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Sample records for radiologically guided technique

  1. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste

  2. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, S.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilcox, D.P. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  3. Radiological design guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design

  4. Dental Radiology I Student Guide [and Instructor Guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox Valley Technical Coll., Appleton, WI.

    The dental radiology student and instructor guides provide instruction in the following units: (1) x-ray physics; (2) x-ray production; (3) radiation health and safety; (4) radiographic anatomy and pathology; (5) darkroom setup and chemistry; (6) bisecting angle technique; (7) paralleling technique; (8) full mouth survey technique--composition and…

  5. Radiological control implementation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamley, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program

  6. Interventional neuroradiology techniques in interventional radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Kieran; Robertson, Fergus; Watkinson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This book provides accessible technique-specific information on interventional radiology procedures, in a format suitable for reference in the IR treatment room or as a carry-around guide. Offers step-by-step points, key point summaries and illustrations.

  7. Radiologic Analysis and Clinical Study of the Upper One-third Joint Technique for Fluoroscopically Guided Sacroiliac Joint Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junghyun; Park, Hue Jung; Moon, Dong Eon; Sa, Gye Jeol; Kim, Young Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Sacroiliac intraarticular injection by the traditional technique can be challenging to perform when the joint is covered with osteophytes or is extremely narrow. To examine whether there is enough space for the needle to be advanced from the L5-S1 interspinous space to the upper one-third sacroiliac joint (SIJ) by magnetic resonance image (MRI) analysis as an alternative to fluoroscopically guided SIJ injection with the lower one-third joint technique, and to determine the feasibility of this novel technique in clinical practice. MRI analysis and observational study. An interventional pain management practice at a university hospital. We analyzed 200 axial T2-weighted MRIs between the L5 and S1 vertebrae of 100 consecutive patients. The following measurements were obtained on both sides: 1) the thickness of fat in the midline; 2) the distance between the midline (Point C) and the junction (Point A) of the skin and the imaginary line that connects the SIJ and the most medial cortex of the ilium; 3) the distance between the midline (Point C) and the junction (Point B) of the skin and the imaginary line that connects the SIJ and the L5 spinous process; 4) the distance between the SIJ and midline (Point C) on the skin, or between the SIJ and the midpoint (Point C') of the line from Point A to Point B; and 5) the angle between the sagittal line and the imaginary line that connects the SIJ and the midline on the skin. The upper one-third joint technique was performed to establish the feasibility of the alternative technique in 20 patients who had unsuccessful sacroiliac intraarticular injections using the lower one-third joint technique. The mean distances from the midline to Point A and to Point B were 21.9 ± 13.7 mm and 27.8 ± 13.6 mm, respectively. The mean distance between the SIJ and Point C (or Point C') was 81.0 ± 13.3 mm. The angle between the sagittal line and the imaginary line that connects the SIJ and the midline on the skin was 42.8 ± 5.1°. The success

  8. Microdialysis technique and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Xiao; Xiao Xiangsheng

    2007-01-01

    Basic research in interventional radiology, including transcatheter artery perfusion especially, is progressing slowly due to lack of proper method. Microdialysis technique, a kind of accurate sampling technique in vivo, may help to solve the problem. Just as its name implies, microdialysis means tiny dialysis with advantages of authenticity, exactness and less error. Furthermore it has been applied widely and should be received with great attention and popularity. (authors)

  9. Techniques and indications in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.

    1987-01-01

    The stated purpose of this book is to review modern radiologic diagnostic techniques as applied to the study of the kidney and urinary tract, and their pertinent indications. This goal is partially accomplished in the first two segments of the book, which consist of about 100 pages. These include a synoptic description of various techniques - including classic uroradiologic studies such as excretory urography and retrograde pyelography, plus sonography, computed tomography, angiography, and nuclear medicine. The diagnostic signs and the differential diagnoses are fairly well described, aided by a profusion of tables and diagrams. The overall quality of the reproduction of the illustrations is good

  10. A radiological control implementation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamley, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program. The manual is now in draft form and includes information that will be of use to line managers dealing with improving radiological performance and the practical aspects of radiological controls implementation. The manual is expected to be completed by the fall of 1993 and to be used in conjunction with a performance-based self-assessment training program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  11. Single-centre review of radiologically guided percutaneous nephrostomy using 'mixed' technique: Success and complication rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montvilas, Paulius, E-mail: paulmont@rm.dk [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Solvig, Jan, E-mail: jansolvi@rm.dk [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Bjerklund Johansen, Truls Erik, E-mail: tebj@skejby.rm.dk [Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: A review of complication and success rates of the 'mixed' technique in percutaneous nephrostomy using both the Seldinger and one-step techniques in dilated and non-dilated systems. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analysed 500 percutaneous nephrostomies in dilated an non-dilated systems in 353 patients from 2006 to 2007 (208 males (range 19-95 years), 127 females (range 27-91 years) and 21 children (range 3 months-16 years: 6 females, 15 males)). Percutaneous nephrostomy was considered successful if catheter was placed in renal pelvis and drained urine spontaneously. Successful percutaneous nephrostomies were classified as primary (renal system drained instantly) or postponed (drainage achieved within 24 h after initial failure). Number of complications was registered. Results: All of the 500 nephrostomies were successful within 24 h (96.2% primary; 3.8% postponed). The success rate of primary nephrostomy in dilated and non-dilated systems was 98.2% and 82%, respectively. Major complications occurred in 0.45% and minor complications in 14.2%. Conclusion: Percutaneous nephrostomy using the 'mixed' technique is very successful in dilated systems, is not superior to other PCN techniques in non-dilated systems and has a very low rate of major complications.

  12. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume is a study guide for training Radiological Control Technicians. Provided herein are support materials for learning radiological documentation, communication systems, counting errors and statistics, dosimetry, contamination control, airborne sampling program methods, respiratory protection, radiological source control, environmental monitoring, access control and work area setup, radiological work coverage, shipment and receipt for radioactive material, radiological incidents and emergencies, personnel decontamination, first aid, radiation survey instrumentation, contamination monitoring, air sampling, and counting room equipment

  13. Radiologic techniques in evaluation endocrine disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, C.R.; Schultz, C.L.; Butler, H.E.; Haaga, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses evaluation of normal and diseased endocrine organs that has been facilitated by the development of new radiologic-imaging techniques including nuclear medicine, ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. With improvement in resolution and tissue contrast, abnormalities as small as 5 mm can now be imaged with these modalities. Endocrinologists and clinicians involved in the evaluation and diagnosis of patients with endocrine diseases can be substantially aided by a proper radiologic workup. The authors describe and illustrate various radiologic techniques that are useful for evaluating thyroid and parathyroid derangements

  14. CT- and MR-guided interventions in radiology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Wilhelm, Kai E.; Ricke, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Revised and extended second edition that covers a broad range of non-vascular interventions guided by CT or MR imaging. Discusses in detail indications, materials, techniques, and results. Includes a comprehensive section on interventional oncology. Richly illustrated source of information and guidance for all radiologists who deal with non-vascular procedures. Interventional radiology is an indispensable and still expanding area of modern medicine that encompasses numerous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Cross-sectional imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) have emerged as important techniques for non-vascular interventions, including percutaneous biopsy, drainage, ablation, and neurolysis. Various organs, diseases, and lesions can be approached in this way, permitting the treatment and management of tumors, fluid collections, and pain, the embolization of endoleaks, the provision of access to hollow organs, etc. Accordingly, interventional radiology is now an integral component of the interdisciplinary management of numerous disorders. The revised and significantly extended second edition of this volume covers a broad range of non-vascular interventions guided by CT or MR imaging. Indications, materials, techniques, and results are all carefully discussed. A particularly comprehensive section is devoted to interventional oncology as the most rapidly growing branch of interventional radiology. In addition, detailed information is provided that will assist in establishing and developing an interventional service. This richly illustrated book will be a most valuable source of information and guidance for all radiologists who deal with non-vascular procedures.

  15. Radiologic examination of orthopaedics. Methods and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafner, E.; Meuli, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    This volume describes in detail radiological examinations of the skeleton modern procedures in orthopaedic surgery. Special emphasis is given to functional examination techniques based upon the authors' extensive work on standardized radiological examinations best suited to the needs of orthopaedic surgeons. These techniques were developed at the Radiodiagnostic Department of the Central Radiological Clinic, Bern University, in cooperation with the University Clinic of Orthopaedics and Surgery of the Locomotor System. Exposure techniques are explained concisely, yet with extraordinary precision and attention to detail. They have proved highly successful in teaching programs for X-ray technicians and as standard examination techniques for many hospitals, X-ray departments, orthopaedic units, and private clinics. Recommended for orthopaedic surgeons, radiologists, general surgeons, and X-ray technicians, this definitive treatise, with its superb X-ray reproductions and complementary line drawings, explains how to achieve improved diagnoses and standardized control with the least possible radiation exposure to the patient

  16. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Radiological Worker H Training, for the worker whose job assignment involves entry into Radiological Buffer Areas and all types of Radiation Contamination and Airborne Radioactivity Areas. This course is designed to prepare the worker to work safely in and around radiological areas and present methods to use to ensure individual radiation exposure is maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  17. Percutaneous Placement of Central Venous Catheters: Comparing the Anatomical Landmark Method with the Radiologically Guided Technique for Central Venous Catheterization Through the Internal Jugular Vein in Emergent Hemodialysis Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroglu, M.; Demir, M.; Koroglu, B.K.; Sezer, M.T.; Akhan, O.; Yildiz, H.; Yavuz, L.; Baykal, B.; Oyar, O. [Suleyman Demirel Univ., Isparta (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Internal Medicine and Anesthesiology

    2006-02-15

    Purpose: To compare the success and immediate complication rates of the anatomical landmark method (group 1) and the radiologically (combined real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy) guided technique (group 2) in the placement of central venous catheters in emergent hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: The study was performed prospectively in a randomized manner. The success and immediate complication rates of radiologically guided placement of central venous access catheters through the internal jugular vein (n = 40) were compared with those of the anatomical landmark method (n 40). The success of placement, the complications, the number of passes required, and whether a single or double-wall puncture occurred were also noted and compared. Results: The groups were comparable in age and sex. The indication for catheter placement was hemodialysis access in all patients. Catheter placement was successful in all patients in group 2 and unsuccessful in 1 (2.5%) patient in group 1. All catheters functioned adequately and immediately after the placement (0% initial failure rate) in group 2, but 3 catheters (7.5% initial failure rate) were non-functional just after placement in group 1. The total number of needle passes, double venous wall puncture, and complication rate were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusion: Percutaneous central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein can be performed by interventional radiologists with better technical success rates and lower immediate complications. In conclusion, central venous catheterization for emergent dialysis should be performed under both real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.

  18. Techniques of industrial radiology in military explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, L.E.G.

    1985-01-01

    The use of industrial radiology techniques id very important for military explosive fabrication. The cylindrical-ogive bodies made in forged metal have their interior fulfilled with high melted explosive and they must explode when they reach the target. The granades, as these bodies are called, are thrown by cannons and their interior are submitted to high pressures and accelerations which can cause a premature detonation, in most case, in interior of tube, in case of they have defects in explosive mass. The origins of defects, its localization and classification presenting the techniques used and disposable in Brazil are discussed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  19. Congenital diseases and syndromes. An illustrated radiological guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali [Universitaetsklinikum Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Sabah Hospital (Kuwait). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2009-07-01

    Congenital Diseases and Syndromes - An Illustrated Radiological Guide is designed to serve the radiologist as an easy-to-use visual guide that illustrates the typical diagnostic radiological features of the most common congenital diseases and syndromes. The book is organised according to body system, with chapters focusing on the CNS, the head and neck, the chest and heart, the abdomen and pelvis, and the musculoskeletal system. A final chapter is devoted to phakomatosis. Each syndrome or disease is illustrated by multiple images as well as by high-quality digital medical illustrations depicting those radiological signs that are difficult to detect. The reader is thereby familiarised with the various congenital anomalies from the radiological point of view. In addition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and main symptoms are described, and potential differential diagnoses highlighted. This book will be immensely useful for junior radiologists, radiology students, and doctors in any specialty who are interested in congenital malformations and syndromes. (orig.)

  20. Congenital diseases and syndromes. An illustrated radiological guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali; Sabah Hospital; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital Diseases and Syndromes - An Illustrated Radiological Guide is designed to serve the radiologist as an easy-to-use visual guide that illustrates the typical diagnostic radiological features of the most common congenital diseases and syndromes. The book is organised according to body system, with chapters focusing on the CNS, the head and neck, the chest and heart, the abdomen and pelvis, and the musculoskeletal system. A final chapter is devoted to phakomatosis. Each syndrome or disease is illustrated by multiple images as well as by high-quality digital medical illustrations depicting those radiological signs that are difficult to detect. The reader is thereby familiarised with the various congenital anomalies from the radiological point of view. In addition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and main symptoms are described, and potential differential diagnoses highlighted. This book will be immensely useful for junior radiologists, radiology students, and doctors in any specialty who are interested in congenital malformations and syndromes. (orig.)

  1. Guide for environmental radiological surveillance at ERDA installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, J.P.; Denham, D.H.; Michels, D.E.; Olsen, A.R.; Waite, D.A.

    1977-03-01

    This Guide is intended to: Provide recommended methods, procedures, and performance criteria to bring greater comparability to ERDA environmental monitoring and reporting systems; provide ERDA management, particularly the Headquarters' Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance (SSC) and field offices, with a broad review of accepted radiological surveillance practices for use in the evaluation of environmental surveillance programs at ERDA facilities; and delineate the capabilities and limitations of the various environmental monitoring systems for radioactivity currently used at ERDA sites, including technical areas where there is either an inadequate basis for procedural selection or where further developmental work may be warranted. The discussion of equipment, measurement techniques, and quality control procedures, although believed to represent current technology, is subject to continuing change as technological improvements become available

  2. Interventional Radiology Techniques for Provision of Enteral Feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given, M.F.; Hanson, J.J.; Lee, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Gastrostomy placement in patients who are unable to maintain their nutrition orally has been attempted using a variety of techniques over the past century. This includes surgical, endoscopic, and, more recently, percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Surgical gastrostomy placement was the method of choice for almost a century, but has since been superseded by both endoscopic and radiological placement. There are a number of indications for gastrostomy placement in clinical practice today, with fewer contraindications due to the recent innovations in technique placement and gastrostomy catheter type. We describe the technique of gastrostomy placement, which we use in our institution, along with appropriate indications and contraindications. In addition, we will discuss the wide variety of catheter types available and their perceived advantages. There remains some debate with regard to gastropexy performance and the use of primary gastrojejunal catheters, which we will address. In addition, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the three major types of gastrostomy placement currently available (i.e., surgical, endoscopic, and radiological) and their associated complications

  3. Pediatric interventional radiology: Indications, techniques, and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towbin, R.B.; Ball, W.S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This course develops a practical approach to pediatric interventional radiology. Radiologic intervention in the pediatricage group is possible by attending to the care and special needs of the child. The authors also emphasize their approach to patient preparation, sedation and anesthesia, nursing care, monitoring of the patient during the procedure, and follow-up care. The course is divided into nonvascular and vascular sections. The discussion of nonvascular procedures focus on the chest and the GU and GI systems. Biopsy techniques and drainage of effusions and abscesses within the chest are discussed. A variety of GU procedures are presented including insertion of a nephrostomy tube and percutaneous tract dilation for placement of internal stents, percutaneous stone removal, and percutaneous surgery for pyeloplasty. The authors approach to percutaneous pyeloplasty is briefly discussed. Intervention within the GI system includes percutaenous aspiration, drainage, and biopsies. Emphasis is placed on the selection of embolic agents and catheter delivery systems, techniques, and current treatment concepts. The authors describe experience with embolization of vascular malformations, renovascular disease, uncontrollable hemorrhage, and selected neoplastic processes. Comments on the indications for and techniques of transluminal angioplasty and fibrinolytic therapy in children conclude the lecture

  4. General Employee Radiological Training: Study guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this class, the participant will be able to discuss his/her responsibilities for maintaining exposures to radiation and radioactive material As Low As Reasonably Achievable. The participant will be able to select the correct response from a group of responses which verifies his/her ability to: Identify natural background and man-made sources of radiation; state the whole body radiation exposure limit for non-radiological workers; state the potential biological effects from chronic radiation exposure; identify the ALARA concept and practices; state methods used to control radiological material; and state employee responsibilities for the ALARA Program

  5. Internal medicine. An illustrated radiological guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali; Sabah Hospital, Kuwait

    2010-01-01

    This book explains how radiology can be a powerful tool for establishing the diagnosis of many internal medicine diseases that are usually diagnosed on the basis of their laboratory or clinical presentation. It is organized in the classic fashion for internal medicine books, with eleven chapters covering the different internal medicine specialties. Within these chapters, more than 450 diseases are considered, some of which are rarely encountered but are nonetheless significant. For each disease, radiological and clinical features are displayed in images and high-quality digital medical illustrations, and those differential diagnoses are identified that can be ruled out by imaging alone. In addition, the pathophysiology underlying the radiological features is described, enabling the reader to understand why a particular sign is seen on MR images, CT scans, or plain radiographs. The book will serve as an excellent radiological atlas for internal medicine practitioners and family physicians, showing disease presentations that may be hard to find in standard medical textbooks and explaining which imaging modalities are likely to be most informative in particular patients. (orig.)

  6. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  7. Radiologically-guided catheter drainage of intrathoracic abscesses and empyemas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Steiner, W.; Bergman, C.; Anthuber, M.; Dienemann, H.

    1993-01-01

    Radiologically guided percutaneous catheter drainage was used in 38 patients to treat pleural empyemas (35 patients) and pulmonary abscesses (3 patients). Drainage was successful in 85.7% of empyemas including 11 cases with fistulous communications. Three percutaneously drained pulmonary abscesses required subsequent lobectomy. One patient died during the drainage procedure due to sepsis. No major complications related to the drainage procedure were observed. Guided percutaneous drainage proved to be a safe and successful alternative to closed drainage of pleural fluid collections. (orig.)

  8. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  9. Guide for intervention levels in radiological accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Tai; Khang, Byung Oui; Lee, Goan Yup; Han, Gee Yang [Korea Atomic Energy Resesrch Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    Based on IAEA SS109 and ICRP63, intervention levels and action levels are derived using cost-benefit approach method. Intervention levels are optimized so that the net benefit from protective measures will be maximized. Evacuation, sheltering, relocation, permanent resettlement, administration of stable iodine and food restriction are included in protective measures. Intervention levels are calculated using site specific parameters in Korea. As a results of calculation, general intervention levels are similar to IAEA recommendation and action levels for food restriction are a little higher than IAEA recommendation and Japan guide. Guide on intervention levels in Korea is also suggested based on the calculated results.

  10. Standard guide for digital detector array radiology

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This standard is a user guide, which is intended to serve as a tutorial for selection and use of various digital detector array systems nominally composed of the detector array and an imaging system to perform digital radiography. This guide also serves as an in-detail reference for the following standards: Practices E2597, , and E2737. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Emergent radiologically guided drainage of large pericardial effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartz, W.H.; Gatenby, R.A.; Kessler, H.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors drained eight pericardial effusions on an emergency basis because of profound symptoms of pericardial tamponade. The etiology of the pericardial was metastatic disease in all eight cases. US of the subxyphoid region allowed definition of an optimal percutaneous approach. The pericardium was initially punctured with a 22-gauge needle, followed by tract dilation over a wire, which allowed ultimate placement of either an 8.4-F or 10-F nephrostomy catheter. Some 500 - 1,500 ml of bloody fluid drained from the pericardial space within minutes, and a total of 2 - 4 L over the next 4 days. No significant arrhythmias or immediate hypotensive episodes were observed. Six of the patients were successfully treated with sclerosis of the pericardium by injection of tetracyline into the pericardial catheter before it was removed. No recurrent effusions have been observed in any of these patients. Two patients died, one of unsuspected cerebral edema and uncal herniation and one of intractable congestive heart failure. At autopsy, the pericardial catheter was properly positioned with no significant remaining fluid. Echocardiograms were falsely normal in two patients, but CT findings were uniformly diagnostic. Radiologically guided drainage of large pericardial effusions appears to be a safe and effective technique for the treatment of pericardial tamponade from metastatic effusions. This technique is an alternative to the usual surgical intervention and does not require general anesthesia

  12. Radiologic techniques in staging malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strijk, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The main subject of this thesis is the evaluation of radiologic techniques in staging patients with newly diagnosed and untreated malignant lymphoma, or restaging patients with recurrent disease after a period of complete remission. Lymphography and, more recently, CT are available to examine the infradiaphragmatic nodes. CT also offers the possibility to examine other organ systems in the abdomen, and to visualize more lymph-node regions than lymphography. In ch. 2 and 4 the diagnostic performance of CT and lymphography in HD and NHL respectively are discussed. Literature data are summarized, and own results are given. The main goal is to determine whether the two methods are overlapping, competitive or complementary, and to answer the question what would be required for optimal staging. Staging laparotomy showed the unreliability of non-invasive examination methods for determining the presence or absence of lymphoma in the spleen. In ch. 3 and 5 the results of CT-based estimations of size of the spleen in relation to its histologic state, in patients with HD and NHL respectively are presented. The chest can be examined for lymphoma by conventional radiography, conventional tomography or computed tomography (CT). In ch. 6 the literature is reviewed, and the results with our patients are presented. The diagnostic performance of each examination is evaluated, and the results are analysed to define the most desirable approach in the examination of the chest for staging purposes. In ch. 7 the uncommon radiologic observation of calcification in lymph nodes, afflicted with HD and NHL is described. The literature is reviewed, and the clinical significance is indicated. 180 refs.; 22 figs.; 24 tabs

  13. Computer technique for correction of nonhomogeneous distribution in radiologic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florian, Rogerio V.; Frere, Annie F.; Schiable, Homero; Marques, Paulo M.A.; Marques, Marcio A.

    1996-01-01

    An image processing technique to provide a 'Heel' effect compensation on medical images is presented. It is reported that the technique can improve the structures detection due to background homogeneity and can be used for any radiologic system

  14. Radiological protection for medical exposure to ionizing radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    When ionizing radiation was discovered more than 100 years ago its beneficial uses were quickly discovered by the medical profession. Over the years new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have been developed and the general level of health care has improved. This has resulted in medical radiation exposures becoming a significant component of the total radiation exposure of populations. Current estimates put the worldwide annual number of diagnostic exposures at 2500 million and therapeutic exposures at 5.5 million. Some 78% of diagnostic exposures are due to medical X rays, 21% due to dental X rays and the remaining 1% due to nuclear medicine techniques. The annual collective dose from all diagnostic exposures is about 2500 million man Sv, corresponding to a worldwide average of 0.4 mSv per person per year. There are, however, wide differences in radiological practices throughout the world, the average annual per caput values for States of the upper and lower health care levels being 1.3 mSv and 0.02 mSv, respectively. It should, however, be noted that doses from therapeutic uses of radiation are not included in these averages, as they involve very high doses (in the region of 20-60 Gy) precisely delivered to target volumes in order to eradicate disease or to alleviate symptoms. Over 90% of total radiation treatments are conducted by teletherapy or brachytherapy, with radiopharmaceuticals being used in only 7% of treatments. Increases in the uses of medical radiation and the resultant doses can be expected following changes in patterns of health care resulting from advances in technology and economic development. For example, increases are likely in the utilization of computed tomography (CT), digital imaging and, with the attendant potential for deterministic effects, interventional procedures; practice in nuclear medicine will be driven by the use of new and more specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and there will be an increased demand for

  15. Radiological protection for medical exposure to ionizing radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    When ionizing radiation was discovered more than 100 years ago its beneficial uses were quickly discovered by the medical profession. Over the years new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have been developed and the general level of health care has improved. This has resulted in medical radiation exposures becoming a significant component of the total radiation exposure of populations. Current estimates put the worldwide annual number of diagnostic exposures at 2500 million and therapeutic exposures at 5.5 million. Some 78% of diagnostic exposures are due to medical X rays, 21% due to dental X rays and the remaining 1% due to nuclear medicine techniques. The annual collective dose from all diagnostic exposures is about 2500 million man Sv, corresponding to a worldwide average of 0.4 mSv per person per year. There are, however, wide differences in radiological practices throughout the world, the average annual per caput values for States of the upper and lower health care levels being 1.3 mSv and 0.02 mSv, respectively. It should, however, be noted that doses from therapeutic uses of radiation are not included in these averages, as they involve very high doses (in the region of 20-60 Gy) precisely delivered to target volumes in order to eradicate disease or to alleviate symptoms. Over 90% of total radiation treatments are conducted by teletherapy or brachytherapy, with radiopharmaceuticals being used in only 7% of treatments. Increases in the uses of medical radiation and the resultant doses can be expected following changes in patterns of health care resulting from advances in technology and economic development. For example, increases are likely in the utilization of computed tomography (CT), digital imaging and, with the attendant potential for deterministic effects, interventional procedures. Practice in nuclear medicine will be driven by the use of new and more specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and there will be an increased demand for

  16. A Transparent Framework for guiding Radiological and Non-Radiological Contaminated Land Risk Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Alex; Mathers, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A framework is presented that may be used as a transparent guidance to both radiological and non-radiological risk assessments. This framework has been developed by BNFL, with external consultation, to provide a systematic approach for identifying key system drivers and to guide associated research packages in light of data deficiencies and sources of model uncertainty. The process presented represents an advance on existing working practices yet combines regulator philosophy to produce a robust, comprehensive, cost-effective and transparent work package. It aims at lending added confidence to risk models thereby adding value to the decision process

  17. Recommendations guide in radiological accidents for first respondents, paramedical personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astudillo, A. J.; Ambriz, J. J.; Paredes, L. C.

    2011-10-01

    The lenders of medical services hope to provide the appropriate attention to the patients due to the great variety of scenarios that are presented. One of these involves the patient that has been exposed or contaminated with radioactive materials. Due to this situation the recommendations guide for the primary task forces are presented. Elements of medical response before the radiological accidents presence. The objective of these guides is to give the guidelines for the initial response to the emergency that fulfills the following criterions: a) to Apply with readiness all the reasonable measures to protect the victims and the public, in order to minimizing the radiological and not radiological effects to the health; b) to Save lives and to develop the procedures required in the medical emergency; c) to Treat the injuries caused by the radiation and the resulting injuries of the emergency; d) to Compile and to protect the information that can be useful to treat the effects to the health, of the victims and public in general, and to impede that emergencies seemed are repeat in the future; e) to Create and to maintain the public's trust in the response; f) to Establish a base for an action of lingering response and g) to Suggest evaluation criterions of the radiological emergency, the organization criterions, operation and surrounding of the emergency area. (Author)

  18. CT Guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions, radiological and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzihasanovic, B.; Milisic, L.; Zuban, J.; Mujic, E.; Jahic, E.; Gjikolli, B.; Hasanovic, B.; Lincender-Cvijetic, L.; Jaganjac, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the study is to overview our experiences in taking the CT guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions during the period of sixteen months, analysis of validity of samples taken and correlation with pathological findings. CT guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions were performed in 32 patients during the period of sixteen months (from December 2004 until March 2006). Age range was from 13 to 78 years. Majorities of the biopsies were performed with coaxial cutting needle system (14 G and 16 G) with introducers size 13 and 15 G. Bone biopsies were performed with Yamsidi needles in purpose of taking the bone cylinder. Majorities of the biopsies were performed under local anaesthesia except a thirteen years old child to whom CT guided biopsy of corpus Th 6 was performed under general anaesthesia. Two samples of tissues were sent in formalin solutions to Pathology Institute for pathological verification. In one case of musculoskeletal lesions CT guided biopsies didn't yield a representative tissue sample. We had high level of congruence between radiological and pathological findings; precise presented in the article. CT guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions are method of choice for pathologic verification of musculoskeletal lesions proving incomparable less risk compared to 'open' biopsy which requires operating theatre and general anaesthesia. Coaxial needle systems has shown as suitable for yielding representative tissue samples (two samples for each patient), and samples are also appropriate for immunohistochemical analysis

  19. Guide for prepare the plan for radiological emergency by the users of ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Radiological Emergency Plan foresees all the possible radiological accidents with the ionizing sources the entity is using. The measures should be adopted by every factor is supped to take part in the emergencies created. The effectiveness of the guaranteed. THis guide establishes the model for elaborating the radiological Emergency Plans

  20. Resolution no. 18/2012 Guide for the preparation and emergency response radiological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This guide aims to establish requirements to ensure an adequate level of entities, for the preparation and response to radiological emergencies and to prepare the Radiation Emergency Plan (PER), asset out in the Basic Safety Standards radiological and authorizations Regulations in force. This guide applies to organizations providing employment practices associated with sources of ionizing radiation, hereinafter sources.

  1. Radiological survey techniques for decontamination and dismantlement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruesink, G.P.; Stempfley, D.H.; Pettit, P.J.; Warner, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is engaged in an aggressive Program to remove all above ground structures as part of the Fernald sites final remediation remedy. Through the complete removal of major facilities such as Plant 7, Plant 4, and Plant 1, the FEMP has developed radiological survey approaches that are effective for the different phases of the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D ampersand D) process. Some of the most pressing challenges facing the FEMP are implementing effective, low cost methods for the D ampersand D of former process buildings while minimizing environmental effects. One of the key components to ensure minimal impact on the environment is the collection of radiological contamination information during the D ampersand D process to facilitate the decision making process. Prior to the final demolition of any structure, radiological surveys of floors, walls, and ceilings must take place. These surveys must demonstrate that contamination levels am below 5000 dpm removable beta/gamma for non-porous surfaces and below 1000 dpm removable-beta/gamma for all porous surfaces. Technique which can perform these activities in a safe, effective, and cost efficient manner are greatly desired. The FEMP has investigated new approaches to address this need. These techniques include sampling approaches using standard baseline methodology as well as innovative approaches to accelerate final radiological clearance processes. To further improve upon this process, the FEMP has investigated several new technologies through the Fernald Plant 1 Large Scale Technology Demonstration Project. One of the most promising of these new technologies, Laser Induced Fluorescence, may significantly improve the radiological clearance survey process. This paper will present real world experiences in applying radiological control limits to D ampersand D projects as well as relate potential productivity and cost improvements with the

  2. Improved understanding of human anatomy through self-guided radiological anatomy modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew W; Smith, Sandy G; Ross, Callum F; Straus, Christopher M

    2012-07-01

    To quantifiably measure the impact of self-instructed radiological anatomy modules on anatomy comprehension, demonstrated by radiology, gross, and written exams. Study guides for independent use that emphasized structural relationships were created for use with two online radiology atlases. A guide was created for each module of the first year medical anatomy course and incorporated as an optional course component. A total of 93 of 96 eligible students participated. All exams were normalized to control for variances in exam difficulty and body region tested. An independent t-test was used to compare overall exam scores with respect to guide completion or incompletion. To account for aptitude differences between students, a paired t-test of each student's exam scores with and without completion of the associated guide was performed, thus allowing students to serve as their own controls. Twenty-one students completed no study guides; 22 completed all six guides; and 50 students completed between one and five guides. Aggregate comparisons of all students' exam scores showed significantly improved mean performance when guides were used (radiology, 57.8% [percentile] vs. 45.1%, P < .001; gross, 56.9% vs. 46.5%, P = .001; written, 57.8% vs. 50.2%, P = .011). Paired comparisons among students who completed between one and five guides demonstrated significantly higher mean practical exam scores when guides were used (radiology, 49.3% [percentile] vs. 36.0%, P = .001; gross, 51.5% vs. 40.4%, P = .005), but not higher written scores. Radiological anatomy study guides significantly improved anatomy comprehension on radiology, gross, and written exams. Copyright © 2012 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Audience response techniques for 21st century radiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael L

    2014-07-01

    Audience response system (ARS) provides an excellent tool for improving interactive learning in radiology residents. However, it is not the technology but the pedagogy that matters the most. It is long past time to upgrade our ARS teaching techniques to match our ARS technology. In this article, several problems with current usage of ARS are discussed and several prescriptions for improving this are presented. Simplifying the ease of use of ARS will get this useful technology into more hands. Using ARS in a bidirectional manner will give us an even better idea of how and what our students are learning. Asking questions on the fly will obviate the usual tedium of multiple-choice questions and allow us to quiz our students in a much more natural manner. It is time to move on to more innovative ARS techniques that are well adapted to radiology and its different styles of learning. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  5. Radiologically Guided Bone Biopsy: Results of 502 Biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Chaan S.; Salisbury, Jonathan R.; Darby, Alan J.; Gishen, Philip

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results of 502 biopsies over a 19-year period for the purpose of highlighting the results that can be expected from such a large study, with emphasis on needle choice and anesthetic methods. Methods: The histological, cytological, and microbiological results of 477 patients who had 502 bone biopsies carried out between July 1977 and March 1996 were studied. Less than 5% of patients required second biopsies. There were almost equal numbers of males and females in the group. The lesions were visible radiologically and most of the biopsies were carried out by a single operator. The lesions were classified on their histopathological, cytopathological, and microbiological findings. Results: Tumors accounted for 40% of the biopsies, and infection for 16%. Biopsies which did not yield a 'positive' diagnosis accounted for 31%; these included specimens reported as normal, or as showing reactive changes, repair, remodelling, non-specific features, inflammation (but not clearly infective), or no evidence of malignancy or inflammation. Less than 4% of biopsies were incorrect, and some of these were re-biopsied. Conclusion: Bone biopsy is a valuable technique for positive diagnosis of malignancy or infection, as it enables a definitive plan for treatment and management of patients to be established. Exclusion of serious pathology is almost equally important. In principle, any osseous site can be biopsied using fluoroscopic or computed tomographic guidance. Care in the biopsy technique and selection of the bone needle is required

  6. Radiological control guide for decommissioning of the TRIGA mark-2, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Jae

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of radiological control for TRIGA mark-2, 3 research reactors and facilities at the KAERI Seoul site, which are to be decommissioned, is in minimizing the radiation exposure for workers and in preventing the release of the radioactive materials to the environment. In order to accomplish these goal, the radiological control guide will be prepared during the decommissioning activities. Therefore, it is expected that this technical report can be used in preparing radiological control guide for safety decommissioning of the TRIGA mark-2, 3

  7. Radiologic placement of hemodialysis central venous catheters: a practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemmer, D.; Sadler, D.J.; Gray, R.R.; Saliken, J.C.; So, C.B. [Foothills Hospital, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2001-04-01

    Typical indications for central venous catheters (CVCs) are hemodialysis (HD), apheresis, total parenteral nutrition, analgesia, chemotherapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and cases of difficult or absent peripheral venous access. One of the largest medical services requesting CVC insertion is nephrology for HD patients. Demographics dictate that the demand for CVCs will continue to grow over the next few decades, placing striking demands on interventional radiology departments. In our centre, interventional radiologists now place nearly all percutaneously inserted HD CVCs. Radiologists provide rapid access to CVC services with significantly fewer complications than CVCs placed by other clinicians. With the demand for CVC management increasing and available operating room time decreasing, many clinicians now refer CVC insertions to radiologists. As well, clinicians who ordinarily place their own lines often refer high-risk patients, such as those who are obese or uncooperative and those with burns or coagulopathy. Our experience, derived from over 7000 CVC insertions, manipulations and removals, has allowed us to continually progress and improve our techniques, many of which are summarized here. (author)

  8. Development of terminology for mammographic techniques for radiological technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagahara, Ayako; Yokooka, Yuki; Tsuji, Shintaro; Nishimoto, Naoki; Uesugi, Masahito; Muto, Hiroshi; Ohba, Hisateru; Kurowarabi, Kunio; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2011-07-01

    We are developing a mammographic ontology to share knowledge of the mammographic domain for radiologic technologists, with the aim of improving mammographic techniques. As a first step in constructing the ontology, we used mammography reference books to establish mammographic terminology for identifying currently available knowledge. This study proceeded in three steps: (1) determination of the domain and scope of the terminology, (2) lexical extraction, and (3) construction of hierarchical structures. We extracted terms mainly from three reference books and constructed the hierarchical structures manually. We compared features of the terms extracted from the three reference books. We constructed a terminology consisting of 440 subclasses grouped into 19 top-level classes: anatomic entity, image quality factor, findings, material, risk, breast, histological classification of breast tumors, role, foreign body, mammographic technique, physics, purpose of mammography examination, explanation of mammography examination, image development, abbreviation, quality control, equipment, interpretation, and evaluation of clinical imaging. The number of terms that occurred in the subclasses varied depending on which reference book was used. We developed a terminology of mammographic techniques for radiologic technologists consisting of 440 terms.

  9. Radiological protection in the interventional techniques: experience in the Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, M. C.; Benitez N, P. P.; Gonzalez G, Y.; Martinez G, A.; Gonzalez R, N.; Sanchez Z, L. R.

    2014-08-01

    The Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ offers treatment to patients with different pathologies, using interventional techniques as the radiology like visual guide to reach the target structure and to apply the election technique. The personnel that carry out these procedures are inserted in the program of radiological surveillance of the institution, reason for which a radiological event could be detected where the main physician responsible of the service was implied. In this work the results of an investigation are presented realized with the objective of to know the causes of the event and to determine the necessary measures to avoid that this repeats again. The investigation was oriented to three fundamental aspects: medical exam of the affected worker; evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point; and dosimetric measurements simulating the real conditions of work for which were used ionization chamber, radiometer and PMMA mannequin. As a result of the medical exam was detected that the main physician of the service did not use during the execution of all the procedures the extremities dosimetry and that he presented a radio induced erythema in the right hand, reason for which he was separated of the activity with ionizing radiations, until the conclusion of the investigation. With relationship to the evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point, was verified that the medical physician not carried out any collimation of the beam and he was located in the positions where the dose rate reached the maximum values, frequently introducing the hands in the direct beam; that which implied an overexposure of the superior extremities and a not optimized exposure for whole body. This result was proven with the realized experimental measurements, which gave dose estimated values in extremities of the order of the deterministic effects. The investigation facilitated to introduce modifications in the

  10. RADIOLOGICAL TIPS CT-guided biopsy of suspected malignancy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    under appropriate medical therapy and the lesion was successfully excised. ... origin.[4] Typically, these sympathetic tumours secrete catecholamines. It should be noted that phaeochromocytomas, arising from the adrenal medulla, are, by definition, ... Radiologically, CT, MRI, metaidbenzylguanidine scan and PET imaging.

  11. Interaction techniques for radiology workstations: impact on users' productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Adrian; Atkins, M. Stella

    2004-04-01

    As radiologists progress from reading images presented on film to modern computer systems with images presented on high-resolution displays, many new problems arise. Although the digital medium has many advantages, the radiologist"s job becomes cluttered with many new tasks related to image manipulation. This paper presents our solution for supporting radiologists" interpretation of digital images by automating image presentation during sequential interpretation steps. Our method supports scenario based interpretation, which group data temporally, according to the mental paradigm of the physician. We extended current hanging protocols with support for "stages". A stage reflects the presentation of digital information required to complete a single step within a complex task. We demonstrated the benefits of staging in a user study with 20 lay subjects involved in a visual conjunctive search for targets, similar to a radiology task of identifying anatomical abnormalities. We designed a task and a set of stimuli which allowed us to simulate the interpretation workflow from a typical radiology scenario - reading a chest computed radiography exam when a prior study is also available. The simulation was possible by abstracting the radiologist"s task and the basic workstation navigation functionality. We introduced "Stages," an interaction technique attuned to the radiologist"s interpretation task. Compared to the traditional user interface, Stages generated a 14% reduction in the average interpretation.

  12. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  13. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound guided percutaneous removal of wooden foreign bodies in the extremities with hydro-dissection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, HeeJin; Lee, So Yeon; Chung, Eun Chul; Rho, Myung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon; Son, Eun Seok [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We described the technique of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous removal of the foreign bodies (FB) with hydro-dissection in the radiologic department and presented video files of several cases.Four patients referred to the radiology department for US evaluation and US-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs in the upper and lower extremities between November, 2006 and November, 2013 were included in this study. The procedures started with US evaluation for the exact location and shape of the FB. A 5 mm-sized skin incision was made at the site of the nearest point from the FB where no passing arteries or tendons were present. We adopted a hydro dissection technique to separate the FB from adjacent tissue using a 2% lidocaine solution. Injected anesthetics detached the FBs from surrounding tissue and thereby facilitated removal. After the tip of the mosquito forceps reached the FB, the wooden FBs were removed. The mean time required for the entire procedure was approximately 20 minutes. There were no significant complications during the US-guided removal or long-term complications after the procedure. All 4 FBs were successfully removed from the soft tissue under US guidance. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs with hydro-dissection in the radiology department is a less invasive and safe method over surgical removal in the operating room. Additionally, the use of a guide wire and serial dilator may help minimize soft tissue injury and facilitate the introduction of forceps.

  15. A guide to radiological research. The Research Sub-Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Radiology, the Royal College of Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    There are broad categories of radiological research. Basic science research undertaken in universities or in manufacturing companies may lead to new techniques or even new products like MRI, CT or contrast media. MRI is a product of university based research, while CT developed within a manufacturing company. Basic science type research is vital for the continuing development of our speciality, but requires considerable resources, teamwork, and research/management expertise. The best place for an interested radiologist to learn such skills is within university departments, typically in the context of an MD, Ph.D. or similar degree course. Clinical radiological research is of equal importance and, in the UK, underpins our international reputation for radiological excellence. Clinical research may be defined as research requiring patients. It can therefore only be carried out in hospitals and clinics. New technologies, drugs, indications, procedures etc., all require clinical research to validate them. The role of the clinical radiologist is pivotal to the proper conduct of clinical imaging research and technology assessment. This is not confined to university and teaching centres, but is of equal importance in district general hospitals. Results from clinical research carried out 'in the field' are the true test of our specialty. This research guide is sponsored by the RCR. Its target is radiologists and others carrying out clinical research within departments of radiology. If it stimulates Fellows and Members of the RCR to conduct more and better research then it will have succeeded in its basic objective. Research is always planned. It is based on observation, measurement and the testing of ideas or hypotheses. It is presented to peers for criticism and then published to be available to all for review. Research is always hard work and requires discipline. Like many things the ability to conduct research improves with practice. Many radiologists have not had much

  16. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, J.C.; Graf, J.M.; Dewart, J.M.; Buhl, T.E.; Wenzel, W.J.; Walker, L.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This guide was prepared to provide the experienced safety analyst with accident analysis guidance in greater detail than is possible in Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The guide addresses analysis of postulated serious accidents considered in the siting and selection of major design features of DOE nuclear facilities. Its scope has been limited to radiological accidents at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The analysis steps addressed in the guide lead to evaluation of radiological dose to exposed persons for comparison with siting guideline doses. Other possible consequences considered are environmental contamination, population dose, and public health effects. Choices of models and parameters leading to estimation of source terms, release fractions, reduction and removal factors, dispersion and dose factors are discussed. Although requirements for risk analysis have not been established, risk estimates are finding increased use in siting of major nuclear facilities, and are discussed in the guide. 3 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Dominic

    2008-07-01

    We describe a case report and technique for using a portable ultrasound scanner and a curvilinear transducer (4-5MHz) (SonoSite Micromaxx SonoSite, Inc. 21919 30th Drive SE Bothwell W. A.) to guide sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection. A 42-year-old male presented with chronic lower back pain centered on his left SIJ. His pain averaged 7 out of 10 (numerical rating scale). For the ultrasound-guided SIJ injection the patient was placed in the prone position. The ultrasound transducer was oriented in a transverse orientation at the level of the sacral hiatus. Here the sacral cornuae were identified. Moving the transducer laterally from here, the lateral edge of the sacrum was identified. This bony edge was followed in a cephalad direction with the transducer maintained in a transverse orientation. A second bony contour, the ileum, was identified. The cleft between both bony contours represented the sacroiliac joint. This was found at 4.5 cm depth. Real-time imaging was used to direct a 22G spinal needle into the SIJ, where solution was injected under direct vision. The patient\\'s pain intensity decreased to a 2 out of 10 (numerical rating scale). Function improved and the patient was able to return to work. These improvements were maintained at 16 weeks. Ultrasound guidance does not expose patients and personnel to radiation and is readily accessible. Ultrasound-guided SIJ injections may have particular applications in the management of chronic lower back pain in certain clinical scenarios (e.g. pregnancy). Future studies to demonstrate efficacy and reproducibility are needed.

  18. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  19. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of thyroid nodules: A consensus statement by the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Hen; Baek, Jung Hwan; Jung, So Lyoung; Kwak, Jin Young; Kim, Ji Hoon; Shin, Jung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) has played a crucial role in managing patients with thyroid nodules, owing to its safety and accuracy. However, even with US guidance, nondiagnostic sampling and infrequent complications still occur after FNA. Accordingly, the Task Force on US-FNA of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has provided consensus recommendations for the US-FNA technique and related issues to improve diagnostic yield. These detailed procedures are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature and from the consensus of experts.

  20. Advanced Neutron Source Reactor zoning, shielding, and radiological optimization guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, J.L.; DeVore, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    In the design of major nuclear facilities, it is important to protect both humans and equipment excessive radiation dose. Past experience has shown that it is very effective to apply dose reduction principles early in the design of a nuclear facility both to specific design features and to the manner of operation of the facility, where they can aid in making the facility more efficient and cost-effective. Since the appropriate choice of radiological controls and practices varies according to the case, each area of the facility must be analyzed for its radiological impact, both by itself and in interactions with other areas. For the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project, a large relational database will be used to collect facility information by system and relate it to areas. The database will also hold the facility dose and shielding information as it is produced during the design process. This report details how the ANS zoning scheme was established and how the calculation of doses and shielding are to be done

  1. Impact of Simulation-Based Training on Radiology Trainee Education in Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Ashley A; Ebuoma, Lilian O; Ortiz-Perez, Tamara; Sepulveda, Karla A; Severs, Frederick J; Wang, Tao; Benveniste, Ana Paula; Sedgwick, Emily L

    2017-12-05

    The aim of this study is to determine the impact of a simulation-based ultrasound-guided (USG) breast biopsy training session on radiology trainee procedural knowledge, comfort levels, and overall procedural confidence and anxiety. Twenty-one diagnostic radiology residents from a single academic institution were recruited to participate in an USG breast biopsy training session. The residents filled out a questionnaire before and after the training session. Ten multiple-choice questions tested general knowledge in diagnostic breast ultrasound and USG breast biopsy concepts. Subjective comfort levels with ultrasound machine and biopsy device functionality, patient positioning, proper biopsy technique, image documentation, needle safety and overall procedural confidence and anxiety levels were reported on a 5-point Likert scale before and after training. Participants demonstrated significant improvement in number of correctly answered general knowledge questions after training (P simulation-based USG breast biopsy training session may improve radiology trainee procedural knowledge, comfort levels, and overall procedural confidence. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interventional radiology techniques for the diagnosis of lymphoma or leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, Kevin M.; Hoffer, Fredric A.; Behm, Frederick G.; Gow, Kenneth W.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Sandlund, John T.

    2002-01-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. Fluid aspiration, percutaneous biopsy, and catheter drainage are standard minimally invasive methods of diagnosing lymphoma or leukemia in adults.Objective. To determine the effectiveness of interventional radiologic techniques in diagnosing specific hematologic malignancies in children.Methods. During a 4-year period, 22 patients (16 male, 6 female; median age, 13 years) underwent 25 percutaneous biopsies, 6 fluid aspirations, 3 catheter drainages, and 1 needle localization for diagnosing suspected hematologic malignancy.Results. For Hodgkin's disease, the procedures yielded 6 true-positive (TP) results, 2 true-negative (TN) results, and 2 false-negative (FN) results; for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), 14 TP results, 1 TN result, and 3 FN results; and for leukemia, 4 TP results and 3 FN results. Percutaneous biopsies yielded 16 TP results, 3 TN results, and 6 FN results. Aspirations and drainages yielded 8 TP results and 1 FN result. The one needle localization yielded a FN result. Overall sensitivity was 75%±7.3%; specificity, 100%; and accuracy, 77%±7.1%.Conclusion. Percutaneous biopsy of lymphoma is usually diagnostic. Drainage or aspiration of a fluid collection associated with NHL or leukemia is often diagnostic and is less invasive than biopsy. These procedures are minimally invasive and effective for diagnosing pediatric hematologic malignancies. (orig.)

  3. Development of a technical guide for the identification of radiological sources of potential exposure and/or contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, R.; Scott, A.; Falo, G.; Collins, J.; Szrom, F.; Collins, D.

    1999-01-01

    Radiological assessment of sites with radioactive residues starts with the identification of potential sources. The US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) has developed a technical guide that summarizes sources of potential radiological exposures of both civilian and military origin. These sources include those found in the natural environment, in the nuclear fuel cycle, in medical and industrial settings, in the transportation of radioactive materials, in US Army commodities and foreign materiel, and in the use and storage of nuclear weapons. This technical guide is intended to foster awareness of radiological hazards and to provide the reader with the knowledge necessary to take the first step in radiological health risk assessment: recognition of the hazard. Furthermore, this guide can be used in conjunction with other technical guides for performing radiological surveys and field dose assessments in war or peacetime operations. (author)

  4. Guide for effluent radiological measurements at DOE installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, J.P.; Corbit, C.D.

    1983-07-01

    Effluent monitoring and reporting programs are maintained at all US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities that may: (1) discharge significant concentrations of radioactivity in relation to applicable standards, or (2) discharge quantities of radioactivity that have potential health and safety or other environmental significance. This Guide is intended to provide supplemental guidance to DOE Orders on methods, procedures, and performance criteria to bring more comparable rationale to DOE facility effluent measurement programs and promote compliance with applicable standards and provide the DOE Office of Operational Safety (OOS) and Operations Offices with an additional tool for evaluating effluent measurement programs at DOE facilities

  5. Symptomatic portal vein occlusion: treated by interventional radiological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Maoqiang; Gu Xiaofang; Guan Jun; Wang Zhongpu; Liu Fengyong; Wang Zhiqiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the interventional radiological techniques for management of symptomatic portal vein (PV) occlusion. Methods: Nine patients with PV trunk occlusion were treated using interventional procedures. Four patients presented with abdominal pain, distention, and malabsorption; five presented with portal hypertension and repeated bleeding from esophagogastric varices. The etiologic factors were identified in all 9 patients, including post-transplantation of the liver in 2, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with PV tumor thrombus in 3, post abdominal operative state in 1, and PV thrombosis in 3 cases. The portal access was established via a percutaneous transhepatic route in 4, and via a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt ( TIPS) approach in 5 patients. The interventional procedures included stent placement in 4, balloon angioplasty in 6, and catheter directed pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis in 7 patients. Results: The technical success was achieved in all cases. No complications related to the procedure occurred. Portal flow was reestablished in all patients after the procedures. Clinical improvement was seen in 3 patients with symptomatic PV thrombosis, characterized by progressive reduction of abdominal pain, distention, and diarrhea. Follow-up time ranged from 4 to 36 months. One patient with HCC died of multiple organs metastases at 11 months after the treatment . One patient died of intraabdominal sepsis and multiple organs failure 12 days after the procedure even though the antegrade flow was re-established in the main trunk of the PV. Patency of the PV trunk was confirmed by follow-up color Doppler ultrasound scan in the rest 7 patients, without recurrence of variceal bleeding or PV thrombus. Conclusions: Interventional minimally invasive procedures, including balloon angioplasty, stent placement, catheter directed local pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis, are safe and effective in

  6. Radiologically guided percutaneous pleurodesis of malignant pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.C.; Mueller, P.R.; Saini, S.; Hahn, P.F.; Lee, M.J.; Cortell, E.; Girard, M.; Goldberg, M.; Simeone, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that in patients with symptomatic malignant pleural effusion. US-guided placement of small-bore catheters for pleurodesis presents an alternative to traditional surgical management. Catheters ranging in size from 7-F to 16-F (n = 17), or greater than 16-F (n = 5), were placed intrapleurally under US guidance in 22 patients with symptomatic malignant pleural effusion. Pleur-E-Vac suction was applied until tube drainage was less than 100 mL/d. Tetracycline (1--2 g/100 mL of normal saline solution) or bleomycin (45--100 U/50 mL of 5% dextrose) was then instilled and left in the pleural space for 1--3 hours. The chest tube was removed when output was less than 20 mL/d

  7. Recommendations guide in radiological accidents for first respondents, firemen and policemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astudillo, A. J.; Ambriz, J. J.; Paredes, L. C.

    2011-10-01

    The action guides for the primary task forces of the Firemen Corps and the Public Security Elements, before the presence of radiological accidents are presented. The objective of these guides is to give the recommendations for the initial response to the emergency that fulfills the following criterions: to to Apply with readiness all the reasonable measures to protect the victims and the public, in order to minimizing the radiological and non radiological effects to the health; b) to Retrieve the control of the situation and to mitigate the consequences; c) to Protect the emergency personnel during the response operations; d) to Compile and to protect the information that can be useful to treat the effects to the health, of the victims and public in general, and to prevent that emergencies seemed are repeat in the future; e) to Create and to maintain the public's trust in the response; f) to Establish a base for an action of lingering response, and to Suggest evaluation criterions of the radiological emergency, the organization criterions, operation and surrounding of the emergency area. (Author)

  8. Arrangements for preparedness for a nuclear or radiological emergency. Safety guide (Spanish Edition); Disposiciones de preparacion para emergencias nucleares o radiologicas. Guia de seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to response to such emergencies. The primary objectives of this Safety Guide, co-sponsored by FAO, OCHA, ILO, PAHO and WHO, are to provide guidance on preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency, to describe appropriate responses to a range of emergencies, and to provide background information on past experience, thus helping the user to better implement arrangements that address the underlying issues.

  9. Guide for: environmental radiological surveillance at US Department of Energy installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, J.P.; Denham, D.H.; Jaquish, R.E.; Michels, D.E.; Olsen, A.R.; Waite, D.A.

    1981-07-01

    This second edition of the Guide, originally published in 1977, is presented as an interim revision and does not contain major changes in content. The original objectives and scope of the Guide have not changed. The Guide is intended to: provide recommended methods, procedures, and performance criteria to bring greater comparability to DOE environmental monitoring and reporting systems; provide DOE management, particularly the Headquarters' Operational and Environmental Safety Division (OESD) and field offices, with a broad review of accepted radiological surveillance practices for use in the evaluation of environmental surveillance programs at DOE facilities; and delineate the capabilities and limitations of the various environmental monitoring systems for radioactivity currently used at DOE sites, including technical areas where there is either an inadequate basis for procedural selection or where further development work may be warranted. The document is intended as a guide, not a manual of detailed mandatory procedure

  10. Use of Low-Fidelity Simulation Laboratory Training for Teaching Radiology Residents CT-Guided Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Melissa; Nelson, Rachel; Roebel, John; Collins, Heather; Anderson, M Bret

    2016-11-01

    To determine the benefit of the addition of low-fidelity simulation-based training to the standard didactic-based training in teaching radiology residents common CT-guided procedures. This was a prospective study involving 24 radiology residents across all years in a university program. All residents underwent standard didactic lecture followed by low-fidelity simulation-based training on three common CT-guided procedures: random liver biopsy, lung nodule biopsy, and drain placement. Baseline knowledge, confidence, and performance assessments were obtained after the didactic session and before the simulation training session. Approximately 2 months later, all residents participated in a simulation-based training session covering all three of these procedures. Knowledge, confidence, and performance data were obtained afterward. These assessments covered topics related to preprocedure workup, intraprocedure steps, and postprocedure management. Knowledge data were collected based on a 15-question assessment. Confidence data were obtained based on a 5-point Likert-like scale. Performance data were obtained based on successful completion of predefined critical steps. There was significant improvement in knowledge (P = .005), confidence (P simulation-based training to the standard didactic curriculum for all procedures. This study suggests that the addition of low-fidelity simulation-based training to a standard didactic-based curriculum is beneficial in improving resident knowledge, confidence, and tested performance of common CT-guided procedures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  12. Human-centred radiological software techniques supporting improved nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoeke, Istvan; Johnsen, Terje

    2013-01-01

    The Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) is an international research foundation for energy and nuclear technology. IFE is also the host for the international OECD Halden Reactor Project. The Software Engineering Department in the Man Technology Organisation at IFE is a leading international centre of competence for the development and evaluation of human-centred technologies, process visualisation, and the lifecycle of high integrity software important to safety. This paper is an attempt to give a general overview of the current, and some of the foreseen, research and development of human-centred radiological software technologies at the Software Engineering department to meet with the need of improved radiological safety for not only nuclear industry but also other industries around the world. (author)

  13. Study of the variation of radiation dose in function of the radiological techniques used in X-ray diagnosis exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marfernandes@fmb.unesp.br [Faculty of Medicine. UNESP, Botucatu (FMB), SP (Brazil); Reis, Charlene O.; Garcia, Paulo L. [Institute of Biosciences of Botucatu. UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Nucleate Radiometry Ltd., Aracatuba, SP (Brazil); Lima, Marcelo A.F.; Dalaqua, Fernando L.D. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Hospital. Radiology Service

    2011-07-01

    This paper values the importance of the implantation of a quality control program in medical x-ray diagnosis services that it seeks mainly to the reduction of the radiation dose applied in the radiology exams, and attempt to the precepts of the Effective Legislation as for the Basic Guidelines of Radiological Protection (law decree MS no. 453 in June 1{sup st} 1998). The study was accomplished Radiology Section of the Medicine Faculty - FMB (UNESP - Botucatu) and it consisted of the accomplishment of measures of the radiation dose applied in the radiological exams, taking as base the x-rays techniques realized by four technicians in radiology the service, using only one x-rays equipment. Was intended analyze the variation of the radiation dose in function of the different applied technical parameters, and this way, guide the professionals as for the possibility of obtaining of x-ray images of better quality and smaller patient exposition. For radiation dose measure a detector of solid state was utilized. During the accomplishment of the measures it was verified that there no a general consensus among the technicians of the section being observed differences of the order of 80% in the mAs. In terms of radiation dose measured, the largest value of verified was 4.752 mGy (exam of lateral lumbar column) and the smallest value of 0.165 mGy (child's thorax).The results showed that a standardization in the x-ray techniques executed by the professionals of the section will be able to reduce significantly the radiation exposition of the assisted patients. (author)

  14. Study of the variation of radiation dose in function of the radiological techniques used in X-ray diagnosis exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R.; Reis, Charlene O.; Garcia, Paulo L.; Lima, Marcelo A.F.; Dalaqua, Fernando L.D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper values the importance of the implantation of a quality control program in medical x-ray diagnosis services that it seeks mainly to the reduction of the radiation dose applied in the radiology exams, and attempt to the precepts of the Effective Legislation as for the Basic Guidelines of Radiological Protection (law decree MS no. 453 in June 1 st 1998). The study was accomplished Radiology Section of the Medicine Faculty - FMB (UNESP - Botucatu) and it consisted of the accomplishment of measures of the radiation dose applied in the radiological exams, taking as base the x-rays techniques realized by four technicians in radiology the service, using only one x-rays equipment. Was intended analyze the variation of the radiation dose in function of the different applied technical parameters, and this way, guide the professionals as for the possibility of obtaining of x-ray images of better quality and smaller patient exposition. For radiation dose measure a detector of solid state was utilized. During the accomplishment of the measures it was verified that there no a general consensus among the technicians of the section being observed differences of the order of 80% in the mAs. In terms of radiation dose measured, the largest value of verified was 4.752 mGy (exam of lateral lumbar column) and the smallest value of 0.165 mGy (child's thorax).The results showed that a standardization in the x-ray techniques executed by the professionals of the section will be able to reduce significantly the radiation exposition of the assisted patients. (author)

  15. Standard guide for data fields for computerized transfer of digital radiological examination data

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides a listing and description of the fields that are recommended for inclusion in a digital radiological examination data base to facilitate the transfer of such data. This guide sets guidelines for the format of data fields for computerized transfer of digital image files obtained from radiographic, radioscopic, computed radiographic, or other radiological examination systems. The field listing includes those fields regarded as necessary for inclusion in the data base: (1) regardless of the radiological examination method (as indicated by Footnote C in Table 1), (2) for radioscopic examination (as indicated by Footnote E in Table 1), and (3) for radiographic examination (as indicated by Footnote D in Table 1). In addition, other optional fields are listed as a reminder of the types of information that may be useful for additional understanding of the data or applicable to a limited number of applications. 1.2 It is recognized that organizations may have in place an internal format for the...

  16. A Technique Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan Türkçapar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available “Socratic Method” is a way of teaching philosophical thinking and knowledge by asking questions which was used by antique period greek philosopher Socrates. Socrates was teaching knowledge to his followers by asking questions and the conversation between them was named “Socratic Dialogues”. In this meaning, no novel knowledge is taught to the individual but only what is formerly known is reminded and rediscovered. The form of socratic questioning which is used during the process of cognitive behavioral therapy is known as Guided Discovery. In this method it is aimed to make the client notice the piece of knowledge which he could notice but is not aware with a series of questions. Socratic method or guided discovery consists of several steps which are: Identifying the problem by listening to the client and making reflections, finding alternatives by examining and evaluating, reidentification by using the newly found information and questioning the old distorted belief and reaching to a conclusion and applying it. Question types used during these procedures are, questions for gaining information, questions revealing the meanings, questions revealing the beliefs, questions about behaviours during the similar past experiences, analyse questions and analytic synthesis questions. In order to make the patient feel understood it is important to be empathetic and summarising the problem during the interview. In this text, steps of Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery will be reviewed with sample dialogues after each step

  17. A guide to radiologic methods of diagnosis. 9. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurn, P.; Buecheler, E.; Frommhold, H.

    1992-01-01

    With the 9th edition of this guide an attempt was made to take account of technical innovations in radiology and the appropriate range of indications. Attention was mainly focused on the various possibilities offered at the clinical level by high-resolution computed tomography as well as nmr imaging and digitized radiography. The chapter on radioprotection and radiation injuries has been rewritten and updated through the addition of recently prepared tables. The clinical chapters chiefly deal with the roles of nmr imaging and computed tomography. This applies in particular to discussions relating to the central nervous system, facial skull, cervical region and soft tissues. Radiologic methods of intervention were given some coverage. The chapter on contrast media and mishaps attributable to these was completely revised. (orig./MG) With 761 figs., 29 tabs [de

  18. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denahm, D. H.; Barnes, M. G.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.; Gilbert, R. O.; Hoenes, G. R.; Jamison, J. D.; McMurray, B. J.; Watson, E. C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations.

  19. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denahm, D.H.; Barnes, M.G.; Jaquish, R.E.; Corley, J.P.; Gilbert, R.O.; Hoenes, G.R.; Jamison, J.D.; McMurray, B.J.; Watson, E.C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations

  20. NMR guided focused ultrasound for myoma therapy - results from the first radiology-gynecology expert meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.; Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin; David, M.; Kroencke, T.; Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Berlin

    2013-01-01

    The contribution on the results from the first radiology-gynecology expert meeting concerning NMR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) for myoma therapy covers the following topics: structural prerequisites for MRgFUS therapy; required examinations before MRgFUS therapy; indication for MRgFUS therapy; success criteria for the MRgFUS therapy; contraindications; MRgFUS therapy for patients that want to have children; side effects and complications of MRgFUS therapy; post-examination after MRgFUS therapy.

  1. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  2. Dose classification scheme for digital imaging techniques in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojreh, A.

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: image quality in diagnostic radiology is determined in crucial extent by the signal-noise-ratio, which is proportional to the applied x-ray dose. Onward technological developments in the diagnostic radiology are therefore frequently connected with a dose increase, which subjectively is hardly or even not perceptible. The aim of this work was to define reproducible standards for image quality as a function of dose and expected therapeutical consequence in case of computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses and the upper and lower jaw (dental CT), whereby practical-clinical purposes are considered. Materials and methods: the image quality of computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses and dental CT was determined by standard deviation of the CT-numbers (pixel noise) in a region of interest of the phantom of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM phantom) and additionally in the patients CT images. The diagnostic quality of the examination was classified on the basis of patients CT images in three dose levels (low dose, standard dose and high dose). Results: the pixel noise of CT of the paranasal sinuses with soft tissue reconstruction amounts to 19.3 Hounsfield units (HU) for low dose, 8.8 HU for standard dose, and below 8 HU for high dose. The pixel noise of the dental CT with bone (high resolution) reconstruction amounts to 344 HU for low dose, 221 HU for standard dose, and below 200 HU for high dose. Suitable indications for low dose CT are the scanning of body regions with high contrast differences, like the bony delimitations of air-filled spaces of the facial bones, and radiological follow-up examinations with dedicated questions such as axis determination in dental implantology, as well as the images of objects with small diameter such as in case of children. The standard dose CT can be recommended for all cases, in which precise staging of the illness plays an indispensable role for the diagnosis and therapy planning. With high dose

  3. Modification of the radiological technique of Parma for reduction of irradiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfel, G.; Ionesco-Farco, F.

    1982-04-01

    A modified radiological technique to demonstrate the temporo-mandibular joint is presented. An ordinary X-ray tube put on the skin is directed 10/sup 0/ dorso-ventrally and 10/sup 0/ caudo-cranially to the temporo-mandibular joint. The irradiation skin dose applied is ten times smaller than by using the conventional contact technique.

  4. Rural water tanks with HFB technique: technical guide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Solsona, F

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available This technical guide describes a very simple technique for water tank construction called H-F-B (heart filled blocks). The technique makes use of a simple mould (which can be made even in rural areas) for the manufacture of concrete building blocks...

  5. Measurement techniques for radiological characterization of contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    1996-09-18

    Once the decision is taken to characterize a contaminated site, appropriate measurement techniques must be selected. The choice will depend on the available information, on the nature and extent of the contamination, as well as on available resources (staff and budget). Some techniques are described on the basis of examples of characterization projects (e.g. Olen area in Belgium).

  6. Aseptic techniques(practical guide no.3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nappa, Andres; Souto Pais, Beatriz

    1994-01-01

    Definition of aseptic techniques in relation with the labor of Radiopharmacy.Control of environment and working areas.Control of materials entered into an aseptic area: water, nitrogen,vials,stoppers,needles and syringes. Personnel and manipulations control,choosing of materials,precautions in the aseptic manipulation and sterility preservation during usage life. Bacteriological membrane filtration in sterilized conditions. Work in a laminar flow unit. Protocol of Practical task 3. Bibliography

  7. Use of the analytical tree technique to develop a radiological protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech N, H.; Jova S, L.

    1996-01-01

    The results obtained by the Cuban Center for Radiological Protection and Hygiene by using an analytical tree technique to develop its general operational radiation protection program are presented. By the application of this method, some factors such as the organization of the radiation protection services, the provision of administrative requirements, the existing general laboratories requirements, the viability of resources and the current documentation was evaluated. Main components were considered such as: complete normative and regulatory documentation; automatic radiological protection data management; scope of 'on the-job'and radiological protection training for the personnel; previous radiological appraisal for the safety performance of the works and application of dose constrains for the personnel and the public. The detailed development of the program allowed to identify the basic aims to be achieved in its maintenance and improvement. (authors). 3 refs

  8. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, J.; Graf, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    DOE Office of Nuclear Safety has sponsored preparation of a guidance document to aid field offices and contractors in their analyses of consequences of postulated major accidents. The guide addresses the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.1A, Chapter V, and 6430.1, including the general requirement that DOE nuclear facilities be sited, designed, and operated in accordance with standards, codes, and guides consistent with those applied to comparable licensed nuclear facilities. The guide includes both philosophical and technical information in the areas of: siting guidelines doses applied to an offsite reference person; consideration also given to an onsite reference person; physical parameters, models, and assumptions to be applied when calculating doses for comparison to siting criteria; and potential accident consequences other than radiological dose to a reference person which might affect siting and major design features of the facility, such as environmental contamination, population dose, and associated public health effects. Recommendations and/or clarifications are provided where this could be done without adding new requirements. In this regard, the guide is considered a valuable aid to the safety analyst, especially where requirements have been subject to inconsistent interpretation or where analysis methods are in transition, such as use of dose model (ICRP 2 or ICRP 30) or use of probabilistic methods of risk analysis in the siting and design of nuclear facilities

  9. A new techniques in the physics of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The basic physics involved in the generation of X-rays and in the energy dependence of their interaction with matter are reviewed. Some applications of those ideas in both conventional X-ray imaging and in new imaging techniques are studied. Methods for the optimization of X-ray diagnostic imaging system are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  10. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided rendezvous technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Itoi, Takao; Sofuni, Atsushi; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Mukai, Shuntaro

    2016-04-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) requires deep biliary cannulation. When deep biliary cannulation is failed, the endoscopic ultrasonography rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) is a useful salvage method. From the previous 15 articles that included 382 EUS-RV cases, the overall success rate of EUS-RV is 81 % with a complication rate of 10 %. In EUS-RV, the bile duct is punctured under EUS guidance and a guidewire is advanced into the duodenum via the papilla. The EUS scope is then switched to a duodenoscope and inserted into the bile duct over the guidewire exiting the papilla, or the guidewire is grasped with forceps and passed through the working channel; the catheter can then be inserted through the papilla over the wire. There are three puncture routes for EUS-RV: transgastric puncture of the intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD), transduodenal puncture of the extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) via the proximal duodenum (D1), and transduodenal puncture of the EHBD via the second portion of the duodenum (D2). The puncture route for each patient should be selected based on the patient condition. GW selection for EUS-RV is critical, a hydrophilic GW is useful for this procedure. Although EUS-RV is now performed relatively routinely in a few high-volume centers, procedure standardization and the development of exclusive devices for EUS-RV are still underway. The development of exclusive devices for EUS-RV and prospective comparative studies with other salvage methods are needed to truly evaluate the procedure's usefulness and safety.

  11. Ultrasound-guided genitourinary interventions: principles and techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwan Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is often used to guide various interventional procedures in the genitourinary (GU tract because it can provide real-time imaging without any radiation hazard. Moreover, US can clearly visualize the pathway of an aspiration or biopsy needle to ensure the safety of the intervention. US guidance also helps clinicians to access lesions via the transabdominal, transhepatic, transvaginal, transrectal, and transperineal routes. Hence, US-guided procedures are useful for radiologists who wish to perform GU interventions. However, US-guided procedures and interventions are difficult for beginners because they involve a steep initial learning curve. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic principles and techniques of US-guided GU interventions.

  12. Ultrasound-guided genitourinary interventions: principles and techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Kwan [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Ultrasound (US) is often used to guide various interventional procedures in the genitourinary (GU) tract because it can provide real-time imaging without any radiation hazard. Moreover, US can clearly visualize the pathway of an aspiration or biopsy needle to ensure the safety of the intervention. US guidance also helps clinicians to access lesions via the transabdominal, transhepatic, transvaginal, transrectal, and transperineal routes. Hence, US-guided procedures are useful for radiologists who wish to perform GU interventions. However, US-guided procedures and interventions are difficult for beginners because they involve a steep initial learning curve. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic principles and techniques of US-guided GU interventions.

  13. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  14. Application gives the technique the analytic tree in the evaluation the effectiveness programs to radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Gonzalez, F.; Perez Velazquez, R.S.; Fornet Rodriguez, O.; Mustelier Hechevarria, A.; Miller Clemente, A.

    1998-01-01

    In the work we develop the IAEA recommendations in the application the analytic tree as instrument for the evaluation the effectiveness the occupational radiological protection programs. Is reflected like it has been assimilated and converted that technique in daily work istruments in the evaluation process the security conditions in the institutions that apply the nuclear techniques with a view to its autorization on the part of the regulatory organ

  15. Double contrast with technique of Insufflated Barium Meal in the radiological study of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallina, F.; Piga, V.; Gallina, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results are reported of the esophagus double contrast examination with Insufflated Barium Meal technique as first part of the routine upper digestive system radiological examination. This technique gives good double contrast without those artifacts using effervescent powders and without modifying the normal radiological alimentary tract examination established way. The double contrast is administered by a special container with a built-in mouthpiece which allows the simultaneous ingestion of barium suspension and air. The esophageal mucosa can be examined as far as the distal tract where frequently the barium contrast stops using different techniques. Good results in 90% of patients have been obtained. The early detection of inflammatory and tumoral lesions has taken particular advantage in patients sometimes asymptomatic

  16. Double contrast with technique of Insufflated Barium Meal in the radiological study of the esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallina, F; Piga, V; Gallina, M.S. and others

    1985-01-01

    The results are reported of the esophagus double contrast examination with Insufflated Barium Meal technique as first part of the routine upper digestive system radiological examination. This technique gives good double contrast without those artifacts using effervescent powders and without modifying the normal radiological alimentary tract examination established way. The double contrast is administered by a special container with a built-in mouthpiece which allows the simultaneous ingestion of barium suspension and air. The esophageal mucosa can be examined as far as the distal tract where frequently the barium contrast stops using different techniques. Good results in 90% of patients have been obtained. The early detection of inflammatory and tumoral lesions has taken particular advantage in patients sometimes asymptomatic.

  17. Radiological techniques in X-ray diagnosis and radiotherapy. 2. enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koecher, E.; Kriester, A.

    1990-01-01

    Since this textbook's first edition appeared in 1981 (INIS:14(13):764471, EDB:83(15):134474), there has been sweeping change in the field of radiological techniques. This is evident from the refinements made to visualisation techniques already used in the past, the development of further methods of imaging and the important role increasingly assumed by innovative computerized procedures. In view of this fact, the relevant curricula and the textbook were thoroughly revised, to keep abreast of the most recent trends. As a result, the new version offers additional contributions on numerous subject groups like 'Transportable X-Ray Units', 'X-Ray Units for Stomatology', 'Fundamentals of Digital Technique' and 'Ultrasound Tomography' as well as sections dealing with quality assurance and electric safety measures. On the other hand, physical and methodological aspects of radiology and radiotherapy, which had been given ample coverage in the first edition, were deliberately neglected here. (orig./HP) With 136 figs., 20 tabs [de

  18. Ultrasound-guided supra-acetabular pin placement in pelvic external fixation: description of a surgical technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chana-Rodríguez, Francisco; Cuervas-Mons, Manuel; Rojo-Manaute, José; Mora, Félix; Arnal, Juan; Vaquero-Martín, Javier

    2017-11-01

    Pelvic fracture in trauma patients can lead to hemodynamic instability. External fixation is a treatment capable of stabilizing these injuries in the context of damage control surgery. Supra-acetabular pin offers the greater biomechanical stability but requires the use of intraoperative fluoroscopy. The aim of this study was to analyze our results for an ultrasound-guided supra-acetabular pinning. Cross-sectional study with cadaveric specimens. Ultrasound-guided pin placement assessed by fluoroscopy and dissection. Fourteen ultrasound-guided supra-acetabular pins were placed in seven cadaveric specimens. Excellent placement in all cases, evaluated with radiological control. Good qualitative bone fixation after dissection. One femoral cutaneous nerve was not found during anatomic dissection and was assumed injured. Ultrasound-guided supra-acetabular pin placement is a feasible and effective technique. Our study indicates that pin placement without intraoperative fluoroscopy is feasible without compromising the reliability of its placement. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of neutron guide systems: Analysis techniques and an experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashev, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the in-depth study of the specific characteristics of the physical processes associated with the total reflection of neutrons from actual reflective coatings; the study of the process whereby neutrons transit a nonideal image channel with allowance for the aforementioned characteristics, and; the development of physical criteria and techniques for calculating the optimum geometry of a neutron guide source system based on the laws found to govern this transit process

  20. Success rates for computed tomography-guided musculoskeletal biopsies performed using a low-dose technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the success rate of a low-dose (50 % mAs reduction) computed tomography (CT) biopsy technique. This protocol was adopted based on other successful reduced-CT radiation dose protocols in our department, which were implemented in conjunction with quality improvement projects. The technique included a scout view and initial localizing scan with standard dose. Additional scans obtained for further guidance or needle adjustment were acquired by reducing the tube current-time product (mAs) by 50 %. The radiology billing data were searched for CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures performed over a period of 8 months following the initial implementation of the protocol. These were reviewed for the type of procedure and compliance with the implemented protocol. The compliant CT-guided biopsy cases were then retrospectively reviewed for patient demographics, tumor pathology, and lesion size. Pathology results were compared to the ultimate diagnoses and were categorized as diagnostic, accurate, or successful. Of 92 CT-guided procedures performed during this period, two were excluded as they were not biopsies (one joint injection and one drainage), 19 were excluded due to non-compliance (operators neglected to follow the protocol), and four were excluded due to lack of available follow-up in our electronic medical records. A total of 67 compliant biopsies were performed in 63 patients (two had two biopsies, and one had three biopsies). There were 32 males and 31 females with an average age of 50 (range, 15-84 years). Of the 67 biopsies, five were non-diagnostic and inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); five were diagnostic but inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); 57 were diagnostic and accurate thus successful (85 %). These results were comparable with results published in the radiology literature. The success rate of CT-guided biopsies using a low-dose protocol is comparable to published rates for conventional dose biopsies. The implemented low-dose protocol

  1. Success rates for computed tomography-guided musculoskeletal biopsies performed using a low-dose technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F. [UCLA Health System, Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the success rate of a low-dose (50 % mAs reduction) computed tomography (CT) biopsy technique. This protocol was adopted based on other successful reduced-CT radiation dose protocols in our department, which were implemented in conjunction with quality improvement projects. The technique included a scout view and initial localizing scan with standard dose. Additional scans obtained for further guidance or needle adjustment were acquired by reducing the tube current-time product (mAs) by 50 %. The radiology billing data were searched for CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures performed over a period of 8 months following the initial implementation of the protocol. These were reviewed for the type of procedure and compliance with the implemented protocol. The compliant CT-guided biopsy cases were then retrospectively reviewed for patient demographics, tumor pathology, and lesion size. Pathology results were compared to the ultimate diagnoses and were categorized as diagnostic, accurate, or successful. Of 92 CT-guided procedures performed during this period, two were excluded as they were not biopsies (one joint injection and one drainage), 19 were excluded due to non-compliance (operators neglected to follow the protocol), and four were excluded due to lack of available follow-up in our electronic medical records. A total of 67 compliant biopsies were performed in 63 patients (two had two biopsies, and one had three biopsies). There were 32 males and 31 females with an average age of 50 (range, 15-84 years). Of the 67 biopsies, five were non-diagnostic and inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); five were diagnostic but inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); 57 were diagnostic and accurate thus successful (85 %). These results were comparable with results published in the radiology literature. The success rate of CT-guided biopsies using a low-dose protocol is comparable to published rates for conventional dose biopsies. The implemented low-dose protocol

  2. Monitoring techniques for the impact assessment during nuclear and radiological emergencies: current status and the challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    Preparedness and response capability for Nuclear and Radiological emergencies, existing world over, are mainly based on the requirement of responding to radiation emergency caused by nuclear or radiological accidents. Cosmos satellite accident, plutonium contamination at Polaris, nuclear accidents like Kystium, Windscale, TMI and Chernobyl, radiological accidents at Goiania etc have demonstrated the requirement of improved radiation monitoring techniques. For quick decision making, state of the art monitoring methodology which can support quantitative and qualitative impact assessment is essential. Evaluation of radiological mapping of the area suspected to be contaminated needs ground based as well as aerial based monitoring systems to predict the level of radioactive contamination on ground. This will help in delineating the area and deciding the required countermeasures, based on the quantity and type of radionuclides responsible for it. The response can be successful with the effective use of i) Early Warning System ii) Mobile Monitoring System and iii) Aerial Gamma Spectrometric System. Selection of the monitoring methodology and survey parameters and assessment of situation using available resources etc. are to be optimized depending on the accident scenario. Recently, many countries and agencies like IAEA have expressed the requirement for responding to other types of nuclear/radiological emergencies i.e, man made radiation emergency situations aimed at harming public at large that can also lead to environmental contamination and significant exposure to public. Reports of lost / misplaced / stolen radioactive sources from many countries are alarming as safety and security of these radioactive sources are under challenge. The monitoring methodology has to take into account of the increase in such demands and more periodic monitoring in suspected locations is to be carried out. Detection of orphan sources possible amidst large heap of metallic scraps may pose

  3. Estimation of Postmortem Interval Using the Radiological Techniques, Computed Tomography: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of postmortem interval (PMI has been an important and difficult subject in the forensic study. It is a primary task of forensic work, and it can help guide the work in field investigation. With the development of computed tomography (CT technology, CT imaging techniques are now being more frequently applied to the field of forensic medicine. This study used CT imaging techniques to observe area changes in different tissues and organs of rabbits after death and the changing pattern of the average CT values in the organs. The study analyzed the relationship between the CT values of different organs and PMI with the imaging software Max Viewer and obtained multiparameter nonlinear regression equation of the different organs, and the study provided an objective and accurate method and reference information for the estimation of PMI in the forensic medicine. In forensic science, PMI refers to the time interval between the discovery or inspection of corpse and the time of death. CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and other imaging techniques have become important means of clinical examinations over the years. Although some scholars in our country have used modern radiological techniques in various fields of forensic science, such as estimation of injury time, personal identification of bodies, analysis of the cause of death, determination of the causes of injury, and identification of the foreign substances of bodies, there are only a few studies on the estimation of time of death. We detected the process of subtle changes in adult rabbits after death, the shape and size of tissues and organs, and the relationship between adjacent organs in three-dimensional space in an effort to develop new method for the estimation of PMI. The bodies of the dead rabbits were stored at 20°C room temperature, sealed condition, and prevented exposure to flesh flies. The dead rabbits were randomly divided into comparison group and experimental group. The whole

  4. [Thrombosis in vascular accesses for haemodialysis: rescue treatment using invasive vascular radiological techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Medina, J; Lacasa Pérez, N; Muray Cases, S; Pérez Garrido, I; García Medina, V

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to communicate our experience in the salvage of thrombosed haemodialysis vascular accesses using interventional radiology techniques. In the last four years, we have treated, by radiological means, 101 thrombosed haemodialysis vascular accesses. There were 44 autologous arteriovenous fistulas (43.56%) and 57 PTFE grafts (56.44%). There were 69 men (68.3%) and 32 women (31.7%). The mean age was 67.73 years (range 33-84). The mean vascular access age was 23.79 months (range 1-132). Manual catheter-directed aspiration was used. Fragmented, triturated or pushed the thrombus against the pulmonary circulation was avoided in all cases. 78 accesses were salvaged (77.2%). Autologous fistulas average and PTFE grafts success rate were 84.44% and 71.42% respectively. Angioplasty in one or more lesions after thromboaspiration was performed in all accesses, except six (5.9%). Metallic endoprostheses were implanted in 14 accesses (13.9%). Mean follow-up was 9 months (range 0-44). Primary patency was 42.3% +/- 5 at 6 months and 32% +/- 4 at one year. Autologous fistulas patency was better than PTFE grafts patency (p better than PTFE grafts. This justifies interventional radiology techniques in these situations.

  5. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  6. Radiological findings for hip dysplasia at skeletal maturity. Validation of digital and manual measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engesaeter, Ingvild Oevsteboe [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, The Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bergen (Norway); Laborie, Lene Bjerke; Rosendahl, Karen [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); Lehmann, Trude Gundersen; Fevang, Jonas; Engesaeter, Lars Birger [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bergen (Norway); Sera, Francesco [University College London Institute of Child Health, Medical Research Council Centre of Epidemiology for Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Pedersen, Douglas; Morcuende, Jose [University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Iowa City, IA (United States); Lie, Stein Atle [Uni Health, Uni Research, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-07-15

    To report on intra-observer, inter-observer, and inter-method reliability and agreement for radiological measurements used in the diagnosis of hip dysplasia at skeletal maturity, as obtained by a manual and a digital measurement technique. Pelvic radiographs from 95 participants (56 females) in a follow-up hip study of 18- to 19-year-old patients were included. Eleven radiological measurements relevant for hip dysplasia (Sharp's, Wiberg's, and Ogata's angles; acetabular roof angle of Toennis; articulo-trochanteric distance; acetabular depth-width ratio; femoral head extrusion index; maximum teardrop width; and the joint space width in three different locations) were validated. Three observers measured the radiographs using both a digital measurement program and manually in AgfaWeb1000. Inter-method and inter- and intra-observer agreement were analyzed using the mean differences between the readings/readers, establishing the 95% limits of agreement. We also calculated the minimum detectable change and the intra-class correlation coefficient. Large variations among different radiological measurements were demonstrated. However, the variation was not related to the use of either the manual or digital measurement technique. For measurements with greater absolute values (Sharp's angle, femoral head extrusion index, and acetabular depth-width ratio) the inter- and intra-observer and inter-method agreements were better as compared to measurements with lower absolute values (acetabular roof angle, teardrop and joint space width). The inter- and intra-observer variation differs notably across different radiological measurements relevant for hip dysplasia at skeletal maturity, a fact that should be taken into account in clinical practice. The agreement between the manual and digital methods is good. (orig.)

  7. Radiological findings for hip dysplasia at skeletal maturity. Validation of digital and manual measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engesæter, Ingvild Øvstebø; Laborie, Lene Bjerke; Lehmann, Trude Gundersen; Sera, Francesco; Fevang, Jonas; Pedersen, Douglas; Morcuende, José; Lie, Stein Atle; Engesæter, Lars Birger; Rosendahl, Karen

    2012-07-01

    To report on intra-observer, inter-observer, and inter-method reliability and agreement for radiological measurements used in the diagnosis of hip dysplasia at skeletal maturity, as obtained by a manual and a digital measurement technique. Pelvic radiographs from 95 participants (56 females) in a follow-up hip study of 18- to 19-year-old patients were included. Eleven radiological measurements relevant for hip dysplasia (Sharp's, Wiberg's, and Ogata's angles; acetabular roof angle of Tönnis; articulo-trochanteric distance; acetabular depth-width ratio; femoral head extrusion index; maximum teardrop width; and the joint space width in three different locations) were validated. Three observers measured the radiographs using both a digital measurement program and manually in AgfaWeb1000. Inter-method and inter- and intra-observer agreement were analyzed using the mean differences between the readings/readers, establishing the 95% limits of agreement. We also calculated the minimum detectable change and the intra-class correlation coefficient. Large variations among different radiological measurements were demonstrated. However, the variation was not related to the use of either the manual or digital measurement technique. For measurements with greater absolute values (Sharp's angle, femoral head extrusion index, and acetabular depth-width ratio) the inter- and intra-observer and inter-method agreements were better as compared to measurements with lower absolute values (acetabular roof angle, teardrop and joint space width). The inter- and intra-observer variation differs notably across different radiological measurements relevant for hip dysplasia at skeletal maturity, a fact that should be taken into account in clinical practice. The agreement between the manual and digital methods is good.

  8. Duty to Inform and Informed Consent in Diagnostic Radiology: How Ethics and Law can Better Guide Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudenkova, Victoria; Bélisle Pipon, Jean-Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Although there is consensus on the fact that ionizing radiation used in radiological examinations can affect health, the stochastic (random) nature of risk makes it difficult to anticipate and assess specific health implications for patients. The issue of radiation protection is peculiar as any dosage received in life is cumulative, the sensitivity to radiation is highly variable from one person to another, and between 20 % and 50 % of radiological examinations appear not to be necessary. In this context, one might reasonably assume that information and patient consent would play an important role in regulating radiological practice. However, there is to date no clear consensus regarding the nature and content of-or even need for-consent by patients exposed to ionizing radiation. While law and ethics support the same principles for respecting the dignity of the person (inviolability and integrity), in the context of radiology practice, they do not provide a consistent message to guide clinical decision-making. This article analyzes the issue of healthcare professionals' duty to inform and obtain patient consent for radiological examinations. Considering that both law and ethics have as one of their aims to protect vulnerable populations, it is important that they begin to give greater attention to issues raised by the use of ionizing radiation in medicine. While the situation in Canada serves as a backdrop for a reflective analysis of the problem, the conclusions are pertinent for professional practice in other jurisdictions because the principles underlying health law and jurisprudence are fairly general.

  9. Opportunity of interventional radiology: advantages and application of interventional technique in biological target therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng Gaojun; Lu Qin

    2007-01-01

    Interventional techniques not only provide opportunity of treatment for many diseases, but also alter the traditional therapeutic pattern. With the new century of wide application of biological therapies, interventional technique also shows extensive roles. The current biological therapy, including gene therapy, cell transplantation therapy, immunobiologic molecule therapy containing cell factors, tumor antibody or vaccine, recombined proteins, radioactive-particles and targeting materials therapy, can be locally administrated by interventional techniques. The combination of targeting biological therapies and high-targeted interventional technique holds advantages of minimal invasion, accurate delivery, vigorous local effect, and less systemic adverse reactions. Authors believe that the biological therapy may arise a great opportunity for interventional radiology, therefore interventional colleagues should grasp firmly and promptly for the development and extension in this field. (authors)

  10. Diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux in adult patients by radiology and isotope-imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigo, J.E.; Gutierrez Amares, M.T.; Bascuas, A.; Bueno Becerra, A.; Sousa, R.; Conde, M.A.; Bascuas, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative radiological and nuclear medicine in 191 adult patients, with a clinical diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflex, emphatizing the radiological role in diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflex. (author)

  11. Practical interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, J.; Schreyer, H.

    1991-01-01

    The book is intended as a practical guide and manual for interventional radiology applications. Main emphasis is placed on the performance of the various techniques, with explanations of the various steps to be taken, illustrated by drawings or pictures. Indications, contra-indications and clinical achievements are given in brief. There is one chapter each for the following techniques: angioplasty - intra-arterial fibrinolysis - vascular stents - neuroembolisation - embolisation of other vessels - biliary interventions - abscess drainage - nephrostomy and ureteral manipulations -percutaneous fine-needle biopsy - vena cava filters - interventional radiology in infants. (orig.)

  12. CT-guided injection for ganglion impar blockade: a radiological approach to the management of coccydynia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datir, A.; Connell, D.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in needle placement for ganglion impar blocks, and to determine the efficacy of CT-guided ganglion impar blocks in the management of coccydynia. Materials and methods: The results of ganglion impar blockade in eight patients with coccydynia secondary to trauma or unknown cause were reviewed. The diagnosis of coccydynia was based on clinical history, location of pain, and response to previous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The eight patients were treated with CT-guided ganglion impar blocks to manage their coccyx pain after conservative procedures, including oral medication and cushions, failed to provide relief. All patients were subjected to ganglion impar blocks under a thin-section CT-guided technique for needle placement, using a mixture of bupivacaine and triamcinolone. The patients were followed-up for a period of 6-months. Results: Eight patients were treated in this study with a total of 11 injections. A technical success of 100% was achieved in all cases with accurate needle placement without any complications and all the patients tolerated the procedure well. Out of eight, three patients (37%) had complete relief of pain on the follow-up intervals up to 6 months. Three out of eight patients (37%), had partial relief of symptoms and a second repeat injection was given at the 3 month interval of the follow-up period. At the end of the 6-month follow-up period, six out of eight patients (75%) experienced symptomatic relief (four complete relief and two partial relief) without any additional resort to conventional pain management. Twenty-five percent (two out of eight) did not have any symptomatic improvement. The mean visual analogue score (VAS) pre-procedure was 8 (range 6-10) and had decreased to 2 (range 0-5) in six out of eight patients. Conclusion: CT can be used as an imaging method to identify the ganglion and guide the needle in ganglion impar blockade. The advantages of CT-guided

  13. CT-guided injection for ganglion impar blockade: a radiological approach to the management of coccydynia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datir, A., E-mail: apdatir@gmail.co [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Connell, D. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in needle placement for ganglion impar blocks, and to determine the efficacy of CT-guided ganglion impar blocks in the management of coccydynia. Materials and methods: The results of ganglion impar blockade in eight patients with coccydynia secondary to trauma or unknown cause were reviewed. The diagnosis of coccydynia was based on clinical history, location of pain, and response to previous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The eight patients were treated with CT-guided ganglion impar blocks to manage their coccyx pain after conservative procedures, including oral medication and cushions, failed to provide relief. All patients were subjected to ganglion impar blocks under a thin-section CT-guided technique for needle placement, using a mixture of bupivacaine and triamcinolone. The patients were followed-up for a period of 6-months. Results: Eight patients were treated in this study with a total of 11 injections. A technical success of 100% was achieved in all cases with accurate needle placement without any complications and all the patients tolerated the procedure well. Out of eight, three patients (37%) had complete relief of pain on the follow-up intervals up to 6 months. Three out of eight patients (37%), had partial relief of symptoms and a second repeat injection was given at the 3 month interval of the follow-up period. At the end of the 6-month follow-up period, six out of eight patients (75%) experienced symptomatic relief (four complete relief and two partial relief) without any additional resort to conventional pain management. Twenty-five percent (two out of eight) did not have any symptomatic improvement. The mean visual analogue score (VAS) pre-procedure was 8 (range 6-10) and had decreased to 2 (range 0-5) in six out of eight patients. Conclusion: CT can be used as an imaging method to identify the ganglion and guide the needle in ganglion impar blockade. The advantages of CT-guided

  14. Radiological protection in the interventional techniques: experience in the Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ; Proteccion radiologica en las tecnicas intervencionistas: experiencia en la Clinica del Dolor del CIMEQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, M. C.; Benitez N, P. P.; Gonzalez G, Y. [Centro de Investigaciones Medico Quirurgicas, Av. 216 Esq. 11B, Playa Siboney, 6096 La Habana (Cuba); Martinez G, A.; Gonzalez R, N. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Carretera de la Cantera, Victoria II, Km. 21.5 Guanabacoa, La Habana (Cuba); Sanchez Z, L. R., E-mail: mayka@infomed.sld.cu [Hospital C. Q. Hermanos Ameijeiras, San Lazaro 701, Centro Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-08-15

    The Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ offers treatment to patients with different pathologies, using interventional techniques as the radiology like visual guide to reach the target structure and to apply the election technique. The personnel that carry out these procedures are inserted in the program of radiological surveillance of the institution, reason for which a radiological event could be detected where the main physician responsible of the service was implied. In this work the results of an investigation are presented realized with the objective of to know the causes of the event and to determine the necessary measures to avoid that this repeats again. The investigation was oriented to three fundamental aspects: medical exam of the affected worker; evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point; and dosimetric measurements simulating the real conditions of work for which were used ionization chamber, radiometer and PMMA mannequin. As a result of the medical exam was detected that the main physician of the service did not use during the execution of all the procedures the extremities dosimetry and that he presented a radio induced erythema in the right hand, reason for which he was separated of the activity with ionizing radiations, until the conclusion of the investigation. With relationship to the evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point, was verified that the medical physician not carried out any collimation of the beam and he was located in the positions where the dose rate reached the maximum values, frequently introducing the hands in the direct beam; that which implied an overexposure of the superior extremities and a not optimized exposure for whole body. This result was proven with the realized experimental measurements, which gave dose estimated values in extremities of the order of the deterministic effects. The investigation facilitated to introduce modifications in the

  15. Federal guide for a radiological response: Supporting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission during the initial hours of a serious accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, R.T.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a planning guide for those Federal agencies that work with the Nuclear Regulatory commission (NRC) during the initial hours of response to a serious radiological emergency in which the NRC is the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). These Federal agencies are: DOE, EPA, USDA, HHS, NOAA, and FEMA. This guide is intended to help these agencies prepare for a prompt response. Instructions are provided on receiving the initial notification, the type of person to send to the scene, the facility at which people are needed, how to get them to that facility, and what they should do when they arrive. Federal agencies not specifically mentioned in this guide may also be asked to support the NRC

  16. Building Virtual Models by Postprocessing Radiology Images: A Guide for Anatomy Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Matthew D. B. S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiology and radiologists are recognized as increasingly valuable resources for the teaching and learning of anatomy. State-of-the-art radiology department workstations with industry-standard software applications can provide exquisite demonstrations of anatomy, pathology, and more recently, physiology. Similar advances in personal computers and…

  17. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  18. A novel osteogenesis technique: The expansible guided bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Zakaria

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Guided bone regeneration is a unique osteogenesis technique that requires a barrier membrane under periosteum to create space for bone regeneration. However, creating sizeable spaces is clinically not commonly feasible. A titanium plate and a thin silicone membrane were surgically layered on each calvaria of eight rabbits. Then, the periphery of the silicone membrane was fixed by a plastic ring to the underlying bone using titanium micro screws. After 1 week, a 5-mm-length titanium screw was used to elevate the titanium plate, which in turn elevated the silicone membrane together with overlying soft tissue in a rate of 1 mm/day for 5 days to create a secluded space. Animals were killed at 2 months (n = 4, group 1 and 4 months (n = 4, group 2 after the elevation. Histological and microradiographical analyses demonstrated creation of an amount of de novo bone formation (68.2 ± 22 mm3 in group 1 and 70.3 ± 14 mm3 in group 2 in the sizeable created spaces (207.1 ± 31 mm3 in group 1 and 202 ± 21 mm3 in group 2 without exposure of the device. This novel osteogenesis technique, “expansible guided bone regeneration,” created a substantial in vivo incubator without applying growth factors or osteoprogenitor cells. Creating a growing space over the secluded surface allowed the development of normal biological healing process occurring on the bone surface into a regenerative process, generating bone outside the genetically determined skeletal bone. This technique is a new tissue engineering approach stimulating endogenous tissue repair without applying cells or factors exogenously.

  19. CT-guided puncture for direct MR-arthrography of the shoulder: Description of possible techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauth E

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The following report describes the possible techniques of CT-guided puncture for direct magnetic resonance (MR arthrography of the shoulder. CT-guided puncture can be regarded as an alternative technique to fluoroscopic- or ultrasound-guided puncture for MR-arthrography of the shoulder with high efficiency, low dose and extremely low complication rate.

  20. Emerging Technologies and Techniques for Wide Area Radiological Survey and Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-24

    Technologies to survey and decontaminate wide-area contamination and process the subsequent radioactive waste have been developed and implemented following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant release and the breach of a radiological source resulting in contamination in Goiania, Brazil. These civilian examples of radioactive material releases provided some of the first examples of urban radiological remediation. Many emerging technologies have recently been developed and demonstrated in Japan following the release of radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011. Information on technologies reported by several Japanese government agencies, such as the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) and the National Institute for Environmental Science (NIES), together with academic institutions and industry are summarized and compared to recently developed, deployed and available technologies in the United States. The technologies and techniques presented in this report may be deployed in response to a wide area contamination event in the United States. In some cases, additional research and testing is needed to adequately validate the technology effectiveness over wide areas. Survey techniques can be deployed on the ground or from the air, allowing a range of coverage rates and sensitivities. Survey technologies also include those useful in measuring decontamination progress and mapping contamination. Decontamination technologies and techniques range from non-destructive (e.g., high pressure washing) and minimally destructive (plowing), to fully destructive (surface removal or demolition). Waste minimization techniques can greatly impact the long-term environmental consequences and cost following remediation efforts. Recommendations on technical improvements to address technology gaps are presented together with observations on remediation in Japan.

  1. Stakeholder involvement techniques. A short guide and annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created under a mandate from the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue amongst all stakeholders, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. FSC documents may be obtained online at www.nea.fr/html/rwrnifsc.html. OECD countries are increasingly implementing forms of participatory democracy that will require new or enhanced forms of dialogue amongst a broader range of concerned parties. The 4. regular FSC meeting held in Paris in May 2003 included a topical session on Stakeholder involvement tools: Criteria for choice and evaluation. The internal Minutes of the 4. meeting noted, in response to the discussions initiated by this topical session: 'Given that FSC members have one specific issue - radioactive waste management (RWM) - to deal with, a continuing relationship and dialogue among stakeholders seems important. What is desired is a well-informed citizen, because this is - in the end - an issue of democracy. Perhaps we have suffered in our field from a lack of recognition that RWM, like others, is an issue of democracy as well as a technical one'. At the close of the topical session, it was agreed that the FSC would prepare a short guide on stakeholder involvement techniques. The present guide approaches the topic from the point of view of radioactive waste management. However, because dialogue and deliberation techniques can be used in many fields, it will be of interest to a wide readership. It includes an annotated bibliography pointing to easily accessible handbooks and other resources. (author)

  2. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howlett, David, E-mail: david.howlett@esht.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom); Vincent, Tim [Department of IT, Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) (United Kingdom); Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom); Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola [Department of Medicine, Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton (United Kingdom); Fairclough, Jil [Department of IT, Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) (United Kingdom); Taylor, Nick [Department of Medical Illustration, Eastbourne District General Hospital (United Kingdom); Miles, Ken [Department of Imaging, BSMS (United Kingdom); Cohen, Jon [Department of Infectious Diseases, BSMS (United Kingdom); Vincent, Richard [Department of Cardiology, BSMS (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. Materials and methods: The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. Results: In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Conclusion: Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of

  3. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, David; Vincent, Tim; Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma; Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola; Fairclough, Jil; Taylor, Nick; Miles, Ken; Cohen, Jon; Vincent, Richard

    2011-06-01

    To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of radiology. Efficient IT links and good image quality

  4. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, David; Vincent, Tim; Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma; Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola; Fairclough, Jil; Taylor, Nick; Miles, Ken; Cohen, Jon; Vincent, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. Materials and methods: The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. Results: In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Conclusion: Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of

  5. Comparative analysis of dose levels to patients in radiological procedures guided by fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Pablo Luis; Fernandez, Manuel; Ramos, Julio A.; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Cons, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the comparative data of the dose indicators for patient in radiological processes with respect to the values published in the ICRP document. It is analyzed the need for different strategies to communicate to different specialists mechanisms to optimize the radiation beginning with practice by training of second degree level in radiological protection and then, working with them the basics of equipment management to reduce doses without detriment to the welfare purpose

  6. Study of an optimization protocol for radiographic techniques in computerized radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrantes, Marcos Eugenio Silva

    2015-01-01

    This work is designed to produce information for the improvement of image quality to deployment in a radiology department based on previous reviews of the images by questionnaires of acceptance and quality e recognition of the parameters used in chest radiographic techniques. The data collected were divided by male, female, PA and LAT thickness, body mass index, biotypes, anthropomorphic parameters and body evaluation associated with constant voltage and the additional filtration. The results show the predominance of 35 and 40 constants with additional filtration from 0.5 to 1.5 mmAl, voltage in male: (PA and LAT) 86-92 kV and 96-112 kV, female: 85-98 kV and 96-112 kV. The charge applied to the tube for males: (PA and LAT) 5-10 mA.s and 5-16 mA.s, female: (PA and LAT) 6.3-8 mA.s and 9-14 mA.s. Absorbed doses for males: (PA and PF) 0.04-0.17 mGy and 0.03-0.19 mGy and from female (PA and PF) from 0.03-0.22 mGy and 0, 04-0.17 mGy. This procedure can be used in radiology department to implement and acceptance in the quality of images. (author)

  7. Elaboration of protocols as a guide in musculoskeletal ultrasound for radiology service of the Hospital Doctor Rafael A. Calderon Guardia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Hernandez, Luis Diego

    2010-01-01

    A protocol to guide residents and attending physicians at the Hospital Dr. Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia has been provided for regulating the work in the field the ultrasound of muscles, tendons and sonography. The staff has handled the ultrasound devices must understand the basis of the interaction of acoustic energy to the tissues and to know the methods and instruments have been used to produce and improve the quality of the image obtained. The guide ultrasound normal locomotor allowed to have a model for service members and medical imaging radiology hospital; it has been prepared through a comprehensive literature review based on textbooks and current articles concerning the most important theoretical bases of the Doppler study, which covers the assessment of shoulder, elbow, wrist, knee and ankle. The data obtained in the study process, facilitated access to printed and digital information, which has led to diagnostic certainty and reliability of results. (author) [es

  8. Percutaneous cecostomy: Laboratory and clinical experience with a new radiologic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Wittich, G.R.; Stavas, J.; Quinn, S.F.; Gibbs, J.; Macaulay, S.; Schecter, M.S.; Edwards, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    Percutaneous cecostomy or colostomy is a new interventional radiology procedure used for colonic decompression due to mechanical obstruction or pseudoobstruction. This paper describes our laboratory and initial clinical work with percutaneous colostomy. In our initial nine patient, it has served as a temporizing (five patients), definitive (three patients), or inadvertent maneuver (one patient). Methods of guidance were CT (three patients) and fluoroscopy (six patients). Catheters were placed both transperitoneally and retroperitoneally; laboratory work focused on these paths of introduction as well as catheter insertion and catheter type. The authors used catheters with retention devices preferentially, and these permit adherence of the colon to the abdominal wall. Both Seldinger and trocar techniques have been utilized. Leakage has resulted in minor abdominal pain; no patient has required operation due to percutaneous cecostomy. All procedures were successful and accomplished their goal

  9. The value of preoperative ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of radiologically suspicious axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torill Sauer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preoperative ultrasound (US and eventually US-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of suspicious axillary lymph nodes (ALN is a standard procedure in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions. Preoperative US FNAC may prevent sentinel node biopsy (SNB procedure in 24-30% of patients with early stage breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the institutional results of this preoperative diagnostic procedure. Materials and Methods: A total of 182 cases of preoperative FNAC of suspicious ALN where retrieved from the pathology files. The results were compared with the final histology and staging. False negative (FN FNAC cases were reviewed and possibly missed metastatic cases (2 were immunostained with the epithelial marker AE1/AE3. Results: There were no false positives, whereas 16 cases were FN. In all but one case the FN′s represented sampling error. Half of the 16 FN cases in this series were macrometastases. Discussion: About 83% of the preoperatively aspirated cases were N+, indicating that a radiologically suspicious ALN has a very high risk of being metastatic. Preoperative US guided FNAC from radiologically suspicious ALN is highly efficient in detecting metastases. Depending on national guidelines, a preoperative, positive ALN FNAC might help to stratify the patients as to SNB and/or ALN dissection.

  10. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: comparison with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imschweiler, Thomas; Freiwald, Bianka; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A. [Kantonspital Baden AG, Institute for Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Haueisen, Harald [Kantonspital Aarau AG, Institute for Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); Kampmann, Gert [Clinica Sant' Anna, Lugano, Sorengo (Switzerland); Rageth, Luzi [Adjumed Services AG, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Division of Biostatistics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Rageth, Christoph [Breast Centre, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    To analyse the development of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) in Switzerland and to compare the procedure with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB. We performed a retrospective analysis of VABs between 2009 and 2011. A total of 9,113 VABs were performed. Of these, 557 were MRI guided. MRI-guided VAB showed the highest growth rate (97 %) of all three procedures. The technical success rates for MRI-guided, stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB were 98.4 % (548/557), 99.1 % (5,904/5,960) and 99.6 % (2,585/2,596), respectively. There were no significant differences (P = 0.12) between the MRI-guided and the stereotactically guided procedures. The technical success rate for ultrasound-guided VAB was significantly higher than that for MRI-guided VAB (P < 0.001). There were no complications using MRI-guided VAB requiring open surgery. The malignancy diagnosis rate for MRI-guided VAB was similar to that for stereotactically guided VAB (P = 0.35). MRI-guided VAB is a safe and accurate procedure that provides insight into clinical breast findings. (orig.)

  11. Radiology of non-spinal pain procedures. A guide for the interventionalist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Mubin I.; Shaikh, Azin

    2011-01-01

    Most interventionalists are not radiologists and most radiologists do not understand interventional pain procedures. Nevertheless, interventionalists order extensive diagnostic imaging in the workup prior to any intervention. Against this background, this handy, well-illustrated manual has been designed to meet the major need of interventional pain physicians to understand the radiologic imaging involved in the performance of non-spinal pain procedures. It provides information on such topics as radiologic anatomy, the radiologic manifestations of indications and contraindications to interventional procedures, and the radiologic appearance of complications that may arise from these procedures. In addition, it will be useful for the diagnostic radiologist, who may be unaware of many of the interventional pain procedures. The chosen format will ensure that the reader is quickly able to reference any given procedure. Sections are devoted to the head and neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. As this is a guidebook, it does not encompass every single pathologic entity that may be encountered; however, the commonly performed non-spinal pain procedures are included. This text will prove essential for any interventionalist who does not have easy access to a radiologist and vice versa. (orig.)

  12. Radiology of non-spinal pain procedures. A guide for the interventionalist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Mubin I. [Dayton Interventional Radiology, Dayton, OH (United States); Shaikh, Azin

    2011-07-01

    Most interventionalists are not radiologists and most radiologists do not understand interventional pain procedures. Nevertheless, interventionalists order extensive diagnostic imaging in the workup prior to any intervention. Against this background, this handy, well-illustrated manual has been designed to meet the major need of interventional pain physicians to understand the radiologic imaging involved in the performance of non-spinal pain procedures. It provides information on such topics as radiologic anatomy, the radiologic manifestations of indications and contraindications to interventional procedures, and the radiologic appearance of complications that may arise from these procedures. In addition, it will be useful for the diagnostic radiologist, who may be unaware of many of the interventional pain procedures. The chosen format will ensure that the reader is quickly able to reference any given procedure. Sections are devoted to the head and neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. As this is a guidebook, it does not encompass every single pathologic entity that may be encountered; however, the commonly performed non-spinal pain procedures are included. This text will prove essential for any interventionalist who does not have easy access to a radiologist and vice versa. (orig.)

  13. Distance Education Techniques to Assist Skills of Tourist Guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Balta, Sabah

    2007-01-01

    This study is a presentation of the usage of distance education technologies in a bid to support face to face education of tourist guide candidates during the training tour. The laws require tourist guide candidates to successfully complete their internship tour and get a certificate. Since the time in this internship period is limited and there…

  14. Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsin, H.; Stephanazzi, J.; Lambert, F.; Curet, P.M.; Gourmelon, P.

    2002-01-01

    Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents. After a severe burn, the injured person is weakened by a risk of infection and a general inflammation. The necrotic tissues have to be removed because they are toxic for the organism. The injured person also needs to be covered by a cutaneous envelope, which has to be done by a treatment centre for burned people. The different techniques are the following: - auto grafts on limited burned areas; - cutaneous substitutes to cover temporary extended burned areas. Among them: natural substitutes like xenografts (pork skin, sheep skin,..) or allografts (human skin), - treated natural substitutes which only maintain the extracellular matrix. Artificial skins belong to this category and allow the development of high quality scars, - cell cultures in the laboratory: multiplying the individual cells and grafting them onto the patient. This technique is not common but allows one to heal severely injured patients. X-ray burns are still a problem. Their characteristics are analysed: intensive, permanent, antalgic resistant pain. They are difficult to compare with heat burns. In spite of a small number of known cases, we can give some comments and guidance on radio necrosis cures: the importance of the patients comfort, of ending the pain, of preventing infection, and nutritional balance. At the level of epidermic inflammation and phlyctena (skin blisters), the treatment may be completed by the use of growth factors. At the level of necrosis, after a temporary cover, an auto graft can be considered only if a healthy basis is guaranteed. The use of cellular cultures in order to obtain harmonious growth factors can be argued. (author)

  15. Medical response guide for the initial phase of a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Marina A.; Perez, Maria del R.

    2007-01-01

    In case of a sanitary emergency, the local community and its health care system are the first aid providers. Therefore, preparedness through education and training programs would allow emergency systems to provide an appropriate first medical response. The main objective of this guide is to give basic guidelines for the medical response management after situations involving radioactive materials, in an easy and simple way. The information contained in this guide is addressed to health care personnel of any local assistance center. (author) [es

  16. Worldwide Implementation of Digital Imaging in Radiology. A Resource Guide. In Cooperation with the World Health Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides a basic introduction to digital technology and digital networks as well as an overview of the issues to consider when implementing such technology in diagnostic radiology. In an area that is under rapid development, it provides a careful analysis of the principles and advice on implementation and sustainability of digital imaging and teleradiology. The transition from film to digitally based medical imaging is complex and requires knowledge and planning to be successful. This comprehensive resource guide contains information on the needs and implications of a transition to digital imaging with case studies for different facilities requiring different levels of communication connectivity. It is aimed at hospital administrators and managers, radiologists and radiographers/technologists, medical physicists and clinical engineers as well as information technology staff

  17. A Study on Techniques for Focusing Circumferential Array Guided Waves for Long Range Inspection of Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, To; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Cho, Young Do; Lee, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hyun Joon

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been widely utilized for long range inspection of structures. Especially, development of array guided waves techniques and its application for long range gas pipe lines(length of from hundreds meters to few km) were getting increased. In this study, focusing algorithm for array guided waves was developed in order to improve long range inspectability and accuracy of the array guided waves techniques for long range inspection of gas pipes, and performance of the developed techniques was verified by experiments using the developed array guided wave system. As a result, S/N ratio of array guided wave signals obtained with the focusing algorithm was increased higher than that of signals without focusing algorithm

  18. Individualization of radiographic techniques in computerized radiology; Individualizacao das tecnicas radiograficas em radiologia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrantes, M.E.S.; Oliveira, A.H. de, E-mail: marcosabrantes2003@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Feliz, W.F.; Stoppa, L.G.; Paiva, O.A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFADTI/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Unidade Funcional Apoio Diagnostico e Terapeutica por Imagem; Oliveira, G.A.P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem

    2015-07-01

    This work aims to produce information for image quality implementation in a radiology sector based on previous assessments of the images by questionnaires, acceptance and quality, as step of recognition of the parameters used in radiographic techniques. After this research data raised were divided into male group, female, PA and PF thickness, body mass index, type of biotypes, anthropomorphic parameters, body evaluation associated with the constant tension and additional filtration. The results show the predominance of the 35 and 40 constant with additional filtering from 0.5 to 1.5 mmAl, voltage for male gender (PA PF) 86-92 kV and 96-112 kV voltage for female gender of 85-98 kV and 96-112 kV, respectively. The load applied to the tube for males (PA and PF) is between 5-10 and 5-16 mA.s mA.s and for females (PA and PF) is between 6.3 to 8 mA.s and 9-14 mA.s.

  19. Clinical and radiological studies upon a combined method for guided bone regeneration in experimental mandibular defects in dogs - a preliminary communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borissov, I.; Uzunov, N.; Paskalev, M.

    2004-01-01

    The treated bone defects were compared clinically and radiologically. After a 3-month period of survey, the best results were obtained in the group treated with partially demineralized bone matrix, enzymatically processed and lyophilized dura mater and mucoperiosteal flap. The placement of titanium screw dental implants did not impair the guided bone regeneration, that was confirmed by their good osteointegration

  20. Analysis of Defective Pipings in Nuclear Power Plants and Applications of Guided Ultrasonic Wave Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Park, Chi Seung; Park, Jae Suck; Choi, H. R.; Jung, S. S.

    2006-07-01

    In order to apply the guided ultrasonic techniques to the pipes in nuclear power plants, the cases of defective pipes of nuclear power plants, were investigated. It was confirmed that geometric factors of pipes, such as location, shape, and allowable space were impertinent for the application of guided ultrasonic techniques to pipes of nuclear power plants. The quality of pipes, supports, signals analysis of weldment/defects, acquisition of accurate defects signals also make difficult to apply the guided ultrasonic techniques to pipes of nuclear power plants. Thus, a piping mock-up representing the pipes in the nuclear power plants were designed and fabricated. The artificial flaws will be fabricated on the piping mock-up. The signals of guided ultrasonic waves from the artificial flaws will be analyzed. The guided ultrasonic techniques will be applied to the inspection of pipes of nuclear power plants according to the basis of signals analysis of artificial flaws in the piping mock-up

  1. RadCon: A radiological consequences model. Technical guide - Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J; Domel, R.U.; Harris, F.F.; Twining, J.R.

    2000-05-01

    A Radiological Consequence model (RadCon) is being developed at ANSTO to assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in any climate, using appropriate meteorological and radiological transfer parameters. The major areas of interest to the developers are tropical and subtropical climates. This is particularly so given that it is anticipated that nuclear energy will become a mainstay for economies in these regions within the foreseeable future. Therefore, data acquisition and use of parameter values have been concentrated primarily on these climate types. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition for Australia can be modelled and supplied by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC, one of five in the world) which is part of the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC), Puri et al. (1992). RadCon combines these data (i.e. the time dependent air and ground concentration generated by the dispersion model or measured quantities in the case of an actual incident) with specific regional parameter values to determine the dose to people via the major pathways of external and internal irradiation. For the external irradiation calculations, data are needed on lifestyle information such as the time spent indoors/outdoors, the high/low physical activity rates for different groups of people (especially critical groups) and shielding factors for housing types. For the internal irradiation calculations, data are needed on food consumption, effect of food processing, transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) and interception values appropriate for the region under study. Where the relevant data are not available default temperate data are currently used. The results of a wide ranging literature search has highlighted where specific research will be initiated to determine the information required for tropical and sub-tropical regions. The user is able to initiate sensitivity analyses within RadCon. This allows the parameters to be ranked in

  2. Proposal of a technical guide for the evaluation and management of the solitary pulmonary nodule in function of the radiological characteristics obtained by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinton Hidalgo, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    A guide is proposed to guide clinical personnel in early diagnosis, assessment and management of the solitary pulmonary nodule, with high potential of to develop lung cancer, in function of the radiological characteristics obtained by computed tomography. The management of patients with diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodule is standardized with the purpose of to unify diagnostic criteria in a multidisciplinary and institutional environment. Tomographic radiological characteristics are described to allow the suspicion of the solitary pulmonary nodule benignity or malignity. A flow diagram is developed to guide the physician to an adequate monitoring, control and eventual therapeutic treatment. A clear and structured perspective of the diagnostic and therapeutic process is provided to the treating physician and patient [es

  3. Standard Guide for Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance of Radiologically Contaminated Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide outlines a method for developing a Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) plan for inactive nuclear facilities. It describes the steps and activities necessary to prevent loss or release of radioactive or hazardous materials, and to minimize physical risks between the deactivation phase and the start of facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). 1.2 The primary concerns for S&M are related to (1) animal intrusion, (2) structural integrity degradation, (3) water in-leakage, (4) contamination migration, (5) unauthorized personnel entry, and (6) theft/intrusion. This document is intended to serve as a guide only, and is not intended to modify existing regulations.

  4. Glenohumeral joint injection: a comparative study of ultrasound and fluoroscopically guided techniques before MR arthrography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.; Collins, J.M.; Maresch, B.J.; Smeets, J.H.R.; Janssen, C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Jager, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the variability in accuracy of contrast media introduction, leakage, required time and patient discomfort in four different centres, each using a different image-guided glenohumeral injection technique. Each centre included 25 consecutive patients. The ultrasound-guided anterior (USa) and

  5. Percutaneous tracheostomy with the guide wire dilating forceps technique : presentation of 171 consecutive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, Bernard G; van Heerbeek, Niels; Krabbe, Paul F M; Marres, Henri A M; van den Hoogen, Frank J A

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of percutaneous tracheostomy (PT) with the guide wire dilating forceps (GWDF) technique. METHODS: Prospective study of perioperative complications, retrospective analysis of early and late complications in an ICU in a teaching university hospital. RESULTS: The success rate of

  6. Percutaneous tracheostomy with the guide wire dilating forceps technique: presentation of 171 consecutive patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, B.G.; Heerbeek, N. van; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of percutaneous tracheostomy (PT) with the guide wire dilating forceps (GWDF) technique. METHODS: Prospective study of perioperative complications, retrospective analysis of early and late complications in an ICU in a teaching university hospital. RESULTS: The success rate of

  7. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akio, E-mail: a.akahane@gmail.com; Kato, Kenichi, E-mail: kkato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Suzuki, Michiko, E-mail: mamimichiko@me.com [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Tanaka, Ryoichi, E-mail: rtanaka@iwate-med.ac.jp; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: nakasato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Ehara, Shigeru, E-mail: ehara@iwate-med.ac.jp [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC.

  8. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Akio; Kato, Kenichi; Suzuki, Michiko; Sone, Miyuki; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC

  9. jQuery 2.0 animation techniques beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Culpepper, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This book is a guide to help you create attractive web page animations using jQuery. Written in a friendly and engaging approach this book is designed to be placed alongside your computer as a mentor.If you are a web designer or a frontend developer or if you want to learn how to animate the user interface of your web applications with jQuery, this book is for you. Experience with jQuery or Javascript would be helpful but solid knowledge base of HTML and CSS is assumed.

  10. Radiological diagnostics of the early gastric carcinoma by means of the double-contrast technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, H

    1981-05-01

    Radiological efforts to detect early gastric cancer have been intensified by three facts: 1) the prognostic importance, 2) the world-wide accepted classification of early cancer, 3) by comparison with the findings of gastrocamera and endoscopy. Main factors in double-contrast barium meal are: distention of the stomach by at least 200 cc gas, gastric atony (Glucagon or anticholinergica), visualization of the total gastric mucosa by high density, low viscosity barium after washing out the mucus from the mucosal relief. Radiological symptoms of early cancer are demonstrated, the urgency of en-face documentation of gastric ulcers is stressed.

  11. Percutaneous CT-guided biopsy for lung lesions 1 cm or smaller: the technique, results and complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chi Sung

    2006-01-01

    The author wanted to assess the diagnostic accuracy and safety of percutaneous biopsy for lung lesions 1 cm or smaller; the biopsies were performed on the basis of the modified coaxial technique under CT guidance. Thirty-five patients (22 men and 13 women) 23-76 years old (average age: 56.8 years) with lung lesions 1 cm or smaller underwent CT-guided percutaneous biopsy. Fifteen patients had underlying primary malignancies. After an 18 G guiding cannula was introduced to the border of the small lung lesion via the modified coaxial technique, fine-needle aspiration biopsy with 21 G needle and core tissue biopsies with 19.5 G or 20 G biopsy guns were performed through the lumen of the guiding cannula. The core tissue biopsies were finished after 6 macroscopic core tissue specimens were obtained. When the needle hit the eccentric portion of the small lung lesion, a 'fanning-out' technique with using the guiding cannula was applied to get multiple core tissue specimens from the small lung lesion. The diagnostic accuracy of this method was evaluated and the complications were reviewed. Both the cytopathologic and histopathologic specimens were obtained in all 35 cases. The fanning-out technique was necessary in 15 cases (43%) for obtaining six core tissue specimens from small lesions. The final diagnoses were 17 malignant lesions and 18 benign lesions. Sixteen lesions were true-positive, eighteen were true-negative, none was false-positive and one was false-negative. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 97%. The sensitivity for detecting malignancy and the specificity for benign lesion were 94% and 100%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 95%, respectively. The diagnostic ability to characterize the specific cell type of the malignant lesion was 94% (16 of 17), that for the benign lesions was 83% (15 of 18), and overall diagnostic ability was 89% (31 of 35). Five patients (14%) developed a pneumopthorax, and one of them (3%) received

  12. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided pancreatic duct access: techniques and literature review of pancreatography, transmural drainage and rendezvous techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, Takao; Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Sofuni, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Kurihara, Toshio; Yasuda, Ichiro; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided (EUS)-guided pancreatic interventions have gained increasing attention. Here we review EUS-guided pancreatic duct (PD) access techniques and outcomes. EUS-guided PD intervention is divided into two types, antegrade and rendezvous techniques, following EUS-guided pancreatography. In the antegrade technique, pancreaticoenterostomy is carried out by stent placement between the PD and the stomach, duodenum, or jejunum. Transenteric antegrade PD stenting is conducted by stent placement, advancing anteriorly into the PD through the pancreatic tract. The rendezvous technique is carried out by using a guidewire through the papilla or anastomotic site for retrograde stent insertion. In terms of EUS-guided PD stenting, 11 case reports totaling 75 patients (35 normal anatomy, 40 altered anatomy) have been published. The technical success rate was greater than 70%. Early adverse events, including severe hematoma and severe pancreatitis,occurred in seven (63.6%) of 11 reports. Regarding the rendezvous technique, 12 case reports totaling 52 patients (22 normal anatomy, 30 altered anatomy) have been published. The technical success rate ranged from 25% to 100%. It was 48% in one report that involved more than 20 cases. Once stents were placed, all patients became free of symptoms. Early mild adverse events occurred in four (36.4%) of 11 reports. In conclusion, although it can be risky because of possible serious or even fatal adverse events, including pancreatic juice leakage, perforation and severe acute pancreatitis, EUS-PD access seems to be promising for treating symptomatic pancreatic diseases caused by PD stricture and pancreaticoenterostomy stricture. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  13. Notes on the history of the radiological study of Egyptian mummies: from X-rays to new imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmacini, P; Piacentini, P

    2008-08-01

    A few centuries after the practice of mummification was finally abolished in the seventh century A.D., mummies began to capture the collective imagination, exerting a mysterious fascination that continues to this day. From the beginning, the radiological study of Egyptian mummies permitted the collection not only of medical data but also of anthropological and archaeological evidence. The first radiological study of an Egyptian mummy was performed by Flinders Petrie shortly after the discovery of X-rays in 1895, and since then, radiology has never stopped investigating these special patients. By the end of the 1970s, computed tomography (CT) scanning permitted more in-depth studies to be carried out without requiring the mummies to be removed from their cartonnage. CT images can be used to obtain a three-dimensional reconstruction of the mummy that provides important new information, in part thanks to the virtual endoscopy technique known as "fly through". Moreover, starting from CT data and using sophisticated graphics software, one can reconstruct an image of the face of the mummified individual at the time of his or her death. The history of imaging, from its origins until now, from the simplest to the most sophisticated technique, allows us to appreciate why these studies have been, and still are, fundamental in the study of Egyptian mummies.

  14. Guide and manual of frequent special radiological procedures pertaining frequent pediatric patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Rodriguez, Marco V.

    2012-01-01

    A set of instructions and / or recommendations are afforded, developed in a systematic way, whose purpose is to help treating doctors to make decisions about the mode of study appropriate for a specialized clinical circumstance. The instructions are aimed at radiologists, in order to facilitate the selection and realization of special studies in the pediatric patient images, so that in this way, guide of the best and most efficient way to the resolution of the cases before diagnostic doubts that seek to clarify the treating clinician. The studies most frequently requested are exposed, as well as those with their prompt realization will lead to a quick and timely medical care and / or surgical of a specific problem [es

  15. Guide of good practices for occupational radiological protection in plutonium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This Technical Standard (TS) does not contain any new requirements. Its purpose is to provide guides to good practice, update existing reference material, and discuss practical lessons learned relevant to the safe handling of plutonium. the technical rationale is given to allow US Department of Energy (DOE) health physicists to adapt the recommendations to similar situations throughout the DOE complex. Generally, DOE contractor health physicists will be responsible to implement radiation protection activities at DOE facilities and DOE health physicists will be responsible for oversight of those activities. This guidance is meant to be useful for both efforts. This TS replaces PNL-6534, Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Plutonium Facilities, by providing more complete and current information and by emphasizing the situations that are typical of DOE`s current plutonium operations; safe storage, decontamination, and decommissioning (environmental restoration); and weapons disassembly.

  16. Criteria for Use in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    This Safety Guide presents a coherent set of generic criteria (expressed numerically in terms of radiation dose) that form a basis for developing the operational levels needed for decision making concerning protective and response actions. The set of generic criteria addresses the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 for emergency preparedness and response, including lessons learned from responses to past emergencies, and provides an internally consistent foundation for the application of principles of radiation protection. The publication also provides a basis for a plain language explanation of the criteria for the public and for public officials. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Basic considerations; 3. Framework for emergency response criteria; 4. Guidance values for emergency workers; 5. Operational criteria; Appendix I: Dose concepts and dosimetric quantities; Appendix II: Examples of default OILs for deposition, individual contamination and contamination of food, milk and water; Appendix III: Development of EALs and example EALs for light water reactors; Appendix IV: Observables on the scene of a radiological emergency.

  17. Criteria for Use in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents a coherent set of generic criteria (expressed numerically in terms of radiation dose) that form a basis for developing the operational levels needed for decision making concerning protective and response actions. The set of generic criteria addresses the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 for emergency preparedness and response, including lessons learned from responses to past emergencies, and provides an internally consistent foundation for the application of radiation protection. The publication also proposes a basis for a plain language explanation of the criteria for the public and for public officials. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Basic considerations; 3. Framework for emergency response criteria; 4. Guidance values for emergency workers; 5. Operational criteria; Appendix I: Dose concepts and dosimetric quantities; Appendix II: Examples of default oils for deposition, individual monitoring and contamination of food, milk and water; Appendix III: Development of EALs and example EALs for light water reactors; Appendix IV: Observables at the scene of a nuclear or radiological emergency

  18. Criteria for Use in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Guide (Russian Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents a coherent set of generic criteria (expressed numerically in terms of radiation dose) that form a basis for developing the operational levels needed for decision making concerning protective and response actions. The set of generic criteria addresses the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 for emergency preparedness and response, including lessons learned from responses to past emergencies, and provides an internally consistent foundation for the application of radiation protection. The publication also proposes a basis for a plain language explanation of the criteria for the public and for public officials. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Basic considerations; 3. Framework for emergency response criteria; 4. Guidance values for emergency workers; 5. Operational criteria; Appendix I: Dose concepts and dosimetric quantities; Appendix II: Examples of default oils for deposition, individual monitoring and contamination of food, milk and water; Appendix III: Development of EALs and example EALs for light water reactors; Appendix IV: Observables at the scene of a nuclear or radiological emergency.

  19. Digital circuit testing a guide to DFT and other techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Francis C

    1991-01-01

    Recent technological advances have created a testing crisis in the electronics industry--smaller, more highly integrated electronic circuits and new packaging techniques make it increasingly difficult to physically access test nodes. New testing methods are needed for the next generation of electronic equipment and a great deal of emphasis is being placed on the development of these methods. Some of the techniques now becoming popular include design for testability (DFT), built-in self-test (BIST), and automatic test vector generation (ATVG). This book will provide a practical introduction to

  20. Recommendations guide in radiological accidents for first respondents, firemen and policemen; Guia de recomendaciones en accidentes radiologicos para primeros respondedores, bomberos y policias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo, A. J.; Ambriz, J. J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Paredes, L. C., E-mail: ajav_x@yahoo.com.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The action guides for the primary task forces of the Firemen Corps and the Public Security Elements, before the presence of radiological accidents are presented. The objective of these guides is to give the recommendations for the initial response to the emergency that fulfills the following criterions: to to Apply with readiness all the reasonable measures to protect the victims and the public, in order to minimizing the radiological and non radiological effects to the health; b) to Retrieve the control of the situation and to mitigate the consequences; c) to Protect the emergency personnel during the response operations; d) to Compile and to protect the information that can be useful to treat the effects to the health, of the victims and public in general, and to prevent that emergencies seemed are repeat in the future; e) to Create and to maintain the public's trust in the response; f) to Establish a base for an action of lingering response, and to Suggest evaluation criterions of the radiological emergency, the organization criterions, operation and surrounding of the emergency area. (Author)

  1. Recommendations guide in radiological accidents for first respondents, paramedical personnel; Guia de recomendaciones en accidentes radiologicos para primeros respondedores, personal paramedico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo, A. J.; Ambriz, J. J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolinata, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Paredes, L. C., E-mail: ajav_x@yahoo.com.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The lenders of medical services hope to provide the appropriate attention to the patients due to the great variety of scenarios that are presented. One of these involves the patient that has been exposed or contaminated with radioactive materials. Due to this situation the recommendations guide for the primary task forces are presented. Elements of medical response before the radiological accidents presence. The objective of these guides is to give the guidelines for the initial response to the emergency that fulfills the following criterions: a) to Apply with readiness all the reasonable measures to protect the victims and the public, in order to minimizing the radiological and not radiological effects to the health; b) to Save lives and to develop the procedures required in the medical emergency; c) to Treat the injuries caused by the radiation and the resulting injuries of the emergency; d) to Compile and to protect the information that can be useful to treat the effects to the health, of the victims and public in general, and to impede that emergencies seemed are repeat in the future; e) to Create and to maintain the public's trust in the response; f) to Establish a base for an action of lingering response and g) to Suggest evaluation criterions of the radiological emergency, the organization criterions, operation and surrounding of the emergency area. (Author)

  2. Adult spinal deformity treated with minimally invasive surgery. Description of surgical technique, radiological results and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, I; Luque, R; Noriega, M; Rey, J; Alía, J; Urda, A; Marco, F

    The prevalence of adult spinal deformity has been increasing exponentially over time. Surgery has been credited with good radiological and clinical results. The incidence of complications is high. MIS techniques provide good results with fewer complications. This is a retrospective study of 25 patients with an adult spinal deformity treated by MIS surgery, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Radiological improvement was SVA from 5 to 2cm, coronal Cobb angle from 31° to 6°, and lumbar lordosis from 18° to 38°. All of these parameters remained stable over time. We also present the complications that appeared in 4 patients (16%). Only one patient needed reoperation. We describe the technique used and review the references on the subject. We conclude that the MIS technique for treating adult spinal deformity has comparable results to those of the conventional techniques but with fewer complications. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. [Fluoroscopy dose reduction of computed tomography guided chest interventional radiology using real-time iterative reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Mihara, Yoshiyuki; Ino, Kenji; Sato, Jiro

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction to patients and radiologists in computed tomography (CT) guided examinations for the thoracic region using CT fluoroscopy. Image quality evaluation of the real-time filtered back-projection (RT-FBP) images and the real-time adaptive iterative dose reduction (RT-AIDR) images was carried out on noise and artifacts that were considered to affect the CT fluoroscopy. The image standard deviation was improved in the fluoroscopy setting with less than 30 mA on 120 kV. With regard to the evaluation of artifact visibility and the amount generated by the needle attached to the chest phantom, there was no significant difference between the RT-FBP images with 120 kV, 20 mA and the RT-AIDR images with low-dose conditions (greater than 80 kV, 30 mA and less than 120 kV, 20 mA). The results suggest that it is possible to reduce the radiation dose by approximately 34% at the maximum using RT-AIDR while maintaining image quality equivalent to the RT-FBP images with 120 V, 20 mA.

  4. A study on CT-guided stereotactic technique for functional neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetsuhara, Koichi; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Hirahara, Kazuho; Gondo, Masazumi; Oda, Hiroshige

    1987-01-01

    Recently, CT-guided stereotactic surgery has become of major interest, and some authors have discussed its potential in functional neurosurgery. The following is a comparative study of the CT-guided stereotactic technique and the conventional roentogenographic stereotactic technique. The Brown-Roberts-Wells apparatus was used for both types of procedures. 37 stereotactic procedures were performed on 35 patients under local anesthesia; 16 for stereotactic biopsy and 21 for stereotactic functional neurosurgery. Target points for stereotactic biopsy were determined by the CT-guided technique and target points for functional neurosurgery were determined by the conventional roentogenographic technique. The correlation with the position of target point determined by both techniques was investigated in the 21 functional neurosurgical procedures. On these occasions the authors used the reformatted horizontal and sagittal CT through the anterior and posterior commissure to determine the position of target point by the CT-guided technique. Results: It was found that the AC-PC line crossed with Reid's base line at angle of 11 ± 1 deg, and therefore it is important to obtain a CT images including AC-PC line at this angle. When applying the CT guided stereotactic procedure for functional surgery, it should be known that there could be a discrepancy within 2 mm from the conventional target determination. (author)

  5. Comparison of fluoroscopy-guided pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) with conventional percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG): clinical results in 253 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang; Schneider, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.B. [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    To analyze the clinical results and complications of fluoroscopy guided internal-external pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) and conventional external-internal percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG). A total of 253 patients underwent radiological gastrostomy between January 2002 and January 2010. Data were collected retrospectively from radiology reports, Chart review of clinical notes, procedure reports, discharge summaries and subsequent hospital visits. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the two methods for gastrostomy with respect to peri-interventional aspects and clinical results. 128 patients received the Pull-type-PRG whereas the other 125 patients were served with the Push-type-PRG. Indications for gastrostomy were similar in these two groups. The most frequent indications for the both methods were stenotic oesophageal tumors or head/neck tumors (54.7% in pull-type-PRG, 68% in push-type-PRG). Gastrostomy procedures were successful in 98.3% in pull-type-PRG compared to 92% in push-type-PRG. There was no procedure-related mortality. Compared to Push-type-PRG, the peri-interventional complication rate was significantly reduced in pull-type-PRG (14.8% versus 34.4%, P = 0.002). Compared to the external-internal push-type-PRG, the internal-external Pull-type-PRG showed a high primary success rate and a decreased incidence of peri-interventional complications. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of fluoroscopy-guided pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) with conventional percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG): clinical results in 253 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yang; Schneider, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the clinical results and complications of fluoroscopy guided internal-external pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) and conventional external-internal percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG). A total of 253 patients underwent radiological gastrostomy between January 2002 and January 2010. Data were collected retrospectively from radiology reports, Chart review of clinical notes, procedure reports, discharge summaries and subsequent hospital visits. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the two methods for gastrostomy with respect to peri-interventional aspects and clinical results. 128 patients received the Pull-type-PRG whereas the other 125 patients were served with the Push-type-PRG. Indications for gastrostomy were similar in these two groups. The most frequent indications for the both methods were stenotic oesophageal tumors or head/neck tumors (54.7% in pull-type-PRG, 68% in push-type-PRG). Gastrostomy procedures were successful in 98.3% in pull-type-PRG compared to 92% in push-type-PRG. There was no procedure-related mortality. Compared to Push-type-PRG, the peri-interventional complication rate was significantly reduced in pull-type-PRG (14.8% versus 34.4%, P = 0.002). Compared to the external-internal push-type-PRG, the internal-external Pull-type-PRG showed a high primary success rate and a decreased incidence of peri-interventional complications. (orig.)

  7. The novel echo-guided ProGlide technique during percutaneous transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yohsuke; Araki, Motoharu; Yamawaki, Masahiro; Tokuda, Takahiro; Tsutumi, Masakazu; Mori, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Yasunari; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Hirano, Keisuke; Ito, Yoshiaki

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical benefit of the Echo-guided ProGlide technique in patients undergoing percutaneous transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI). The efficacy of the Echo-guided ProGlide technique during percutaneous TF-TAVI was not previously clarified. A total of 121 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous TF-TAVI at our institution between February 2014 and July 2017 were enrolled in this study. According to the introduction of this novel technique in March 2016, patients were divided into two groups (echo-guided group who underwent TAVI from March 2016 to July 2017, n = 63; not echo-guided group who underwent TAVI from February 2014 to February 2016, n = 58). The incidence of major vascular complications, defined per the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria, and ProGlide complications including acute femoral artery stenosis or occlusion and bleeding requiring any intervention. The incidence of major vascular complication and ProGlide complication were significantly lower in the echo-guided group than in not echo-guided group (1.6% vs 17.2%, P guided ProGlide technique was independently associated with prevention of ProGlide complications (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidential interval, 0.01-0.76; P = 0.03). This novel Echo-guided ProGlide technique was associated with a lower rate of major vascular complications, particularly ProGlide complications during percutaneous TF-TAVI. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Study on the Guided Wave Mode Conversion using Self-calibrating Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Chul; Cho, Youn Ho

    2000-01-01

    The guided wave mode conversion phenomena were investigated for the NDE of a plate-like structure with thickness variation. The ratios of reflection and transmission (R/T) were measured via the self-calibrating procedure which allows us to obtain experimental guided wave data in a more reliable way regardless of the coupling uncertainty between transducer and specimen. The results on R/T could be used to determine the thickness reduction of the structure. It was shown that not only the incident modes but also the converted ones need to be considered in the self-calibrating guided wave inspection to extract a reasonable correlation between experimental data and the thickness variation. Through this study, the potential of guided wave inspection as a quantitative NDE technique was explored based on the combined concept of self-calibration and multi-mode conversion in guided wave scattering problems

  9. Radiological diagnostics in hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, U.; Kuhn, F.P.; Gruetzner, G.

    1991-01-01

    The most important radiologically detectable effects of the primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism of the skeletal system and the periarticular soft tissue structures are presented. In the following sensitivity and specificity of radiological imaging - sonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, arteriography and selective venous sampling - in the preoperative diagnostic of the parathyroid adenomas are discussed. Therefore, radiological imaging can be omitted before primary surgery. It was only in secondary surgery that radiological process proved useful and a guide during surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  10. Standards in radiographically guided biopsies - indications, techniques, complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerbach, S.; Schreyer, A.; Schlottmann, K.

    2003-01-01

    In the first place, different needle types are presented, in particular, biopsy cannulae applying the ''TruCut'' principle and devices suitable for bone biopsy. Important aids for the daily practice, such as tandem technology and coaxial technology, are presented. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, together with the most important sites of target-directed fluoroscopy, sonography and computer tomography as well as CT-fluoroscopy. Local anesthesia and analgosedation are presented, and the general and specific caliber- or entrance-dependent contraindications are described. The literature is reviewed for data of severe complications, such as death or tumor cell deposits along the puncture site. For the different targets in thorax and abdomen, the typical indications, points of entrance, contraindications, complications and special techniques are described, and the value of the biopsy for these localizations is presented. Under the heading ''Tips and Tricks'', practical advice useful for the daily routine can be found. (orig.) [de

  11. Guided-wave tomographic imaging of plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  12. A study on laser-based ultrasonic technique by the use of guided wave tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr; Lim, Juyoung, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr [Graduate school, School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Younho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Krishnaswamy, Sridhar [Center for Quality Engineering and Failure Prevention, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Guided wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and coarse surfaces or geometrically complicated features. A non-contact setup with a laser ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is the classic attractive for guided wave inspection. The present work was done to develop a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique by laser ultrasonic technique in a plate-like structure. A method for Lam wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulse laser ultrasonic transmitter and a Michelson interferometer receiver has been developed. In the images obtained by laser scanning, the defect shape and area showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact-based online inspection and monitoring technique.

  13. Guided-wave tomography imaging plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Pil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  14. Quantify uncertain emergency search techniques (QUEST) -- Theory and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.M.; Goldsby, M.E.; Plantenga, T.D.; Porter, T.L.; West, T.H.; Wilcox, W.B.; Hensley, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    As recent world events show, criminal and terrorist access to nuclear materials is a growing national concern. The national laboratories are taking the lead in developing technologies to counter these potential threats to the national security. Sandia National laboratories, with support from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Bechtel Nevada, Remote Sensing Laboratory, has developed QUEST (a model to Quantify Uncertain Emergency Search Techniques), to enhance the performance of organizations in the search for lost or stolen nuclear material. In addition, QUEST supports a wide range of other applications, such as environmental monitoring, nuclear facilities inspections, and searcher training. QUEST simulates the search for nuclear materials and calculates detector response for various source types and locations. The probability of detecting a radioactive source during a search is a function of many different variables, including source type, search location and structure geometry (including shielding), search dynamics (path and speed), and detector type and size. Through calculation of dynamic detector response, QUEST makes possible quantitative comparisons of various sensor technologies and search patterns. The QUEST model can be used as a tool to examine the impact of new detector technologies, explore alternative search concepts, and provide interactive search/inspector training

  15. The value of various radiological techniques for follow-up of Camurati-Engelmann disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, K.R.; Fritz, P.; Bihl, H.; Baldauf, G.

    1987-01-01

    Camurati-Engelmann disease is a rare progressive bone dysplasia; involvement of the skull base can lead to deafness, vestibular disturbances, facial paralysis and damage to the optic nerves. Treatment with corticosteroids, calcitonin and diphosphonates promises only very limited success. Conservative treatment of compression of the cranial nerves is almost ineffective, but the aim of surgical treatment is decompression of involved nerves. The differential diagnosis depends on radiological findings and clinical symptoms. Follow-up depends on radiographic examination and skeletal scintigraphy for showing the extent of the disease. CT may help in demonstrating compression of cranial nerves and define the indications for surgical decompression. (orig.) [de

  16. Vehicle tracking based technique for radiation monitoring during nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saindane, Shashank S.; Otari, Anil D.; Suri, M.M.K.; Patil, S.S.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC has developed an advanced online radiation measurement cum vehicle tracking system for use. For the preparedness for response to any nuclear/radiological emergency scenario which may occur anywhere, the system designed is a Global System for Mobile (GSM) based Radiation Monitoring System (GRaMS) along with a Global Positioning System (GPS). It uses an energy compensated GM detector for radiation monitoring and is attached with commercially available Global Positioning System (GPS) for online acquisition of positional coordinates with time, and GSM modem for online data transfer to a remote control centre. The equipment can be operated continuously while the vehicle is moving

  17. Intraoperative MRI to guide the resection of primary supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme - a quantitative radiological analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jens P.; Rubach, Matthias; Schulz, Thomas; Dietrich, Juergen; Zimmer, Claus; Kahn, Thomas [University of Leipzig, Diagnostic Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Trantakis, Christos; Winkler, Dirk; Renner, Christof [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurosurgery, Leipzig (Germany); Schober, Ralf; Geiger, Kathrin [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuropathology, Leipzig (Germany); Brosteanu, Oana [Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    primary glioblastoma multiforme under intraoperative MR guidance as demonstrated is a possibility to achieve a more complete removal of the tumor than with conventional techniques. In our small but homogeneous patient group we found an increase in the median survival time in patients with MRI for complete tumor resection, and the overall surgical morbidity was low. (orig.)

  18. Transurethral Bougie-guided Placement of Suprapubic Catheter Over Guide Wire Monorail in Females: A Novel Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalela, Divakar; Gupta, Piyush; Dalela, Disha; Srinivas, A K; Bhaskar, Ved; Govil, Tuhina; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan

    2016-08-01

    To assess the safety and effectiveness of a novel transurethral bougie-guided monorail technique for suprapubic catheterization in females with vesicovaginal fistula. Patients undergoing transvaginal vesicovaginal fistula repair from February 2013 to December 2013 were selected. Suprapubic catheter was placed using this technique and assessment was done in terms of time taken, intraprocedural dislodgement or entanglement of catheter during the procedure, bleeding from the anterior abdominal wall or urethra, or any other intraoperative difficulty. All patients were catheterized smoothly without any intraoperative difficulty, with a mean time of 6 minutes. We describe a new technique of performing suprapubic cystostomy in patients, especially where the bladder cannot be distended. It is safe and easy to perform. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of an online radiology case review system featuring interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Boh Kyoung; Jung, Ju Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Woo, Hyun Soo; Jo, Jae Min; Lee, Min Hee

    2015-01-01

    To develop an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques. Our Institutional Review Board approved the use of the patient data and waived the need for informed consent. We determined the following system requirements: volumetric navigation, accessibility, scalability, undemanding case management, trainee encouragement, and simulation of a busy practice. The system comprised a case registry server, client case review program, and commercially available cloud-based image viewing system. In the pilot test, we used 30 cases of low-dose abdomen computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In each case, a trainee was required to navigate through the images and submit answers to the case questions. The trainee was then given the correct answers and key images, as well as the image dataset with annotations on the appendix. After evaluation of all cases, the system displayed the diagnostic accuracy and average review time, and the trainee was asked to reassess the failed cases. The pilot system was deployed successfully in a hands-on workshop course. We developed an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

  20. Development of an online radiology case review system featuring interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Boh Kyoung; Jung, Ju Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jae Min [Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    To develop an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques. Our Institutional Review Board approved the use of the patient data and waived the need for informed consent. We determined the following system requirements: volumetric navigation, accessibility, scalability, undemanding case management, trainee encouragement, and simulation of a busy practice. The system comprised a case registry server, client case review program, and commercially available cloud-based image viewing system. In the pilot test, we used 30 cases of low-dose abdomen computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In each case, a trainee was required to navigate through the images and submit answers to the case questions. The trainee was then given the correct answers and key images, as well as the image dataset with annotations on the appendix. After evaluation of all cases, the system displayed the diagnostic accuracy and average review time, and the trainee was asked to reassess the failed cases. The pilot system was deployed successfully in a hands-on workshop course. We developed an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques.

  1. Remote inspection with multi-copters, radiological sensors and SLAM techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Henrique; Vale, Alberto; Marques, Rúben; Ventura, Rodrigo; Brouwer, Yoeri; Gonçalves, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Activated material can be found in different scenarios, such as in nuclear reactor facilities or medical facilities (e.g. in positron emission tomography commonly known as PET scanning). In addition, there are unexpected scenarios resulting from possible accidents, or where dangerous material is hidden for terrorism attacks using nuclear weapons. Thus, a technological solution is important to cope with fast and reliable remote inspection. The multi-copter is a common type of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that provides the ability to perform a first radiological inspection in the described scenarios. The paper proposes a solution with a multi-copter equipped with on-board sensors to perform a 3D reconstruction and a radiological mapping of the scenario. A depth camera and a Geiger-Müler counter are the used sensors. The inspection is performed in two steps: i) a 3D reconstruction of the environment and ii) radiation activity inference to localise and quantify sources of radiation. Experimental results were achieved with real 3D data and simulated radiation activity. Experimental tests with real sources of radiation are planned in the next iteration of the work.

  2. Remote inspection with multi-copters, radiological sensors and SLAM techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Henrique

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated material can be found in different scenarios, such as in nuclear reactor facilities or medical facilities (e.g. in positron emission tomography commonly known as PET scanning. In addition, there are unexpected scenarios resulting from possible accidents, or where dangerous material is hidden for terrorism attacks using nuclear weapons. Thus, a technological solution is important to cope with fast and reliable remote inspection. The multi-copter is a common type of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV that provides the ability to perform a first radiological inspection in the described scenarios. The paper proposes a solution with a multi-copter equipped with on-board sensors to perform a 3D reconstruction and a radiological mapping of the scenario. A depth camera and a Geiger-Müler counter are the used sensors. The inspection is performed in two steps: i a 3D reconstruction of the environment and ii radiation activity inference to localise and quantify sources of radiation. Experimental results were achieved with real 3D data and simulated radiation activity. Experimental tests with real sources of radiation are planned in the next iteration of the work.

  3. Reliability of tunnel angle in ACL reconstruction: two-dimensional versus three-dimensional guide technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Jeff R S; de Korompay, Nevin; Macdonald, Lindsey; McRae, Sheila; Froese, Warren; Macdonald, Peter B

    2011-08-01

    To compare the reliability of tibial tunnel position and angle produced with a standard ACL guide (two-dimensional guide) or Howell 65° Guide (three-dimensional guide) in the coronal and sagittal planes. In the sagittal plane, the dependent variables were the angle of the tibial tunnel relative to the tibial plateau and the position of the tibial tunnel with respect to the most posterior aspect of the tibia. In the coronal plane, the dependent variables were the angle of the tunnel with respect to the medial joint line of the tibia and the medial and lateral placement of the tibial tunnel relative to the most medial aspect of the tibia. The position and angle of the tibial tunnel in the coronal and sagittal planes were determined from anteroposterior and lateral radiographs, respectively, taken 2-6 months postoperatively. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional guide groups included 28 and 24 sets of radiographs, respectively. Tibial tunnel position was identified, and tunnel angle measurements were completed. Multiple investigators measured the position and angle of the tunnel 3 times, at least 7 days apart. The angle of the tibial tunnel in the coronal plane using a two-dimensional guide (61.3 ± 4.8°) was more horizontal (P guide (64.7 ± 6.2°). The position of the tibial tunnel in the sagittal plane was more anterior (P guide group compared to the three-dimensional guide group (43.3 ± 2.9%). The Howell Tibial Guide allows for reliable placement of the tibial tunnel in the coronal plane at an angle of 65°. Tibial tunnels were within the anatomical footprint of the ACL with either technique. Future studies should investigate the effects of tibial tunnel angle on knee function and patient quality of life. Case-control retrospective comparative study, Level III.

  4. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schouten, Martijn G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bomers, Joyce G.R.; Yakar, Derya; Huisman, Henkjan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rothgang, Eva [Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research, Baltimore, MD (United States); Misra, Sarthak [University of Twente, MIRA-Institute of Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed in-house to guide biopsies under real-time imaging. From 13 consecutive biopsy procedures, the targeting error, biopsy error and target displacement were calculated to evaluate the accuracy. The time was recorded to evaluate manipulation and procedure time. The robotic and manual techniques demonstrated comparable results regarding mean targeting error (5.7 vs 5.8 mm, respectively) and mean target displacement (6.6 vs 6.0 mm, respectively). The mean biopsy error was larger (6.5 vs 4.4 mm) when using the robotic technique, although not significant. Mean procedure and manipulation time were 76 min and 6 min, respectively using the robotic technique and 61 and 8 min with the manual technique. Although comparable results regarding accuracy and speed were found, the extended technical effort of the robotic technique make the manual technique - currently - more suitable to perform MRI-guided biopsies. Furthermore, this study provided a better insight in displacement of the target during in vivo biopsy procedures. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schouten, Martijn G.; Bomers, Joyce G.R.; Yakar, Derya; Huisman, Henkjan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J.; Rothgang, Eva; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed in-house to guide biopsies under real-time imaging. From 13 consecutive biopsy procedures, the targeting error, biopsy error and target displacement were calculated to evaluate the accuracy. The time was recorded to evaluate manipulation and procedure time. The robotic and manual techniques demonstrated comparable results regarding mean targeting error (5.7 vs 5.8 mm, respectively) and mean target displacement (6.6 vs 6.0 mm, respectively). The mean biopsy error was larger (6.5 vs 4.4 mm) when using the robotic technique, although not significant. Mean procedure and manipulation time were 76 min and 6 min, respectively using the robotic technique and 61 and 8 min with the manual technique. Although comparable results regarding accuracy and speed were found, the extended technical effort of the robotic technique make the manual technique - currently - more suitable to perform MRI-guided biopsies. Furthermore, this study provided a better insight in displacement of the target during in vivo biopsy procedures. (orig.)

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Intervention for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah El-Sayed Allam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial myofascial pain is prevalent and most often results from entrapment of branches of the trigeminal nerves. It is challenging to inject branches of the trigeminal nerve, a large portion of which are shielded by the facial bones. Bony landmarks of the cranium serve as important guides for palpation-guided injections and can be delineated using ultrasound. Ultrasound also provides real-time images of the adjacent muscles and accompanying arteries and can be used to guide the needle to the target region. Most importantly, ultrasound guidance significantly reduces the risk of collateral injury to vital neurovascular structures. In this review, we aimed to summarize the regional anatomy and ultrasound-guided injection techniques for the trigeminal nerve and its branches, including the supraorbital, infraorbital, mental, auriculotemporal, maxillary, and mandibular nerves.

  7. Development of an In-Situ Radiological Classification Technique for Material from CERN's Accelerator Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081300; Froeschl, Robert; Forkel-Wirth, Doris

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, operates high energy accelerators for particle physics research. Because of beam losses and subsequent particle interactions, radioactivity can be induced in certain accelerator components. Material and waste taken out of the accelerators facilities as a result of maintenance repair and upgrade actions as well as in case of decommissioning needs to be radiologically classied for future handling. Depending on the level of residual activity, some of these components are candidates for clearance from regulatory control in Switzerland. The Swiss radiation protection ordinance sets as criteria for clearance of material and waste from regulatory control the compliance with radionuclide specic limits for surface contamination and for specic activity as well as an ambient dose equivalent rate criterion. For objects with a mass below 1 kg a radionuclide specic clearance limit for total activity has to be respected. This work is focused on the specic activity criter...

  8. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah; Given, Mark F.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrade puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.

  9. Radiological optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological optimization is one of the basic principles in each radiation-protection system and it is a basic requirement in the safety standards for radiation protection in the European Communities. The objectives of the research, performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, are: (1) to implement the ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for optimization techniques in decision-aiding; (3) to optimize radiological assessment models by validation and intercomparison; (4) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (5) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (6) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (7) to investigate existing software programmes in the domain of multi criteria analysis. The main achievements for 1997 are given

  10. MEMO radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1989-01-01

    This radiology volume is a concise handbook of imaging techniques, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy, albeit that the main emphasis is on classic radiology. It offers, for instance, a survey of radiological findings for the most frequent pathological conditions, many overviews of differential diagnosis, a glossary of the technical bases of radiology and so forth. The contents are divided into the following chapters: Physical and biological bases; skeleton; thorax with the subdivisions lungs, heart, mediastinum, and pleura; gastrointestinal tract with the subsections esophagus, small and large intestine; liver; biliary tract; pancreas; retroperitoneal space; kidney; suprarenal glands; bladder; blood vessels, lymph nodes, spleen; mammary glands; female genitals; prostate and scrotum, epididymis and seminal vesicle. (orig./MG) With 23 figs [de

  11. Cold War Arms Control Motivations and Techniques - A Guide for the Future?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Elmer

    1996-01-01

    .... This paper provides a brief historical account of some of the arms control agreements between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, examines their major motivations to enter into negotiations, and illustrates some successful negotiation techniques. The author hypothesizes on the utility of this Cold War arms control experience as a useful guide for arms control in a single superpower world.

  12. Making Quality Sense: A Guide to Quality, Tools and Techniques, Awards and the Thinking Behind Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jane

    This document is intended to guide further education colleges and work-based learning providers through some of the commonly used tools, techniques, and theories of quality management. The following are among the topics discussed: (1) various ways of defining quality; methods used by organizations to achieve quality (quality control, quality…

  13. Radiology Aide. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hronek, Dennis

    This module was designed to assist educators in facilitating learning in health careers outside nursing. It may be used for classroom, on-the-job, or independent study. The module is oranized in 13 units. Each unit includes one or more lessons that contain the following components: scope of unit, unit objectives; student's information assignment,…

  14. Postoperative radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenne, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of postoperative radiology. Most surgical procedures on the alimentary tract are successful, but postoperative complications remain a common occurrence. The radiologist must be familiar with a large variety of possible surgical complications, because it is this specialty that is most commonly called on to render a definitive diagnosis. The decision for reoperation, for instance, is usually based on results from radiologic imaging techniques. These now include ultrasonography, CT scanning, needle biopsy, and interventional techniques in addition to contrast studies and nuclear medicine investigation

  15. Comparison of EUS-guided rendezvous and precut papillotomy techniques for biliary access (with videos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Vinay; Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Bapat, Mukta; Maydeo, Amit

    2012-02-01

    Precut papillotomy after failed bile duct cannulation is associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis. EUS-guided rendezvous drainage is a novel alternative technique, but there are no data comparing this approach with precut papillotomy. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided rendezvous drainage of the bile duct and compare its outcome with that of precut papillotomy. Retrospective study. Tertiary care referral center. Consecutive patients with distal bile duct obstruction, in whom selective cannulation of the bile duct at ERCP failed after 5 attempts with a guidewire and sphincterotome, underwent an EUS-guided rendezvous procedure. The outcomes were compared with those in a historical cohort of patients who underwent precut papillotomy. Patients in whom selective cannulation failed underwent EUS-guided rendezvous drainage by use of the short wire technique or precut papillotomy by use of the Erlangen papillotome. At EUS, after the extrahepatic bile duct was punctured with a 19-gauge needle, a hydrophilic angled-tip guidewire 260 cm long was passed in an antegrade manner across the papilla into the duodenum. The echoendoscope was then exchanged for a duodenoscope, which was introduced alongside the EUS-placed guidewire. The transpapillary guidewire was retrieved through its biopsy channel, and accessories were passed over the wire to perform the requisite endotherapy. Comparison of the rates of technical success and complications between patients treated by the EUS-guided rendezvous and those treated by precut papillotomy techniques. Treatment success was defined as completion of the requisite endotherapy in one treatment session. Treatment success was significantly higher for the EUS-guided rendezvous (57/58 patients) than for those undergoing precut papillotomy technique (130/144 patients) (98.3% vs 90.3%; P = .03). There was no significant difference in the rate of procedural complications between the EUS and precut papillotomy techniques (3

  16. Radiological passports as a decision support technique for post Chernobyl dose reduction in contaminated settlements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, A.; Mansoux, H.; Yakushau, A.; Antsipov, G.; Averin, V.; Zhouchenko, Y.; Minenko, V.; Tirmarche, M.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, IRSN and GRS initiated a support for collecting, securing and validating of existing data in the field of Chernobyl accident consequences and establishing a database including a detailed documentation in order to make available all reliable and objective information for decision makers, for planning of actions, for information of the public and for further scientific work. Three projects as a part of French/German Initiative (FGI) for humanitarian and technical assistance in favour of the Ukraine, Belarus and Russia have been established. The authors represent sub-project 3.9.1, which objectives are as follows: (i) develop and replenish the database for the Radiological-Hygienic Passports (RHP) and perform additional investigation of the target settlements in Belarus where comprehensive information has not been acquired yet, (ii) establish conditions and communication infrastructure for database availability, (iii) provide data analysis involving data on individual effective dose monitoring and results of countermeasures applied, and (iii) formulate the wider recommendations for the target settlements located in contaminated areas, concerning radiation, health, sanitary and social protection, countermeasures, industrial infrastructure development and reviving the local economy. During implementation of the project, 96 settlements with total population of 25 thousand were investigated and their RHPs were compiled. Every RHP consisted of 13 separate forms grouped under three principal headings: Statistics (societal and demographic structure of population, housing, land used and predominant soil type); Economical infrastructure and public utilities (farms, industries, schools, hospitals, shops, service, etc.); Radiological data and doses (total area subdivided vs. level of contamination, Cs-137 content in human body, contamination of agricultural products, contamination of households, annual effective dose). Every RHP was concluded with proposals as to the

  17. Effective radiological contamination control and monitoring techniques in high alpha environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Kevin C

    2003-02-01

    In the decommissioning of a highly contaminated alpha environment, such as the one at Hanford's 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility, one of the key elements of a successful radiological control program is an integrated safety approach. This approach begins with the job-planning phase where the scope of the work is described. This is followed by a brainstorming session involving engineering and craft to identify how to perform the work in a logical sequence of events. Once the brainstorming session is over, a Job Hazard Analysis is performed to identify any potential problems. Mockups are utilized to enable the craft to get hands on experience and provide feedback and ideas to make the job run smoother. Ideas and experience gained during mockups are incorporated into the task instruction. To assure appropriate data are used in planning and executing the job, our principal evaluation tools included lapel and workplace air sampling, plus continuous air monitors and frequent surveys to effectively monitor job progress. In this highly contaminated alpha environment, with contamination levels ranging from 0.3 Bq cm-2 to approximately 100,000 Bq cm-2 (2,000 dpm per 100 cm2 to approximately 600 million dpm per 100 cm2), with average working levels of 1,600-3,200 Bq cm-2 (10-20 million dpm per 100 cm2) without concomitant ambient radiation levels, control of the spread of contamination is key to keeping airborne levels As Low As Reasonably Achievable.

  18. Ultrasonographic-guided, percutaneous antegarde pyelography: technique and clinical application in the dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, B.J.; Walter, P.A.; Polzin, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    Fluoroscopically guided, percutaneous antegrade pyelography in canine patients has been described previously in the veterinary literature. This report describes the technique with ultrasonographic guidance and its clinical application in the diagnosis of four cases (two dogs, two cats) of obstructive uropathy. The technique provided successful diagnosis of ureteral obstruction in all four cases. No complications were observed in three cases. In one feline case, ureteral obstruction with a blood clot occurred following the procedure; however, it could not be ascertained whether this event represented a complication of the technique

  19. Methodological improvement and extension of scope of the guide to the radiological examination and evaluation of contaminated former mining sites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    G.E.O.S. Freiberg Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH have been requested in a letter from the Federal Radiation Protection Office dated 15 September 2006 - AG 3.1 StSch - to submit a quote on the topic of ''Methodological improvement and extension of scope of the guide to the radiological examination and evaluation of contaminated former mining sites''. In response to this request Part A of this guide is to be extended by a section on microbiology or, more specifically, on processes in tailings and sedimentation plants that could be induced by microorganisms. Up until now the guide only considered chemical and geochemical processes in the modelling and evaluation of the release of radionuclides from tailings. However, in view of the possibility of microbiological processes occurring in tailings, as for example in the presence of pyrite, one must also reckon with microbiological influences on radionuclide release. the following tasks and problems will therefore be addressed: Do the recommendations given in the guide also apply if microbiological influences are considered? Is it also necessary to consider microbiological issues in the examination and modelling of radionuclide transport via groundwater? What parameters need to be measured and assessed if decisions on rehabilitation measures for tailings must also be based on microbiological aspects? Which examination methods should be used to measure the required parameters efficiently and reliably? Is there anything particular that needs to be considered in studying the involvement of microbiological processes in the release of radionuclides from industrial sedimentation plants? The recommendations given in the guide with respect to the treatment of the water pathway should be reviewed with regard to any amendments or supplementations they might require from the microbiological viewpoint. It should also be investigated whether microbiological studies and measurements are required for the guide's further development. The

  20. Proposal of a radiological protection inspection technique for nuclear medicine facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Leopoldino da Cruz Gouveia; Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa da; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to implement an impartial and efficient inspection method for a correct and secure use of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine. The radiological protection model was tested in 113 nuclear medicine services (NMS) all over Brazil, following a biannual analysis schedule (1996, 1998, 2000 and 2002). In the analytical process, we adopted the methodology of assigning different importance levels to each of 82 features, based on the risk factors established by the 'Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear' (CNEN) and on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommendations. A feature was considered a radioprotection fault when in nonconformity with the rules mentioned above, and was imparted a grade. The sum of those grades, classified the NMS in one of the three different ranges, as follows: operating without restriction - 100 points and below; operating with restriction - between 100 and 300 points; temporary shutdown - above 300 points. Permission for the second group to carry on operation should be attached to a defined and restricted period of time (6 to 12 months), considered enough for the NMS to solve the problems and submit to a new evaluation. The NMS's classified in the third group are supposed to go back into operation only after compliance with all the pending radioprotection requirements. Until the next regular evaluation, a multiplication factor 2 n was applied to the recalcitrant NMS's, where n is the number of unwilling occurrences. The previous establishment of those items of radioprotection, with their respective grades, excluded subjective and personal values in the judgement and technical evaluation of the institutions. (author)

  1. Entrapment of Guide Wire in an Inferior Vena Cava Filter: A Technique for Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel; Saddekni, Souheil; Hamed, Maysoon Farouk; Fitzpatrick, Farley

    2013-01-01

    Entrapment of a central venous catheter (CVC) guide wire in an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is a rare, but reported complication during CVC placement. With the increasing use of vena cava filters (VCFs), this number will most likely continue to grow. The consequences of this complication can be serious, as continued traction upon the guide wire may result in filter dislodgement and migration, filter fracture, or injury to the IVC. We describe a case in which a J-tipped guide wire introduced through a left subclavian access without fluoroscopic guidance during CVC placement was entrapped at the apex of an IVC filter. We describe a technique that we used successfully in removing the entrapped wire through the left subclavian access site. We also present simple useful recommendations to prevent this complication.

  2. Wall thinning inspection technique for large-diameter piping using guided wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Masahiro; Nagashima, Yoshiaki; Endou, Masao; Kodaira, Kojiro; Maniwa, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave inspection technique is effective for detecting defects like corrosion in piping, because it can perform long range inspection. It is possible to expect this inspection as a method that leads to the decrease of the inspection process and its cost, because the incidental work can be reduced. Especially, the contraction effect of the inspection work is extensive in large-diameter piping inspection. In this paper, we introduce the guided wave inspection system to large-diameter piping. The feature is a guided wave sensor that can freely transform according to the curvature of inspection object, and portable inspection equipment. We discuss the result of detection examination for artificial wall-thinning in large-diameter piping using this system. (author)

  3. A Technique to Facilitate Tooth Modification for Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis Guide Planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberle, C Brent; Abreu, Amara; Metzler, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The technique in this article was developed to provide a means to create prepared guide planes of proper dimension to ensure a more stable and retentive removable partial denture prosthesis (RPDP) framework when providing this service for a patient. Using commonly found clinical materials, a paralleling device can be fabricated from the modified diagnostic cast of the patient's dental arch requiring an RPDP. Polymethyl methacrylate or composite added to an altered thermoplastic form can be positioned intraorally and used as a guide to predictably adjust tooth structure for guide planes. Since it can potentially minimize the number of impressions and diagnostic casts made during the procedure, this can help achieve the desired result more efficiently and quickly for the patient. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Possibilities and limits of digital industrial radiology: the new high contrast sensitivity technique - Examples and system theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.; Bavendiek, K.

    2007-01-01

    During the last years more and more reports about film replacement techniques are published using different ways to prove the required and obtained image quality. The motivation is usually cost reduction due to shorter exposure times and lower storage costs, smaller space requirements and elimination of chemical processing inclusive associated waste handling and disposal. There are no other publications known, which explore the upper limits of image quality achievable by the new digital techniques. This is important for inspection of safety relevant and high risk parts, as e.g. in nuclear or aerospace industries. A new calibration and measurement procedure for digital detector arrays (DDA) was explored to obtain the maximum signal/noise ratio achievable with DDAs. This procedure yields a contrast sensitivity which allows distinguishing wall thickness changes of up to 1/1000 of the penetrated material thickness. Standard film radiography using NDT film systems (with and without lead screens) achieves a wall thickness contrast which is not better than 1/100 even with the best film system class (class 'C1' according to EN 584-1 or 'special' according to ASTM E 1815). Computed Radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plates is a true film replacement technique without enhancement of the image quality compared to NDT film systems. The comparison is based on parameter studies which measure signal/noise ratios and determine the basic spatial resolution as well as a comparison of radiological images with fine flaws. (authors)

  5. Evaluation guide for the radiological impact study of a basic nuclear installation (BNI) as a support for the authorization application of releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, Mr.; Despres, A.; Supervil, S.; Conte, D.; Hubert, P.; Oudiz, A.; Champion, D.

    2002-10-01

    At the time of a licence application of effluent releases and water pumping of basic nuclear facilities (BNF), the operator of the installation must in particular provide a radiological impact study of the radioactive effluent releases coming from the installation on the environment and on public health. An impact study of the radioactive releases represents technical and conditional specifications. It was for this reason that the French Safety Authority (ASN then DSIN) and the Directorate-General of Health Services (DGS) requested IRSN (then IPSN), in April 1999, to develop a guide facilitating the review of such a study, as well for the services implied in the examination of the licence applications, as for all the concerned parties in this field. The objective of the guide is to take into account the regulatory context which underlies the development of the impact studies (decree no. 95-540 of May 4, 1995, modified by the decree no. 2002-460 of April 4, 2002, and the Euratom guideline 96/29 of May 13, 1996, known as 'the basic standard guideline', accompanied by its transposition texts in French law). In this precise context, the guide proposes to assess the radiological impact study of a BNF from three different angles: - the description and the quantification of the produced effluents, by taking account of the triggering processes, of the different processing measures and of the procedures to optimise the reduction of the produced effluents; - the estimate of the dosimetric impact of the planned releases on the population, taking into account the environmental characteristics of the installation; - the definition of the conditions to monitor the releases and the environment. This guide provides a general condition logical framework adaptable to any particular situation met

  6. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency neurotomy in cervical spine: sonoanatomic study of a new technique in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.-H.; Kang, C.H.; Lee, S.-H.; Derby, R.; Yang, S.N.; Lee, J.E.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.S.; Lee, J.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To develop an ultrasound-guided technique for radiofrequency (RF) cervical medial branch neurotomy and to validate the accuracy of this new method. Materials and methods: Five non-embalmed, fresh cadavers were used; three male and two female cadavers with a median age at death of 67.2 years (range 50-84 years). This study was conducted in two parts. First, two of the cadavers were used to define the sonographic target point for RF cervical medial branch neurotomy using high-resolution ultrasound (12 to 5 MHz). The needles were guided to five consecutive cervical medial branches in the cadavers under ultrasound guidance. Subsequently, the position of the ultrasound-guided needle was verified using C-arm fluoroscopy. Ultrasound-guided RF neurotomy was performed to the C5 medial branches in all five cadavers. In the three cadavers not used in the first part of the study, ultrasound-guided RF neurotomy without C-arm fluoroscopic confirmation was performed to the C3-C7 medial branches. The accuracy of neurotomy was assessed by pathological examination of the cervical medial branches obtained through cadaver dissection. Results: In all five cadavers, the sonographic target point was identified in all C3-C7 segments with the 12 to 5 MHz linear transducer. In all 20 needle placements for the first and second cadavers, C-arm fluoroscopy validated proper needle tip positions. In all five cadavers, successful neurotomy was pathologically confirmed in 30 of 34 cervical medial branches. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided cervical medial branch neurotomy was successfully performed in 30 of 34 cervical medial branches in five cadavers. However, before eliminating fluoroscopic validation of final needle tip positioning, the technique should be validated in symptomatic patients

  7. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  8. Guided tooth eruption: Comparison of open and closed eruption techniques in labially impacted maxillary canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M londhe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: After third molars, the maxillary canines are the most commonly impacted permanent teeth and one-third of these are labial impactions. Impacted canines often require orthodontic guidance in the eruption. This study was conducted to assess the posttreatment results of surgically exposed and orthodontically aligned labially impacted maxillary canines comparing two different surgical techniques. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two phases, a surgical phase and an orthodontic phase. In surgical phase, events during surgical exposure and recovery of 31 patients with labially impacted maxillary canine were recorded. Patients were managed with open and closed eruption technique. The assessment included comparison of two techniques of surgical exposure, postoperative pain, mobility, vitality, periodontal health, level of impaction, and duration of orthodontic treatment. Results: The postoperative recovery was longer after open eruption than close eruption technique (P = 0.000. Postoperative pain experienced by patients was similar, but regression of pain was faster in closed eruption technique. The mean surgical time for open eruption technique was lesser when compared with closed eruption technique (P = 0.000. The total duration of orthodontic treatment was directly dependent upon the level of impaction, with deeper level of impaction having longer duration of orthodontic treatment. The mobility and vitality of guided canine was similar in both techniques. Conclusion: The closed eruption technique was a longer surgical procedure, but the postoperative pain regression was faster. The duration of orthodontic treatment was longer with deeper level of impaction. The closed eruption surgical techniques provide better periodontal tissues around the guided erupted teeth.

  9. Fluoroscopy- vs ultrasound-guided aspiration techniques in the management of periprosthetic joint infection: which is the best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Filippo; Brioschi, Marco; Randelli, Pietro; Ambrogi, Federico; Sdao, Silvana; Aliprandi, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Fluid samples obtained from an affected joint still play a central role in the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). It is the only preoperative test able to discover the causative microbiological agent. In the hip, fluid aspiration can be performed through fluoroscopy, ultrasound, or, less commonly, computed tomography. However, there is still a lack of consensus on which method is preferable in terms of efficacy and costbenefit. We, therefore, asked whether (1) the benefits in terms of sensitivity and specificity and (2) the costs were comparable between fluoroscopy- and ultrasound-guided joint aspirations in a suspicious of hip PJI. Between 2013 and 2016, 52 hip aspirations were performed on 49 patients with clinical, radiological, or serological suspicion of PJI, waiting for a revision surgery. The patients were divided in two groups: fluoroscopy- (n = 26) vs ultrasound-guided hip aspiration group (n = 26). These groups were also divided in control and infected patients. The criteria of MusculoSkeletal Infection Society (MSIS) were used, as gold standard, to define PJI. (1) Ultrasound-guided aspiration revealed valid sensitivity (89% vs 60%) and specificity (94% vs 81%) in comparison with fluoroscopic-guided aspiration. (2) The cost analysis was also in favor of ultrasound-guided aspiration (125.30€) than fluoroscopic-guided aspiration (343.58€). We concluded that ultrasound-guided hip aspiration could represent a valid, safe, and less expensive diagnostic alternative to fluoroscopic-guided aspiration in hip PJI.

  10. Brief reports: ultrasound-guided obturator nerve block: a proximal interfascial technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ahmad Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    In this report, I describe and evaluate a proximal ultrasound (US)-guided obturator nerve block technique using an interfascial local anesthetic (LA) injection deep to the pectineus muscle. The pectineus muscle was identified and followed, while the US probe was tilted cranially until the superior pubic ramus was visualized. In this plane, LA was injected interfascially between the pectineus and obturator externus. The median time required to identify the injection site was 4 seconds (95% confidence interval, 3-5 seconds). The median motor block onset was 4 minutes (95% confidence interval, 3-5 minutes). Both obturator nerve branches were blocked successfully in all patients (100%). The US-guided obturator nerve block using interfascial LA injection inferior to the superior pubic ramus, between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles, was shown to be a simple and successful technique.

  11. Technical Note: Radiological properties of tissue surrogates used in a multimodality deformable pelvic phantom for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niebuhr, Nina I.; Johnen, Wibke; Güldaglar, Timur; Runz, Armin; Echner, Gernot; Mann, Philipp; Möhler, Christian; Pfaffenberger, Asja; Greilich, Steffen; Jäkel, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Phantom surrogates were developed to allow multimodal [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and teletherapy] and anthropomorphic tissue simulation as well as materials and methods to construct deformable organ shapes and anthropomorphic bone models. Methods: Agarose gels of variable concentrations and loadings were investigated to simulate various soft tissue types. Oils, fats, and Vaseline were investigated as surrogates for adipose tissue and bone marrow. Anthropomorphic shapes of bone and organs were realized using 3D-printing techniques based on segmentations of patient CT-scans. All materials were characterized in dual energy CT and MRI to adapt CT numbers, electron density, effective atomic number, as well as T1- and T2-relaxation times to patient and literature values. Results: Soft tissue simulation could be achieved with agarose gels in combination with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and NaF to simulate muscle, prostate, and tumor tissues. Vegetable oils were shown to be a good representation for adipose tissue in all modalities. Inner bone was realized using a mixture of Vaseline and K_2HPO_4, resulting in both a fatty bone marrow signal in MRI and inhomogeneous areas of low and high attenuation in CT. The high attenuation of outer bone was additionally adapted by applying gypsum bandages to the 3D-printed hollow bone case with values up to 1200 HU. Deformable hollow organs were manufactured using silicone. Signal loss in the MR images based on the conductivity of the gels needs to be further investigated. Conclusions: The presented surrogates and techniques allow the customized construction of multimodality, anthropomorphic, and deformable phantoms as exemplarily shown for a pelvic phantom, which is intended to study adaptive treatment scenarios in MR-guided radiation therapy

  12. Technical Note: Radiological properties of tissue surrogates used in a multimodality deformable pelvic phantom for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niebuhr, Nina I., E-mail: n.niebuhr@dkfz.de; Johnen, Wibke; Güldaglar, Timur; Runz, Armin; Echner, Gernot; Mann, Philipp; Möhler, Christian; Pfaffenberger, Asja; Greilich, Steffen [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Phantom surrogates were developed to allow multimodal [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and teletherapy] and anthropomorphic tissue simulation as well as materials and methods to construct deformable organ shapes and anthropomorphic bone models. Methods: Agarose gels of variable concentrations and loadings were investigated to simulate various soft tissue types. Oils, fats, and Vaseline were investigated as surrogates for adipose tissue and bone marrow. Anthropomorphic shapes of bone and organs were realized using 3D-printing techniques based on segmentations of patient CT-scans. All materials were characterized in dual energy CT and MRI to adapt CT numbers, electron density, effective atomic number, as well as T1- and T2-relaxation times to patient and literature values. Results: Soft tissue simulation could be achieved with agarose gels in combination with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and NaF to simulate muscle, prostate, and tumor tissues. Vegetable oils were shown to be a good representation for adipose tissue in all modalities. Inner bone was realized using a mixture of Vaseline and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, resulting in both a fatty bone marrow signal in MRI and inhomogeneous areas of low and high attenuation in CT. The high attenuation of outer bone was additionally adapted by applying gypsum bandages to the 3D-printed hollow bone case with values up to 1200 HU. Deformable hollow organs were manufactured using silicone. Signal loss in the MR images based on the conductivity of the gels needs to be further investigated. Conclusions: The presented surrogates and techniques allow the customized construction of multimodality, anthropomorphic, and deformable phantoms as exemplarily shown for a pelvic phantom, which is intended to study adaptive treatment scenarios in MR-guided radiation therapy.

  13. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat'hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures.

  14. Outcome of percutaneous continuous drainage of psoas abscess: A clinically guided technique

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat R Dave; Ranganatha Babu Kurupati; Dipak Shah; Devanand Degulamadi; Nitu Borgohain; Ajay Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous aspiration of abscesses under ultrasonography (USG) and computer tomography (CT) scan has been well described. With recurrence rate reported as high as 66%. The open drainage and percutaneous continuous drainage (PCD) has reduced the recurrence rate. The disadvantage of PCD under CT is radiation hazard and problems of asepsis. Hence a technique of clinically guided percutaneous continuous drainage of the psoas abscess without real-time imaging overcomes these problems...

  15. C-arm flat detector computed tomography: the technique and its applications in interventional neuro-radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Nagaraja, Sanjoy; Byrne, James V.

    2010-01-01

    Flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) is an imaging tool that generates three-dimensional (3-D) volumes from data obtained during C-arm rotation using CT-like reconstruction algorithms. The technique is relatively new and, at current levels of performance, lags behind conventional CT in terms of image quality. However, the advantage of its availability in the interventional room has prompted neuro-radiologists to identify clinical settings where its role is uniquely beneficial. We performed a search of the online literature databases to identify studies reporting experience with FDCT in interventional neuro-radiology. The studies were systematically reviewed and their findings grouped according to specific clinical situation addressed. FDCT images allow detection of procedural complications, evaluation of low-radiopacity stents and assessment of endosaccular coil packing in intra-cranial aneurysms. Additional roles are 3-D angiography that provides an accurate depiction of vessel morphology with low concentrations of radiographic contrast media and a potential for perfusion imaging due to its dynamic scanning capability. A single scan combining soft tissue and angiographic examinations reduces radiation dose and examination time. Ongoing developments in flat detector technology and reconstruction algorithms are expected to further enhance its performance and increase this range of applications. FDCT images provide useful information in neuro-interventional setting. If current research confirms its potential for assessing cerebral haemodynamics by perfusion scanning, the combination would redefine it as an invaluable tool for interventional neuro-radiology procedures. This facility and its existing capabilities of parenchymal and angiographic imaging would also extend its use to the triage of acute stroke patients. (orig.)

  16. Gout. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Calvo Paramo, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the clinical and radiological aspects of gout, showing the most frequent radiological findings that can guide to the correct diagnosis of the disease. The cases that we presented here have been analyzed for many years in our rheumatology service, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Bogota

  17. Radiological normal anatomy of the larynx and pharynx and imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, S.F.; Krestan, C.R.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Fruehwald, J.; Peloschek, P.; Kainberger, F.; Czerny, C.; Formanek, M.

    2009-01-01

    The larynx and the pharynx represent anatomically as well as functionally a very complex organ which serves as an airway and a nutrition channel. Knowledge of anatomy and anatomical topography is therefore a fundamental basis for the evaluation of any pathological process. Beside the clinical examination and endoscopy performed by ear, nose and throat specialists, imaging techniques play a crucial role in pre-therapeutic and post-therapeutic diagnostics. The radiologist employs a conventional x-ray swallow examination, as well as contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), depending on the medical problem in question. The following article demonstrates the functional and especially the structural anatomy of the larynx and the pharynx. Furthermore, the broad range of imaging techniques in clinical use is discussed. (orig.) [de

  18. In-Plane Ultrasound-Guided Knee Injection Through a Lateral Suprapatellar Approach: A Safe Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco A; Taneja, Atul K; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to describe a technique for in-plane ultrasound-guided knee arthrography through a lateral suprapatellar approach, reporting its accuracy and related complications. A retrospective search was performed for computed tomography and magnetic resonance reports from June 2013 through June 2015. Imaging studies, puncture descriptions, and guided-procedure images were reviewed along with clinical and surgical history. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist performed all procedures under sterile technique and ultrasound guidance with the probe in oblique position on the lateral suprapatellar recess after local anesthesia with the patient on dorsal decubitus, hip in neutral rotation, and 30 to 45 degrees of knee flexion. A total of 86 consecutive subjects were evaluated (mean, 55 years). All subjects underwent intra-articular injection of contrast, which was successfully reached in the first attempt in 94.2% of the procedures (81/86), and in the second attempt in 5.8% (5/86) after needle repositioning without a second puncture. There were no postprocedural reports of regional complications at the puncture site, such as significant pain, bleeding, or vascular lesions. Our study demonstrates that in-plane ultrasound-guided injection of the knee in semiflexion approaching the lateral suprapatellar recess is a safe and useful technique to administer intra-articular contrast solution, as an alternative method without radiation exposure.

  19. An alternative noninvasive technique for the treatment of iatrogenic femoral pseudoaneurysms: stethoscope-guided compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Ahmet; Duyuler, Serkan; Kalayci, Süleyman; Türker, Pinar; Sahan, Ekrem; Maden, Orhan; Selçuk, Mehmet Timur

    2013-06-01

    latrogenic femoral pseudoaneurysm is a well-known vascular access site complication. Many invasive and noninvasive techniques have been proposed for the management of this relatively common complication. In this study, we aimed to evaluate efficiency and safety of stethoscope-guided compression as a novel noninvasive technique in the femoral pseudoaneurysm treatment. We prospectively included 29 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of femoral pseudoaneurysm who underwent coronary angiography. Patients with a clinical suspicion of femoral pseudoaneurysm were referred to colour Doppler ultrasound evaluation. The adult (large) side of the stethoscope was used to determine the location where the bruit was best heard. Then compression with the paediatric (small) side of the stethoscope was applied until the bruit could no longer be heard and compression was maintained for at least two sessions. Once the bruit disappeared, a 12-hour bed rest with external elastic compression was advised to the patients, in order to prevent disintegration of newly formed thrombosis. Mean pseudoaneurysm size was 1.7 +/- 0.4 cmx 3.0 +/- 0.9 cm and the mean duration of compression was 36.2 +/- 8.5 minutes.Twenty-six (89.6%) of these 29 patients were successfully treated with stethoscope-guided compression. In 18 patients (62%), the pseuodoaneurysms were successfully closed after 2 sessions of 15-minute compression. No severe complication was observed. Stethoscope-guided compression of femoral pseudoaneurysms is a safe and effective novel technique which requires less equipment and expertise than other contemporary methods.

  20. A New CT-Guided Modified Trocar Technique for Drainage of Difficult Locations Abscesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang J., E-mail: chiangjengtyng@gmail.com; Amoedo, Maurício K.; Bohrer, Yves; Bitencourt, Almir G. V.; Barbosa, Paula N. V.; Almeida, Maria Fernanda A.; Zurstrassen, Charles E. [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Department of Imaging (Brazil); Coimbra, Felipe J. F.; Costa, Wilson L. da [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Department of Abdominal Surgery (Brazil); Chojniak, Rubens [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Department of Imaging (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeComputed tomography (CT) is commonly used to guide drainage of deep-seated abdominal fluid collections. However, in some cases, these collections seem to be inaccessible due to surrounding organs or their being in difficult locations. The aim of this study is to describe a modified Trocar technique to drain collections in difficult locations, especially those in the subphrenic space, without passing through intervening organs.Materials and MethodsThis retrospective case series study describes seven inpatients who underwent CT-guided drainage using a modified Trocar technique for abscesses that are difficult to access percutaneously. All patients provided written informed consent prior to the procedure. After placement of a 12–14F catheter inside the peritoneum, the Trocar stylet was removed so that the tip of the catheter became blunt and flexible to avoid injury to organs and structures in the catheter route, and the catheter was slowly advanced towards the collection using CT guidance and tactile sensation. After reaching the target, the stylet was reintroduced to enter the abscess wall.ResultsAll procedures were performed using an anterior abdominal wall access with adequate catheter positioning and resulted in clinical status improvement in the days after the drainage. No complications related to the procedure were identified in any of the patients.ConclusionsThe modified Trocar technique for percutaneous CT-guided drainage of abdominal abscesses may be feasible for lesions that are difficult to access with conventional methods.

  1. A novel technique for distal fingertip replantation: Polypropylene suture guided interpositional vein graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadaci, Mehmet; Ince, Bilsev; Altuntas, Zeynep; Bitik, Ozan; Uzun, Hakan; Bilgen, Fatma

    2015-05-04

    Despite current advances in microsurgery, fingertip replantation is still controversial, mainly due to its difficulty and cost. The purpose of this study is to describe a new technique of interposition vein graft guided by polypropylene suture in distal fingertip replantation. A total of eight consecutive Tamai zone 1 fingertip replantations performed by the same author were included. All replantations were performed using interposition vein graft guided by polypropylene suture. This technique involved a vein graft of ∼ 2 cm, with appropriate calibration, obtained from the volar part of the forearm and a 2-0 polyprolene suture passed through the interposition vein graft. Then, a polypropylene suture guide carrying the vein graft was inserted into the artery. The anastomosis was easily performed with the aid of 10-0 or 11-0 nylon in a bloodless medium and without encountering the posterior wall problem. Average surgery time was 2.5 hours (range = 2-3 hours). Among eight Tamai zone 1 replantations, six were successful (75%). There were two replantations lost because of arterial failure. This technique may ease fingertip replantations and increase the success rate for Tamai zone 1 injuries.

  2. Urethrotonography - a radiological and manometrical combination technique to diagnose urinary stress incontinance in comparison with urethral pressure profile recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wess, H.

    1982-01-01

    The study described here was carried out in order to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of urinary stress incontinance and the related urethrovesical functions. The pathophysiological changes in the urogenital tract that are associated with urinary stress incontinance are described just as well as the clinical symptoms and signs differentiating the individual forms of incontinance from each other. Account is further taken of the various manometrical and radiological techniques used in the diagnosis of urinary stress incontinance. In this study, which included a total of 100 patients, comparative evaluations were made of the pressure behaviour of the bladder during the filling-up phase and the closing mechanism of the urethra both at rest and under stress using the following procedures: - Method developed by Brown and Wickham for urethral pressure profile recording; visualisation of the bladder and urethra with the aid of X-rays and a balloon catheter especially developed by us. The latter technique may help to solve the problems usually arising when given morphological factors are to be connected with certain medical views or theories concerning the vesical and urethral functions as well as the pathogenesis of urinary stress incontinance. It may thus enable more straightforward diagnosis to be made. (TRV) [de

  3. Radiological Society of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSNA Permissions Librarian Guide Subscriptions & Licensing Free Samples & Online Trial Radiology Legacy Collection Services Promote Your Offerings Manage Your Account Contact Us Agency Guide Pricing Commision Rates Customer Service Contact Us Advertising Editorial Fellowships Policies FAQs ...

  4. Framing quality improvement tools and techniques in healthcare the case of improvement leaders' guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Ross

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a study of how quality improvement tools and techniques are framed within healthcare settings. The paper employs an interpretive approach to understand how quality improvement tools and techniques are mobilised and legitimated. It does so using a case study of the NHS Modernisation Agency Improvement Leaders' Guides in England. Improvement Leaders' Guides were framed within a service improvement approach encouraging the use of quality improvement tools and techniques within healthcare settings. Their use formed part of enacting tools and techniques across different contexts. Whilst this enactment was believed to support the mobilisation of tools and techniques, the experience also illustrated the challenges in distributing such approaches. The paper provides an important contribution in furthering our understanding of framing the "social act" of quality improvement. Given the ongoing emphasis on quality improvement in health systems and the persistent challenges involved, it also provides important information for healthcare leaders globally in seeking to develop, implement or modify similar tools and distribute leadership within health and social care settings.

  5. Interventional radiology in the management of visceral artery pseudoaneurysms: A review of techniques and embolic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Venkatesh, Hosur Ananthashayana; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Garg, Pramod; Srivastava, Deep Narayan [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2016-06-15

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms occur mostly as a result of inflammation and trauma. Owing to high risk of rupture, they require early treatment to prevent lethal complications. Knowledge of the various approaches of embolization of pseudoaneurysms and different embolic materials used in the management of visceral artery pseudoaneurysms is essential for successful and safe embolization. We review and illustrate the endovascular, percutaneous and endoscopic ultrasound techniques used in the treatment of visceral artery pseudoaneurysm and briefly discuss the embolic materials and their benefits and risks.

  6. Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology Drug Delivery Technologies in the Superficial Femoral Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmbhatt, Akshaar; Misra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) affects over 8 million people in the United States alone. While great strides have been made in reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease the prevalence of PAD is expected to rise as the global population ages. PAD characterized by narrowing of arterial blood can be asymptomatic or cause acute limb threatening claudication. It has been classically treated with bypass, but these techniques have been supplanted by endovascular therapy. Plain old Balloon Angioplasty (POBA) has been successful in helping revascularize lesions, but its effect has not been durable due to restenosis. This prompted the creation of several technologies aimed at reducing restenosis. These advances slowly improved outcomes and the durability of endovascular management. Amongst the main tools used in current endovascular practice are drug delivery devices aimed at inhibiting the inflammatory and proliferative pathways that lead to restenosis. This review will examine the current drug delivery technologies used in the SFA. PMID:27423996

  7. MR-guided biopsies of lesions in the retroperitoneal space: technique and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangos, S.; Eichler, K.; Wetter, A.; Lehnert, T.; Hammerstingl, R.; Diebold, T.; Reichel, P.; Herzog, C.; Mack, M.G.; Vogl, T.J.; Hansmann, M.-L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and precision of MRI-guided biopsies of retroperitoneal space-occupying tumors in an open low-field system. In 30 patients with indistinct retroperitoneal tumors [paraaortic lesion (n=20), kidney (n=2), suprarenal gland (n=3) and pancreas (n=5)] MR-guided biopsies were performed using a low-field system (0.2 T, Magnetom Concerto, Siemens, Germany). For the monitoring of the biopsies T1-weighted FLASH sequences (TR/TE=160/5 ms; 90 ) were used in all patients and modified FLASH sequences (TR/TE=160/13 ms; 90 ) in ten patients. After positioning of the needle in the tumors 114 biopsy specimens were acquired in coaxial technique with 16-gauge cutting needles (Somatex, Germany). The biopsies were successfully performed in all patients without vascular or organ injuries. The visualization of the aortic blood flow with MRI facilitated the biopsy procedures of paraaortic lesions. The size of the lesions ranged from 1.6 to 7.5 cm. The median distance of the biopsy access path was 10.4 cm. Adequate specimens were obtained in 28 cases (93.3%) resulting in a correct histological classification of 27 lesions (90%). In conclusion, MR-guided biopsies of retroperitoneal lesions using an open low-field system can be performed safely and accurately and is an alternative to CT-guided biopsies. (orig.)

  8. Radiologic technology educators and andragogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, M W; Simon-Galbraith, J A

    1984-01-01

    Radiologic technology educators are in constant contact with adult learners. However, the theoretical framework that radiologic educators use to guide their instruction may not be appropriate for adults. This article examines the assumptions of the standard instructional theory and the most modern approach to adult education-- andragogy . It also shows how these assumptions affect the adult learner in a radiologic education setting.

  9. Use of chemical and biological adjuvants to achieve the optimum application of radiological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azab, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, the optimization and attainment of maximum guarantee are representing the real challenge for the nuclear technology exercise. The Adjuvant techniques might be considered one of the available tactics for the developing, reducing risk and facilitating secure clearing of nuclear waste in the field of radiation technology applications. The history describes the belief that an adjuvant is required for immunity because the immune system evolved to respond to dangerous situations such as infections, and the presence of an adjuvant is the mechanism used to identify these situations. In immunology, an adjuvant is an agent that may stimulate the immune system and increase the response to a vaccine, without having any specific antigenic effect. Adjuvants are coming increasingly into focus for vaccine developers since many novel split and subunit vaccines are insufficiently immunogenic on their own. Among the used today are alum (aluminum hydroxide) and Glycosyl ceramides. It is worth mentioning that manufacturers already had produced thousands of different adjuvants, for both industrial and agricultural purposes. Today, the agricultural and horticultural industries are being overwhelmed by adjuvant choices. Complete Freunds adjuvant is the adjuvant used in animal research studies of basic and applied immunology. (author)

  10. Diagnostic radiology of pet and wild birds: a review I. Radiographic techniques and radiographs of healthy birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beregi, A.; Molnar, V.; Felkai, F.; Biro, F.; Szentgali, Zs.

    1999-01-01

    The first part of the present review summaries the basic technical conditions of radiological examinations, analyses the radiographic features of healthy birds, and describes the procedure and radiological indications of contrast radiography. (This paper can be seen on the Internet at: http://www.akkrt.hu)

  11. Ultrasound-guided endocavitary drainage of pelvic abscesses: Technique, results and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, R.S.; McGrath, F P.; Haslam, P.J.; Varghese, J.C.; Lee, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the experience in our institution with ultrasound-guided transrectal and transvaginal (endocavitary) drainage of pelvic abscesses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients (four male, 14 female; mean age 55 years, range 30-78 years) presenting with pelvic abscesses were referred to our institution for therapeutic drainage over a 4 year period. Patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics prior to drainage, which was performed by either the transvaginal or transrectal route under ultrasound guidance. Patients were given sedo-analgesia in the form of midazolam and fentanyl and local anaesthesia was also employed. Eight French catheters were inserted into the abscess cavities, and patients were subsequently monitored on a daily basis by a member of the interventional radiology team until such time as it was deemed appropriate to remove the catheter. RESULTS: Eighteen catheters were placed in 17 patients, and transvaginal aspiration alone was performed in one patient. Drainage was successful in 16 of 17 patients, but a transgluteal approach was ultimately required in the remaining patient to enable passage of a larger catheter into an infected haematoma. The mean duration of drainage was 5 days, mean time to defervesce 2 days. Spontaneous catheter dislodgement occurred in four patients associated with straining, but this did not have any adverse effect in three of the four patients. CONCLUSION: Endocavitary drainage is an effective method of treatment for pelvic abscesses. Spontaneous catheter dislodgement does not affect patient outcome

  12. Ultrasound-guided endocavitary drainage of pelvic abscesses: Technique, results and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, R.S.; McGrath, F P.; Haslam, P.J.; Varghese, J.C.; Lee, M.J

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the experience in our institution with ultrasound-guided transrectal and transvaginal (endocavitary) drainage of pelvic abscesses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients (four male, 14 female; mean age 55 years, range 30-78 years) presenting with pelvic abscesses were referred to our institution for therapeutic drainage over a 4 year period. Patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics prior to drainage, which was performed by either the transvaginal or transrectal route under ultrasound guidance. Patients were given sedo-analgesia in the form of midazolam and fentanyl and local anaesthesia was also employed. Eight French catheters were inserted into the abscess cavities, and patients were subsequently monitored on a daily basis by a member of the interventional radiology team until such time as it was deemed appropriate to remove the catheter. RESULTS: Eighteen catheters were placed in 17 patients, and transvaginal aspiration alone was performed in one patient. Drainage was successful in 16 of 17 patients, but a transgluteal approach was ultimately required in the remaining patient to enable passage of a larger catheter into an infected haematoma. The mean duration of drainage was 5 days, mean time to defervesce 2 days. Spontaneous catheter dislodgement occurred in four patients associated with straining, but this did not have any adverse effect in three of the four patients. CONCLUSION: Endocavitary drainage is an effective method of treatment for pelvic abscesses. Spontaneous catheter dislodgement does not affect patient outcome.

  13. Guided Wave Propagation Study on Laminated Composites by Frequency-Wavenumber Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Toward the goal of delamination detection and quantification in laminated composites, this paper examines guided wave propagation and wave interaction with delamination damage in laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites using frequency-wavenumber (f-kappa) analysis. Three-dimensional elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used to acquire simulated time-space wavefields for a CFRP composite. The time-space wavefields show trapped waves in the delamination region. To unveil the wave propagation physics, the time-space wavefields are further analyzed by using two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transforms (FT). In the analysis results, new f-k components are observed when the incident guided waves interact with the delamination damage. These new f-kappa components in the simulations are experimentally verified through data obtained from scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) tests. By filtering the new f-kappa components, delamination damage is detected and quantified.

  14. Application of the Guided Wave Technique to the Heat Exchanger Tube in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Soon; Kim, Hyung Nam; Yoo, Hyun Joo

    2005-01-01

    The heat exchanger tube is examined by the method of eddy current test(ECT) to identify the integrity of the nuclear power plant. Because ECT probe is moved through the tube inside to identify flaws, the ECT probe should be exchanged periodically due to the wear of probe surface in order to remove the noise form the ECT signal. Moreover, it is impossible to examine the tube by ECT method because the ECT probe can not move through the inside due to the deformation such as dent. Recently, the theory of guided wave was established and the equipment applying the theory has been actively developed so as to overcome the limitation of ECT method for the tube inspection of heater exchanger in nuclear power plant. The object of this study is to know the application of the guided wave technique to heat exchanger tube in NPP

  15. Feasibility study on the guided wave technique for condenser tube in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Nam; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Nam; Yoo, Hyun Joo; Hwang, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    The condenser tube is examined by the eddy current test (ECT) method to identify the integrity of the nuclear power plant. Because ECT probe is moved through the tube inside to identify flaws, the ECT probe should be exchanged periodically due to the wear of probe surface in order to remove the noise form the ECT signal. Moreover, it is impossible to examine the tube by ECT method because the ECT probe can not move through the inside due to the deformation such as dent. Recently, the theory of guided wave was established and the equipment applying the theory has been actively developed so as to overcome the limitation of ECT method for the tube inspection of heater exchanger in nuclear power plant. The object of this study is to know the feasibility of applying the guided wave technique to condenser tube in NPP

  16. Fluoroscopically guided tunneled trans-caudal epidural catheter technique for opioid-free neonatal epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Andrew D; Hughes, Elisabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Epidural analgesia confers significant perioperative advantages to neonates undergoing surgical procedures but may be very technically challenging to place using a standard interlaminar loss-of-resistance to saline technique given the shallow depth of the epidural space. Thoracic epidural catheters placed via the caudal route may reduce the risk of direct neural injury from needle placement, but often pose higher risks of infection and/or improper positioning if placed without radiographic guidance. We present a detailed method of placing a fluoroscopically guided, tunneled transcaudal epidural catheter, which may reduce both of these risks. The accuracy and precision of this technique often provides adequate analgesia to allow for opioid-free epidural infusions as well as significant reductions in systemic opioids through the perioperative period. Opioid-free analgesia using a regional anesthetic technique allows for earlier extubation and reduced perioperative sedation, which may have a less deleterious neurocognitive effect on the developing brain of the neonate.

  17. Outcome of percutaneous continuous drainage of psoas abscess: A clinically guided technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Bharat R; Kurupati, Ranganatha Babu; Shah, Dipak; Degulamadi, Devanand; Borgohain, Nitu; Krishnan, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous aspiration of abscesses under ultrasonography (USG) and computer tomography (CT) scan has been well described. With recurrence rate reported as high as 66%. The open drainage and percutaneous continuous drainage (PCD) has reduced the recurrence rate. The disadvantage of PCD under CT is radiation hazard and problems of asepsis. Hence a technique of clinically guided percutaneous continuous drainage of the psoas abscess without real-time imaging overcomes these problems. We describe clinically guided PCD of psoas abscess and its outcome. Twenty-nine patients with dorsolumbar spondylodiscitis without gross neural deficit with psoas abscess of size >5 cm were selected for PCD. It was done as a day care procedure under local anesthesia. Sequentially, aspiration followed by guide pin-guided trocar and catheter insertion was done without image guidance. Culture sensitivity was done and chemotherapy initiated and catheter kept till the drainage was drainage and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index) score at 2 years. PCD was successful in all cases. Back and radicular pain improved in all cases. Average procedure time was 24.30 minutes, drain output was 234.40 ml, and the drainage duration was 7.90 days. One patient required surgical stabilisation due to progression of the spondylodiscitis resulting in instability inspite of successful drainage of abscess. Problems with the procedure were noticed in six patients. Multiple attempts (n = 2), persistent discharge (n = 1) for 2 weeks, blocked catheter (n = 2) and catheter pull out (n = 1) occurred with no effect on the outcome. The average ODI score improved from 62.47 to 5.51 at 2 years. Clinically guided PCD is an efficient, safe and easy procedure in drainage of psoas abscess.

  18. Outcome of percutaneous continuous drainage of psoas abscess: A clinically guided technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat R Dave

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Percutaneous aspiration of abscesses under ultrasonography (USG and computer tomography (CT scan has been well described. With recurrence rate reported as high as 66%. The open drainage and percutaneous continuous drainage (PCD has reduced the recurrence rate. The disadvantage of PCD under CT is radiation hazard and problems of asepsis. Hence a technique of clinically guided percutaneous continuous drainage of the psoas abscess without real-time imaging overcomes these problems. We describe clinically guided PCD of psoas abscess and its outcome. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients with dorsolumbar spondylodiscitis without gross neural deficit with psoas abscess of size >5 cm were selected for PCD. It was done as a day care procedure under local anesthesia. Sequentially, aspiration followed by guide pin-guided trocar and catheter insertion was done without image guidance. Culture sensitivity was done and chemotherapy initiated and catheter kept till the drainage was <10 ml for 48 hours. Outcome assessment was done with relief of pain, successful abscess drainage and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index score at 2 years. Results: PCD was successful in all cases. Back and radicular pain improved in all cases. Average procedure time was 24.30 minutes, drain output was 234.40 ml, and the drainage duration was 7.90 days. One patient required surgical stabilisation due to progression of the spondylodiscitis resulting in instability inspite of successful drainage of abscess. Problems with the procedure were noticed in six patients. Multiple attempts ( n = 2, persistent discharge ( n = 1 for 2 weeks, blocked catheter ( n = 2 and catheter pull out ( n = 1 occurred with no effect on the outcome. The average ODI score improved from 62.47 to 5.51 at 2 years. Conclusions: Clinically guided PCD is an efficient, safe and easy procedure in drainage of psoas abscess.

  19. Technique for Targeting Arteriovenous Malformations Using Frameless Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Dimitre; Liu, Lina; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Moore, Teri; Sarmiento, Marily; Chang, Steve D.; Dodd, Robert; Marks, Michael; Do, Huy M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To integrate three-dimensional (3D) digital rotation angiography (DRA) and two-dimensional (2D) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging into a targeting methodology enabling comprehensive image-guided robotic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: DRA geometric integrity was evaluated by imaging a phantom with embedded markers. Dedicated DSA acquisition modes with preset C-arm positions were configured. The geometric reproducibility of the presets was determined, and its impact on localization accuracy was evaluated. An imaging protocol composed of anterior-posterior and lateral DSA series in combination with a DRA run without couch displacement between acquisitions was introduced. Software was developed for registration of DSA and DRA (2D-3D) images to correct for: (a) small misalignments of the C-arm with respect to the estimated geometry of the set positions and (b) potential patient motion between image series. Within the software, correlated navigation of registered DRA and DSA images was incorporated to localize AVMs within a 3D image coordinate space. Subsequent treatment planning and delivery followed a standard image-guided robotic radiosurgery process. Results: DRA spatial distortions were typically smaller than 0.3 mm throughout a 145-mm x 145-mm x 145-mm volume. With 2D-3D image registration, localization uncertainties resulting from the achievable reproducibility of the C-arm set positions could be reduced to about 0.2 mm. Overall system-related localization uncertainty within the DRA coordinate space was 0.4 mm. Image-guided frameless robotic radiosurgical treatments with this technique were initiated. Conclusions: The integration of DRA and DSA into the process of nidus localization increases the confidence with which radiosurgical ablation of AVMs can be performed when using only an image-guided technique. Such an approach can increase patient comfort, decrease time pressure on clinical and

  20. Functional and radiological evaluation of acute acromioclavicular dislocation treated with anchors without eyelet: comparison with other techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Tadeu do Nascimento

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To assess the repair results of acromioclavicular dislocations (ACJD grades III and V, with anchors without eyelet, when compared with other techniques, and to evaluate factors that can affect the final result. METHODS: A retrospective study of 36 patients with ACJD grades III and V in the Rockwood classification, 12 treated with anchors without eyelet, 11 with one tightrope, six with two tightropes, and six with subcoracoid cerclage, operated from September 2012 to February 2015. Patients were assessed radiographically and through DASH, UCLA, the visual analog scale of pain (VAS and the Short-Form 36 (SF-36. Surgical time and the possible influence of some factors in the outcome were also assessed. RESULTS: The mean DASH score was 6.7; UCLA, 32.9; VAS, 1.2; and SF-36, 79.47. Radiographically, the final mean measurement was 9.93 mm, with no statistical difference between the groups. The mean surgical time for Group I was 31 min; Group II, 19 min; Group III, 29 min; and Group IV, 59 min. There was a significant difference between Groups II and IV when compared with the study group. The initial and immediate post-operative ACJD measurements ACJD were correlated with the final measure. CONCLUSION: The repair of acute ACJD with anchors without eyelet is as effective as the other methods, with significantly shorter operative time when compared with the subcoracoid cerclage technique. The final radiological result is influenced by the coracoclavicular initial distance and the immediate postoperative measurement.

  1. Usefulness of the coaxial technique in US-guided breast core biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Ha, Jeon Ju; Lee, Keon; Kim, Won Ho; Kwon, Jung Hyeok [Dongkang general hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Soo Youn [Ulsan Univ. Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the coaxial technique in US-guided breast core biopsy. Using the coaxial technique, US-guided breast core biopsy was performed in 49 breast lesions (40 patients). Under US-guidance the 17-gauge, 13 cm long introducer needle was positioned proximal to the lesion. Once the needle was in place, the central trocar was removed and was replaced with the core biopsy needle. We used an 18-gauge, 16-cm-long core biopsy needle with a 17 mm specimen notch. Four to eight tissue specimens were obtained from each lesion, and the quality and quantity of specimens, procedure time, and complications and their rate were evaluated. For 48 of 49 lesions, specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis, and the findings were as follows : six cases of invasive ductal carcinoma, one of ductal carcinoma in situ, 29 of fibrocystic disease, eight of fibroadenoma, two of chronic inflammation, and two of sclerosing lesion. In 12 lesions agreement between the pathologic results of needle core biopsy and surgical results was 100%. The procedure time was about 15 minutes and no significant complications were noted. In breast core biopsy, the coaxial technique is simple and time-saving, and compared with standard breast core biopsy, may also be less traumatic and decrease the potential risk of seeding the biopsy tract with malignant cells.

  2. Usefulness of the coaxial technique in US-guided breast core biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Ha, Jeon Ju; Lee, Keon; Kim, Won Ho; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Ham, Soo Youn

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the coaxial technique in US-guided breast core biopsy. Using the coaxial technique, US-guided breast core biopsy was performed in 49 breast lesions (40 patients). Under US-guidance the 17-gauge, 13 cm long introducer needle was positioned proximal to the lesion. Once the needle was in place, the central trocar was removed and was replaced with the core biopsy needle. We used an 18-gauge, 16-cm-long core biopsy needle with a 17 mm specimen notch. Four to eight tissue specimens were obtained from each lesion, and the quality and quantity of specimens, procedure time, and complications and their rate were evaluated. For 48 of 49 lesions, specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis, and the findings were as follows : six cases of invasive ductal carcinoma, one of ductal carcinoma in situ, 29 of fibrocystic disease, eight of fibroadenoma, two of chronic inflammation, and two of sclerosing lesion. In 12 lesions agreement between the pathologic results of needle core biopsy and surgical results was 100%. The procedure time was about 15 minutes and no significant complications were noted. In breast core biopsy, the coaxial technique is simple and time-saving, and compared with standard breast core biopsy, may also be less traumatic and decrease the potential risk of seeding the biopsy tract with malignant cells

  3. Radiological safety training for uranium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

  4. [Development of an attitude-measurement questionnaire using the semantic differential technique: defining the attitudes of radiological technology students toward X-ray examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Naomi; Terashita, Takayoshi; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2014-03-01

    In general, it is difficult to objectively evaluate the results of an educational program. The semantic differential (SeD) technique, a methodology used to measure the connotative meaning of objects, words, and concepts, can, however, be applied to the evaluation of students' attitudes. In this study, we aimed to achieve an objective evaluation of the effects of radiological technology education. We therefore investigated the attitude of radiological students using the SeD technique. We focused on X-ray examinations in the field of radiological technology science. Bipolar adjective scales were used for the SeD questionnaire. To create the questionnaire, appropriate adjectives were selected from past reports of X-ray examination practice. The participants were 32 senior students at Hokkaido University at the Division of Radiological Technology at the School of Medicine's Department of Health Sciences. All the participants completed the questionnaire. The study was conducted in early June 2012. Attitudes toward X-ray examination were identified using a factor analysis of 11 adjectives. The factor analysis revealed the following three attitudes: feelings of expectation, responsibility, and resistance. Knowledge regarding the attitudes that students have toward X-ray examination will prove useful for evaluating the effects of educational intervention. In this study, a sampling bias may have occurred due to the small sample size; however, no other biases were observed.

  5. Architecture and Key Techniques of Augmented Reality Maintenance Guiding System for Civil Aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    hong, Zhou; Wenhua, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Augmented reality technology is introduced into the maintenance related field for strengthened information in real-world scenarios through integration of virtual assistant maintenance information with real-world scenarios. This can lower the difficulty of maintenance, reduce maintenance errors, and improve the maintenance efficiency and quality of civil aviation crews. Architecture of augmented reality virtual maintenance guiding system is proposed on the basis of introducing the definition of augmented reality and analyzing the characteristics of augmented reality virtual maintenance. Key techniques involved, such as standardization and organization of maintenance data, 3D registration, modeling of maintenance guidance information and virtual maintenance man-machine interaction, are elaborated emphatically, and solutions are given.

  6. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  7. Application of the cylindrically guided wave technique for bolt and pump shaft inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, G.M.; Ruescher, E.H.; Bloom, E.A.; Joshi, N.R.; Tsai, Y.M.; Liu, S.N.

    1993-01-01

    Elastic wave propagation in a bounded medium significantly differs from that in an unbounded medium. The bounded medium in the form of a cylinder acts like a solid waveguide directing the wave with its geometry. A continuous or a pulsed wave interacts with cylindrical boundaries producing mode-converted signals in addition to the backwall echo. The signals are received at constant time intervals directly proportional to the diameter of a solid cylindrical object such as a bolt or an anchor stud. The Cylindrically Guided Wave Technique (CGWT) makes intelligent use of the mode-converted signals, or trailing pulses, to detect corrosion wastages and cracks in cylindrical objects. (orig.)

  8. Guide of the CSN about methodology of radiological Checking of location and general levels of release; Guia del CSN sobre metodologia de comprobacion del estado radiologico de un emplazamiento y niveles genericos de liberacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz Alduan, M. T.

    2013-07-01

    The guide aims to recommend a methodology for checking radiological status of a site with a view to his release, complete and with a reasonable, statistically representative number of measures. Checking of the radiological situation of a site allows to determine if it is contaminated and, if so, whether, after cleaning performances, has reached a level of residual contamination, allowing their release with or without restrictions. Generic levels for the release without restrictions on the grounds of sites recommended for this verification of nuclear installations on the basis of the radiological dose criteria laid down in the instruction of the CSN IS-13. I agree with the IS-13, the site includes terrain, structures and facilities described in the authorization of exploitation, as well as any area has been released prior to the closing statement. The Guide recommends only the levels of release of land, regardless of the structures and facilities. (Author)

  9. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de, E-mail: ricardomcfreitas@gmail.com; Andrade, Celi Santos, E-mail: celis.andrade@hotmail.com; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira, E-mail: jgmpcaldas@uol.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit of the Instituto de Radiologia (Brazil); Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi, E-mail: miharumi@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Department of Biostatistics, Biosciences Institute (Brazil); Ferreira, Lorraine Braga, E-mail: lorraine.braga@gmail.com; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias, E-mail: vearana@usp.br [Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Oral Pathology (Brazil); Cury, Patrícia Maluf, E-mail: pmcury@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO{sub 2}) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO{sub 2} epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers.

  10. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de; Andrade, Celi Santos; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira; Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi; Ferreira, Lorraine Braga; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Cury, Patrícia Maluf

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO 2 ) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO 2 epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers

  11. HTS-SQUID NDE Technique for Pipes based on Ultrasonic Guided Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsukade, Y; Masutani, N; Teranishi, S; Masamoto, K; Kanenaga, S; Adachi, S; Tanabe, K

    2017-01-01

    This article describes research on the novel high-temperature superconductor (HTS) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for metallic pipes based on ultrasonic guided waves. We constructed HTS-SQUID NDE system for pipes based on ultrasonic guided waves, which were generated and received by means of the magnetostrictive effects. Using the system, we measured magnetic signals due to T (0, 1) mode ultrasonic guided waves that transmitted on aluminium pipe, and investigated influences of measurement parameters to the magnetic signals, such as direction of a HTS-SQUID gradiometer, lift-off distance, and intensity and frequency of input current fed to a magnetostrictive transmitter. With the gradiometer oriented parallel to the pipe axis, more than 10 times larger signals were measured compared with that oriented perpendicular to the pipe axis. Magnetic signals measured by the gradiometer were inverse proportional to the power of the list- off distance, and proportional to the intensity of the input current up to 1 A pp . Relation between the frequency of the input current and the measured signal was shown and discussed. (paper)

  12. HTS-SQUID NDE Technique for Pipes based on Ultrasonic Guided Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukade, Y.; Masutani, N.; Teranishi, S.; Masamoto, K.; Kanenaga, S.; Adachi, S.; Tanabe, K.

    2017-07-01

    This article describes research on the novel high-temperature superconductor (HTS) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for metallic pipes based on ultrasonic guided waves. We constructed HTS-SQUID NDE system for pipes based on ultrasonic guided waves, which were generated and received by means of the magnetostrictive effects. Using the system, we measured magnetic signals due to T (0, 1) mode ultrasonic guided waves that transmitted on aluminium pipe, and investigated influences of measurement parameters to the magnetic signals, such as direction of a HTS-SQUID gradiometer, lift-off distance, and intensity and frequency of input current fed to a magnetostrictive transmitter. With the gradiometer oriented parallel to the pipe axis, more than 10 times larger signals were measured compared with that oriented perpendicular to the pipe axis. Magnetic signals measured by the gradiometer were inverse proportional to the power of the list- off distance, and proportional to the intensity of the input current up to 1 App. Relation between the frequency of the input current and the measured signal was shown and discussed.

  13. Application of a digital technique in evaluating the reliability of shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, E; Sonugelen, M; Guneri, P; Kesercioglu, A; Kose, T

    2004-05-01

    There appears to be a need for a reliable method for quantification of tooth colour and analysis of shade. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to show the applicability of graphic software in colour analysis and secondly to investigate the reliability of commercial shade guides produced by the same manufacturer, using this digital technique. After confirming the reliability and reproducibility of the digital method by using self-assessed coloured images, three shade guides of the same manufacturer were photographed in daylight and in studio environments with a digital camera and saved in tagged image file format (TIFF) format. Colour analysis of each photograph was performed using the Adobe Photoshop 4.0 graphic program. Luminosity, and red, green, blue (L and RGB) values of each shade tab of each shade guide were measured and the data were subjected to statistical analysis using the repeated measure Anova test. The L and RGB values of the images taken in daylight differed significantly from those of the images taken in studio environment (P < 0.05). In both environments, the luminosity and red values of the shade tabs were significantly different from each other (P < 0.05). It was concluded that, when the environmental conditions were kept constant, the Adobe Photoshop 4.0 colour analysis program could be used to analyse the colour of images. On the other hand, the results revealed that the accuracy of shade tabs widely being used in colour matching should be readdressed.

  14. Comparison between ultrasound guided technique and digital palpation technique for radial artery cannulation in adult patients: An updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sulagna; Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim K

    2018-03-22

    Possible advantages and risks associated with ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation in-comparison to digital palpation guided method in adult patients are not fully known. We have compared ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation with digital palpation technique in this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Trials conducted in operating room, emergency department, cardiac catheterization laboratory. PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched (from 1946 to 20th November 2017) to identify prospective randomized controlled trials in adult patients. Two-dimensional ultrasound guided radial artery catheterization versus digital palpation guided radial artery cannulation. Overall cannulation success rate, first attempt success rate, time to cannulation and mean number of attempts to successful cannulation. Odds ratio (OR) and standardized mean difference (SMD) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for categorical and continuous variables respectively. Data of 1895 patients from 10 studies have been included in this meta- analysis. Overall cannulation success rate was similar between ultrasound guided technique and digital palpation [OR (95% CI) 2.01 (1.00, 4.06); p = 0.05]. Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation is associated with higher first attempt success rate of radial artery cannulation in comparison to digital palpation [OR (95% CI) 2.76 (186, 4.10); p guided technique with palpation technique. Radial artery cannulation by ultrasound guidance may increase the first attempt success rate but not the overall cannulation success when compared to digital palpation technique. However, results of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution due presence of heterogeneity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The endoscopic ultrasonography-guided rendezvous technique for biliary cannulation: a technical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Kogure, Hirofumi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-04-01

    Steady progress is being made in endoscopic biliary intervention, especially endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided procedures. The EUS-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) is a salvage method for failed selective biliary cannulation. The overall success rate of EUS-RV in 247 cases from seven published articles was 74 % and the incidence of complications was 11 %. The main cause of failed rendezvous cannulation was difficulty passing a biliary stricture or papilla due to poor guidewire (GW) manipulation. A recent large study found a 98.3 % success rate and superiority to precutting. This report suggested using a hydrophilic guidewire. Major complications were bleeding (0.8 %), bile leakage (1.2 %), peritonitis (0.4 %), pneumoperitoneum (0.2 %), and pancreatitis (1.6 %). The approach routes for EUS-RV were transgastric, transduodenal short position, and transduodenal long position. The appropriate route for each patient should be used. GW selection for EUS-RV is critical, and a hydrophilic GW might be the most useful. The catheter can be inserted through the papilla alongside or over the wire. Alongside cannulation is convenient, but difficult. The problem with the over-the-wire technique is withdrawal of the GW in the accessory channel. EUS-RV is effective and safe, but is not established. The efficacy should be confirmed in a prospective comparative trial, and the necessary specialist equipment should be developed.

  16. Pancreatic duct drainage using EUS-guided rendezvous technique for stenotic pancreaticojejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takikawa, Tetsuya; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Nakano, Eriko; Miura, Shin; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Unno, Jun; Kume, Kiyoshi; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Katayose, Yu; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-08-21

    The patient was a 30-year-old female who had undergone excision of the extrahepatic bile duct and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy for congenital biliary dilatation at the age of 7. Thereafter, she suffered from recurrent acute pancreatitis due to pancreaticobiliary maljunction and received subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. She developed a pancreatic fistula and an intra-abdominal abscess after the operation. These complications were improved by percutaneous abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy. However, upper abdominal discomfort and the elevation of serum pancreatic enzymes persisted due to stenosis from the pancreaticojejunostomy. Because we could not accomplish dilation of the stenosis by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, we tried an endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) guided rendezvous technique for pancreatic duct drainage. After transgastric puncture of the pancreatic duct using an EUS-fine needle aspiration needle, the guidewire was inserted into the pancreatic duct and finally reached to the jejunum through the stenotic anastomosis. We changed the echoendoscope to an oblique-viewing endoscope, then grasped the guidewire and withdrew it through the scope. The stenosis of the pancreaticojejunostomy was dilated up to 4 mm, and a pancreatic stent was put in place. Though the pancreatic stent was removed after three months, the patient remained symptom-free. Pancreatic duct drainage using an EUS-guided rendezvous technique was useful for the treatment of a stenotic pancreaticojejunostomy after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  17. Guide for the use of the regulations on medical surveillance to exposed workers in case of abnormal events (radiological accidents)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    According to medical surveillance, abnormal events are those extraordinary situations that may imply real or potential damage for a human being or a determined population. This guide refers to abnormal events that may imply, solely, to occupationally-exposed workers and small groups of population eventually related

  18. Experience and improved techniques in radiological environmental monitoring at major DOE low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    A summary of routine radiological environmental surveillance programs conducted at major active US Department of Energy (DOE) solid low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites is provided. The DOE disposal sites at which monitoring programs were reviewed include those located at Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Plant (SRP). The review is limited to activities conducted for the purpose of monitoring disposal site performance. Areas of environmental monitoring reviewed include air monitoring for particulates and gases, monitoring of surface water runoff, surface water bodies, ground water, monitoring of surface soils and the vadose zone, and monitoring of ambient penetrating radiation. Routine environmental surveillance is conducted at major LLW disposal sites at various levels of effort for specific environmental media. In summary, all sites implement a routine monitoring program for penetrating radiation. Four sites (INEL, NTS, LANL, and SRP) monitor particulates in air specifically at LLW disposal sites. Hanford monitors particulates at LLW sites in conjunction with monitoring of other site operations. Particulates are monitored on a reservationwide network at ORNL. Gases are monitored specifically at active LLW sites operated at NTS, LANL, and SRP. Ground water is monitored specifically at LLW sites at INEL, LANL, and SRP, in conjunction with other operations at Hanford, and as part of a reservationwide program at NTS and ORNL. Surface water is monitored at INEL, LANL, and SRP LLW sites. Surface soil is sampled and analyzed on a routine basis at INEL and LANL. Routine monitoring of the vadose zone is conducted at the INEL and SRP. Techniques and equipment in use are described and other aspects of environmental monitoring programs, such as quality assurance and data base management, are reviewed

  19. Doppler echography and utilization of intravenous echo enhancer in the follow-up of hepato carcinoma with percutaneous radiological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forner, J.; Flored de la Torre, M.; Senis, C.; Lozano de Arnilla, M. C.; Ferrer, S.; Celma, M. I.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the utilization of Doppler ultrasound scan in conjunction with echographic enhancer in the follow-up of hepato carcinomas treated by means of radiological intervention techniques. We treated 20 hepatic nodules diagnosed with hepato carcinoma either by means of chemo embolization or percutaneously (either injection of acetic acid or radio-frequency thermo-ablation). Doppler ultrasound scan was performed before and after the treatment by means of sectorial and convex multifrequency probes. Evaluated were the absence, presence and degree of vascularisation, as well as its distribution and characteristics. In all cases, a contrast-en-handed spiral CT was performed. Both studies served as a pattern for comparison before and after treatment. In post-treatment enhanced-echo-Doppler controls of the 18 patients treated with acetic acid, vascularisation was not demonstrated in 7 cases, peripheral vascularisation was detected in 4 cases, perforation vascularisation in another four, and central vascularisation was detected in 3 cases. Contrast-enhanced spiral CT demonstrated superimposed findings, except in one cases, in which the spiral CT detected central capitation of the nodule.With enhanced echo-Doppler, peripheral vascularisation was detected. In both nodules treated by means of radio-frequency thermo ablation, there was detected neither vascularisation in the echo-Doppler nor captation of contrast media in the CT. Doppler ultrasound scan is a good method of follow-up for treated hepato carcinomas. The utilization of echoenhancers increases its ability to detect vascularization it being comparable to that of contrast-enhanced CT. As such, Doppler ultrasound scan together with echoenhancers can help us both in the selection of treatment and evaluation of therapeutic response. (Author) 35 refs

  20. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2B, User's guide to the LWR assemblies data base, Appendix 2C, User's guide to the LWR radiological data base, Appendix 2D, User's guide to the LWR quantities data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This User's Guide for the LWR Assemblies data base system is part of the Characteristics Data Base being developed under the Waste Systems Data Development Program. The objective of the LWR Assemblies data base is to provide access at the personal computer level to information about fuel assemblies used in light-water reactors. The information available is physical descriptions of intact fuel assemblies and radiological descriptions of spent fuel disassembly hardware. The LWR Assemblies data base is a user-oriented menu driven system. Each menu is instructive about its use. Section 5 of this guide provides a sample session with the data base to assist the user

  1. Radiology today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, M.W.; Heuck, F.H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The book encompasses the proceedings of a postgraduate course held in Salzburg in June 1980. 230 radiologists from 17 countries discussed here the important and practical advances of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and ultrasound as they contribute to gastrointestinal, urologic, skeletal, cardiovascular, pediatric, and neuroradiology. The book contains 55 single contributions of different authors to the following main themes: Cardiovascular, Radiology, pulmonary radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, urinary tract radiology, skeletal radiology, mammography, lymphography, ultrasound, ENT radiology, and neuroradiology. (orig./MG)

  2. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  3. Collaborative filtering to improve navigation of large radiology knowledge resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Charles E

    2005-06-01

    Collaborative filtering is a knowledge-discovery technique that can help guide readers to items of potential interest based on the experience of prior users. This study sought to determine the impact of collaborative filtering on navigation of a large, Web-based radiology knowledge resource. Collaborative filtering was applied to a collection of 1,168 radiology hypertext documents available via the Internet. An item-based collaborative filtering algorithm identified each document's six most closely related documents based on 248,304 page views in an 18-day period. Documents were amended to include links to their related documents, and use was analyzed over the next 5 days. The mean number of documents viewed per visit increased from 1.57 to 1.74 (P Collaborative filtering can increase a radiology information resource's utilization and can improve its usefulness and ease of navigation. The technique holds promise for improving navigation of large Internet-based radiology knowledge resources.

  4. Detection and excision of non-palpable breast lesions by radio guided surgery and air injection for radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Rafael Henrique Szymanski; Gutfilen, Bianca; Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa da

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to asses the efficiency of the radioguided localization and removal of occult breast lesions using radiopharmaceuticals injected directly into the lesions or close to them with posterior air injection as a radiological control. Methods: twenty-nine consecutive patients with thirty-two occult breast lesions detected mammographically or by ultrasound, and categorized 3, 4 and 5 BI-RADS, were included in this observational study with results expressed in percentages. The radiopharmaceutical used was human serum albumin labeled with 99m Tc-HSA injected inside or close to the lesion using mammographic or ultrasonographic guidance. The injection of the radiopharmaceutical was followed immediately by air injection through the needle used for stereotaxis as a radiological control of the radiopharmaceutical placement. The excision biopsy was carried out with the aid of a hand-held gamma-detecting probe and the entire removal of the lesion was verified by X-ray of the surgical specimens or by intraoperative frozen section examination. Results: breast cancer was found in 10.0% (1/10) of the 3 BI-RADS lesions, in 31.5% (6/19) of the 4 BI-RADS and in 66.6% (2/3) of the 5 BI-RADS. The radiotracer was correctly positioned in 96.8% of the specimens (31/32) allowing the removal of also 96.8% of the studied non-palpable breast lesions. To show the entire removal, X-ray was used in 23 cases (71.8%), intraoperative frozen section study in 21.8% (7/32) and both methods in 6.2% (2/32). Conclusions: radioguided surgery showed to be an important tool in the removal of non-palpable breast lesions, as a simple, fast and feasible method that can be implemented in the clinical routine of these patients. (author)

  5. The challenging image-guided abdominal mass biopsy: established and emerging techniques 'if you can see it, you can biopsy it'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainani, Nisha I; Arellano, Ronald S; Shyn, Paul B; Gervais, Debra A; Mueller, Peter R; Silverman, Stuart G

    2013-08-01

    Image-guided percutaneous biopsy of abdominal masses is among the most commonly performed procedures in interventional radiology. While most abdominal masses are readily amenable to percutaneous biopsy, some may be technically challenging for a number of reasons. Low lesion conspicuity, small size, overlying or intervening structures, motion, such as that due to respiration, are some of the factors that can influence the ability and ultimately the success of an abdominal biopsy. Various techniques or technologies, such as choice of imaging modality, use of intravenous contrast and anatomic landmarks, patient positioning, organ displacement or trans-organ approach, angling CT gantry, triangulation method, real-time guidance with CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound, sedation or breath-hold, pre-procedural image fusion, electromagnetic tracking, and others, when used singularly or in combination, can overcome these challenges to facilitate needle placement in abdominal masses that otherwise would be considered not amenable to percutaneous biopsy. Familiarity and awareness of these techniques allows the interventional radiologist to expand the use of percutaneous biopsy in clinical practice, and help choose the most appropriate technique for a particular patient.

  6. A new modified speculum guided single nostril technique for endoscopic transnasal transsphenoidal surgery: an analysis of nasal complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waran, Vicknes; Tang, Ing Ping; Karuppiah, Ravindran; Abd Kadir, Khairul Azmi; Chandran, Hari; Muthusamy, Kalai Arasu; Prepageran, Narayanan

    2013-12-01

    Abstract The endoscopic transnasal, transsphenoidal surgical technique for pituitary tumour excision has generally been regarded as a less invasive technique, ranging from single nostril to dual nostril techniques. We propose a single nostril technique using a modified nasal speculum as a preferred technique. We initially reviewed 25 patients who underwent pituitary tumour excision, via endoscopic transnasal transsphenoidal surgery, using this new modified speculum-guided single nostril technique. The results show shorter operation time with reduced intra- and post-operative nasal soft tissue injuries and complications.

  7. Radiological diagnosis of pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, K.G.; Wiebe, V.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is extremely important in the diagnosis of occupational lung disease. Owing to its general availability and international comparability, the roentgenographic pa view of the chest obtained by the high-voltage technique is still the basis of the radiologic examination. Supplementary investigations are necessary for medical reasons, however, as well as for documentation of experts' certification. Valuable diagnostic information is supplied by oblique views of the thorax and by conventional X-ray tomography, though not by scintigraphic examinations or - up to now - by digital luminescence radiography. Ultrasound helps in the differentiation of free pleural fluid, organized pleural effusion, and pleural malignancy. In addition, computed tomography (CT) can be guided by ultrasound. CT has emerged as the method of choice for examination and for support of medical expert's certification of pneumoconiotic pleural disease, and high-resolution CT (HRCT) is also increasing used for examination of pneumoconiotic lung foci as well. Diagnostic accurcay in pneumoconiosis is further improved by shorter CT scanning times in combination with HRCT. (orig.) [de

  8. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bucourt, Maximilian; Collettini, Federico; Althoff, Christian; Streitparth, Florian; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd (Dept. of Radiology, Charite - Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany)), Email: mdb@charite.de; Teichgraeber, U.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Jena Univ. (Germany))

    2012-04-15

    Background: In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with respiratory impairment and/or advanced disease, performing even mild sedation - as is usually necessary for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placements - is fraught with risk. These patients are often referred to Interventional Radiology for alternative percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement options. Purpose: To report our experience with CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with a novel loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in ALS patients as an alternative to endoscopic techniques. Material and Methods: A consecutive series of 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy was considered too dangerous or impossible to perform underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastropexy and gastrostomy and prospective follow-up. All procedures were performed with a 15 FR Freka Pexact gastrostomy kit, a 16-row CT scanner (Aquilion 16) and single shot CT fluoroscopy mode. Results: The procedure was performed successfully in 30 of 31 patients (20 men, 11 women; median age 60 years, range 38-80 years). In the remaining case the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy and CO2 insufflation was initiated thereafter, leading to successful gastrostomy without prior gastropexy and without further adverse events during follow-up. Two patients reported unproblematic exchange of a balloon tube due to skin irritations with no further adverse events. One patient reported accidental displacement of an exchanged new balloon tube in domestic environment due to balloon leakage: A new balloon tube was easily re-inserted in a hospital the same day. No serious adverse events such as peritonitis, persistent local bleeding, systemic blood loss, or any local infection requiring surgical intervention were observed. Until August 11, 2011 follow-up resulted in 7473 cumulative gastrostomy-days from the date of first placement. Conclusion: Initial results suggest that the described

  9. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bucourt, Maximilian; Collettini, Federico; Althoff, Christian; Streitparth, Florian; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, U.K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with respiratory impairment and/or advanced disease, performing even mild sedation - as is usually necessary for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placements - is fraught with risk. These patients are often referred to Interventional Radiology for alternative percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement options. Purpose: To report our experience with CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with a novel loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in ALS patients as an alternative to endoscopic techniques. Material and Methods: A consecutive series of 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy was considered too dangerous or impossible to perform underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastropexy and gastrostomy and prospective follow-up. All procedures were performed with a 15 FR Freka Pexact gastrostomy kit, a 16-row CT scanner (Aquilion 16) and single shot CT fluoroscopy mode. Results: The procedure was performed successfully in 30 of 31 patients (20 men, 11 women; median age 60 years, range 38-80 years). In the remaining case the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy and CO2 insufflation was initiated thereafter, leading to successful gastrostomy without prior gastropexy and without further adverse events during follow-up. Two patients reported unproblematic exchange of a balloon tube due to skin irritations with no further adverse events. One patient reported accidental displacement of an exchanged new balloon tube in domestic environment due to balloon leakage: A new balloon tube was easily re-inserted in a hospital the same day. No serious adverse events such as peritonitis, persistent local bleeding, systemic blood loss, or any local infection requiring surgical intervention were observed. Until August 11, 2011 follow-up resulted in 7473 cumulative gastrostomy-days from the date of first placement. Conclusion: Initial results suggest that the described

  10. Image-guided biopsy in patients with suspected ovarian carcinoma: a safe and effective technique?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee A.; Freeman, Susan J.; Berman, Laurence H.; Sala, Evis; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Earl, Helena; Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour; Crawford, Robin; Brenton, James

    2009-01-01

    In patients with suspected advanced ovarian carcinoma, a precise histological diagnosis is required before commencing neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. This study aims to determine the diagnostic accuracy and complication rate of percutaneous biopsies performed under ultrasound or computed tomography guidance. Between 2002 to 2007, 60 consecutive image-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed in patients with suspected ovarian cancer. The following variables were recorded: tissue biopsied, imaging technique, experience of operator, biopsy needle gauge, number of passes, complications, and final histology. Forty-seven patients had omental biopsies, 12 pelvic mass biopsies, and 1 para-aortic lymph node biopsy. Thirty-five biopsies were performed under ultrasound, 25 under computed tomography guidance. Biopsy needle gauges ranged from 14-20 swg with two to five passes for each patient. There were no complications. Histology was obtained in 52 (87%) patients. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy of peritoneal disease or pelvic mass is safe with high diagnostic accuracy. The large-gauge biopsy needle is as safe as the small gauge needle, but has the added value of obtaining tissue samples for immunohistochemistry and genomic studies. (orig.)

  11. Novel Techniques with the Aid of a Staged CBCT Guided Surgical Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evdokia Chasioti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The case report will present some novel techniques for using a “staged” protocol utilizing strategic periodontally involved teeth as transitional abutments in combination with CBCT guided implant surgery. Staging the case prevented premature loading of the grafted sites during the healing phase. A CBCT following a tenting screw guided bone regeneration procedure ensured adequate bone to place an implant fixture. Proper assessment of the CBCT allowed the surgeon to do an osteotome internal sinus lift in an optimum location. The depth of the bone needed for the osteotome sinus floor elevation was planned. The staged appliance allowed these sinus-augmented sites to heal for an extended period of time compared to implants, which were uncovered and loaded at an earlier time frame. The staged protocol and CBCT analysis enabled the immediate implants to be placed in proper alignment to the adjacent fixture. After teeth were extracted, the osseointegrated implants were converted to abutments for the transitional appliance. Finally, the staged protocol allowed for soft tissue enhancement in the implant and pontic areas prior to final insertion of the prosthesis.

  12. An evaluation of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with the pull technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Chang Wook; Won, Jong Yun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (FPG) using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied with the pull technique, and without the use of an endoscopy or a gastropexy. From March 2005 to February 2007, 25 patients underwent an FPG using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied by the pull technique, in which a 24F pull-type tube was inserted into a patient's mouth and was pulled to the upper abdominal puncture site using a snare, under fluoroscopy. The 18 patients with difficulty swallowing due to muscular atrophic lateral sclerosis or transitional myodystrophy included 5 cases of quadriplegia, 1 case of Parkinson's disease, and 1 metastatic mediastinal tumor. The technical success rate, occurrence of complications, and clinical outcomes were examined. The technical success rate was found to be 100%. In addition, the retention periods for the indwelling tube ranged from 1 to 24 months (mean: 6.5 months), with all tubes retained at a normal position with normal function. No procedure-related mortality occurred. One patient (4%) did however develop a complication in the form of ascites and ascitic fluid leakage around the tube, which was of hepatic origin and was ultimately resolved after the drainage of ascites. As a result of this study the FPG, accompanied with the pull technique using a 24F tube, should be considered as a safe and effective method for examining patients. It was found to have a high success rate and a low complication rate

  13. Contrast-enhanced versus systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate cancer detection: An overview of techniques and a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijmink, Stijn W.T.P.J.; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of the current conventional and contrast-specific transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) techniques for prostate imaging that may be used for guiding biopsy. Subsequently, a systematic literature search resulted in inclusion of four studies that directly compared systematic and contrast-enhanced-targeted TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. All four studies revealed that contrast-enhanced-targeted TRUS-guided biopsy significantly improved the positive biopsy core rate. In the largest study, the mean Gleason score of the contrast-enhanced-targeted TRUS-guided biopsies was significantly higher than that of the systematic biopsies. Future randomized clinical trials, preferably in a non-academic multi-institutional set-up, will have to be performed to confirm the value of contrast-enhanced-targeted TRUS-guided biopsy in regular clinical practice

  14. Treatment of a Developmental Groove and Supernumerary Root Using Guided Tissue Regeneration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alizadeh Tabari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The radicular groove is a developmental groove which is usually found on the palatal or lateral aspects of the maxillary incisor teeth. The present case is a maxillary lateral incisor with a small second root and a deep radicular groove. The developmental groove caused a combined periodontal-endodontic lesion. Methods. Case was managed using a combined treatment procedure involving nonsurgical root canal therapy and surgical periodontal treatment. After completion of root canal treatment, guided tissue regeneration (GTR was carried out using decalcified freeze dried bone allograft (DFDBA and a bioabsorbable collagenous membrane. Tooth also was splinted for two months. Results. After 12 months the tooth was asymptomatic. The periapical radiolucency disappeared and probing depth did not exceed 3 mm. Conclusion. Combined treatment procedure involving nonsurgical root canal therapy and surgical periodontal regenerative treatment can be a predictable technique in treating combined endodontic-periodontal lesions caused by radicular groove.

  15. Augmented reality-guided neurosurgery: accuracy and intraoperative application of an image projection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharati Tabrizi, Leila; Mahvash, Mehran

    2015-07-01

    An augmented reality system has been developed for image-guided neurosurgery to project images with regions of interest onto the patient's head, skull, or brain surface in real time. The aim of this study was to evaluate system accuracy and to perform the first intraoperative application. Images of segmented brain tumors in different localizations and sizes were created in 10 cases and were projected to a head phantom using a video projector. Registration was performed using 5 fiducial markers. After each registration, the distance of the 5 fiducial markers from the visualized tumor borders was measured on the virtual image and on the phantom. The difference was considered a projection error. Moreover, the image projection technique was intraoperatively applied in 5 patients and was compared with a standard navigation system. Augmented reality visualization of the tumors succeeded in all cases. The mean time for registration was 3.8 minutes (range 2-7 minutes). The mean projection error was 0.8 ± 0.25 mm. There were no significant differences in accuracy according to the localization and size of the tumor. Clinical feasibility and reliability of the augmented reality system could be proved intraoperatively in 5 patients (projection error 1.2 ± 0.54 mm). The augmented reality system is accurate and reliable for the intraoperative projection of images to the head, skull, and brain surface. The ergonomic advantage of this technique improves the planning of neurosurgical procedures and enables the surgeon to use direct visualization for image-guided neurosurgery.

  16. Ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release technique: a retrospective study of 46 feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Praveen K; Japour, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of anatomy at the surgical site. This technique uses small arthroscopic dissecting instruments through a 0.5-cm incision, allowing the surgeon to avoid the larger and more tissue-disruptive incision that is traditionally used for plantar heel spur resection and plantar fascia releases. Forty-one patients (46 feet) were selected for the study. The mean patient age was 47 years. Twenty-nine were considered obese with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2). Patients were functionally and subjectively evaluated 4 weeks after surgery using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle and Hindfoot Rating Scale. Results from the study show a significant improvement (P = .05 confidence level) 4 weeks postoperatively for the 41 patients (46 feet), compared to their preoperative condition. The mean pretest score was 33.6 (range 10-52); this score improved to 88.0 (range 50-100), 4 weeks postoperatively. There were no postoperative infections or complications. The ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release technique is a practical surgical procedure for the relief of chronic plantar fascia pain because the surgeon is able to clearly visualize the plantar fascia by ultrasound. In addition, there is minimal disruption to surrounding tissue because small instruments are passed through a small 0.5-cm incision. The traditional open method of heel spur surgery, in contrast, uses a larger skin incision of 3 to 5 cm, followed by larger instruments to dissect to the plantar fascia.

  17. Development of an ultrasound-guided technique for pudendal nerve block in cat cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Chiara; Angeli, Giovanni; Haenssgen, Kati; Stoffel, Michael H; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this prospective experimental cadaveric study was to develop an ultrasound-guided technique to perform an anaesthetic pudendal nerve block in male cats. Fifteen fresh cadavers were used for this trial. A detailed anatomical dissection was performed on one cat in order to scrutinise the pudendal nerve and its ramifications. In a second step, the cadavers of six cats were used to test three different ultrasonographic approaches to the pudendal nerve: the deep dorso-lateral, the superficial dorso-lateral and the median transperineal. Although none of the approaches allowed direct ultrasonographical identification of the pudendal nerve branches, the deep dorso-lateral was found to be the most advantageous one in terms of practicability and ability to identify useful and reliable landmarks. Based on these findings, the deep dorso-lateral approach was selected as technique of choice for tracer injections (0.1 ml 1% methylene blue injected bilaterally) in six cat cadavers distinct from those used for the ultrasonographical study. Anatomical dissection revealed a homogeneous spread of the tracer around the pudendal nerve sensory branches in all six cadavers. Finally, computed tomography was performed in two additional cadavers after injection of 0.3 ml/kg (0.15 ml/kg per each injection sites, left and right) contrast medium through the deep dorso-lateral approach in order to obtain a model of volume distribution applicable to local anaesthetics. Our findings in cat cadavers indicate that ultrasound-guided pudendal nerve block is feasible and could be proposed to provide peri-operative analgesia in clinical patients undergoing perineal urethrostomy.

  18. Medical intervention in case of a nuclear or radiological event - national guide, release V3.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, M.; Giraud, J.M.; Helfer, N.; Menetrier, F.; Schoulz, D.; Blanc, J.; Vilain, D.; Boll, H.; Bourguignon, M.; Chappe, P.; Mehl-Auget, I.; Carli, P.; Telion, C.; Carosella, E.; Castagnet, X.; Romet, G.; Ducousso, R.; Challeton de Vathaire, C.; Gourmelon, P.; Herbelet, G.; Martin, J.C.; Chicorp, J.; Cosset, J.M.; Court, L.; Lallemand, J.; Facon, A.; Goldstein, P.; Fleutot, J.B.; Geneau, C.; Kolodie, H.; Vrousos, C.; Lachenaud, L.; Maison, D.; Masse, R.; Massiot, P.; Menthonnex, P.; Origny, S.; Peton Klein, D.; Pasnon, J.; Quesne, B.; Rougy, C.; Sapori, JM.; Talbot, JN.; Van Rechem, M.

    2008-01-01

    This guide proposes a set of thematic sheets which address the following topics: generalities (intervention strategy, categories of casualties, definitions, emergency medical care organisation), taking into care in case of irradiation (generalities, clinical observation, additions examinations, localized acute external irradiation), cross-examination and description of circumstances, behaviour in case of contamination (general principles, rescuers protection, first gestures, etc.), behaviour in case of radio-combined lesions, reception in proximity medical structures and in a hospital. Some technical sheets are also proposed. They address how to handle a radio-contaminated casualty, how to undress a lying or a valid casualty, protection means (clothes, masks, gloves), dosimetry means, detection means, specific antidotes and other medicines

  19. Dose levels from thoracic and pelvic examinations in two pediatric radiological departments in Norway - a comparison study of dose-area product and radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjernlie Saether, Hilde; Traegde Martinsen, Anne Catrine; Lagesen, Bente; Platou Holsen, Eva; Oevreboe, Kirsti Marie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pediatric doses expressed in dose-area product (DAP) can be retrieved from only a few publications; most of which correlate DAP to patient size or large age spans. In clinical practice age is often the only available parameter describing the patient, and thus, evaluation of dose levels in pediatric radiology on the basis of DAP related to age alone would be useful in optimization work. Purpose: To provide comparable data on age-related DAP from thoracic and pelvic radiological examinations of children, and evaluate the usefulness of comparing age-related DAP and radiographic technique between systems to identify areas with potential for optimization. Material and Methods: DAP, age, and radiographic technique were registered for 575 thoracic examinations and 371 pelvic examinations of children from newborn up to 14 years of age in groups with an age span of 1 year, performed with two digital flat-panel systems and one computed radiography system. Results: DAP varies from 2.2 to 54.0 mGycm2 for thoracic examinations, and from 4.6 to 532.5 mGycm2 for pelvic examinations. There are significant differences in DAP between systems and departments due to differences in technique, equipment, and staff. Conclusion: This study provides comparable data on age-related DAP from thoracic and pelvic radiological examinations of children, which could be used as an input to estimate diagnostic reference levels. The comparison between systems of DAP and radiographic technique has proven useful in identifying areas where there may be a potential for optimization.

  20. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  1. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  2. Application of the guided lock technique to Advanced Virgo's high-finesse cavities using reduced actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersanetti, Diego

    2018-02-01

    The recent upgrades of the Advanced Virgo experiment required an update of the locking strategy for the long, high-finesse arm cavities of the detector. In this work we will present a full description of the requirements and the constraints of such system in relation to the lock acquisition of the cavities; the focus of this work is the strategy used to accomplish this goal, which is the adaptation and use of the guided lock technique, which dynamically slows down a suspended optical cavity in order to make the lock possible. This work describes the first application of such locking technique to 3km long optical cavities, which are affected by stringent constraints as the low force available on the actuators, the high finesse and the maximum sustainable speed of the cavities, which is quite low due to a number of technical reasons that will be explained. A full set of optical time domain simulations has been developed in order to study the feasibility and the performance of this algorithm and will be throughout discussed, while finally the application on the real Advanced Virgo's arm cavities will be reported.

  3. Standardised imaging technique for guided M-mode and Doppler echocardiography in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, K J; Bonagura, J D; Darke, P G

    1992-05-01

    Eighteen echocardiographic images useful for diagnostic imaging, M-mode echocardiography, and Doppler echocardiography of the equine heart were standardised by relating the position of the axial beam to various intracardiac landmarks. The transducer orientation required for each image was recorded in 14 adult horses by describing the degree of sector rotation and the orientation of the axial beam relative to the thorax. Repeatable images could be obtained within narrow limits of angulation and rotation for 14 of the 18 standardised images evaluated. Twenty-seven National Hunt horses were subsequently examined using this standardised technique. Selected cardiac dimensions were measured from two-dimensional and guided M-mode studies. Satisfactory results were achieved in 26 of the 27 horses. There was no linear correlation between any of the measured cardiac values and bodyweight. There was no significant difference between measurements taken from the left and the right hemithorax. Six horses were imaged on three consecutive days to assess the repeatability of the measurements. No significant difference was found between measurements obtained on different days. This study demonstrates a method for standardised echocardiographic evaluation of the equine heart that is repeatable, valuable for teaching techniques of equine echocardiography, applicable for diagnostic imaging and quantification of cardiac size, and useful for the evaluation of blood-flow patterns by Doppler ultrasound.

  4. Impact of self-administered relaxation and guided imagery techniques during final trimester and birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedde-Dahl, Merete; Fors, Egil A

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test if and how self-administered practice of relaxation techniques, positive affirmation and guided imagery, in the final part of pregnancy had an impact on giving birth. Further to see if the use of a simple method, a CD with a booklet, with no previous training or specific support of the participants (neither required nor delivered), affected the birth experience. Outcome measures were monitored both during and after delivery: During delivery, pain and anxiety were measured at different stages of birth. Post-delivery Wellbeing (Edmonton Scale 0-10, where 10 is the worst possible feeling of Wellbeing), pain, anxiety, Apgar score, duration of birth, complications and anesthesia/analgesic were recorded. Those in the CD-intervention group also reported how many times they had practiced the techniques. The study employed a randomized controlled trial. Results show that the CD-intervention group had a significantly better score on total Wellbeing, as measured by the ESAS (0-10) Edmonton Scale. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In-room CT techniques for image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Paskalev, Kamen M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate patient setup and target localization are essential to advanced radiation therapy treatment. Significant improvement has been made recently with the development of image-guided radiation therapy, in which image guidance facilitates short treatment course and high dose per fraction radiotherapy, aiming at improving tumor control and quality of life. Many imaging modalities are being investigated, including x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonant imaging, magnetic resonant spectroscopic imaging, and kV/MV imaging with flat panel detectors. These developments provide unique imaging techniques and methods for patient setup and target localization. Some of them are different; some are complementary. This paper reviews the currently available kV x-ray CT systems used in the radiation treatment room, with a focus on the CT-on-rails systems, which are diagnostic CT scanners moving on rails installed in the treatment room. We will describe the system hardware including configurations, specifications, operation principles, and functionality. We will review software development for image fusion, structure recognition, deformation correction, target localization, and alignment. Issues related to the clinical implementation of in-room CT techniques in routine procedures are discussed, including acceptance testing and quality assurance. Clinical applications of the in-room CT systems for patient setup, target localization, and adaptive therapy are also reviewed for advanced radiotherapy treatments

  6. Histopathological Breast Cancer Image Classification by Deep Neural Network Techniques Guided by Local Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, Abdullah-Al; Mehrabi, Mohamad Ali; Kong, Yinan

    2018-01-01

    Breast Cancer is a serious threat and one of the largest causes of death of women throughout the world. The identification of cancer largely depends on digital biomedical photography analysis such as histopathological images by doctors and physicians. Analyzing histopathological images is a nontrivial task, and decisions from investigation of these kinds of images always require specialised knowledge. However, Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) techniques can help the doctor make more reliable decisions. The state-of-the-art Deep Neural Network (DNN) has been recently introduced for biomedical image analysis. Normally each image contains structural and statistical information. This paper classifies a set of biomedical breast cancer images (BreakHis dataset) using novel DNN techniques guided by structural and statistical information derived from the images. Specifically a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), a Long-Short-Term-Memory (LSTM), and a combination of CNN and LSTM are proposed for breast cancer image classification. Softmax and Support Vector Machine (SVM) layers have been used for the decision-making stage after extracting features utilising the proposed novel DNN models. In this experiment the best Accuracy value of 91.00% is achieved on the 200x dataset, the best Precision value 96.00% is achieved on the 40x dataset, and the best F -Measure value is achieved on both the 40x and 100x datasets.

  7. Localization techniques for guided surgical excision of non-palpable breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benjamin K Y; Wiseberg-Firtell, Jill A; Jois, Ramesh H S; Jensen, Katrin; Audisio, Riccardo A

    2015-12-31

    compared radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) versus WGL, and two RCTs compared radioactive iodine ((125)I) seed localization (RSL) versus WGL. Of the three remaining trials, one RCT compared cryo-assisted techniques (CAL) versus WGL, one compared intraoperative ultrasound-guided lumpectomy (IOUS) versus WGL, and one compared modified ROLL technique in combination with methylene dye (RCML) versus WGL. Of the trials we included in the meta-analysis, there were a total of 1273 participants with non-palpable breast lesions (627 participants (WGL); 443 participants (ROLL); and 203 participants (RSL)). The participant population varied considerably between included trials, which included participants with both non-palpable benign and malignant lesions, and varied in defining clear margins. The included trials did not report any long-term outcomes.In general, the outcomes of WGL, ROLL and RSL were comparable.ROLL demonstrated favourable results in successful localization (risk ratio (RR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 2.28; 869 participants; six trials), positive excision margins (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.29; 517 participants; five trials), and re-operation rates (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.21 to 1.23; 583 participants; four trials) versus WGL, but none were statistically significant. WGL was significantly superior to RSL in successfully localizing non-palpable lesions (RR 3.85, 95% CI 1.21 to 12.19; 402 participants; two trials). However, for successful excision, ROLL and RSL have comparable outcomes versus WGL (ROLL versus WGL: RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.01; 871 participants; six trials; RSL versus WGL: RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.01; 402 participants; two trials). These findings were similar in that RSL demonstrated favourable results over WGL in positive tumour margins (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.06; 366 participants; two trials), and re-operation rates (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.32; 305 participants; one trial) but neither reached statistical significance. In

  8. An evaluation of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with the pull technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Chang Wook; Won, Jong Yun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (FPG) using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied with the pull technique, and without the use of an endoscopy or a gastropexy. From March 2005 to February 2007, 25 patients underwent an FPG using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied by the pull technique, in which a 24F pull-type tube was inserted into a patient's mouth and was pulled to the upper abdominal puncture site using a snare, under fluoroscopy. The 18 patients with difficulty swallowing due to muscular atrophic lateral sclerosis or transitional myodystrophy included 5 cases of quadriplegia, 1 case of Parkinson's disease, and 1 metastatic mediastinal tumor. The technical success rate, occurrence of complications, and clinical outcomes were examined. The technical success rate was found to be 100%. In addition, the retention periods for the indwelling tube ranged from 1 to 24 months (mean: 6.5 months), with all tubes retained at a normal position with normal function. No procedure-related mortality occurred. One patient (4%) did however develop a complication in the form of ascites and ascitic fluid leakage around the tube, which was of hepatic origin and was ultimately resolved after the drainage of ascites. As a result of this study the FPG, accompanied with the pull technique using a 24F tube, should be considered as a safe and effective method for examining patients. It was found to have a high success rate and a low complication rate.

  9. Comparison of bougie-guided insertion of Proseal tm laryngeal mask airway with digital technique in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Kuppusamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Proseal TM laryngeal mask airway (PLMA TM , Laryngeal Mask Company, UK was designed to improve ventilatory characteristics and offer protection against regurgitation and gastric insufflation. The PLMA is a modified laryngeal mask airway with large ventral cuff, dorsal cuff and a drain tube. These modifications improve seal around glottis and enable better ventilatory characteristics. The drain tube prevents gastric distension and offers protection against aspiration. There were occasional problems, like failed insertion and inadequate ventilation, in placing PLMA TM using the classical digital technique. To overcome these problems, newer placement techniques like thumb insertion technique, introducer tool placement and gum elastic bougie (GEB-aided placement were devised. We compared classical digital placement of PLMA TM with gum elastic bougie-aided technique in 60 anaesthetised adult patients (with 30 patients in each group with respect to number of attempts to successful placement, effective airway time, airway trauma during insertion, postoperative airway morbidity and haemodynamic response to insertion. The number of attempts to successful placement, airway trauma during insertion and haemodynamic response to insertion were comparable among the two groups, while effective airway time and oropharyngeal leak pressure were significantly higher in bougie- guided insertion of PLMA. Postoperatively, sore throat was more frequent with digital technique while dysphagia was more frequent with bougie-guided technique. Hence gum elastic bougie guided, laryngoscope aided insertion of PLMA is an excellent alternate to classical digital technique.

  10. Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The present guide endeavours to provide an outline of the type of quality assurance programme to be recommended for (1) routine implementation by those performing radiodiagnostic procedures (medical radiology technicians, medical physicists, and radiologists), (2) for application by the responsible national authorities, and (3) for use by international bodies such as the International Society of Radiology (ISR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  11. Summary: Update to ASTM guide E 1523 to charge control and charge referencing techniques in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    An updated version of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) guide E 1523 to the methods to charge control and charge referencing techniques in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been released by ASTM [Annual Book of ASTM Standards Surface Analysis (American Society for Testing and Materials, West Conshohocken, PA, 2004), Vol. 03.06]. The guide is meant to acquaint x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) users with the various charge control and charge referencing techniques that are and have been used in the acquisition and interpretation of XPS data from surfaces of insulating specimens. The current guide has been expanded to include new references as well as recommendations for reporting information on charge control and charge referencing. The previous version of the document had been published in 1997 [D. R. Baer and K. D. Bomben, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 16, 754 (1998)

  12. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  13. Research in radiology. Present situation and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros, L. H.

    2003-01-01

    After having had defined the concept of research and stages of scientific method in the health field, there has been an attempt to deal with the characteristics of radiological research in the last years, as well as current and future guidelines of such. Among those items considered are the concept of teams which would be interdisciplinary and multi-centered (molecular imaging, imaging-guided therapy, early detection of illness using imaging techniques), as well as the need for certain changes in mentality. As such, there would appear a new generation of scientists (with training in molecular biology, bioengineering, physiopathology and pharmacology) who would bring to fruition an integral use of computers to complement research and imaging techniques. Finally, the concept of evidence-based radiology is analyzed, along with its principles and associated repercussions in health care and research. (Author) 15 refs

  14. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  15. Comparison of two percutaneous tracheostomy techniques, guide wire dilating forceps and Ciaglia Blue Rhino: a sequential cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, B.G.; Staatsen, M; Lardenoije, S.G.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To evaluate and compare the peri-operative and postoperative complications of the two most frequently used percutaneous tracheostomy techniques, namely guide wire dilating forceps (GWDF) and Ciaglia Blue Rhino (CBR). METHODS: A sequential cohort study with comparison of short-term and

  16. MR-Guided Laser-Induced Thermotherapy of the Infratemporal Fossa and Orbit in Malignant Chondrosarcoma via a Modified Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Mack, Martin G.; Straub, Ralf; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    A 76-year-old patient presented with a recurrent mass of a malignant chondrosarcoma in the right infratemporal fossa and in the left maxillary sinus with orbital invasion. The patient was treated with a palliative intention with MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy using a modified applicator technique. Following treatment clinical symptoms improved and MRI revealed complete laser-induced tumor necrosis

  17. The Use of Brain Electrophysiology Techniques To Study Language: A Basic Guide for the Beginning Consumer of Electrophysiology Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfese, Dennis L.; Molfese, Victoria J.; Kelly, Spencer

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the use of event-related potential (ERP) approaches to study language processes. First, a brief history of the emergence of this technology is presented, followed by definitions, a theoretical overview, and a practical guide to conducting ERP studies. Examples of language studies that use this technique are…

  18. Clinical utility of an endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique via various approach routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sasahira, Naoki; Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Miyabayashi, Koji; Mizuno, Suguru; Sasaki, Takashi; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-09-01

    The endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous techniques (EUS-rendezvous) provide reliable biliary access after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) cannulation. We evaluated the clinical utility of an EUS-rendezvous technique using various approach routes. Patients undergoing EUS-rendezvous for biliary access after failed bile duct cannulation in ERCP were included. EUS-rendezvous was performed via three approach routes depending on the patient's condition: transgastric, transduodenal in a short endoscopic position, or transduodenal in a long endoscopic position. The main outcomes were the technical success rates. Secondary outcomes were procedure time and complications. Fourteen patients (median age, 77 years) underwent EUS-rendezvous for biliary access resulting from failed biliary cannulation. The reasons for biliary drainage were malignant biliary obstruction in five patients and choledocholithiasis in nine. Transgastric, transduodenal in a short position, and transduodenal in a long position EUS-rendezvous was performed in five, five, and four patients, respectively. Bile duct puncture occurred in the left intrahepatic duct in four patients, right hepatic duct in one, middle common bile duct in four, and lower common bile duct in five. The technical success rate was 100 %. In four patients, the approach route was modified from transduodenal in a short position to transduodenal in a long position or transgastric route. The median procedure time was 81 min. One case each of biliary peritonitis and pancreatitis occurred and were managed conservatively. EUS-rendezvous provided safe and reliable transpapillary bile duct access after failed ERCP cannulation. The selection of the appropriate approach routes, depending on patient condition, is critical.

  19. Application of the cylindrically guided wave technique for bolt and pump-shaft inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, G.M.; Ruescher, E.H.; Bloom, E.A.; Tsai, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has been working with the cylindrically guided wave technique (CGWT) since late 1982. The initial work was aimed at inspecting reactor pressure vessel hold-down studs. The CGWT was shown to be able to detect defects as small as 0.060 inch (1.5 mm) deep through metal paths up to 120 inches (304 cm) in stud bolt carbon steel. Later developments in the application of CGWT were aimed at inspecting reactor coolant pump (RCP) shafts. The RCP shafts are usually approximately 2 meters long and have changing diameters along the length, from approximately 12 cm to 23 cm in discrete steps. The pump shafts have been susceptible to small cracks and can be inspected most cost-effectively from the top of the shaft. A matrix transducer composed of six 1-inch (2.54-cm) diameter transducers along with pulsing and receiving electronics (EPRI Pump-Shaft Inspection System) was developed during 1988. A patent application for this technology has been made. This report describes the work conducted during 1989 and the results obtained

  20. Radiological diagnostics of muscle diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.A.; Essig, M.; Kauczor, H.U.

    2007-01-01

    Muscular diseases are a heterogeneous group of diseases with difficult differential diagnosis. This article reviews morphological and functional radiological techniques for assessment of muscular diseases. Morphological techniques can describe edema-like changes, lipomatous and atrophic changes of muscular tissue. However, these imaging signs are often not disease-specific. As a result, clinicians assign radiology a secondary role in the management of muscular diseases. Meanwhile, functional radiological techniques allow the assessment of muscle fiber architecture, skeletal muscle perfusion, myocellular sodium-homoeostasis, lipid- and energy-phosphate metabolism, etc. By detecting and spatially localizing pathophysiological phenomena, these new techniques can increase the role of radiology in muscular diseases. (orig.)

  1. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  2. Machine learning and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Techniques for Accessing and Draining the Biliary System and the Pancreatic Duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbaş, Mihai; Larghi, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    When endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) fails to decompress the biliary system or the pancreatic duct, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided biliary or pancreatic access and drainage can be used. Data show a high success rate and acceptable adverse event rate for EUS-guided biliary drainage. The outcomes of EUS-guided biliary drainage seem equivalent to percutaneous drainage and ERCP, whereas only retrospective studies are available for pancreatic duct drainage. In this article, revision of the technical and clinical status and the current evidence of interventional EUS-guided biliary and pancreatic duct access and drainage are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Retrograde Intubation in Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis-A Double Guide Wire Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitha K Dhulkhed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intubating a patient with temporomandibular joint ankylosis is always a challenge particularly when fibreoptic laryngo-scope is not available. In a 20-year-old male patient we successfully carried out endotracheal intubation with 7 mm portex cuffed PVC tube with the help of two flexible J tipped guide wires. One guide wire was passed into the airway from cricothyroid puncture site and another from subcricoid site. Both were brought out through the nose. The first guide wire was used for retracting the epiglottis and the second as a guide for passing the endotracheal tube.

  5. Ultrasound-guided antegrade access during laparoscopic pyeloplasty in infants less than one year of age: A point of technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Ganpule

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Access to urethras and ureters of infants may be hazardous and injurious through an endoscopic route. Placement and removal of stents in infants requires anaesthesia and access through these small caliber urethras. We describe our technique of placing antegrade splint during a laparoscopic pyeloplasty in these infants. Materials and Methods: An ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal access is obtained. Telescopic metal two part needle is passed into the kidney over a guide wire. A second guide wire is passed through the telescopic metal two part needle. The tract is dilated with 14 Fr screw dilator. Over one guide wire, a 5 Fr ureteric catheter is passed and coiled in the renal pelvis. Over the other wire, a 14 Fr malecot catheter is placed as nephrostomy. Laparoscopic pyeloplasty is then done. During pyelotomy, the ureteric catheter is pulled and advanced through the ureter before the pyeloplasty is completed. The ureteric catheter thus acts as a splint across the anastomosis. Ureteric catheter is removed on the 3 rd post operative day and nephrostomy is clamped. Nephrostomy is removed on 4 th post operative day if child is asymptomatic. The modified technique was successfully done in five patients aged less than one year old. All patients tolerated the procedure well. Post operative period was uneventful in all. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided ante grade nephroureteral ureteral splint for infant laparoscopic pyeloplasty is safe. It avoids the need for urethral instrumentation for insertion and removal of stents in these small patients.

  6. A technique for adaptive image-guided helical tomotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, Chester R.; Langen, Katja M.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Scaperoth, Daniel D.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Mahan, Stephen L.; Seibert, Rebecca M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The gross tumor volume (GTV) for many lung cancer patients can decrease during the course of radiation therapy. As the tumor reduces in size during treatment, the margin added around the GTV effectively becomes larger, which can result in the excessive irradiation of normal lung tissue. The specific goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using image-guided adaptive radiation therapy to adjust the planning target volume weekly based on the previous week's CT image sets that were used for image-guided patient setup. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) images of the GTV were acquired daily on a helical tomotherapy system. These images were used to position the patient and to measure reduction in GTV volume. A planning study was conducted to determine the amount of lung-sparing that could have been achieved if adaptive therapy had been used. Treatment plans were created in which the target volumes were reduced after tumor reduction was measured. Results: A total of 158 MVCT imaging sessions were performed on 7 lung patients. The GTV was reduced by 60-80% during the course of treatment. The tumor reduction in the first 60 days of treatment can be modeled using the second-order polynomial R 0.0002t 2 - 0.0219t + 1.0, where R is the percent reduction in GTV, and t is the number of elapsed days. Based on these treatment planning studies, the absolute volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy can be reduced between 17% and 23% (21% mean) by adapting the treatment delivery. The benefits of adaptive therapy are the greatest for tumor volumes ≥25 cm 3 and are directly dependent on GTV reduction during treatment. Conclusions: Megavoltage CT-based image guidance can be used to position lung cancer patients daily. This has the potential to decrease margins associated with daily setup error. Furthermore, the adaptive therapy technique described in this article can decrease the volume of healthy lung tissue receiving above 20 Gy

  7. Use of the cylindrically guided wave technique for the inspection of stud bolts, valve stems and pump shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, G.M.; Bloom, E.A.; Ruescher, E.H.; Lui, S.N.

    1989-01-01

    Over the last several years, nuclear power plants have expressed concern about failures of bolting, valve stems, and pump shafts. This paper reports on the development of an ultrasonic technique to inspect these components. The authors have successfully demonstrated the cylindrically guided wave technique (CGWT) on a wide range of stud bolts. The CGWT employs zero-degree longitudinal waves constrained to travel within the boundary of the cylindrically shaped components during inspection. Theoretically explained, mode conversion occurs because the ultrasonic wave is guided down the length of the component. These mode-converted signals are dependent upon the diameter of the component under inspection and the longitudinal- and shear-wave velocities of the component material. This technique has also been successfully used on valve stems in the field. The geometry of the valve stem is very similar to that of the stud bolt

  8. A Simple Radiological Technique for Demonstration of Incorrect Positioning of a Foley Catheter with Balloon Inflated in the Urethra of a Male Spinal Cord Injury Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a male patient with cervical spinal cord injury, the urinary bladder may go into spasm when a urethral catheter is removed and a new Foley catheter is inserted. Before the balloon is inflated, the spastic bladder may push the Foley catheter out or the catheter may slip out of a small-capacity bladder. An inexperienced health professional may inflate the balloon of a Foley catheter in the urethra without realizing that the balloon segment of the catheter is lying in the urethra instead of the urinary bladder. When a Foley balloon is inflated in the urethra, a tetraplegic patient is likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia. This is a medical emergency and requires urgent treatment. Before the incorrectly placed Foley catheter is removed, it is important to document whether the balloon has been inflated in the urinary bladder or not. The clinician should first use the always available tools of observation and palpation at the bedside without delays of transportation. A misplaced balloon will often be evident by a long catheter sign, indicating excessive catheter remaining outside the patient. Radiological diagnosis is not frequently required and, when needed, should employ the technique most readily available, which might be a body and pelvic CT without intravenous contrast. An alternative radiological technique to demonstrate the position of the balloon of the Foley catheter is described. Three milliliters of nonionic X-ray contrast medium, Ioversol (OPTIRAY 300, is injected through the side channel of the Foley catheter, which is used for inflating the balloon. Then, with a catheter-tip syringe, 30 ml of sterile Ioversol is injected through the main lumen of the Foley catheter. Immediately thereafter, an X-ray of the pelvis (including perineum is taken. By this technique, both the urinary bladder and balloon of the Foley catheter are visualized by the X-ray contrast medium. When a Foley catheter has been inserted correctly, the balloon of the

  9. Radiological English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribes, R. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba (Spain). Servicio de Radiologia; Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Div. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  10. Radiological English

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribes, R.; Ros, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  11. A New Technique for Superselective Catheterization of Arteries: Preshaping of a Micro-Guide Wire into a Shepherd's Hook Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jee Hyun; Chung; Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to introduce a new technique for superselective catheterization of arteries with preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form, and this is useful for superselection of small arteries branching at an acute angle from a large parent artery for the treatment of tumors and hemorrhages. We developed a superselective catheterization technique by using preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form. We encountered six patients in our practice for whom we failed to catheterize the small tumor-feeding arteries that branched at an acute angle from wide parent arteries during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma; the parent arteries were the right inferior phrenic artery (n = 4) and the left gastric artery (n = 1) from the celiac axis with celiac stenosis due to compression by the median arcuate ligament and the proper hepatic artery from the gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) in a patient who had celiac axis occlusion with collateral circulation via the pancreaticoduodenal arcade from the superior mesenteric artery. In these consecutive six patients, we tested the usefulness of this new technique with employing preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form for superselective catheterization of targeted vessels. The target arteries were successfully catheterized and satisfactory transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed in all six patients. There were no significant complications such as arterial dissection. We developed a technique that is effective for superselection of vessels with preshaping of micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook hook form, and we successfully applied it during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. This technique can be useful for superselection of small arteries that branch from a large parent artery at acute angles for the treatment of tumors and hemorrhages

  12. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  13. Use of rope guides in uranium mining and their innovations in techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Erlian.

    1984-01-01

    Thanks to some innovations and effective measures, the rope guides have been successfully used in multi-level operation in some uranium mines since the year of 1968. These innovations and measures are as follows: (1) by the use of the intermediate fixing grips of guide ropes, etc., to increase the rigidity of the guides and restrain swaying of the hoisting conveyance. (2) by the use of modified screw tensioning device to replace the weight tensioning one to cut down operation cost apparently. (3) By the use of mobile platform in the form of arc plate, or the shiftable guides as the cage stabilizer for intermediate levels to firm the cage horizontally and prevent it from vertical tilting owing to impulsive force from the motion of mine cars, etc. (Author)

  14. Study of an optimization protocol for radiographic techniques in computerized radiology; Estudo de um protocolo de otimizacao para as tecnicas radiograficas em radiologia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrantes, Marcos Eugenio Silva

    2015-07-01

    This work is designed to produce information for the improvement of image quality to deployment in a radiology department based on previous reviews of the images by questionnaires of acceptance and quality e recognition of the parameters used in chest radiographic techniques. The data collected were divided by male, female, PA and LAT thickness, body mass index, biotypes, anthropomorphic parameters and body evaluation associated with constant voltage and the additional filtration. The results show the predominance of 35 and 40 constants with additional filtration from 0.5 to 1.5 mmAl, voltage in male: (PA and LAT) 86-92 kV and 96-112 kV, female: 85-98 kV and 96-112 kV. The charge applied to the tube for males: (PA and LAT) 5-10 mA.s and 5-16 mA.s, female: (PA and LAT) 6.3-8 mA.s and 9-14 mA.s. Absorbed doses for males: (PA and PF) 0.04-0.17 mGy and 0.03-0.19 mGy and from female (PA and PF) from 0.03-0.22 mGy and 0, 04-0.17 mGy. This procedure can be used in radiology department to implement and acceptance in the quality of images. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the incidence on insufficient cytology results comparing different ultrasound-guided aspiration techniques for thyroid nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Hyng; Park, Jun Hyun; Park, Ji Kang [Dept. of Radiology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    We compared the incidence of insufficient thyroid cytology due to blood-stained materials or low cellularity in terms of aspiration technique, especially focusing on the degree of suction pressure and needle size. Three experienced radiologists performed ultrasound-guided aspiration for thyroid nodules in 1174 thyroid nodules consecutively. Three different techniques were used; (A) using a 25 gauge needle with mainly capillary technique in 269 nodules; (B) using a 25 gauge needle with 3 cc syringe and minimal suction pressure in 303 nodules; (C) using a 22-23 gauge needle with 10 cc syringe and aspirator in 602 nodules. The differences of the incidence of the insufficient cytology among the three aspiration techniques and relationships of the incidence and needle size/degree of suction pressure was statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test with linear-by-linear association. Overall, the difference in insufficient cytology was significant across the three aspiration technique (p = 0.004), and the incidence tended to increase significantly with increase of needle size and degree of suction pressure (p < 0.001). A pairwise comparison of aspiration techniques found significant differences (p = 0.003) between techniques (A) and (C), and no differences between technique (B) and (C) (p 0.07) and between techniques (A) and (B) (p = 0.10). The incidence of insufficient cytology was significantly low in the capillary technique, and it increased significantly with the increase of needle size and degree of suction pressure.

  16. Evaluation of the incidence on insufficient cytology results comparing different ultrasound-guided aspiration techniques for thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Hyng; Park, Jun Hyun; Park, Ji Kang

    2013-01-01

    We compared the incidence of insufficient thyroid cytology due to blood-stained materials or low cellularity in terms of aspiration technique, especially focusing on the degree of suction pressure and needle size. Three experienced radiologists performed ultrasound-guided aspiration for thyroid nodules in 1174 thyroid nodules consecutively. Three different techniques were used; (A) using a 25 gauge needle with mainly capillary technique in 269 nodules; (B) using a 25 gauge needle with 3 cc syringe and minimal suction pressure in 303 nodules; (C) using a 22-23 gauge needle with 10 cc syringe and aspirator in 602 nodules. The differences of the incidence of the insufficient cytology among the three aspiration techniques and relationships of the incidence and needle size/degree of suction pressure was statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test with linear-by-linear association. Overall, the difference in insufficient cytology was significant across the three aspiration technique (p = 0.004), and the incidence tended to increase significantly with increase of needle size and degree of suction pressure (p < 0.001). A pairwise comparison of aspiration techniques found significant differences (p = 0.003) between techniques (A) and (C), and no differences between technique (B) and (C) (p 0.07) and between techniques (A) and (B) (p = 0.10). The incidence of insufficient cytology was significantly low in the capillary technique, and it increased significantly with the increase of needle size and degree of suction pressure.

  17. RSVP radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.; Chaffee, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a relative scale of value for pediatric radiology (RSVPR). Neither the HCFA/ACA Relative Value Scale nor the Workload Measurement System developed by Health and Welfare Canada specifically addressed pediatric radiologic examinations. Technical and professional charges for examinations at Children's Hospital Medical Center were reviewed and compared with time and cost analysis. A scale was developed with chest radiography (PA and lateral views) assigned a value of 1. After review by pediatric radiologic technologists, radiologic administrators, pediatric radiologists, and chairs of departments of children's hospitals, this proposed scale was modified to reflect more accurately relative value components of pediatric radiologic and imaging examinations

  18. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  19. Feasibility of the use of optimisation techniques to calibrate the models used in a post-closure radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laundy, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    This report addresses the feasibility of the use of optimisation techniques to calibrate the models developed for the impact assessment of a radioactive waste repository. The maximum likelihood method for improving parameter estimates is considered in detail, and non-linear optimisation techniques for finding solutions are reviewed. Applications are described for the calibration of groundwater flow, radionuclide transport and biosphere models. (author)

  20. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  1. Radiological sciences dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Dowsett, David

    2009-01-01

    The Radiological Sciences Dictionary is a rapid reference guide for all hospital staff employed in diagnostic imaging, providing definitions of over 3000 keywords as applied to the technology of diagnostic radiology.Written in a concise and easy to digest form, the dictionary covers a wide variety of subject matter, including:· radiation legislation and measurement · computing and digital imaging terminology· nuclear medicine radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals· radiographic contrast agents (x-ray, MRI and ultrasound)· definitions used in ultrasound and MRI technology· statistical exp

  2. Radiological worker training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  3. Workflow and intervention times of MR-guided focused ultrasound - Predicting the impact of new techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeve, Arjo J; Al-Issawi, Jumana; Fernandez-Gutiérrez, Fabiola; Langø, Thomas; Strehlow, Jan; Haase, Sabrina; Matzko, Matthias; Napoli, Alessandro; Melzer, Andreas; Dankelman, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) has become an attractive, non-invasive treatment for benign and malignant tumours, and offers specific benefits for poorly accessible locations in the liver. However, the presence of the ribcage and the occurrence of liver motion due to respiration limit the applicability MRgFUS. Several techniques are being developed to address these issues or to decrease treatment times in other ways. However, the potential benefit of such improvements has not been quantified. In this research, the detailed workflow of current MRgFUS procedures was determined qualitatively and quantitatively by using observation studies on uterine MRgFUS interventions, and the bottlenecks in MRgFUS were identified. A validated simulation model based on discrete events simulation was developed to quantitatively predict the effect of new technological developments on the intervention duration of MRgFUS on the liver. During the observation studies, the duration and occurrence frequencies of all actions and decisions in the MRgFUS workflow were registered, as were the occurrence frequencies of motion detections and intervention halts. The observation results show that current MRgFUS uterine interventions take on average 213min. Organ motion was detected on average 2.9 times per intervention, of which on average 1.0 actually caused a need for rework. Nevertheless, these motion occurrences and the actions required to continue after their detection consumed on average 11% and up to 29% of the total intervention duration. The simulation results suggest that, depending on the motion occurrence frequency, the addition of new technology to automate currently manual MRgFUS tasks and motion compensation could potentially reduce the intervention durations by 98.4% (from 256h 5min to 4h 4min) in the case of 90% motion occurrence, and with 24% (from 5h 19min to 4h 2min) in the case of no motion. In conclusion, new tools were developed to predict how

  4. Radiologic science for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of physics, biology and protection for the radiologic technology student. It presents a significant portion of all of the science required of radiologic technology students under one cover. Chapter content reflects a readable and practical organization with outlines listed on the first page of each chapter and sample problems at the end. New to this edition are: new and expanded sections on radiation techniques, digital imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound

  5. Articular dysfunction patterns in patients with mechanical low back pain: A clinical algorithm to guide specific mobilization and manipulation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, V; Cagnie, B; Barbe, T; Beernaert, A; Vanthillo, B; Danneels, L

    2015-06-01

    Recent systematic reviews have demonstrated reasonable evidence that lumbar mobilization and manipulation techniques are beneficial. However, knowledge on optimal techniques and doses, and its clinical reasoning is currently lacking. To address this, a clinical algorithm is presented so as to guide therapists in their clinical reasoning to identify patients who are likely to respond to lumbar mobilization and/or manipulation and to direct appropriate technique selection. Key features in subjective and clinical examination suggestive of mechanical nociceptive pain probably arising from articular structures, can categorize patients into distinct articular dysfunction patterns. Based on these patterns, specific mobilization and manipulation techniques are suggested. This clinical algorithm is merely based on empirical clinical expertise and complemented through knowledge exchange between international colleagues. The added value of the proposed articular dysfunction patterns should be considered within a broader perspective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The radiological safety in the use of nuclear technique -activities developed by Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, T.; Pereira, E.G.; Hirayama, T.

    1991-01-01

    The activities developed by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN supporting the users of nuclear techniques are described. The methodology used and future plans for the group are shown. (E.G.)

  7. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  8. Comparative analysis of dose levels to patients in radiological procedures guided by fluoroscopy; Analisis comparativo de los niveles de dosis a paciente en procedimientos radiologicos guiados por fluoroscopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Pablo Luis; Fernandez, Manuel; Ramos, Julio A.; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Cons, Nestor, E-mail: pablogll@eresmas.com [Hospital Universitario de Salamanca (Spain). Servicio de Radio fisica y Proteccion Radiologica

    2013-07-01

    This work presents the comparative data of the dose indicators for patient in radiological processes with respect to the values published in the ICRP document. It is analyzed the need for different strategies to communicate to different specialists mechanisms to optimize the radiation beginning with practice by training of second degree level in radiological protection and then, working with them the basics of equipment management to reduce doses without detriment to the welfare purpose.

  9. An Analysis of the Guided Wave Patterns in a Small-bore Titanium Tube by a Magnetostrictive Sensor Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Yong-Moo; Kim, Shin

    2007-01-01

    The presence of damage or defects in pipes or tubes is one of the major problems in nuclear power plants. However, in many cases, it is difficult to inspect all of them by the conventional ultrasonic methods, because of their geometrical complexity and inaccessibility. The magnetostrictive guided wave technique has several advantages for practical applications, such as a 100- percent volumetric coverage of a long segment of a structure, a reduced inspection time and its cost effectiveness, as well as its' relatively simple structure. One promising feature of the magnetostrictive sensor technique is that the wave patterns are relatively clear and simple compared to the conventional piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer. If we can characterize the evolution of the defect signals, it can be a promising tool for a structural health monitoring of pipes for a long period as well as the identification of flaws. An in-bore guided wave probe was developed for an application to small bore heat exchanger tubes. The magnetostrictive probe installed on the hollow cylindrical waveguide generates and detects torsional waves in the waveguide. This waveguide is expanded by the draw bar to create an intimate mechanical contact between the waveguide and the inside surface of the tube being tested. In this paper, we analyzed the wave patterns reflected from various artificial holes in a titanium tube, which is used in the condenser in a nuclear power plant. The torsional guided waves were generated and received by a coil and a DC magnetized nickel strip as well as an inbore guided wave probe. The wave patterns from various defects were compared with two different sensor techniques and a detectable limit of the defected was estimated

  10. Development of an ultrasound-guided technique for retrobulbar nerve block in dromedary camels: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Adel M; Eshra, Eman A

    2018-03-01

    Description of an ultrasound (US)-guided technique for retrobulbar nerve blockade in dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) cadavers. Prospective experimental cadaveric study that was carried out in three phases: phase I: anatomical dissection and development of US-guided technique; phase II: methylene blue (MB) injection; phase III: contrast medium (CM), US-guided injections with computed tomography (CT) control. A total of 36 orbits from 18 heads were obtained from 18 dromedary cadavers. Phase I: anatomical dissections were carried out bilaterally, using two heads to determine needle site placement. Phase II: a US-guided, lateral, in-plane approach using one of three volumes of MB (3, 6, or 9 mL) was evaluated in six heads (four orbits per volume tested) to establish the ideal injection volume. Injections of MB that strongly stained all retrobulbar nerves were considered successful, whereas insufficient MB volumes resulted in weak or no nerve staining. Phase III: US-guided retrobulbar injection with CM was carried out using 20 orbits. Computed tomography was performed after each injection trial to determine the accuracy of needle placement and CM dispersal. An injection was judged to be successful when the CT images revealed that the needle was located within the retractor bulbi muscle cone and the CM reached the target nerves at the orbitorotundum and the optic foramina. Only injection of 9 mL of MB stained the target nerves sufficiently, whereas there was no or only weak staining with 3 and 6 mL, respectively. Therefore, 9 mL of CM was used for the US-guided injections in phase III. Subsequent CT scans revealed satisfying CM distribution within the ocular muscle cone in 18 of 20 cases (90% success rate). US-guided retrobulbar injection in dromedary cadavers is feasible. Further research is required to assess its practicality and usefulness in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and

  11. Using the Delphi questionnaire technique to create a reading comprehension resource guide for middle school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Molly F.

    As students begin middle school, they are expected to possess and apply a wide array of nonfiction reading strategies if they are to comprehend new concepts from nonfiction texts. Although strategies and resource guides for fiction reading are available, an effective nonfiction reading comprehension resource guide tailored to middle school science teachers is lacking. The conceptual framework guiding this study is based on schema theory that supports the use of prior knowledge as a foundation for learning. The purpose of this project study was to address this local problem by providing middle school science teachers with a user-friendly resource for nonfiction reading comprehension strategies in a science context. The research question examined nonfiction reading comprehension strategies that could supplement middle school science teachers' instructional practices to increase student comprehension in science, as reflected on the results of state standardized tests. This project study consulted science and language arts teachers using a Delphi questionnaire technique to achieve a consensus through multiple iterations of questionnaires. Science teachers identified 7 areas of concern as students read nonfiction texts, and language arts teachers suggested effective reading comprehension strategies to address these areas. Based on the consensus of reading comprehension strategies and review of literature, a resource guide for middle school science teachers was created. By improving reading comprehension in content areas, teachers may not only increase student learning, but also underscore the importance of literacy relating to life-long learning through future occupations, academic endeavors, and society as well.

  12. Analysing data from observer studies in medical imaging research: An introductory guide to free-response techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.D.; Manning, D.J.; Hogg, P.

    2014-01-01

    Observer performance methods maintain their place in radiology research, particularly in the assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of new and existing techniques, despite not being fully embraced by the wider audience in medical imaging. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) paradigm has been widely used in research and the latest location sensitive methods allow an analysis that is closer to the clinical scenario. This paper discusses the underpinning theories behind observer performance assessment, exploring the potential sources of error and the development of the ROC method. The paper progresses by explaining the clinical relevance and statistical suitability of the free-response ROC (FROC) paradigm, and the methodological considerations for those wishing to perform an observer performance study

  13. Techniques for Eliminating Sex Discrimination from Vocational Education: An Instructor's Guide for Culinary Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Georgia S.; Upton, Linda Kulow

    This instructor's guide addresses issues of sex bias as they occur in the shop area of the Culinary Arts Program. The first part gives general background by discussing sex discrimination and schools and course enrollments by sex and the Culinary Arts shop at the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School, Massachusetts. A second, and much…

  14. Localization of intraductal mass through the ostium of the duct using wire guided ductography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.

    2014-01-01

    To localize intraductal mass (Papilloma) before surgery Materials Guide wire 10-15 cm length of 2/3-0 Prolene/Surgipro Plastic 26G to 20G I/V cannulas Kopans breast lesion localization hook wire Disposable syringe heaving 2ml non-ionic contrast High intensity light and magnified glass. Methods: Prepare patient in sitting or lying position adjust high intensity light clean the nipple with antiseptic lotion. Elicit the discharge with gentle periareolar pressure or ask the patient to bring the discharge. If the opening with discharge is not clearly visualize use magnified glass or loop. Slowly inserted the wire into the duct orifice, it should pass freely into the duct. Introduce the 26G I/V plastic cannula coaxially over the guide wire and remove the guide wire. Gently inject 0.2-0.4 ml contrast, remove and the syringe and apply stopper. The cannula stopper assembly is secured to the breast with tape. Magnified craniocaudal view of the breast is taken, the 26G cannula removed and bigger length 22/20G cannula gradually passed over the guide wire according to distance of lesion from the ostium. Intraductal mass location is verified the hook wire is replaced with guide wire, the position of hook confirmed by mammographic film. The wire is cut 2cms from the nipple and pt. send to operation theater Results:Hook localization has been successfully carried out in six patients. Conclusion:This is a new method of localization of intraductal mass it enables the surgeon to do microductectomy with minimal cosmetic effects to the breast. (author)

  15. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  16. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  17. Clinical Outcomes of SMILE With a Triple Centration Technique and Corneal Wavefront-Guided Transepithelial PRK in High Astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ikhyun; Kang, David Sung Yong; Reinstein, Dan Z; Arba-Mosquera, Samuel; Archer, Timothy J; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Kim, Tae-Im

    2018-03-01

    To comparatively investigate the clinical outcomes, vector parameters, and corneal aberrations of small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) with a triple centration technique and corneal wavefront-guided transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for the correction of high astigmatism. This retrospective, comparative case series study included 89 eyes (89 patients) that received treatment for myopia with high astigmatism (≥ 2.50 diopters) using SMILE with a triple centration technique (SMILE group; 45 eyes) and corneal wavefront-guided transepithelial PRK (transepithelial PRK group; 44 eyes). Visual acuity measurement, manifest refraction, slit-lamp examination, autokeratometry, corneal topography, and evaluation of corneal wavefront aberration were performed preoperatively and at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. The safety, efficacy, vector parameters, and corneal aberrations at 6 months after surgery were compared between the two groups. At 6 months after surgery, the transepithelial PRK and SMILE groups exhibited comparable mean uncorrected distance visual acuities (-0.06 ± 0.07 and -0.05 ± 0.07 logMAR, respectively), safety, efficacy, and predictability of refractive and visual outcomes. There was a slight but statistically significant difference in the correction index between the transepithelial PRK and SMILE groups (0.96 ± 0.11 and 0.91 ± 0.10, respectively). Whereas the transepithelial PRK group exhibited increased corneal spherical aberration and significantly reduced corneal coma and trefoil, no changes in aberrometric values were noted in the SMILE group. Both SMILE with a triple centration technique and corneal wavefront-guided transepithelial PRK are effective and provide predictable outcomes for the correction of high myopic astigmatism, although slight undercorrection was observed in the SMILE group. The triple centration technique was helpful in astigmatism correction by SMILE. [J Refract Surg. 2018;34(3):156-163.]. Copyright 2018

  18. The teaching of Radiological Protection in actual society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzo, Nestor Pedro de

    1996-01-01

    The use more and more frequent of radiations in different areas of the daily life generate a growing necessity of competent professionals and technicians qualified in Health Physics. The teaching of the Radiological Protection does not limit only to the instruction in scientists topics that quality to the professionals in the resolution of problems or the application of techniques, must qualified also the students in the diffusion of the own problems of the radiological protection. The content of different courses of radiological protection given in the Instituto Bailer's ( a join between the National University of Cuyo and the National Commission of Atomic Energy) guided to different groups of students or professionals are also introduced. Finally, some of the examples used in order to clarify practical situations are shown. (author)

  19. Microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography-guided small-incision lenticule extraction: New surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Namrata; Urkude, Jayanand; Chaniyara, Manthan; Titiyal, Jeewan S

    2017-10-01

    We describe the surgical technique of microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT)-guided small-incision lenticule extraction. The technique enables manual tracking of surgical instruments and identification of the desired dissection plane. It also helps discern the relation between the dissector and the intrastromal lenticule. The dissection plane becomes hyperreflective on dissection, ensuring complete separation of the intrastromal lenticule from the overlying and underlying stroma. Inadvertent posterior plane entry, cap-lenticule adhesion, incomplete separation of the lenticule, creation of a false plane, and lenticule remnants may be recognized intraoperatively so corrective steps can be taken immediately. In cases with a hazy overlying cap, microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT enables localization and extraction of the lenticule. The technique is helpful for inexperienced surgeons, especially in cases with low amplitudes of refractive errors, ie, thin lenticules. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiological aspects of Gaucher disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Robert; Booth, Tom; Hargunani, Rikin; Wylie, Peter; Holloway, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Advances in imaging and the development of commercially available enzyme therapy have significantly altered the traditional radiology of Gaucher disease. The cost of treatment and need for monitoring response to therapy have magnified the importance of imaging. There are no recent comprehensive reviews of the radiology of this relatively common lysosomal storage disease. This article describes the modern imaging, techniques and radiological manifestations of Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  1. Radiological aspects of Gaucher disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Robert; Booth, Tom; Hargunani, Rikin; Wylie, Peter; Holloway, Brian [Royal Free Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Advances in imaging and the development of commercially available enzyme therapy have significantly altered the traditional radiology of Gaucher disease. The cost of treatment and need for monitoring response to therapy have magnified the importance of imaging. There are no recent comprehensive reviews of the radiology of this relatively common lysosomal storage disease. This article describes the modern imaging, techniques and radiological manifestations of Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  2. A novel 3D volumetric voxel registration technique for volume-view-guided image registration of multiple imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guang; Xie Huchen; Ning, Holly; Capala, Jacek; Arora, Barbara C.; Coleman, C. Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To provide more clinically useful image registration with improved accuracy and reduced time, a novel technique of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric voxel registration of multimodality images is developed. Methods and Materials: This technique can register up to four concurrent images from multimodalities with volume view guidance. Various visualization effects can be applied, facilitating global and internal voxel registration. Fourteen computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) image sets and two computed tomography/positron emission tomography (CT/PET) image sets are used. For comparison, an automatic registration technique using maximization of mutual information (MMI) and a three-orthogonal-planar (3P) registration technique are used. Results: Visually sensitive registration criteria for CT/MR and CT/PET have been established, including the homogeneity of color distribution. Based on the registration results of 14 CT/MR images, the 3D voxel technique is in excellent agreement with the automatic MMI technique and is indicatory of a global positioning error (defined as the means and standard deviations of the error distribution) using the 3P pixel technique: 1.8 deg ± 1.2 deg in rotation and 2.0 ± 1.3 (voxel unit) in translation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such positioning error has been addressed. Conclusion: This novel 3D voxel technique establishes volume-view-guided image registration of up to four modalities. It improves registration accuracy with reduced time, compared with the 3P pixel technique. This article suggests that any interactive and automatic registration should be safeguarded using the 3D voxel technique

  3. Percutaneous Transhepatic Catheterization of the Portal Vein: A Combined CT- and Fluoroscopy-Guided Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimar, Bernd; Rauber, Klaus; Brendel, Mathias D.; Bretzel, Reinhard G.; Rau, Wigbert S.

    1999-01-01

    Combined CT- and fluoroscopy-guided transhepatic portal vein catheterization was performed in 44 patients selected for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. The method allowed catheterization with a single puncture attempt in 39 patients. In four patients two attempts and in one patient four attempts were necessary. One minor hematoma of the liver capsule occurred that required no further treatment. Compared with other methods the average number of puncture attempts was reduced

  4. Radiological containment handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to be used as a reference text. It is meant to be used by the working personnel as a guide for using temporary radiological containments. The installing group and health physics group may vary among organizations but responsibilities and duties will not change. It covers installation and inspection containments; working and operating guidelines; operating requirement; emergency procedures; and removal of containments

  5. Comparison of two ultrasound-guided injection techniques targeting the sacroiliac joint region in equine cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, John David; Bergamino, Chiara; Sanders, Ruth; Fogarty, Ursula; Puggioni, Antonella; Kearney, Clodagh; David, Florent

    2016-09-20

    To compare the accuracy and distribution of injectate for cranial (CR) and caudomedial (CM) ultrasound-guided injections of equine sacroiliac joints. Both sacroiliac joints from 10 lumbosacropelvic specimens were injected using cranial parasagittal (CR; curved 18 gauge, 25 cm spinal needles) and caudomedial (CM; straight 18 gauge, 15 cm spinal needles) ultrasound-guided approaches. Injectate consisted of 4 ml iodinated contrast and 2 ml methylene blue. Computed tomographical (CT) scans were performed before and after injections. Time for needle guidance and repositioning attempts were recorded. The CT sequences were analysed for accuracy and distribution of contrast. Intra-articular contrast was detected in sacroiliac joints following 15/40 injections. The CR and CM approaches deposited injectate ≤2 cm from sacroiliac joint margins following 17/20 and 20/20 injections, respectively. Median distance of closest contrast to the sacroiliac joint was 0.4 cm (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.5 cm) for CR approaches and 0.6 cm (IQR: 0.95 cm) for CM approaches. Cranial injections resulted in injectate contacting lumbosacral intertransverse joints 15/20 times. Caudomedial injections were perivascular 16/20 times. Safety and efficacy could not be established. Cranial and CM ultrasound-guided injections targeting sacroiliac joints were very accurate for periarticular injection, but accuracy was poor for intra-articular injection. Injectate was frequently found in contact with interosseous sacroiliac ligaments, as well as neurovascular and synovial structures in close vicinity of sacroiliac joints.

  6. Application of a Magnetostrictive Guided wave Technique to Monitor the Evolution of Defect Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Yong-Moo; Oh, Se-Beom; Lee, Duck-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    An advantage of a magnetostrictive strip transducer for a long-range guided wave inspection is that wave patterns are clear and simple when compared to a conventional piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer. Therefore, if we can characterize the evolution of defect signals, it could be a promising tool for a structural health monitoring of pipes for a long period of time as well as an identification of flaw. Of course, when evaluating a signal during a realistic field examination, it should be careful because of some spurious signals or false indications, such as signals due to a directionality, multiple reflections, mode conversion, geometrical reflections etc. Therefore, the different frequency components of the guided waves will travel at different speeds and the shape of the received signal will changed as it propagates along the pipe. Once the magnetostrictive sensors are attached in the pipe permanently and the signal shape and phase can be compared to the signals before and after, we can monitor the evolution of the flow for the given period. We developed a program to subtract the guided wave signal. The program has a capability of adjusting the time scale and can minimize the noise level after subtraction. By applying the newly developed program, a notch with 2% of CSA can be detected with increased accuracy with noise reduction.

  7. Risk factor analysis of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided lung biopsy in coaxial and non-coaxial core biopsy techniques in 650 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A., E-mail: nour410@hotmail.com [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department, Cairo University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Alsubhi, Mohammed [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Naguib, Nagy N. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department, Alexandria University Hospital, Alexandria (Egypt); Lehnert, Thomas; Emam, Ahmed; Beeres, Martin; Bodelle, Boris; Koitka, Karen; Vogl, Thomas J.; Jacobi, Volkmar [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors involved in the development of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques. Materials and methods: Retrospective study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD: 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique in coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were: lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors for pulmonary hemorrhage complicating lung biopsy were classified into: (a) patient's related risk factors, (b) lesion's related risk factors and (d) technical risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher's exact tests for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 19.6% (65/332) in non-coaxial group and 22.3% (71/318) in coaxial group. The difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.27). Hemoptysis developed in 5.4% (18/332) and in 6.3% (20/318) in the non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively. Traversing pulmonary vessels in the needle biopsy track was a significant risk factor of the development pulmonary hemorrhage (incidence: 55.4% (36/65, p = 0.0003) in the non-coaxial group and 57.7% (41/71, p = 0.0013) in coaxial group). Other significant risk factors included: lesions of less than 2 cm (p value of 0.01 and 0.02 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), basal and middle zonal lesions in comparison to upper zonal lung lesions (p = 0.002 and 0.03 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), increased lesion

  8. Risk factor analysis of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided lung biopsy in coaxial and non-coaxial core biopsy techniques in 650 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Alsubhi, Mohammed; Naguib, Nagy N.; Lehnert, Thomas; Emam, Ahmed; Beeres, Martin; Bodelle, Boris; Koitka, Karen; Vogl, Thomas J.; Jacobi, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors involved in the development of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques. Materials and methods: Retrospective study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD: 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique in coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were: lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors for pulmonary hemorrhage complicating lung biopsy were classified into: (a) patient's related risk factors, (b) lesion's related risk factors and (d) technical risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher's exact tests for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 19.6% (65/332) in non-coaxial group and 22.3% (71/318) in coaxial group. The difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.27). Hemoptysis developed in 5.4% (18/332) and in 6.3% (20/318) in the non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively. Traversing pulmonary vessels in the needle biopsy track was a significant risk factor of the development pulmonary hemorrhage (incidence: 55.4% (36/65, p = 0.0003) in the non-coaxial group and 57.7% (41/71, p = 0.0013) in coaxial group). Other significant risk factors included: lesions of less than 2 cm (p value of 0.01 and 0.02 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), basal and middle zonal lesions in comparison to upper zonal lung lesions (p = 0.002 and 0.03 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), increased lesion

  9. Humeral repair in birds by guided tissue regeneration and external and internal associated fixation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delogu, M.

    1993-01-01

    Ten pigeons (Columba livia domestic form) with humeral diaphyseal fracture were treated with external and internal fixation techniques (Boston technique and intamedullary pin). Longitudinal space was intentionally left between fracture surfaces during osteosynthesis. This space was filled with bovine lyophilized collagen, set around an intramedullary pin, in five samples. Ossification process was checked by radiography every seven days. Results show the utility of this technique in pneumatic bird bones. In fact, shortening control and callus formation facility were observed [it

  10. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835

  11. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  12. Self-Guided Collaboration: A Technique to Coordinate Crisis Management Response for Homeland Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leary, Alison E; Shaker, Steven M

    2004-01-01

    .... One basic step is to enable organizations to determine the strengths, capabilities, techniques and equipment, personnel skills, talent, and other offerings, which various organizations can contribute...

  13. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    The book presents the radiological manifestations of the maxillodental region in a suitable manner for fast detection and correct diagnosing of diseases of the teeth, soft tissue, and jaws. Classification therefore is made according to the radiological manifestations of the diseases and not according to etiology. (orig./MG) [de

  14. CT-guided percutaneous injection of the fibrin glue by 'double needle' technique for the treatment of sacral cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ganggang; Chen Long; Yang Chao; Ni Caifang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the efficacy and safety of CT-guided percutaneous injection of the fibrin glue by 'double needle' technique to treat sacral cyst. Methods: Clinical data of 20 cases with 'double-needle' injection of fibrin glue technology to treat sacral cyst were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had varying degrees of sacral nerve root compression symptoms. The treatment for sacral cyst was carried out after clear diagnosis was made. On the basis of CT-guided percutaneous injection of fibrin glue, the improved CT-guided percutaneous injection of fibrin glue by 'double-needle' technique was used to treat these patients. The average dose of fibrin glue was (5.9 ± 2.4) ml. The clinical results of improvement as to pain and neurological function were evaluated after follow-up of an average of 17 months. The assessment criteria were as follows: excellent, complete resolution of signs and symptoms, with the patient returning to his or her regular employment and no recurrence of cysts during 1 year of follow-up, good, symptoms and signs in the legs and perineal region resolved but with persistent pain in the lumbosacral region, which did not interfere with the patient's regular work (the cysts did not recur for 6 months during follow-up), fair, no improvement in clinical symptoms, but a decrease in cyst size on the imaging study, poor, no improvement in clinical symptoms and no observed changes in cyst size in imaging studies or recurrence. Results: Most patients experienced some degree of pain relief and functional improvement after fibrin glue therapy, with most experiencing complete or marked resolution of clinical symptoms. Nine patients reported excellent recovery, 8 reported good recovery, 2 reported fair recovery, and 1 reported poor recovery. The overall percentage of positive outcomes (excellent and good recovery) was 85%. No serious postoperative complications were discovered. Conclusions: CT guided percutaneous injection of the fibrin glue by

  15. Aspiration Thrombectomy Using a Guiding Catheter in Acute Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis: Usefulness of the Calf-Squeeze Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae A; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Yu, Hee Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The effectiveness of the calf-squeeze technique during aspiration thrombectomy using guiding catheter in the treatment of an acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was evaluated by the use of imaging and the clinical follow-up of patients. A prospective analysis of ten patients (seven women, three men; median age, 56.9 years) with common iliac vein (CIV) obstruction and ipsilateral DVT was performed for this study. All patients presented with leg edema or pain and were treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis via an ipsilateral popliteal vein approach after insertion of a temporary inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Subsequently, the patients were treated with by aspiration thrombectomy using a guiding catheter to remove the residual thrombus. The calf-squeeze technique during aspiration thrombectomy can be used to induce the proximal migration of thrombi in the popliteal, tibial, and muscular veins were used to increase venous flow. The calf-squeeze technique was employed at mean of 1.3 times (range, 1-3 times). All patients showed proximal migration of a popliteal and muscular vein thrombus during the execution of the calf-squeeze technique. Successful recanalization was achieved in all patients (100%) without any complications. On duplex ultrasonography, which was performed immediately after the aspiration thrombectomy, four patients had a residual thrombus in the soleal muscular veins. However, none of the patients had a thrombus in the popliteal and tibial veins; and, during follow-up, no DVT recurred in any patient. The use of the calf-squeeze technique during aspiration thrombectomy after catheter-directed thrombolysis can induce the proximal migration of thrombi in the popliotibial and muscular veins and is an effective method that can remove a thrombus in calf veins.

  16. Aspiration Thrombectomy Using a Guiding Catheter in Acute Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis: Usefulness of the Calf-Squeeze Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae A; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Yu, Hee Chul

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of the calf-squeeze technique during aspiration thrombectomy using guiding catheter in the treatment of an acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was evaluated by the use of imaging and the clinical follow-up of patients. A prospective analysis of ten patients (seven women, three men; median age, 56.9 years) with common iliac vein (CIV) obstruction and ipsilateral DVT was performed for this study. All patients presented with leg edema or pain and were treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis via an ipsilateral popliteal vein approach after insertion of a temporary inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Subsequently, the patients were treated with by aspiration thrombectomy using a guiding catheter to remove the residual thrombus. The calf-squeeze technique during aspiration thrombectomy can be used to induce the proximal migration of thrombi in the popliteal, tibial, and muscular veins were used to increase venous flow. The calf-squeeze technique was employed at mean of 1.3 times (range, 1-3 times). All patients showed proximal migration of a popliteal and muscular vein thrombus during the execution of the calf-squeeze technique. Successful recanalization was achieved in all patients (100%) without any complications. On duplex ultrasonography, which was performed immediately after the aspiration thrombectomy, four patients had a residual thrombus in the soleal muscular veins. However, none of the patients had a thrombus in the popliteal and tibial veins; and, during follow-up, no DVT recurred in any patient. The use of the calf-squeeze technique during aspiration thrombectomy after catheter-directed thrombolysis can induce the proximal migration of thrombi in the popliotibial and muscular veins and is an effective method that can remove a thrombus in calf veins.

  17. Efficacy and safety of transradial percutaneous coronary intervention using sheathless guide catheter technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Aboel-Kassem F. Abdelmegid

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: TR PCI via standard and sheathless hydrophilic-coated GC techniques are effective and safe with high rate of procedural success and low rate of asymptomatic radial artery occlusion. Moreover, TR PCI using sheathless GC technique has the advantage of performing complex intervention requiring large bore catheters that can not be performed via standard TR PCI using 6F GC.

  18. Using Behavior Change Techniques to Guide Selections of Mobile Applications to Promote Fluid Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, David E; Dubansky, Alexandra; Remillard, Joshua; Murray, Robert; Pellegrini, Christine A; Phillips, Siobhan M; Streeper, Necole M

    2017-01-01

    To determine the extent to which validated techniques for behavior change have been infused in commercially available fluid consumption applications (apps). Coders evaluated behavior change techniques represented in online descriptions for 50 fluid consumption apps and the latest version of each app. Apps incorporated a limited range of behavior change techniques (operating system but not as a function of whether apps were free or paid. Limitations include the lack of experimental evidence establishing the efficacy of these apps. Patients with urolithiasis can choose from many apps to support the recommended increase in fluid intake. Apps for iOS devices incorporate more behavior change techniques compared to apps for the Android operating system. Free apps are likely to expose patients to a similar number of techniques as paid apps. Physicians and patients should screen app descriptions for features to promote self-monitoring and provide feedback on discrepancies between behavior and a fluid consumption goal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding your users a practical guide to user requirements methods, tools, and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    Today many companies are employing a user-centered design (UCD) process, but for most companies, usability begins and ends with the usability test. Although usability testing is a critical part of an effective user-centered life cycle, it is only one component of the UCD process. This book is focused on the requirements gathering stage, which often receives less attention than usability testing, but is equally as important. Understanding user requirements is critical to the development of a successful product. Understanding Your Users is an easy to read, easy to implement, how-to guide on

  20. The advent of ultrasound-guided ablation techniques in nodular thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papini, Enrico; Pacella, Claudio M; Misischi, Irene

    2014-01-01

    non-functioning thyroid nodules that grow or become symptomatic, trained operators may safely induce, with a single session of laser ablation treatment or radiofrequency ablation, a 50% volume decrease and, in parallel, improve local symptoms. In contrast, hyperfunctioning nodules remain best treated...... minimally invasive treatments, directed towards office-based management of symptomatic nodules, without requiring general anaesthesia, and with negligible damage to the skin and cervical tissues, have been proposed during the past two decades. Today, ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection...

  1. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  2. CT-guided transthoracic cutting needle biopsy of intrathoracic lesions: Comparison between coaxial and single needle technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Reng-Hong; Tzeng, Wen-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Jing; Chang, Shih-Chin; Chen, Chia-Huei; Fung, Jui-Lung; Wang, Yen-Jen; Mak, Chee-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the complication rates and diagnostic accuracy of two different CT-guided transthoracic cutting needle biopsy techniques: coaxial method and single needle method. Methods: This study involved 198 consecutive subjects with 198 intrathoracic lesions. The first 98 consecutive subjects received a single needle cutting technique and the next 100 consecutive subjects received a coaxial technique. Both groups were compared in relation the diagnostic accuracy and complication rates. Results: No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning patient characteristics, lesions and procedure variables. There was a borderline statistical difference in the incidence of pneumothorax at within 24-h post biopsy between patients in the single needle group (5%) and the coaxial group (13%) (P = 0.053). Little difference was found in the pneumothorax rate at immediately post biopsy between the two groups, which was 28% in the single needle group and 31% in the coaxial group. There was no significant difference in the hemoptysis rate between the two groups, which was 9.2% in the single needle group and 11% in the coaxial group. Both techniques yielded an overall diagnostic accuracy of 98% for malignant lesions with similar sensitivity (single needle: 96.9% vs. coaxial: 96.4%) and specificity (single needle: 100% vs. coaxial: 100%). Conclusion: There is little difference in the pneumothorax rates and bleeding complications between patients who either received a single needle or a coaxial transthoracic cutting biopsy. Both techniques produce an overall diagnostic accuracy of 98% for malignant lesions.

  3. Handbook of radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgcock, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is organized around radiologic procedures with each discussed from the points of view of: indications, contraindications, materials, method of procedures and complications. Covered in this book are: emergency radiology chest radiology, bone radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, GU radiology, pediatric radiology, computerized tomography, neuroradiology, visceral and peripheral angiography, cardiovascular radiology, nuclear medicine, lymphangiography, and mammography

  4. Radiology illustrated. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Chung, Man Pyo; Jeong, Yeon Joo

    2014-01-01

    Pattern approach to the diagnosis of lung diseases based on CT scan appearances. Guide to quick and reliable differential diagnosis. CT-pathology correlation. Emphasis on state-of-the-art MDCT. The purpose of this atlas is to illustrate how to achieve reliable diagnoses when confronted by the different abnormalities, or ''disease patterns'', that may be visualized on CT scans of the chest. The task of pattern recognition has been greatly facilitated by the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), and the focus of the book is very much on the role of state-of-the-art MDCT. A wide range of disease patterns and distributions are covered, with emphasis on the typical imaging characteristics of the various focal and diffuse lung diseases. In addition, clinical information relevant to differential diagnosis is provided and the underlying gross and microscopic pathology is depicted, permitting CT-pathology correlation. The entire information relevant to each disease pattern is also tabulated for ease of reference. This book will be an invaluable handy tool that will enable the reader to quickly and easily reach a diagnosis appropriate to the pattern of lung abnormality identified on CT scans.

  5. Crack-depth effects in the cylindrically guided wave technique for bolt and pump-shaft inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.M.; Liu, S.N.; Light, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have experienced the failures of bolts and pump shafts. The industry is concerned about nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that can be applied to these components. The cylindrically guided wave technique (CGWT) has been developed to detect the simulated circumferential defects in long bolts and studs. The ultrasonic CGWT employs the zero-degree longitudinal waves constrained to travel within the boundary of the components with cylindrical shape during inspection. When longitudinal waves are guided to travel along a cylinder, and impinge onto a circumferential defect, the waves are scattered at the crack on the cylinder surface. In this work, the wave scattering at the circumferential crack on a long cylinder is investigated. The transfer factor of the scattered waves is calculated for a wide range of frequency spectra. The scattered waveform at a distance away from a crack is calculated. The effect that crack depth exerts to the waveform in CGWT is shown. CGWT signals, waveform calculation and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Musculoskeletal ultrasound: how to treat calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided single-needle lavage technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth S; Rosas, Humberto G

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this video article is to illustrate the ultrasound appearance of calcium deposition in the rotator cuff and provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for performing the ultrasound-guided single-needle lavage technique for the treatment of calcific tendinitis with emphasis on patient positioning, necessary supplies, real-time lavage technique, and steroid injection into the subacromial subdeltoid bursa. Musculoskeletal ultrasound is well established as a safe, cost-effective imaging tool in diagnosing and treating common musculoskeletal disorders. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disabling cause of shoulder pain. Although most cases are self-limiting, a subset of patients is refractory to conservative therapy and requires treatment intervention. Ultrasound-guided lavage is an effective and safe minimally-invasive treatment not readily offered in the United States as an alternative to surgery, perhaps because of the limited prevalence of musculoskeletal ultrasound programs and limited training. On completion of this video article, the participant should be able to develop an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff using ultrasound.

  7. ICRP PUBLICATION 121: Radiological Protection in Paediatric Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P-L.; Ringertz, H.; Donoghue, V.; Frush, D.; Rehani, M.; Appelgate, K.; Sanchez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric patients have a higher average risk of developing cancer compared with adults receiving the same dose. The longer life expectancy in children allows more time for any harmful effects of radiation to manifest, and developing organs and tissues are more sensitive to the effects of radiation. This publication aims to provide guiding principles of radiological protection for referring clinicians and clinical staff performing diagnostic imaging and interventional procedures for paediatric patients. It begins with a brief description of the basic concepts of radiological protection, followed by the general aspects of radiological protection, including principles of justification and optimisation. Guidelines and suggestions for radiological protection in specific modalities – radiography and fluoroscopy, interventional radiology, and computed tomography – are subsequently covered in depth. The report concludes with a summary and recommendations. The importance of rigorous justification of radiological procedures is emphasised for every procedure involving ionising radiation, and the use of imaging modalities that are non-ionising should always be considered. The basic aim of optimisation of radiological protection is to adjust imaging parameters and institute protective measures such that the required image is obtained with the lowest possible dose of radiation, and that net benefit is maximised to maintain sufficient quality for diagnostic interpretation. Special consideration should be given to the availability of dose reduction measures when purchasing new imaging equipment for paediatric use. One of the unique aspects of paediatric imaging is with regards to the wide range in patient size (and weight), therefore requiring special attention to optimisation and modification of equipment, technique, and imaging parameters. Examples of good radiographic and fluoroscopic technique include attention to patient positioning, field size and adequate collimation

  8. Intraoperative MRI-guided resection of focal cortical dysplasia in pediatric patients: technique and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacino, Matthew F; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Murnick, Jonathan; Tsuchida, Tammy; Magge, Suresh N; Keating, Robert F; Gaillard, William D; Oluigbo, Chima O

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous meta-analysis has demonstrated that the most important factor in seizure freedom following surgery for focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is completeness of resection. However, intraoperative detection of epileptogenic dysplastic cortical tissue remains a challenge, potentially leading to a partial resection and the need for reoperation. The objective of this study was to determine the role of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in the intraoperative detection and localization of FCD as well as its impact on surgical decision making, completeness of resection, and seizure control outcomes. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of pediatric patients who underwent iMRI-assisted resection of FCD at the Children's National Health System between January 2014 and April 2015. Data reviewed included demographics, length of surgery, details of iMRI acquisition, postoperative seizure freedom, and complications. Postsurgical seizure outcome was assessed utilizing the Engel Epilepsy Surgery Outcome Scale. RESULTS Twelve consecutive pediatric patients (8 females and 4 males) underwent iMRI-guided resection of FCD lesions. The mean age at the time of surgery was 8.8 years ± 1.6 years (range 0.7 to 18.8 years), and the mean duration of follow up was 3.5 months ± 1.0 month. The mean age at seizure onset was 2.8 years ± 1.0 year (range birth to 9.0 years). Two patients had Type 1 FCD, 5 patients had Type 2A FCD, 2 patients had Type 2B FCD, and 3 patients had FCD of undetermined classification. iMRI findings impacted intraoperative surgical decision making in 5 (42%) of the 12 patients, who then underwent further exploration of the resection cavity. At the time of the last postoperative follow-up, 11 (92%) of the 12 patients were seizure free (Engel Class I). No patients underwent reoperation following iMRI-guided surgery. CONCLUSIONS iMRI-guided resection of FCD in pediatric patients precluded the need for repeat surgery. Furthermore, it resulted

  9. Intestinal obstruction after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass by Higa's technique for treatment of morbid obesity: radiological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrunie, Ester Moraes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: emlabrunie@superig.com.br; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2007-05-15

    Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the main radiological aspects of postoperative intestinal obstruction in patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass by means of the Higa's technique. Materials and methods: A total of 10 patients presenting with postoperative intestinal obstruction following a gastric reduction procedure were evaluated in the period between November 2001 and April 2006, in seven different medical centers. Results: In the ten patients, the obstruction occurred in the small bowel, five of them because of internal hernias, three because of adhesions, one because of an umbilical hernia and one because of intussusception. Four patients presented obstruction early in the postoperative period (by the seventh post-op day), and six, late in the postoperative period (between the third month and the fifth year). Conclusion: All of the cases of intestinal obstruction were found in the small bowel. Internal hernia was the most frequent cause, followed by adhesion. Other causes included umbilical hernia and intussusception. (author)

  10. Quantitative X ray analysis system. User's manual and guide to X ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This guide covers trimmed and re-arranged version 3.6 of the Quantitative X ray Analysis System (QXAS) software package that includes the most frequently used methods of quantitative analysis. QXAS is a comprehensive quantitative analysis package that has been developed by the IAEA through research and technical contracts. Additional development has also been carried out in the IAEA Laboratories in Seibersdorf where QXAS was extensively tested. New in this version of the manual are the descriptions of the Voigt-profile peak fitting, the backscatter fundamental parameters' and emission-transmission methods of chemical composition analysis, an expanded chapter on the X ray fluorescence physics, and completely revised and increased number of practical examples of utilization of the QXAS software package. The analytical data accompanying this manual were collected in the IAEA Seibersdorf Laboratories in the years 2006/2007

  11. Managing landfill gas. Techniques and recommendations. To know in order to act - Guides and Technical Guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Christian; Meiffren, Isabelle; Dumas, Bruno; Galtier, Laurent; Prud'homme, Eric; Hebe, Isabelle; Riquier, Laurent; Miralves, James; Riviere, Georges; Herault, Irene

    2001-12-01

    This guide first recalls some basic notions about landfill gas: presence of three gases in varying proportions (biogas, air, and volatile compounds), biogas composition, toxicity and explosiveness of the various landfill gas components, production mechanism and evolution in time of landfill gas composition. The next part proposes a large and discussed overview of the different objectives of landfill gas management: reduction of environmental impacts, safety and security of people and assets, compliance with regulatory requirements, to provide better conditions for biogas valorisation, long term performance of gas management. Different types of tools and methods are discussed for the study of landfill biogas management and production: calculations, measurements, controls and audits. The design and implementation of gas management systems is then addressed: equipment securing, general procedures, gas capturing, gas collection, gas processing and conditioning, analysis, measurement and control. The next part addresses issues related to exploitation: safety, maintenance organisation, control and command

  12. Percutaneous CT-guided sacroiliac joint sampling for infection: aspiration, biopsy, and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipp, David; Simeone, F Joseph; Nelson, Sandra B; Huang, Ambrose J; Chang, Connie Y

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate methods of CT-guided sacroiliac joint sampling in patients with suspected infection. All CT-guided sacroiliac joint sampling procedures for suspected infection were reviewed for sampling type (aspiration, lavage aspiration, biopsy), microbiology results, and clinical and imaging follow-up. The primary gold standard was anatomic pathology. If pathology was not available, then positive blood culture with the same organism as SIJ sampling, imaging and clinical follow-up, or clinical follow-up only were used. Anterior and posterior joint distention was evaluated by MRI within 7 days of the procedure. A total of 34 patients (age 39 ± 20 (range, 6-75) years; 21 F, 13 M) were included. Aspiration samples only were obtained in 13/34 (38%) cases, biopsy samples only in 9/34 (26%) cases, and both samples in 12/34 (35%) cases. There was an overall 54% sensitivity and 86% specificity. For the aspiration samples, sensitivity and specificity were 60 and 81%, respectively, compared to 45 and 90% for the biopsy samples. In cases with both samples, biopsy did not add additional microbial information. Seventeen (17/34, 50%) patients had an MRI. The anterior joint was more distended than the posterior joint in 15/17 (88%) of patients, and this difference was significant (P = 0.0003). All of these 17 patients had an attempted aspiration by a posterior approach; 6/17 (35%) resulted in a successful aspiration. Aspiration of the sacroiliac joint has a higher sensitivity than biopsy and should always be attempted first. MRI may be helpful for procedure planning.

  13. Percutaneous CT-guided sacroiliac joint sampling for infection. Aspiration, biopsy, and technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipp, David; Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Nelson, Sandra B. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Infectious Disease Unit, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2018-04-15

    To evaluate methods of CT-guided sacroiliac joint sampling in patients with suspected infection. All CT-guided sacroiliac joint sampling procedures for suspected infection were reviewed for sampling type (aspiration, lavage aspiration, biopsy), microbiology results, and clinical and imaging follow-up. The primary gold standard was anatomic pathology. If pathology was not available, then positive blood culture with the same organism as SIJ sampling, imaging and clinical follow-up, or clinical follow-up only were used. Anterior and posterior joint distention was evaluated by MRI within 7 days of the procedure. A total of 34 patients (age 39 ± 20 (range, 6-75) years; 21 F, 13 M) were included. Aspiration samples only were obtained in 13/34 (38%) cases, biopsy samples only in 9/34 (26%) cases, and both samples in 12/34 (35%) cases. There was an overall 54% sensitivity and 86% specificity. For the aspiration samples, sensitivity and specificity were 60 and 81%, respectively, compared to 45 and 90% for the biopsy samples. In cases with both samples, biopsy did not add additional microbial information. Seventeen (17/34, 50%) patients had an MRI. The anterior joint was more distended than the posterior joint in 15/17 (88%) of patients, and this difference was significant (P = 0.0003). All of these 17 patients had an attempted aspiration by a posterior approach; 6/17 (35%) resulted in a successful aspiration. Aspiration of the sacroiliac joint has a higher sensitivity than biopsy and should always be attempted first. MRI may be helpful for procedure planning. (orig.)

  14. Classification of radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A classification for departments in Danish hospitals which use radiological procedures. The classification codes consist of 4 digits, where the first 2 are the codes for the main groups. The first digit represents the procedure's topographical object and the second the techniques. The last 2 digits describe individual procedures. (CLS)

  15. Occupational exposure in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, H.J.; Lee, K.Y.; Cha, S.H.; Kang, Y.K.; Kim, H.J.; Oh, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to survey of radiation safety control and to measure occupational radiation exposure dose of staff in interventional radiology in Korea. Interventioanl radiology requires the operator and assisting personnel to remain close to the patient, and thus close to primary beams of radiation. Therefore exposure doses of these personnel are significant from a radiological protection point of view. We surveyed the status of radiation safety on interventional radiology of 72 hospitals. The result were that 119 radiation equipments are using in interventional radiology and 744 staffs are composed of 307 radiologists, 116 residents of radiology, 5 general physicians, 171 radiologic technologists and 145 nurses. 81.4% and 20.2 % of operating physicians are using neck collar protector and goggle respectively. The average radiation dose was measured 0.46±0.15 mSv/10 hours fluoroscopy inside examination room in radiation protection facilities. Occupational radiation exposure data on the staff were assessed in interventional radiology procedures from 8 interventional radiology equipments of 6 university hospitals. The dose measurements were made by placing a thermoluminesent dosimeter(TLD) on various body surface of operation and assistant staff during actual interventional radiology. The measured points were the corner of the eyes, neck(on the thyroid) , wrists, chest(outside and inside of the protector), and back. Average radiation equivalent dose of the corner of left eye and left wrist of operating physicians were 1.19 mSv(0.11∼4.13 mSv)/100 minutes fluoroscopy and 4.32 mSv(0.16∼11.0 mSv)/100 minutes fluoroscopy respectively. Average exposure dose may vary depending on the type of procedure, personal skills and the quality of equipment. These results will be contributed to prepare the guide line in interventional radiology in Korea

  16. Radiology illustrated. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2014-01-01

    Clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. A wealth of carefully selected and categorized illustrations. Highlighted key points to facilitate rapid review. Aid to differential diagnosis. Radiology Illustrated: Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Radiology is the first of two volumes that will serve as a clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. This volume, devoted to diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen, covers congenital disorders, vascular diseases, benign and malignant tumors, and infectious conditions. Liver transplantation, evaluation of the therapeutic response of hepatocellular carcinoma, trauma, and post-treatment complications are also addressed. The book presents approximately 560 cases with more than 2100 carefully selected and categorized illustrations, along with key text messages and tables, that will allow the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis. At the end of each text message, key points are summarized to facilitate rapid review and learning. In addition, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by both common and uncommon case studies that illustrate the role of different imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, radiography, CT, and MRI.

  17. Radiology illustrated. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. A wealth of carefully selected and categorized illustrations. Highlighted key points to facilitate rapid review. Aid to differential diagnosis. Radiology Illustrated: Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Radiology is the first of two volumes that will serve as a clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. This volume, devoted to diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen, covers congenital disorders, vascular diseases, benign and malignant tumors, and infectious conditions. Liver transplantation, evaluation of the therapeutic response of hepatocellular carcinoma, trauma, and post-treatment complications are also addressed. The book presents approximately 560 cases with more than 2100 carefully selected and categorized illustrations, along with key text messages and tables, that will allow the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis. At the end of each text message, key points are summarized to facilitate rapid review and learning. In addition, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by both common and uncommon case studies that illustrate the role of different imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, radiography, CT, and MRI.

  18. Radiological hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the (United Kingdom) National Radiological Protection Board is discussed. The following topics are mentioned: relative contributions to genetically significant doses of radiation from various sources; radon gas in non-coal mines and in dwelling houses; effects of radiation accidents; radioactive waste disposal; radiological protection of the patient in medicine; microwaves, infrared radiation and cataracts; guidance notes for use with forthcoming Ionising Radiations Regulations; training courses; personal dosimetry service; work related to European Communities. (U.K.)

  19. Studying water in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum: a bibliographic guide to techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The parameters used to describe the flow of water, and energy to a lesser extent, through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum are reviewed and the techniques used for estimating their values contrasted. The measurements which are necessary...

  20. Urban field guide: applying social forestry observation techniques to the east coast megalopolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Svendsen; V. Marshall; M.F. Ufer

    2006-01-01

    A changing economy and different lifestyles have altered the meaning of the forest in the northeastern United States, prompting scientists to reconsider the spatial form, stewardship and function of the urban forest. The Authors describe how social observation techniques and the employment of a novel, locally based, participatory hand-held monitoring system could aid...

  1. A cone beam CT-guided online plan modification technique to correct interfractional anatomic changes for prostate cancer IMRT treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Weihua; Yang Yong; Yue, Ning J; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an online plan modification technique to compensate for the interfractional anatomic changes for prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment based on daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. In this proposed technique, pre-treatment CBCT images are acquired after the patient is set up on the treatment couch using an in-room laser with the guidance of the setup skin marks. Instead of moving the couch to rigidly align the target or re-planning using the CBCT images, we modify the original IMRT plan to account for the interfractional target motion and deformation based on the daily CBCT image feedback. The multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions for each subfield are automatically adjusted in the proposed algorithm based on the position and shape changes of target projection in the beam's eye view (BEV). Three typical prostate cases were adopted to evaluate the proposed technique, and the results were compared with those obtained with bony-structure-based rigid translation correction, prostate-based correction and CBCT-based re-planning strategies. The study revealed that the proposed modification technique is superior to the bony-structure-based and prostate-based correction techniques, especially when interfractional target deformation exists. Its dosimetric performance is closer to that of the re-planned strategy, but with much higher efficiency, indicating that the introduced online CBCT-guided plan modification technique may be an efficient and practical method to compensate for the interfractional target position and shape changes for prostate IMRT.

  2. Technical innovation: Wire guided ductography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, Muhammad Ovais; Ramadan, Salwa; Al-Adwani, Muneera

    2012-01-01

    To introduce an easy and improved technique for performing ductography using inexpensive easily available intravenous cannula. Guide wire: Prolene/Surgipro 3-0 (Polypropylene mono filament non-absorbable surgical suture). A plastic 26 G intravenous cannula. Disposable syringe 2 ml. Non-ionic contrast (low density like Omnipaque 240 mg I/I). The guide wire (Prolene 3-0) is introduced into the orifice of the duct heaving discharge and 26 G intravenous plastic cannula is then passed over the guide wire. The cannula is advanced in the duct over guide wire by spinning around it. When the cannula is in place the guide wire is removed. Any air bubbles present in the hub of the cannula can be displaced by filling the hub from bottom upwards with needle attached to contrast filled syringe. 0.2–0.4 ml non-ionic contrast is gently injected. Injection is stopped if the patient has pain or burning. Magnified cranio-caudal view is obtained with cannula tapped in place and gentle compression is applied with the patient sitting. If duct filling is satisfactory a 90* lateral view is obtained. A successful adaptation of the technique for performing ductography is presented. The materials required for the technique are easily available in most radiology departments and are inexpensive, thus making the procedure comfortable for the patient and radiologist with considerable cost effectiveness.

  3. Synopsis of radiologic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The book is a compact version of earlier publications that appeared in 1975 as a one- and a two-volume issue under the title 'Atlas of Radiologic Anatomy'. A chapter on computed tomography has been added as this novel technique requires a new approach to radiologic anatomy. The radiologist will find all the information on the anatomic conditions he needs for analysing radiographs and CT pictures. More than 600 radiographs and CT pictures are given that illustrate typical and rare findings. The book also is useful as a source of reference for making good radiographs and evaluating the quality of radiographs or CT pictures. With 1413 figs., 18 tabs [de

  4. Image super-resolution reconstruction based on regularization technique and guided filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, De-tian; Huang, Wei-qin; Gu, Pei-ting; Liu, Pei-zhong; Luo, Yan-min

    2017-06-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of sparse representation coefficients and the quality of reconstructed images, an improved image super-resolution algorithm based on sparse representation is presented. In the sparse coding stage, the autoregressive (AR) regularization and the non-local (NL) similarity regularization are introduced to improve the sparse coding objective function. A group of AR models which describe the image local structures are pre-learned from the training samples, and one or several suitable AR models can be adaptively selected for each image patch to regularize the solution space. Then, the image non-local redundancy is obtained by the NL similarity regularization to preserve edges. In the process of computing the sparse representation coefficients, the feature-sign search algorithm is utilized instead of the conventional orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm to improve the accuracy of the sparse coefficients. To restore image details further, a global error compensation model based on weighted guided filter is proposed to realize error compensation for the reconstructed images. Experimental results demonstrate that compared with Bicubic, L1SR, SISR, GR, ANR, NE + LS, NE + NNLS, NE + LLE and A + (16 atoms) methods, the proposed approach has remarkable improvement in peak signal-to-noise ratio, structural similarity and subjective visual perception.

  5. “Two-Step” Raman Imaging Technique To Guide Chemo-Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin; Li, Qiujin; Yang, Yang; Omar, Haneen; Tang, Naijun; Zhang, Jianfei; Nie, Zhihong; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide-wrapped gold nanorods (GO@AuNRs) offer efficient drug delivery as well as NIR laser photothermal therapy (PTT) in vitro and in vivo. However, no real-time observation of drug release has been reported to better understand the synergy of chemotherapy and PTT. Herein, surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is employed to guide chemo-photothermal cancer therapy by a two-step mechanism. In the presence of GO as an internal standard, SERS signals of DOX (doxorubicin) loaded onto GO@AuNRs are found to be pH-responsive. Both DOX and GO show strong SERS signals before the DOX@GO@AuNRs are endocytic. However, when the DOX@GO@AuNRs enter acidic microenvironments such as endosomes and/or lysosomes, the DOX signals start decreasing while the GO signals remain the same. This plasmonic antenna could be used to identify the appropriate time to apply the PTT laser during chemo-photothermal therapy.

  6. “Two-Step” Raman Imaging Technique To Guide Chemo-Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin

    2015-08-13

    Graphene oxide-wrapped gold nanorods (GO@AuNRs) offer efficient drug delivery as well as NIR laser photothermal therapy (PTT) in vitro and in vivo. However, no real-time observation of drug release has been reported to better understand the synergy of chemotherapy and PTT. Herein, surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is employed to guide chemo-photothermal cancer therapy by a two-step mechanism. In the presence of GO as an internal standard, SERS signals of DOX (doxorubicin) loaded onto GO@AuNRs are found to be pH-responsive. Both DOX and GO show strong SERS signals before the DOX@GO@AuNRs are endocytic. However, when the DOX@GO@AuNRs enter acidic microenvironments such as endosomes and/or lysosomes, the DOX signals start decreasing while the GO signals remain the same. This plasmonic antenna could be used to identify the appropriate time to apply the PTT laser during chemo-photothermal therapy.

  7. Impression techniques for the resorbed mandibular arch: A guide to increased stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All clinicians face the common problems in making complete denture prosthesis for patients exhibiting high degree of bone resorption. Though resorption can be prevented to an extent but sooner or later it comes back to haunt the clinician. The result is a dis-satisfied patient with a loose prosthesis ready for a new one. The real problem lies in the capturing the oral tissues and using them for creating retention and stability in the prosthesis. Though ultimate success also depends on many other factors such as the occlusal scheme used and patient adaptability yet the most important step still remains the impression technique employed. A few impression techniques are suggested for increasing the success rates in such patients.

  8. Aseptic techniques(practical guide no.3); Practico no.3-Tecnicas asepticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nappa, Andres; Souto Pais, Beatriz [Centro de Investigaciones Nucleares, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    1994-12-31

    Definition of aseptic techniques in relation with the labor of Radiopharmacy.Control of environment and working areas.Control of materials entered into an aseptic area: water, nitrogen,vials,stoppers,needles and syringes. Personnel and manipulations control,choosing of materials,precautions in the aseptic manipulation and sterility preservation during usage life. Bacteriological membrane filtration in sterilized conditions. Work in a laminar flow unit. Protocol of Practical task 3. Bibliography

  9. Guide du calcul en mécanique valider le comportement des systèmes techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Spenlé, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Ce guide couvre l’essentiel des programmes de la Première STI2D aux sections de BTS pour les compétences liées à la mécanique. Pour prendre en compte les nouveautés pédagogiques, cette nouvelle édition évolue vers des systèmes « grand public » (robotique humanoïde, cycle trainer, power-ball…) ou des systèmes liés au développement durable(éolienne, scooter électrique…). Points forts - Un guide qui tient compte des orientations du nouveau programme de STI2D : - systèmes vibratoires ; - accéléromètres, effet gyroscopique ; - développement de l’énergétique. - Les disciplines Génie mécanique/Génie électrique sont décloisonnées: - introduction de dispositifs pluri-techniques ; - présentation d’interfaces liant la partie opérative à la partie commande ; - introduction de la conversion de l’énergie électrique en énergie mécanique et réciproquement, étude comportementale, point de fonctionnement, définition des grandeurs associées. - Le caractère expérimental, ...

  10. Anatomical basis for simultaneous block of greater and third occipital nerves, with an ultrasound-guided technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Ken; Usui, Yosuke; Higashi, Naoko; Nakamoto, Tatsuo; Shimbori, Hironobu; Terada, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Ueta, Hisashi; Kitazawa, Yusuke; Sawanobori, Yasushi; Okuda, Yasuhisa; Matsuno, Kenjiro

    2017-11-13

    In some headache disorders, for which the greater occipital nerve block is partly effective, the third occipital nerve is also suggested to be involved. We aimed to establish a simple technique for simultaneously blocking the greater and third occipital nerves. We performed a detailed examination of dorsal neck anatomy in 33 formalin-fixed cadavers, and deduced two candidate target points for blocking both the greater and third occipital nerves. These target points were tested on three Thiel-fixed cadavers. We performed ultrasound-guided dye injections into these points, examined the results by dissection, and selected the most suitable injection point. Finally, this target point was tested in three healthy volunteers. We injected 4 ml of local anesthetic and 1 ml of radiopaque material at the selected point, guided with a standard ultrasound system. Then, the pattern of local anesthetic distribution was imaged with computed tomography. We deduced that the most suitable injection point was the medial head of the semispinalis capitis muscle at the C1 level of the cervical vertebra. Both nerves entered this muscle, in close proximity, with little individual variation. In healthy volunteers, an anesthetic injected was confined to the muscle and induced anesthesia in the skin areas innervated by both nerves. The medial head of the semispinalis capitis muscle is a suitable landmark for blocking the greater and third occipital nerves simultaneously, by which occipital nerve involvement in various headache disorders may be rapidly examined and treated.

  11. Articular dysfunction patterns in patients with mechanical neck pain: a clinical algorithm to guide specific mobilization and manipulation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Vincent; Beernaert, Axel; Vanthillo, Bart; Barbe, Tom; Danneels, Lieven; Cagnie, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    In view of a didactical approach for teaching cervical mobilization and manipulation techniques to students as well as their use in daily practice, it is mandatory to acquire sound clinical reasoning to optimally apply advanced technical skills. The aim of this Masterclass is to present a clinical algorithm to guide (novice) therapists in their clinical reasoning to identify patients who are likely to respond to mobilization and/or manipulation. The presented clinical reasoning process is situated within the context of pain mechanisms and is narrowed to and applicable in patients with a dominant input pain mechanism. Based on key features in subjective and clinical examination, patients with mechanical nociceptive pain probably arising from articular structures can be categorized into specific articular dysfunction patterns. Pending on these patterns, specific mobilization and manipulation techniques are warranted. The proposed patterns are illustrated in 3 case studies. This clinical algorithm is the corollary of empirical expertise and is complemented by in-depth discussions and knowledge exchange with international colleagues. Consequently, it is intended that a carefully targeted approach contributes to an increase in specificity and safety in the use of cervical mobilizations and manipulation techniques as valuable adjuncts to other manual therapy modalities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Limitations and ceiling effects with circumferential minimally invasive correction techniques for adult scoliosis: analysis of radiological outcomes over a 7-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Neel; Baron, Eli M; Khandehroo, Babak

    2014-05-01

    Minimally invasive correction of adult scoliosis is a surgical method increasing in popularity. Limited data exist, however, as to how effective these methodologies are in achieving coronal plane and sagittal plane correction in addition to improving spinopelvic parameters. This study serves to quantify how much correction is possible with present circumferential minimally invasive surgical (cMIS) methods. Ninety patients were selected from a database of 187 patients who underwent cMIS scoliosis correction. All patients had a Cobb angle greater than 15°, 3 or more levels fused, and availability of preoperative and postoperative 36-inch standing radiographs. The mean duration of follow-up was 37 months. Preoperative and postoperative Cobb angle, sagittal vertical axis (SVA), coronal balance, lumbar lordosis (LL), and pelvic incidence (PI) were measured. Scatter plots were performed comparing the pre- and postoperative radiological parameters to calculate ceiling effects for SVA correction, Cobb angle correction, and PI-LL mismatch correction. The mean preoperative SVA value was 60 mm (range 11.5-151 mm); the mean postoperative value was 31 mm (range 0-84 mm). The maximum SVA correction achieved with cMIS techniques in any of the cases was 89 mm. In terms of coronal Cobb angle, a mean correction of 61% was noted, with a mean preoperative value of 35.8° (range 15°-74.7°) and a mean postoperative value of 13.9° (range 0°-32.5°). A ceiling effect for Cobb angle correction was noted at 42°. The ability to correct the PI-LL mismatch to 10° was limited to cases in which the preoperative PI-LL mismatch was 38° or less. Circumferential MIS techniques as currently used for the treatment of adult scoliosis have limitations in terms of their ability to achieve SVA correction and lumbar lordosis. When the preoperative SVA is greater than 100 mm and a substantial amount of lumbar lordosis is needed, as determined by spinopelvic parameter calculations, surgeons should

  13. Radiology of chest diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.; Stark, P.

    1990-01-01

    This book is divided into three parts: The first part - 'Technology and normal findings' - explains current radiological diagnostic methods. The indications for particular examinations are given, with the techniques and possible errors. The second part of the book - 'Diseases of the lung' - gives a systematic description of basic knowledge needed for diagnosis. Each chapter begins with a definition of the disease and a discussion of the diagnostic information that can be expected from the various radiological methods. This is followed by the pathological morphology and pathological physiology and the clinical symptoms. The third part of the book - 'Radiological signs and differential diagnosis' - deals with image patterns, such as segmental opacities, calcification, localized hyperlucency, etc. It begins where the diagnostician must begin - immediate confrontation with the radiograph, analysis of the details, recognition of structures and understanding the image. (orig./DGD) With 381 figs., 42 tabs

  14. Right atrial and right ventricular ultrasound-guided biopsy technique in standing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decloedt, A; de Clercq, D; Ven, S; van der Vekens, N; Chiers, K; van Loon, G

    2016-05-01

    Endomyocardial biopsies could be a valuable tool in equine cardiology for diagnosing myocardial disease, which is probably underdiagnosed in horses because of lack of specific diagnostic measures and limitations of currently available diagnostic methods. To describe a technique for serial right atrial and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy in standing horses using a percutaneous approach through the jugular vein. Prospective study. Biopsy was performed in 10 healthy standing horses sedated with detomidine, under continuous electrocardiography monitoring. A 10 cm (n = 6), 45 cm (n = 1) or 98 cm (n = 3) introducer sheath was inserted into the right jugular vein. Under echocardiographic guidance, a biopsy forceps was introduced through the sheath into the right ventricle and right atrium and endomyocardial biopsies were acquired. In all horses, 3 right ventricular biopsies were obtained from the right ventricular apex and 3 right atrial biopsies were obtained from the dorsal right atrial wall near the tuberculum intervenosum. The presence of myocardial tissue was confirmed by histology. All horses showed atrial and ventricular premature depolarisations associated with acquisition of the biopsies. In 9 horses, the arrhythmia disappeared after retraction of the forceps and introducer sheath. In one horse, ventricular premature depolarisations disappeared only after 8 h. No other complications were observed. Endomyocardial biopsy of the right atrium and right ventricle could be performed in standing horses using a percutaneous approach through the jugular vein and was not associated with complications other than temporary arrhythmias. This technique may be useful for research purposes or as a diagnostic tool, although further research is needed to establish the safety of the technique in clinical patients with myocardial disease. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  15. CT-Guided Superior Vena Cava Puncture: A Solution to Re-Establishing Access in Haemodialysis-Related Central Venous Occlusion Refractory to Conventional Endovascular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, Mohamed, E-mail: mkhalifa@nhs.net; Patel, Neeral R., E-mail: neeral.patel06@gmail.com; Moser, Steven, E-mail: steven.moser@imperial.nhs.uk [Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this technical note is to demonstrate the novel use of CT-guided superior vena cava (SVC) puncture and subsequent tunnelled haemodialysis (HD) line placement in end-stage renal failure (ESRF) patients with central venous obstruction refractory to conventional percutaneous venoplasty (PTV) and wire transgression, thereby allowing resumption of HD.MethodsThree successive ESRF patients underwent CT-guided SVC puncture with subsequent tract recanalisation. Ultrasound-guided puncture of the right internal jugular vein was performed, the needle advanced to the patent SVC under CT guidance, with subsequent insertion of a stabilisation guidewire. Following appropriate tract angioplasty, twin-tunnelled HD catheters were inserted and HD resumed.ResultsNo immediate complications were identified. There was resumption of HD in all three patients with a 100 % success rate. One patient’s HD catheter remained in use for 2 years post-procedure, and another remains functional 1 year to the present day. One patient died 2 weeks after the procedure due to pancreatitis-related abdominal sepsis unrelated to the Tesio lines.ConclusionCT-guided SVC puncture and tunnelled HD line insertion in HD-related central venous occlusion (CVO) refractory to conventional recanalisation options can be performed safely, requires no extra equipment and lies within the skill set and resources of most interventional radiology departments involved in the management of HD patients.

  16. Three-Year Major Clinical Outcomes of Angiography-Guided Single Stenting Technique in Non-Complex Left Main Coronary Artery Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Her, Ae-Young; Rha, Seung-Woon; Choi, Byoung Geol; Shim, Minsuk; Choi, Se Yeon; Byun, Jae Kyeong; Li, Hu; Kim, Woohyeun; Kang, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Jah Yeon; Park, Eun Jin; Park, Sung Hun; Lee, Sunki; Na, Jin Oh; Choi, Cheol Ung; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Eung Ju; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo

    2017-10-12

    There is limited long-term comparative clinical outcome data concerning angiography- versus intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in non-complex left main coronary artery (LMCA) disease treated with the single stenting technique in the drug-eluting stent (DES) era.The aim of this study was to investigate whether angiography-guided stenting is comparable to IVUS-guided stenting during 3-year clinical follow-up periods in patients with non-complex LM disease treated with the single stenting technique.A total of 196 patients treated with either angiography-guided (n = 74) or IVUS-guided (n = 122) PCI were included. The primary outcome was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) defined as total death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), target lesion revascularization (TLR), target vessel revascularization (TVR), and non-target vessel revascularization (Non-TVR). To adjust for any potential confounders, propensity score (PS) adjusted analysis was performed.During 3-year follow-up, the PS adjusted Cox-proportional hazard ratio (HR) was not significantly different between the two groups for total death, cardiac death, and MI. Also, TLR and the combined rates of TVR and non-TVR were not significantly different. Finally, MACE was not significantly different between the two groups (HR: 0.63, 95% Confidence interval (CI): 0.33-1.17; P = 0.149).Angiography-guided PCI for non-complex LMCA diseases treated with the single stenting technique showed comparable results compared with IVUS-guided PCI in reducing clinical events during 3-year clinical follow-up in the DES era. Although IVUS guided PCI is the ideal strategy, angiography-guided PCI can be an option for LMCA PCI in some selected cases.

  17. Lessons learned in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodenough, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reviews aspects of the history of radiology with the goal of identifying lessons learned, particularly in the area of radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. It is pointed out that since the days of Roentgen there has been a need not only to control and quantify the amount of radiation reaching the patient but also to optimize the imaging process to offer the greatest diagnostic benefit within allowable levels of patient dose. To this end, in diagnostic radiology, one finds the development of better films, X rays tubes, grids, screens and processing techniques, while in fluoroscopy, one sees the increased luminance of calcium tungstate. In interventional radiology, one finds an improvement in catheterization techniques and contrast agents. In nuclear medicine, the development of tracer techniques into modern cameras and isotopes such as technetium can be followed. In radiotherapy, one sees the early superficial X rays and radium sources gradually replaced with radon seeds, supervoltage, 60 Co and today's linear accelerators. Along with the incredible advances in imaging and therapeutic technologies comes the growing realization of the potential danger of radiation and the need to protect the patient (as well as physicians, ancillary personnel and the general population) from unnecessary radiation. The important lesson learned is that we must walk a tightrope, balancing the benefits and risks of any technology utilizing radiation to produce the greatest benefits at the lowest acceptable risk. The alternative techniques using non-ionizing radiation will have to be considered as part of the general armamentarium for medical imaging whenever radiation consequences are unacceptable. (author)

  18. An improved optical flow tracking technique for real-time MR-guided beam therapies in moving organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, C.; Papadakis, N.; Ries, M.; Moonen, C.; de Senneville, B. Denis

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guided high intensity focused ultrasound and external beam radiotherapy interventions, which we shall refer to as beam therapies/interventions, are promising techniques for the non-invasive ablation of tumours in abdominal organs. However, therapeutic energy delivery in these areas becomes challenging due to the continuous displacement of the organs with respiration. Previous studies have addressed this problem by coupling high-framerate MR-imaging with a tracking technique based on the algorithm proposed by Horn and Schunck (H and S), which was chosen due to its fast convergence rate and highly parallelisable numerical scheme. Such characteristics were shown to be indispensable for the real-time guidance of beam therapies. In its original form, however, the algorithm is sensitive to local grey-level intensity variations not attributed to motion such as those that occur, for example, in the proximity of pulsating arteries. In this study, an improved motion estimation strategy which reduces the impact of such effects is proposed. Displacements are estimated through the minimisation of a variation of the H and S functional for which the quadratic data fidelity term was replaced with a term based on the linear L1norm, resulting in what we have called an L2-L1 functional. The proposed method was tested in the livers and kidneys of two healthy volunteers under free-breathing conditions, on a data set comprising 3000 images equally divided between the volunteers. The results show that, compared to the existing approaches, our method demonstrates a greater robustness to local grey-level intensity variations introduced by arterial pulsations. Additionally, the computational time required by our implementation make it compatible with the work-flow of real-time MR-guided beam interventions. To the best of our knowledge this study was the first to analyse the behaviour of an L1-based optical flow functional in an applicative context: real-time MR

  19. Comparison of peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasonography guided axillary block using multiple injection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Alok; Sharma, Dk; Sibi, Maj E; Datta, Barun; Gogoi, Biraj

    2014-01-01

    The established methods of nerve location were based on either proper motor response on nerve stimulation (NS) or ultrasound guidance. In this prospective, randomised, observer-blinded study, we compared ultrasound guidance with NS for axillary brachial plexus block using 0.5% bupivacaine with the multiple injection techniques. A total of 120 patients receiving axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% bupivacaine, using a multiple injection technique, were randomly allocated to receive either NS (group NS, n = 60), or ultrasound guidance (group US, n = 60) for nerve location. A blinded observer recorded the onset of sensory and motor blocks, skin punctures, needle redirections, procedure-related pain and patient satisfaction. The median (range) number of skin punctures were 2 (2-4) in group US and 3 (2-5) in group NS (P =0.27). Insufficient block was observed in three patient (5%) of group US and four patients (6.67%) of group NS (P > =0.35). Patient acceptance was similarly good in the two groups. Multiple injection axillary blocks with ultrasound guidance provided similar success rates and comparable incidence of complications as compared with NS guidance with 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine.

  20. Comparison of peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasonography guided axillary block using multiple injection technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The established methods of nerve location were based on either proper motor response on nerve stimulation (NS or ultrasound guidance. In this prospective, randomised, observer-blinded study, we compared ultrasound guidance with NS for axillary brachial plexus block using 0.5% bupivacaine with the multiple injection techniques. Methods : A total of 120 patients receiving axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% bupivacaine, using a multiple injection technique, were randomly allocated to receive either NS (group NS, n = 60, or ultrasound guidance (group US, n = 60 for nerve location. A blinded observer recorded the onset of sensory and motor blocks, skin punctures, needle redirections, procedure-related pain and patient satisfaction. Results: The median (range number of skin punctures were 2 (2-4 in group US and 3 (2-5 in group NS (P =0.27. Insufficient block was observed in three patient (5% of group US and four patients (6.67% of group NS (P > =0.35. Patient acceptance was similarly good in the two groups. Conclusion: Multiple injection axillary blocks with ultrasound guidance provided similar success rates and comparable incidence of complications as compared with NS guidance with 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine.

  1. Radiology of blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, H.S.; Samuels, T.H. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    Chest injuries and related complications prove fatal in over half of the victims of multiple trauma. The radiologist's responsibility is twofold: a) to recognize key radiographic signs and b) to guide the clinician in the radiologic investigation and management of the patient. The important diagnoses to be recognized from radiographs are pneumothorax, aortic rupture, bronhcial rupture and diaphragmatic rupture.

  2. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  3. Path integration guided with a quality map for shape reconstruction in the fringe reflection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoli; Cheng, Haobo; Wen, Yongfu

    2018-04-01

    A new local integration algorithm called quality map path integration (QMPI) is reported for shape reconstruction in the fringe reflection technique. A quality map is proposed to evaluate the quality of gradient data locally, and functions as a guideline for the integrated path. The presented method can be employed in wavefront estimation from its slopes over the general shaped surface with slope noise equivalent to that in practical measurements. Moreover, QMPI is much better at handling the slope data with local noise, which may be caused by the irregular shapes of the surface under test. The performance of QMPI is discussed by simulations and experiment. It is shown that QMPI not only improves the accuracy of local integration, but can also be easily implemented with no iteration compared to Southwell zonal reconstruction (SZR). From an engineering point-of-view, the proposed method may also provide an efficient and stable approach for different shapes with high-precise demand.

  4. Innovative techniques for image-guided ablation of benign thyroid nodules: Combined ethanol and radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Sun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In the treatment of benign thyroid nodules, ethanol ablation (EA), and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been suggested for cystic and solid thyroid nodules, respectively. Although combining these ablation techniques may be effective, no guidelines for or reviews of the combination have been published. Currently, there are three ways of combining EA and RFA: additional RFA is effective for treatment of incompletely resolved symptoms and solid residual portions of a thyroid nodule after EA. Additional EA can be performed for the residual unablated solid portion of a nodule after RFA if it is adjacent to critical structures (e.g., trachea, esophagus, and recurrent laryngeal nerve). In the concomitant procedure, ethanol is injected to control venous oozing after aspiration of cystic fluid prior to RFA of the remaining solid nodule.

  5. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Young, E-mail: pjy1331@hanmail.net; Kim, Shin Jung, E-mail: witdd2@hanmail.net; Kim, Hyoung Ook, E-mail: chaos821209@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae, E-mail: mono-111@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol, E-mail: apleseed@hanmail.net; Kim, Jae Kyu, E-mail: kjkrad@jnu.ac.kr [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sang Young, E-mail: sycpvts@jnu.ac.kr; Choi, Soo Jin Na, E-mail: choisjn@jnu.ac.kr; Lee, Ho Kyun, E-mail: mhaha@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  6. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bücker, Arno; Hohl, Christian; Berlis, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Purpose  Scope and clinical importance of interventional radiology markedly evolved over the last decades. Consequently it was acknowledged as independent subspecialty by the "European Union of Medical Specialists" (UEMS). Based on radiological imaging techniques Interventional Radiology is an integral part of Radiology. Materials und Methods  In 2009 the German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a structured training in Interventional Radiology. In cooperation with the German Society of Neuroradiology (DGNR) this training was extended to also cover Interventional Neuroradiology in 2012. Tailored for this training in Interventional Radiology a structured curriculum was developed, covering the scope of this modular training. Results  The curriculum is based on the DeGIR/DGNR modular training concept in Interventional Radiology. There is also an European Curriculum and Syllabus for Interventional Radiology developed by the "Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe" (CIRSE). The presented curriculum in Interventional Radiology is designed to provide a uniform base for the training in Interventional Radiology in Germany, based on the competencies obtained during residency. Conclusion  This curriculum can be used as a basis for training in Interventional Radiology by all training sites. Key Points: · Interventional Radiology is an integral part of clinical radiology. · The German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a curriculum in Interventional Radiology. · This curriculum is an integrative basis for the training in interventional. Citation Format · Mahnken AH, Bücker A, Hohl C et al. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 309 - 311. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  8. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs [de

  9. Radiology – Changing Role in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Khalilur Rahman

    2014-01-01

    also as a major contributor to treatment and recovery. Working in tandem with other disciplines, radiology has had a major impact on achievements in such significant areas as early cancer detection, speedy trauma analysis, precise stroke localization and many others.7 Interventional radiology, one of the subspecialty areas of radiology, uses the imaging modalities of diagnostic radiology to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures, such as that in laparoscopic gallstone surgery. The number of interventional radiology examinations has shown a huge rise, increasing by over 50% since 2007. Therapeutic radiology, better known as radiation oncology uses radiation to treat diseases such as cancer using a form of treatment called radiation therapy.5,8 The last few decades have witnessed dramatic innovations and improvisations in imaging technology. In all sense radiological advances have revolutionized the practice of modern medicine. Imaging now uses a wide range of modalities that vary in their mode of image acquisition. In order to request the correct imaging technique and thereby improve patient management, it is useful for the practicing clinician to be conversant with all imaging techniques available, their advantages as well as limitations, indications and contraindications of each modality.

  10. Infantile abuse: Radiological diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa Araujo Reyes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Infantile abuse is a frequent problem, that must be suspected to bediagnosed, the children victims of infantile abuse can present anytype of injury, nevertheless there are associated injuries common toan inferred trauma that constitute radiological patterns highly specific for abuse, among them are the metafisial injuries, posterior costal fractures and first costal arc fractures, fractures of the toracolumbar region, fractures without apparent explanation, fractures in different stage of evolution, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraparenquimatose contusion and diffuse axonal injury, which combined with the history of the trauma, the age, the development of mental abilities, as well as the mechanism guides the injury diagnose.

  11. Standards in radiographically guided biopsies - indications, techniques, complications; Standards radiologisch bildgesteuerter Biopsien - Indikationsstellung, Technik, Komplikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerbach, S.; Schreyer, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Schlottmann, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin I

    2003-09-01

    In the first place, different needle types are presented, in particular, biopsy cannulae applying the ''TruCut'' principle and devices suitable for bone biopsy. Important aids for the daily practice, such as tandem technology and coaxial technology, are presented. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, together with the most important sites of target-directed fluoroscopy, sonography and computer tomography as well as CT-fluoroscopy. Local anesthesia and analgosedation are presented, and the general and specific caliber- or entrance-dependent contraindications are described. The literature is reviewed for data of severe complications, such as death or tumor cell deposits along the puncture site. For the different targets in thorax and abdomen, the typical indications, points of entrance, contraindications, complications and special techniques are described, and the value of the biopsy for these localizations is presented. Under the heading ''Tips and Tricks'', practical advice useful for the daily routine can be found. (orig.) [German] Zunaechst werden verschiedene Nadeltypen vorgestellt, insbesondere die nach dem ''Tru-Cut''-Prinzip funktionierenden Biopsiekanuelen, und Bestecke, die sich zur Knochenbiopsie eignen. Fuer die taegliche Praxis wichtige Hilfsmittel wie Tandemtechnik und Koaxialtechnik werden dargestellt. Auf die Vor- und Nachteile und damit auch die wichtigen Einsatzgebiete der Zielverfahren Fluoroskopie, Ultraschall und Computertomographie sowie CT-Fluoroskopie wird eingegangen. Lokalanaesthesie und Analogsedierung werden ebenso dargestellt, die allgemeinen und spezifischen, kaliber- oder zugangsabhaengigen Kontraindikationen werden beschrieben und auf die Daten zur Literatur hinsichtlich schwerer Komplikationen wie Todesfaelle oder Tumorzellenverschleppung in den Stichkanal wird eingegangen. Fuer die unterschiedlichen Punktionsziele im Thorax und Abdomen werden die typischen

  12. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  13. Alternative radiation-free registration technique for image-guided pedicle screw placement in deformed cervico-thoracic segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Neulen, Axel; Keric, Naureen; Gutenberg, Angelika; Conrad, Jens; Giese, Alf

    2017-10-01

    Image-guided pedicle screw placement in the cervico-thoracic region is a commonly applied technique. In some patients with deformed cervico-thoracic segments, conventional or 3D fluoroscopy based registration of image-guidance might be difficult or impossible because of the anatomic/pathological conditions. Landmark based registration has been used as an alternative, mostly using separate registration of each vertebra. We here investigated a routine for landmark based registration of rigid spinal segments as single objects, using cranial image-guidance software. Landmark based registration of image-guidance was performed using cranial navigation software. After surgical exposure of the spinous processes, lamina and facet joints and fixation of a reference marker array, up to 26 predefined landmarks were acquired using a pointer. All pedicle screws were implanted using image guidance alone. Following image-guided screw placement all patients underwent postoperative CT scanning. Screw positions as well as intraoperative and clinical parameters were retrospectively analyzed. Thirteen patients received 73 pedicle screws at levels C6 to Th8. Registration of spinal segments, using the cranial image-guidance succeeded in all cases. Pedicle perforations were observed in 11.0%, severe perforations of >2 mm occurred in 5.4%. One patient developed a transient C8 syndrome and had to be revised for deviation of the C7 pedicle screw. No other pedicle screw-related complications were observed. In selected patients suffering from pathologies of the cervico-thoracic region, which impair intraoperative fluoroscopy or 3D C-arm imaging, landmark based registration of image-guidance using cranial software is a feasible, radiation-saving and a safe alternative.

  14. Utilization of a modified Clavien Classification System in reporting complications after ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement: comparison to standard Society of Interventional Radiology practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, Tansu; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Arslan, Murat; Ceylan, Yasin; Ors, Bumin; Minareci, Suleyman

    2013-06-01

    To report our results on percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and classify our complications with the Standard of Practice Committee of the Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines and the modified Clavien Classification System (CCS). Three hundred eighty-nine PCN insertions were performed in 322 patients (224 men and 98 women) at our institution. PCN insertion was performed under ultrasound for dilated pelvicalyceal system and ultrasound/fluoroscopy for nondilated system. PCN was considered successful if the catheter was drained urine spontaneously. Number of complications was registered. Primary successful PCN insertion was achieved in 368 of the 389 procedures (94.6%). The success rates for nondilated and dilated systems were 82.7% and 96.4%, respectively. Major complications occurred in 9.6% and minor complications in 9.9% according to the Society of Interventional Radiology. According to the modified CCS grades I, II, III, IV, and V was 9.9%, 1.2%, 6.8%, 1.2%, and 0.3%, respectively. Age, grade of the hydronephrosis, serum creatinine levels, and mean hemoglobin levels were statistically significant parameters for the occurrence of complications on univariate analysis. The nondilated system has statistically significant parameters affecting the complication rates on multivariate analysis (P = .001, odds ratio [OR] = 6.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2-18.4). Percutaneous nephrostomy is a well-known procedure in the treatment of temporary or permanent drainage of an obstructed system. It is very important to define the complications related to interventions for interpretation of clinical comparisons more accurately. Modified CCS is a reproducible system to evaluate the complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy for thyroid nodules: effective technique and a peculiar smear method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyeong Rok; Rho, Myung Ho; Kim, Dong Wook; Koo, Yong Woon; Lee, Kyeong Hee; Kang, Tae Woo

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the effective methods that are appropriate for an endemic area of thyroid disease and to compare the differences of cytologic diagnostic rates with and without using a peculiar smear technique. We analyzed the incidence rate of insufficient results, complications and the total procedure times of 1,126 thyroid nodules in 776 patients who underwent US-FNAB (ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy) from January to December 2005. We compared the diagnostic rate between the two groups; the groups' tests were performed with a peculiar smear technique (Group A, n 313) or with a ventional smear technique (Group B, n = 250). According to the size of the thyroid nodule, the incidence rate of an insufficient result on US-FNAB and the mean total procedure time for 1126 thyroid nodules in 776 patients were measured as 16.9% (52/308) and 208 seconds for nodules under 0.5 cm, 9.8% (30/306) and 160 seconds for nodules between 0.5 cm-10 cm, and 6.0% (30/504) and 134 seconds for nodules over 1.0 cm. These 776 patients showed no significant complication, except for mild pain. In Group A, the incidence rate of an insufficient result was calculated as 15.1% (14/93) for the group with nodules under 0.5 cm, 5.3% (5/95) for the group with nodules between 0.5 cm-1.0 cm, 4.8% (6/125) for the group with nodules over 1.0 cm, and 8.0% (25/313) for the total A Group. In Group B, the incidence rate of an insufficient result was measured as 33.3% (15/45) for the group with nodules under 0.5 cm, 28.1% (25/89) for the group with nodules between 0.5 cm-1.0 cm, 21.4% (24/112) for the group with nodules over 1.0 cm, and 25.7% (63/245) for the total B group. There was a statistically significant correlation between the rate of an insufficient result and the peculiar smear technique or the size of the thyroid nodule. We consider that US-FNAB is very simple, safe and accurate diagnostic method for thyroid nodules, and US-FNAB with a peculiar smear technique is able to

  16. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Schoepf, U Joseph; Xu, Jiaqian; Lu, Guang Ming; Li, Enzhong

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. • Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase. • Neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology are the most productive fields. • MRI is the most used modality in Mainland China's Radiology research. • Guangdong, Shanghai, and Beijing are the most productive provinces.

  17. Implementation of Upright Digital Breast Tomosynthesis-guided Stereotactic Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omofoye, Toma S; Martaindale, Sarah; Teichgraeber, Davis C; Parikh, Jay R

    2017-11-01

    With growing adoption of digital breast tomosynthesis, an increasing number of imaging abnormalities are being identified only by tomosynthesis. Upright digital breast tomosynthesis-guided stereotactic biopsy is a proven method for sampling these abnormalities as well as abnormalities traditionally evaluated using conventional stereotactic biopsy. In this article, we describe the technique of upright digital breast tomosynthesis-guided stereotactic biopsy and outline a systematic operational approach to implementation of this technique in clinical radiology practices. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D Printing Guide Implant Placement: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahović Zoran

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cone Beam Computer Tomography (CBCT is representing a new concept of radiological diagnostics and its application occupies a special place in implantology. Today, preoperative planning, and quantitative and qualitative jaw bone analysis cannot be done without the use of these techniques. The latest in a series of achievements in this field is a method of making a guide for implant using a 3D printing technique. This way pre implantology planning reduces the chance of surgical complications to a minimum and allows installation of dental implants in the most optimal position for future prosthetic work. Aim: To show benefits of guide implantation in clinical practice.

  19. Clinical operations management in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondategui-Parra, Silvia; Gill, Ileana E; Bhagwat, Jui G; Intrieri, Lisa A; Gogate, Adheet; Zou, Kelly H; Nathanson, Eric; Seltzer, Steven E; Ros, Pablo R

    2004-09-01

    Providing radiology services is a complex and technically demanding enterprise in which the application of operations management (OM) tools can play a substantial role in process management and improvement. This paper considers the benefits of an OM process in a radiology setting. Available techniques and concepts of OM are addressed, along with gains and benefits that can be derived from these processes. A reference framework for the radiology processes is described, distinguishing two phases in the initial assessment of a unit: the diagnostic phase and the redesign phase.

  20. Radiologic placement of Hickman catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, L.J.; Mauro, M.A.; Jaques, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Hickman catheter inserter has previously been predominantly accomplished surgically by means of venous cutdown or percutaneous placement in the operating room. The authors describe their method and results for 55 consecutive percutaneous placements of Hickman catheters in the interventional radiology suite. Complication rates were comparable to those for surgical techniques. Radiologic placement resulted in increased convenience, decreased time and cost of insertion, and super fluoroscopic control of catheter placement and any special manipulations. Modern angiographic materials provide safer access to the subclavian vein than traditional methods. The authors conclude that radiologic placement of Hickman catheters offers significant advantages over traditional surgical placement

  1. Radiologic drainage of infected and noninfected thoracic fluid collections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Stavas, J.; Neff, C.C.; Varney, R.A.; Wittich, G.R.; Dillard, J.; Christensen, R.A.; Friedman, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Radiologically guided drainage of 100 thoracic fluid collections is described in this paper. Collections that underwent drainage include empyemas, lung abscesses, bronchopleural fistulas (BPFs), mediastinal abscesses, paracardial collections, bronchogenic cysts, sequestrations, lymphoceles, lymphangiomas, malignant effusions, and necrotic tumors. Catheters were placed for sclerotherapy in nine patients. Guidance modalities (in descending order of frequency) were CT, US, fluoroscopy, and MR. Inadequate thoracostomy tube drainage occurred in a third of the patients prior to radiologic drainage. Drainages were effective in 85% of cases, sparing surgery or another thoracostomy tube. Complications occurred in 7% of patients, most being minor and none requiring operation. Criteria for drainage of lung abscess and BPF will be emphasized, as will techniques and methods of follow-up

  2. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  3. Radiological health training resources, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The Division of Training and Medical Applications is the component of the Bureau of Radiological Health which has the responsibility for providing training assistance to the Nation's radiological health agencies. Recognizing that these agencies are establishing their own user and personnel training programs, the Division offers through the Training Resources Center a variety of educational materials which may be utilized for specific training purposes. This bulletin contains a list of educational materials, including publications, booklets, slides and transparencies, movies, video tapes, training guides, and training seminars for the education of x-ray technicians in radiation protection

  4. Radiological imaging in endocrine hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan J Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While different generations of assays have played important role in elucidating causes of different endocrine disorders, radiological techniques are instrumental in localizing the pathology. This statement cannot be truer in any disease entity other than endocrine hypertension. This review makes an effort to highlight the role of different radiological modalities, especially ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in the evaluation of different causes of endocrine hypertension.

  5. Deep Learning in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Morgan P; Awan, Omer A; Colucci, Andrew T; Ghobadi, Comeron W; Kadom, Nadja; Kansagra, Akash P; Tridandapani, Srini; Auffermann, William F

    2018-03-29

    As radiology is inherently a data-driven specialty, it is especially conducive to utilizing data processing techniques. One such technique, deep learning (DL), has become a remarkably powerful tool for image processing in recent years. In this work, the Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on Deep Learning provides an overview of DL for the radiologist. This article aims to present an overview of DL in a manner that is understandable to radiologists; to examine past, present, and future applications; as well as to evaluate how radiologists may benefit from this remarkable new tool. We describe several areas within radiology in which DL techniques are having the most significant impact: lesion or disease detection, classification, quantification, and segmentation. The legal and ethical hurdles to implementation are also discussed. By taking advantage of this powerful tool, radiologists can become increasingly more accurate in their interpretations with fewer errors and spend more time to focus on patient care. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiovascular and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.I. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A symposium of eight short but complete papers giving an overview of interventional radiology is presented. Organized by Dr. William Casarella, this symposium is certainly the most current review of the subject available. This year's cardiovascular section is again heavily weighted toward interventional radiology. Abrams and Doubilet's article on the underutilization of angioplasty is important because it describes the cost effectiveness of this method. Most health planners, right or wrong, have complained about overutilization of diagnostic radiology procedures. In general, the opposite is true for interventional procedures - they are underutilized. If the authors draw the attention of their hospital administrators to these approaches and also produce the data on long-term follow-up for our medical colleagues, interventional radiology may realize its full potential. Articles on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are beginning to appear and this technique seems to have great potential. An important article, which is the first prospective study comparing lung scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, supports the increased use of pulmonary angiography. Finally, an article on complications of percutaneous biliary drainage provokes some discussion of its value for routine preoperative use

  7. 78 FR 42071 - Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance for Radiological Incidents AGENCY... guidance ``PAG Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance for Radiological Incidents... ``anonymous access'' system, which means the EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you...

  8. Technique adaptation, strategic replanning, and team learning during implementation of MR-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliarenko, Julia; Carlone, Marco; Tanderup, Kari; Han, Kathy; Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar; Borg, Jette; Chan, Kitty; Croke, Jennifer; Rink, Alexandra; Simeonov, Anna; Ujaimi, Reem; Xie, Jason; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    MR-guided brachytherapy (MRgBT) with interstitial needles is associated with improved outcomes in cervical cancer patients. However, there are implementation barriers, including magnetic resonance (MR) access, practitioner familiarity/comfort, and efficiency. This study explores a graded MRgBT implementation strategy that included the adaptive use of needles, strategic use of MR imaging/planning, and team learning. Twenty patients with cervical cancer were treated with high-dose-rate MRgBT (28 Gy in four fractions, two insertions, daily MR imaging/planning). A tandem/ring applicator alone was used for the first insertion in most patients. Needles were added for the second insertion based on evaluation of the initial dosimetry. An interdisciplinary expert team reviewed and discussed the MR images and treatment plans. Dosimetry-trigger technique adaptation with the addition of needles for the second insertion improved target coverage in all patients with suboptimal dosimetry initially without compromising organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. Target and OAR planning objectives were achieved in most patients. There were small or no systematic differences in tumor or OAR dosimetry between imaging/planning once per insertion vs. daily and only small random variations. Peer review and discussion of images, contours, and plans promoted learning and process development. Technique adaptation based on the initial dosimetry is an efficient approach to implementing MRgBT while gaining comfort with the use of needles. MR imaging and planning once per insertion is safe in most patients as long as applicator shifts, and large anatomical changes are excluded. Team learning is essential to building individual and programmatic competencies. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Support for biomedical research and its impact on radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, D G; Hendee, W R

    1994-12-01

    Research in medical imaging has experienced substantial growth during the past decade. Still, research is a small fraction of the budget of the typical academic radiology program. Few radiology faculty participate in hypothesis-driven research projects. Funding of research will be more difficult to secure in the future, since clinical subsidies will diminish or disappear, support from industry is decreasing, and funds from private foundations and philanthropists are not likely to increase. Support from the NIH will probably remain about level in constant dollars. In response to these constraints, radiology will have to be both more creative and more opportunistic to tap the limited remaining resources of research support. An excellent compilation of some major resources was recently published by Williams and Holden (9). Efforts of the Conjoint Committee will continue to be critical for continuing support of the LDRR, encouraging the allocation of intramural and extramural resources of the NCI to medical imaging, guiding the development of the American Academy of Radiologic Research, providing research training opportunities for physicians and scientists in radiology, and leading the research effort in medical imaging in general (10). Within individual institutions and departments, imaging research must continue to be acknowledged as a priority despite increasing pressures to generate clinical revenue. Enhanced efforts are warranted to nurture the research interests of younger faculty and selected residents and fellows, including pairing them with research mentors and providing them with opportunities to develop skills in areas such as research design, statistical analysis, and evaluative techniques. The long-term well-being of radiology and its important contributions to patient care are dependent on its continued investment in research and development.

  10. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Rendezvous Technique after Failed Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: Which Approach Route Is the Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Nozomi; Hara, Kazuo; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Hirayama, Yutaka; Onishi, Sachiyo; Niwa, Yasumasa; Yamao, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    Objective The endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) is a salvage method for failed selective biliary cannulation. Three puncture routes have been reported, with many comparisons between the intra-hepatic and extra-hepatic biliary ducts. We used the trans-esophagus (TE) and trans-jejunum (TJ) routes. In the present study, the utility of EUS-RV for biliary access was evaluated, focusing on the approach routes. Methods and Patients In 39 patients, 42 puncture routes were evaluated in detail. EUS-RV was performed between January 2010 and December 2014. The patients were prospectively enrolled, and their clinical data were retrospectively collected. Results The patients' median age was 71 (range 29-84) years. The indications for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were malignant biliary obstruction in 24 patients and benign biliary disease in 15. The technical success rate was 78.6% (33/42) and was similar among approach routes (p=0.377). The overall complication rate was 16.7% (7/42) and was similar among approach routes (p=0.489). However, mediastinal emphysema occurred in 2 TE route EUS-RV patients. No EUS-RV-related deaths occurred. Conclusion EUS-RV proved reliable after failed ERCP. The selection of the appropriate route based on the patient's condition is crucial.

  12. A new approach to the treatment of true-combined endodontic-periodontic lesions by the guided tissue regeneration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C C; Harn, W M; Chen, Y H; Huang, C C; Yuan, K; Huang, P H

    1996-12-01

    Clinicians often have difficulty in the diagnosis and treatment of the combined endodontal and periodontal (endo-perio) lesion. A case of an endo-perio true-combined lesion on a maxillary premolar was first treated with conventional endodontic therapy. Periodontal surgery was then completed, which included scaling and root planing and apical curettage on the tooth. The facial bony defect was then filled with a decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft mixed with tetracycline powder. A non-resorbable Teflon membrane was then used to cover the bone material and the periodontal flap sutured over this. This combined treatment resulted in minimal probing depth (2 mm), maximal clinical attachment gain (8 mm), as well as radiographic evidence of alveolar bone gain. This case report demonstrates that proper diagnosis, followed by removal of etiological factors and utilizing the guided tissue regeneration technique combined with osseous grafting, will restore health and function to a tooth with severe attachment loss caused by an endo-perio lesion.

  13. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Growth Plate Bone Bridge Resection at 0.23 Tesla: Report of a Novel Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, R.; Vaehaesarja, V.; Ojala, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Growth plate or physeal cartilage trauma may result in delayed or immediate failure of growth due to bone bridge formation at the insult site. With computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the role of imaging has expanded from diagnosis to treatment planning and therapy guidance. Purpose: To describe a technique for MR-guided growth plate bone bridge resection and to evaluate feasibility of the procedure. Material and Methods: Three consecutive patients with growth plate bone bridges were treated surgically under MR guidance. All bridges were detected with prior MRI and radiographs. All patients were referred to procedure due to growth plate bridge associated growth anomaly and pertaining clinical symptoms. The effect of the treatment was evaluated after 48 months with a clinical follow-up. Results: All bridges were successfully detected, marked, and removed under MRI guidance. All patients had relief from their symptoms. Two patients had lasting results from the operation with no further operative treatment needed or scheduled at 48 months from primary treatment. There was one clinical failure, with the patient requiring repeated osteotomies. Conclusion: We have successfully implemented a novel therapy for growth plate bridge resection

  14. Guiding Inspiratory Flow: Development of the In-Check DIAL G16, a Tool for Improving Inhaler Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jeremy Sanders

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Portable inhalers are divisible into those that deliver medication by patient triggering (pMDIs: a gentle slow inhalation and those that use the patient’s inspiratory effort as the force for deaggregation and delivery (DPIs: a stronger deeper inspiratory effort. Patient confusion and poor technique are commonplace. The use of training tools has become standard practice, and unique amongst these is an inspiratory flow meter (In-Check which is able to simulate the resistance characteristics of different inhalers and, thereby, guide the patient to the correct effort. In-Check’s origins lie in the 1960s peak expiratory flow meters, the development of the Mini-Wright peak flow meter, and inspiratory flow assessment via the nose during the 1970s–1980s. The current device (In-Check DIAL G16 is the third iteration of the original 1998 training tool, with detailed and ongoing assessments of all common inhaler resistances (including combination and breath-actuated inhaler types summarised into resistance ranges that are preset within the device. The device works by interpolating one of six ranges with the inspiratory effort. Use of the tool has been shown to be contributory to significant improvements in asthma care and control, and it is being advocated for assessment and training in irreversible lung disease.

  15. Radiological and cytological correlation of neoplastic lesions of the breast diagnosed by fine needle aspiration biopsy guided with ultrasound at the Hospital San Juan de Dios in the year 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madriz Meza, Wendy P.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality from breast cancer has been increased, going on to occupy the first place of the malignant neoplasms in women with a percentage increase of over 45% in 10 years. A bibliographic search demonstrates that have not been performed works that allow to establish the clinical and radiological characteristics of the lesions who have been diagnosed as mammary neoplasms by fine needle aspiration biopsy at the Hospital San Juan de Dios. A observational job, descriptive, longitudinal, retrospective is pretended to perform, to provide an instrument of guidance to the radiologist about the characteristics of alarm on a breast lesion. Female patients ascribed to the Hospital San Juan de Dios, with breast cancer diagnosed by guided fine needle puncture with echography during the year 2009 are included in the study. Data from 39 patients that fulfilled with all the inclusion criteria were presented. The data obtained were collected by reviewing of clinical records; which were found only women, who in their majority were from the province of San Jose, the most affected age group by the five-year periods has been of 45-49 years, followed by the groups between 40-44 years and 50-54 years. The greater part of cases has treated of unique injuries, almost all have been unilateral and measure the size of all the lesions was 21 mm. The injuries have been primarily in the right breast and the upper outer quadrant. The level of radiological success has been good in cases where was used the BIRADS, because it was classified with 4c or 5 to 52,4% of cases, however, it should be noted that in 17 of 39 cases were not properly categorized BIRADS. The main conclusions of this study are: women whose ages are between 45 and 55 years have been especially prone to mammary neoplasms, these lesions are found primarily in upper outer quadrants and measured more than 2 cm. The health problems generated in the patients with these diagnoses have made important to prioritize your attention once

  16. Reimbursement of radiologically guided vascular interventions within the DRG-System: What wil change?; Verguetung radiologischer Gefaessinterventionen im DRG-System: Was wird sich aendern?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strotzer, M. [Krankenhaus Hohe Warte, Bayreuth (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologie; Feuerbach, S. [Klinikum der Univ. Regensburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Voelk, M. [Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Ulm (Germany). Abt. Radiologie

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate reimbursement within the DRG-system ('diagnosis-related groups') compared with traditional reimbursement for interventional therapy of hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: Reimbursement calculation was prospectively analyzed in two respects for 30 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the lower extremity arteries: (1) based on the DRG-system; (2) based on the traditional system. Additional evaluation was performed for five further, typical vascular procedures on the basis of real documentation and calculation data (stenting of the carotid artery, fibrinolytic therapy of basilar artery occlusion, stenting of renal artery stenosis, angioplasty of hemodialysis-shunt stenosis and aspiration thrombectomy of an infrapopliteal arterial occlusion). Results: In our hospital, the introduction of the DRG system would reduce reimbursement by approximately 1100 Euro per PTA patient. However, the other vascular radiological procedures can be expected to increase the payments by up to 4500 Euro. Conclusion: To minimize imminent reduction of reimbursement for patients with peripheral PTA, complete documentation and economical patient management is mandatory. Payment may increase significantly for patients with the other reported vascular interventional procedures. (orig.)

  17. CARS 2008: Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-06-15

    The proceedings contain contributions to the following topics: digital imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, cardiac and vascular imaging, computer assisted radiation therapy, image processing and display, minimal invasive spinal surgery, computer assisted treatment of the prostate, the interventional radiology suite of the future, interventional oncology, computer assisted neurosurgery, computer assisted head and neck and ENT surgery, cardiovascular surgery, computer assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics, instrumentation and navigation, surgical modelling, simulation and education, endoscopy and related techniques, workflow and new concepts in surgery, research training group 1126: intelligent surgery, digital operating room, image distribution and integration strategies, regional PACS and telemedicine, PACS - beyond radiology and E-learning, workflow and standardization, breast CAD, thoracic CAD, abdominal CAD, brain CAD, orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics and airways, imaging and treating temporomandibular joint conditions, maxillofacial cone beam CT, craniomaxillofacial image fusion and CBCT incidental findings, image guided craniomaxillofacial procedures, imaging as a biomarker for therapy response, computer aided diagnosis. The Poster sessions cover the topics computer aided surgery, Euro PACS meeting, computer assisted radiology, computer aided diagnosis and computer assisted radiology and surgery.

  18. CARS 2008: Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings contain contributions to the following topics: digital imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, cardiac and vascular imaging, computer assisted radiation therapy, image processing and display, minimal invasive spinal surgery, computer assisted treatment of the prostate, the interventional radiology suite of the future, interventional oncology, computer assisted neurosurgery, computer assisted head and neck and ENT surgery, cardiovascular surgery, computer assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics, instrumentation and navigation, surgical modelling, simulation and education, endoscopy and related techniques, workflow and new concepts in surgery, research training group 1126: intelligent surgery, digital operating room, image distribution and integration strategies, regional PACS and telemedicine, PACS - beyond radiology and E-learning, workflow and standardization, breast CAD, thoracic CAD, abdominal CAD, brain CAD, orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics and airways, imaging and treating temporomandibular joint conditions, maxillofacial cone beam CT, craniomaxillofacial image fusion and CBCT incidental findings, image guided craniomaxillofacial procedures, imaging as a biomarker for therapy response, computer aided diagnosis. The Poster sessions cover the topics computer aided surgery, Euro PACS meeting, computer assisted radiology, computer aided diagnosis and computer assisted radiology and surgery

  19. Computer-based image analysis in radiological diagnostics and image-guided therapy: 3D-Reconstruction, contrast medium dynamics, surface analysis, radiation therapy and multi-modal image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beier, J.

    2001-01-01

    This book deals with substantial subjects of postprocessing and analysis of radiological image data, a particular emphasis was put on pulmonary themes. For a multitude of purposes the developed methods and procedures can directly be transferred to other non-pulmonary applications. The work presented here is structured in 14 chapters, each describing a selected complex of research. The chapter order reflects the sequence of the processing steps starting from artefact reduction, segmentation, visualization, analysis, therapy planning and image fusion up to multimedia archiving. In particular, this includes virtual endoscopy with three different scene viewers (Chap. 6), visualizations of the lung disease bronchiectasis (Chap. 7), surface structure analysis of pulmonary tumors (Chap. 8), quantification of contrast medium dynamics from temporal 2D and 3D image sequences (Chap. 9) as well as multimodality image fusion of arbitrary tomographical data using several visualization techniques (Chap. 12). Thus, the software systems presented cover the majority of image processing applications necessary in radiology and were entirely developed, implemented and validated in the clinical routine of a university medical school. (orig.) [de

  20. Medical response guide for the initial phase of a radiological emergency; Guia para la respuesta medica en la fase inicial de una emergencia radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Marina A; Perez, Maria del R

    2007-07-01

    In case of a sanitary emergency, the local community and its health care system are the first aid providers. Therefore, preparedness through education and training programs would allow emergency systems to provide an appropriate first medical response. The main objective of this guide is to give basic guidelines for the medical response management after situations involving radioactive materials, in an easy and simple way. The information contained in this guide is addressed to health care personnel of any local assistance center. (author) [Spanish] Las emergencias que afecten a un numero importante de personas y que tengan como protagonistas agentes 'no convencionales' como lo son las radiaciones ionizantes, deben ser abordadas mediante la implementacion de programas sanitarios especiales. En una situacion de emergencia, generalmente los primeros en proporcionar la ayuda, son la comunidad local y su sistema de salud. Por ello la preparacion previa local, a traves de la capacitacion y el entrenamiento permitira brindar una respuesta inicial adecuada que se articule con un sistema de respuesta en emergencias escalonado y de complejidad creciente. Esto requiere la participacion de las autoridades de salud en cada uno de los niveles de atencion, asi como apoyo de otros sectores para desarrollar sus planes de preparacion y respuesta. La presente guia, como instrumento de capacitacion, tiene como objetivo primario brindar las herramientas basicas para el manejo de la respuesta medica en una situacion de emergencia que involucre material radiactivo, en un lenguaje claro y sencillo, dirigida al personal de salud de todos los centros asistenciales locales. (autor)

  1. Radiologic Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Nondistended Stomach: A Modified Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrocelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.petrocelli@hsanmartino.it; Salsano, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.salsano@yahoo.it; Bovio, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.bovio@hsanmartino.it; Camerano, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.camerano@gmail.com; Utili, Alice, E-mail: aliceutili@gmail.com; Ferro, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ferro@hsanmartino.it [IRCCS San Martino University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    IntroductionGastrostomy tube placement for patients requiring long-term nutritional support may be performed using different techniques including endoscopic, surgical, and percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG), typically performed when percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is not possible, requires proper gastric distension that is achieved by insufflating air through a nasogastric tube. We describe a simple technique to prevent air escape from the stomach during gastrostomy tube placement. To the best of our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described in the literature.Materials and MethodsFour patients with unsuccessful percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy were referred for fluoroscopic-guided gastrostomy. One patient had a pyriform sinus tumor and three had an ischemic stroke causing dysphagia. Gastric distention was not achieved in the patients due to air escaping into the bowel during the standard RIG procedure. A modified approach using a balloon catheter inflated in the pylorus to avoid air passing into the duodenum permitted successful RIG.ResultsThe modified RIG procedure was successfully carried out in all cases without complications.DiscussionInadequate air distension of the stomach is an unusual event that causes a failure of gastrostomy tube placement and an increased risk of both major and minor complications. The use of a balloon catheter inflated in the first part of the duodenum prevents the air passage into the bowel allowing the correct positioning of the gastrostomy.

  2. Radiological aspects of Arthroplasties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Sara Eugenia; Barragan, John Henry; Narvaez, Jorge Andres

    2008-01-01

    The development of new surgical techniques, of new prosthetic materials, and the increase in life expectancy with greater coverage of health services has ugmented the performance of hip replacements in our country. The radiologist should be familiar with the different surgical techniques and prosthetic devices, the evaluation of its components and associated complications. The most frequently performed arthroplasties are: shoulder, elbow, hip and knee replacement. This article reviews the most frequent prosthetic devices used, the radiological aspects of arthroplasties and their most common complications.

  3. Technical success, technique efficacy and complications of minimally-invasive imaging-guided percutaneous ablation procedures of breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Giovanni; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Fedeli, Maria Paola; Alì, Marco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review studies concerning imaging-guided minimally-invasive breast cancer treatments. An online database search was performed for English-language articles evaluating percutaneous breast cancer ablation. Pooled data and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Technical success, technique efficacy, minor and major complications were analysed, including ablation technique subgroup analysis and effect of tumour size on outcome. Forty-five studies were analysed, including 1,156 patients and 1,168 lesions. Radiofrequency (n=577; 50%), microwaves (n=78; 7%), laser (n=227; 19%), cryoablation (n=156; 13%) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, n=129; 11%) were used. Pooled technical success was 96% (95%CI 94-97%) [laser=98% (95-99%); HIFU=96% (90-98%); radiofrequency=96% (93-97%); cryoablation=95% (90-98%); microwave=93% (81-98%)]. Pooled technique efficacy was 75% (67-81%) [radiofrequency=82% (74-88); cryoablation=75% (51-90); laser=59% (35-79); HIFU=49% (26-74)]. Major complications pooled rate was 6% (4-8). Minor complications pooled rate was 8% (5-13%). Differences between techniques were not significant for technical success (p=0.449), major complications (p=0.181) or minor complications (p=0.762), but significant for technique efficacy (p=0.009). Tumour size did not impact on variables (p>0.142). Imaging-guided percutaneous ablation techniques of breast cancer have a high rate of technical success, while technique efficacy remains suboptimal. Complication rates are relatively low. • Imaging-guided ablation techniques for breast cancer are 96% technically successful. • Overall technique efficacy rate is 75% but largely inhomogeneous among studies. • Overall major and minor complication rates are low (6-8%).

  4. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  5. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  6. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G. (ed.) [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  7. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  8. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  9. WHO basic radiological system: Manual of radiographic interpretation for general practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, P.E.S.; Cockshott, W.P.; Hegedus, V.; Samuel, E.

    1985-01-01

    This manual serves as a guide to basic radiologic procedures such as chest, abdominal, and skeletal examinations as well as simple nonfluoroscopic studies using contrast material. The book concentrates on the more common diagnostic problems encountered in medicine, as the services of a radiologist would be required for the more complicated techniques. The text begins with a short introductory note describing the intentions of the manual and the goals of the BRS. Following this, there are several complete sections covering essential areas in radiology. The first section, on radiation risks and protective countermeasures, serves to instruct radiologic personnel concisely on how to minimize their exposure to the harmful effects of radiation. In the second section, adverse reactions to intravenous drugs used in urography are described, and the appropriate treatment for such reactions are outlined. Following this, proper patient care and first-aid measures to be employed in the event of an emergency are described in several pages

  10. WHO basic radiological system: Manual of radiographic interpretation for general practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, P.E.S.; Cockshott, W.P.; Hegedus, V.; Samuel, E.

    1985-01-01

    This manual serves as a guide to basic radiologic procedures such as chest, abdominal, and skeletal examinations as well as simple nonfluoroscopic studies using contrast material. The book concentrates on the more common diagnostic problems encountered in medicine, as the services of a radiologist would be required for the more complicated techniques. The text begins with a short introductory note describing the intentions of the manual and the goals of the BRS. Following this, there are several complete sections covering essential areas in radiology. The first section, on radiation risks and protective countermeasures, serves to instruct radiologic personnel concisely on how to minimize their exposure to the harmful effects of radiation. In the second section, adverse reactions to intravenous drugs used in urography are described, and the appropriate treatment for such reactions are outlined. Following this, proper patient care and first-aid measures to be employed in the event of an emergency are described in several pages.

  11. The Importance of Curriculum-Based Training and Assessment in Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St. George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Lee, Michael, E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2013-10-30

    Physician performance and outcomes are being scrutinised by health care providers to improve patient safety and cost efficiency. Patients are best served by physicians who have undergone appropriate specialist training and assessment and perform large numbers of cases to maintain their skills. The Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe has put into place a curriculum for training in interventional radiology (IR) and a syllabus with an examination, the European Board of Interventional Radiology, providing evidence of attainment of an appropriate and satisfactory skill set for the safe practice of IR. This curriculum is appropriate for IR where there is a high volume of image-guided procedures in vascular and nonvascular organ systems with cross-use of minimally invasive techniques in patients with a variety of disease processes. Other specialties may require different, longer, and more focused training if their experience is “diluted” by the need to master a different skill set.

  12. The Importance of Curriculum-Based Training and Assessment in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, Anna-Maria; Reekers, Jim A.; Lee, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Physician performance and outcomes are being scrutinised by health care providers to improve patient safety and cost efficiency. Patients are best served by physicians who have undergone appropriate specialist training and assessment and perform large numbers of cases to maintain their skills. The Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe has put into place a curriculum for training in interventional radiology (IR) and a syllabus with an examination, the European Board of Interventional Radiology, providing evidence of attainment of an appropriate and satisfactory skill set for the safe practice of IR. This curriculum is appropriate for IR where there is a high volume of image-guided procedures in vascular and nonvascular organ systems with cross-use of minimally invasive techniques in patients with a variety of disease processes. Other specialties may require different, longer, and more focused training if their experience is “diluted” by the need to master a different skill set

  13. Combustion gas cleaning in the ceramic tile industry: technical guide; Nettoyage des fumees de combustion dans l'industrie ceramique: guide technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lezaun, F.J. [ENAGAS-Grupo Gas Natural (Spain); Mallol, G.; Monfort, E. [instituto de Tecnologia Ceramica, ITC (Spain); Busani, G. [Agenzia Regionale per la Prevenzione e l' Amiente, ARPA (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This document presents a summary of a technical guide drawn up on combustion gas cleaning systems in ceramic frit and tile production. The guide describes the method to be followed for selecting the best possible solutions for reducing pollutant concentrations in different emission sources, in accordance with current regulatory requirements and the CET recommendation. There are three sources of combustion gas air emissions that need to be cleaned in ceramic tile and frit production and they are usually related to the following process stages: slip spray drying, tile firing and frit melting. The different nature of the emissions means that different substances will need to be cleaned in each emission. Thus, in spray drying and frit melting, the only species to be cleaned are suspended particles, while in tile firing, it is also necessary to reduce the fluorine concentration. The systems analysed in this guide are mainly wet cleaning systems, bag filters and electrostatic precipitators. In the study, the efficiency of these cleaning systems is compared at each emission source from a technical and economic point of view, and concrete solutions are put forward in each case, together with a list of suppliers of the technologies involved. (authors)

  14. Cardiothoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    A wealth of cardiothoracic websites exist on the internet. What follows is a list of the higher quality resources currently available which should save you time searching them out for yourself. Many of the sites listed cater for undergraduates and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, nevertheless these may also be of interest to specialists in thoracic radiology, particularly for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (April 2005)

  15. Computer assisted radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, H.U.; Jaffe, C.C.; Felix, R.

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the CAR'93 symposium present the 126 oral papers and the 58 posters contributed to the four Technical Sessions entitled: (1) Image Management, (2) Medical Workstations, (3) Digital Image Generation - DIG, and (4) Application Systems - AS. Topics discussed in Session (1) are: picture archiving and communication systems, teleradiology, hospital information systems and radiological information systems, technology assessment and implications, standards, and data bases. Session (2) deals with computer vision, computer graphics, design and application, man computer interaction. Session (3) goes into the details of the diagnostic examination methods such as digital radiography, MRI, CT, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, digital angiography, and multimodality imaging. Session (4) is devoted to computer-assisted techniques, as there are: computer assisted radiological diagnosis, knowledge based systems, computer assisted radiation therapy and computer assisted surgical planning. (UWA). 266 figs [de

  16. Digital radiology and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.

    1991-01-01

    With the access to digital methods for handling and processing images in general, many medical imaging methods are becoming more effectively handled digitally. This applies in particular to basically digital techniques such as CT and MR but also now includes Nuclear Medicine (NM), Ultrasound (US) and a variety of radiological procedures such as Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) and Fluoroscopy (DF). The access to conventional projection images by stimulatable plates (CR) or by digitization of film makes all of radiology potentially accessible, and the management of such images by a network is the basic aim of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). However, it is suggested that in order for such systems to be of greater value, that way in which such images are treated needs to change, that is, digital images can be used to derive additional clinical value by appropriate processing

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Rendezvous Technique for Failed Biliary Cannulation in Benign and Resectable Malignant Biliary Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Hideyuki; Yamao, Kentaro; Hoki, Noriyuki; Hisa, Takeshi; Ogura, Takeshi; Minaga, Kosuke; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Kato, Hironari; Kamada, Hideki; Goto, Daisuke; Imai, Hajime; Takenaka, Mamoru; Noguchi, Chishio; Nishikiori, Hidefumi; Chiba, Yasutaka; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Kitano, Masayuki

    2018-03-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) has emerged as an effective salvage method for unsuccessful biliary cannulation. However, its application for benign and resectable malignant biliary disorders has not been fully evaluated. To assess the efficacy and safety of EUS-RV for benign and resectable malignant biliary disorders. This was a multicenter prospective study from 12 Japanese referral centers. Patients who underwent EUS-RV after failed biliary cannulation for biliary disorder were candidates for this study. Inclusion criteria were unsuccessful biliary cannulation for therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with benign and potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction. Exclusion criteria included unresectable malignant biliary obstruction, inaccessible papillae due to surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy or duodenal stricture, and previous sphincterotomy and/or biliary stent placement. The primary outcome was the technical success rate of biliary cannulation; procedure time, adverse events, and clinical outcomes were secondary outcomes. Twenty patients were prospectively enrolled. The overall technical success rate and median procedure time were 85% and 33 min, respectively. Guidewire manipulation using a 4-Fr tapered tip catheter contributed to the success in advancing the guidewire into the duodenum. Adverse events were identified in 15% patients, including 2 with biliary peritonitis and 1 mild pancreatitis. EUS-RV did not affect surgical maneuvers or complications associated with surgery, or postoperative course. EUS-RV may be a safe and feasible salvage method for unsuccessful biliary cannulation for benign or resectable malignant biliary disorders. Use of a 4-Fr tapered tip catheter may improve the overall EUS-RV success rate.

  18. Radiological characterisation - Know your objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindow, Veronica; Moeller, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    When developing a programme for mapping the radiological characteristics of a facility to be decommissioned it is important to take into account the objectives of the programme. Will the results be used to plan for radiological control and selection of appropriate decontamination and dismantling techniques? Will the radiological inventory be used for dimensioning of future waste repositories? These are two examples of the applications for such studies, which could require that a radiological characterisation programme be adapted to provide the data appropriate to the intended use. The level of detail and scope needed for a radiological characterisation will also vary depending on how the data will be used. An application to free-release a facility requires a comprehensive survey and well documented analysis in order to ensure that no radioactive contamination above prescribed levels is present. A bounding calculation to determine the maximum anticipated volumes and activity of radioactive waste requires a different approach. During the past few years, older decommissioning studies for the Swedish nuclear power plants have been updated (or are in the process of being updated). The decommissioning study's main purpose is to estimate the cost for decommissioning. The cost estimation is based on material and activity inventories, which in turn is based on previous and, in some cases, updated radiological characterisations of the facilities. The radiological inventory is an important part of the study as it affects the cost of decommissioning but also the uncertainties and accuracy of the cost estimation. The presentation will discuss the challenges in specifying a radiological characterisation programme with multiple objectives, together with insights on how data delivered can be applied to yield results suitable for the intended purpose, without introducing excessive conservatism. The intent of the presentation is to define issues that can be of use in various aspects

  19. Radiological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant has been shown the radiation dose to the public from plant operation to be quite small. Calculations from the reported release rates yield 0.2 mrem whole body dose and 0.6 mrem skin dose for the calendar quarter of maximum release. Radioactivity discharges to the Chesapeake Bay have resulted in detectable concentrations of /sup 110m/Ag, 58 Co, and 60 Co in sediments and shellfish. The area yielding samples with detectable concentrations of plant effluents extends for roughly six miles up and down the western shore, with maximum values found at the plant discharge area. The radiation dose to an individual eating 29 doz oysters and 15 doz crabs (5 kg of each) taken from the plant discharge area would be about 4/1000 mrem whole body dose and 0.2 mrem gastrointestinal tract dose (about 0.007% and 0.5% of the applicable guidelines, respectively.) Comparison of these power plant-induced doses with the fluctuations in natural radiation dose already experienced by the public indicates that the power plant effects are insignificant. The natural variations are tens of times greater than the maximum doses resulting from Calvert Cliffs Power Plant. Although operations to date provide an insufficient basis to predict radiological impact of the Calvert Cliffs Plant over its operational lifetime, available data indicate that the plant should continue to operate with insignificant radiological impact, well within all applicable guidelines

  20. Radiological malpractice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.

    1987-01-01

    As medico-legal statistics show, compared with other branches of medicine, cases of liability of the radiologist or his assistants are relatively rare. The duty to exercise due care as set out in Paragraph 6 of the Austrian penal code or Paragraph 276 of the German civil code, respectively, provide a basic rule of law also for radiology. Due to the risk inherent in the investigation method, incidents in angiography cannot be totally excluded. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that all steps be taken with regard to staff, equipment and drugs to be able to deal with any complications and incidents that may arise. The courts of law require the employer to produce strongest exonerating evidence to prove that the duty to exercise due care in the selection and supervision of the assistants has been duly fulfilled. For the practical execution of radiological investigations of the digestive tract, also the RTA is responsible; her liability when performing an irrigoscopy is particularly great, as perforation of the intestine is often lethal. The introduction of the rectal tube into the vagina by mistake, with resultant injury or death of the patient, will regularly lead to conviction under penal law. (orig.) [de

  1. A New Technique for Superselective Catheterization of Arteries: Preshaping of a Micro-Guide Wire into a Shepherd's Hook Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jee Hyun; Chung; Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    We wanted to introduce a new technique for superselective catheterization of arteries with preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form, and this is useful for superselection of small arteries branching at an acute angle from a large parent artery for the treatment of tumors and hemorrhages. We developed a superselective catheterization technique by using preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form. We encountered six patients in our practice for whom we failed to catheterize the small tumor-feeding arteries that branched at an acute angle from wide parent arteries during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma; the parent arteries were the right inferior phrenic artery (n = 4) and the left gastric artery (n = 1) from the celiac axis with celiac stenosis due to compression by the median arcuate ligament and the proper hepatic artery from the gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) in a patient who had celiac axis occlusion with collateral circulation via the pancreaticoduodenal arcade from the superior mesenteric artery. In these consecutive six patients, we tested the usefulness of this new technique with employing preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form for superselective catheterization of targeted vessels. The target arteries were successfully catheterized and satisfactory transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed in all six patients. There were no significant complications such as arterial dissection. We developed a technique that is effective for superselection of vessels with preshaping of micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook hook form, and we successfully applied it during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. This technique can be useful for superselection of small arteries that branch from a large parent artery at acute angles for the treatment of tumors and hemorrhages.

  2. Radiological security for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya G, Manuel.

    1985-04-01

    This report comprises the basic notions of nucleonics, simple calculations for point sources, X-rays, calculations for coatings, standards for radiation protection and industrial radiography instruments. The preceding sums up with the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This is a guide for people who wish to pass examinations, to get the license for radiological safety, for operators on gamma-graphic sources, which work in the country. It is a requirement for work with this kind of radioactive sources

  3. Comparison of a magnetostrictive and an EMAT guided wave technique for the long-range pipe inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung Yong Moo; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Young Suk

    2005-01-01

    An EMAT sensor and a magnetostrictive sensor were developed for the long-range guided wave inspection of pipe. An array of EMAT were designed and fabricated for the generation and reception of torsional guided waves. Also a magnetostrictive sensor with a circumferentially magnetized Ni strip and coil for alternating magnetization were fabricated for torsional guided waves, T(0,1) mode. These two approaches were applied to the feeder pipe with various artificial notches. The advantages and limitations of the EMAT method and magnetostrictive method compared in the viewpoint of field application.

  4. MRI-Guided Intervention for Breast Lesions Using the Freehand Technique in a 3.0-T Closed-Bore MRI Scanner: Feasibility and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Young [Department of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To report the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided intervention for diagnosing suspicious breast lesions detectable by MRI only, using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner. Five women with 5 consecutive MRI-only breast lesions underwent MRI-guided intervention: 3 underwent MRI-guided needle localization and 2, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy. The interventions were performed in a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI system using a dedicated phased-array breast coil with the patients in the prone position; the freehand technique was used. Technical success and histopathologic outcome were analyzed. MRI showed that four lesions were masses (mean size, 11.5 mm; range, 7-18 mm); and 1, a nonmass-like enhancement (maximum diameter, 21 mm). The locations of the lesions with respect to the breast with index cancer were as follows: different quadrant, same breast - 3 cases; same quadrant, same breast - 1 case; and contralateral breast - 1 case. Histopathologic evaluation of the lesions treated with needle localization disclosed perilobular hemangioma, fibrocystic change, and fibroadenomatous change. The lesions treated with vacuum-assisted biopsy demonstrated a radial scar and atypical apocrine hyperplasia. Follow-up MRI after 2-7 months (mean, 4.6 months) confirmed complete lesion removal in all cases. MRI-guided intervention for breast lesions using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner is feasible and accurate for diagnosing MRI-only lesions.

  5. MRI-Guided Intervention for Breast Lesions Using the Freehand Technique in a 3.0-T Closed-Bore MRI Scanner: Feasibility and Initial Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, So Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Ko, Eun Sook

    2013-01-01

    To report the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided intervention for diagnosing suspicious breast lesions detectable by MRI only, using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner. Five women with 5 consecutive MRI-only breast lesions underwent MRI-guided intervention: 3 underwent MRI-guided needle localization and 2, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy. The interventions were performed in a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI system using a dedicated phased-array breast coil with the patients in the prone position; the freehand technique was used. Technical success and histopathologic outcome were analyzed. MRI showed that four lesions were masses (mean size, 11.5 mm; range, 7-18 mm); and 1, a nonmass-like enhancement (maximum diameter, 21 mm). The locations of the lesions with respect to the breast with index cancer were as follows: different quadrant, same breast - 3 cases; same quadrant, same breast - 1 case; and contralateral breast - 1 case. Histopathologic evaluation of the lesions treated with needle localization disclosed perilobular hemangioma, fibrocystic change, and fibroadenomatous change. The lesions treated with vacuum-assisted biopsy demonstrated a radial scar and atypical apocrine hyperplasia. Follow-up MRI after 2-7 months (mean, 4.6 months) confirmed complete lesion removal in all cases. MRI-guided intervention for breast lesions using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner is feasible and accurate for diagnosing MRI-only lesions

  6. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.; Hare, W.S.C.; Thomson, K.; Tess, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book outlines the various procedures necessary for the successful practice of diagnostic radiology. Topics covered are: general principles, imaging of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, vascular radiology, arthrography, and miscellaneous diagnostic radiologic procedures

  7. Interventional radiological therapy of benign low back pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huegli, R.W.; Jacob, A.L.; Steinbrich, W.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal affections belong to the most widespread sources of back pain. Beside medical history and clinical examination, the radiological investigation plays an important rote in the clinical workup especially with the modern Cross sectional imaging methods such as computed and magnetic resonance tomography. After exclusion of a malignant disease usually a conservative therapeutic approach is the first line treatment option. If the conservative treatment approach falls a minimalinvasive image guided diagnostic or therapeutic infiltration may be considered. Thereby the interventional radiologist should be a member of the team which decides the clinical strategy. This article describes epidemiology and pathophysiology, common pre-interventional diagnostic strategies, drugs, indications, possible complications and the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic minimally invasive image guided techniques in low back pain. In this context facet joint blockade, periradicular and peridural therapy as well as sacroiliac joint blockades are discussed

  8. Perception of radiological technicians on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, E.; Borges, L.M.; Camozzato, T.S.C.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to know the professionals' perception of radiological techniques about radiation protection in the work process in Nuclear Medicine. The research was carried out with nine professionals of the radiological techniques of two private institutions located in the South of Brazil. An interview was applied through recording and transcription. The analysis of the data took place through a thematic analysis. The professionals' perception of radiological techniques regarding the radiological protection in the work process is evidenced when professionals mention the basic rules of radiation protection: time, shielding and distance as attitudes used to minimize the exposure to ionizing radiation. However, it was verified the fragility in the knowledge about the norms and legislation of the radiological protection

  9. Digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is vital to the life-saving efforts of surgeons and other physicians, but precious time can be lost generating the images and transferring them to and from the operating room. Furthermore, hospitals are straining under the task of storing and managing the deluge of diagnostic films produced every year. A 300-bed hospital generates about 1 gigabyte (8 x 10 9 bits) of picture information every day and is legally bound to hold it for three to seven years--30 years in the case of silicosis or black lung disease, illnesses that may have relevance to future lawsuits. Consequently, hospital warehouses are filling with x-ray film and written reports that are important for analysis of patient histories, for comparison between patients, and for analyzing the progress of disease. Yet only a fraction of the information's potential is being used because access is so complicated. What is more, films are easily lost, erasing valuable medical histories

  10. Preliminary clinical experience with a dedicated interventional robotic system for CT-guided biopsies of lung lesions: a comparison with the conventional manual technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzidei, Michele; Argiro, Renato; Porfiri, Andrea; Boni, Fabrizio; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Napoli, Alessandro; Leonardi, Andrea; Bezzi, Mario; Catalano, Carlo; Anile, Marco; Venuta, Federico; Vitolo, Domenico; Saba, Luca; Longo, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate the performance of a robotic system for CT-guided lung biopsy in comparison to the conventional manual technique. One hundred patients referred for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomly assigned to group A (robot-assisted procedure) or group B (conventional procedure). Size, distance from entry point and position in lung of target lesions were evaluated to assess homogeneity differences between the two groups. Procedure duration, dose length product (DLP), precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were evaluated to assess the clinical performance of the robotic system as compared to the conventional technique. All biopsies were successfully performed. The size (p = 0.41), distance from entry point (p = 0.86) and position in lung (p = 0.32) of target lesions were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Procedure duration and radiation dose were significantly reduced in group A as compared to group B (p = 0.001). Precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Robot-assisted CT-guided lung biopsy can be performed safely and with high diagnostic accuracy, reducing procedure duration and radiation dose in comparison to the conventional manual technique. (orig.)

  11. Preliminary clinical experience with a dedicated interventional robotic system for CT-guided biopsies of lung lesions: a comparison with the conventional manual technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzidei, Michele; Argiro, Renato; Porfiri, Andrea; Boni, Fabrizio; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Napoli, Alessandro; Leonardi, Andrea; Bezzi, Mario; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences - Radiology - Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Anile, Marco; Venuta, Federico [University of Rome, Department of Thoracic Surgery - Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Vitolo, Domenico [University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences - Pathology - Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Saba, Luca [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Monserrato (Italy); Longo, Flavia [University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences - Oncology - Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Evaluate the performance of a robotic system for CT-guided lung biopsy in comparison to the conventional manual technique. One hundred patients referred for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomly assigned to group A (robot-assisted procedure) or group B (conventional procedure). Size, distance from entry point and position in lung of target lesions were evaluated to assess homogeneity differences between the two groups. Procedure duration, dose length product (DLP), precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were evaluated to assess the clinical performance of the robotic system as compared to the conventional technique. All biopsies were successfully performed. The size (p = 0.41), distance from entry point (p = 0.86) and position in lung (p = 0.32) of target lesions were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Procedure duration and radiation dose were significantly reduced in group A as compared to group B (p = 0.001). Precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Robot-assisted CT-guided lung biopsy can be performed safely and with high diagnostic accuracy, reducing procedure duration and radiation dose in comparison to the conventional manual technique. (orig.)

  12. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

  13. Difficult diagnoses in the skeletal radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyschmidt, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    The book on difficult diagnoses in the skeletal radiology discusses the path from symptom to diagnoses including image interpretation. Specific case studies concern the skull, the spinal cord, pelvis, shoulder and chest, upper and lower extremities. The used radiological techniques include projecting radiography, computerized tomography, scintiscanning, PET/CT, NNR imaging and ultrasonography.

  14. Radiological protection and quality control for diagnostic radiology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baorong, Yue

    2008-01-01

    Full text: There are 43,000 diagnostic departments, nearly 70,000 X-ray diagnostic facilities, 7,000 CT, 250 million for the annual total numbers of X-ray examinations, 120,000 occupationally exposed workers in diagnostic radiology. 'Basic standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources' is promulgated on October, 2002. This basic standard follows the BSS. 'Rule on the administration of radio-diagnosis and radiotherapy', as a order of the Ministry of Health No. 46, is promulgated by Minister of Health on January 24, 2006. It includes general provisions, requirements and practice, establishment and approval of radio-diagnosis and radiotherapy services, safeguards and quality assurance, and so on. There are a series of radiological protection standards and quality control standards in diagnostic radiology, including 'radiological protection standard for the examination in X-ray diagnosis', 'radiological health protection standards for X-ray examination of child-bearing age women and pregnant women', 'radiological protection standards for the children in X-ray diagnosis', 'standards for radiological protection in medical X-ray diagnosis', 'specification for radiological protection monitoring in medical X-ray diagnosis', 'guide for reasonable application of medical X-ray diagnosis', 'general aspects for quality assurance in medical X-ray image of diagnosis', 'specification of image quality control test for the medical X-ray diagnostic equipment', 'specification of image quality assurance test for X-ray equipment for computed tomography', 'specification for testing of quality control in computed radiography (CR)' and 'specification for testing of quality control in X-ray mammography'. With the X-ray diagnostic equipment, there are acceptant tests, status tests and routing tests in large hospitals. It is poor for routing test in middle and smaller hospitals. CT is used widely in diagnostic radiology, however most workers in CT

  15. Compression for radiological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1992-07-01

    The viewing of radiological images has peculiarities that must be taken into account in the design of a compression technique. The images may be manipulated on a workstation to change the contrast, to change the center of the brightness levels that are viewed, and even to invert the images. Because of the possible consequences of losing information in a medical application, bit preserving compression is used for the images used for diagnosis. However, for archiving the images may be compressed to 10 of their original size. A compression technique based on the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) takes the viewing factors into account by compressing the changes in the local brightness levels. The compression technique is a variation of the CCITT JPEG compression that suppresses the blocking of the DCT except in areas of very high contrast.

  16. Radiological findings after gastrectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedl, P.; Polterauer, P.; Funovics, J.

    1980-06-01

    In 63 patients after total gastrectomy and reconstruction of the small bowel described by Beal-Longmire, Roux and Tomoda radiological findings were correlated with clinical symptoms. No correlation could be found between clinical symptoms of dumping and oesophagitis caused by reflux on one side and increased length of intestinal transit time, increased diameter of intestinal loops and gastro-oesophageal reflux on the other side. Enlarged blind loops after termino-lateral oesophago-jejunostomy and insufficient ligations (operation technique by Tomoda) were correlated with higher incidence of pains. Patients operated by the method of Beal-Longmire and Roux showed better results than those operated with the method of Tomoda.

  17. Angiography and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The decrease in angiographic procedures as a result of less invasive imaging modalities has been counterbalanced by the rise in interventional radiological techniques. Because the interventional radiologist behaves somewhat like a surgeon, his legal responsibilities also approach those of his surgical colleagues. The basic concerns of negligent malpractice are amplified by the issues of informed consent and vicarious liability. Also, damages resulting from these procedures are costly because of the severity of the injuries. The angiographer must become versed in medicolegal issues of this rapidly evolving specialty

  18. Radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, F.H.W.

    1990-01-01

    The roentgen-morphologic findings of 'osteoporosis' in the different regions of the skeleton are demonstrated. A combination of osteoporosis and osteomalacia induced by hormonal and metabolic bone diseases occur frequently. The results of sequential studies are discussed. Diagnostic informations obtained by quantitative radiology, especially by different methods like x-ray morphometry, densitometry with gamma-rays of isotopes of different energies, quantitative computed tomography, and imaging analysis with electronic methods are described. The sequential use of diagnostic imaging techniques in cases of suspected osteoporosis are explained. (Author)

  19. Orthopedic radiology in the postoperative patient (practical orthopedic radiology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, B.N.; Gelman, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    This course examines various aspects of the radiologic examination of postoperative orthopedic patients. The operative indications, pertinent aspects of surgical technique, expected postoperative radiographic appearances, and radiographic findings indicating postoperative complications are discussed. The evaluation of total joint replacement surgery, spinal surgery, lower extremity procedures, and failed orthopedic devices and appliances are covered

  20. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.; Bermudez Jimenez, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  1. Iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block in inguinal hernia repair for postoperative pain management: comparison of the anatomical landmark and ultrasound guided techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Demirci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve blocks performed with the ultrasound guided and the anatomical landmark techniques for postoperative pain management in cases of adult inguinal herniorrhaphy.Methods:40 patients, ASA I-II status were randomized into two groups equally: in Group AN (anatomical landmark technique and in Group ultrasound (ultrasound guided technique, iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block was performed with 20 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine prior to surgery with the specified techniques. Pain score in postoperative assessment, first mobilization time, duration of hospital stay, score of postoperative analgesia satisfaction, opioid induced side effects and complications related to block were assessed for 24 h postoperatively.Results:VAS scores at rest in the recovery room and all the clinical follow-up points were found significantly less in Group ultrasound (p < 0.01 or p < 0.001. VAS scores at movement in the recovery room and all the clinical follow-up points were found significantly less in Group ultrasound (p < 0.001 in all time points. While duration of hospital stay and the first mobilization time were being found significantly shorter, analgesia satisfaction scores were found significantly higher in ultrasound Group (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively.Conclusion:According to our study, US guided iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block in adult inguinal herniorrhaphies provides a more effective analgesia and higher satisfaction of analgesia than iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block with the anatomical landmark technique. Moreover, it may be suggested that the observation of anatomical structures with the US may increase the success of the block, and minimize the block-related complications.

  2. Sonographically guided fine-needle biopsy of thyroid nodules: the effects of nodule characteristics, sampling technique, and needle size on the adequacy of cytological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degirmenci, B.; Haktanir, A.; Albayrak, R.; Acar, M.; Sahin, D.A.; Sahin, O.; Yucel, A.; Caliskan, G.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of sonographic characteristics of thyroid nodules, the diameter of needle used for sampling, and sampling technique on obtaining sufficient cytological material (SCM). Materials and methods: We performed sonography-guided fine-needle biopsy (FNB) in 232 solid thyroid nodules. Size-, echogenicity, vascularity, and localization of all nodules were evaluated by Doppler sonography before the biopsy. Needles of size 20, 22, and 24 G were used for biopsy. The biopsy specimen was acquired using two different methods after localisation. In first method, the needle tip was advanced into the nodule in various positions using a to-and-fro motion whilst in the nodule, along with concurrent aspiration. In the second method, the needle was advanced vigorously using a to-and-fro motion within the nodule whilst being rotated on its axis (capillary-action technique). Results: The mean nodule size was 2.1 ± 1.3 cm (range 0.4-7.2 cm). SCM was acquired from 154 (66.4%) nodules by sonography-guided FNB. In 78 (33.6%) nodules, SCM could not be collected. There was no significant difference between nodules with different echogenicity and vascularity for SCM. Regarding the needle size, the lowest rate of SCM was obtained using 20 G needles (56.6%) and the highest rate of adequate material was obtained using 24 G needles (82.5%; p = 0.001). The SCM rate was 76.9% with the capillary-action technique versus 49.4% with the aspiration technique (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Selecting finer needles (24-25 G) for sonography-guided FNB of thyroid nodules and using the capillary-action technique decreased the rate of inadequate material in cytological examination

  3. The European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-European Institute of Radiotherapy (ESTRO-EIR) report on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance systems: a practical and technical review and guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korreman, Stine; Rasch, Coen; McNair, Helen; Verellen, Dirk; Oelfke, Uwe; Maingon, Philippe; Mijnheer, Ben; Khoo, Vincent

    2010-02-01

    The past decade has provided many technological advances in radiotherapy. The European Institute of Radiotherapy (EIR) was established by the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) to provide current consensus statement with evidence-based and pragmatic guidelines on topics of practical relevance for radiation oncology. This report focuses primarily on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance (3DCT-IGRT) systems. It will provide an overview and current standing of 3DCT-IGRT systems addressing the rationale, objectives, principles, applications, and process pathways, both clinical and technical for treatment delivery and quality assurance. These are reviewed for four categories of solutions; kV CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) as well as MV CT and MV CBCT. It will also provide a framework and checklist to consider the capability and functionality of these systems as well as the resources needed for implementation. Two different but typical clinical cases (tonsillar and prostate cancer) using 3DCT-IGRT are illustrated with workflow processes via feedback questionnaires from several large clinical centres currently utilizing these systems. The feedback from these clinical centres demonstrates a wide variability based on local practices. This report whilst comprehensive is not exhaustive as this area of development remains a very active field for research and development. However, it should serve as a practical guide and framework for all professional groups within the field, focussed on clinicians, physicists and radiation therapy technologists interested in IGRT. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. IAEA Perspectives on Radiological Characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Patrick; Ljubenov, Vladan

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for characterization of radiological and other hazards in nuclear facilities are reflected in the IAEA Safety Standards. WS-R-5, Safety Requirements for Decommissioning of Facilities using Radioactive Material, includes a requirement that 'During the preparation of the final decommissioning plan, the extent and type of radioactive material (irradiated and contaminated structures and components) at the facility shall be determined by means of a detailed characterization survey and on the basis of records collected during the operational period'. The subsidiary Safety Guide WS-G-2.1, Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants and Research Reactors, further elaborates that 'A survey of radiological and non-radiological hazards provides an important input for the safety assessment and for implementing a safe approach during the work'. Although the characterisation requirements addressed in the Safety Standards relate primarily to the detailed survey activities undertaken following the shutdown of the facility, it is evident that radiological characterization is of relevance to all major phases of the lifetime of a nuclear facility, including: - the siting phase - baseline surveys are undertaken to determine background radiation levels; - the construction phase - construction materials are retained to support future calculations of radioactivity distributions; - the operational phase - surveys are done regularly, with additional surveys being required following incidents involving plant contamination; - the transition phase - detailed radiological surveys are required to support the development of the final decommissioning plan; and - the closure phase - a final survey of the site and any remaining structures will be needed to support an application for release of the site from regulatory control. In the case of facilities that are already shut down, the main purpose of radiological characterisation is to provide a reliable database of information on the

  5. Physics Instruction for Radiologic Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Edward L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the Denver collaborative training program in radiologic technology with emphasis upon identification of core topics, preparation of quality instructional materials, and use of innovative teaching techniques, such as computer-assisted instruction and video tape presentations. Included is a 10-week course outline. (CC)

  6. Gonad shielding in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The use of gonad shielding is an important radiation protection technique, intended to reduce unnecessary x-ray exposure of the gonads of patients from diagnostic x-ray procedures. This pamphlet will provide physicians and radiologic technologists with information which will aid their appropriate use of gonad shielding

  7. MR-guided transgluteal biopsies with an open low-field system in patients with clinically suspected prostate cancer: technique and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangos, Stephan [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eichler, Katrin; Engelmann, Kerstin; Ahmed, Mukhtiar; Dettmer, Sebastian; Herzog, Christopher; Pegios, Wasilios; Wetter, A.; Lehnert, Thomas; Mack, Martin G.; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of MR-guided biopsies with a transgluteal approach in patients with uncertain or suspicious prostate lesions. Twenty-five patients with uncertain or suspicious focal prostate lesions detected by high-field MR imaging of the prostate gland using endorectal coil imaging were biopsied with a transgluteal approach in a low-field MRI system (0.2 T, Concerto, Siemens). The procedures were guided using T1-weighted FLASH sequences. The prostate gland was biopsied repeatedly with a coaxial technique through a 15-gauge pencil tip with a 16-gauge biopsy handy (median 3.8 samples per patient). Complications and biopsy findings were documented retrospectively. Using T1-weighted sequences biopsy procedures were performed successfully with MR guidance in all cases without any side effects or complications. The median intervention time was 11.3 min. Pathological findings revealed ten cases of hyperplasia or atrophy, three cases of prostatitis, ten cases of carcinoma and two cases of normal tissue. The clinical follow-up showed that in two patients prostate cancer was missed at MR-guided biopsy. Transgluteal MR-guided biopsy of the prostate gland is a safe and promising approach for histological clarification of uncertain or suspicious lesions. (orig.)

  8. Current radiology. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular

  9. Radiological interpretation: The 'step-child' in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, H.P.

    1981-01-01

    Radiology has a highly developed technique, an extensive scientific literature and is excellent for acquiring information; one must contrast with this the difficulties in interpreting the information. In an attempt to find the reason for this, the process of radiological interpretation has been scrutinised. Critical consideration has been given to errors in the interpretation of the findings and to problems arising from the use of the available data. An attempt is made, with the help of diagrams, to determine a pathway for further development of information handling in X-ray diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  10. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  11. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  12. Can a Drill Guide Improve the Coracoid Graft Placement During the Latarjet Procedure? A Prospective Comparative Study With the Freehand Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Neyton, Lionel; Lafosse, Laurent; Walch, Gilles

    2017-10-01

    One of the factors that can affect the success of the Latarjet procedure is accurate coracoid graft (CG) placement. The use of a guide can improve placement of the CG and screw positioning in the sagittal and axial planes as compared with the classic open ("freehand") technique. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 49 patients who underwent a Latarjet procedure for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability were prospectively included; the procedure was performed with the freehand technique in 22 patients (group 1) and with use of a parallel drill guide during screw placement in 27 patients (group 2). All patients underwent a postoperative computed tomography scan with the same established protocol. The scans were used to evaluate and compare the position of the CG in the sagittal and axial planes, the direction of the screws (α angle), and overall contact of the graft with the anterior surface of the glenoid after the 2 surgical techniques. The CG was placed >60% below the native glenoid equator in 23 patients (85.2%) in group 2, compared with 14 patients (63.6%) in group 1 ( P = .004). In the axial plane, the position of the CG in group 2 patients was more accurate (85.2% and 88.9% flush) at the inferior and middle quartiles of the glenoid surface ( P = .012 and .009), respectively. Moreover, with the freehand technique (group 1), the graft was in a more lateral position in the inferior and middle quartiles ( P = .012 and .009, respectively). No differences were found between groups 1 and 2 regarding the mean α angle of the superior (9° ± 4.14° vs 11° ± 6.3°, P = .232) and inferior (9.5° ± 6° vs 10° ± 7.5°, P = .629) screws. However, the mean contact angle (angle between the posterior coracoid and the anterior glenoid surface) with the freehand technique (3.8° ± 6.8°) was better than that of the guide (8.55° ± 8°) ( P = .05). Compared with the classic freehand operative technique, the parallel drill guide can ensure

  13. Radiological Image Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Chung Benedict

    The movement toward digital images in radiology presents the problem of how to conveniently and economically store, retrieve, and transmit the volume of digital images. Basic research into image data compression is necessary in order to move from a film-based department to an efficient digital -based department. Digital data compression technology consists of two types of compression technique: error-free and irreversible. Error -free image compression is desired; however, present techniques can only achieve compression ratio of from 1.5:1 to 3:1, depending upon the image characteristics. Irreversible image compression can achieve a much higher compression ratio; however, the image reconstructed from the compressed data shows some difference from the original image. This dissertation studies both error-free and irreversible image compression techniques. In particular, some modified error-free techniques have been tested and the recommended strategies for various radiological images are discussed. A full-frame bit-allocation irreversible compression technique has been derived. A total of 76 images which include CT head and body, and radiographs digitized to 2048 x 2048, 1024 x 1024, and 512 x 512 have been used to test this algorithm. The normalized mean -square-error (NMSE) on the difference image, defined as the difference between the original and the reconstructed image from a given compression ratio, is used as a global measurement on the quality of the reconstructed image. The NMSE's of total of 380 reconstructed and 380 difference images are measured and the results tabulated. Three complex compression methods are also suggested to compress images with special characteristics. Finally, various parameters which would effect the quality of the reconstructed images are discussed. A proposed hardware compression module is given in the last chapter.

  14. RADTRAN 4: User guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Kanipe, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    RADTRAN 4 is used to evaluate radiological consequences of incident-free transportation, as well as the radiological risks from vehicular accidents occurring during transportation. This User Guide is Volume 3 in a series of four volume of the documentation of the RADTRAN 4 computer code for transportation risk analysis. The other three volumes are Volume 1, the Executive Summary; Volume 2, the Technical Manual; and Volume 4, the Programmer's Manual. The theoretical and calculational basis for the operations performed by RADTRAN 4 are discussed in Volume 2. Throughout this User Guide the reader will be referred to Volume 2 for detailed discussions of certain RADTRAN features. This User Guide supersedes the document ''RADTRAN III'' by Madsen et al. (1983). This RADTRAN 4 User Guide specifies and describes the required data, control inputs, input sequences, user options, program limitations, and other activities necessary for execution of the RADTRAN 4 computer code

  15. Application of C-arm CT-guided targeted puncturing technique in performing non-vascular interventional biopsy or interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhen; Han Xinwei; Jiao Dechao; Ren Jianzhuang; Su Yu; Ye Hui

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the clinical value of C-arm CT-guided targeted puncturing technique in performing non, vascular interventional biopsy or interventional therapy. Methods: Thirty, one patients, who were encountered in authors' hospital during the period from July 2010 to September 2010, were involved in this study. C-arm CT-guided percutaneous targeted puncturing biopsy or interventional therapy was performed in all 31 patients. All patients had complete clinical data. The complications and positive rate of biopsy were recorded and analyzed. Results: Under C-arm CT-guidance, percutaneous interventional therapy was carried out in 13 patients. The interventional procedures included radiofrequency ablation therapy for hepatic cellular carcinoma (n=2), pelvic abscess draining (n=1), hepatic abscess draining (n=1), ethanol injection for liver cancer (n=4), sclerotic therapy with ethanol injection for renal cyst (n=2), sclerotic therapy with ethanol injection for liver cyst (n=2) and catheter-indwelling drainage for pancreatic pseudocyst (n=1). percutaneous interventional biopsy was performed in the remaining 18 cases, including liver (n=4), lung (n=7), mediastinum (n=2), bone and soft tissue (n=4) and neck mass (n=1). All the procedures were successfully accomplished, no technique, related complications occurred during the operation. For biopsy examination in 18 cases, the positive rate was 94.4% (17/18) and false, negative results was seen in one case with lung lesion. Conclusion: The percutaneous targeted puncturing technique with C, arm CT-guidance combines the advantages of both CT scanning and fluoroscopy. The use of real, time road, mapping function can effectively guide the puncturing and therapeutic management, which can not only optimize the workflow, save the operation time, but also improve the success rate and technical safety. Therefore, it is of great value to popularize this targeted puncturing technique. (authors)

  16. A comparative study of two techniques (electrocardiogram- and landmark-guided for correct depth of the central venous catheter placement in paediatric patients undergoing elective cardiovascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Barnwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The complications of central venous catheterisation can be minimized by ensuring catheter tip placement just above the superior vena cava-right atrium junction. We aimed to compare two methods, using an electrocardiogram (ECG or landmark as guides, for assessing correct depth of central venous catheter (CVC placement. Methods: In a prospective randomised study of sixty patients of <12 years of age, thirty patients each were allotted randomly to two groups (ECG and landmark. After induction, central venous catheterisation was performed by either of the two techniques and position of CVC tip was compared in post-operative chest X-ray with respect to carina. Unpaired t-test was used for quantitative data and Chi-square test was used for qualitative data. Results: In ECG group, positions of CVC tip were above carina in 12, at carina in 9 and below carina in 9 patients. In landmark group, the positions of CVC tips were above carina in 10, at carina in 4 and below carina in 16 patients. Mean distance of CVC tip in ECG group was 0.34 ± 0.23 cm and 0.66 ± 0.35 cm in landmark group (P = 0.0001. Complications occurred in one patient in ECG group and in nine patients in landmark group (P = 0.0056. Conclusion: Overall, landmark-guided technique was comparable with ECG technique. ECG-guided technique was more precise for CVC tip placement closer to carina. The incidence of complications was more in the landmark group.

  17. Percutaneous Management of Accidentally Retained Foreign Bodies During Image-Guided Non-vascular Procedures: Novel Technique Using a Large-Bore Biopsy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr; Thénint, Marie-Aude, E-mail: marie-aude.thenint@chru-strasbourg.fr; Rao, Pramod, E-mail: pramodrao@me.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France)

    2016-07-15

    ObjectiveTo describe a novel percutaneous image-guided technique using a large-bore biopsy system to retrieve foreign bodies (FBs) accidentally retained during non-vascular interventional procedures.Materials and MethodsBetween May 2013 and October 2015, five patients underwent percutaneous retrieval of five iatrogenic FBs, including a biopsy needle tip in the femoral head following osteoblastoma biopsy and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); a co-axial needle shaft within a giant desmoid tumour following cryoablation; and three post-vertebroplasty cement tails within paraspinal muscles. All FBs were retrieved immediately following original procedures under local or general anaesthesia, using combined computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. The basic technique involved positioning a 6G trocar sleeve around the FB long axis and co-axially advancing an 8G biopsy needle to retrieve the FB within the biopsy core. Retrospective chart review facilitated analysis of procedures, FBs, technical success, and complications.ResultsMean FB size was 23 mm (range 8–74 mm). Four FBs were located within 10 mm of non-vascular significant anatomic structures. The basic technique was successful in 3 cases; 2 cases required technical modifications including using a stiff guide-wire to facilitate retrieval in the case of the post-cryoablation FB; and using the central mandrin of the 6G trocar to push a cement tract back into an augmented vertebra when initial retrieval failed. Overall technical success (FB retrieval or removal to non-hazardous location) was 100 %, with no complications.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided retrieval of iatrogenic FBs using a large-bore biopsy system is a feasible, safe, effective, and versatile technique, with potential advantages over existing methods.