Biostatistics and Data Management Core Facility, IDIBAPS, (Hospital Clinic) C/ Mallorca, 183. Floor -1. Office #60. 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Grau, Jaume [Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology Unit, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, C/ Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Burrel, Marta; Cores, Enrique; Velasco, Martín [Department of Radiology (CDIC), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, C/ Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • 1-The cancer detection rate of the screening program improved using a single reading protocol by experienced radiologists assisted by CAD. • 2-The cancer detection rate improved at the cost of increasing recall rate. • 3-CAD, used by breast radiologists, did not help to detect more cancers. - Abstract: Objectives: To assess the impact of shifting from a standard double reading plus arbitration protocol to a single reading by experienced radiologists assisted by computer-aided detection (CAD) in a breast cancer screening program. Methods: This was a prospective study approved by the ethics committee. Data from 21,321 consecutive screening mammograms in incident rounds (2010–2012) were read following a single reading plus CAD protocol and compared with data from 47,462 consecutive screening mammograms in incident rounds (2004–2010) that were interpreted following a double reading plus arbitration protocol. For the single reading, radiologists were selected on the basis of the appraisement of their previous performance. Results: Period 2010–2012 vs. period 2004–2010: Cancer detection rate (CDR): 6.1‰ (95% confidence interval: 5.1–7.2) vs. 5.25‰; Recall rate (RR): 7.02% (95% confidence interval: 6.7–7.4) vs. 7.24% (selected readers before arbitration) and vs. 3.94 (all readers after arbitration); Predictive positive value of recall: 8.69% vs. 13.32%. Average size of invasive cancers: 14.6 ± 9.5 mm vs. 14.3 ± 9.5 mm. Stage: 0 (22.3/26.1%); I (59.2/50.8%); II (19.2/17.1%); III (3.1/3.3%); IV (0/1.9%). Specialized breast radiologists performed better than general radiologists. Conclusions: The cancer detection rate of the screening program improved using a single reading protocol by experienced radiologists assisted by CAD, at the cost of a moderate increase of the recall rate mainly related to the lack of arbitration.

  9. Radiation effects analysis in a group of interventional radiologists using biological and physical dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, M., E-mail: WEMLmirapas@iqn.upv.e [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Ferrer, S. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Tortosa, R. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rodriguez, P. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Barrios, L.L. [Department of Physiology and Cellular Biology, Unit of Cellular Biology (UAB) (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Interventional radiologists and staff members are frequently exposed to protracted and fractionated low doses of ionizing radiation, which extend during all their professional activities. These exposures can derive, due to the effects of direct and scattered radiation, in deterministic effects (radiodermitis, aged skin, cataracts, telangiectasia in nasal region, vasocellular epitelioms, hands depilation) and/or stochastic ones (cancer incidence). A methodology has been proposed for estimating the radiation risk or detriment from a group of six exposed interventional radiologists of the Hospital Universitario La Fe (Valencia, Spain), which had developed general exposition symptoms attributable to deterministic effects of ionizing radiation. Equivalent doses have been periodically registered using TLD's and wrist dosimeters, H{sub p}(10) and H{sub p}(0.07), respectively, and estimated through the observation of translocations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood (biological methods), by extrapolating the yield of translocations to their respective dose-effect curves. The software RADRISK has been applied for estimating radiation risks in these occupational radiation exposures. This software is based on transport models from epidemiological studies of population exposed to external sources of ionizing radiation, such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors [UNSCEAR, Sources and effects of ionizing radiation: 2006 report to the general assembly, with scientific annexes. New York: United Nations; 2006]. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for skin cancer has been, using wrist physical doses, of [1.03x10{sup -3}, 5.06x10{sup -2}], concluding that there is not an increased risk of skin cancer incidence. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for leukemia has been, using TLD physical doses, of [7.84x10{sup -2}, 3.36x10{sup -1}], and using biological doses, of [1.40x10{sup -1}, 1.51], which is considerably higher than incidence rates, showing an

  10. Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography: A Guide for the General Radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadsmoore, Clare; Newman, David; MacIver, Duncan; Pawaroo, Davina

    2015-11-01

    or radiotherapy when there is suspicion of recurrent or residual disease. FDG PETCT is not specific for malignancy and can also be used for diagnosing and monitoring a number of inflammatory and infectious conditions that can be difficult to diagnose on anatomical imaging, some of which carry significant morbidity. FDG PETCT is increasingly used in patients with pyrexia of unknown origin and in patients with metastatic malignancies of unidentified primary on conventional imaging. This article reviews the uses of PETCT including an overview of the more common incidental lesions and conditions. It also provides guidance of how to approach a PETCT as a nonradionuclide radiologist and how to interpret a study in the multidisciplinary team setting. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Incidence of tendon entrapment and dislocation with calcaneus and pilon fractures on CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresley, Jonathan [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Subhawong, Ty K.; Singer, Adam D.; Clifford, Paul D. [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-07-15

    To examine the association between tibial pilon and calcaneal fracture classification and tendon entrapment or dislocation. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive CT scans with calcaneal or pilon fractures from 5 years at a level 1 trauma center. We categorized calcaneal fractures according to the Sanders classification, and pilon fractures according to the Ruedi and Allgower and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Osteosynthesefragen-Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO-OTA) classifications. Ankle tendons were assessed for dislocation or entrapment. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis with significance at p < 0.05. A total of 312 fractures (91 pilon only, 193 calcaneal only, and 14 ankles with ipsilateral pilon and calcaneal fractures) were identified in 273 patients. Twenty-two pilon, 42 calcaneal, and nine combination fractures were associated with 99 occurrences of tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Such findings were associated with multiple fractures (p = 0.002). Multifragmentary pilon fractures were associated with posterior tibial and flexor digitorum longus tendon entrapment (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0003 for Ruedi/Allgower and AO-OTA, respectively), and multifragmentary Sanders type 3 or 4 calcaneal fractures were associated with superior peroneal retinacular injury (p = 0.0473) compared to simple fracture patterns. Thirty-nine percent of tendon entrapments or retinacular injuries were prospectively identified, 85 % by musculoskeletal radiologists (p < 0.0001). Approximately 25 % of calcaneal and pilon fractures were retrospectively identified to contain posteromedial tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Radiologists should meticulously search for such injuries, particularly when analyzing multifragmentary and multiple fractures. (orig.)

  12. Incidence of tendon entrapment and dislocation with calcaneus and pilon fractures on CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresley, Jonathan; Subhawong, Ty K.; Singer, Adam D.; Clifford, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    To examine the association between tibial pilon and calcaneal fracture classification and tendon entrapment or dislocation. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive CT scans with calcaneal or pilon fractures from 5 years at a level 1 trauma center. We categorized calcaneal fractures according to the Sanders classification, and pilon fractures according to the Ruedi and Allgower and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Osteosynthesefragen-Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO-OTA) classifications. Ankle tendons were assessed for dislocation or entrapment. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis with significance at p < 0.05. A total of 312 fractures (91 pilon only, 193 calcaneal only, and 14 ankles with ipsilateral pilon and calcaneal fractures) were identified in 273 patients. Twenty-two pilon, 42 calcaneal, and nine combination fractures were associated with 99 occurrences of tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Such findings were associated with multiple fractures (p = 0.002). Multifragmentary pilon fractures were associated with posterior tibial and flexor digitorum longus tendon entrapment (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0003 for Ruedi/Allgower and AO-OTA, respectively), and multifragmentary Sanders type 3 or 4 calcaneal fractures were associated with superior peroneal retinacular injury (p = 0.0473) compared to simple fracture patterns. Thirty-nine percent of tendon entrapments or retinacular injuries were prospectively identified, 85 % by musculoskeletal radiologists (p < 0.0001). Approximately 25 % of calcaneal and pilon fractures were retrospectively identified to contain posteromedial tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Radiologists should meticulously search for such injuries, particularly when analyzing multifragmentary and multiple fractures. (orig.)

  13. Shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography needle placement using fluoroscopic guidance: practice patterns of musculoskeletal radiologists in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortt, Conor P.; Morrison, William B.; Deely, Diane M.; Gopez, Angela G.; Zoga, Adam C.; Roberts, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the range of techniques used by radiologists performing shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography using fluoroscopic guidance. Questionnaires on shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography were distributed to radiologists at a national radiology meeting. We enquired regarding years of experience, preferred approaches, needle gauge, gadolinium dilution, and volume injected. For each approach, the radiologist was asked their starting and end needle position based on a numbered and lettered grid superimposed on a radiograph. Sixty-eight questionnaires were returned. Sixty-eight radiologists performed shoulder and hip arthrography, and 65 performed knee arthrograms. Mean experience was 13.5 and 12.8 years, respectively. For magnetic resonance arthrography, a gadolinium dilution of 1/200 was used by 69-71%. For shoulder arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 65/68 (96%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and posterior approaches, was immediately lateral to the humeral cortex. A 22-gauge needle was used by 46/66 (70%). Mean injected volume was 12.7 ml (5-30). For hip arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 51/68 (75%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and lateral approaches, was along the lateral femoral head/neck junction. A 22-gauge needle was used by 53/68 (78%). Mean injected volume was 11.5 ml (5-20). For knee arthrography, a lateral approach was preferred by 41/64 (64%). The most common site of needle end position, for lateral and medial approaches, was mid-patellofemoral joint level. A 22-gauge needle was used by 36/65 (56%). Mean injected volume was 28.2 ml (5-60). Arthrographic approaches for the shoulder, hip, and knee vary among radiologists over a wide range of experience levels. (orig.)

  14. Shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography needle placement using fluoroscopic guidance: practice patterns of musculoskeletal radiologists in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shortt, Conor P. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrison, William B.; Deely, Diane M.; Gopez, Angela G.; Zoga, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Roberts, Catherine C. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the range of techniques used by radiologists performing shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography using fluoroscopic guidance. Questionnaires on shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography were distributed to radiologists at a national radiology meeting. We enquired regarding years of experience, preferred approaches, needle gauge, gadolinium dilution, and volume injected. For each approach, the radiologist was asked their starting and end needle position based on a numbered and lettered grid superimposed on a radiograph. Sixty-eight questionnaires were returned. Sixty-eight radiologists performed shoulder and hip arthrography, and 65 performed knee arthrograms. Mean experience was 13.5 and 12.8 years, respectively. For magnetic resonance arthrography, a gadolinium dilution of 1/200 was used by 69-71%. For shoulder arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 65/68 (96%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and posterior approaches, was immediately lateral to the humeral cortex. A 22-gauge needle was used by 46/66 (70%). Mean injected volume was 12.7 ml (5-30). For hip arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 51/68 (75%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and lateral approaches, was along the lateral femoral head/neck junction. A 22-gauge needle was used by 53/68 (78%). Mean injected volume was 11.5 ml (5-20). For knee arthrography, a lateral approach was preferred by 41/64 (64%). The most common site of needle end position, for lateral and medial approaches, was mid-patellofemoral joint level. A 22-gauge needle was used by 36/65 (56%). Mean injected volume was 28.2 ml (5-60). Arthrographic approaches for the shoulder, hip, and knee vary among radiologists over a wide range of experience levels. (orig.)

  15. Chloral hydrate in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging: evaluation of a 10-year sedation experience administered by radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jorge; Toro, Rodrigo; Rascovsky, Simon; Arango, Andres; Angel, Gabriel J.; Calvo, Victor; Delgado, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    Chloral hydrate is a sedative that has been used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To evaluate the use, effectiveness and safety of chloral hydrate administered by radiologists for the sedation of children who require MRI procedures. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts for all patients ages 0 - 10 years old who underwent sedation with chloral hydrate for MRI from January 2000 to December 2010. Demographic factors, dose information, indication for MRI, therapeutic failures and adverse reactions to the drug were reviewed. One thousand, seven hundred and three children (946 males, 757 females) with a median age of 2.5 years (range: 4 days - 9.91 years) received chloral hydrate. Moderate to deep sedation was achieved in 1,618/1,703 (95%) of the patients, 35/1,703 (2.1%) of the patients failed to achieve moderate to deep sedation, and 47/1,703 (2.8%) of the patients woke up during MRI examination. Adverse reactions were present in 31/1,703 (1.8%) of the patients. Three severe adverse reactions occurred (0.18%). A single dose of chloral hydrate (40-60 mg/kg) was administered to 1,477/1,703 patients (86.7%). An additional dose of chloral hydrate (10-20 mg/kg), given 15 min after the first dose or when the patient woke up during the MRI examination, was required in 226/1,703 patients (13.3%). The likelihood of requiring an additional dose in children older than 2 years was 2.2 times the likelihood compared to children younger than 2 years (OR = 2.2 [95%CI: 1.6-3.0]). The use of a reduced dose (<50 mg/kg) was not associated with a higher therapeutic failure rate (OR = 1.04 [95%CI 0.57-1.89]). Chloral hydrate is an appropriate sedation option for pediatric patients in MRI services when strict patient selection criteria are met. The use of a reduced dose does not affect the effectiveness of sedation. The lack of data regarding the presence of transient oxygen desaturation, the time to induce sedation and the exact duration of sedation are limitations of this

  16. Chloral hydrate in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging: evaluation of a 10-year sedation experience administered by radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Jorge; Toro, Rodrigo; Rascovsky, Simon; Arango, Andres; Angel, Gabriel J.; Calvo, Victor; Delgado, Jorge A. [Fundacion Instituto de Alta Tecnologia Medica, Department of Radiology, Medellin (Colombia)

    2014-08-21

    Chloral hydrate is a sedative that has been used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To evaluate the use, effectiveness and safety of chloral hydrate administered by radiologists for the sedation of children who require MRI procedures. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts for all patients ages 0 - 10 years old who underwent sedation with chloral hydrate for MRI from January 2000 to December 2010. Demographic factors, dose information, indication for MRI, therapeutic failures and adverse reactions to the drug were reviewed. One thousand, seven hundred and three children (946 males, 757 females) with a median age of 2.5 years (range: 4 days - 9.91 years) received chloral hydrate. Moderate to deep sedation was achieved in 1,618/1,703 (95%) of the patients, 35/1,703 (2.1%) of the patients failed to achieve moderate to deep sedation, and 47/1,703 (2.8%) of the patients woke up during MRI examination. Adverse reactions were present in 31/1,703 (1.8%) of the patients. Three severe adverse reactions occurred (0.18%). A single dose of chloral hydrate (40-60 mg/kg) was administered to 1,477/1,703 patients (86.7%). An additional dose of chloral hydrate (10-20 mg/kg), given 15 min after the first dose or when the patient woke up during the MRI examination, was required in 226/1,703 patients (13.3%). The likelihood of requiring an additional dose in children older than 2 years was 2.2 times the likelihood compared to children younger than 2 years (OR = 2.2 [95%CI: 1.6-3.0]). The use of a reduced dose (<50 mg/kg) was not associated with a higher therapeutic failure rate (OR = 1.04 [95%CI 0.57-1.89]). Chloral hydrate is an appropriate sedation option for pediatric patients in MRI services when strict patient selection criteria are met. The use of a reduced dose does not affect the effectiveness of sedation. The lack of data regarding the presence of transient oxygen desaturation, the time to induce sedation and the exact duration of sedation are limitations of this

  17. Radiofrequency ablation in primary non-small cell lung cancer: What a radiologist needs to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shivank; Pereira, Keith; Mohan, Prasoon; Narayanan, Govindarajan; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In advanced cases of lung cancer, a multimodality approach is often applied, however with poor local control rates. In early non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery is the standard of care. Only 15-30% of patients are eligible for surgical resection. Improvements in imaging and treatment delivery systems have provided new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has evolved as the next best option. The role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is also growing. Currently, it is a third-line option in stage 1 NSCLC, when SBRT cannot be performed. More recent studies have demonstrated usefulness in recurrent tumors and some authors have also suggested combination of RFA with other modalities in larger tumors. Following the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT) has demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in high-risk populations. Hence, even considering the current role of RFA as a third-line option, in view of increasing numbers of occurrences detected, the number of potential RFA candidates may see a steep uptrend. In view of all this, it is imperative that interventional radiologists be familiar with the techniques of lung ablation. The aim of this article is to discuss the procedural technique of RFA in the lung and review the current evidence regarding RFA for NSCLC. PMID:27081229

  18. The radiologist's role in the management of papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral de la Calle, M Á; Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Martín López, M R; Fernández Pérez, G C; Águeda Del Bas, D S

    Papillary carcinoma is the second most common renal cell carcinoma. It has a better prognosis than the more frequent clear cell carcinoma, although this does not hold true for advanced cases, because no specific treatment exists. It presents as a circumscribed peripheral tumor (small and homogeneously solid or larger and cystic/hemorrhagic) or as an infiltrating lesion that invades the veins, which has a worse prognosis. Due to their low vascular density, papillary renal cell carcinomas enhance less than other renal tumors, and this facilitates their characterization. On computed tomography, they might not enhance conclusively, and in these cases they are impossible to distinguish from hyperattenuating cysts. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are more sensitive for detecting vascularization. Other characteristics include a specific vascular pattern, hypointensity on T2-weighted images, restricted water diffusion, and increased signal intensity in opposed phase images. We discuss the genetic, histologic, clinical, and radiological aspects of these tumors in which radiologists play a fundamental role in management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. X-rays taken by radiologists. Influence on a continuous quality improvement process?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, C.; Freiburg Univ.; Czapp, W.; Trampe, I.; Leppek, R.; Klose, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate how the training of radiology residents in taking radiographs influences the work of radiographers and the established quality standards. Methods: A first year radiology resident was trained for 4 weeks in focusing and exposure techniques by radiographers. In a second period the resident took 582 radiograms, which were compared with those taken by technicians for error estimation on a daily basis. During a third period the radiographs were produced in a contest between the resident and a skilled radiographer. Errors were analysed by two independent experts according to established guidelines of the German Medical Association. Results: At the beginning of the second period the average error rate of the resident was 11.9% as compared to 8.9% in the technicians team, in the following month 9.2% versus 15.9%. In the third period no relevant difference in errors could be observed. Finally, unexpected quality improvements were implemented like an improved standardization of focusing and exposure techniques as well as dose reduction. Conclusions: Radiology residents easily learn focusing and exposure techniques and achieve comparable results as radiographers within a short period of time. The additionally achieved knowledge improves the technical process of taking radiographs. We recommend to include a two plane radiography training period in the curriculum of radiology residents. It reinforces the radiologist's role in continuous quality improvements of the diagnostic process. (orig.) [de

  20. Malpractice and radiologists, update 1986: an 11.5-year perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin, L.

    1986-01-01

    All medical malpractice lawsuits filed in Cook County, IL, from January 1, 1980, through June 30, 1986, were reviewed and compared with similar data for the period of January 1, 1975, through December 30, 1979. A total of 11,203 suits were filed during the 11.5-year period; of these, 1391 (12%) were radiology related. The latter were categorized into six groups. The largest was missed radiologic diagnoses, which accounted for 40% of the total. The remaining groups included complications, 19%; failure to order, 17%; radiation therapy, 11%; slip and fall, 5%; and miscellaneous, 8%. Over the 1975-1986 period, the rise in the number of suits alleging radiologic misses outpaced all other groups. Although the most common type of miss continues to involve fractures, the frequency of missed carcinomas has grown at a disproportionately faster rate. Misses specifically involving CT, nuclear medicine, and sonography also are becoming more prevalent. Radiographic misses continue to occur at an average rate of 30%, with little hope of improvement. Methods to combat the rising number of malpractice suits are discussed. It is concluded that although programs to educate radiologists on risk management should continue, the ultimate solution may be a more enlightened public attitude as to what actually constitutes malpractice, and institution of tort reform measures by federal and state legislatures

  1. Errors and malpractice lawsuits in radiology: what the radiologist needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Frati, Paola; Santurro, Alessandro; Zaami, Simona; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-09-01

    All medical specialties dealing with patients include an intrinsic risk in exposing them to issues resulting from human errors. Radiology is not spared from this risk since it includes "decision-making under conditions of uncertainty." In medical imaging, the line between the word "error" and misdiagnosis or discrepancy is very difficult to demarcate, mainly because the diagnostic process is not a binary relation and it is not always possible to establish if a pathological condition is present or not. The error in radiology is strongly related to the diagnostic process; hence, it can be defined as a "diagnostic error" which represents the most common cause of medical malpractice suits against radiologists. In this paper, the authors described the features of errors occurring in radiology, trying to establish their impact and prevalence. Secondly, some data coming from different countries were compared in order to highlight the most frequent causes leading to malpractice lawsuits in radiology and how the phenomenon of malpractice in this field is represented worldwide.

  2. The Service Review Committee: Royal College of Radiologists. Philosophy, role, and lessons to be learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thind, R.; Barter, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Service Review Committee (SRC) was established by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Radiology in 2000. At the time, the RCR identified a clear need to respond appropriately and swiftly to requests for review of service provision in clinical radiology departments where trusts were concerned about standards or performance issues. It was recognized by the College that the poorly performing radiologist is often part of a department that is itself dysfunctional, and that sub-optimal performance may often reflect inadequate management, lack of support, overwhelming workload, or inadequate facilities. Following the completion of a range of service reviews during its first 6 years, the SRC recognized that among the reviews there were recurring themes and causes for poorly functioning departments. The committee felt it appropriate to share these with the wider radiological community. In doing so, it is hoped that other departments may recognize their own problems at an early stage and take appropriate steps to prevent any escalation of difficulties

  3. Sedation in a radiology department--do radiologists follow their own guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, D; Chakraverty, S; Wildsmith, J A W

    2011-05-01

    The Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) published guidelines in 2003 which aimed to standardise and improve the safety of sedation in the modern Radiology department. As sedation requirements increase, we decided to audit our own departments understandings and practice with respect to sedation. A repeat audit cycle was performed following a re-educational lecture, one year later. Three common sedation case scenarios were incorporated into a questionnaire which detailed questioning on requirements for fasting, monitoring and the order and use of sedation drugs alongside analgesics. These were compared to the 2003 RCR guidelines. The audit was recycled at one year. Despite the RCR guidelines, freely available on the RCR website, there was a persisting variation in practice which revealed a lack of awareness of the requirements for adequate fasting and the importance of giving the opiate before the benzodiazepine (sedative) agent in cases where a combination are chosen. The audit did show a trend towards using shorter acting benzodiazepines, which is in keeping with the guidelines. Monitoring of vital signs was generally, well carried out. General awareness of the RCR guidelines for safe sedation in the Radiology department was initially low and practice found to be variable. Re-education saw some improvements but also, some persisting habitual deviations from the guidelines, particularly with respect to the order in which the opiate and sedative benzodiazepine were given.

  4. Transformation and Transformational Leadership: A Review of the Current and Relevant Literature for Academic Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Norman B; Rawson, James V; Slade, Catherine P; Bledsoe, Martin

    2016-05-01

    With the US healthcare system on an unsustainable course, change is inevitable. Changes in the healthcare landscape impacting radiology include changing payment models, rapid adoption of digital technology, changes in radiology resident certifying exams, and the rise of consumerism in health care. Academic Radiology will be part of that change with none of its missions spared. What matters is not that change is coming but how Academic Radiology responds to change. Do we ignore, adapt, adopt others' practices, or lead change? Change management or transformation is a management skill set that can be learned and developed. Transformational leadership is a leadership style defined by the relationships between the leaders and the followers and the results they are able to achieve together to meet organizational goals. In this paper, we provide a review of key change management theories, as well as practical advice for self-reflection and development of leadership behaviors that promote effective change management and organizational transformation, particularly in a complex industry like Academic Radiology. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiservice Within the Medical Service Encounter: Lessons for Radiologists Beyond Service Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Paul Armstrong; Hill, Ronald Paul

    2015-12-01

    Recent modifications in the metrics for reimbursement have reinforced the importance of radiology service-delivery experiences of patients. Evaluating current radiology practices calls for reflection on the various touch points with patients, as well as their overall satisfaction. If problems occur during encounters, service failure, or lack of satisfactory medical experiences can be transformed through service recovery, whereby patients-as-customers are given chances to voice their concerns, and health care providers across the spectrum can work together to resolve problematic issues. This paper takes a systemic view of the patient experience as embedded in the care continuum, recognizing that different beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of members of the health care team can negatively affect or sabotage patient satisfaction. Although radiologists are only one of many roles in the care continuum, recommendations are discussed for how they can integrate service satisfaction as a pervasive communal goal among all health care team members. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microbiology for Radiologists: How to Minimize Infection Transmission in the Radiology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Sobia K; Tragon, Tyson R; Fukui, Melanie B; Hartman, Matthew S; Hartman, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of standardized infection control and prevention practices is increasingly relevant as modern radiology practice evolves into its more clinical role. Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, and World Health Organization guidelines for the proper use of personal protective equipment, decontamination of reusable medical equipment, and appropriate management of bloodborne pathogen exposures will be reviewed. Standard precautions apply to all patients at all times and are the mainstay of infection control. Proper hand hygiene includes washing hands with soap and water when exposed to certain infectious particles, such as Clostridium difficile spores, which are not inactivated by alcohol-based hand rubs. The appropriate use of personal protective equipment in accordance with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention includes wearing a surgical mask during lumbar puncture. Because radiologists may perform lumbar punctures for patients with prion disease, it is important to appreciate that incineration is the most effective method of inactivating prion proteins. However, there is currently no consensus recommendation on the decontamination of prion-contaminated reusable items associated with lumbar puncture, and institutional policies should be consulted for directed management. In the event of a needlestick injury, radiology staff must be able to quickly provide appropriate initial management and seek medical attention, including laboratory testing for bloodborne pathogens. ©RSNA, 2015.

  7. Why Vascular Surgeons and Interventional Radiologists Collaborate or Compete: A Look at Endovascular Stent Placements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Eric J.; Collins, Jeremy D. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States); Crowley-Matoka, Megan [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities (United States); Chrisman, Howard B. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States); Milad, Magdy P. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology-Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (United States); Vogelzang, Robert L., E-mail: vogelzang@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeTo understand how cultural differences between vascular surgeons (VSs) and interventional radiologists (IRs) affect their clinical decision making and inter-specialty relationships.MethodsTwenty-four conversational interviews were conducted with IRs and VSs about their approaches to patient care, views of their specialty and others, and solutions to any expressed concerns. Interview transcripts were systematically analyzed to identify and compare key themes according to the constructivist grounded theory and content analysis using NVivo 10 software. These data were supplemented with a retrospective analysis of 3658 endovascular stent placements performed at a large medical academic center over 11 years. Aggregate counts were divided by provider specialty, and trends were assessed via correlation coefficients.ResultsEndovascular stent placements were relatively equally divided between IR and VS over 11 years with some variability from placements by cardiology. IRs tend to lay claim to treatments as masters of procedures, whereas VSs base their claims on being masters of the treated diseases, leading to collaboration in some practices and bitter competition in others. The level of perceived competition was most associated with specialists’ awareness of and appreciation for specialty-specific values rather than differences in practice structure/reimbursement.ConclusionsUnderstanding cultural differences between IRs and VSs is imperative for fostering better collaboration to grow shared territory rather than competing for the same slice of the pie.

  8. Creating an interactive Web-based e-learning course: a practical introduction for radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Denis; Micheau, Antoine; Gahide, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    With the development of e-learning and its ability to provide rich animated content rapidly to a wide audience, new methods for teaching medical imaging have evolved. E-learning tools allow building of learner-focused structured courses. Standards such as shareable content object reference model (SCORM) or Aviation Industry Computer-based Training Committee (AICC) guidelines and recommendations provide the framework required to combine text, images, videos, animations, and quizzes for learning assessment, even if each of these elements is created with different software. The main features to consider when choosing a learning management system are content management, assessment and reporting tools, customization options, course delivery, administration, and security. The tools for building a Web-based course with pages containing text, images, videos, and Flash animations are now accessible to any radiologist. Open-source learning management systems and content authoring software are available at no cost. The authors developed e-MRI.com, a free Web-based e-learning course with interactive animations and simulations, self-tests, and clinical cases to demonstrate the potential of the latest advances in e-learning and pedagogy applied to magnetic resonance imaging physics.

  9. Acetabular fractures: what radiologists should know and how 3D CT can aid classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeld, Meir H; Dym, Akiva A; Spektor, Michael; Avery, Laura L; Dym, R Joshua; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2015-01-01

    Correct recognition, description, and classification of acetabular fractures is essential for efficient patient triage and treatment. Acetabular fractures may result from high-energy trauma or low-energy trauma in the elderly. The most widely used acetabular fracture classification system among radiologists and orthopedic surgeons is the system of Judet and Letournel, which includes five elementary (or elemental) and five associated fractures. The elementary fractures are anterior wall, posterior wall, anterior column, posterior column, and transverse. The associated fractures are all combinations or partial combinations of the elementary fractures and include transverse with posterior wall, T-shaped, associated both column, anterior column or wall with posterior hemitransverse, and posterior column with posterior wall. The most unique fracture is the associated both column fracture, which completely dissociates the acetabular articular surface from the sciatic buttress. Accurate categorization of acetabular fractures is challenging because of the complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the pelvis, the rarity of certain acetabular fracture variants, and confusing nomenclature. Comparing a 3D image of the fractured acetabulum with a standard diagram containing the 10 Judet and Letournel categories of acetabular fracture and using a flowchart algorithm are effective ways of arriving at the correct fracture classification. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  10. Inter-observer variability between radiologists reporting on cerebellopontine angle tumours on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, S R; Ranguis, S; Fagan, P

    2017-01-01

    Studies demonstrate the significance of intra- and inter-observer variability when measuring cerebellopontine angle tumours on magnetic resonance imaging, with measured differences as high as 2 mm. To determine intra- and inter-observer measurement variability of cerebellopontine angle tumours in a specialised institution. The magnetic resonance imaging maximal diameter of 12 randomly selected cerebellopontine angle tumours were independently measured by 4 neuroradiologists at a tertiary referral centre using a standard definition for maximal tumour diameter. Average deviation and intraclass correlation were subsequently calculated. Inter-observer difference averaged 0.33 ± 0.04 mm (range, 0.0-0.8 mm). Intra-observer measurements were more consistent than inter-observer measurements, with differences averaging 0.17 mm (95 per cent confidence interval = 0.27-0.06, p = 0.002). Inter-observer reliability was 0.99 (95 per cent confidence interval = 0.97-0.99), suggesting high reliability between the readings. The use of a standard definition for maximal tumour volume provided high reliability amongst radiologists' readings. To avoid oversizing tumours, it is recommended that conservative monitoring be conducted by the same institution with thin slice magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  11. Low reproducibility between oral radiologists and general dentists with regards to radiographic diagnosis of caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Pakkala, Tuomas; Haukka, Jari; Siukosaari, Päivi

    2018-04-12

    Early clinical and radiological diagnosis of dental caries is one of the fundamental objectives of clinical dentistry because of the high frequency of the disease and severe complications if caries remains untreated, especially among the elderly and patients with immunodeficiency. Dental panoramic tomography (DPT) is a common radiographic method for evaluating dentition when indicated, especially in an adult population. The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of diagnosis between specialists in oral radiology and general dentists with regards to caries lesions based on DPTs of adults. One-hundred DPTs taken from adult patients (average age 35) and then analyzed and reported on by 42 general dentists were then analyzed independently by two specialists in oral radiology with respect to caries lesions in the premolar and molar areas using radiographic criteria established for caries diagnosis. The general dentists versus oral radiologists were not calibrated before. Level of agreement between specialists and general dentists was measured using Cohen's kappa. Comparison between observations of general dentists and specialists in oral radiology showed that 61% of the caries lesions on proximal surfaces of premolars and molars observed by specialists went unobserved by general dentists. Cohen's kappa value for specialists was 0.85 (p < .001) and for each specialist and general dentists 0.48 (p < .001) and 0.44 (p < .001). The reproducibility between specialists in oral radiology and general dentists for detecting caries in DPTs was low.

  12. Why Vascular Surgeons and Interventional Radiologists Collaborate or Compete: A Look at Endovascular Stent Placements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Eric J.; Collins, Jeremy D.; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Chrisman, Howard B.; Milad, Magdy P.; Vogelzang, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo understand how cultural differences between vascular surgeons (VSs) and interventional radiologists (IRs) affect their clinical decision making and inter-specialty relationships.MethodsTwenty-four conversational interviews were conducted with IRs and VSs about their approaches to patient care, views of their specialty and others, and solutions to any expressed concerns. Interview transcripts were systematically analyzed to identify and compare key themes according to the constructivist grounded theory and content analysis using NVivo 10 software. These data were supplemented with a retrospective analysis of 3658 endovascular stent placements performed at a large medical academic center over 11 years. Aggregate counts were divided by provider specialty, and trends were assessed via correlation coefficients.ResultsEndovascular stent placements were relatively equally divided between IR and VS over 11 years with some variability from placements by cardiology. IRs tend to lay claim to treatments as masters of procedures, whereas VSs base their claims on being masters of the treated diseases, leading to collaboration in some practices and bitter competition in others. The level of perceived competition was most associated with specialists’ awareness of and appreciation for specialty-specific values rather than differences in practice structure/reimbursement.ConclusionsUnderstanding cultural differences between IRs and VSs is imperative for fostering better collaboration to grow shared territory rather than competing for the same slice of the pie.

  13. Radiofrequency ablation in primary non-small cell lung cancer: What a radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Shivank; Pereira, Keith; Mohan, Prasoon; Narayanan, Govindarajan; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In advanced cases of lung cancer, a multimodality approach is often applied, however with poor local control rates. In early non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery is the standard of care. Only 15-30% of patients are eligible for surgical resection. Improvements in imaging and treatment delivery systems have provided new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has evolved as the next best option. The role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is also growing. Currently, it is a third-line option in stage 1 NSCLC, when SBRT cannot be performed. More recent studies have demonstrated usefulness in recurrent tumors and some authors have also suggested combination of RFA with other modalities in larger tumors. Following the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT) has demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in high-risk populations. Hence, even considering the current role of RFA as a third-line option, in view of increasing numbers of occurrences detected, the number of potential RFA candidates may see a steep uptrend. In view of all this, it is imperative that interventional radiologists be familiar with the techniques of lung ablation. The aim of this article is to discuss the procedural technique of RFA in the lung and review the current evidence regarding RFA for NSCLC

  14. Changes in frequency of recall recommendations of examinations depicting cancer with the availability of either priors or digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Christiane M.; Bandos, Andriy I.; Ganott, Marie A.; Catullo, Victor J.; Chough, Denise M.; Kelly, Amy E.; Shinde, Dilip D.; Sumkin, Jules H.; Wallace, Luisa P.; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Gur, David

    2016-03-01

    Performance changes in a binary environment when using additional information is affected only when changes in recommendations are made due to the additional information in question. In a recent study, we have shown that, contrary to general expectation, introducing prior examinations improved recall rates, but not sensitivity. In this study, we assessed cancer detection differences when prior examinations and/or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) were made available to the radiologist. We identified a subset of 21 cancer cases with differences in the number of radiologists who recalled these cases after reviewing either a prior examination or DBT. For the cases with differences in recommendations after viewing either priors or DBT, separately, we evaluated the total number of readers that changed their recommendations, regardless of the specific radiologist in question. Confidence intervals for the number of readers and a test for the hypothesis of no difference was performed using the non-parameteric bootstrap approach addressing both case and reader-related sources of variability by resampling cases and readers. With the addition of priors, there were 14 cancer cases (out of 15) where the number of "recalling radiologists" decreased. With the addition of DBT, the number of "recalling radiologists" decreased in only five cases (out of 15) while increasing in the remaining 9 cases. Unlike most new approaches to breast imaging DBT seems to improve both recall rates and cancer detection rates. Changes in recommendations were noted by all radiologists for all cancers by type, size, and breast density.

  15. Dimensional analysis made simple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    An inductive strategy is proposed for teaching dimensional analysis to second- or third-year students of physics, chemistry, or engineering. In this strategy, Buckingham's theorem is seen as a consequence and not as the starting point. In order to concentrate on the basics, the mathematics is kept as elementary as possible. Simple examples are suggested for classroom demonstrations of the power of the technique and others are put forward for homework or experimentation, but instructors are encouraged to produce examples of their own. (paper)

  16. Applied mathematics made simple

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Applied Mathematics: Made Simple provides an elementary study of the three main branches of classical applied mathematics: statics, hydrostatics, and dynamics. The book begins with discussion of the concepts of mechanics, parallel forces and rigid bodies, kinematics, motion with uniform acceleration in a straight line, and Newton's law of motion. Separate chapters cover vector algebra and coplanar motion, relative motion, projectiles, friction, and rigid bodies in equilibrium under the action of coplanar forces. The final chapters deal with machines and hydrostatics. The standard and conte

  17. Data processing made simple

    CERN Document Server

    Wooldridge, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Data Processing: Made Simple, Second Edition presents discussions of a number of trends and developments in the world of commercial data processing. The book covers the rapid growth of micro- and mini-computers for both home and office use; word processing and the 'automated office'; the advent of distributed data processing; and the continued growth of database-oriented systems. The text also discusses modern digital computers; fundamental computer concepts; information and data processing requirements of commercial organizations; and the historical perspective of the computer industry. The

  18. ASP made simple

    CERN Document Server

    Deane, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    ASP Made Simple provides a brief introduction to ASP for the person who favours self teaching and/or does not have expensive computing facilities to learn on. The book will demonstrate how the principles of ASP can be learned with an ordinary PC running Personal Web Server, MS Access and a general text editor like Notepad.After working through the material readers should be able to:* Write ASP scripts that can display changing information on a web browser* Request records from a remote database or add records to it* Check user names & passwords and take this knowledge forward, either for their

  19. Theory of simple liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Jean-Pierre

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of the theory of ""simple"" liquids. The new second edition has been rearranged and considerably expanded to give a balanced account both of basic theory and of the advances of the past decade. It presents the main ideas of modern liquid state theory in a way that is both pedagogical and self-contained. The book should be accessible to graduate students and research workers, both experimentalists and theorists, who have a good background in elementary mechanics.Key Features* Compares theoretical deductions with experimental r

  20. Potential clinical impact of advanced imaging and computer-aided diagnosis in chest radiology: importance of radiologist's role and successful observer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng

    2015-07-01

    This review paper is based on our research experience in the past 30 years. The importance of radiologists' role is discussed in the development or evaluation of new medical images and of computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes in chest radiology. The four main topics include (1) introducing what diseases can be included in a research database for different imaging techniques or CAD systems and what imaging database can be built by radiologists, (2) understanding how radiologists' subjective judgment can be combined with technical objective features to improve CAD performance, (3) sharing our experience in the design of successful observer performance studies, and (4) finally, discussing whether the new images and CAD systems can improve radiologists' diagnostic ability in chest radiology. In conclusion, advanced imaging techniques and detection/classification of CAD systems have a potential clinical impact on improvement of radiologists' diagnostic ability, for both the detection and the differential diagnosis of various lung diseases, in chest radiology.

  1. Nondestructive examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mletzko, U.

    1980-01-01

    Visual examination is treated as a method for the control of size and shape of components, surface quality and weld performance. Dye penetrant, magnetic particle and eddy current examinations are treated as methods for the evaluation of surface defects and material properties. The limitations to certain materials, defect sizes and types are shown. (orig./RW)

  2. Probabilistic simple sticker systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2017-04-01

    A model for DNA computing using the recombination behavior of DNA molecules, known as a sticker system, was introduced by by L. Kari, G. Paun, G. Rozenberg, A. Salomaa, and S. Yu in the paper entitled DNA computing, sticker systems and universality from the journal of Acta Informatica vol. 35, pp. 401-420 in the year 1998. A sticker system uses the Watson-Crick complementary feature of DNA molecules: starting from the incomplete double stranded sequences, and iteratively using sticking operations until a complete double stranded sequence is obtained. It is known that sticker systems with finite sets of axioms and sticker rules generate only regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered to increase the computational power of sticker systems. Recently, a variant of restricted sticker systems, called probabilistic sticker systems, has been introduced [4]. In this variant, the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probability of a generated string is computed by multiplying the probabilities of all occurrences of the initial strings in the computation of the string. Strings for the language are selected according to some probabilistic requirements. In this paper, we study fundamental properties of probabilistic simple sticker systems. We prove that the probabilistic enhancement increases the computational power of simple sticker systems.

  3. Simple stochastic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilstra, Maria J; Martin, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    Stochastic simulations may be used to describe changes with time of a reaction system in a way that explicitly accounts for the fact that molecules show a significant degree of randomness in their dynamic behavior. The stochastic approach is almost invariably used when small numbers of molecules or molecular assemblies are involved because this randomness leads to significant deviations from the predictions of the conventional deterministic (or continuous) approach to the simulation of biochemical kinetics. Advances in computational methods over the three decades that have elapsed since the publication of Daniel Gillespie's seminal paper in 1977 (J. Phys. Chem. 81, 2340-2361) have allowed researchers to produce highly sophisticated models of complex biological systems. However, these models are frequently highly specific for the particular application and their description often involves mathematical treatments inaccessible to the nonspecialist. For anyone completely new to the field to apply such techniques in their own work might seem at first sight to be a rather intimidating prospect. However, the fundamental principles underlying the approach are in essence rather simple, and the aim of this article is to provide an entry point to the field for a newcomer. It focuses mainly on these general principles, both kinetic and computational, which tend to be not particularly well covered in specialist literature, and shows that interesting information may even be obtained using very simple operations in a conventional spreadsheet.

  4. Radiology clinical synopsis: a simple solution for obtaining an adequate clinical history for the accurate reporting of imaging studies on patients in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Mervyn D.; Alam, Khurshaid

    2005-01-01

    Lack of clinical history on radiology requisitions is a universal problem. We describe a simple Web-based system that readily provides radiology-relevant clinical history to the radiologist reading radiographs of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Along with the relevant history, which includes primary and secondary diagnoses, disease progression and complications, the system provides the patient's name, record number and hospital location. This information is immediately available to reporting radiologists. New clinical information is immediately entered on-line by the radiologists as they are reviewing images. After patient discharge, the data are stored and immediately available if the patient is readmitted. The system has been in routine clinical use in our hospital for nearly 2 years. (orig.)

  5. Beyond Simple Headquarters Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellestrand, Henrik; Kappen, Philip; Nell, Phillip Christopher

    We investigate “dual headquarters involvement”, i.e. corporate and divisional headquarters’ simultaneous involvement in subsidiaries’ innovation development projects. Analyses draw on 85 innovation projects in 23 multibusiness firms and reveal that cross-divisional innovation importance, i.......e., an innovation that is important for the firm beyond the divisional boundaries, drives dual headquarters involvement in innovation development. Contrary to expectations, on average, a non-significant effect of cross-divisional embeddedness on dual headquarters involvement is found. Yet, both cross......-divisional importance and embeddedness effects are contingent on the overall complexity of the innovation project as signified by the size of the development network. The results lend support for the notion that parenting in complex structures entails complex headquarters structures and that we need to go beyond simple...

  6. Simple relation algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Givant, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This monograph details several different methods for constructing simple relation algebras, many of which are new with this book. By drawing these seemingly different methods together, all are shown to be aspects of one general approach, for which several applications are given. These tools for constructing and analyzing relation algebras are of particular interest to mathematicians working in logic, algebraic logic, or universal algebra, but will also appeal to philosophers and theoretical computer scientists working in fields that use mathematics. The book is written with a broad audience in mind and features a careful, pedagogical approach; an appendix contains the requisite background material in relation algebras. Over 400 exercises provide ample opportunities to engage with the material, making this a monograph equally appropriate for use in a special topics course or for independent study. Readers interested in pursuing an extended background study of relation algebras will find a comprehensive treatme...

  7. A Simple Harmonic Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Peter W.; /Stanford U., ITP; Horn, Bart; Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC; Rajendran, Surjeet; /Johns Hopkins U. /Stanford U., ITP; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We explore simple but novel bouncing solutions of general relativity that avoid singularities. These solutions require curvature k = +1, and are supported by a negative cosmological term and matter with -1 < w < -1 = 3. In the case of moderate bounces (where the ratio of the maximal scale factor a{sub +} to the minimal scale factor a{sub -} is {Omicron}(1)), the solutions are shown to be classically stable and cycle through an infinite set of bounces. For more extreme cases with large a{sub +} = a{sub -}, the solutions can still oscillate many times before classical instabilities take them out of the regime of validity of our approximations. In this regime, quantum particle production also leads eventually to a departure from the realm of validity of semiclassical general relativity, likely yielding a singular crunch. We briefly discuss possible applications of these models to realistic cosmology.

  8. SIMPLE for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Azmi; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Siti Madiha Muhammad Amir; Glam Hadzir Patai Mohamad; Saidi Rajab

    2004-01-01

    The first thing industrial radiographers have to do before commencing radiography works is to determine manually the amount of correct exposure that the film need to be exposed in order to obtain the right density. The amount of exposure depends on many variables such as type of radioisotope, type of film, nature of test-object and its orientation, and specific arrangement related to object location and configuration. In many cases radiography works are rejected because of radiographs fail to meet certain reference criteria as defined in the applicable standard. One of the main reasons of radiograph rejection is due to inadequate exposure received by the films. SIMPLE is a software specially developed to facilitate the calculation of gamma-radiography exposure. By using this software and knowing radiographic parameters to be encountered during the work, it is expected that human error will be minimized, thus enhancing the quality and productivity of NDT jobs. (Author)

  9. Molecular genetics made simple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Sh. Kassem

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetics have undoubtedly become an integral part of biomedical science and clinical practice, with important implications in deciphering disease pathogenesis and progression, identifying diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as designing better targeted treatments. The exponential growth of our understanding of different genetic concepts is paralleled by a growing list of genetic terminology that can easily intimidate the unfamiliar reader. Rendering genetics incomprehensible to the clinician however, defeats the very essence of genetic research: its utilization for combating disease and improving quality of life. Herein we attempt to correct this notion by presenting the basic genetic concepts along with their usefulness in the cardiology clinic. Bringing genetics closer to the clinician will enable its harmonious incorporation into clinical care, thus not only restoring our perception of its simple and elegant nature, but importantly ensuring the maximal benefit for our patients.

  10. Molecular genetics made simple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Heba Sh.; Girolami, Francesca; Sanoudou, Despina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Genetics have undoubtedly become an integral part of biomedical science and clinical practice, with important implications in deciphering disease pathogenesis and progression, identifying diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as designing better targeted treatments. The exponential growth of our understanding of different genetic concepts is paralleled by a growing list of genetic terminology that can easily intimidate the unfamiliar reader. Rendering genetics incomprehensible to the clinician however, defeats the very essence of genetic research: its utilization for combating disease and improving quality of life. Herein we attempt to correct this notion by presenting the basic genetic concepts along with their usefulness in the cardiology clinic. Bringing genetics closer to the clinician will enable its harmonious incorporation into clinical care, thus not only restoring our perception of its simple and elegant nature, but importantly ensuring the maximal benefit for our patients. PMID:25610837

  11. SIMPLE LIFE AND RELIGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIRIM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals in terms of the economy in which we live is one of the most important phenomenon of the century. This phenomenon present itself as the only determinant of people's lives by entering almost makes itself felt. The mo st obvious objective needs of the economy by triggering motive is to induce people to consume . Consumer culture pervades all aspects of the situation are people . Therefore, these people have the blessing of culture , beauty and value all in the name of w hatever is consumed. This is way out of the siege of moral and religious values we have is to go back again . Referred by local cultural and religious values, based on today increasingly come to the fore and the Muslim way of life appears to be close to th e plain / lean preferred by many people life has been a way of life. Even the simple life , a way of life in the Western world , a conception of life , a philosophy, a movement as it has become widely accepted. Here in determining the Muslim way of life Pr ophet. Prophet (sa lived the kind of life a very important model, sample, and determining which direction is known. Religious values, which is the carrier of the prophets, sent to the society they have always been examples and models. Because every aspect of human life, his life style and the surrounding area has a feature. We also value his life that he has unknowingly and without learning and skills and to understand it is not possible to live our religion . We also our presentation, we mainly of Islam o utlook on life and predicted life - style, including the Prophet of Islam 's (sa simple life to scrutinize and lifestyle issues related to reveal , in short Islam's how life has embraced and the Prophet. Prophet's will try to find answers to questions reg arding how to live.

  12. Prospective evaluation of the radiologist's hand dose in CT-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogits, B.; Jungnickel, K.; Loewenthal, D.; Dudeck, O.; Pech, M.; Ricke, J.; Kropf, S.; Nekolla, E.A.; Wieners, G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Assessment of radiologist's hand dose in CT-guided interventions and determination of influencing factors. Materials and Methods: The following CT-guided interventions were included: Core biopsy, drainage, periradicular therapy, and celiac plexus neurolysis. The hand dose was measured with an immediately readable dosimeter, the EDD-30 (Unfors, Sweden). The default parameters for CT fluoroscopy were 120 kV, 90 mA and a 4 mm slice thickness. All interventions were performed on a 16-slice CT unit (Aquilion 16 Toshiba, Japan). The tumor size, degree of difficulty (1 - 3), level of experience and device parameters (mAs, dose-length product, scan time) were documented. Results: 138 CT-guided interventions (biopsy n = 99, drainage n = 23, pain therapy n = 16) at different locations (lung n = 41, retroperitoneum n = 53, liver n = 25, spine n = 19) were included. The lesion size was 4 - 240 mm (median: 23 mm). The fluoroscopy time per intervention was 4.6 - 140.2 s (median: 24.2 s). The measured hand dose ranged from 0.001 - 3.02 mSv (median: 0.22 mSv). The median hand dose for lung puncture (n = 41) was slightly higher (median: 0.32 mSv, p = 0.01) compared to that for the liver, retroperitoneum and other. Besides physical influencing factors, the degree of difficulty (p = 0.001) and summed puncture depth (p = 0.004) correlated significantly with the hand dose. Conclusion: The median hand dose for different CT-guided interventions was 0.22 mSv. Therefore, the annual hand dose limit would normally only be reached with about 2000 interventions. (orig.)

  13. An assessment of incentive versus survey length trade-offs in a Web survey of radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y; Niederhauser, Blake D; Kallmes, David; Beebe, Timothy J

    2013-03-20

    It is generally understood that shorter Web surveys and use of incentives result in higher response rates in Web surveys directed to health care providers. Less is known about potential respondent preference for reduced burden as compared to increased reward. To help elicit preference for minimized burden compared to reward for completion of a survey, we observed physician preferences for shorter Web surveys compared to incentives as well as incentive preference (small guaranteed incentive compared to larger lottery incentive) accompanying an electronic request to complete a survey. This was an observational study that accompanied a large Web survey study of radiology staff, fellows, and residents at select academic medical centers in the United States. With the request to complete the survey, potential respondents were offered three options: (1) a 10-minute Web survey with the chance to win an iPad, (2) a 10-minute Web survey with a guaranteed nominal incentive ($5 amazon.com gift card), or (3) a shorter (5-7 minute) Web survey with no incentive. A total of 254 individuals responded to the Web survey request. Overwhelmingly, individuals chose a longer survey accompanied by an incentive compared to a shorter survey with no incentive (85% compared to 15%, P<.001). Of those opting for an incentive, a small, but not significant majority chose the chance to win an iPad over a guaranteed $5 gift card (56% compared to 44%). When given the choice, radiologists preferred a reward (either guaranteed or based on a lottery) to a less burdensome survey, indicating that researchers should focus more attention at increasing perceived benefits of completing a Web survey compared to decreasing perceived burden.

  14. Talar Fractures and Dislocations: A Radiologist's Guide to Timely Diagnosis and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenevsky, Yulia; Mackey, Robert A; Abrahams, R Brad; Thomson, Norman B

    2015-01-01

    The talus, the second largest tarsal bone, has distinctive imaging characteristics and injury patterns. The predominantly extraosseous vascular supply of the talus predisposes it to significant injury in the setting of trauma. In addition, the lack of muscular attachments and absence of a secondary blood supply can lead to subsequent osteonecrosis. Although talar fractures account for less than 1% of all fractures, they commonly result from high-energy trauma and may lead to complications and long-term morbidity if not recognized and managed appropriately. While initial evaluation is with foot and ankle radiographs, computed tomography (CT) is often performed to evaluate the extent of the fracture, displacement, comminution, intra-articular extension, and associated injuries. Talar fractures are divided by anatomic region: head, neck, and body. Talar head fractures can be treated conservatively if nondisplaced, warranting careful radiographic and CT evaluation to assess rotation, displacement, and extension into the neck. The modified Hawkins-Canale classification of talar neck fractures is most commonly used due to its simplicity, usefulness in guiding treatment, and prognostic value, as it correlates associated malalignment with risk of subsequent osteonecrosis. Isolated talar body fractures may be more common than previously thought. The Sneppen classification further divides talar body fractures into osteochondral talar dome, lateral and posterior process, and shear and crush comminuted central body fractures. Crush comminuted central body fractures carry a poor prognosis due to nonanatomic reduction, bone loss, and subsequent osteonecrosis. Lateral process fractures can be radiographically occult and require a higher index of suspicion for successful diagnosis. Subtalar dislocations are often accompanied by fractures, necessitating postreduction CT. Familiarity with the unique talar anatomy and injury patterns is essential for radiologists to facilitate

  15. Diagnostic abilities of three CAD methods for assessing microcalcifications in mammograms and an aspect of equivocal cases decisions by radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, W.T.; Nguyen, H.T.; Thornton, B.S.; Rickard, M.T.; Blinowska, A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiologists use an 'Overall impression' rating to assess a suspicious region on a mammogram. The value ranges from 1 to 5. They will definitely send a patient for biopsy if the rating is 4 or 5. They will send the patient for core biopsy when a rating of 3 (indeterminate) is given. We have developed three methods to aid diagnosis of cases with microcalcifications. The first two methods, namely, Bayesian and multiple logistic regression (with a special 'cutting score' technique), utilise six parameter ratings which minimise subjectivity in characterising the microcalcifications. The third method uses three parameters (age of patient, uniformity of size of microcalcification and their distribution) in a multiple stepwise regression. For both training set and test set, all three methods are as good as the two radiologists in terms of percentages of correct classification. Therefore, all three proposed methods potentially can be used as second readers. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  16. Incomplete fissures in severe emphysematous patients evaluated with MDCT: Incidence and interobserver agreement among radiologists and pneumologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstr. 5,69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto - University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Campus Universitario Monte Alegre, 14048 900 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Puderbach, Michael [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstr. 5,69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Gompelmann, Daniela; Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix [Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstr. 5,69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus Peter [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstr. 5,69126 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objective: Pulmonary fissures completeness predicts efficacy in endobronchial valves (EBV) implantation, a new lobar volume reduction therapy for severe emphysematous patients. We assessed the incidence of incomplete fissures and the interobserver agreement in its evaluation with MDCT, in severe emphysematous patients prior to EBV implantation. Materials and Methods: Volumetric thin-section CT scans of 35 patients (CODP GOLD 3/4, heterogeneous emphysema) were retrospectively reviewed by 2 pneumologists, 1 general and 2 experienced chest radiologists, independently and blinded for treatment outcome, and the pulmonary fissures were classified as either complete or incomplete. Interobserver agreement was assessed with Kappa index (KI). Results: Agreement between all readers for the left oblique, right oblique and horizontal fissure was, respectively, moderate (KI = 0.53), fair (KI = 0.37) and moderate (KI = 0.42). Highest agreement (99/105 fissures) was observed among experienced radiologists, being for left oblique, right oblique and horizontal, respectively, almost perfect (KI = 0.79), perfect (KI = 1.0) and moderate (KI = 0.52). These 2 reviewers found that all of 35 patients had at least one incomplete fissure, with a proportion of incomplete fissures assigned as 74/65%, 85/85% and 91/88%, respectively for the left oblique, right oblique and horizontal fissures. Conclusions: Pneumologists and radiologists agreed fairly to moderately in fissures analysis, while the experienced chest radiologists reached the highest clinically adequate agreement of 94%. We believe that clinical routine visual analysis of the fissures integrity can be done with a good degree of confidence in MDCT images, and experienced readers might be required. Also, a higher than expected incidence of incomplete fissures was described in our studied population.

  17. The exposure of radiologists and patients to radiation during coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karppinen, J.; Parviainen, T.

    1993-03-01

    The exposure of radiologists and patients to radiation during coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in Finland was studied using phantom measurements. Additional tests were made concerning the performance of TV fluoroscopy systems, cine fluorographic units and film processing. These tests include sensitometric quality control of film processing, automatic exposure control in fluoroscopy and cinefluorography, and contrast and resolution in a cine frame and TV image

  18. Effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubizarreta Alberdi, Raquel [Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Edificio Administrativo da Conselleria de Sanidade, Servicio de Programas Poboacionais de Cribado, Direccion Xeral de Saude Publica e Planificacion, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Llanes, Ana B.F.; Ortega, Raquel Almazan [Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Exposito, Ruben Roman; Collado, Jose M.V.; Oliveres, Xavier Castells [Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Parc de Salut Mar. CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Queiro Verdes, Teresa [Galician Agency for Health Technology Assessment, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Natal Ramos, Carmen [Principality of Asturias Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Principality of Asturias (Spain); Sanz, Maria Ederra [Public Health Institute, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Salas Trejo, Dolores [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    To evaluate the effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in population-based breast cancer screening programmes. We evaluated 1,440,384 single-read screening mammograms, corresponding to 471,112 women aged 45-69 years participating in four Spanish programmes between 1990 and 2006. The mammograms were interpreted by 72 radiologists. The overall percentage of false-positive results was 5.85% and that for false-positives resulting in an invasive procedure was 0.38%. Both the risk of false-positives overall and of false-positives leading to an invasive procedure significantly decreased (p < 0.001) with greater reading volume in the previous year: OR 0.77 and OR 0.78, respectively, for a reading volume 500-1,999 mammograms and OR 0.59 and OR 0.60 for a reading volume of >14,999 mammograms with respect to the reference category (<500). The risk of both categories of false-positives was also significantly reduced (p < 0.001) as radiologists' years of experience increased: OR 0.96 and OR 0.84, respectively, for 1 year's experience and OR 0.72 and OR 0.73, respectively, for more than 4 years' experience with regard to the category of <1 year's experience. Radiologist experience is a determining factor in the risk of a false-positive result in breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  19. Incomplete fissures in severe emphysematous patients evaluated with MDCT: Incidence and interobserver agreement among radiologists and pneumologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Puderbach, Michael; Gompelmann, Daniela; Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Heussel, Claus Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary fissures completeness predicts efficacy in endobronchial valves (EBV) implantation, a new lobar volume reduction therapy for severe emphysematous patients. We assessed the incidence of incomplete fissures and the interobserver agreement in its evaluation with MDCT, in severe emphysematous patients prior to EBV implantation. Materials and Methods: Volumetric thin-section CT scans of 35 patients (CODP GOLD 3/4, heterogeneous emphysema) were retrospectively reviewed by 2 pneumologists, 1 general and 2 experienced chest radiologists, independently and blinded for treatment outcome, and the pulmonary fissures were classified as either complete or incomplete. Interobserver agreement was assessed with Kappa index (KI). Results: Agreement between all readers for the left oblique, right oblique and horizontal fissure was, respectively, moderate (KI = 0.53), fair (KI = 0.37) and moderate (KI = 0.42). Highest agreement (99/105 fissures) was observed among experienced radiologists, being for left oblique, right oblique and horizontal, respectively, almost perfect (KI = 0.79), perfect (KI = 1.0) and moderate (KI = 0.52). These 2 reviewers found that all of 35 patients had at least one incomplete fissure, with a proportion of incomplete fissures assigned as 74/65%, 85/85% and 91/88%, respectively for the left oblique, right oblique and horizontal fissures. Conclusions: Pneumologists and radiologists agreed fairly to moderately in fissures analysis, while the experienced chest radiologists reached the highest clinically adequate agreement of 94%. We believe that clinical routine visual analysis of the fissures integrity can be done with a good degree of confidence in MDCT images, and experienced readers might be required. Also, a higher than expected incidence of incomplete fissures was described in our studied population.

  20. Radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  1. Simple model of the arms race

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zane, L.I.

    1982-01-01

    A simple model of a two-party arms race is developed based on the principle that the race will continue so long as either side can unleash an effective first strike against the other side. The model is used to examine how secrecy, the ABM, MIRV-ing, and an MX system affect the arms race

  2. Radiologic examination of orthopaedics. Methods and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafner, E.; Meuli, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    This volume describes in detail radiological examinations of the skeleton modern procedures in orthopaedic surgery. Special emphasis is given to functional examination techniques based upon the authors' extensive work on standardized radiological examinations best suited to the needs of orthopaedic surgeons. These techniques were developed at the Ra