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Sample records for radiological physics center

  1. Implementation of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol by the Radiological Physics Center and its implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastorf, R.J.; Hanson, W.F.; Shalek, R.J.; Berkley, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine appointed Task Group 21 to write a new protocol for the calibration of high-energy photon and electron therapy beams. This protocol updates the physical parameters used in the calculations and is intended to account for differences in ionization chamber design and some differences between phantom materials that were not considered in previous protocols. This paper discusses how the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) intends to implement the new protocol, the changes required in the RPC calibration techniques, and the magnitude of the change in the RPC calculations of absorbed dose resulting from the implementation of the new protocol. Although the change in the RPC absorbed-dose calculations will be only 0%-2% over the range of photon and electron energies of interest, some institutions using specific dosimetry systems may find their absorbed-dose calculations changing by 4% or more

  2. Design, development, and implementation of the Radiological Physics Center's pelvis and thorax anthropomorphic quality assurance phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, David S.; Radford Evans, DeeAnn; Cherry, Christopher; Molineu, Andrea; Fisher, Gary; Hanson, William F.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) developed two heterogeneous anthropomorphic quality assurance phantoms for use in verifying the accuracy of radiation delivery: one for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the pelvis and the other for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the thorax. The purpose of this study was to describe the design and development of these two phantoms and to demonstrate the reproducibility of measurements generated with them. The phantoms were built to simulate actual patient anatomy. They are lightweight and water-fillable, and they contain imageable targets and organs at risk of radiation exposure that are of similar densities to their human counterparts. Dosimetry inserts accommodate radiochromic film for relative dosimetry and thermoluminesent dosimetry capsules for absolute dosimetry. As a part of the commissioning process, each phantom was imaged, treatment plans were developed, and radiation was delivered at least three times. Under these controlled irradiation conditions, the reproducibility of dose delivery to the target TLD in the pelvis and thorax phantoms was 3% and 0.5%, respectively. The reproducibility of radiation-field localization was less than 2.5 mm for both phantoms. Using these anthropomorphic phantoms, pelvic IMRT and thoracic SBRT radiation treatments can be verified with a high level of precision. These phantoms can be used to effectively credential institutions for participation in specific NCI-sponsored clinical trials

  3. Physics of Radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Harold Elford

    1983-01-01

    Authority, comprehensivity and a consummate manner of presentation have been hallmarks of The Physics of Radiology since it first saw publication some three decades past. This Fourth Edition adheres to that tradition but again updates the context. It thoroughly integrates ideas recently advanced and practices lately effected. Students and professionals alike will continue to view it, in essence, as the bible of radiological physics.

  4. Radiological physics in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstam, Rune

    1980-01-01

    Development of radiological or radiation physics as a separate discipline in Sweden is outlined. Growth in number of hospital physicists is compared with that of some other countries for the period 1950-1975. The main duties of hospital physicists are described. Undergraduate and postgraduate courses in radiation physics in Sweden are discussed. A microtron and a multi-source cobalt-60 unit are described. (M.G.B.)

  5. SU-C-BRD-07: The Radiological Physics Center (RPC): 45 Years of Improving Radiotherapy Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Followill, D; Lowenstein, J; Molineu, A; Alvarez, P; Summers, P; Kry, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The RPC, established in 1968 has contributed to the development, conduct, and QA of NCI funded multi-institutional cooperative group clinical trials and institutions, primarily in the USA/Canada and 242 other countries, participating in trials. Methods: The RPC QA program components were designed to audit the radiation dose calculation chain from the NIST traceable reference beam calibration, to inclusion of dosimetry parameters used to calculate tumor doses, to the delivery of the radiation dose. The QA program included: 1) remote TLD/OSLD audit of machine output, 2) on-site dosimetry review visits, 3) credentialing for advanced technologies, and 4) review of patient treatment records. The RPC presented and published their findings to the radiation oncology community. Results: The number of institutions monitored by the RPC increased from around 1200 in the late 90s, to ∼2000 in 2013. There were over 4000 megavoltage therapy machines and ∼28,000 therapy beams in the 1991 institutions monitored by the RPC by the end of 2013. Within the 14,000 photon, electron and proton beam outputs remotely monitored with TLD/OSLD annually, between 10-20% of the institutions have one or more beams outside the RPC 5% criterion. Dosimetry site visits to photon and proton centers continue to result in 2-4 recommendations affecting key dosimetry parameters that impact patient treatment times. One in four patient treatment records reviewed by the RPC have their dose data corrected by >5% before trial groups use them for outcomes analysis. Twelve of fourteen clinically active proton centers are approved to participate in NCI funded clinical trials. The RPC published 222 peer reviewed articles since 1972. Conclusion: Findings from the RPC suggest that human errors continue to play a role in radiotherapy discrepancies and without the RPC independent QA program, the number of undetected errors and time elapsed before their discovery would have been greater. Work supported by

  6. IMRT credentialing for prospective trials using institutional virtual phantoms: results of a joint European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Radiological Physics Center project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C; Vallet, Veronique; Molineu, Andrea; Melidis, Christos; Teglas, Vanda; Naudy, Suzanne; Moeckli, Raphael; Followill, David S; Hurkmans, Coen W

    2014-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) credentialing for a EORTC study was performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC; RPC PH ). Institutions were retrospectively requested to irradiate their institutional phantom (INST PH ) using the same treatment plan in the framework of a Virtual Phantom Project (VPP) for IMRT credentialing. CT data set of the institutional phantom and measured 2D dose matrices were requested from centers and sent to a dedicated secure EORTC uploader. Data from the RPC PH and INST PH were thereafter centrally analyzed and inter-compared by the QA team using commercially available software (RIT; ver.5.2; Colorado Springs, USA). Eighteen institutions participated to the VPP. The measurements of 6 (33%) institutions could not be analyzed centrally. All other centers passed both the VPP and the RPC ±7%/4 mm credentialing criteria. At the 5%/5 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing), 11(92%) as compared to 12 (100%) centers pass the credentialing process with RPC PH and INST PH (p = 0.29), respectively. The corresponding pass rate for the 3%/3 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing) was 2 (17%) and 9 (75%; p = 0.01), respectively. IMRT dosimetry gamma evaluations in a single plane for a H&N prospective trial using the INST PH measurements showed agreement at the gamma index criteria of ±5%/5 mm (90% of pixels passing) for a small number of VPP measurements. Using more stringent, criteria, the RPC PH and INST PH comparison showed disagreement. More data is warranted and urgently required within the framework of prospective studies

  7. Plan for radiological security at a university health center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiaman Mendoza, G.M.; Sanchez Riojas, M.M.; Felix JImenez, D.

    1998-01-01

    This work shows a radiological security plan applied to a Basic Radiological Service at a university health center. Factors taken into account were installation designs, equipment operation parameters, work procedures, image system and responsibilities

  8. Experimental validation of deterministic Acuros XB algorithm for IMRT and VMAT dose calculations with the Radiological Physics Center's head and neck phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Tao; Mourtada, Firas; Kisling, Kelly; Mikell, Justin; Followill, David; Howell, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to verify the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), a grid-based Boltzmann solver, in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) head and neck (H and N) phantom was used for all calculations and measurements in this study. Clinically equivalent IMRT and VMAT plans were created on the RPC H and N phantom in the Eclipse treatment planning system (version 10.0) by using RPC dose prescription specifications. The dose distributions were calculated with two different algorithms, AXB 11.0.03 and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) 10.0.24. Two dose report modes of AXB were recorded: dose-to-medium in medium (D m,m ) and dose-to-water in medium (D w,m ). Each treatment plan was delivered to the RPC phantom three times for reproducibility by using a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator. Absolute point dose and planar dose were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and GafChromic registered EBT2 film, respectively. Profile comparison and 2D gamma analysis were used to quantify the agreement between the film measurements and the calculated dose distributions from both AXB and AAA. The computation times for AAA and AXB were also evaluated. Results: Good agreement was observed between measured doses and those calculated with AAA or AXB. Both AAA and AXB calculated doses within 5% of TLD measurements in both the IMRT and VMAT plans. Results of AXB Dm,m (0.1% to 3.6%) were slightly better than AAA (0.2% to 4.6%) or AXB Dw,m (0.3% to 5.1%). The gamma analysis for both AAA and AXB met the RPC 7%/4 mm criteria (over 90% passed), whereas AXB Dm,m met 5%/3 mm criteria in most cases. AAA was 2 to 3 times faster than AXB for IMRT, whereas AXB was 4-6 times faster than AAA for VMAT. Conclusions: AXB was found to be satisfactorily accurate when compared to measurements in the RPC H and N phantom. Compared with AAA, AXB results were equal

  9. Physics Instruction for Radiologic Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Edward L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the Denver collaborative training program in radiologic technology with emphasis upon identification of core topics, preparation of quality instructional materials, and use of innovative teaching techniques, such as computer-assisted instruction and video tape presentations. Included is a 10-week course outline. (CC)

  10. Center for Devices and Radiological Health Publications Index, August 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This is the first Publications Index to be published by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Previous indexes, titled 'Bureau of Radiological Health Publications Index', were published before the Center was formed in 1982 through the merger of the Bureau of Radiological Health and the Bureau of Medical Devices; the last of these indexes was published in October 1980. The 1988 edition contains records of medical device and radiological health documents authored or published by the Center from 1978 through 1986. It should not be considered all-inclusive since those documents for which bibliographic information was not available have been excluded. The Publications Index is being distributed to Center staff, state radiological health programs, and libraries on the Center's publication mailing list. The Center plans to update and publish the Index every other year to provide a convenient record of published Center documents

  11. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Overview of FRMAC Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This cooperative effort will ensure that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas

  12. Improving physics education in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendee, William R

    2007-08-01

    Concern is growing that the physics education of radiologists is flawed and that without knowledge of physics principles and applications, mastery of the technology of medical imaging is impaired. Furthermore, it is proposed that a mastery of imaging technology is necessary to perfect the clinical acumen of radiologists and to preserve the quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness of imaging procedures. These issues were the focus of a multiorganizational educational summit on physics education of radiologists held in January 2006 in Atlanta. Recommendations for improving the physics education and knowledge of radiologists that evolved from this summit are presented here, together with progress made to date on their fulfillment.

  13. Development of Russian radiology (on the occasion of 75th anniversary of Russian Radiology Research Center)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, V.P.; Tsallagova, Z.S.; Sergeev, I.E.

    1999-01-01

    Brief historical review of establishment and development of native X-ray radiology is presented in relation to 75-year anniversary of the Russian Radiology Research Center. Attention is paid to both scientific and organizational-methodical activities, scientific personnel of the Center [ru

  14. The health physics and radiological health handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shleien, B.

    1992-01-01

    This handbook was conceived in order to fill the need of health physics practitioners, technicians, and students for an easy to use, practical handbook containing health physics and radiological health data. While briefer and more specific data sources are sources are available on single subject areas, as are multi-volume compendia, there is no current up-to-date compilation of information useful on a daily basis by the health physicist. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 16 chapters in this book

  15. Physics, radiology and chemistry. 6. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, O.K.; Knigge, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    The scientific basic disciplines of physics and chemistry are the beginning of all medical teaching. They are suitable to clarify medical and biochemical problems in their causality by means of their own thinking methodics as well as by the information provided. This book attempts to point out the relationships of physics, radiology and chemistry to neighbouring disciplines, especially to practical medicine. Greater importance must naturally be given here to the examples of individual fundamental facts than to the conveying of pure theory from books. The statements and questions on self control ordered according to chapter represent a minimum learning for the students which can be extended as required. (orig./ORU) [de

  16. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Phased Response Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.A.; Bowman, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to the Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or state request when a major radiological emergency is anticipated of has occurred. The FRMAC becomes a coalition of federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities to assist the LFA, state(s), local, and tribal authorities. State, local, and tribal authorities are invited to co-locate and prioritize monitoring and assessment efforts in the FRMAC. The Department of Energy is tasked by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate the FRMAC

  17. Introduction to radiological physics and radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Attix, Frank Herbert

    2004-01-01

    A straightforward presentation of the broad concepts underlying radiological physics and radiation dosimetry for the graduate-level student. Covers photon and neutron attenuation, radiation and charged particle equilibrium, interactions of photons and charged particles with matter, radiotherapy dosimetry, as well as photographic, calorimetric, chemical, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Includes many new derivations, such as Kramers X-ray spectrum, as well as topics that have not been thoroughly analyzed in other texts, such as broad-beam attenuation and geometrics, and the reciprocity theorem

  18. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  19. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities

  20. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Lambert, R.; Tighe, R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions

  1. Environmental radiological protection of Bariloche Atomic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres, Pablo A.; Levanon, Izhar S.

    2013-01-01

    This plan of monitoring radiological environmental routine fits on environmental policy of CNEA, satisfying national and international recommendations for licensed facilities. Sampling matrices are related to direct routes of exposure: air and water (river, lake, sediments, drinking water). Soil samples are also analyzed for having integrated matrices. They are considered as minimum three points of measurement: a white point (water or winds up), a point of maximum (water or winds down) and a point corresponding to the location of the individual representative or a point of public interest. Measurements in air estimate KERMA rate with thermoluminescent dosimeters, bi-monthly, and concentrations of particulate material and aerosols. For water samples (monthly), soil and sediments (quarterly), radionuclides that have download limits are analyzed, according to its importance in the dosages produced in the representative individual. In these cases artificial radionuclides using gamma spectrometry, beta total and Sr-90 by radiochemical techniques if the value of total screening (1 Bq/L) is exceeded. Foods are not included because no possible matrices were detected, either by their distance. by located not predominant wind direction. They are however still looking for milk producers that fulfills the minimum requirements.The data collected are compared with environmental baselines to set trends that might point to future significant changes in the environment during the life of the facilities. So far it was not observed significant differences with respect to baseline values

  2. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis: Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted State(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division (M ampersand A) is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC M ampersand A and the content and preparation of the manual

  3. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook

  4. Physical correlates of radiologic heart volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, D.

    1978-01-01

    Radiologic heart volume was calculated on a 10 per cent random sample of subjects examined in the London Civil Service Health Survey. Data were available for 1 188 men over the age of 40, and the importance of correcting radiologic heart volume for body size, age and heart rate was demonstrated. After these variables were taken into account, the most important association found was with blood pressure. Radiologic heart volume has potential value in cardiovascular screening programmes. (Auth.)

  5. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center. The analytical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local governments, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. Emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations are discussed. (author)

  6. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FR-MAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FR-MAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant FR-om the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FR-MAC operations

  7. Medical imaging physics teaching to radiologic technologists in Kuwait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballani, Nasser S.; Sukkar, Ibrahim

    2005-01-01

    Physics of X-radiation and medical imaging is an important subject (among others) in the education and preparation of skilful and problem-solving radiologic technologists. This short communication gives a brief explanation of the physics courses at the Department of Radiologic Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Kuwait University, Kuwait. The methods of teaching and assessing the physics courses offered to radiographers as part of their education are also explained

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), US response to major radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    radiological materials from: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities, Space Craft Launches, Weapon (Department of Defence or DOE) Transportation, Weapon Production Facilities, Spacecraft Re-entry (domestic or foreign), Terrorist Incidents, High-Level Waste Transportation, Nuclear Power Plants. Key to the FRERP would be the establishment of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Development and implementation was assigned to DOE as the agency most capable of providing sufficient resources, assets, and support. In 1987, DOE subsequently assigned programmatic responsibility, with limited funding, to the Nevada Operations Office in Las Vegas, Nevada. (author)

  9. An introduction to physics for radiologic technologists. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, B.; Seeram, E.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the basic principles of physics for radiologic technologists, and includes new chapters on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Coverage includes magnetism, atoms and molecules, chemical elements, interactions with matter, radiation detectors, radiation exposure, light, the radiographic image in motion, image intensification, the x-ray image on film, processing radiographs, protection in diagnostic radiology, the x-ray circuit

  10. Radiologic science for technologists: physics, biology, and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The second edition of a textbook primarily for students in radiologic technology is presented. Separate chapters discuss mammography, computed tomography, diagnostic ultrasound, and design of radiologic physics. Radiation protection is specifically presented in two chapters as well as being integrated throughout the text. The fundamentals of radiobiology, molecular and cellular effects of irradiation, and early and late radiation effects comprise four chapters

  11. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center's mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993

  12. Role of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) following a radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.F. III.

    1986-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) calls for the Department of Energy to establish a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) immediately following a major radiological accident to coordinate all federal off-site monitoring efforts in support of the State and the Cognizant Federal Agency (CFA) for the facility or material involved in the accident. Some accidents are potentailly very complex and may require hundreds of radiation specialists to ensure immediate protection of the public and workers in the area, and to identify priorities for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) long-term efforts once the immediate protective actions have been carried out. The FRMAC provides a working environment with today's high technology tools (i.e., communication, computers, management procedures, etc.) to assure that the State and CFA decision makers have the best possible information in a timely manner on which to act. The FRMAC planners also recognize an underlying responsibility to continuously document such operations in order to provide the State, the CFA, and the EPA the technical information they will require for long term assessments. In addition, it is fully recognized that information collected and actions taken by the FRMAC will be subjected to the same scrutiny as other parts of the accident and the overall response

  13. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hands-on Physics Education of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Hardy, Peter A; DiSantis, David J; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    The American Board of Radiology Core Examination integrates assessment of physics knowledge into its overall testing of clinical radiology, with an emphasis on understanding image quality and artifacts, radiation dose, and patient safety for each modality or subspecialty organ system. Accordingly, achieving a holistic approach to physics education of radiology residents is a huge challenge. The traditional teaching of radiological physics-simply through didactic lectures-was not designed for such a holistic approach. Admittedly, time constraints and clinical demands can make incorporation of physics teaching into clinical practice problematic. We created and implemented a week-long, intensive physics rotation for fledgling radiology residents and evaluated its effectiveness. The dedicated physics rotation is held for 1 week during the first month of radiology residency. It comprises three components: introductory lectures, hands-on practical clinical physics operations, and observation of clinical image production. A brief introduction of the physics pertinent to each modality is given at the beginning of each session. Hands-on experimental demonstrations are emphasized, receiving the greatest allotment of time. The residents perform experiments such as measuring radiation dose, studying the relationship between patient dose and clinical practice (eg, fluoroscopy technique), investigating the influence of acquisition parameters (kV, mAs) on radiographs, and evaluating image quality using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and gamma camera/single-photon emission computed tomography/positron emission tomography phantoms. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of the rotation is based on an examination that tests the residents' grasp of basic medical physics concepts along with written course evaluations provided by each resident. The pre- and post-rotation tests show that after the physics rotation, the average correct score of 25

  15. Strategic planning for radiology: opening an outpatient diagnostic imaging center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leepson, Evan

    2003-01-01

    Launching a new diagnostic imaging center involves very specific requirements and roadmaps, including five major areas of change that have a direct impact on planning: Imaging and communication technology Finances and reimbursement Ownership structure of imaging entities Critical workforce shortages Imaging is moving outside radiology First, planning must focus on the strategic level of any organization, whether it is a multi-national corporation or a six-person radiology group. Think of all organizations as a triangle with three horizontal levels: strategic, managerial and operational. The strategic level of decision-making is at the top of the triangle, and here is where planning must take place. For strategic planning to work, there must be focused time and energy spent on this activity, usually away from the reading room and imaging center. There are five planning strategies, which must have the explicit goal of developing and growing the imaging center. The five strategies are: Clinical and quality issues, Governance and administration, Technology, Relationships, Marketing and business development. The best way to plan and implement these strategies is to create work groups of radiologists, technologists, and administrative and support staff. Once the group agrees on the strategy and tactic, it takes responsibility for implementation. Embarking on the launch of a new outpatient diagnostic imaging center is no small undertaking, and anyone who has struggled with such an endeavor can readily attest to the associated challenges and benefits. Success depends on many things, and one of the most important factors relates to the amount of time and the quality of effort spent on strategic planning at the outset. Neglecting or skimping on this phase may lead to unforeseen obstacles that could potentially derail the project.

  16. The American Board of Radiology Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program in Radiologic Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Stephen R.; Hendee, William R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC) recognizes that in addition to medical knowledge, several essential elements involved in delivering quality care must be developed and maintained throughout one's career. The MOC process is designed to facilitate and document the professional development of each diplomate of The American Board of Radiology (ABR) through its focus on the essential elements of quality care in Diagnostic Radiology and its subspecialties, and in the specialties of Radiation Oncology and Radiologic Physics. The initial elements of the ABR-MOC have been developed in accord with guidelines of The American Board of Medical Specialties. All diplomates with a ten-year, time-limited primary certificate in Diagnostic Radiologic Physics, Therapeutic Radiologic Physics, or Medical Nuclear Physics who wish to maintain certification must successfully complete the requirements of the appropriate ABR-MOC program for their specialty. Holders of multiple certificates must meet ABR-MOC requirements specific to the certificates held. Diplomates with lifelong certificates are not required to participate in the MOC, but are strongly encouraged to do so. MOC is based on documentation of individual participation in the four components of MOC: (1) professional standing, (2) lifelong learning and self-assessment, (3) cognitive expertise, and (4) performance in practice. Within these components, MOC addresses six competencies: medical knowledge, patient care, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice

  17. Physics and radiology for nursing professions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goretzki, G.

    1977-01-01

    Since mechanization is progressing more and more in the health service, especially in the hospitals, persons working in medical assisting professions must increase their knowledge and understanding of technical and physical matters. This book aims at showing the physical connections important for the medical sphere and to describe their application in medicine. The topics of the book were selected according to the 'physical profile' of a modern large hospital and to the legally assigned subjects for physics in nursing training. Contents and presentation of the subjects have been proving good for several years in physics taught in nursing schools. (orig./RW) [de

  18. Physics, radiology, and chemistry. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, O.K.; Knigge, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    This book is an introduction into physics and chemistry especially for medical personnel. After a general introduction, measurement methods, mechanics including mechanics of colid bodies, fluids and gases, heat, optics, acoustics, electricity, radiations including their biological effects, general chemistry, anorganic and organic chemistry are treated. Every chapter contains exercises mostly in connection with medical and biological effects. Futhermore connections with biology and medicine are considered. (HSI) [de

  19. Physics, radiology, and chemistry. 7. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, O.K.; Knigge, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an introduction to physics and chemistry especially for medical personnel. After a general introduction, measurement methods, mechanics including mechanics of solid bodies, fluids and gases, heat, optics, acoustics, electricity, radiations including their biological effects, general chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry are treated. Every chapter contains exercises mostly in connection with medical and biological effects. Furthermore, connections with biology and medicine are considered. The chapters on physiological chemistry, computer and information theory, chemistry and ecology, and metabolism have been rewritten. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC): Overview of FRMAC operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Management Overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is to explain the federal preparation for a radiological accident and to describe the subsequent response activities which provide radiological monitoring and assessment outside the boundaries of the monitoring which support the radiological accident site. In the event of a radiological accident, federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the accident scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the state(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA) that all federal technical assistance is fully supporting their efforts to protect the public and will provide these monitoring results in a working data center for immediate use by the state(s) and LFA decision makers. The federal agencies do not relinquish their statutory responsibilities. However, the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibility

  1. Physical and cognitive task analysis in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, S [School of Psychology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Healey, A [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Evans, J [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Murphy, M [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Crawshaw, M [Department of Psychology, University of Hull, Hull (United Kingdom); Gould, D [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    AIM: To identify, describe and detail the cognitive thought processes, decision-making, and physical actions involved in the preparation and successful performance of core interventional radiology procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five commonly performed core interventional radiology procedures were selected for cognitive task analysis. Several examples of each procedure being performed by consultant interventional radiologists were videoed. The videos of those procedures, and the steps required for successful outcome, were analysed by a psychologist and an interventional radiologist. Once a skeleton algorithm of the procedures was defined, further refinement was achieved using individual interview techniques with consultant interventional radiologists. Additionally a critique of each iteration of the established algorithm was sought from non-participating independent consultant interventional radiologists. RESULTS: Detailed task descriptions and decision protocols were developed for five interventional radiology procedures (arterial puncture, nephrostomy, venous access, biopsy-using both ultrasound and computed tomography, and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram). Identical tasks performed within these procedures were identified and standardized within the protocols. CONCLUSIONS: Complex procedures were broken down and their constituent processes identified. This might be suitable for use as a training protocol to provide a universally acceptable safe practice at the most fundamental level. It is envisaged that data collected in this way can be used as an educational resource for trainees and could provide the basis for a training curriculum in interventional radiology. It will direct trainees towards safe practice of the highest standard. It will also provide performance objectives of a simulator model.

  2. Physical and cognitive task analysis in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.; Healey, A.; Evans, J.; Murphy, M.; Crawshaw, M.; Gould, D.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To identify, describe and detail the cognitive thought processes, decision-making, and physical actions involved in the preparation and successful performance of core interventional radiology procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five commonly performed core interventional radiology procedures were selected for cognitive task analysis. Several examples of each procedure being performed by consultant interventional radiologists were videoed. The videos of those procedures, and the steps required for successful outcome, were analysed by a psychologist and an interventional radiologist. Once a skeleton algorithm of the procedures was defined, further refinement was achieved using individual interview techniques with consultant interventional radiologists. Additionally a critique of each iteration of the established algorithm was sought from non-participating independent consultant interventional radiologists. RESULTS: Detailed task descriptions and decision protocols were developed for five interventional radiology procedures (arterial puncture, nephrostomy, venous access, biopsy-using both ultrasound and computed tomography, and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram). Identical tasks performed within these procedures were identified and standardized within the protocols. CONCLUSIONS: Complex procedures were broken down and their constituent processes identified. This might be suitable for use as a training protocol to provide a universally acceptable safe practice at the most fundamental level. It is envisaged that data collected in this way can be used as an educational resource for trainees and could provide the basis for a training curriculum in interventional radiology. It will direct trainees towards safe practice of the highest standard. It will also provide performance objectives of a simulator model

  3. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  4. Position and integration of radiology in a large clinical center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.

    2005-01-01

    Radiology has undergone enormous technological and hence organizational changes in the last few decades. These changes occurred more or less in unison with total state expenditures for healthcare, whereas individual disposable income increased twice as much in the same timeframe (1988-2003). Costs for medical technology account for approximately 3-5% of national healthcare expenditures. On the national level, but also in a central hospital setting, radiology does not constitute a major cost factor. Tomographic investigations have increased by 2-3% in recent years and currently represent 30% of all radiological procedures. Increasing sophistication of diagnostics and treatment using genetic and molecular techniques, novel information technologies, and a critical evidence-based approach to all functional activity will result in a further explosion of knowledge. Radiology must meet these challenges head on by intensifying all forms of training, from basics to continuing professional education. (orig.) [de

  5. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) overview of FRMAC operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the designated Lead Federal Agency (LFA) and the state(s) that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. The mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Operations describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas. These off-site areas may include one or more affected states

  6. The Emergency Radiological Monitoring and Analysis Division of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorises the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to co-ordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted States and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for co-ordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. This program includes: 1. Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed-Wing and Helicopter; 2. Field Monitoring and Sampling; 3. Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories; 4. Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance; 5. Environmental Dosimetry; 6. Integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC Monitoring and Analysis Division and the content and preparation of the manual. (author)

  7. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  8. TH-E-201-02: Hands-On Physics Teaching of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  9. TH-E-201-03: A Radiology Resident’s Perspectives of Physics Teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, A.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  10. TH-E-201-01: Diagnostic Radiology Residents Physics Curriculum and Updates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensakovic, W.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  11. TH-E-201-03: A Radiology Resident’s Perspectives of Physics Teaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, A. [University of Kentucky (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant.

  12. TH-E-201-01: Diagnostic Radiology Residents Physics Curriculum and Updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensakovic, W. [Florida Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant.

  13. TH-E-201-02: Hands-On Physics Teaching of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. [University of Kentucky (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant.

  14. Teaching Radiology Physics Interactively with Scientific Notebook Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael L; Amini, Behrang

    2018-06-01

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate how the teaching of radiology physics can be enhanced with the use of interactive scientific notebook software. We used the scientific notebook software known as Project Jupyter, which is free, open-source, and available for the Macintosh, Windows, and Linux operating systems. We have created a scientific notebook that demonstrates multiple interactive teaching modules we have written for our residents using the Jupyter notebook system. Scientific notebook software allows educators to create teaching modules in a form that combines text, graphics, images, data, interactive calculations, and image analysis within a single document. These notebooks can be used to build interactive teaching modules, which can help explain complex topics in imaging physics to residents. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Trends in Publications in Radiology Journals Designated as Relating to Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Rawson, James V

    2017-05-01

    To assess trends in publications in radiology journals designated as dealing with patient-centered care. PubMed was searched for articles in radiology journals for which the article's record referenced patient-centered/patient-centric care. Among these, original research articles were identified and assigned major themes. Trends were assessed descriptively. A total of 115 articles in radiology journals designated as dealing with patient-centered care were identified, including 40 original research articles. The number of articles annually ranged from 0 to 4 in 2000-2008, 5 to 9 in 2010-2012, 14 to 15 in 2013-2014, and 25 in 2015. Only four radiology journals had published more than one of the original research articles. Original research articles' most common themes were: optimization of patients' access to reports and images (n=7); patients' examination experience (5); image evaluation (n=4); radiologists meeting with patients (n=4); improving patients' knowledge of imaging (n=3); examination wait times/efficiency (n=3); examination utilization/appropriateness (n=3); and IT enhancements (n=3). A total of 13 of 40 original research articles solicited opinions from patients. One study involved patients in educating trainees regarding patient-centered care. No study involved patients in system-level decisions regarding health care design and delivery. Articles dealing with patient-centered care in radiology are increasing, though they remain concentrated in a limited number of journals. Though major themes included image/report access, patient experiences, and radiologists meeting with patients, many studies dealt with less clearly patient-centric topics such as examination interpretation, while inclusion of patients in systems design was lacking. Further research in radiology is encouraged to target a broader range of ideals of patient-centered care, such as diversity, autonomy, and compassion, and to incorporate greater patient engagement. Copyright © 2016

  16. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

    2012-03-20

    This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

  17. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  18. Development of a user-centered radiology teaching file system

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcelo; Fujino, Asa

    2011-03-01

    Learning radiology requires systematic and comprehensive study of a large knowledge base of medical images. In this work is presented the development of a digital radiology teaching file system. The proposed system has been created in order to offer a set of customized services regarding to users' contexts and their informational needs. This has been done by means of an electronic infrastructure that provides easy and integrated access to all relevant patient data at the time of image interpretation, so that radiologists and researchers can examine all available data to reach well-informed conclusions, while protecting patient data privacy and security. The system is presented such as an environment which implements a distributed clinical database, including medical images, authoring tools, repository for multimedia documents, and also a peer-reviewed model which assures dataset quality. The current implementation has shown that creating clinical data repositories on networked computer environments points to be a good solution in terms of providing means to review information management practices in electronic environments and to create customized and contextbased tools for users connected to the system throughout electronic interfaces.

  19. Targeted methods for measuring patient satisfaction in a radiological center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, M.H.; Stein, E.; Schreiter, N.F.; Renz, D.M.; Poellinger, A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate two event-oriented methods for evaluating patient satisfaction with radiological services like outpatient computed tomography (CT) examinations. Materials and Methods: 159 patients (55 % men, 45 % women) were asked to complete a questionnaire to provide information about their satisfaction with their examination. At first, patients were asked to spontaneously recall notably positive and negative aspects (so-called 'critical incidents', critical incident technique = CIT) of the examination. Subsequently a flow chart containing all single steps of the examination procedure was shown to all patients. They were asked to point out the positive and negative aspects they perceived at each step (so-called sequential incident technique = SIT). Results: The CIT-based part of the questionnaire yielded 356 comments (183 positive and 173 negative), which were assigned to one of four categories: interaction of staff with patient, procedure and organization, CT examination, and overall setting of the examination. Significantly more detailed comments regarding individual aspects of the CT examination were elicited in the second part of the survey, which was based on the SIT. There were 1413 statements with a significantly higher number of positive comments (n = 939, 66 %) versus negative comments (n = 474, 34 %; p < 0.001). Conclusion: The critical and sequential incident techniques are suitable to measure the subjective satisfaction with the delivery of radiological services such as CT examinations. Positive comments confirm the adequacy of the existing procedures, while negative comments provide direct information about how service quality can be improved. (orig.)

  20. Future directions for radiological physics: An interface with molecular biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experiments with low energy x-rays and fast molecular ions have shown that the products of the interaction of several ionizations within a few nanometers dominate radiation effects. However, the authors still can only make assumptions about the physical and chemical nature of this initial damage. Enzymatic repair of DNA damage is another key factor, but they have little idea of what governs the success or failure (misrepair) of these processes. Unresolved problems like these dictate the future direction of radiological physics. Molecular biology techniques are being applied to determine molecular alterations which result in observed damage. Interpretation of these experiments will require new data on the physics of energy transfer to macromolecules and the stochastics of energy deposition in time. Future studies will attempt to identify the initial damage, before biological processes have amplified it. This will require a detailed understanding of the role of chromatin structure in governing gene expression, the transport of energy within macromolecules, the transport of ions and radicals in the semiordered environment near DNA strands, and many other physical characteristics within the living cell

  1. Principles of radiologic physics, dosimetry, and treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, J.A.; Lightfoot, D.A.; Glasgow, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    A solid foundation in the principles of radiologic physics, dosimetry, and treatment planning is essential for the practice of radiation oncology. In this chapter, the authors consider several topics that lay the foundation for the material covered other chapters. Among the topics discussed here are atomic and nuclear structure; the production of x-rays; radioactivity; the interaction of x-rays with matter; radiation therapy treatment machines; the measurement of radiation exposure; the determination of absorbed dose; and definitions of various dosimetry parameters, such as percentage depth dose and tissue-air ratio. This chapter also discusses basic concepts used in calculations of dose and the standard correction methods used to account for air gaps and tissue inhomogeneities

  2. Establishing a health outcomes and economics center in radiology: strategies and resources required

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Santiago L.; Altman, Nolan R.

    2002-01-01

    To describe the resources and strategies required to establish a health outcomes and economics center in radiology.Methods. Human and nonhuman resources required to perform sound outcomes and economics studies in radiology are reviewed.Results. Human resources needed include skilled medical and nonmedical staff. Nonhuman resources required are: (1) communication and information network; (2) education tools and training programs; (3) budgetary strategies; and (4) sources of income. Effective utilization of these resources allows the performance of robust operational and clinical research projects in decision analysis, cost-effectiveness, diagnostic performance (sensitivity, specificity, and ROC curves), and clinical analytical and experimental studies.Conclusion. As new radiologic technology and techniques are introduced in medicine, society is increasingly demanding sound clinical studies that will determine the impact of radiologic studies on patient outcome. Health-care funding is scarce, and therefore third-party payers and hospitals are demanding more efficiency and productivity from radiologic service providers. To meet these challenges, radiology departments could establish health outcomes and economics centers to study the clinical effectiveness of imaging and its impact on patient outcome. (orig.)

  3. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center's mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center's program include addressing R ampersand D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R ampersand D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R ampersand D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP's outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997

  4. Patient-Centered Radiology Reporting: Using Online Crowdsourcing to Assess the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Interactive Radiology Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Ryan G; Middleton, Dana; Befera, Nicholas T; Gondalia, Raj; Tailor, Tina D

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a patient-centered web-based interactive mammography report. A survey was distributed on Amazon Mechanical Turk, an online crowdsourcing platform. One hundred ninety-three US women ≥18 years of age were surveyed and then randomized to one of three simulated BI-RADS ® 0 report formats: standard report, Mammography Quality Standards Act-modeled patient letter, or web-based interactive report. Survey questions assessed participants' report comprehension, satisfaction with and perception of the interpreting radiologist, and experience with the presented report. Two-tailed t tests and χ 2 tests were used to evaluate differences among groups. Participants in the interactive web-based group spent more than double the time viewing the report than the standard report group (160.0 versus 64.2 seconds, P < .001). Report comprehension scores were significantly higher for the interactive web-based and patient letter groups than the standard report group (P < .05). Scores of satisfaction with the interpreting radiologist were significantly higher for the web-based interactive report and patient letter groups than the standard report group (P < .01). There were no significant differences between the patient letter and web-based interactive report groups. Radiology report format likely influences communication effectiveness. For result communication to a non-medical patient audience, patient-centric report formats, such as a Mammography Quality Standards Act-modeled patient letter or web-based interactive report, may offer advantages over the standard radiology report. Future work is needed to determine if these findings are reproducible in patient care settings and to determine how best to optimize radiology result communication to patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Physical reconstruction of the radiological accident of Chilca (Lima - Peru)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachos, A.; Marquez, J. F.

    2014-08-01

    The radiological accident happened in the Chilca District, the Canete County at 60 km to the south of Lima-Peru, during the night of January 11 to 12, 2012. The physical reconstruction of the accident was carried out in January 21, 2012, by means of the information gathering administrative and technical of the radioactive source as well as of the installation, the personnel and the involved procedures in the accidental event, information of the space geometry where the event took place. The preliminary information indicates that the source could have been locked in the guide tube of the equipment, next to the collimator in the first takes radiographic. The radiation monitors were not activated on the procedure, impeding this way, not to realize the flaw and causing that the personnel were exposed to the radiation during the whole work period. Their hands and especially their fingers would have been only to some millimeters of the source. With the obtained information and the measurements of the exposure rates of the radioactive source, was carried out the dose calculation to total body, the dose received in the hands and the dose received in the index finger of the left hand. The accident happened by operative procedure breach, by lack of training of the operators. The physical reconstruction of the accident contributes fundamental information for the decisions taking in the medical management of the accidents by radiation. (author)

  6. 75 FR 384 - Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-N-0576] Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  7. Atomic physics center in 1972. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, D

    1973-12-31

    The activities of the Toulouse Atomic Physics Center in 1972 are presented. Each research group of the atomic physics section is dealt with separately: atomic collisions, afterglow in gases, dc discharges in medium and high pressure gases, electric arcs, the physics of dielectrics, transport of radiation in matter, stimulated electronic emission, and pn semiconductor junctions. Because of its size, the aerosol and atmospheric exchanges section was not divided into different research groups; the work carried out by this section is presented as a single overall account. (auth)

  8. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  9. Impact on Quality When Pediatric Urgent Care Centers Are Staffed With Radiology Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, J Herman; Orth, Robert C; Yen, Terry A; Schallert, Erica K; Zhang, Wei; Donnelly, Lane F

    2018-02-02

    The proliferation of pediatric urgent care centers has increased the need for diagnostic imaging support, but the impact of employing radiology technologists at these centers is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiographic impact and quality at urgent care centers with and without radiology technologists. A retrospective case-control study was conducted comparing 235 radiographic examinations (study) performed without and 83 examinations (control) performed with a radiology technologist at the authors' pediatric urgent care centers. Studies were evaluated for quality using a five-point, Likert-type scale (1 = poor, 5 = best) regarding field of view, presentation, and orthogonal view orientation. Studies were also evaluated for the incidence of positive results, need for repeat imaging, and discrepancies between initial study and follow-up. Imaging quality comparisons between study and control groups were statistically different for field of view (3.98 versus 4.29, P = .014), presentation (4.39 versus 4.51, P = .045), and orthogonal view orientation (4.45 versus 4.69, P = .033). The incidence of repeat imaging was similar (4.7% versus 2.4%, P = 0.526), as well as the discrepancy rates (3.4 versus 2.4%, P = 1.00). The incidence of abnormal radiographic findings for the study and control groups was similar (40.9% versus 34.9%, P = .363). Radiography is an important triage tool at pediatric urgent care centers. It is imperative to have optimal radiographic imaging for accurate diagnosis, and imaging quality is improved when radiology technologists are available. If not feasible or cost prohibitive, it is important that physicians be given training opportunities to bridge the quality gap when using radiographic equipment and exposing children to radiation. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of Lifestyle with Physical and Mental Health in Japanese Radiological Technologists

    OpenAIRE

    Tahara, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ueya, Etsuo

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of low-dose radiation exposure and lifestyle on physical health and mental health, we evaluated the relationship of age, cumulative radiation dose, and lifestyle (cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and physical exercise) to physical and mental health in Japanese radiological technologists. The study subjects were 932 Japanese radiological technologists who participated in a health study from 1981 to 1985. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to each subject t...

  11. Center for Beam Physics: 1994--95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center's mission is a fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of particle and photon beam physics, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage, and control of systems of charged particles and photons. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP's team and gives a brief review of the multifaceted activities during 1994 and 1995

  12. Radiation safety knowledge of medical center radiology technologists in southern Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Wen-Chuan; Huang Ying-Fong; Chen Cheng-Chung; Chang Pao-Shu [Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan (China)

    2000-05-01

    People who live in Taiwan are getting more and more afraid of radiation. Sometimes the phobia results from distorted knowledge. Radiology technologists, in one hand, are more well-educated in radiation and, in the other hand, have more chance to expose to radiation when they are operating radiation producing medical instruments in their daily life. So we are interested in whether they have enough knowledge to protect themselves. We pick up the radiology technology board examination to make the questionnaire for this study. The population is the radiology technologists who work at department of diagnostic radiology, of radiation therapy and nuclear medicine in medical centers. Statistics is then used to see the relationship between knowledge and the factors including gender, age and career period. Based on statistics, we find out that there is significant correlation between the knowledge with age or education level. Elder or lower education level ones has worse knowledge. Continued education may be highly recommended for radiology technologists to avoid occupational radiation injury. (author)

  13. Radiation safety knowledge of medical center radiology technologists in southern Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Wen-Chuan; Huang Ying-Fong; Chen Cheng-Chung; Chang Pao-Shu

    2000-01-01

    People who live in Taiwan are getting more and more afraid of radiation. Sometimes the phobia results from distorted knowledge. Radiology technologists, in one hand, are more well-educated in radiation and, in the other hand, have more chance to expose to radiation when they are operating radiation producing medical instruments in their daily life. So we are interested in whether they have enough knowledge to protect themselves. We pick up the radiology technology board examination to make the questionnaire for this study. The population is the radiology technologists who work at department of diagnostic radiology, of radiation therapy and nuclear medicine in medical centers. Statistics is then used to see the relationship between knowledge and the factors including gender, age and career period. Based on statistics, we find out that there is significant correlation between the knowledge with age or education level. Elder or lower education level ones has worse knowledge. Continued education may be highly recommended for radiology technologists to avoid occupational radiation injury. (author)

  14. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  15. Patient-centered outcomes research in radiology: trends in funding and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christoph I; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2014-09-01

    The creation of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 presents new opportunities for funding patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER) in radiology. We provide an overview of the evolution of federal funding and priorities for CER with a focus on radiology-related priority topics over the last two decades, and discuss the funding processes and methodological standards outlined by PCORI. We introduce key paradigm shifts in research methodology that will be required on the part of radiology health services researchers to obtain competitive federal grant funding in patient-centered outcomes research. These paradigm shifts include direct engagement of patients and other stakeholders at every stage of the research process, from initial conception to dissemination of results. We will also discuss the increasing use of mixed methods and novel trial designs. One of these trial designs, the pragmatic trial, has the potential to be readily applied to evaluating the effectiveness of diagnostic imaging procedures and imaging-based interventions among diverse patient populations in real-world settings. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. BNL ALARA center's development of a computerized Radiological Assessment and Design System (RADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Connelly, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene sponsored a study of Radiological Engineering Programs at selected DOE contractor facilities. This study was conducted to review, evaluate, and summarize techniques and practices that should be considered in the design phase that reduce dose and the spread of radioactive materials during subsequent construction and operation at DOE radiological facilities. As in a previous study on operational ALARA programs, a variety of open-quotes good-practice documentsclose quotes will be generated. It is envisioned that these documents will serve as a resource to assist radiological engineers in the process of designing radiological facilities, and in performing radiological safety/ALARA design reviews. This paper presents the features for three good-practice documents and related software applications that are being developed based on the findings of this study. The proposed software called open-quotes Radiological Assessment and Design Systemclose quotes (RADS) will be a menu-driven database and spreadsheet program. It will be designed to provide easy, consistent, and effective implementation of the methodologies described in the three good-practice documents. These documents and the associated RADS software will provide the user with the following three functions: (1) enter dose assessment information and data into computer worksheets and provide printed tables of the results which can then be inserted into safety analysis reports or cost-benefit analysis, (2) perform a wide variety of sorts of radiological design criteria from DOE Orders and produce a checklist of the desired design criteria, and (3) enter cost/benefit data and qualitative ratings of attributes for various design alternatives which reduce dose into computer worksheets and provide printed reports of cost-effectiveness results

  17. BNL ALARA Center's development of a computerized radiological assessment and design system (RADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Masciulli, S.; Connelly, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene sponsored a study of Radiological Engineering Programs at selected DOE contractor facilities. This study was conducted to review, evaluate, and summarize techniques and practices that should be considered in the design phase that reduce dose and the spread of radioactive materials during subsequent construction and operation of DOE radiological facilities. As in a previous study on operational ALARA programs, a variety of good-practice documents will be generated. It is envisioned that these documents will serve as a resource to assist radiological engineers in the process of designing radiological facilities, and in performing radiological safety/ALARA design reviews. This paper presents the features for three good-practice documents and related software applications that are being developed based on the findings of this study. The proposed software called Radiological Assessment and Design System (RADS) will be a menu-driven database and spreadsheet program. It will be designed to provide easy, consistent, and effective implementation of the methodologies described in the three good-practice documents. These documents and the associated RADS software will provide the user with the following three functions: (1) enter dose assessment information and data into computer worksheets and provide printed tables of the results which can then be inserted into safety analysis reports or cost-benefit analyses, (2) perform a wide variety of sorts of radiological design criteria from DOE Orders and produce a checklist of the desired design criteria, and (3) enter cost/benefit data and qualitative rating of attributes for various design alternatives which reduce dose into computer worksheets and provide printed reports of cost-effectiveness results

  18. Structure and content of radiology reports, a quantitative and qualitative study in eight medical centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosmans, Jan M.L.; Weyler, Joost J.; Parizel, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and objectives: In order to determine how the quality of the radiology report can be improved, the variation in content, form and length of the report needs to be examined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the length and structure of radiology reports (reports of abdominal CT examinations) in eight hospitals in the Netherlands and Flanders, the Dutch speaking part of Belgium. Materials and methods: Eight hundred reports - 100 from each collaborating center - were collected. After exclusion of the reports that did not fulfill the criteria for a standard CT examination of the abdomen, 525 were retained for further study. The structure of each report was analyzed and the constituting parts (technical information, description of the findings, conclusion, advice, remark, note) were determined. The character and word count of the report and its constituting parts were measured and the results were grouped according to the country (Netherlands vs. Belgium/Flanders), the qualification of the radiologist (staff members vs. residents.) and the nature of the hospital (university medical centers vs. community hospitals). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the Netherlands and Flanders, and between staff members and residents. The authors also found a wide variety in the lay-out and the overall content of the radiology report. Conclusion: While most of the differences we found are probably rooted in local tradition, a standard model for the radiology report in centers sharing the same language may be a means to avoid interpretation mistakes by referring physicians, and to promote better care.

  19. The American Board of Radiology perspective on maintenance of certification: Part IV: Practice quality improvement in radiologic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, G. Donald; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Morin, Richard L.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Thomas, Stephen R.; Bosma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Recent initiatives of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) in the area of maintenance of certification (MOC) have been reflective of the response of the medical community to address public concerns regarding quality of care, medical error reduction, and patient safety. In March 2000, the 24 member boards of the ABMS representing all medical subspecialties in the USA agreed to initiate specialty-specific maintenance of certification (MOC) programs. The American Board of Radiology (ABR) MOC program for diagnostic radiology, radiation oncology, and radiologic physics has been developed, approved by the ABMS, and initiated with full implementation for all three disciplines beginning in 2007. The overriding objective of MOC is to improve the quality of health care through diplomate-initiated learning and quality improvement. The four component parts to the MOC process are: Part I: Professional standing, Part II: Evidence of life long learning and periodic self-assessment, Part III: Cognitive expertise, and Part IV: Evaluation of performance in practice (with the latter being the focus of this paper). The key components of Part IV require a physicist-based response to demonstrate commitment to practice quality improvement (PQI) and progress in continuing individual competence in practice. Diplomates of radiologic physics must select a project to be completed over the ten-year cycle that potentially can improve the quality of the diplomate's individual or systems practice and enhance the quality of care. Five categories have been created from which an individual radiologic physics diplomate can select one required PQI project: (1) Safety for patients, employees, and the public, (2) accuracy of analyses and calculations, (3) report turnaround time and communication issues, (4) practice guidelines and technical standards, and (5) surveys (including peer review of self-assessment reports). Each diplomate may select a project appropriate for an individual

  20. SU-E-E-01: ABR Diagnostic Radiology Core Exam: Was Our Redesigned Physics Course Successful in Teaching Physics to Radiology Residents?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanal, K; Hoff, M; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D; Stewart, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to evaluate the effectiveness of our two year physics course in preparing radiology residents for the American Board of Radiology (ABR) diagnostic radiology exam. Methods: We designed a new two-year physics course that integrates radiology clinical content and practice and is primarily based on the AAPM curriculum and RSNA/AAPM physics modules. Biweekly classes focus on relevant concepts from assigned reading and use audience response systems to encourage participation. Teaching efficiency is optimized through lecturer rotations of physicists, radiologists, and guest speakers. An emphasis is placed on clinical relevance by requiring lab work and providing equipment demonstrations. Periodic quiz were given during the course. The course website was also redesigned for usability, and physics review lectures were conducted two weeks before the board exam to refresh key concepts. At the completion of our first two-year course, we conducted a confidential evaluation of the faculty and course. The evaluation assessed metrics such as overall organization, clinical relevance of content, and level of difficulty, with a rating scale from poor to excellent. Results: Our evaluation indicated that the redesigned course provided effective board exam preparation, with most responses between good and excellent. There was some criticism on the course length and on chronological discontinuity, but the review lectures were appreciated by the residents. All of our residents passed the physics component of the ABR exam with scores exceeding the minimum passing score by a significant margin. Conclusion: The course evaluation and board exam results indicate that our new two-year course format provides valuable board exam preparation. This is possible thanks to the time and effort taken by the physics faculty on ensuring the residents get quality physics education

  1. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  2. RCOP: Research Center for Optical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibi, Bagher M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    During the five years since its inception, Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) has excelled in the goals stated in the original proposal: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, there have been 16 Bachelors degrees and 9 Masters degrees awarded to African American students working in RCOP during the last five years. RCOP has also provided research experience to undergraduate and high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been instrumental in the development of the Ph.D. program in physics which is in its fourth year at Hampton. There are currently over 40 graduate students in the program and 9 African American graduate students, working in RCOP, that have satisfied all of the requirements for Ph.D. candidancy and are working on their dissertation research. At least three of these students will be awarded their doctoral degrees during 1997. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. During the first five years of existence, RCOP researchers have generated well over $3 M in research funding that directly supports the Center. Close ties with NASA Langley and NASA Lewis have been established, and collaborations with NASA scientists, URC's and other universities as well as with industry have been developed. This success is evidenced by the rate of publishing research results in refereed journals, which now exceeds that of the goals in the original proposal (approx. 2 publications per faculty per year). Also, two patents have been awarded to RCOP scientists.

  3. Characterization of X-ray fields at the center for devices and radiological health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerra, F. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This talk summarizes the process undertaken by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) for establishing reference x-ray fields in its accredited calibration laboratory. The main considerations and their effects on the calibration parameters are discussed. The characterization of fields may be broken down into two parts: (1) the initial setup of the calibration beam spectra and (2) the ongoing measurements and controls which ensure consistency of the reference fields. The methods employed by CDRH for both these stages and underlying considerations are presented. Uncertainties associated with the various parameters are discussed. Finally, the laboratory`s performance, as evidenced by ongoing measurement quality assurance results, is reported.

  4. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center advanced part phase response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, B.

    1997-01-01

    Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response actions are carried out in Advance Party and Main Party phases of deployment. Response activities are initiated by a FRMAC Home Team prior to and during Advance Party deployment, with Home Team support continuing until the FRMAC Main Party is fully deployed. Upon arrival at the incident scene, the Advance Party establishes communications with other federal, state, and local response organizations, Following an Advance Party Meeting with these response organizations, FRMAC begins formulation of an initial monitoring and sampling plan, in coordination with the jurisdictional state and the Lead Federal Agency, and initiates detailed logistical arrangements for Main Party deployment and operations

  5. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  6. Text Simplification Using Consumer Health Vocabulary to Generate Patient-Centered Radiology Reporting: Translation and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qenam, Basel; Kim, Tae Youn; Carroll, Mark J; Hogarth, Michael

    2017-12-18

    12% of the unmapped concepts, whereas the remaining six concepts (6%, 12/97) were physiological descriptions. The rate of lexical similarity between the CHV-preferred terms and the terms in the radiology reports was approximately 72.6%. The CHV covered a high percentage of concepts found in the radiology reports, but unmapped concepts are associated with areas that are commonly found in radiology reporting. CHV terms also showed a high percentage of lexical similarity with terms in the reports, which contain a myriad of medical jargon. This suggests that many CHV terms might not be suitable for lay consumers who would not be facile with radiology-specific vocabulary. Therefore, further patient-centered content changes are needed of the CHV to increase its usefulness and facilitate its integration into consumer-oriented applications. ©Basel Qenam, Tae Youn Kim, Mark J Carroll, Michael Hogarth. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 18.12.2017.

  7. Study of physical, chemical and radiological characteristic of thermal water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labidi, Saleem

    2004-01-01

    Hydrotherapy is an activity during which the practitioner is exposed to natural ionising radiation. Radon from deep geological layers constitutes the praincipal irradiation factor for the worker and the patient. The study of radiological impact requires specific measurements that should be compared with international commission of radiological protection (ICRP) recommendations. The objective of this study is to estimate the health risk for employees and patients in hydrotherapy spas in tunisia, by calculating the annual effective dose within the diffrent sites, to identify the sites that could present a hasard from radon and to establish a protection scheme for on workers in these spas. This study is performed inside of the tunisian thermal spas. It consists in separating 226 Ra and measuring its concentration in the thermal water of each spa and then, determining the radon concentration with solid state track detectors (SSTD) chosen for their sensitivity to alpha particles. The dose assessment results show that the estimates values were lower than the ICRP recommendations. In addition, the effective doses received by the workers are greater than those received by the patients due to the longer exposure time for the workers. (author). 79 refs 6)

  8. Herbert M. Parker: Publications and contributions to radiological and health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.; Baalman, R.W.; Bair, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    For more than a half century, Herbert M. Parker was a leading force in radiological physics. As a scientist, he was codeveloper of a systematic dosimetry scheme for implant therapy and the innovative proposer of radiological units with unambiguous physical and biological bases. He made seminal contributions to the development of scientifically based radiation protection standards and, as an administrator and manager as well as scientist, helped the Hanford Laboratories to achieve preeminance in several areas, including radiation biology, radioactive waste disposal, and environmental radioactivity. This volume brings together, sometimes from obscure sources, his works

  9. Physics and radiology for nursing staff. 3. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goretzki, G.

    1984-01-01

    As nurses working in hospitals and surgeries as well as other assistants regularly operate technical equipment, it is essential to explain the physical basics in a form which is comprehensible to them. The author has managed to give a very clear portrayal of each area of physics with close reference to its application in medicine, partly with the use of simplified models. His portrayal extends from the make-up of the material to atomic and nuclear physics and covers mechanics, heat and electricity theory, optics and acoustics. The explanation is completed by sections on radiography and radiation protection. (orig.) [de

  10. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Williams, D; DiSantis, D; Hardy, P; Oates, M [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  11. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Williams, D; DiSantis, D; Hardy, P; Oates, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  12. The Atomic Physics Center of Toulouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, Daniel.

    The research program was concerned with the aerosol and atmospheric exchange physics and, in atomic physics essentially with: atomic collisions, postluminescence in gases, discharges in gases at medium and high pressure, the electric arc, dielectric physics, and radiation transport in matter [fr

  13. Physical bases of radiology. Diagnosis and therapy. Bases fisicas da radiologia. Diagnostico e terapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaff, L A.M. [Instituto de Radioterapia Osvaldo Cruz, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1979-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in the book: basic notions of nuclear physics; X-rays; X-or gamma radiation absorption by the matter; ionizing radiation measurement; qualities of X-rays; measurement of the absorbed energy - dose; physical parameters of radiotherapy; isodose curves; irradiation fields; schemes of treatment; teletherapy machines; radiotherapy with radioisotopes; diagnostic radiology and ionizing radiation protection. Tables relative to the matter treated in the text are furnished.

  14. A new techniques in the physics of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The basic physics involved in the generation of X-rays and in the energy dependence of their interaction with matter are reviewed. Some applications of those ideas in both conventional X-ray imaging and in new imaging techniques are studied. Methods for the optimization of X-ray diagnostic imaging system are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  15. The physics and engineering aspects of radiology. Textbook with questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, T.M.; Heppe, A.; Meier, N.; Fiebich, M.

    1994-01-01

    The textbook formulates and answers the questions encountered in practice by students in the radiology professions, covering the physics and engineering aspects as well as quality control and the relevant requirements set by the X-ray Ordinance and the Quality Assurance Guide issued by the Bundesaerztekammer for diagnostic radiography and computed tomography. The text is accompanied by simplified illustrations that are easy to remember. The book is intended to serve as a textbook for readers preparing for their examination as a medical specialist, or for participants of obligatory courses in radiological protection, or radiographers. Readers will also find it useful as a refresher course. (orig.) [de

  16. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinato, W.; Souza, D. N.

    2011-10-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide "Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment." In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  17. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinato, W.; Souza, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide 'Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment.' In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  18. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, W. [Instituto Federal de Ensino Basico, Tecnico e Tecnologico da Bahia, Av. Amazonas, 1350-45030-220, Zabele, Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 Rosa Elze, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Souza, D.N., E-mail: divanizi@ufs.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 Rosa Elze, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide 'Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment.' In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  19. SU-E-E-06: Teaching Medical Physics in a Radiology Museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To enhance the learning process in the teaching of medical physics by providing a venue to experience the historical equipment and devices of radiology. Methods: We have created a museum by assembling a large collection of equipment and artifacts related to radiology and medical physics. As part of a learning-in-context educational approach, classes for a survey course in medical physics are held in the museum so that students are able to visually and tangibly experience the implements of radiology, while related topics are discussed. The students learn how x-ray equipment and techniques evolved throughout the years and they learn to appreciate the differences and similarities between current x-ray technology and that of the early days. The collection contains items dating from the era of the discovery of x-rays up to recent times and includes gas x-ray tubes, hand-held fluoroscopes, generators, spark-gap kV meters, stereoscopes, glass-plate radiographs, a photofluorographic unit, wood-interspaced grid, flat-panel detector, linear-accelerator klystron, and brachytherapy radium applicators, as well as an extensive library containing some of the seminal literature of the field so that students can delve deeper into the technology. In addition to the classes, guided tours are provided for radiologic-technology, bioengineering, physics and medical students, as well as group and individual tours for the general public. Results: Student course assessments have consistently included positive expressions of their experience in the museum. Numerous students have volunteered to assist with display preparation and have learned by researching the content. Many individuals have been attracted on a walk-in basis and have expressed a deep curiosity in the technology, with positive feedback. Conclusion: The museum and its artifacts have been invaluable in stimulating interest in the history and technology of medical physics. Students and visitors alike obtain a deeper

  20. SU-E-E-06: Teaching Medical Physics in a Radiology Museum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To enhance the learning process in the teaching of medical physics by providing a venue to experience the historical equipment and devices of radiology. Methods: We have created a museum by assembling a large collection of equipment and artifacts related to radiology and medical physics. As part of a learning-in-context educational approach, classes for a survey course in medical physics are held in the museum so that students are able to visually and tangibly experience the implements of radiology, while related topics are discussed. The students learn how x-ray equipment and techniques evolved throughout the years and they learn to appreciate the differences and similarities between current x-ray technology and that of the early days. The collection contains items dating from the era of the discovery of x-rays up to recent times and includes gas x-ray tubes, hand-held fluoroscopes, generators, spark-gap kV meters, stereoscopes, glass-plate radiographs, a photofluorographic unit, wood-interspaced grid, flat-panel detector, linear-accelerator klystron, and brachytherapy radium applicators, as well as an extensive library containing some of the seminal literature of the field so that students can delve deeper into the technology. In addition to the classes, guided tours are provided for radiologic-technology, bioengineering, physics and medical students, as well as group and individual tours for the general public. Results: Student course assessments have consistently included positive expressions of their experience in the museum. Numerous students have volunteered to assist with display preparation and have learned by researching the content. Many individuals have been attracted on a walk-in basis and have expressed a deep curiosity in the technology, with positive feedback. Conclusion: The museum and its artifacts have been invaluable in stimulating interest in the history and technology of medical physics. Students and visitors alike obtain a deeper

  1. The Ability of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center to Collect and Disseminate Environmental Measurements during Radiological Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marianno, Craig; Essex, James

    2007-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is the United States response organization for radiological emergencies. The FRMAC is structured as an operations center and employs the combined resources of several federal agencies to respond to any disaster resulting in the release of radioactivity. The mission of the FRMAC is to support state and local authorities in the gathering of environmental data using an array of survey equipment ranging from alpha probes, beta/gamma probes, and high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectroscopy to the gathering of physical samples. Once collected, the data are projected on maps to assist public officials make protective action decisions. In addition to the accumulation of data, it is the legal obligation of the FRMAC to keep archival records of all data points and their actions. During an event, it is conceivable that hundreds to thousands of sample points will be recorded over a relatively short time. It is in the interest of the federal government and public that the information collected be put to the best use as fast as possible. Toward this end, the Remote Sensing Laboratory, working under the direction of the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, is investigating the use of several technologies that will accelerate data flow from field teams to the FRMAC and, finally, distribution of data to decision makers and the public. Not only can finished data products be viewed through the internet, but the actual collection of data via 'real-time' telemetry can be viewed using this same method. Data from the field will be transferred directly to the FRMAC using the MCPD (multi-path communication device). This base station receives the survey information from the field teams via Bluetooth and instantly investigates the best communication pathway to transfer data to the FRMAC. Possible paths include standalone radio, commercial cellular networks (GPRS and CDMA) and satellite

  2. Qualification diploma in radiological and medical physics. Evolution of the initial training of hospital physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammadi, A.

    2009-01-01

    This series of slides presents: - the evolution of the radio-physicists training since its creation (history, 1995-2005 era, 2005-2009 changes); - the qualification diploma in radiological and medical physics (QDRMP - DQPRM in French) in figures (validating services, number of qualified people); - the QDRMP context and goals (strength needs, limited number of candidates); - the means implemented to reach the goals; - the perspectives (increase of students number, continuous training). (J.S.)

  3. Radiological response and dosimetry in physical phantom of head and neck for 3D conformational radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larissa

    2013-01-01

    Phantoms are tools for simulation of organs and tissues of the human body in radiology and radiotherapy. This thesis describes the development, validation and, most importantly, the use of a physical head and neck phantom in radiology and radiotherapy, with the purpose of evaluating dose distribution using Gafchromic EBT2 film in 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy. The work was divided in two stages, (1) development of new equivalent tissues and improvement of the physical phantom, and (2) use of the physical phantom in experimental dosimetry studies. In phase (1) parameters such as mass density, chemical composition of tissues, anatomical and biometric measurements were considered, as well as aspects of imaging by computed tomography (CT) and radiological response representation in Hounsfield Units (HU), which were compared with human data. Radiological experiments of in-phantom simulated brain pathologies were also conducted. All those results matched human-sourced data, therefore the physical phantom is a suitable simulator that may be used to enhance radiological protocols and education in medical imaging. The main objective in phase (2) was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution in a brain tumor simulator inserted inside the head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI), exposed to 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy, for internal dose assessment. Radiation planning was based on CT images of the physical phantom with a brain tumor simulator made with equivalent material. The treatment planning system (TPS), CAT3D software, used CT images and prescribed a dose of 200 cGy, distributed in three fields of radiation, in a T-shaped pattern. The TPS covered the planning treatment volume (PTV) with 97% of the prescribed dose. A solid water phantom and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film were used for calibration procedures, generating a dose response curve as a function of optical density (OD). After calibration and irradiation, the film

  4. Physical Measurement Profile at Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical Measurement Profile at Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center, ... hip circumference in under 35 years and body mass index in under 45 year age groups were ... Comparison with findings in other parts of the world showed that Ethiopians ...

  5. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1990-07-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Fifteen different experiments were run during these 12 months, approximately the same as the previous two years. Brief summaries of each experiment are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 7 refs., 4 tabs

  6. Radiological characterization of practices employed at the Center for the Protection and Hygiene of Radiation (CPHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech Nieves, H.; Callis Fernandez, E.

    1998-01-01

    This work makes the radiological characterization of practices carried out at the CPHR to evaluate dose possible restrictions. The characterization was based on data processed from annual individual doses to which workers were exposed during 1994-1997. This was done in a global way and also for different groups of workers identified (Group of Radioactive Refuses; Secondary laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration; the Laboratory of Environmental Radiological Surveillance and the Group that Evaluates Radiological Safety)

  7. Automated system for the management of the radiological safety in a radiopharmaceutical and labelled compounds production center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador B, Z.H.; Alvarez Builla de Sologuren, E.

    2006-01-01

    The establishment in the Center of Isotopes of Cuba of a managerial quality system in matter of radiological safety Y the accumulated operational experience, its constitute the foundations for the development of a system of management of the radiological safety organically structured, with the application of evaluative techniques of it management Y it integration in an automated system. The Visual Basic 5 platform for the programming of the 'SASR' system is used. The functions of each one of the 11 modules that integrate it are described. With this it can be carried out the registration of the data of the training Y the personnel's authorization, the checkup of the radioactive inventory of the installation, the annual upgrade of the registrations of the individual doses of those workers, the analysis of the state of the available equipment for magnitude to control, the radiological situation of the work positions, the public exposure by the gassy discharges, the experiences of the radiological events, the annual consolidation of the costs of the safety Y the evaluation of indicators Y of tendencies. A computer tool that facilitates the effective management of the radiological safety in a radioactive installation is obtained. (Author)

  8. Radiological physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Methods used for the dosimetry of monoenergetic neutrons in rats yielded information on the γ dose and dose received from scattered radiation during neutron beam exposure. Results are reported from studies on the effects of neutron irradiation on the induction of somatic mutations in Tradescantia and the induction of chromosome aberrations in root tip cells of Vicia faba and Allium cepa. The neutron and photon (x and γ) tissue kermas in free air and absorbed dose in a tissue-equivalent phantom were measured for four energies of monoenergetic neutrons (15.1, 5.5, 2.1, and 0.67 MeV) and a 252 Cf source of fission neutrons. Callibrations were made using a 137 Cs γ source. The accuracy of the various dosemeters used is discussed. An apparatus is described that was constructed for irradiating mammalian cells with beams of charged particles. Methods for the microdosimetry of charged particles and monoenergetic photons (x and γ) are discussed in detail. (U.S.)

  9. Emergency control center of the nuclear Regulatory Authority: a national, regional and international tool to coordinate the response to radiological and nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, Osvaldo; Hernandez, Daniel; Telleria, Diego; Bruno, Hector; Boutet, Luis; Kunst, Juan; Sadaniowski, Ivana; Rey, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the year 1998, with the regulation of the Nuclear Law, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is constituted as the national coordinator of the response in case of nuclear or radiological emergencies. The ARN builds his first operative center installed in his Head quarter in Buenos Aires. Likewise, from the obligations that come with the Convention of Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, the ARN is the National Warning Point and the National Competent Authority. Therefore, the operative capacity of the center needs to be expanded to cover not only the national territory but also its link with the region and the IAEA, as an access point to the International community, as the conventions demand. For the purpose of giving ARN capacities which reflect the state of art at the international level on Nuclear Emergency Centers and warrant that its equipment and technology will be compatible with those abroad (mainly with IAEA), the ARN made an arrangements with Department of Energy of United States, in the framework of an existing bilateral Argentine Foreign Office/US Government agreement (Joint Standing Committee on Nuclear Cooperation). This agreement allows a deep experience exchange, high level specialists support and last generation equipment access. As a result, the center of ARN can be considerate as the most advanced civil nuclear emergency center in the region. This work describes the implementation process of the emergency center and the technical features, like the physical distribution, hardware and software resources, communication equipment, Geographic Information Systems, etc. (author)

  10. Discussion on concepts for radiological dosimetric quantities in the Japan Health Physics Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Oda, Keiji

    2007-01-01

    Many dosimetric quantities have been used for radiation protection purpose. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended protection quantities and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) has introduced operational quantities to provide a reasonable estimate of the protection quantities. Enthusiastic discussions are continuously made on the issues of the dosimetric quantities, such as basic biological data for the definition of these quantities and applicability of the quantities to actual radiation protection practice. At the moment, some changes are being proposed concerning dosimetric quantities in the draft recommendations of ICRP, opened for consultation in recent years. Thus, the Japan Health Physics Society (JHPS) established the Expert Committee on concepts of Dosimetric Quantities used in radiological protection (ECDQ) in April 2005 to reviewed and discuss issues in the dosimetric quantities. (author)

  11. Hotspot health physics codes used as a tool for managing excess risk on radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Alves, Nelson Mendes; Rocha, Joao B.T.; Cruz, Ivana B. Manica da; Santos, Greice F. Fey dos; Machado, Michel Mansur; Rossato, Veronica Venturini; Bauermann, Liliane Freitas

    2008-01-01

    This work is aimed to use the Hotspot Health Physics codes in acute mode in order to estimate the immediate radiological impact associated with high acute radiation doses, which is applied to special target organs such as lung, small intestine wall, and red bone marrow. Organic compounds such as Diphenyl Diselenide (C 6 H 5 Se 2 C 6 H 5 ) and Ebselen (C 13 H 9 NOSe), an antioxidants selenium containing compounds, were used over irradiated phospholipids extracted from chicken yolk eggs, in vitro in order to reduce lipo-peroxidation. Experimental data were measured by Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substance (TBARS) assay which is able to measure the production of oxidative stress in the sample. Experimental data were extrapolated and applied as a reduction factors over equations for cancer excess risk calculation from BEIR V, for helping the decisonmaking process on Radiological Emergency Scenarios. (author)

  12. RSVP radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.; Chaffee, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a relative scale of value for pediatric radiology (RSVPR). Neither the HCFA/ACA Relative Value Scale nor the Workload Measurement System developed by Health and Welfare Canada specifically addressed pediatric radiologic examinations. Technical and professional charges for examinations at Children's Hospital Medical Center were reviewed and compared with time and cost analysis. A scale was developed with chest radiography (PA and lateral views) assigned a value of 1. After review by pediatric radiologic technologists, radiologic administrators, pediatric radiologists, and chairs of departments of children's hospitals, this proposed scale was modified to reflect more accurately relative value components of pediatric radiologic and imaging examinations

  13. Patient-centered Radiology: Where Are We, Where Do We Want to Be, and How Do We Get There?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Mary C; Mathews, Vincent P; Wintermark, Max; Yee, Judy; Brown, Stephen D

    2017-11-01

    Purpose The objectives of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Patient-Centered Radiology Steering Committee survey were to (a) assess RSNA members' general attitudes and experiences concerning patient-centered radiology, with specific attention paid to radiologist-to-patient communication; (b) examine the members' barriers to communicating more directly with patients; and (c) explore their perceptions of how such barriers can be overcome. Materials and Methods A total of 5999 radiologists were invited by e-mail to complete an anonymous electronic survey developed by the Steering Committee and the RSNA Department of Research. Participants were asked to identify aspects of patient-centered care important to their practice, report on their interactions with patients, and share their opinions on radiologist-patient communication. Statistical analyses were performed by using the χ 2 test and analysis of variance. Results The response rate was 12% (n = 694, 109 invitations were undeliverable). Most respondents (89%, 611 of 684) agreed that promoting awareness of the role of radiology in patients' overall health care is important to how they practice. The majority (73%, 421 of 575) reported that time or workload frequently prevented them from communicating directly with patients. The majority (74%, 423 of 572) reported that a personal sense of satisfaction was likely to motivate them to communicate more directly with patients, but many commented that changes to reimbursement and compensation would help them communicate with patients more directly. Conclusion Many radiologists support the concept of communicating more directly with patients but report they are constrained by time or workload. Changes to reimbursement schemes may help mitigate these barriers to one crucial aspect of patient-centered care. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. Conceptual Framework for Physical Protection Against Sabotage Considering Plant-specific Radiological Consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joung Hoon; Yu, Dong Han

    2010-01-01

    According to the Generation IV (Gen IV) Technology Roadmap, Gen IV nuclear energy systems (NESs) should highlight proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) as one of the four goals along with sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. Especially, physical protection (PP) is the typical important characteristic of an NES that impedes the theft of materials suitable for nuclear explosives or radiation dispersal devices (RDD) and the sabotage of facilities and transportation by subnation entities and other non-Host State adversaries. These two subjects have been studied separately. Proliferation is commonly considered as an international concern and the past work on the PR assessments can be found. On the other hands, PP is regarded as a State security concern, much of which is classified and facility-dependent. Recently, more concern has been focused on the PP design and regulation because of rapid environment changes including radiological consequences by internal sabotage and nuclear terrorism by RDDs. The current PP Regulation has been applied intensively to the existing nuclear facilities and could be a possible guidance for the future GEN-IV NESs. This paper first reviews the IAEA guide document, INFCIRC/225, which was accepted as the standard international guideline in the physical protection area. It has been updated several times up to now, and is undergoing another revision. The paper introduces current substantial changes in the document regarding PP including the national nuclear security and sabotage in the nuclear facilities. Then, it presents a conceptual framework for physical protection against sabotage considering plant-specific radiological consequence after malicious acts within certain vital areas. The framework combines the newly developed method of vital area identification, the current PSA level 2 works, and physical protection concepts. This would help to improve a design concept of new physical protection

  15. Conceptual Framework for Physical Protection Against Sabotage Considering Plant-specific Radiological Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joung Hoon; Yu, Dong Han [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    According to the Generation IV (Gen IV) Technology Roadmap, Gen IV nuclear energy systems (NESs) should highlight proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) as one of the four goals along with sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. Especially, physical protection (PP) is the typical important characteristic of an NES that impedes the theft of materials suitable for nuclear explosives or radiation dispersal devices (RDD) and the sabotage of facilities and transportation by subnation entities and other non-Host State adversaries. These two subjects have been studied separately. Proliferation is commonly considered as an international concern and the past work on the PR assessments can be found. On the other hands, PP is regarded as a State security concern, much of which is classified and facility-dependent. Recently, more concern has been focused on the PP design and regulation because of rapid environment changes including radiological consequences by internal sabotage and nuclear terrorism by RDDs. The current PP Regulation has been applied intensively to the existing nuclear facilities and could be a possible guidance for the future GEN-IV NESs. This paper first reviews the IAEA guide document, INFCIRC/225, which was accepted as the standard international guideline in the physical protection area. It has been updated several times up to now, and is undergoing another revision. The paper introduces current substantial changes in the document regarding PP including the national nuclear security and sabotage in the nuclear facilities. Then, it presents a conceptual framework for physical protection against sabotage considering plant-specific radiological consequence after malicious acts within certain vital areas. The framework combines the newly developed method of vital area identification, the current PSA level 2 works, and physical protection concepts. This would help to improve a design concept of new physical protection

  16. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  17. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Involvement and impact on radiology at a kidney stone center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, S.T.; Barbaric, Z.L.; Mindell, H.; Chaussy, C.D.; Fuchs, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    Of 1,222 extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ECSW) procedures performed on 925 patients (600 males, 325 females), 85% were unilateral and 35% were bilateral treatments. Treated were 446 calyceal, 345 pelvic, 172 uretral, and 108 staghorn calculi. The impact of this new technology to the radiology department was studied. An average of 6.3 KUB studies and 1.2 renal US studies were performed per treatment session. Six percent of patients required post-ESWL excretory urography of CT; 10% required percutaneous nephrostomy. Patients with treated staghorn calculi required the most radiologic procedures (34% performed for partial staghorn calculi, 56% for complete staghorn calculi). By comparison, 3%, 8%, and 11% of radiologic procedures were performed for calyceal, pelvic, and ureteral stones, respectively. The impact of ESWL on the radiology department can be substantial. When staghorn calculi are treated by ESWL, a radiologist skilled in interventional techniques is essential

  18. Radiological safety experience in nuclear fuel cycle operations at Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushparaja; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Subramaniam, G.

    2000-01-01

    Activities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, cover nuclear fuel cycle operations based on natural uranium as the fuel. The facilities include: plant for purification and production of nuclear grade uranium metal, fuel fabrication, research reactor operation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management in each stage. Comprehensive radiation protection programmes for assessment and monitoring of radiological impact of these operations, both in occupational and public environment, have been operating in BARC since beginning. These programmes, based on the 1990 ICRP Recommendations as prescribed by national regulatory body, the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), are being successfully implemented by the Health, Safety and Environment Group, BARC. Radiation Hazards Control Units attached to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities provide radiation safety surveillance to the various operations. The radiation monitoring programme consists of measurement and control of external exposures by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), hand-held and installed instruments, and internal exposures by bioassay and direct whole body counting using shadow shield counter for beta gamma emitters and phoswich detector based system for plutonium. In addition, an environmental monitoring programme is in place to assess public exposures resulting from the operation of these facilities. The programme involves analysis of various matrices in the environment such as bay water, salt, fish, sediment and computation of resulting public exposures. Based on the operating experience in these plants, improved educating and training programmes for plant operators, have been designed. This, together with the application of new technologies have brought down individual as well as average doses of occupational workers. The environmental releases remain a small fraction of the authorised limits. The operating health physics experience in some of these facilities is discussed in this paper

  19. Diagnosis of Pediatric Foreign Body Ingestion: Clinical Presentation, Physical Examination, and Radiologic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sink, Jacquelyn R; Kitsko, Dennis J; Mehta, Deepak K; Georg, Matthew W; Simons, Jeffrey P

    2016-04-01

    (1) To describe clinical and radiologic findings in patients with esophageal foreign bodies. (2) To examine the sensitivity and specificity of history, physical examination, and radiologic studies in children with suspected foreign body ingestion. A retrospective cohort study was performed evaluating all children who underwent esophagoscopy for suspected foreign body ingestion at our institution from 2006 to 2013. Five hundred forty-three patients were included (54% male). Average age was 4.7 years (SD = 4.1 years). Foreign bodies were identified on esophagoscopy in 497 cases (92%). Ingestion was witnessed in 23% of cases. Most common presenting symptoms were choking/gagging (49%), vomiting (47%), and dysphagia/odynophagia (42%). Most patients with foreign bodies had a normal exam (76%). Most foreign bodies were radiopaque (83%). In 59% of patients with normal chest radiographs, a foreign body was present. Sensitivity and specificity of 1 or more findings on history, physical examination, and imaging were 99% and 0%, 21% and 76%, and 83% and 100%, respectively. Most patients with esophageal foreign bodies are symptomatic. Although many patients will have a normal physical examination, an abnormal exam should increase suspicion for a foreign body. Most esophageal foreign bodies are radiopaque, but a normal chest radiograph cannot rule out a foreign body. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Use of audio-visual methods in radiology and physics courses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, P

    1987-03-15

    Today's medicine utilizes sophisticated equipment for radiological, biochemical and microbiological investigation procedures and analyses. Hence it is necessary that physicans have adequate scientific and technical knowledge of the apparatus they are using so that the equipment can be used in the most effective way. Partly this knowledge is obtained from science-orientated courses in the preclinical stage of the study program for medical students. To increase the motivation to study science-courses (medical physics) audio-visual methods are used to describe diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the clinical routines.

  1. The use of audio-visual methods in radiology and physics courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, P.

    1987-01-01

    Today's medicine utilizes sophisticated equipment for radiological, biochemical and microbiological investigation procedures and analyses. Hence it is necessary that physicans have adequate scientific and technical knowledge of the apparatus they are using so that the equipment can be used in the most effective way. Partly this knowledge is obtained from science-orientated courses in the preclinical stage of the study program for medical students. To increase the motivation to study science-courses (medical physics) audio-visual methods are used to describe diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the clinical routines. (orig.)

  2. Radiological protection and routinary controls of an activimeter with a cesium and barium sources in an nuclear medicine center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales L, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the results when carrying out the routine controls in a Deluxe Isotope (Calibrator II) equipment, with some sources of Cesium 137 and Barium 133, in a Nuclear Medicine Center that operates from the year 1983 in a modern one construction inside the Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses (INEN) are shown. Taking in account the Radiological Protection measures to verify if the equipment responds to the personnel's demands in the measurements of activities of the diverse radionuclides that are used in different types of exams that are carried out in this Nuclear Medicine Center are the objectives of this work. This Center was equipped initially with donated equipment by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with those that it develops assistance, educational works and of research, giving services to patients of the INEN and other public and private medical centers. (Author)

  3. Physical dose reconstruction in case of radiological accidents: an asset for the victims' management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, Christelle; Trompier, Francois; Clairand, Isabelle; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    In most cases of radiological accidents caused by an external source, the irradiation is heterogeneous, even for a whole body irradiation. Therefore, more than a whole body dose, estimating the dose distribution in the victim's organism is essential to assess biological damages. This dose distribution can be obtained by physical dosimetric reconstruction methods. The laboratory has developed several techniques based on experimental and numerical dose reconstruction and retrospective dosimetry by ESR in order to assess as accurately as possible and as quickly as possible the dose received and especially its distribution throughout the organism so that the physicians may fine tune their diagnosis and prescribe the most suitable treatment. These last years, these techniques were applied several times and each time the results obtained proved to be essential for the physicians in charge of the victims in order to define the therapeutic strategy. This article proposes a review of the physical dose reconstructions performed in the laboratory for recent radiological accidents focusing on the complementarity of the methods and the gain for the victims' management. (author)

  4. Emergency radiology and mass casualty incidents-report of a mass casualty incident at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Ferdia; Linnau, Ken; Mitchell, Steve; Roberge, Eric; Nguyen, Quynh; Robinson, Jeffrey; Lehnert, Bruce; Gross, Joel

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this article are to describe the events of a recent mass casualty incident (MCI) at our level 1 trauma center and to describe the radiology response to the event. We also describe the findings and recommendations of our radiology department after-action review. An MCI activation was triggered after an amphibious military vehicle, repurposed for tourist activities, carrying 37 passengers, collided with a charter bus carrying 45 passengers on a busy highway bridge in Seattle, WA, USA. There were 4 deaths at the scene, and 51 patients were transferred to local hospitals following prehospital scene triage. Nineteen patients were transferred to our level 1 trauma center. Eighteen casualties arrived within 72 min. Sixteen arrived within 1 h of the first patient arrival, and 1 casualty was transferred 3 h later having initially been assessed at another hospital. Eighteen casualties (94.7 %) underwent diagnostic imaging in the emergency department. Of these 18 casualties, 15 had a trauma series (portable chest x-ray and x-ray of pelvis). Whole-body trauma computed tomography scans (WBCT) were performed on 15 casualties (78.9 %), 12 were immediate and performed during the initial active phase of the MCI, and 3 WBCTs were delayed. The initial 12 WBCTs were completed in 101 min. The mean number of radiographic studies performed per patient was 3 (range 1-8), and the total number of injuries detected was 88. The surge in imaging requirements during an MCI can be significant and exceed normal operating capacity. This report of our radiology experience during a recent MCI and subsequent after-action review serves to provide an example of how radiology capacity and workflow functioned during an MCI, in order to provide emergency radiologists and response planners with practical recommendations for implementation in the event of a future MCI.

  5. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification

  6. Biodosimetry versus physical dosimetry for emergency dose assessment following large-scale radiological exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Sholom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Existing data on intercomparisons involving biodosimetry or physical dosimetry methods are analyzed and the results interpreted regarding their efficacy in triage in emergency dosimetry following mass casualty radiological events. The biodosimetry technique examined is dicentric chromosome aberrations (DCA). The physical dosimetry techniques include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of biological material (teeth) and physical material (smartphone screen glass), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of electronic components (surface mount resistors) from mobile phones. Issues relating to calibration and interpretation of the data are discussed. An important conclusion of the analysis is that more research is critically needed to interpret the efficacy of the various methods. Included in this needed research are intercomparisons of the various methods in controlled experiments and the need to harmonize protocols. - Highlights: • Utility of bio- and physical dosimetry methods for emergency dosimetry triage. • Analysis of intercomparison data for different bio- and physical dosimetry methods. • The percentage of false positives and false negatives for a simulated IND event. • More research, especially intercomparisons, is required to reduce uncertainties.

  7. A Study on Establishment of Unacceptable Radiological Consequence (URC) for Physical Protection against Sabotage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myungtak; Koh, Moonsung; Lee, Youngwook; Jo, Kwang Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The international community has recommended that a graded approach should be applied to the establishment of the domestic regime for physical protection in accordance with fundamental principle H of the amended Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM) and INFCIRC/225/rev.5. In Korea, Currently, the graded approach to unauthorized removal of nuclear material is divided into three categories (Category Ι, Category ΙΙ, Category ΙΙΙ) based on the IAEA INFCIRC/225/rev.5. Moreover, depending on the categorization of nuclear material, physical protection measures against unauthorized removal are also clearly categorized. But in the case of physical protection against sabotage, the graded approach to the physical protection measures is not applied since Unacceptable Radiological Consequence (URC) for identifying sabotage target and level is not determined. URC can be established based on either dose limit or design limit. The report by Sandia National Lab. in USA specifies that core damage is used for URC. Calculation of an exact dose is based on various assumptions and processes and subsequently increases uncertainty. Therefore, using design limit for decreasing uncertainty is more effective than using dose limit. In order to apply the graded approach to physical protection against sabotage, we have taken into Fundamental principle H : Physical protection requirements should be based on a graded approach, taking into account the current evaluation of the threat, the relative attractiveness, the nature of the material and potential consequences associated with the unauthorized removal of nuclear material and with the sabotage against nuclear material of nuclear facilities consideration legal and institutional standards on domestic and international radiological consequences and intended to provide a reference for the URC establishment by the State. The study on various standards led to the conclusion that each value has advantages and

  8. The physics and engineering aspects of radiology.. Textbook with questions and answers. 2. enl. and rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, T.M.; Heppe, A.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have chosen the form of questions and answers derived from practice in order to present and explain the fundamental physics and engineering aspects of radiology. The second, completely revised edition of the textbook has been updated so as to include recent legislation and the guidelines for specialized medical education and training for specialists in diagnostic radiology. One new chapters added deals with the diagnostic method of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the chapters on computed tomography (CT), digital radiography and ultrasonography have been enlarged to include recent developments. The text is accompanied by illustrations that are easy to remember, showing the typical aspects and information, and the chapter containing and discussing diagnostic images has likewise been enlarged by representative CT and MRI images. The book is intended for readers preparing for their examination as specialists, for participants of courses in radiological protection, radiological medical technicians or medical students, and may also serve as a refresher course. (orig./CB) [de

  9. Evaluation and assessment methodology, standards, and procedures manual of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, K.C.; Burson, Z.G.; Smith, J.M.; Blanchard, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, the U.S. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan authorises the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to co-ordinate the Federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities, and is comprised of representatives from several Federal agencies and Department of Energy contractors who provide assistance to the state(s) and Lead Federal Agency. The Evaluation and Assessment (E and A) Division of the FRMAC is responsible for receiving, storing, and interpreting environmental surveillance data to estimate the potential health consequences to the population in the vicinity of the accident site. The E and A Division has commissioned the preparation of a methodology and procedures manual which will result in a consistent approach by Division members in carrying out their duties. The first edition of this manual is nearing completion. In this paper, a brief review of the structure of the FRMAC is presented, with emphasis on the E and A Division. The contents of the E and A manual are briefly described, as are future plans for its expansion. (author)

  10. Challenges in defining a radiologic and hydrologic source term for underground nuclear test centers, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.

    1995-06-01

    The compilation of a radionuclide inventory for long-lived radioactive contaminants residual from nuclear testing provides a partial measure of the radiologic source term at the Nevada Test Site. The radiologic source term also includes potentially mobile short-lived radionuclides excluded from the inventory. The radiologic source term for tritium is known with accuracy and is equivalent to the hydrologic source term within the saturated zone. Definition of the total hydrologic source term for fission and activation products that have high activities for decades following underground testing involves knowledge and assumptions which are presently unavailable. Systematic investigation of the behavior of fission products, activation products and actinides under saturated or Partially saturated conditions is imperative to define a representative total hydrologic source term. This is particularly important given the heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides within testing centers. Data quality objectives which emphasize a combination of measurements and credible estimates of the hydrologic source term are a priority for near-field investigations at the Nevada Test Site

  11. Astrophysics related programs at center for underground physics (CUP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeongduk

    2018-04-01

    We are developing experimental programs related to particle astrophysics at the Center for Underground Physics (CUP); searching for neutrino-less double beta decay (0νββ) of 100Mo nuclei and sterile neutrinos in the mass range of eV using reactor neutrinos. Expected sensitivities of AMoRE double beta decay experiment and the results from recent NEOS experiment are described. Utilizing the facilities for ultra-low radioactivity measurement at the center, we are planning to measure the decay of 180mTa which is important to the nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei.

  12. Georgia Tech video-based MS program in health physics/radiological engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Kahn, B.

    1991-01-01

    For the past several years, the health physics/radiation protection field has experienced a significant shortage of qualified professionals. The shortage is expected to continue for foreseeable future given the continued demand by both nuclear and medical facilities and the expected growth in the areas of waste management and environmental remediation. In response to such a shortage, beginning in the fall of 1984, Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) established a video-based instruction program that enables professionals in the nuclear field to earn a master of science degree in health physics/radiological engineering while working at a distant nuclear facility. The admission criteria and curricular requirements for the program are identical to those for the resident (on-campus) students (except that weekly attendance at departmental seminars is excused). The program is designed for students with undergraduate degrees in health physics, engineering, or appropriate sciences such as physics, chemistry, or biology. A total of 50 quarter credit hours is required, so that a student who takes one course per quarter can complete the program in four years

  13. New Mexico Center for Particle Physics: Studies of fundamental interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The New Mexico Center/UNM group research program includes the CDF experiment at Fermilab and the SDC experiment at the SSC. In both experiments the UNM group research focuses on silicon strip tracking systems. The present research goals are to develop and utilize precision silicon tracking to increase significantly the physics reach of the Tevatron, and to make possible the study of high-P t physics at the SSC. The search for the t-quark in CDF is the primary goal of the upcoming Tevatron runs. This Progress Report summarizes our research accomplishments from the last year

  14. New Mexico center for particle physics: Studies of fundmental interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research program in the New Mexico Center during the last year and presents our program of proposed research for the next year. The majority of the New Mexico Center group's research involves the CDF experiment at the Tevatron pp collider at Fermilab. Our group is a leader in all of the SVX vertex detector upgrades for CDF. These vertex detectors are of critical importance to the pursuit of our physics interests at the Tevatron; they are also an imposing instrumentation challenge. Our group is also deeply involved in several CDF B-physics analyses and in an exotics search. Our research also includes important contributions to R ampersand D for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

  15. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Harrison H; Myers, Kyle J; Caucci, Luca

    2014-08-17

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon.

  16. Quality control test solutions for diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and health physics with PTW equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froescher, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In 1922 PTW-Freiburg was founded to produce and market a revolutionary new electromechanical component for measuring very small electrical charges. Today PTW is the specialist and one of the global market leaders for manufacturing and supplying high-quality products in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy and health physics. The quality control of X-ray images is influenced by a number of parameters. To maintain a consistent performance of X-ray installations, quality checks have to be conducted regularly. PTW offers a variety of diagnostic test tools for different X-ray devices, and therefore to reduce patient exposure and costs for X-ray departments. PTW's 'Code of Practice' defines in an easy and compact way how to perform quality control measurements on different diagnostic X-ray installations. The necessary equipment for measuring main parameters as well as acceptable limits are mentioned accordingly. The 'Code of Practice' bases on actual standards.

  17. Diagnostic radiology physics: A handbook for teachers and students. Endorsed by: American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dance, D. R. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford (United Kingdom); Christofides, S. [New Nicosia General Hospital (Cyprus); Maidment, A. D.A. [University of Pennsylvania (United States); McLean, I. D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ng, K. H. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-09-15

    This publication is written for students and teachers involved in programmes that train medical physicists for work in diagnostic radiology. It provides, in the form of a syllabus, a comprehensive overview of the basic medical physics knowledge required for the practice of modern diagnostic radiology. This makes it particularly useful for graduate students and residents in medical physics programmes. The material presented in the publication has been endorsed by the major international organizations and is the foundation for academic and clinical courses in both diagnostic radiology physics and in emerging areas such as imaging in radiotherapy.

  18. The Computational Physics Program of the national MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Since June 1974, the MFE Computer Center has been engaged in a significant computational physics effort. The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generations of supercomputers. The Computational Physics Group has been involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to tokamaks and compact toroids. A third area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code; this work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence have been under examination, with the hope of being able to explain anomalous transport. Also, we are collaborating in an international effort to evaluate fully three-dimensional linear stability of toroidal devices. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers. A summary of these programs are included in this paper. 6 tabs

  19. Use of bioindicators in the environmental radiological surveillance of Mexican Nuclear Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaso P, M.I.; Segovia, N.; Herrera, T.; Perez S, E.; Cervantes, M.L.; Quintero, E.; Palacios, J.; Acosta, E.; Segovia, N.; Herrera, T.

    1998-01-01

    Cs-137 and K-40 concentrations were determined in soil samples and wild eatable mushrooms at the forest ecosystem of Mexican Nuclear Center and its surrounding area. The evaluation was carried out with a low bottom gamma spectroscopy system including a high-purity Ge detector (HPGe). The local species that showed greater soil-mushroom transference factor, for Cs-137, were Clavariadelphus truncatus, Cortinarius caerulescenc, Gomphus floccosus and Lyophyllum decastes. The Cs-137 levels obtained in the mushroom samples of Nuclear Center, were in general slightly lower than those of adjacent places, which indicates that this Center is not polluting the atmosphere with such radionuclide. (Author)

  20. Inappropriateness of cardiovascular radiological imaging testing; a tertiary care referral center study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Carpeggiani

    Full Text Available AIMS: Radiological inappropriateness in medical imaging leads to loss of resources and accumulation of avoidable population cancer risk. Aim of the study was to audit the appropriateness rate of different cardiac radiological examinations. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With a retrospective, observational study we reviewed clinical records of 818 consecutive patients (67 ± 12 years, 75% males admitted from January 1-May 31, 2010 to the National Research Council - Tuscany Region Gabriele Monasterio Foundation cardiology division. A total of 940 procedures were audited: 250 chest x-rays (CXR; 240 coronary computed tomographies (CCT; 250 coronary angiographies (CA; 200 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI. For each test, indications were rated on the basis of guidelines class of recommendation and level of evidence: definitely appropriate (A, including class I, appropriate, and class IIa, probably appropriate, uncertain (U, class IIb, probably inappropriate, or inappropriate (I, class III, definitely inappropriate. Appropriateness was suboptimal for all tests: CXR (A = 48%, U = 10%, I = 42%; CCT (A = 58%, U = 24%, I = 18%; CA (A = 45%, U = 25%, I = 30%; PCI (A = 63%, U = 15%, I = 22%. Top reasons for inappropriateness were: routine on hospital admission (70% of inappropriate CXR; first line application in asymptomatic low-risk patients (42% of CCT or in patients with unchanged clinical status post-revascularization (20% of CA; PCI in patients either asymptomatic or with miscellaneous symptoms and without inducible ischemia on non-invasive testing (36% of inappropriate PCI. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Public healthcare system--with universal access paid for with public money--is haemorrhaging significant resources and accumulating avoidable long-term cancer risk with inappropriate cardiovascular imaging prevention.

  1. Physical and Radiological Characterisation of Measuring Sites Within The Croatian Gamma Dose Rate Early Warning Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cindro, M.; Stepisnik, M.; Pinezic, D.; Sinka, D.; Skanata, D.

    2016-01-01

    The work described in this paper was done within the EU funded project 'Upgrading the systems for the on- and off-line monitoring of radioactivity in the environment in Croatia in regular and emergency situations'. The existing system of early warning in case of nuclear accident in Croatia (SPUNN), managed by the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety, includes 33 stations for measuring ambient gamma dose rate (GDR). The aim of the project was to determine appropriate correction factors that will allow the results from this network to be used not only for timely warning in case of nuclear accident but also in routine environmental monitoring to determine the background radiation. Additionally, in the case of fresh deposition due to radioactive contamination, the corrected values are better suited to be used as an input for support systems for decision making in the case of emergency (such as RODOS), as well as for international data exchange (EURDEP) or automatic interpolation and mapping of radiological data (INTAMAP). The response of the individual probes to natural or accidental radiation mostly depends on the geometry or topography, surrounding buildings, vegetation (trees) and the type of soil beneath the detector. In the case of measuring the dose rate, objects such as buildings act as a shield against gamma radiation and limit the field of vision of the detector. If we want to have representative values that can be compared with other measuring sites, it is clear that we need to define standard conditions that each location has to meet. This is true not only for the probes within the same network, but can also be applied more broadly, at the international level, since data exchange mechanisms for GDR data already exist across Europe. The response of each probe is not determined only by the physical features, it is also important to understand the radiological characteristics of the site. Radiological characterization was performed through

  2. Joint CDRH (Center for Devices and Radiological Health) and state quality-assurance surveys in nuclear medicine: Phase 2 - radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, D.R.; Evans, C.D.

    1986-08-01

    The report discusses survey results on aspects of the quality assurance of radio-pharmaceuticals from 180 nuclear-medicine facilities in the United States. Data were collected from facilities in 8 states. Demographic information about nuclear-medicine operations and quality-assurance programs was gathered by state radiation-control-program personnel. The data collected from the survey show an incomplete acceptance of quality-assurance practices for radiopharmaceuticals. Most of the facilities in the survey indicated that, because an inferior radiopharmaceutical was prepared so infrequently, they did not believe it was cost-effective to perform extensive quality-assurance testing. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health hopes that the information from the survey will stimulate nuclear-medicine professionals and their organizations to encourage appropriate testing of all radiopharmaceuticals

  3. Center of thermal-physical data for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobkov, V P; Blokhin, A I; Ivashkevich, A A; Katan, I B; Peskov, O L; Pan' kov, V M; Savanin, N K; Sal' nikova, O V; Khrushcheva, E N; Kirova, T S

    1982-09-01

    The specific features of a specialized Center of thermal-physical data (CTD) are considered. The center has been created for data acquisition, storage and analysis and working out recommendations on the following NPP thermal physics sections: hydrodynamics of channel flows (monophase laminar and turbulent, and two-phase flows, hydrodynamic vibrations) heat exchange in NPP elements, thermohydraulic calculations of nuclear reactor cores, heat exchangers, steam generators and NPP cooling system elements, coolant properties (water and steam, liquid metals and gases). On the CTD data base an automated system ASKhOD, oriented to EC computer, is created. The ASKhoD software ensures data allocation on magnetic tapes or other carriers, automated renewal and data relocation, data search in compliance with a specified set of signs, data processing for the purpose of their estimation or obtaining optimized model constants. Different publications in home and foreign magazines, conference, seminar materials, organization preprints serve as the data sources used for the formation of the ASKhOD data base.

  4. Center of thermal-physical data for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobkov, V.P.; Blokhin, A.I.; Ivashkevich, A.A.; Katan, I.B.; Peskov, O.L.; Pan'kov, V.M.; Savanin, N.K.; Sal'nikova, O.V.; Khrushcheva, E.N.; Kirova, T.S.

    1982-01-01

    The specific features of a specialized Center of thermal-physical data (CTD) are considered. The center has been created for data acquisition, storage and analysis and working out recommendations on the following NPP thermal physics sections: hydrodynamics of channel flows (monophase laminar and turbulent, and two-phase flows, hydrodynamic vibrations) heat exchange in NPP elements, thermohydraulic calculations of nuclear reactor cores, heat exchangers, steam generators and NPP cooling system elements, coolant properties (water and steam, liquid metals and gases). On the CTD data base an automated system ASKhOD, oriented to EC computer, is created. The ASKhoD software ensures data allocation on magnetic tapes or other carriers, automated renewal and data relocation, data search in compliance with a specified set of signs, data processing for the purpose of their estimation or obtaining optimized model constants. Different publications in home and foreign magazines, conference, seminar materials, organization preprints serve as the data sources used for the formation of the ASKhOD data base

  5. Applied Physics Research at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, D. S.; Hunt, A. W.; Chouffani, K.; Wells, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    The Idaho Accelerator Center, founded in 1996 and based at Idaho State University, supports research, education, and high technology economic development in the United States. The research center currently has eight electron linear accelerators ranging in energy from 6 to 44 MeV with the latter linear accelerator capable of picosecond pulses, a 2 MeV positive-ion Van de Graaff, a 4 MV Nec tandem Pelletron, and a pulsed-power 8 k A, 10 MeV electron induction accelerator. Current research emphases include, accelerator physics research, accelerator based medical isotope production, active interrogation techniques for homeland security and nuclear nonproliferation applications, non destructive testing and materials science studies in support of industry as well as the development of advanced nuclear fuels, pure and applied radio-biology, and medical physics. This talk will highlight three of these areas including the production of the isotopes 99 Tc and 67 Cu for medical diagnostics and therapy, as well as two new technologies currently under development for nuclear safeguards and homeland security - namely laser Compton scattering and the polarized photofission of actinides

  6. Aerial radiological survey of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and surrounding area, Princeton, New Jersey. Date of survey: August 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, P.A.

    1981-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during August 1980 to radiometrically survey a 10.4 km 2 area centered on the future site of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) located near Princeton, New Jersey. All detected radionuclides were consistent with normal background emitters and no man-made gamma emitters were detected. Average aerial exposure rates normalized to one meter above the ground are presented in the form of an isopleth map

  7. Environmental radiological protection of Bariloche Atomic Center; Proteccion radiologica ambiental del Centro Atomico Bariloche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, Pablo A.; Levanon, Izhar S., E-mail: andresp@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: levanon@cab.cnca.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Division Proteccion Radiologica

    2013-07-01

    This plan of monitoring radiological environmental routine fits on environmental policy of CNEA, satisfying national and international recommendations for licensed facilities. Sampling matrices are related to direct routes of exposure: air and water (river, lake, sediments, drinking water). Soil samples are also analyzed for having integrated matrices. They are considered as minimum three points of measurement: a white point (water or winds up), a point of maximum (water or winds down) and a point corresponding to the location of the individual representative or a point of public interest. Measurements in air estimate KERMA rate with thermoluminescent dosimeters, bi-monthly, and concentrations of particulate material and aerosols. For water samples (monthly), soil and sediments (quarterly), radionuclides that have download limits are analyzed, according to its importance in the dosages produced in the representative individual. In these cases artificial radionuclides using gamma spectrometry, beta total and Sr-90 by radiochemical techniques if the value of total screening (1 Bq/L) is exceeded. Foods are not included because no possible matrices were detected, either by their distance. by located not predominant wind direction. They are however still looking for milk producers that fulfills the minimum requirements.The data collected are compared with environmental baselines to set trends that might point to future significant changes in the environment during the life of the facilities. So far it was not observed significant differences with respect to baseline values.

  8. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Savina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support for fundamental and applied scientific research on a competitive and non-competitive basis was given. The analysis of the obtained data indicated that a multi-channeling in off-budget funding was formed. It also showed to some extent a situation at the open market of grants in the field of medical radiology, radiobiology, and radiation epidemiology among leading investors in intellectual products.

  9. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once

  10. The Detector Physics and Applications Center - DePAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plothow-Besch, H.; Besch, H.-J.; Fiorini, C.; Grupen, C.; Hassard, J.; Longoni, A.; Walenta, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    A new project, the 'Detector Physics and Applications Center (DePAC)', is presented. DePAC is a general detector and sensor database, which is not application specific, on the Internet. DePAC collects and explains the physics, the technology and the application of a wide range of radiation detectors. DePAC also collects and describes information about noise problems, front-end electronics, data transfer, processing and storage. DePAC provides short write-ups and source code of all sorts of detector related software depending on availability. DePAC collects useful constants and properties of materials in an exhaustive series of tables and graphs. DePAC also acts as a point of contact for researchers and industry in an interdisciplinary way, e.g. in biology, in medicine, in materials research and in high energy or nuclear physics. Last but not least, DePAC aims to develop also into a virtual lecturing school and serves as a tutorial for students and all interested scientists

  11. The Detector Physics and Applications Center - DePAC

    CERN Document Server

    Plothow-Besch, H; Fiorini, C; Grupen, C; Hassard, J; Longoni, A; Walenta, Albert H

    2001-01-01

    A new project, the 'Detector Physics and Applications Center (DePAC)', is presented. DePAC is a general detector and sensor database, which is not application specific, on the Internet. DePAC collects and explains the physics, the technology and the application of a wide range of radiation detectors. DePAC also collects and describes information about noise problems, front-end electronics, data transfer, processing and storage. DePAC provides short write-ups and source code of all sorts of detector related software depending on availability. DePAC collects useful constants and properties of materials in an exhaustive series of tables and graphs. DePAC also acts as a point of contact for researchers and industry in an interdisciplinary way, e.g. in biology, in medicine, in materials research and in high energy or nuclear physics. Last but not least, DePAC aims to develop also into a virtual lecturing school and serves as a tutorial for students and all interested scientists.

  12. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program: implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security

  13. Strategies in Interventional Radiology: Formation of an Interdisciplinary Center of Vascular Anomalies - Chances and Challenges for Effective and Efficient Patient Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Maliha; Dally, Franz Josef; Schönberg, Stefan O; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wohlgemuth, Walter A

    2017-10-01

    Background  Radiology is an interdisciplinary field dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of numerous diseases and is involved in the development of multimodal treatment concepts. Method  Interdisciplinary case management, a broad spectrum of diagnostic imaging facilities and dedicated endovascular radiological treatment options are valuable tools that allow radiology to set up an interdisciplinary center for vascular anomalies. Results  Image-based diagnosis combined with endovascular treatment options is an essential tool for the treatment of patients with highly complex vascular diseases. These vascular anomalies can affect numerous parts of the body so that a multidisciplinary treatment approach is required for optimal patient care. Conclusion  This paper discusses the possibilities and challenges regarding effective and efficient patient management in connection with the formation of an interdisciplinary center for vascular anomalies with strengthening of the clinical role of radiologists. Key points   · Vascular anomalies, which include vascular tumors and malformations, are complex to diagnose and treat.. · There are far more patients with vascular anomalies requiring therapy than interdisciplinary centers for vascular anomalies - there is currently a shortage of dedicated interdisciplinary centers for vascular anomalies in Germany that can provide dedicated care for affected patients.. · Radiology includes a broad spectrum of diagnostic and minimally invasive therapeutic tools which allow the formation of an interdisciplinary center for vascular anomalies for effective, efficient and comprehensive patient management.. Citation Format · Sadick M, Dally FJ, Schönberg SO et al. Strategies in Interventional Radiology: Formation of an Interdisciplinary Center of Vascular Anomalies - Chances and Challenges for Effective and Efficient Patient Management. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 957 - 966. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New

  14. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described

  15. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1991-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Brief summaries of research experiments are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  16. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993

  17. Significance of radiological diagnosis in complex investigation of necroses of femoral head ossification centers. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegling, C.W.; Endert, G.; Ritter, H.; Schumann, E.

    1984-07-01

    101 scintigraphic investigations and 42 angiograms show that the vascular tamponade is the decisive factor for the beginning of necrosis of the femoral head ossification center. Plain films, scintigraphy and angiography give information of the duration of the disease. Extent and localisation of the circulatory disturbance are important for the prognosis of the disease. From stage classification and prognostic factors the conclusions for therapy can be drawn.

  18. The role of the medical physic on radiologic, hemodynamic and surgery unit at Hospital das Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacelar, A.; Furtado, A.P.A.; Krebs, E.M.; Oliveira, S.S.; Lima, A.A.; Jacques, L.C.; Silveira, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    The activities executed by the medical physic in the radiologic, hemodynamic and surgery unit are presented. Topics such as organization of a radiologic protection project and a quality assurance program, monthly information of the individual doses, sanitary inspection and training of the professionals involved are emphasized. The methodology and results are briefly presented

  19. 50 Years of the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF)

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is in its 50th year of operation. It was commissioned on April 1, 1967 as a collaboration between the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and members of the Medical Research Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It was initially funded as a user facility for radiobiology and radiological physics, concentrating on monoenergetic neutrons. Facilities for irradiation with MeV light charged particles were d...

  20. Microsensors for In-situ Chemical, Physical and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste (73808)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thundat, Thomas G.

    2004-01-01

    Portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors for the characterization and monitoring of transuranic waste, mixed waste, ground water, contaminated soil, and process streams are needed within the DOE complex. A continuation of this basic research program is proposed to study the influence of control of the electrochemical potential of a metallic coating on a microcantilever as a means of developing specific and highly sensitive sensors. Basic research will be needed to understand the influence of variation of electrochemical potential on the bending of cantilevers in an electrolyte solution. Changes in the chemical potential of a metal-electrolyte interface, affected by changing the applied potential, leads to a change in the depletion or accumulation of substances at the interface. This change in the surface excess at the interface is reflected in a change in the interfacial tension, which is sensitively detected as cantilever deflection. Deposition of electroactive heavy metals as well as the adsorption of metal oxide species will be detectable as a cantilever bending. We plan to continue field-testing cantilever sensors at DOE sites as appropriate. Practical sensors for Hg and CrO4 -2 have been developed, and the former has been field tested. A sensor for large poorly hydrated anions (ClO4 -, ReO4 -, TcO4 -) based on a quarternary ammonium SAM coating is under development and will be field tested when appropriate. The advantage of cantilever sensors is that once the basic platform is developed, it can be the basis for a plethora of inexpensive, miniature sensors. This program will take advantage of advances in cantilever technology made by other programs as well

  1. MEMO radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1989-01-01

    This radiology volume is a concise handbook of imaging techniques, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy, albeit that the main emphasis is on classic radiology. It offers, for instance, a survey of radiological findings for the most frequent pathological conditions, many overviews of differential diagnosis, a glossary of the technical bases of radiology and so forth. The contents are divided into the following chapters: Physical and biological bases; skeleton; thorax with the subdivisions lungs, heart, mediastinum, and pleura; gastrointestinal tract with the subsections esophagus, small and large intestine; liver; biliary tract; pancreas; retroperitoneal space; kidney; suprarenal glands; bladder; blood vessels, lymph nodes, spleen; mammary glands; female genitals; prostate and scrotum, epididymis and seminal vesicle. (orig./MG) With 23 figs [de

  2. Analysis of complex wind regimes at Kennedy Space Center for radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.E.; Parks, C.R.; Atchison, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    Galileo and Ulysses will be launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during October 1989 and October 1990, respectively. These deep-space probes will contain a radioactive thermoelectric generator as a power source. An accidental breach of the containment vessel housing the generator could cause a leak of radioactive material to the atmosphere. If this occurred, the radioactive cloud would move with the prevailing wind flow pattern and pose a serious health threat to all in its path. Since the KSC/Cape Canaveral (KSC/CC) area of Florida is located in a coastal environment with several different land/water interfaces, complex low-level wind circulation patterns exist throughout the year. Thus, if any transport and diffusion model is to correctly predict the movement of effluent near KSC, it must be able to accurately portray the characteristics of the land/sea breeze flow pattern. To evaluate models used at KSC, the KSC Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (KABLE) has been designed to provide a data set to better define the characteristics of these mesoscale circulations. Data collection for KABLE occurred from November 1, 1988, to October 31, 1989. This paper presents analyses for 1 day during November 1988 that demonstrate the complexity of the local meteorological conditions at KSC/CC. The NUS Corporation has used these data and empirical sea breeze parameters to evaluate their Emergency Dose Assessment System, EMERGE

  3. SPASE: The Connection Among Solar and Space Physics Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, James R.; King, Todd A.; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) project is an international collaboration among Heliophysics (solar and space physics) groups concerned with data acquisition and archiving. Within this community there are a variety of old and new data centers, resident archives, "virtual observatories", etc. acquiring, holding, and distributing data. A researcher interested in finding data of value for his or her study faces a complex data environment. The SPASE group has simplified the search for data through the development of the SPASE Data Model as a common method to describe data sets in the various archives. The data model is an XML-based schema and is now in operational use. There are both positives and negatives to this approach. The advantage is the common metadata language enabling wide-ranging searches across the archives, but it is difficult to inspire the data holders to spend the time necessary to describe their data using the Model. Software tools have helped, but the main motivational factor is wide-ranging use of the standard by the community. The use is expanding, but there are still other groups who could benefit from adopting SPASE. The SPASE Data Model is also being expanded in the sense of providing the means for more detailed description of data sets with the aim of enabling more automated ingestion and use of the data through detailed format descriptions. We will discuss the present state of SPASE usage and how we foresee development in the future. The evolution is based on a number of lessons learned - some unique to Heliophysics, but many common to the various data disciplines.

  4. Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. Section 108 of Public Law 95-604 states that the US Department of Energy (DOE) shall ''select and perform remedial actions at the designated processing sites and disposal sites in accordance with the general standards'' prescribed by the EPA. Regulations governing the required remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites were promulgated by the EPA in 1983 and are contained in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993), Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings. This document describes the radiological and physical parameters for the remedial action of the soil

  5. The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Digital Imaging Network, Picture Archival and Communication System, and Radiology Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldszal, A F; Brown, G K; McDonald, H J; Vucich, J J; Staab, E V

    2001-06-01

    In this work, we describe the digital imaging network (DIN), picture archival and communication system (PACS), and radiology information system (RIS) currently being implemented at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH). These systems are presently in clinical operation. The DIN is a redundant meshed network designed to address gigabit density and expected high bandwidth requirements for image transfer and server aggregation. The PACS projected workload is 5.0 TB of new imaging data per year. Its architecture consists of a central, high-throughput Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data repository and distributed redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) servers employing fiber-channel technology for immediate delivery of imaging data. On demand distribution of images and reports to clinicians and researchers is accomplished via a clustered web server. The RIS follows a client-server model and provides tools to order exams, schedule resources, retrieve and review results, and generate management reports. The RIS-hospital information system (HIS) interfaces include admissions, discharges, and transfers (ATDs)/demographics, orders, appointment notifications, doctors update, and results.

  6. Aerial radiological survey of the Feed Materials Production Center and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio. Date of survey: April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Feed Materials Production Center, located near Fernald, Ohio, during the period April 24 to 27, 1985. The survey covered a 70-square-kilometer (27-square-mile) area centered on the plant. The highest exposure rates, in excess of 0.35 milliroentgens per hour (mR/h), were inferred from the data measured directly over the plant. This radiation was due to the presence of nuclides which were consistent with normal plant operations. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates, varying from 6 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), were due to naturally-occurring potassium, uranium, thorium, and daughter products. The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted during the time of the aerial survey, were compared to the aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired at several locations within the survey area. The exposure rate values obtained from these measurements were in agreement with the inferred aerial results. Soil sample results showed several areas just outside the site boundary with slightly elevated amounts of U-238. The levels, however, were well below the detection limit of the aerial system. The only off-site area that showed apparent above background activity in the aerial data was directly west of the storage silos. The symmetric shape of the contours, however, suggests that these elevated levels are due to ''shine'' from material stored on-site in the silos and not to actual off-site contamination. Detailed comparison of the 1985 aerial survey data with a previous survey conducted in 1976 showed no significant change in any area outside the plant boundary. 6 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Genetic damages in radiation workers of radiology centers in Bushehr port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khamisipour

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Unstable genetic aberrations might provide a good marker for assessing genetic damage in populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation.The frequency of these aberrations was estimated in peripheral lymphocytes from hospital workers in Bushehr Port, occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation (54 subjects and age and sex matched controls. A total of 34 (23 males & 11 females subjects had unstable genetic aberrations (50 chromosomal-type & 31 chromatid type but only 7 subjects in control group had unstable genetic aberrations. When compared with controls, exposed workers showed a significant increase in structural chromosomal-type aberrations (p<0.001 OR=11 chromosomal exchange being the most frequent alteration. Chromatid deletion (18 cases and ring chromosome (4 cases were seen only in exposed group. There was no association between smoking status, sex, age, level of education or working years. The increased frequencies of chromosomal damage in radiation workers, indicate conducting cytogenetic analysis in parallel to physical dosimetry in the working place.

  8. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  9. Center of Nuclear Physics Data (CNPD), RFNC-VNIIEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taova, S.

    2011-01-01

    high-precision numerical methods. The procedure of optimum potential automatic search at describing elastic scattering data was implemented and is being under test now. It is planned to present the early calculation results on differential cross sections at the conference 'Nucleus-2011'. The works on obtaining the calculated reaction cross sections with the EMPIRE code are being continued in our Center. The constantly update program version available through the Internet CVN protocol is used. General The report entitled 'Center of Nuclear Physics Data in VNIIEF' was presented last year in Saint-Petersburg at the 60th Meeting on Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear Structure 'Nucleus 2010. Methods of Nuclear Physics for Femto - and Nanotechnologies'. The Center staff takes an active part in preparation of the 61st conference 'Nucleus-2011' which will be held in Sarov, October 10-14, 2011. (author)

  10. Annual report of the Center for Theoretical Physics, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Research on dynamical systems; statistical physics; string theory; field theory; elementary particle physics (QCD, standard model, GUT); plasma physics (inertial and magnetic confinement); astrophysics; and statistical mechanics is presented [fr

  11. Annual report of the Center for Theoretical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Research on dynamical systems; statistical physics; string theory; field theory; elementary particle physics (QCD, standard model, GUT); plasma physics (inertial and magnetic confinement); astrophysics; and statistical mechanics is presented [fr

  12. Upgrading the Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory Towards ISO/IEC 17025: Radiation Standards and Calibration in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Norhayati Abdullah; Shahrul Azlan Azizan; Siti Sara Deraman; Nor Azlin Azraai; Md Khairusalih Md Zin

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of quality control (QC) test tools used in diagnostic radiology is legally required under the Ministry of Health (MOH) requirement. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency is the national focal point for the calibration of quality control test tools used in diagnostic radiology. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory has measurement traceability to primary standard dosimetry laboratory (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)), thus providing an interface between the primary standard dosimetry laboratory and Malaysian hospitals, clinics and license class H holder. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory facility is comprised of a constant potential x-ray system with a capability of 160 kV tube and a series of reference and working standard ion chambers. The stability of reference and working standard ion chambers was measured using strontium-90. Dosimetric instruments used in diagnostic radiology is calibrated in terms of air kerma to comply with an International Code of Practices of dosimetry for example IAEA's Technical Report Series number 457. The new series of standard radiation qualities was established based on ISO/IEC 61267. The measurement of beam homogeneity was measured using film and ion chamber to define the field size at certain distance and kV output was measured using the spectrometer and non-invasive kVp meter. The uncertainties measurement was determined with expended uncertainties to a level of confidence of approximately 95% (coverage factor k=2). This paper describes the available facility and the effort of the Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory to upgrade the laboratory towards ISO/IEC 17025. (author)

  13. [History of the development of radiodiagnosis at the Russian Research Center of Roentgenology and Radiology: on the occasion of the 90th anniversary of its foundation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodkiĭ, V A; Kotliarov, P M; Nudnov, N V

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the history of the Russian Research Center of Roentgenology and Radiology set up 90 years ago, the main advances of the researchers of the Institute in roentgenology and radiodiagnosis in historical perspective--from the last century up to the present day. It gives a brief list of the most important procedures and publications on radiodiagnosis, which have been developed and published by the Institute's researchers.

  14. Mortal radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    After defining the concept of 'Radiological accident', statistical data from Radiation Emergency Assistance Center of ORNL (United States of America) are given about the deaths caused by acute irradiation between 1944 and April 24, 1986 -ie, the day before Chernobyl nuclear accident- as well as on the number of deaths caused by the latter. Next the different clinical stages of the Acute Irradiation Syndrome (AIS) as well as its possible treatment are described, and finally the different physical, clinical and biological characteristics linked to the AIS and to its diagnosis and prognosis are discussed. (M.E.L.) [es

  15. Experience to the center of radiations hygiene and protection and Hygiene in the training as regards radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech Nieves, H.; Jove ased, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    The CPHR comes carrying out for several years a group activities among them regular courses for the basic formation as regards radiological protection the personnel with responsibilities as for the security the nuclear facilities. Presently work summary these experiences

  16. Patients as partners in radiology education: an innovative approach to teaching and assessing patient-centered communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Beth A; Sasson, J Pierre; Hinrichs, Peg

    2008-04-01

    Effective communication is essential for high quality care, yet little is known about radiologists' communication with patients, what constitutes "best communication practices," and how best to teach and evaluate it. We piloted educational strategies and an assessment instrument to teach and evaluate radiologists' communication skills. We focused on communication in the diagnostic mammography suite, where patient-radiologist interactions are often intense and stressful. We adapted existing instruments to create a Radiology Communication Skills Assessment Tool (RCSAT). We piloted an educational program that included patients as teachers and raters of interpersonal and communication skills, and implemented a radiology objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). We measured radiology residents' self-assessed skills, confidence and stress, as well as patient-rated communication skills using the RCSAT. Residents' baseline self-assessed communication skills regarding abnormal mammograms were fair, confidence in their communication was minimal, and they found this communication stressful. Overall baseline communication skills, rated by patient-teachers using the RCSAT, were 3.62 on a 5-point scale (1 = poor to 5 = excellent). Analysis of post-OSCE debriefing comments yielded nine themes regarding effective radiology communication, as well as residents' reflections on the communication challenges they experience. The themes were integrated into subsequent RCSAT revisions. Residents' reflections were used to inform teaching workshops. Educational curricula on communication about difficult information can be implemented in radiology training programs. Radiology residents' performance can be assessed using a communication skills assessment tool during standardized patient-teacher encounters. Further research is necessary in this important domain.

  17. Physical Activity in Child-Care Centers: Do Teachers Hold the Key to the Playground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Sherman, Susan N.

    2012-01-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49…

  18. Social Inequalities in Body Weight and Physical Activity: Exploring the Role of Fitness Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Lindsay; Rock, Melanie J.; McElgunn, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Fitness centers are a viable option for physical activity, particularly in climates with significant weather variation. Due to variation in economic and social expressions of exclusivity, fitness centers may have some relation to social inequalities in physical inactivity and related health outcomes; thus, our objective was to explore this…

  19. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification

  20. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  1. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  2. Physical Activity Opportunities Within the Schedule of Early Care and Education Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucca, Stephanie; Hales, Derek; Evenson, Kelly R; Ammerman, Alice; Tate, Deborah F; Berry, Diane C; Ward, Dianne S

    2018-02-01

    Physical activity has many benefits for young children's health and overall development, but few studies have investigated how early care and education centers allot time for physical activity, along with measured individual physical activity levels for indoor/outdoor activities during a typical day. Fifty early care and education centers in central North Carolina participated in 4 full-day observations, and 559 children aged 3-5 years within centers wore accelerometers assessing physical activity during observation days. Observation and physical activity data were linked and analyzed for associations between child activity and type of classroom activity. Children averaged 51 (13) minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity and 99 (18) minutes per day of light physical activity while in child care. Children averaged 6 (10) and 10 (13) minutes per day of observed outdoor and indoor daily teacher-led physical activity, respectively. Outdoor time averaged 67 (49) minutes per day, and physical activity levels were higher during outdoor time than during common indoor activities (center time, circle time, and TV time). Physical activity levels varied between indoor and outdoor class activities. Policy and program-related efforts to increase physical activity in preschoolers should consider these patterns to leverage opportunities to optimize physical activity within early care and education centers.

  3. Evaluation of radiosensitivity and correlation between physical and biological dosimetry in a case of vascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoro, A.; Sebastia, N.; Aparici, F.; Candela, C.; Soriano del Castillo, J. M.; Perez, J.; Gras, P.; Cervera, J.; Alonso, O.; Villaescusa, J. I.

    2013-01-01

    The threshold dose required to produce a deterministic effect or even differences in the degree of the effect produced vary between individuals due to idiopathic causes, at the age or underlying disease. According to this work based on the Society of Interventional Radiology and the Guidelines for patient radiation dose management greater than 60 minutes fluoroscopy time management it is an indirect indicator of a significant radiation dose. According to this guide, instructions post procedure in these cases included a follow-up of the patient. (Author)

  4. American College of Radiology Accreditation Program for mammographic screening sites: Physical evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, R.E.; Haus, A.G.; Hubbard, L.B.; Lasky, H.J.; McCrohan, J.; McLelland, R.; Rothenberg, L.N.; Tanner, R.L.; Zinninger, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The American College of Radiology has initiated a program for the accreditation of mammographic screening sites, which includes evaluation by mail of image quality and average glandular breast dose. Image quality is evaluated by use of a specially designed phantom (a modified RMI 152D Mammographic Phantom) containing simulated microcalcifications, fibrils and masses. Average glandular dose to a simulated 4.5-cm-thick (50% glandular, 50% fat) compressed breast is evaluated by thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of entrance exposure and half value layer. Standards for acceptable image quality and patient doses are presented and preliminary results of the accreditation program are discussed

  5. Radiation exposure and image quality in x-Ray diagnostic radiology physical principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Horst; Joite-Barfuß, Sigrid; Säbel, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The largest contribution to radiation exposure to the population as a whole arises from diagnostic X-rays. Protecting the patient from radiation is a major aim of modern health policy, and an understanding of the relationship between radiation dose and image quality is of pivotal importance in optimising medical diagnostic radiology. In this volume the data provided for exploring these concerns are partly based on X-ray spectra, measured on diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies, and are supplemented by the results of measurements on phantoms and simulation calculations.

  6. Radiological practices using dosimetric films and electronic dosimeters in F-18 production at cyclotron complex center at IEN/CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Osvaldir P. dos; Silva, J.C.P.; Silva, Luiz Carlos Reina P. da

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate, guide and correct radiological practices based on dose rate values obtained from dosimetric films and electronic dosimeters used by technicians involved in Fluorine-18 production facilities at IEN/CNEN. Standard statistical methods have been used to analyze and to evaluate these results. The comparison between these results is the first step to orient decisions concerning radiological practices. Besides, radiometric routine surveys are under evaluation in order to improve radiological control in these facility areas. The electronic dosimeters provide the technicians immediate reading and this help them take protective action immediately. So the comparison between dosimetric film and electronic dosimeters data will provide information about how the recently employed electronic dosimeters are being used and what corrections in their practical use are necessary in order to achieve correct practices. In addition the results and observations obtained will be very important to implement possible changes in radiological routine practices in order to optimize them and keep occupationally exposed individuals radiological dose rates, as low as reasonably achievable, according to ALARA principle. (author)

  7. Radiation exposure and image quality in X-ray diagnostic radiology. Physical principles and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saebel, Manfred; Aichinger, Horst; Dierker, Joachim; Joite-Barfuss, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic X-rays are the largest contributor to radiation exposure to the general population, and protecting the patient from radiation damage is a major aim of modern health policy. Once the decision has been taken to use ionising radiation for imaging in a particular patient, it is necessary to optimize the image acquisition process taking into account the diagnostic quality of the images and the radiation dose to the patient. Both image quality and radiation dose are affected by a number of parameters, knowledge of which permits scientifically based decision making. The authors of this second edition of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality in X-ray Diagnostic Radiology have spent many years studying the optimization of radiological imaging. In this book they present in detail the basic physical principles of diagnostic radiology and their application to clinical problems. Particular attention is devoted to evaluation of the dose to the patient, the influence of scattered radiation on image quality, the use of antiscatter grids, and optimization of image quality and dose. The final section is a supplement containing tables of data and graphical depictions of X-ray spectra, interaction coefficients, characteristics of X-ray beams, and other aspects relevant to patient dose calculations. In addition, a complementary CD-ROM contains a user-friendly Excel file database covering these aspects that can be used in the reader's own programs. Since the first edition, the text, figures, tables, and references have all been thoroughly updated, and more detailed attention is now paid to image quality and radiation exposure when using digital imaging and computed tomography. This book will be an invaluable aid to medical physicists when performing calculations relating to patient dose and image quality, and will also prove useful for diagnostic radiologists and engineers. (orig.)

  8. Relationship between child care centers' compliance with physical activity regulations and children's physical activity, New York City, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Robert L; Xu, Ye; Lesesne, Catherine A; Dunn, Lillian; Kakietek, Jakub; Jernigan, Jan; Khan, Laura Kettel

    2014-10-16

    Physical activity may protect against overweight and obesity among preschoolers, and the policies and characteristics of group child care centers influence the physical activity levels of children who attend them. We examined whether children in New York City group child care centers that are compliant with the city's regulations on child physical activity engage in more activity than children in centers who do not comply. A sample of 1,352 children (mean age, 3.39 years) served by 110 group child care centers in low-income neighborhoods participated. Children's anthropometric data were collected and accelerometers were used to measure duration and intensity of physical activity. Multilevel generalized linear regression modeling techniques were used to assess the effect of center- and child-level factors on child-level physical activity. Centers' compliance with the regulation of obtaining at least 60 minutes of total physical activity per day was positively associated with children's levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA); compliance with the regulation of obtaining at least 30 minutes of structured activity was not associated with increased levels of MVPA. Children in centers with a dedicated outdoor play space available also spent more time in MVPA. Boys spent more time in MVPA than girls, and non-Hispanic black children spent more time in MVPA than Hispanic children. To increase children's level of MVPA in child care, both time and type of activity should be considered. Further examination of the role of play space availability and its effect on opportunities for engaging in physical activity is needed.

  9. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-01-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS

  10. Computational-physics program of the National MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1982-02-01

    The computational physics group is ivolved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of multidimensional Fokker-Planck, transport and combined Fokker-Planck/transport codes to both toroidal and mirror devices. Another major area is the investigation of linear and nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamics in two and three dimensions, with applications to all types of fusion devices. The MHD work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. In addition to these computational physics studies, investigations of more efficient numerical algorithms are being carried out

  11. Development of an anthropomorphic model and a Monte Carlo calculation code devoted to the physical reconstruction of a radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.

    2001-01-01

    The diversity of radiological accidents makes difficult the medical prognosis and the therapy choice from only clinical observations. To complete this information, it is important to know the global dose received by the organism and the dose distributions in depth in tissues. The dose estimation can be made by a physical reconstruction of the accident with the help of tools based on experimental techniques or on calculation. The software of the geometry construction (M.G.E.D.), associated to the Monte-Carlo code of photons and neutrons transport (M.O.R.S.E.) replies these constraints. An important result of this work is to determine the principal parameters to know in function of the accident type, as well as the precision level required for these parameters. (N.C.)

  12. The computational physics program of the National MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generation of supercomputers. The computational physics group is involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to compact toroids. Another major area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code. This work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence are being examined. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers

  13. Computational Physics Program of the National MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1984-12-01

    The principal objective of the computational physics group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. A summary of the groups activities is presented, including computational studies in MHD equilibria and stability, plasma transport, Fokker-Planck, and efficient numerical and programming algorithms. References are included

  14. MO-DE-BRA-01: Flipped Physics Courses Within a Radiologic Technologist Program: Video Production and Long Term Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiro, T; Donaghy, M; Slechta, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if the flipped class format has an effect on examination results for a radiologic technologist (RT) program and discuss benefits from creating video resources. Methods: From 2001–2015, students had taken both a radiological physics and quality control (QC) class as a part of their didactic training. In 2005/2006, the creation of videos of didactic lectures and QC test demonstrations allowed for a flip where content was studied at home while exercises and reviews were done in-class. Final examinations were retrospectively reviewed from this timeframe. 12 multiple choice physics questions (MCP) and 5 short answer QC questions (SAQC) were common to pre and post flip exams. The RT program’s ARRT exam scores were also obtained and compared to national averages. Results: In total, 36 lecture videos and 65 quality control videos were created for the flipped content. Data was ∼2.4GB and distributed to students via USB or CD media. For MCP questions, scores improved by 7.9% with the flipped format and significance (Student’s t-test, p<0.05) was found for 3 of the 12 questions. SAQC questions showed improvement by 14.6% and significance was found for 2 of the 5 questions. Student enrollment increased from ∼14 (2001–2004) to ∼23 students (2005–15). Content was continuously added post-flip due to the efficiency of delivery. The QC class in 2003 covered 45 test setups in-class while 65 were covered with video segments in 2014. Flipped materials are currently being repurposed. In 2015, this video content was restructured into an ARRT exam review guide and in 2016, the content was reorganized for fluoroscopy training for physicians. Conclusion: We believe that flipped classes can improve efficiency of content delivery and improve student performance even with an increase in class size. This format allows for flexibility in learning as well as re-use in multiple applications.

  15. MO-DE-BRA-01: Flipped Physics Courses Within a Radiologic Technologist Program: Video Production and Long Term Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshiro, T [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Donaghy, M [California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA (United States); Slechta, A [California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if the flipped class format has an effect on examination results for a radiologic technologist (RT) program and discuss benefits from creating video resources. Methods: From 2001–2015, students had taken both a radiological physics and quality control (QC) class as a part of their didactic training. In 2005/2006, the creation of videos of didactic lectures and QC test demonstrations allowed for a flip where content was studied at home while exercises and reviews were done in-class. Final examinations were retrospectively reviewed from this timeframe. 12 multiple choice physics questions (MCP) and 5 short answer QC questions (SAQC) were common to pre and post flip exams. The RT program’s ARRT exam scores were also obtained and compared to national averages. Results: In total, 36 lecture videos and 65 quality control videos were created for the flipped content. Data was ∼2.4GB and distributed to students via USB or CD media. For MCP questions, scores improved by 7.9% with the flipped format and significance (Student’s t-test, p<0.05) was found for 3 of the 12 questions. SAQC questions showed improvement by 14.6% and significance was found for 2 of the 5 questions. Student enrollment increased from ∼14 (2001–2004) to ∼23 students (2005–15). Content was continuously added post-flip due to the efficiency of delivery. The QC class in 2003 covered 45 test setups in-class while 65 were covered with video segments in 2014. Flipped materials are currently being repurposed. In 2015, this video content was restructured into an ARRT exam review guide and in 2016, the content was reorganized for fluoroscopy training for physicians. Conclusion: We believe that flipped classes can improve efficiency of content delivery and improve student performance even with an increase in class size. This format allows for flexibility in learning as well as re-use in multiple applications.

  16. A Model for Protective Behavior Against the Harmful Effects of Radiation for Radiological Technologists in Medical Radiological Technologists in Medical Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok; Moon, In Ok

    2009-01-01

    Protective behavior of radiological technologists against radiation exposure is important to achieve reduction of the patient doses without compromising medical achievements. This study attempts to provide a basic model for the sophisticated intervention strategy that increases the level of the protective behavior of the technologists. The model was applied to real situations in Korea to demonstrate its utility. The results of this study are summarized as follows: First, the protective environment showed the highest relationship in the factors considered, r=0.637 (p<0.01). Secondly, the important factors were protective environment in environment characteristics, expectation for the protective behavior 0.228 (p<0.001), self efficacy 0.142 (p<0.001), and attitude for the protective behavior 0.178 (p<0.001) in personal characteristics, and daily patient -0.112 (p<0.001) and number of the participation in the education session for the protective behavior 0.074 (p<0.05). Thirdly, the final protective behavior model by a path analysis method had direct influence on the attitude 0.171 (p<0.01) and environment 0.405 (p<0.01) for the protective behavior, self efficacy 0.122 (p<0.01), expectation for the protective behavior 0.16 (p<0.01), and self-efficacy in the specialty of projects 0.154 (p<0.01). The acceptance of the model determined by the absolute fit index (GFI), 0.969, and by the incremental fit index (CFI), 0.943, showed very significant levels. Value of 2/df that is a factor applied to verify the acceptance of the model was 37, which implies that the result can be accepted in the desirable range. In addition, the parsimonious fit index configured by AGFI (0.890) and TLI (0.852) was also considered as a scale that accepts the model in practical applications. In case of the establishment of some specific intervention strategies based on the protective behavior model against harmful radiation effects proposed in this study, the strategy will provide an effective way

  17. A Model for Protective Behavior Against the Harmful Effects of Radiation for Radiological Technologists in Medical Radiological Technologists in Medical Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, In Ok [Ewha Woman' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Protective behavior of radiological technologists against radiation exposure is important to achieve reduction of the patient doses without compromising medical achievements. This study attempts to provide a basic model for the sophisticated intervention strategy that increases the level of the protective behavior of the technologists. The model was applied to real situations in Korea to demonstrate its utility. The results of this study are summarized as follows: First, the protective environment showed the highest relationship in the factors considered, r=0.637 (p<0.01). Secondly, the important factors were protective environment in environment characteristics, expectation for the protective behavior 0.228 (p<0.001), self efficacy 0.142 (p<0.001), and attitude for the protective behavior 0.178 (p<0.001) in personal characteristics, and daily patient -0.112 (p<0.001) and number of the participation in the education session for the protective behavior 0.074 (p<0.05). Thirdly, the final protective behavior model by a path analysis method had direct influence on the attitude 0.171 (p<0.01) and environment 0.405 (p<0.01) for the protective behavior, self efficacy 0.122 (p<0.01), expectation for the protective behavior 0.16 (p<0.01), and self-efficacy in the specialty of projects 0.154 (p<0.01). The acceptance of the model determined by the absolute fit index (GFI), 0.969, and by the incremental fit index (CFI), 0.943, showed very significant levels. Value of 2/df that is a factor applied to verify the acceptance of the model was 37, which implies that the result can be accepted in the desirable range. In addition, the parsimonious fit index configured by AGFI (0.890) and TLI (0.852) was also considered as a scale that accepts the model in practical applications. In case of the establishment of some specific intervention strategies based on the protective behavior model against harmful radiation effects proposed in this study, the strategy will provide an effective way

  18. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, RHIC Spin Physics V, Volume 32, February 21, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BUNCE, G.; SAITO, N.; VIGDOR, S.; ROSER, T.; SPINKA, H.; ENYO, H.; BLAND, L.C.; GURYN, W.

    2001-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. During the fast year, the Center had only a Theory Group. In the second year, an Experimental Group was also established at the Center. At present, there are seven Fellows and nine post dots in these two groups. During the third year, we started a new Tenure Track Strong Interaction Theory RHIC Physics Fellow Program, with six positions in the academic year 1999-2000; this program will increase to include eleven theorists in the next academic year, and, in the year after, also be extended to experimental physics. In addition, the Center has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics, about ten workshops a year, with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. The construction of a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor, which was begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998

  19. Physical environment and job satisfaction in a community mental health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkins, C; O'Reilly, C; Roberts, K; Miller, S

    1977-01-01

    Relocation of professional staff in a community mental health center provided a setting in which to evaluate the effects of physical environment on job satisfaction. Two mental health teams moved from an old, drab central clinic building to new satellite clinics while a third team remained in the old building. Relocated staff reported significant increase in satisfaction with physical surroundings as compared to staff that did not move. Furthermore, satisfaction with physical surroundings had some impact on overall satisfaction ratings. Physical surroundings in a community mental health center may be a mediating variable for staff morale and effectiveness.

  20. Physics and radiology for nursing staff. Physik und Strahlenkunde fuer Krankenpflegeberufe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretzki, G

    1984-01-01

    As nurses working in hospitals and surgeries as well as other assistants regularly operate technical equipment, it is essential to explain the physical basics in a form which is comprehensible to them. The author has managed to give a very clear portrayal of each area of physics with close reference to its application in medicine, partly with the use of simplified models. His portrayal extends from the make-up of the material to atomic and nuclear physics and covers mechanics, heat and electricity theory, optics and acoustics. The explanation is completed by sections on radiography and radiation protection.

  1. The Loyalty of older people in fitness centers: Managing customers for physical activity programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo García Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The fitness centers are now places where partners perform «controlled» physical activity, which improves their physical and mental state, and where they socialize with other partners of all ages. These centers have been typically managed by people without training in this subject and with the only interest of obtaining partners without taking into account the long-term impact. This problem, together with management problems of the center and personal problems of the members, have meant that there are high desertion rates in this type of indoor facilities, with the consequent increase in expenditure on marketing and a non-sustainable profitability. We propose a program of physical activity that could improve the rate of loyalty, being the central point of management of sports centers today, the satisfaction and loyalty to the fitness centers.

  2. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  3. Contribution to the radiological Security in hospital facilities: The graduate in Physics Prescribes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, O.; Manso, M.V.; Gelen, A.; Alvarez, I.; Alfonso, R.; Borron, M.; Morales, J.A.; Jova, L.; Fraxedas, R.

    1998-01-01

    The graduate in Physics Prescribes, it allows the training, recalificacion and academic superacion he gives the technical staff that he works in the medical services he gives the different institutions he gives the National Health System

  4. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1979-September 1980: fundamental molecular physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Research is reported on the physics and chemistry of atoms, ions, and molecules, especially their interactions with external agents such as photons and electrons. Individual items from the report were prepared separately for the data base

  5. Radiology today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, M.W.; Heuck, F.H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The book encompasses the proceedings of a postgraduate course held in Salzburg in June 1980. 230 radiologists from 17 countries discussed here the important and practical advances of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and ultrasound as they contribute to gastrointestinal, urologic, skeletal, cardiovascular, pediatric, and neuroradiology. The book contains 55 single contributions of different authors to the following main themes: Cardiovascular, Radiology, pulmonary radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, urinary tract radiology, skeletal radiology, mammography, lymphography, ultrasound, ENT radiology, and neuroradiology. (orig./MG)

  6. The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Watson, L. E.; Hooper, E.; Huesmann, A.; Schenker, B.; Timbie, P.; Rzchowski, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides academic support and small-group supplemental instruction to students studying introductory algebra-based and calculus-based physics. These classes are gateway courses for majors in the biological and physical sciences, pre-health fields, engineering, and secondary science education. The Physics Learning Center offers supplemental instruction groups twice weekly where students can discuss concepts and practice with problem-solving techniques. The Center also provides students with access on-line resources that stress conceptual understanding, and to exam review sessions. Participants in our program include returning adults, people from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, students from families in lower-income circumstances, students in the first generation of their family to attend college, transfer students, veterans, and people with disabilities, all of whom might feel isolated in their large introductory course and thus have a more difficult time finding study partners. We also work with students potentially at-risk for having academic difficulty (due to factors academic probation, weak math background, low first exam score, or no high school physics). A second mission of the Physics Learning Center is to provide teacher training and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. These Peer Tutors lead the majority of the weekly group sessions in close supervision by PLC staff members. We will describe our work to support students in the Physics Learning Center, including our teacher-training program for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors

  7. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio. Dates of surveys, August 1976/May-June 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1979-06-01

    Two aerial radiological surveys to measure terrestrial gamma radiation were made over an area centered on the United States Department of Energy's Feed Materials Production Center in the city of Fernald, Ohio. The Center is operated by the National Lead Company of Ohio. Gamma ray data were collected from east-west flight lines at 90 m intervals over an area 25 km 2 centered on the plant site. The small Ohio towns of Shandon, Ross, and New Baltimore were surveyed from north-south flight lines at 300 m intervals. Processed data indicated that on-site radioactivity was due primarily to radionuclides currently being handled or processed at the Center. Off-site data showed the radioactivity to be due to naturally occurring radionuclides northeast and south of the site. If the northwest corner of the survey area an unusually high count rate region of airborne radon daughter activity was encountered. This was equivalent to approximately four times the normal background. However, the follow-up survey of 1977 showed this area to be within the background count rate level

  8. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1981-December 1982. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    This document is the twelfth Annual Report of our Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry Program. Scientifically, the work of the program deals with aspects of the physics and chemistry of molecules related to their interactions with photons, electrons, and other external agents. We chose these areas of study in view of our matic goals; that is to say, we chose them so that the eventual outcome of our work meets some of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and of other government agencies that support our research. First, we endeavor to determine theoretically and experimentally cross sections for electron and photon interactions with molecules, because those cross sections are indispensable for detailed microscopic analyses of the earliest processes of radiation action on any molecular substance, including biological materials. Those analyses in turn provide a sound basis for radiology and radiation dosimetry. Second, we study the spectroscopy of certain molecules and of small clusters of molecules because this topic is fundamental to the full understanding of atmospheric-pollutant chemistry

  9. Physical reconstruction of the radiological accident of Chilca (Lima - Peru); Reconstruccion fisica del accidente radiologico de Chilca (Lima - Peru)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachos, A. [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Departamento de Radioterapia, Av. Angamos Este 2520, Surquillo, Lima (Peru); Marquez, J. F., E-mail: alachosd1271@yahoo.com [Univesidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, C. German Amezaga 375, Ciudad Univesitaria, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The radiological accident happened in the Chilca District, the Canete County at 60 km to the south of Lima-Peru, during the night of January 11 to 12, 2012. The physical reconstruction of the accident was carried out in January 21, 2012, by means of the information gathering administrative and technical of the radioactive source as well as of the installation, the personnel and the involved procedures in the accidental event, information of the space geometry where the event took place. The preliminary information indicates that the source could have been locked in the guide tube of the equipment, next to the collimator in the first takes radiographic. The radiation monitors were not activated on the procedure, impeding this way, not to realize the flaw and causing that the personnel were exposed to the radiation during the whole work period. Their hands and especially their fingers would have been only to some millimeters of the source. With the obtained information and the measurements of the exposure rates of the radioactive source, was carried out the dose calculation to total body, the dose received in the hands and the dose received in the index finger of the left hand. The accident happened by operative procedure breach, by lack of training of the operators. The physical reconstruction of the accident contributes fundamental information for the decisions taking in the medical management of the accidents by radiation. (author)

  10. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1981-December 1982. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    This document is the twelfth Annual Report of our Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry Program. Scientifically, the work of the program deals with aspects of the physics and chemistry of molecules related to their interactions with photons, electrons, and other external agents. We chose these areas of study in view of our matic goals; that is to say, we chose them so that the eventual outcome of our work meets some of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and of other government agencies that support our research. First, we endeavor to determine theoretically and experimentally cross sections for electron and photon interactions with molecules, because those cross sections are indispensable for detailed microscopic analyses of the earliest processes of radiation action on any molecular substance, including biological materials. Those analyses in turn provide a sound basis for radiology and radiation dosimetry. Second, we study the spectroscopy of certain molecules and of small clusters of molecules because this topic is fundamental to the full understanding of atmospheric-pollutant chemistry.

  11. Daycare Center Attendance Buffers the Effects of Maternal Authoritarian Parenting Style on Physical Aggression in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, José M; Braza, Paloma; Carreras, Rosario; Braza, Francisco; Azurmendi, Aitziber; Pascual-Sagastizábal, Eider; Cardas, Jaione; Sánchez-Martín, José R

    2017-01-01

    A maternal authoritarian style has been related to the development of physical aggression during childhood and later future social problems; however, not too many studies have detected other than individual or family factors that may buffer this maternal effect. This work examines whether daycare center attendance may moderate the relationships between a mother authoritarian style and physical aggression. The study sample was 72 (40 girls) kindergarten children from Spain. Parents were asked to complete two questionnaires focused on individual family characteristics and parenting styles. At age 5, children physical aggression was assessed by direct observation at playtime; aggression scores at 6 was obtained by a peer-rated questionnaire. A least squared multiple regression was performed after controlling for children's level of physical aggression at 5, child sex and siblings. A positive contribution of maternal authoritarian style on physical aggression was detected. Daycare center attendance appears to attenuate the effect of the mother's authoritarian style on physical aggression, only in boys.

  12. MERS-CoV: Middle East respiratory syndrome corona virus: Can radiology be of help? Initial single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hamimi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Human infection with a novel coronavirus named Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was first identified in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East in September, 2012. The aim of this study was to establish the most pathognomonic radiological sign(s) to diagnose MERS CoV. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective descriptive study. All patients were subjected to serial X-ray. High resolution non-contrast CT chest was also obtained for 10 patients. The scans were reviewed fo...

  13. Program of environmental radiological surveillance of the radioactive wastes storage center of Maquixco in the period January-December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaso P, M.I.

    1991-12-01

    The primary objective of all program of environmental radiological surveillance (PVRA), it is to follow the evolution of the radioactive content of the links of the chains that constitute the different ways of transfer of the radioactivity toward the man, with the purpose of making a realistic evaluation of the environmental impact produced by the installation under surveillance. In the CADER in Mexico, only accidents or escapes of radioactivity of slow evolution can be detected. At the moment the radioactive wastes in this installation are not treated. In this report the results obtained during the year 1991 are presented. (Author)

  14. Physics, radiology, and chemistry. An introduction to natural science. 8. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, O.K.; Knigge, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    This book is an introduction to physics and chemistry especially for medical personnel. After a general introduction, measurement methods, mechanics including mechanics of solid bodies, fluids and gases, heat, optics, acoustics, electricity, radiations including their biological effects, general chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry are treated. Every chapter contains exercises mostly in connection with medical and biological effects. Furthermore connections with biology and medicine are considered. (orig./HP) With 104 figs., 51 tabs [de

  15. Detection and observation of deep vein thromboses by physical, radiological and electrical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonafous, J.; Constantinesco, A.; Meyer, P.; Bidet, R.; Healy, J.C.; Chambron, J.; Lobera, A.; Chopin, J.

    1975-01-01

    The method of thrombosis detection by iodine 131-labelled exogenous fibrinogen was evaluated by comparison with three physical methods: an isotopic method using selenomethionine-labelled endogenous fibrinogen, phlebography, phletysmography by electrical impedance. The results confirm the superiority of the isotopic method with regard to efficiency and comfort for the patient. Under certain conditions the frequency of positive tests was the same with selenomethionine as with exogenous fibrinogen [fr

  16. Radiological/Health physics program assessement at Rocky Flats, the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psomas, P.O.

    1996-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Office, Safety and Health Group, Health Physics Team (HPT) is responsible for oversight of the Radiation Protection and Health Physics Program (RPHP) of the Integrating Management Contractor (IMC), Kaiser-Hill (K-H) operations at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). As of 1 January 1996 the Rocky Flats Plant employed 300 DOE and 4,300 contractor personnel (K-H and their subcontractors). WSI is a subcontractor and provides plant security. To accomplish the RPHP program oversight HPT personnel developed a systematic methodology for performing a functional RPHP Assessment. The initial process included development of a flow diagram identifying all programmatic elements and assessment criteria documents. Formulation of plans for conducting interviews and performance of assessments constituted the second major effort. The generation of assessment reports was the final step, based on the results of this process. This assessment will be a 6 person-year effort, over the next three years. This process is the most comprehensive assessment of any Radiation Protection and Health Physics (RPHP) Program ever performed at Rocky Flats. The results of these efforts will establish a baseline for future RPHP Program assessments at RFETS. This methodology has been well-received by contractor personnel and creates no Privacy Act violations or other misunderstandings

  17. [Physical activity in staff workers at Centers for Psychosocial Care in southern Brazil: temporal trends].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerônimo, Jeferson Santos; Jardim, Vanda Maria da Rosa; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Domingues, Marlos Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze temporal trends of physical activity among staff workers in Centers for Psychosocial Care and associated factors in southern Brazil from 2006 to 2011. This cross-sectional study was part of the Evaluation of Centers for Psychosocial Care in Southern Brazil/CAPSUL. Physical and mental health variables were collected using the Self-Report Questionnaire (SRQ-20), and physical activity was measured with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Participation included 435 staff workers in 2006 and 546 in 2011. Total prevalence rates were: physical activity (≥ 150 minutes/week) 23.2% in 2006 and 17.6% in 2011 and minor psychiatric disorders 11% and 8.4%. There was no statistically significant difference in physical activity between men and women. In 2006, individuals with less schooling (p = 0.03) and lower income (p = 0.01) showed higher levels of physical activity. In 2011, staff workers in larger cities showed higher levels of physical activity (p = 0.02). Interventions are needed to promote physical activity in this population, especially among staff workers at Centers for Psychosocial Care in smaller municipalities.

  18. The role of interventional radiology in biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation: a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civelli, Enrico Maria; Cozzi, Guido; Milella, Marco; Suman, Laura; Severini, Aldo; Meroni, Roberta; Vercelli, Ruggero

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated interventional radiological experience in the management of biliary complications of OLT at the National Cancer Institute of Milan. Seventeen patients who had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation in various hospital were referred to our unit with biliary complications. Group I consisted of 8 patients with anastomotic biliary fistula who came to our attention a short time after transplantation. Group II consisted of 9 patients with anastomotic strictures who came to our attention in a longer period. Two different interventional radiological approaches were used: (a) percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) in the presence of fistulas in patients of group I; and (b) percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage combined with dilatation of the strictures with a balloon catheter in patients of group II. On the whole resolution of the biliary complications was achieved in 13 of the 17 cases treated (76.5%), 5 of 8 in group I and 8 of 9 in group II. No secondary stenosis after PTBD were observed in group I, whereas two patients of group II needed a second dilatation. Percutaneous biliary drainage is indicated as a valid treatment in the management of biliary complications, either to allow closure of the fistula either to perform balloon dilatation of stenosis. (orig.)

  19. 76 FR 13642 - Town Hall Discussion With the Director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Senior Center Management.'' The purpose of this public meeting in the Orlando, FL, area is to engage in a.... Location: The public meeting will be held at the Sheraton Orlando Downtown Hotel, 400 West Livingston St... Senior Center Management AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting...

  20. Radiological protection and calibration of an activity meter with cesium and barium sources in a nuclear medicine center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales L, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Presently work is shown the results when gauging a team Deluxe Isotope (Caliper 11) with some sources of Cesium 137 and Barium 133, in a Center of Medicine Nuclear that operates from the anus 1983 in a modern building inside the one Institute of Illnesses Neoplasia (Inn). This Center was equipped initially with teams donated by the International Organism of Atomic Energy (Oa) with those that it develops assistance, educational works and of investigation, giving services to patient of the Inn and other public and private medical centers. (Author)

  1. EUTEMPE-RX, an EC supported FP7 project for the training and education of medical physics experts in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosmans, H.; Van Peteghem, N.; Bliznakova, K.; Vassileva, J.; Padovani, R.; Christofides, S.; Tsapaki, V.; Caruana, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    The core activity of the medical physics expert (MPE) is to ensure optimal use of ionising radiation in health care. It is essential that these health care professionals are trained to the highest level, defined as European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning (EQF) level 8 by the European Commission's Radiation Protection Report 174 'Guidelines on the MPE'. The main objective of the EUTEMPE-RX project is to provide a model training scheme that allows the medical physicist in diagnostic and interventional radiology (D and IR) to reach this high level. A European network of partners was brought together in this FP7 EC project to ensure sufficient expertise in all aspects of the subject and to create a harmonised course programme. Targeted participants are medical physicists in D and IR in hospitals, engineers and scientists in medical device industries and officers working in regulatory authorities. Twelve course modules will be developed at EQF level 8, with radiation safety and diagnostic effectiveness being prevalent subjects. The modules will combine online with face-to-face teaching using a blended learning approach. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of a draft standard on performance specifications for health physics instrumentation. Initial results for radiological tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Mileham, A.P.; Kathren, R.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    The draft ANSI standard N42.17D2 on performance specifications for health physics instrumentation is currently being evaluated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of the project is the evaluation of the applicability and practicality of the proposed standard through testing of a cross-section of currently available commercial instruments to determine how well they conform to the standard. The standard is being tested against instruments such as ionization chambers, G.M. detectors, alpha survey meters, and neutron dose equivalent survey meters. This paper presents results of the preliminary radiological performance tests on ionization chambers and G.M. detectors. This includes both the data generated during the tests and a discussion of procedures developed to perform the testing. Results are reported for response time, accuracy, precision, radiation overloads, and angular dependence. In addition, results are reported for parameters that affect instrument performance including battery lifetime, geotropism and stability. Initial test indicates that some of the instruments will not meet the criteria specified in ANSI N42.17D2. Results cover approximately 40 instruments that have been obtained by direct purchase, by loan from instrument vendors or by loan from others including DOE licensees

  3. Evaluation of the radiological protection and proposal of a PGC in physical aspects for Roentgen therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, L.M.; Silvestre, I.; Laguardia, R.A.; Almeida, A. de

    1998-01-01

    The present work was realized in a first stage in the Hnos Ameijeiras Hospital in Cuba and its objective in this phase is to present at the Regulatory Agency (OR) the documentation for obtaining the Institutional Exploitation License (LE) of a Roentgen therapy equipment, according with the IAEA Safety Series No. 115 and propose the Quality Assurance Program (PGC) in the physical aspects that it will be applied in this practice. For obtaining the LE it was made up a safety report, a safety manual and a radiological emergency plan. For making up the PGC it was established the reference state of the equipment (ER), realizing the tests which determine the value or stability of the physical parameters involved in the treatment through the adaptation of International protocols, mainly the 'Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy' derived of Arcal XXX. In a second stage were applied some of the acquired experiences in the Das Clinicas Hospital at Ribeirao Preto in Brazil. As more important results it was had that was renewed the Roentgen therapy Service of the Hnos. Ameijeiras Hospital and was made the PGC which will govern this practice. Moreover it was obtained the dose percentage curves in depth (PDP) for X-rays low energies. It was proposed procedures for the parameters control like the PDP, the absolute dose and the hemi reducing layer (CHR). With this work it was started doing the fulfilment of one of the main objectives of the Arcal XXX Project related with the Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy extending its application toward area of Latin American countries. (Author)

  4. Radiological and Environmental Research Division Annual Report. Atmosphere Physics January - December 1979.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, R. E.; Hicks, B. B.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of this document with previous reports of this series will reveal some substantial changes in the research performed by this Section. There have been several projects in which scientific work has evolved, creating the bases for exciting new programs. For example, the Section's work on micrometeorology was initially in support of planetary boundary layer modeling studies. In recent years, the techniques that were developed have been extended to .include air pollutants, and we are now closely identified with work on the dry deposition of airborne particles and trace gases. In this area of research, three separate programs can be identified'. Under EPA sponsorship, we are developing methods for parameterizing the dry deposition of acid aerosol for, the MAP3S program. In a second EPA program, we are conducting field experiments to investigate the physical, chemical and biological factors that control dry deposition rates to natural surfaces. Under DOE sponsorship, we are conducting field experiments concentrating on the deposition of trace gases and particles to open water surfaces.

  5. Implementation of the Gamma Monitor Calibration Laboratory (LABCAL) of the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (IDQBRN) of the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (CTEx)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balthar, Mario Cesar V.; Amorim, Aneuri de; Santos, Avelino dos and others, E-mail: mariobalthar@gmail.com [Centro Tecnológico do Exército (IDQBRN/CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Defesa Química, Biológica, Radiológica e Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the implementation and adaptation stages of the Gamma Monitor Calibration Laboratory (Laboratório de Calibração de Monitores Gama - LABCAL) of the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (Instituto de Defesa Química, Biológica, Radiológica e Nuclear - IDQBRN) of the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (Centro Tecnológico do Exército - CTEx). Calibration of the radiation monitors used by the Brazilian Army will be performed by quantitatively measuring the ambient dose equivalent, in compliance with national legislation. LABCAL still seeks licensing from CNEN and INMETRO. The laboratory in intended to supply the total demand for calibration of ionizing radiation devices from the Brazilian Army. (author)

  6. Implementation of the Gamma Monitor Calibration Laboratory (LABCAL) of the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (IDQBRN) of the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (CTEx)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balthar, Mario Cesar V.; Amorim, Aneuri de; Santos, Avelino dos and others

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the implementation and adaptation stages of the Gamma Monitor Calibration Laboratory (Laboratório de Calibração de Monitores Gama - LABCAL) of the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (Instituto de Defesa Química, Biológica, Radiológica e Nuclear - IDQBRN) of the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (Centro Tecnológico do Exército - CTEx). Calibration of the radiation monitors used by the Brazilian Army will be performed by quantitatively measuring the ambient dose equivalent, in compliance with national legislation. LABCAL still seeks licensing from CNEN and INMETRO. The laboratory in intended to supply the total demand for calibration of ionizing radiation devices from the Brazilian Army. (author)

  7. Strategies in interventional radiology. Formation of an interdisciplinary center of vascular anomalies. Chances and challenges for effective and efficient patient management; Strategien in der interventionellen Radiologie. Gruendung eines Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Gefaessanomalien. Chancen und Herausforderungen fuer effektives und effizientes Patientenmanagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadick, Maliha; Dally, Franz Josef; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Interdisciplinary Center for Vascular Anomalies; Stroszczynski, Christian [University Hospital Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Wohlgemuth, Walter A. [University Hospital Halle (Germany). Interdisciplinary Center for Vascular Anomalies

    2017-10-15

    Radiology is an interdisciplinary field dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of numerous diseases and is involved in the development of multimodal treatment concepts. Interdisciplinary case management, a broad spectrum of diagnostic imaging facilities and dedicated endovascular radiological treatment options are valuable tools that allow radiology to set up an interdisciplinary center for vascular anomalies. Image-based diagnosis combined with endovascular treatment options is an essential tool for the treatment of patients with highly complex vascular diseases. These vascular anomalies can affect numerous parts of the body so that a multidisciplinary treatment approach is required for optimal patient care. This paper discusses the possibilities and challenges regarding effective and efficient patient management in connection with the formation of an interdisciplinary center for vascular anomalies with strengthening of the clinical role of radiologists. Key points: Vascular anomalies, which include vascular tumors and malformations, are complex to diagnose and treat. There are far more patients with vascular anomalies requiring therapy than interdisciplinary centers for vascular anomalies - there is currently a shortage of dedicated interdisciplinary centers for vascular anomalies in Germany that can provide dedicated care for affected patients. Radiology includes a broad spectrum of diagnostic and minimally invasive therapeutic tools which allow the formation of an interdisciplinary center for vascular anomalies for effective, efficient and comprehensive patient management.

  8. Daycare Center Attendance Buffers the Effects of Maternal Authoritarian Parenting Style on Physical Aggression in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, José M.; Braza, Paloma; Carreras, Rosario; Braza, Francisco; Azurmendi, Aitziber; Pascual-Sagastizábal, Eider; Cardas, Jaione; Sánchez-Martín, José R.

    2017-01-01

    A maternal authoritarian style has been related to the development of physical aggression during childhood and later future social problems; however, not too many studies have detected other than individual or family factors that may buffer this maternal effect. This work examines whether daycare center attendance may moderate the relationships between a mother authoritarian style and physical aggression. The study sample was 72 (40 girls) kindergarten children from Spain. Parents were asked ...

  9. Hospital organization and importance of an interventional radiology inpatient admitting service: Italian single-center 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel; Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-03-01

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of 1,009,095.35 euros. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  10. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel; Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  11. 76 FR 41804 - Town Hall Discussion With the Director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... two meetings: one in Dallas, TX, and one in Orlando, FL. The meeting in San Francisco will be our... Senior Center Management AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting entitled...

  12. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once. (KRM)

  13. Individual Information-Centered Approach for Handling Physical Activity Missing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minsoo; Rowe, David A.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Robinson, Terrance S.; Mahar, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate individual information (II)-centered methods for handling missing data, using data samples of 118 middle-aged adults and 91 older adults equipped with Yamax SW-200 pedometers and Actigraph accelerometers for 7 days. We used a semisimulation approach to create six data sets: three physical activity outcome…

  14. Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in Childcare Centers versus Family Childcare Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby; Page, Monica; Sanders, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Obesity rates among preschool-aged children have doubled in the past 10 years, and 60% of these children spend the majority of their day in childcare facilities. Few studies have examined the quality of nutrition and physical activity practices in childcare centers as compared to family childcare homes. The purpose of this study is to determine if…

  15. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Aaron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-08-04

    This award provided partial support for the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics to host two workshops "Beyond the Standard Model 2016" in October 2016, and the "5th MCTP Symposium: Foundations of String Cosmology" in April 2017 on the University of Michigan campus.

  16. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  17. Education and training of medical physicists in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, V.; Vassileva, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Medical radiology is chronologically the first and widest field of work of medical physicists. Therefore the education and training of medical radiological physicists is of big importance for both diagnostics and therapy. The education of medical radiological physicists in Bulgaria is organized in two levels: university and postgraduate, which is a good achievement of Bulgarian educational system. University education is in the framework of the M. Sc. program in Medical physics with a prevalent training in medical radiological physics. Three universities in the country have been carrying out this education since more than ten years. Postgraduate education covers specialties Medical Radiological Physics and Radiation Hygiene. It is organized by the Medical University but the training is opened also to specialists outside the health care system. The interests in both levels of education and training in Medical Physics is increasing with about 40 trainees in last years. The university and postgraduate education has good quality in theory but still inadequate in practical aspects. The continuous training and qualification of medical physicists has also difficulties; the main reasons are insufficient technical and financial resources as well as the lack of interest of the staff of the training centers. The responsibilities for education and training of medical physicists in radiology should be shared between physicists and physicians in the country

  18. Clinical features and radiological findings of adenovirus pneumonia associated with progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome: A single center study in 19 adult patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Min Jae; Chong, Semin [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; KIm, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Jung Ho [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To describe radiologic findings of adenovirus pneumonia and to understand clinico-radiological features associated with progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients with adenovirus pneumonia. This study included 19 patients diagnosed with adenovirus pneumonia at a tertiary referral center, in the period between March 2003 and April 2015. Clinical findings were reviewed, and two radiologists assessed imaging findings by consensus. Chi-square, Fisher's exact, and Student's t tests were used for comparing patients with and without subsequent development of ARDS. Of 19 patients, nine were immunocompromised, and 10 were immunocompetent. Twelve patients (63%) progressed to ARDS, six of whom (32%) eventually died from the disease. The average time for progression to ARDS from symptom onset was 9.6 days. Initial chest radiographic findings were normal (n = 2), focal opacity (n = 9), or multifocal or diffuse opacity (n = 8). Computed tomography (CT) findings included bilateral (n = 17) or unilateral (n = 2) ground-glass opacity with consolidation (n = 14) or pleural effusion (n = 11). Patients having subsequent ARDS had a higher probability of pleural effusion and a higher total CT extent compared with the non-ARDS group (p = 0.010 and 0.007, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in clinical variables such as patient age and premorbid condition. Adenovirus pneumonia demonstrates high rates of ARDS and mortality, regardless of patient age and premorbid conditions, in the tertiary care setting. Large disease extent and presence of pleural effusion on CT are factors suggestive of progression to ARDS.

  19. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Fields. CETUP2015/ Particle Physics and Cosmology Conference. PPC2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczerbinska, Barbara [Dakota State Univ., Madison, SD (United States)

    2016-02-22

    For last five years Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*) serves as a collaboration point for scientists from around the world interested in theoretical and experimental aspects of underground science. The mission of CETUP* is to promote an organized research in physics, astrophysics, geoscience, geomicrobiology and other fields related to the underground science and provide a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Scientists invited to participate in the program will not only provide theoretical support to the underground science, but they will also examine core questions of the 21st century including: What is dark matter? How well do we know the neutrino parameters?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, How were the heavy elements made?, What are the fundamental underlying symmetries of the Universe? Is there a Grand Unified Theory of the Universe? How do supernovae explode? Studies of Neutrino Physics and Dark Matter are of high interest to particle and nuclear physicists, astrophysicists and cosmologists. Ongoing and proposed Neutrino and Dark Matter experiments are expected to unveil the answers to fundamental questions about the Universe. This year summer program was focused exactly on these subjects bringing together experts in dark matter, neutrino physics, particle physics, nuclear physics and astrophysics and cosmology. CETUP*2015 consisted of 5 week long program (June 14 – July 18, 2015) covering various theoretical and experimental aspects in these research areas. The two week long session on Dark Matter physics (June 14 – June 26) was followed by two week long program on Neutrino physics (July 6 – July 18). The international conference entitled IXth International Conference on Interconnection Between Particle Physics and Cosmology (PPC) was hosted at CETUP

  20. Studies on the chronological alterations of blood counts on the radiological technicians at health centers in Japan (1957 - 1975)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Kouichi; Ishizaka, Masatsuna

    1977-01-01

    From the nine health surveys made on clinical radiation technicians working at health centers during the 18 years from 1957 to 1975, 679 technicians on whom blood examinations were made for not less than ten consecutive years were sampled to investigate for chronological alterations in their blood parameters. The radiation protective means at the health centers have made rapid progress ever since the atomic bomb experiment in 1954, and the dose of exposure to radiation then began to decrease. On the other hand, it was in about 1960 that the measurement of individual exposure doses began to be made on 60% of all the technicians. Chronological alterations in the average blood counts of these technicians under the abovementioned situation were such that RBC and hemoglobin level continued to increase from 1963 until about 1967, but then began to decrease, and that WBC was as low as 5,883/mm 3 in 1957, but tended to increase though slightly at each of the subsequent surveys, and was increased to 6,570/mm 3 in 1975, that is, WBC has been approaching the normal count of 6,774/mm 3 in the Japanese, with a significant difference at a not more than 1% level of significance in each survey year. For the purpose of preventing radiation hazard, further efforts should be made to protect the technicians from exposure to radiation and to control their health. (auth.)

  1. Integrated marketing sphere of physical culture and sports in terms of European integration Regional Center Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Popov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: exposure of conceptual and strategic positions of the complex marketing of sphere of physical culture and sport in the conditions of European integration of regional center. Material and Methods: analysis of literary sources, analysis of documents of legislative, normatively-legal and programmatic maintenance, analysis of the systems, questioning as a questionnaire. Results: the analysis of the systems of terms of development of sphere of physical culture and sport is carried out by the study of modern tendencies, interests of young people and habitants of regional center; complex description of conceptual and strategic positions of the relatively complex marketing of sphere of physical culture and sport is presented in the conditions of European integration of regional center. Conclusions: it is set that the decision of tasks in relation to conditioning for development of sphere of physical culture and sport must come true with the observance of certain principles; got founding in relation to development of marketing plan of forming of sporting image Kharkiv.

  2. Accelerator laboratories: development centers for experimental physics and technology in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazari, M.

    1989-01-01

    Three years ago in this Nuclear Center the author and Professor Graef expounded the inception and development of experimental physics and new techniques centered about laboratories and equipped in our country with positive ion accelerators. Extracted here is the information on the laboratories that have allowed professional training as well as the furtherance of scientific productivity in each group. An additional proposal as to how the technical groups knowledgeable in advanced technology might contribute significantly to adequate preparation of youth at the intermediate level able to generate innocuous micro industries in their own neighbourhood. (Author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Radiological English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribes, R. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba (Spain). Servicio de Radiologia; Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Div. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  4. Radiological English

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribes, R.; Ros, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  5. Simbios: an NIH national center for physics-based simulation of biological structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, Scott L; Ku, Joy P; Pande, Vijay S; Sherman, Michael A; Altman, Russ B

    2012-01-01

    Physics-based simulation provides a powerful framework for understanding biological form and function. Simulations can be used by biologists to study macromolecular assemblies and by clinicians to design treatments for diseases. Simulations help biomedical researchers understand the physical constraints on biological systems as they engineer novel drugs, synthetic tissues, medical devices, and surgical interventions. Although individual biomedical investigators make outstanding contributions to physics-based simulation, the field has been fragmented. Applications are typically limited to a single physical scale, and individual investigators usually must create their own software. These conditions created a major barrier to advancing simulation capabilities. In 2004, we established a National Center for Physics-Based Simulation of Biological Structures (Simbios) to help integrate the field and accelerate biomedical research. In 6 years, Simbios has become a vibrant national center, with collaborators in 16 states and eight countries. Simbios focuses on problems at both the molecular scale and the organismal level, with a long-term goal of uniting these in accurate multiscale simulations.

  6. The consolidation of the Bariloche Atomic Center: an approach from the development of the experimental physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marisa C.; Reising, Ailin M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper investigates the origins of the Center and of the Institute of Physics 'Jose Antonio Balseiro' from the reconstruction of the experimental research programs that were developed between the years 1955 and 1962 in those organizations of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). Within that intention the paper analyzes the scientific policy of the Institute of Physics and its relations with the CNEA as well as the strategy of resolution of the economic and institutional crisis that affected them between 1958 and 1959. Its incidence in the consolidation of the research programs is also examined

  7. Displacement of the hip center of rotation after arthroplasty of Crowe III and IV dysplasia: a radiological and biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Jafari, Davood; Bougherara, Habiba; Gross, Allan E; Ghazavi, Mohammad T

    2013-06-01

    To study the direction and biomechanical consequences of hip center of rotation (HCOR) migration in Crowe type III and VI hips after total hip arthroplasty, post-operative radiographs and CT scans of several unilaterally affected hips were evaluated. Using a three-dimensional model of the human hip, the HCOR was moved in all directions, and joint reaction force (JRF) and abductor muscle force (AMF) were calculated for single-leg stance configuration. Comparing to the normal side, HCOR had displaced medially and inferiorly by an average of 23.4% and 20.8%, respectively, of the normal femoral head diameter. Significant decreases in JRF (13%) and AMF (46.13%) were observed in a presumptive case with that amount of displacement. Isolated inferior displacement had a small, increasing effect on these forces. In Crowe type III and IV hips, the HCOR migrates inferiorly and medially after THA, resulting in a decrease in JRF, AMF, and abductor muscle contraction force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring student learning profiles in algebra-based studio physics: A person-centered approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Jarrad W. T.; Chini, Jacquelyn J.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we explore the strategic self-regulatory and motivational characteristics of students in studio-mode physics courses at three universities with varying student populations and varying levels of success in their studio-mode courses. We survey students using questions compiled from several existing questionnaires designed to measure students' study strategies, attitudes toward and motivations for learning physics, organization of scientific knowledge, experiences outside the classroom, and demographics. Using a person-centered approach, we utilize cluster analysis methods to group students into learning profiles based on their individual responses to better understand the strategies and motives of algebra-based studio physics students. Previous studies have identified five distinct learning profiles across several student populations using similar methods. We present results from first-semester and second-semester studio-mode introductory physics courses across three universities. We identify these five distinct learning profiles found in previous studies to be present within our population of introductory physics students. In addition, we investigate interactions between these learning profiles and student demographics. We find significant interactions between a student's learning profile and their experience with high school physics, major, gender, grade expectation, and institution. Ultimately, we aim to use this method of analysis to take the characteristics of students into account in the investigation of successful strategies for using studio methods of physics instruction within and across institutions.

  9. Radiological imaging features and clinicopathological correlation of hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor: experience in a single tertiary cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Driscoll, Dearbhail; Athanasian, Edward; Hameed, Meera; Hwang, Sinchun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the imaging features of hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor (HFLT), which has a propensity towards local recurrence and the potential to transform into myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma (MIFS). The study included 8 patients with a diagnosis of HFLT and imaging at a tertiary cancer center. Imaging studies included radiographs (n = 2), ultrasound (n = 3), and MRI (n = 16). Imaging features were evaluated including location, calcification, sonographic echogenicity, vascular flow, size, border, signal characteristics, contrast enhancement, and blooming on MRI. The HFLT was located in the ankle/foot in 4 out of 8 and was subcutaneous in 8 out of 8, ranging in size from 2 to 18 cm. Histology at initial diagnosis was HFLT in 5 out of 8 and HFLT with MIFS in 3 out of 8. None was calcified on radiography. On ultrasound 2 out of 3 were heterogeneously echogenic with ≥10 foci of vascular flow. Two out of 8 patients had MRI only at local recurrence. The tumor border was infiltrative in 4 out of 6 at initial diagnosis and in 2 patients with MRI at recurrence only. Fat and septae were present in 7 out of 8 at initial diagnosis and at recurrence. Signal intensity was iso-/hypointense to muscle on T1-weighted sequences in more than two thirds of the tumor in 4 out of 7 and hyperintense to muscle in at least one third of the tumor on fluid-sensitive sequences in 6 out of 8. Contrast enhancement was heterogeneous in 7 out of 7; blooming in two thirds of the tumor on gradient-echo sequence MRI indicated hemorrhage. The HFLT commonly presents as a mass with an infiltrative border, interspersed fat and septations at initial diagnosis and local recurrence on MRI regardless of histology of HFLT alone or with MIFS. Hemosiderin deposits may be detected as blooming on gradient-echo sequences. (orig.)

  10. Radiologic science for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of physics, biology and protection for the radiologic technology student. It presents a significant portion of all of the science required of radiologic technology students under one cover. Chapter content reflects a readable and practical organization with outlines listed on the first page of each chapter and sample problems at the end. New to this edition are: new and expanded sections on radiation techniques, digital imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound

  11. Radiological protection act, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and dissolves An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh (the Board), transferring its assets and liabilities to the Institute. It sets out a range of radiation protection measures to be taken by various Ministers in the event of a radiological emergency and gives effect at national level to the Assistance Convention, the Early Notification Convention and the Physical Protection Convention. The Institute is the competent Irish authority for the three Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  12. Textbook of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, C.E.; Ravin, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book is presented in two volumes, standard textbook of imaging, conclusive and totally up-to-date. This provides information organized by major topics covering the state-of-the-art for all imaging procedures. The volume 1 presents radiologic physics and technology by discussing roentgenography, ultrasound, CT, nuclear medicine, MRI, and positron emission tomography. The volume 2 studies pulmonary radiology, imaging of the skeletal and central nervous systems, uroradiology, abdominal and cardiac imaging, and imaging of the pelvis

  13. DOC/WSNSO [Department of Commerce/Weather Service Nuclear Support Office] operational support to Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.

    1989-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is an agency of the Department of Commerce. The NWS has hundreds of weather offices throughout the United States. The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) is a highly specialized unit of NWS that provides direct support to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) underground nuclear testing program. The WSNSO has been associated with the DOE for >33 yr. As a result of the unique relationship with the DOE, all WSNSO emergency response meteorologists and meteorological technicians are allowed access to classified material. Meteorological phenomena play a significant role during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) event, and WSNSO meteorologists provide direct support to ARAC. The marriage of state-of-the-art computer systems together with proven technology provides the on-scene WSNSO meteorologist with essentially a portable fully equipped, fully functional, advanced NWS weather station. The WSNSO's emergency response personnel and hardware are at the ready and can be mobilized within 2 h. WSNSO can provide on-scene weather forecasts and critical weather data collection whenever and wherever necessary

  14. The calculated radiological impact on the environment of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center due to radioactive emissions to the atmosphere in the years 1975 and 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebschmann, W.; Nagel, D.; Papadopoulos, D.

    1976-08-01

    The radiological impact by radioactive offgas and exhaust air on the environment of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (KNRC) is calculated every year and compared with the permissible equivalent doses. This report includes both the forecasted maximum doses from maximum releases scheduled for the year 1976 and the actual doses of 1975 based on the measured releases in 1975. According to the various irradiation mechanisms of the nuclides emitted, the following doses are indicated, each calculated for an adult person: whole body dose by γ-irradiation and tritium inhalation, skin dose by external β-irradiation, lung dose by aerosol inhalation, bone dose by plutonium inhalation, and effective integral dose. The maximum infant thyroid dose due to iodine ingestion via the pasture-cow-milk-pathway is also calculated. The respective maximum doses indicate that the dose limits of 30 mrem/a whole body dose (adult) and 90 mrem/a thyroid dose (Infant) which are to be observed by the KNRC since the year 1975 are not exceeded at any point, provided the emissions remain below the scheduled maximum level. The doses in 1975 were markedly below the dose limits mentioned above. This is even true when partial body and organ doses are integrated in an 'effective dose'. (orig.) [de

  15. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  16. Syllabus for postgraduate diplomas and degrees in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajraj, Arcot; Nedungadi, T.M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of preparation of a suitable syllabus of radiological physics for postgraduate courses in radiology is discussed. In the earlier years there was a stress on pure Physics, but now this has shifted to applied physics required for the practice of radiology. Guidelines evolved to draw up a suitable syllabus for medical radiology students are presented. (M.G.B.)

  17. Automated system for the management of the radiological safety in a radiopharmaceutical and labelled compounds production center; Sistema automatizado para la gestion de la seguridad radiologica un centro de produccion de radiofarmacos y compuestos marcados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador B, Z.H. [Centro de Isotopos, Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada, Km. 3, Guanabacoa, Apartado 3415, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba); Alvarez Builla de Sologuren, E. [Centro de Gestion de Informacion y Desarrollo de la Energia, Cale 20 No. 4111 e/47y 18A, Playa, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: zabalbona@centis.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The establishment in the Center of Isotopes of Cuba of a managerial quality system in matter of radiological safety Y the accumulated operational experience, its constitute the foundations for the development of a system of management of the radiological safety organically structured, with the application of evaluative techniques of it management Y it integration in an automated system. The Visual Basic 5 platform for the programming of the 'SASR' system is used. The functions of each one of the 11 modules that integrate it are described. With this it can be carried out the registration of the data of the training Y the personnel's authorization, the checkup of the radioactive inventory of the installation, the annual upgrade of the registrations of the individual doses of those workers, the analysis of the state of the available equipment for magnitude to control, the radiological situation of the work positions, the public exposure by the gassy discharges, the experiences of the radiological events, the annual consolidation of the costs of the safety Y the evaluation of indicators Y of tendencies. A computer tool that facilitates the effective management of the radiological safety in a radioactive installation is obtained. (Author)

  18. Radiology. 3. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Maximilian; Kuhn, Fritz-Peter; Debus, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    The text book on radiology covers the following issues: Part A: General radiology: Fundamental physics: radiation biology; radiation protection fundamentals: radiologic methods; radiotherapy; nuclear medicine. Part B: Special radiology: Thorax; heart; urogenital tract and retroperitoneum; vascular system and interventional radiology; esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines; liver, biliary system, pancreas and spleen; mammary glands; central nervous system; spinal cord and spinal canal; basis of the skull, facial bones and eye socket; neck; pediatric imaging diagnostics.

  19. Radiology. 3. rev. and enl. ed.; Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Maximilian [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Kuhn, Fritz-Peter [Klinikum Kassel (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Debus, Juergen [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie

    2011-07-01

    The text book on radiology covers the following issues: Part A: General radiology: Fundamental physics: radiation biology; radiation protection fundamentals: radiologic methods; radiotherapy; nuclear medicine. Part B: Special radiology: Thorax; heart; urogenital tract and retroperitoneum; vascular system and interventional radiology; esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines; liver, biliary system, pancreas and spleen; mammary glands; central nervous system; spinal cord and spinal canal; basis of the skull, facial bones and eye socket; neck; pediatric imaging diagnostics.

  20. Radiology Architecture Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Hogan, Laurie; Teshima, Satoshi; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-19

    The rapid pace of technologic advancement and increasing expectations for patient- and family-friendly environments make it common for radiology leaders to be involved in imaging remodel and construction projects. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in architectural and construction processes but are expected to play significant and often leading roles in all phases of an imaging construction project. Avoidable mistakes can result in significant increased costs and scheduling delays; knowledgeable participation and communication can result in a final product that enhances staff workflow and morale and improves patient care and experience. This article presents practical guidelines for preparing for and leading a new imaging architectural and construction project. We share principles derived from the radiology and nonradiology literature and our own experience over the past decade completely remodeling a large pediatric radiology department and building a full-service outpatient imaging center. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  2. Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, April 1-November 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology and radiological physics. The experiments run at RARAF are described, and center on neutron dosimetry, mutagenesis, and neutron-induced oncogenic transformations as well as survival of exposed cells. Accelerator utilization, operation, and development of facilities are reviewed

  3. Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 [Public Law (PL) 95-6041]. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. The remedial action at the processing site will be conducted to remove the tailings and contaminated materials to meet the EPA bulk soil cleanup standards for surface and subsurface soils. The site areas disturbed by remedial action excavation will be either contoured or backfilled with radiologically uncontaminated soil and contoured to restore the site. The final contours will produce a final surface grade that will create positive drainage from the site

  4. Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina-Gironzini, E.

    2004-01-01

    Considering that professionals with studies, training and experience in Radiological Protection as a Second Professional Specialization must be recognized, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), which is the institution responsible for the promotion and control of ionizing radiations in the country, has sign a specific agreement with the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, in order to develop these courses. They are based on the content of the Post Graduate Course on Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety of the Universidad de Buenos Aires, in Argentina, where more than 360 people from 27 different countries have been trained in the last 20 years. People who have a professional degree in Sciences or Engineering, and who fulfill the requirements demanded by the University, study this Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection. The studies last 2 years and the courses cover the following subjects: Nuclear Physics, Basic Mathematics, Basic Biology, Radiation Sources, Interaction between Radiation and Matter, Radiation Detection and Measurement, Biological effects of ionizing radiations, Radiological protection in the use of radiations in industry and medicine, Regulatory aspects, and nuclear safety - radiological protection interface. IPEN has taken the responsibility to carry out these studies due to its experience in the organization, together with different Universities, of six Masters in Nuclear Energy, four Masters in Medical Physics, one Master in Nuclear Physics, one Master in Nuclear Chemistry, and two Specialization in Nuclear Medicine. For this purpose, IPEN has the Superior Center of Nuclear Studies (CSEN), which has trained more than 2200 people in radiological protection in more than 30 years. CSEN is the first center in the country to train people in the area of nuclear energy and radiological protection. It has the best staff of professors with a both a great education and professional experience, as well as

  5. Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection in Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina-Gironzini, E.

    2004-07-01

    Considering that professionals with studies, training and experience in Radiological Protection as a Second Professional Specialization must be recognized, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), which is the institution responsible for the promotion and control of ionizing radiations in the country, has sign a specific agreement with the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, in order to develop these courses. They are based on the content of the Post Graduate Course on Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety of the Universidad de Buenos Aires, in Argentina, where more than 360 people from 27 different countries have been trained in the last 20 years. People who have a professional degree in Sciences or Engineering, and who fulfill the requirements demanded by the University, study this Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection. The studies last 2 years and the courses cover the following subjects: Nuclear Physics, Basic Mathematics, Basic Biology, Radiation Sources, Interaction between Radiation and Matter, Radiation Detection and Measurement, Biological effects of ionizing radiations, Radiological protection in the use of radiations in industry and medicine, Regulatory aspects, and nuclear safety - radiological protection interface. IPEN has taken the responsibility to carry out these studies due to its experience in the organization, together with different Universities, of six Masters in Nuclear Energy, four Masters in Medical Physics, one Master in Nuclear Physics, one Master in Nuclear Chemistry, and two Specialization in Nuclear Medicine. For this purpose, IPEN has the Superior Center of Nuclear Studies (CSEN), which has trained more than 2200 people in radiological protection in more than 30 years. CSEN is the first center in the country to train people in the area of nuclear energy and radiological protection. It has the best staff of professors with a both a great education and professional experience, as well as

  6. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Physics of W and Z Bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.; Okada, K.; Patwa, A.; Qiu, J.; Surrow, B.

    2010-06-24

    A two-day workshop on 'The Physics of Wand Z Bosons' Was held at the RIKEN BNL Research Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory on June 24-25, 2010. With the recent release of the first measurement of W bosons in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and the first observation of W events at the LHC, the workshop was a timely opportunity to bring together experts from both the high energy particle and nuclear physics communities to share their ideas and expertise on the physics of Wand Z bosons, with the aim of fully exploring the potential of the W/Z physics programs at RHIC and the LHC. The focus was on the production and measurement of W/Z bosons in both polarized and unpolarized proton-proton collisions, and the role of W/Z production in probing the parton flavor and helicity structure of the colliding proton and in the search for new physics. There were lively discussions about the potential and future prospects of W/Z programs at RHIC, Tevatron, and the LHC.

  7. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas – CETUP*2016 Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczerbinska, Barbara [Texas A& M University Corpus Christi, Madison, SD (United States)

    2017-02-15

    For last six years Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*) successfully provided a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Ongoing and proposed Neutrino and Dark Matter experiments are expected to unveil the answers to fundamental questions about the Universe. CETUP*2016 was focused exactly on these subjects bringing together experts in dark matter, neutrino physics, particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics and cosmology from around the world. Scientists invited to participate in the program not only provided theoretical support to the underground science, but they also examined core questions including: What is the nature of dark matter?, What is the origin of the neutrino masses?, How well do we know the neutrino parameters?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, , What are the fundamental underlying symmetries of the Universe? Is there a Grand Unified Theory of the Universe? and many others. The 2016 CETUP* summer program consisted of three sessions (June 6 – July 16, 2016) covering various aspects of theoretical and experimental neutrino physics, unification and dark matter. The two week long session on Physics and Instrumentation of the Near Detector for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments (June 6 – June 16) was followed by the two week long Neutrino Physics/Unification session: “From Grand Unification to String Theory and Back” (June 20 – July 2). The program ended with two week long session on Dark Matter Physics (July 4 – July 16). This six-week long program allowed for thorough discussions and an effective and comprehensive analysis of topics related to Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Neutrino Physics including astrophysical neutrinos, near and far detector physics, neutrino interactions, Higgs Boson, Inflation, Leptogenesis and many others that will advance

  8. La carpeta de aprendizaje: una innovación docente en la asignatura de Radiología y Medicina Física Especial The portfolio: an innovate educational project on the subject of Radiology and Special Physical Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Berná

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Presentar una innovación docente desarrollada en la asignatura de Radiología y Medicina Física Especial durante el curso académico 2006-2007. Sujetos y métodos. Los alumnos realizaron una rotación durante dos semanas en los servicios de Radiodiagnóstico y Medicina Nuclear, en grupos pequeños. La metodología docente utilizada fue la carpeta de aprendizaje o portafolio. Se describen los aspectos fundamentales para la elaboración de la carpeta y de los casos clínicos, así como del sistema de evaluación. Dentro del ciclo de mejora continuada se llevó a cabo una encuesta de satisfacción. Resultados. Los resultados académicos obtenidos fueron excelentes. La mayoría de los alumnos consideraron que la asignatura fue interesante. También señalaron una valoración positiva de la rotación, de los seminarios y del sistema de evaluación. Asimismo, la opinión de los alumnos acerca de la experiencia docente realizada fue muy favorable. Conclusión. La satisfacción global de los alumnos ha sido muy alta con la metodología docente implantada en la asignatura.Aim. To introduce a learning innovation on the subject of Radiology and Special Physical Medicine along the academic year 2006/2007. Subjects and methods. Working in small groups, students carried out a two-week rotation in the departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. The portfolio was the educational methodology used. The main aspects to elaborate the portfolio, the case reports, as well as the evaluation system are described. A satisfaction survey within the continuous improvement course was performed. Results. The academic results achieved were excellent. The subject was considered interesting by most of the students. A positive evaluation about the rotation made by the students, the seminaries and the evaluation system was made. Students’ opinion about the educational experience performed was also, very favourable. Conclusion. The educational methodology

  9. Annual report of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. April 1, 1993 - March 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Nobuyuki; Miura, Iwao; Takahisa, Keiji

    1994-01-01

    This volume of the RCNP annual report gives briefly research activities of the RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics), Osaka University, in the academic year of 1993 (April 1993 - March 1994). RCNP is a national nuclear physics laboratory with the AVF cyclotron and the ring cyclotron. This annual report includes major research activities at RCNP as follows. 1) Low-energy nuclear physics by means of the K=140 MeV AVF cyclotron. Nuclear reactions and nuclear structures were studied. 2) Medium-energy nuclear physics by means of the 0.4 GeV ring cyclotron. The new ring cyclotron is in full operation, and several new progresses in the medium energy nuclear physics have been made. In particular, spin-isospin responses for discrete states, giant resonances and for quasi-free scattering processes have been studied by means of charge exchange reactions. 3) Heavy-ion physics with the secondary radio-active nuclear beams. It includes production of radioactive nuclei with large spin-polarization and studies of snow-balls. 4) Non-accelerator physics programs have started in collaboration with the Dept. Phys. group. Neutrino studies by means of double beta decays and dark matter searches by means of scintillators are under progress at the Kamioka underground laboratory. 5) Theoretical works on nuclear structures and nuclear reactions. The RCNP computers are widely used for theoretical studies all over Japan. 6) Developments of accelerators and detector systems. The new external ion-source and the new axial injection line are build in order to increase beam currents. (J.P.N.)

  10. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  11. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  12. From the measurement to the dose, from model to practice in radiological and medical physics. Diploma of accreditation to supervise research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, D.

    2003-11-01

    After an introduction describing his course in research activities, the author presents and analyzes the current recommendations in the field of radioprotection, focusing more particularly on the standardization and regulation aspects of radioprotection within the frame of medical and radiological physics. He comments the passage from measurement to radiation dose in external dosimetry, by referring to works on passive and active dosimetry, and more particularly on mixed flow neutron dosimetry. Then, he gives an overview of simulation works based on Monte Carlo codes in radioprotection, radio-physics and dosimetry (examples are given dealing with detector response and with the modelling of radioactive sources). He proposes an assessment of the knowledge acquired during this 15 year period of researches in different laboratories, and draws perspectives for future works. Several published articles are also enclosed

  13. Human-centered design of a cyber-physical system for advanced response to Ebola (CARE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Velin; Jagtap, Vinayak; Skorinko, Jeanine; Chernova, Sonia; Gennert, Michael; Padir, Taşkin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the process towards the design of a safe, reliable, and intuitive emergency treatment unit to facilitate a higher degree of safety and situational awareness for medical staff, leading to an increased level of patient care during an epidemic outbreak in an unprepared, underdeveloped, or disaster stricken area. We start with a human-centered design process to understand the design challenge of working with Ebola treatment units in Western Africa in the latest Ebola outbreak, and show preliminary work towards cyber-physical technologies applicable to potentially helping during the next outbreak.

  14. Microscale Ocean Biophysics, Aspen Center for Physics: January 11-16 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-19

    dissolved   organic  matter  persist  in  the  deep  ocean:  Is  the  solution   dilution ?”     8.45  –  Kwangmin  Son...AUTHORS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES 15. SUBJECT TERMS b. ABSTRACT 2. REPORT TYPE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 15. NUMBER OF PAGES...Microscale Ocean Biophysics, Aspen Center for Physics, January 11-16, 2015 Microscopic organisms control ocean processes at global scales. However

  15. Contribution of the Medical Radiology Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, to liquidation of radionuclide contamination aftereffects in the Kaluga Region that resulted from the Chernobyl power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveenko, E.G.; Berdov, B.A.; Gorobets, V.F.; Tsyplyakovskaya, L.M.; Ivanov, V.K.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Pitkevich, V.A.; Omel'chenko, V.N.; Borovikova, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    Specialists from the Medical Radiology Research Center, have been participating in liquidation of the Chernobyl power plant accident aftereffects since May-June, 1986. The basic trends of their work are mass dosimetric studies of the population of the contaminated areas, annual prophylactic check-ups of children and adolescents, pregnant and nursing women and other adults of high-risk groups (agricultural workers, patients with chronic diseases), development of recommendations for health and prophylactic measures in the districts under observation, treatment of patients from these regions, who are in need of a specialized care, at the clinic of the Center

  16. The work of physical education professionals in Family Health Support Centers (NASF: a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueyla Ferreira da Silva dos Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n6p693   This is a descriptive and quantitative national survey aimed at presenting Health Education practices (HE developed by Physical Education professionals working at NASF in Brazil. Overall, 296 professionals participated in this study, stratified by Brazilian regions and NASF groupings. Electronic interviews were conducted regarding the activities developed at the unity where each NASF professional worked. The main activities reported were gymnastics (40.1%, and walking (29.4%, having as their priority public elderly people (68.8%, groups of hypertensive and diabetic patients (30.9% and young people (48.3%, respectively. The most discussed topics in lectures and orientations was the importance of physical activity (51.4% and the second most cited was the prevention/treatment of comorbities (32.3%. The community spaces most utilized by Physical Education professionals to develop activities were: public squares, community centers and schools in the southeastern and southern regions of Brazil, and religious entities in the northeastern and Midwestern regions. In conclusion, in spite of the diversity of activities developed in different regions of Brazil, there is predominance of traditional Physical Education contents, which reflect the need of permanent education of such professionals to improve the quality of services offered to the community.

  17. An Exploration Of Engagement, Motiviation And Student-Centered Learning In Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara WARNER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This author examines the discrepancy between the known benefits of physical activity and the startling statistics of obesity in children between the ages of 12 and 17. She queries if it is time to look at educators as contributing to this problem and questions if our current teaching styles and curriculum are working for students. In addition, the author explores the question if by allowing our students autonomy, will this equate to engagement and motivation to continue to participate in physical activities? Through a discussion of her personal experiences and a literature review focusing on the areas of autonomy, engagement and motivation, the author shares input into how and why some students experience physical education in a negative manner, and some things that educators can do to improve student engagement and motivation. Her argument demonstrates that an autonomous, student-centered teaching approach will positively affect student engagement, which in turn causes motivation and a desire to participate in life-long physical activity.

  18. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    The book presents the radiological manifestations of the maxillodental region in a suitable manner for fast detection and correct diagnosing of diseases of the teeth, soft tissue, and jaws. Classification therefore is made according to the radiological manifestations of the diseases and not according to etiology. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success

  20. Radiological engineering evaluation of the delay time line air scrubber located at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huneycutt, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the addition of an air scrubber to an already existing delay line and whether it would scrub 11 CO 2 . There were three main objectives of this study. The first objective was to determine the scrubbing efficiency of the scrubber. The scrubbing efficiency was then used to predict the dose rates in the scrubber area and compare those values with measurements from radiological surveys. The third objective was to determine if the shield blocks were effective in reducing the dose rates in the scrubber area. The activities were measured before and during scrubber operation and this information was used to calculate the scrubbing efficiency and the efficiency of 11 CO 2 removal was determined to be around 50%. Microshield was then used to predict dose rates and compared those values with measurements from radiological surveys. This was also used to determine the that the shield blocks around the scrubber were effective in reducing the dose rates from the radiation field produced by the radionuclides in the scrubber

  1. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas - CETUP*2013 Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczerbinska, Barbara [Dakota State Univ., Madison, SD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    In response to an increasing interest in experiments conducted at deep underground facilities around the world, in 2010 the theory community has proposed a new initiative - a Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*). The main goal of CETUP* is to bring together people with different talents and skills to address the most exciting questions in particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics, geosciences, and geomicrobiology. Scientists invited to participate in the program do not only provide theoretical support to the underground science, they also examine underlying universal questions of the 21st century including: What is dark matter?, What are the masses of neutrinos?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, How were the elements from iron to uranium made?, What is the origin and thermal history of the Earth? The mission of the CETUP* is to promote an organized research in physics, astrophysics, geoscience, geomicrobiology and other fields related to the underground science via individual and collaborative research in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Our main goal is to bring together scientists scattered around the world, promote the deep underground science and provide a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities. CETUP*2014 included 5 week long program (June 24 – July 26, 2013) covering various theoretical and experimental aspects of Dark Matter, Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics. Two week long session focused on Dark Matter (June 24-July 6) was followed by two week long program on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (July 15-26). The VIIth International Conference on Interconnections between Particle Physics and Cosmology (PPC) was sandwiched between these sessions (July 8-13) covering the subjects of dark matter, neutrino physics, gravitational waves, collider physics and other from both

  2. Radiological protection and routinary controls of an activimeter with a cesium and barium sources in an nuclear medicine center; Proteccion radiologica y controles rutinarios de un activimetro con fuentes de cesio y bario en un centro de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales L, M.E. [IPEN INEN, Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Av. Aviacion 3799, Lima 34 (Peru)]. e-mail: toyoco3000@hotmail.com

    2006-07-01

    In the present work the results when carrying out the routine controls in a Deluxe Isotope (Calibrator II) equipment, with some sources of Cesium 137 and Barium 133, in a Nuclear Medicine Center that operates from the year 1983 in a modern one construction inside the Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses (INEN) are shown. Taking in account the Radiological Protection measures to verify if the equipment responds to the personnel's demands in the measurements of activities of the diverse radionuclides that are used in different types of exams that are carried out in this Nuclear Medicine Center are the objectives of this work. This Center was equipped initially with donated equipment by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with those that it develops assistance, educational works and of research, giving services to patients of the INEN and other public and private medical centers. (Author)

  3. Research Center for Optical Physics: Education and Technology for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    During the past eleven years since its inception, RCOP has excelled in its two primary goals: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, as of May 2003, RCOP produced 36 Bachelors degrees, 25 Masters degrees, and 13 Doctoral degrees. Of these, all 36 Bachelors degrees, 16 of the Masters degrees and 9 of the Doctoral degrees were awarded to African Americans. Four of the Doctoral graduates and one of the Masters graduates are working at NASA Field Centers. RCOP has also provided research experiences to 130 undergraduate students and 22 high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been crucial to the development of the Ph.D. program in physics at Hampton University by providing high quality research training and technical electives required for a Doctoral degree in physics. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. Since 1992, RCOP researchers have leveraged over 8 million dollars in additional research funding, published 152 papers in refereed journals and proceedings, and given 125 presentations at refereed international conferences in the United States and eight other countries. RCOP also developed numerous collaborations with other research centers, universities and industries. In recognition of this outstanding work, RCOP is the first research center in the United States invited to join the Joint Open Laboratory for Laser Crystals and Precise Laser Systems headed by Dr. Alexander Kaminiskii of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  4. Accuracy and calibration of integrated radiation output indicators in diagnostic radiology: A report of the AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 190

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Pei-Jan P.; Schueler, Beth A.; Balter, Stephen; Strauss, Keith J.; Wunderle, Kevin A.; LaFrance, M. Terry; Kim, Don-Soo; Behrman, Richard H.; Shepard, S. Jeff; Bercha, Ishtiaq H.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the proliferation of disciplines employing fluoroscopy as their primary imaging tool and the prolonged extensive use of fluoroscopy in interventional and cardiovascular angiography procedures, “dose-area-product” (DAP) meters were installed to monitor and record the radiation dose delivered to patients. In some cases, the radiation dose or the output value is calculated, rather than measured, using the pertinent radiological parameters and geometrical information. The AAPM Task Group 190 (TG-190) was established to evaluate the accuracy of the DAP meter in 2008. Since then, the term “DAP-meter” has been revised to air kerma-area product (KAP) meter. The charge of TG 190 (Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators in Diagnostic Radiology) has also been realigned to investigate the “Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators” which is reflected in the title of the task group, to include situations where the KAP may be acquired with or without the presence of a physical “meter.” To accomplish this goal, validation test protocols were developed to compare the displayed radiation output value to an external measurement. These test protocols were applied to a number of clinical systems to collect information on the accuracy of dose display values in the field

  5. Accuracy and calibration of integrated radiation output indicators in diagnostic radiology: A report of the AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 190

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Pei-Jan P., E-mail: Pei-Jan.Lin@vcuhealth.org [Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Schueler, Beth A. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Balter, Stephen [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Strauss, Keith J. [Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 (United States); Wunderle, Kevin A. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States); LaFrance, M. Terry [Baystate Health Systems, Inc., Springfield, Massachusetts 01199 (United States); Kim, Don-Soo [Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Behrman, Richard H. [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02118 (United States); Shepard, S. Jeff [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77096 (United States); Bercha, Ishtiaq H. [Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Due to the proliferation of disciplines employing fluoroscopy as their primary imaging tool and the prolonged extensive use of fluoroscopy in interventional and cardiovascular angiography procedures, “dose-area-product” (DAP) meters were installed to monitor and record the radiation dose delivered to patients. In some cases, the radiation dose or the output value is calculated, rather than measured, using the pertinent radiological parameters and geometrical information. The AAPM Task Group 190 (TG-190) was established to evaluate the accuracy of the DAP meter in 2008. Since then, the term “DAP-meter” has been revised to air kerma-area product (KAP) meter. The charge of TG 190 (Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators in Diagnostic Radiology) has also been realigned to investigate the “Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators” which is reflected in the title of the task group, to include situations where the KAP may be acquired with or without the presence of a physical “meter.” To accomplish this goal, validation test protocols were developed to compare the displayed radiation output value to an external measurement. These test protocols were applied to a number of clinical systems to collect information on the accuracy of dose display values in the field.

  6. The importance of recording physical and chemical variables simultaneously with remote radiological surveillance of aquatic systems: a perspective for environmental modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abril, J.M.; El-Mrabet, R.; Barros, H.

    2004-01-01

    Modern nuclear metrological tools allow the remote surveillance of the radiological status of the aquatic systems, providing an important advance in the protection of the environment. Nevertheless, the significance of the radiological data could be highly improved through simultaneous recording of physical and chemical variables that govern the behaviour and bioavailability of radionuclides in these aquatic systems. This work reviews some of these variables from the point of view of the environmental modelling. The amount, nature and dynamics of the suspended loads and bottom sediments strongly influence the behaviour of particle-reactive radionuclides. The kinetics of this process has a very fast component, as it is shown from our recent studies with 241 Am, 239 Pu and 133 Ba in several aquatic systems from southern Spain. Changes in pH, temperature and in the electrical conductivity are influencing the uptake kinetics and the final partitioning of the radioactivity. Water currents govern the radionuclide transport and dispersion. These points are illustrated with modelling exercises in the scenarios of the Suez Canal (Egypt) and the Haersvatten Lake (Sweden)

  7. Non-Destructive Method by Gamma Sampling Measurements for Radiological Characterization of a Steam Generator: Physical and Numerical Modeling for ANIMMA (23-27 June 2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auge, G.; Rottner, B.; Dubois, C.

    2013-06-01

    The radiological characterization of a steam generator consists of evaluating the global radiological activity in the tube bundle. In this paper, we present a non-destructive method and the results analysis of the gamma sampling measurements from a sample of U-tubes in the bundle. On site, the implementation of the methodology is fairly easy. But the analysis of the results is more complicated due to the long path of the gamma ray (from 60 Co quite penetrating), and also the heterogeneous activity of U-tubes bundle, which have not the same life cycle. We explain why the periodic spatial arrangement complicates also the analysis. Furthermore, we have taken into account the environment of all tubes measured because of all the external influence activity of others U-tubes (the nearest, the most distant and potential hot spot). A great amount of independent influence coefficient had to be considered (roughly 18 million). Based on a physical and numerical modeling, and using a Cholesky algorithm solving the problem and saving time machine. (authors)

  8. Handbook of radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgcock, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is organized around radiologic procedures with each discussed from the points of view of: indications, contraindications, materials, method of procedures and complications. Covered in this book are: emergency radiology chest radiology, bone radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, GU radiology, pediatric radiology, computerized tomography, neuroradiology, visceral and peripheral angiography, cardiovascular radiology, nuclear medicine, lymphangiography, and mammography

  9. Investigating student communities with network analysis of interactions in a physics learning center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Brewe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and retention of physics majors. We utilize social network analysis to quantify interactions in Florida International University’s Physics Learning Center (PLC that support the development of academic and social integration. The tools of social network analysis allow us to visualize and quantify student interactions and characterize the roles of students within a social network. After providing a brief introduction to social network analysis, we use sequential multiple regression modeling to evaluate factors that contribute to participation in the learning community. Results of the sequential multiple regression indicate that the PLC learning community is an equitable environment as we find that gender and ethnicity are not significant predictors of participation in the PLC. We find that providing students space for collaboration provides a vital element in the formation of a supportive learning community.

  10. Investigating student communities with network analysis of interactions in a physics learning center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2012-06-01

    Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and retention of physics majors. We utilize social network analysis to quantify interactions in Florida International University’s Physics Learning Center (PLC) that support the development of academic and social integration. The tools of social network analysis allow us to visualize and quantify student interactions and characterize the roles of students within a social network. After providing a brief introduction to social network analysis, we use sequential multiple regression modeling to evaluate factors that contribute to participation in the learning community. Results of the sequential multiple regression indicate that the PLC learning community is an equitable environment as we find that gender and ethnicity are not significant predictors of participation in the PLC. We find that providing students space for collaboration provides a vital element in the formation of a supportive learning community.

  11. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Engineering. Progress report on research and development work in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Engineering is concerned with research work in the field of nuclear engineering related to the safety of thermal reactors as well as with specific problems of fusion reactor technology. Under the project of nuclear safety research, the Institute works on concepts designed to drastically improve reactor safety. Apart from that, methods to estimate and minimize the radiological consequences of reactor accidents are developed. Under the fusion technology project, the Institute deals with neutron physics and technological questions of the breeding blanket. Basic research covers technico-physical questions of the interaction between light ion radiation of a high energy density and matter. In addition and to a small extent, questions of employing hydrogen in the transport area are studied. (orig.) [de

  12. Evaluation design of New York City's regulations on nutrition, physical activity, and screen time in early child care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breck, Andrew; Goodman, Ken; Dunn, Lillian; Stephens, Robert L; Dawkins, Nicola; Dixon, Beth; Jernigan, Jan; Kakietek, Jakub; Lesesne, Catherine; Lessard, Laura; Nonas, Cathy; O'Dell, Sarah Abood; Osuji, Thearis A; Bronson, Bernice; Xu, Ye; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-10-16

    This article describes the multi-method cross-sectional design used to evaluate New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's regulations of nutrition, physical activity, and screen time for children aged 3 years or older in licensed group child care centers. The Center Evaluation Component collected data from a stratified random sample of 176 licensed group child care centers in New York City. Compliance with the regulations was measured through a review of center records, a facility inventory, and interviews of center directors, lead teachers, and food service staff. The Classroom Evaluation Component included an observational and biometric study of a sample of approximately 1,400 children aged 3 or 4 years attending 110 child care centers and was designed to complement the center component at the classroom and child level. The study methodology detailed in this paper may aid researchers in designing policy evaluation studies that can inform other jurisdictions considering similar policies.

  13. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions

  14. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

  15. Radiological protection Program of CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiological protection program of CDTN, its purposes and rules, responsabilities, physical control, monitoring, personnel radiation protection, radiation sources and radioactive wastes control, emergency and accidents and siting are described. (C.M.) [pt

  16. Radiation during pregnancy: physical aspects relevant to radiological safety of the fetus; Radioterapia durante a gravidez: aspectos fisicos relevantes para seguranca radiologica do feto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Dermatologia e Radioterapia; Pasqueta, Jessica; Branco, Isabela S.L.; Meira, Luiza L.C.; Morelli, Humberto A.S., E-mail: marfernandes@fmb.unesp.br, E-mail: marco@cetea.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias

    2013-08-15

    The work presents the physical and radiological protection procedures involved in radiotherapy performed in patients during pregnancy that contribute to the security and development of the fetus. We analyzed clinical cases studies with confirmed pregnancy undergoing radiotherapy. The study also analyzed the dosimetry protocols specific to different treatment fields considering the absorbed dose in the region estimated fetal through experimental measurements and computer simulations presented in the literature. It is discussed the concepts of radiation fetuses presented in the Report of the AAPM TG 36 focusing on the influence of the use of appropriate shielding and peripheral dose distribution outside the primary radiation field. Studies show no consensus on the threshold dose for fetal exposure, with values ranging between 2 and 25 cGy, depending on gestational age and position within the abdomen. As recommended by the organs of radiological protection in Brazil, the equivalent dose of radiation to the abdomen of pregnant women occupationally exposed should not exceed 2.0 mSv for the entire period of pregnancy. The measurements show that the main factors contributing to the increase in dose to the fetus are: radiation trail head, scattering from the collimator and dispersion by tissue irradiated region to the region surrounding the fetus. The results of research and clinical situations illustrated in reviewed scientific articles indicate that radiotherapy in pregnant patients is feasible, provided that the dose to the fetus is less than the threshold values, which can be achieved by the use of screens and settings fields Radiation appropriate and properly planned by experts who should simulate physical prior to treatment. The work aims to contribute to subsidize the treatment decision in radiotherapy procedures in pregnant patients pointing out the risks and benefits when the need for treatment. (author)

  17. Polarized Electron Beams for Nuclear Physics at the MIT Bates Accelerator Center

    CERN Document Server

    Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Franklin, Wilbur; Ihloff, Ernie; McAllister, Brian; Milner, Richard; North, William; Tschalär, C; Tsentalovich, Evgeni; Wang, Defa; Wang, Dong; Wang, Fuhua; Zolfaghari, Abbasali; Zwart, Townsend; van der Laan, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The MIT Bates Accelerator Center is delivering highly polarized electron beams to its South Hall Ring for use in Nuclear Physics Experiments. Circulating electron currents in excess of 200 mA with polarization of 70% are scattered from a highly polarized, but very thin atomic beam source deuterium target. At the electron source a compact diode laser creates photoemission of quasi-CW mA pulses of polarized electrons at low duty factors from a strained GaAs photocathode. Refurbished RF transmitters provide power to the 2856 MHz linac, accelerating the beam to 850 MeV in two passes before injection into the South Hall Ring. In the ring a Siberian snake serves to maintain a high degree of longitudinal polarization at the BLAST scattering target. A Compton laser back-scattering polarimeter measures the electron beam polarization with a statistical acuracy of 6% every 15 minutes.

  18. Intermediate energy nuclear physics at the MIT-Bates linear accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarcon, R.

    2001-01-01

    The MlT-Bates linear accelerator center is a University-based laboratory carrying out frontier research in electromagnetic nuclear physics. The research program is focussed on the flavor structure, charge distribution, shape, size and polarizability of the nucleon; the spin and electromagnetic structure of light nuclei; and the origin of the elements. The Bates research program has three central thrusts: the SAMPLE experiments to probe the flavor structure of the proton using parity-violating electron scattering at back angles; the OOPS (out-of-plane spectrometer system) program which uses out-of-plane detection to probe nucleon and few-body nuclear structure; and the BLAST (Bates large acceptance spectrometer toroid) program which will use a new spectrometer under construction to measure electron scattering from internal gas targets in the south hall ring. (Author)

  19. Annual report of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. 1997 (April 1, 1997-March 31, 1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hiroshi; Sakai, Tsutomu; Hirata, Maiko

    1998-01-01

    Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) is the national center of nuclear physics in Japan, which is a laboratory complex of the cyclotron laboratory, the laser electron photon laboratory, and the Oto underground laboratory and aims at studies of nucleon meson nuclear physics and quark lepton nuclear physics. In the cyclotron laboratory, AVF/Ring cyclotron complex provides high quality beams of polarized protons and light ions in the medium energy region. Experimental studies have extensively been carried out on nucleon meson nuclear physics. The subjects studied include the nucleon mass and the nuclear interaction in nuclear medium, nuclear spin isospin motions and nuclear responses for neutrinos, pions and isobars interactions, medium energy nuclear reactions of light heavy ions, medical applications, and so on. The Oto Cosmo Observatory is the low background underground laboratory for lepton nuclear physics, and is used for applied science. The laser photon laboratory is used to study quark nuclear physics by means of the multi-GeV laser electron photon beam, and will be ready in the academic year of 1998 to be used for studying quark gluon structures and low-energy QCD. The accelerator researches and developments are being carried out for the new future plan of the multi-GeV electron proton collider. Theoretical works on nuclear particle physics have extensively been made by the RCNP theory groups and laser groups. Computer, network and DAQ systems, including the supercomputer system and the new generation network, have been developed. In this report, 25 reports of nuclear physics, 8 reports of lepton nuclear physics, 1 report of quark nuclear physics, and 2 reports of interdisciplinary physics are described in the experimental nuclear physics. And, 16 reports of quark nuclear physics, 9 reports of intermediate nuclear physics, 19 reports of nuclear physics, and 1 report of miscellaneous are described in the theoretical physics. (G.K.)

  20. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  1. Radiological optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological optimization is one of the basic principles in each radiation-protection system and it is a basic requirement in the safety standards for radiation protection in the European Communities. The objectives of the research, performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, are: (1) to implement the ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for optimization techniques in decision-aiding; (3) to optimize radiological assessment models by validation and intercomparison; (4) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (5) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (6) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (7) to investigate existing software programmes in the domain of multi criteria analysis. The main achievements for 1997 are given

  2. Physical chemistry characterization of soils of the Storage Center of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez T, U. O.; Fernandez R, E.; Monroy G, F.; Anguiano A, J.

    2011-11-01

    Any type of waste should be confined so that it does not causes damage to the human health neither the environment and for the storage of the radioactive wastes these actions are the main priority. In the Storage Center of Radioactive Wastes the radioactive wastes generated in Mexico by non energy applications are storage of temporary way. The present study is focused in determining the physical chemistry properties of the lands of the Storage Center of Radioactive Wastes like they are: real density, ph, conductivity percentage of organic matter and percentage of humidity. With what is sought to make a characterization to verify the reaction capacity of the soils in case of a possible flight of radioactive material. The results show that there are different density variations, ph and conductivity in all the soil samples; the ph and conductivity vary with regard to the contact time between the soil and their saturation point in water, for the case of the density due to the characteristics of the same soil; for what is not possible to establish a general profile, but is necessary to know the properties of each soil type more amply. Contrary case is the content of organic matter and humidity since both are in minor proportions. (Author)

  3. Radiological hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the (United Kingdom) National Radiological Protection Board is discussed. The following topics are mentioned: relative contributions to genetically significant doses of radiation from various sources; radon gas in non-coal mines and in dwelling houses; effects of radiation accidents; radioactive waste disposal; radiological protection of the patient in medicine; microwaves, infrared radiation and cataracts; guidance notes for use with forthcoming Ionising Radiations Regulations; training courses; personal dosimetry service; work related to European Communities. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear or radiology: which term to use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document brings information and definition to help the public in the distinction between the two terms: nuclear and radiologic. What means the words nuclear and radiologic in the physics and common languages? In which situation an accidental or malevolent event can be called nuclear or radiologic? By which technic and for which use is concerned the radiology? It concludes by recommendation for the choice of one or the other term. (A.L.B.)

  5. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1978-September 1979. Part I. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Research on the chemical physics of atoms and molecules, especially their interaction with external agents such as photons and electrons is reported. Abstracts of seven individual items from the report were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  6. Radiation safety in operation with morally and physically obsolete radiological devices is a imperative of the day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, A.; Grajdieru, L.; Coretchi, L.

    2009-01-01

    The activity with superannuated morally and physically radio-diagnostic device needs an increased attention to perform obligatory monthly technical revision, annual and every quarter (in radiotherapy) dosimetry and correctness of technical parameters (KV and exposition time), estimation of all superannuated morally and physically dosimeters, which are still utilized. The most efficient measure of radioprotection suitable assurance in activity with such devices is their urgent renovation. (authors)

  7. [Physical and pharmacological restraints in geriatric and gerontology services and centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Cordero, Primitivo; López Trigo, José Antonio; Maíllo Pedraz, Herminio; Paz Rubio, José María

    2015-01-01

    Physical and pharmacological restraints are a controversial issue in the context of geriatric care due to their moral, ethical, social and legal repercussions and, despite this fact, no specific legislation exists at a national level. The use of restraints is being questioned with growing frequency, as there are studies that demonstrate that restraints do not reduce the number of falls or their consequences, but rather can increase them, cause complications, injuries and potentially fatal accidents. Restraints are not always used rationally, despite compromising a fundamental human right, that is, freedom, protected in the Constitution, as well as values and principles, such as dignity and personal self-esteem. There are centers where restraints are applied to more than 50% of patients, and in some cases without the consent of their legal representatives. On some occasions, restraints are used for attaining organizational or environmental objectives, such as complying with tight schedules, and for reducing or avoiding the supervision of patients who walk erratically and, at times, are used indefinitely. Even greater confusion exists with respect to the emerging concept of chemical or pharmacological restraints, since no conceptual framework exists based on scientific evidence, and with sufficient consensus for guiding healthcare workers. In this context, the Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología (SEGG--Spanish Geriatrics and Gerontology Society), aware of the significance and transcendence of the issue, and in an attempt to preserve and guarantee maximum freedom, dignity and self-esteem, on the one hand, and to ensure the maximum integrity and legal certainty of the persons cared for in geriatric and gerontology services and centers, on the other, decided to create an "Interdisciplinary Committee on Restraints" made up by members from different disciplines and members of SEGG Working Groups or Committees, external health care workers, groups

  8. Emotional Exhaustion and Motivation in Physical Education Teachers: A Variable-Centered and Person-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berghe, Lynn; Cardon, Greet; Aelterman, Nathalie; Tallir, Isabel Barbara; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Haerens, Leen

    2013-01-01

    Burnout in teachers is related to different maladaptive outcomes. This study aimed at exploring the relationship between emotional exhaustion and motivation to teach in 93 physical education teachers. Results showed that teachers report more emotional exhaustion when they are less autonomously motivated, while the opposite relationship was found…

  9. Validation of a physically based catchment model for application in post-closure radiological safety assessments of deep geological repositories for solid radioactive wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, M C; Degnan, P; Ewen, J; Parkin, G

    2000-12-01

    The physically based river catchment modelling system SHETRAN incorporates components representing water flow, sediment transport and radionuclide transport both in solution and bound to sediments. The system has been applied to simulate hypothetical future catchments in the context of post-closure radiological safety assessments of a potential site for a deep geological disposal facility for intermediate and certain low-level radioactive wastes at Sellafield, west Cumbria. In order to have confidence in the application of SHETRAN for this purpose, various blind validation studies have been undertaken. In earlier studies, the validation was undertaken against uncertainty bounds in model output predictions set by the modelling team on the basis of how well they expected the model to perform. However, validation can also be carried out with bounds set on the basis of how well the model is required to perform in order to constitute a useful assessment tool. Herein, such an assessment-based validation exercise is reported. This exercise related to a field plot experiment conducted at Calder Hollow, west Cumbria, in which the migration of strontium and lanthanum in subsurface Quaternary deposits was studied on a length scale of a few metres. Blind predictions of tracer migration were compared with experimental results using bounds set by a small group of assessment experts independent of the modelling team. Overall, the SHETRAN system performed well, failing only two out of seven of the imposed tests. Furthermore, of the five tests that were not failed, three were positively passed even when a pessimistic view was taken as to how measurement errors should be taken into account. It is concluded that the SHETRAN system, which is still being developed further, is a powerful tool for application in post-closure radiological safety assessments.

  10. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  11. Physical properties of new collimator cone system for stereotactic radiation therapy developed in samsung medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D Y; Ahn, Y C; Oh, D G; Choi, D R; Ju, S G; Yeo, I H; Huh, S J

    2000-09-01

    A new collimator cone system has been developed at the Samsung Medical Center that overcomes some of the limitations of present commercially supplied collimator cones. The physical properties of the newly developed cone system are described in this report. The new cones have relatively larger aperture sizes (3.0-7.0 cm in diameter) and are 16 cm in length. Each new cone is fabricated with cerrobend alloy melted and poured into a stainless steel housing that is permanently fixed to a mounting plate. The mounting plate of the new cone is designed to insert into the wedge mount slot of the gantry head. The mechanical accuracy of the central axis of the cone pointing to the isocenter was tested using film, a steel ball positioned at the isocenter by the mechanical isocenter device. For the evaluation of beam flatness and penumbra, off-axis ratios at 5 cm depth were measured by film dosimetry using polystyrene phantom. The average error of the mechanical isocenter was 0.27 mm (+/- 0.16 mm). The beam flatness was excellent in the central region of the beam, and the average penumbra width was 3.35 mm (+/- 0.25 mm). The new cone design has more clearance between the patient's head and the gantry, and can more easily be removed from the gantry head because it slides in and out of the wedge slot. This facilitates changing cone sizes during one treatment session, and makes the process of double exposure port films easier. A new collimator cone system for stereotactic radiation therapy has been developed. The mechanical accuracy and physical properties are satisfactory for clinical use, and the new design permits a wider range of clinical applications for stereotactic radiation therapy.

  12. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  13. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs [de

  14. Postoperative radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenne, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of postoperative radiology. Most surgical procedures on the alimentary tract are successful, but postoperative complications remain a common occurrence. The radiologist must be familiar with a large variety of possible surgical complications, because it is this specialty that is most commonly called on to render a definitive diagnosis. The decision for reoperation, for instance, is usually based on results from radiologic imaging techniques. These now include ultrasonography, CT scanning, needle biopsy, and interventional techniques in addition to contrast studies and nuclear medicine investigation

  15. The role of physical therapists in the context of family health support centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Cristina Braghini

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Since 2008, with the establishment of Family Health Support Centers (NASF, physiotherapists have been listed among professionals to be included in the team. Physical therapists have many assignments in the NASF, which are conducted through group sessions, in the households, with complementary and integrative practices, lectures and referrals to reference services. Objective: To analyze role and obstacles to the realization of the work of the physiotherapists in NASF. Methods: This is a qualitative research, guided by the case study method. The population was composed by eight physiotherapists active in NASF. Participant observation and semi-structured interviews with physiotherapists were used for data collection. Results: The actions performed by physiotherapists consist of group assistance, home visits, ear therapy and oxygen therapy and activities of health education and disease prevention. As for the barriers, these included lack of training to work at NASF; structural and organizational impediments; insufficient workload and fragility of professional training to work with public health. Conclusion: The role of physiotherapists is in line, in part, with the guidelines recommended by NASF, but principles as matrix support and collective pacts need to be strengthened.

  16. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  17. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  18. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  19. Differences Between the Family-Centered "COPCA" Program and Traditional Infant Physical Therapy Based on Neurodevelopmental Treatment Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, Tineke; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H.; Hulshof, Lily J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background. Evidence for effectiveness of pediatric physical therapy in infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders is limited. Therefore, "Coping With and Caring for Infants With Special Needs" (COPCA), a family-centered, early intervention program, was developed. The COPCA program is

  20. Interrelationship of motivation for and perceived constraints to physical activity participation and the well-being of senior center participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoko Miyake; Ellen Rodgers

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of motivation for and perceived constraints to physical activity (PA) participation and the well-being of senior center participants. A survey instrument made up of modified versions of the Sport Motivation and Perceived Constraints Scales, the Life Satisfaction Index-Z, and the Geriatric Depression Scale was administered at the...

  1. Fundamentals of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.; Mill, A.J.; Charles, M.W.

    1978-05-01

    The basic processes of living cells which are relevant to an understanding of the interaction of ionizing radiation with man are described. Particular reference is made to cell death, cancer induction and genetic effects. This is the second of a series of reports which present the fundamentals necessary for an understanding of the bases of regulatory criteria such as those recommended by the International Commision on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Others consider basic radiation physics and the biological effects of ionizing radiation. (author)

  2. Radiological containment handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to be used as a reference text. It is meant to be used by the working personnel as a guide for using temporary radiological containments. The installing group and health physics group may vary among organizations but responsibilities and duties will not change. It covers installation and inspection containments; working and operating guidelines; operating requirement; emergency procedures; and removal of containments

  3. Fundamentals of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, A.J.; Charles, M.W.; Wells, J.

    1978-04-01

    A review is presented of basic radiation physics with particular relevance to radiological protection. The processes leading to the production and absorption of ionising radiation are outlined, and the important dosimetric quantities and their units of measurements. The review is the first of a series of reports presenting the fundamentals necessary for an understanding of the basis of regulatory criteria such as those recommended by the ICRP. (author)

  4. Analysis of the Radiology Reports from Radiology Clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Kwack, Kyu Sung; Cho, Jae Hyun; Jang, Eun Ho

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the form and content of the radiology reports from radiology clinics in Korea. One hundred and sixty six radiology reports from 49 radiology clinics were collected, and these reports were referred to the academic tertiary medical center from March 2008 to February 2009. These included reports for CT (n = 18), MRI (n = 146) and examinations not specified (n = 2). Each report was evaluated for the presence of required contents (demographics, technical information, findings, conclusion, the name, license number and signature of the radiologist and the referring facility). These requirements were based on the guideline of the American College of Radiology and the previous research. The name of the patient, the gender, the body part, the type of examination, the time of examination and the conclusion, the name of the radiologist and the name of facility were well recorded in over 90% of the radiology reports. However, the identification number of the patient, the referring facility, the referring physician, the use of contrast material, the clinical information, the time of dictation, the signature of the radiologist and the license number of the radiologist were poorly recorded (less than 50%). The optimal format of a radiology report should be established for reliable and valid communication with clinicians

  5. Radiological protection and its organization in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    By means of a research carried out in Radiotherapy Centers in Mexico City, divided in 7 public institutions and 5 private, aspects related to the radiological safety and its organization in radiotherapy were evaluated. The population being studied was: medical and technical personnel, that works in the selected radiotherapy centers. The survey was made with 36 dichotomic variables, being obtained 90 surveys. The personnel characteristics are: 76% works for more than 3 years in radiotherapy, 93% has updated information about radiological protection, 67% knows the general radiological safety regulations, 93% knows the radiological emergency project and 95% makes use of personal dosemeter. As result of this research we found that the main problems that the radiological protection have are: lack of personnel training in radiological protection, although the 93% states to have updated information, the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G. (ed.) [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  7. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  8. Targeted methods for measuring patient satisfaction in a radiological center; Gezielte Methoden zur Messung der Patientenzufriedenheit in einem radiologischen Versorgungszentrum (MVZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, M.H.; Stein, E.; Schreiter, N.F.; Renz, D.M.; Poellinger, A. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate two event-oriented methods for evaluating patient satisfaction with radiological services like outpatient computed tomography (CT) examinations. Materials and Methods: 159 patients (55 % men, 45 % women) were asked to complete a questionnaire to provide information about their satisfaction with their examination. At first, patients were asked to spontaneously recall notably positive and negative aspects (so-called 'critical incidents', critical incident technique = CIT) of the examination. Subsequently a flow chart containing all single steps of the examination procedure was shown to all patients. They were asked to point out the positive and negative aspects they perceived at each step (so-called sequential incident technique = SIT). Results: The CIT-based part of the questionnaire yielded 356 comments (183 positive and 173 negative), which were assigned to one of four categories: interaction of staff with patient, procedure and organization, CT examination, and overall setting of the examination. Significantly more detailed comments regarding individual aspects of the CT examination were elicited in the second part of the survey, which was based on the SIT. There were 1413 statements with a significantly higher number of positive comments (n = 939, 66 %) versus negative comments (n = 474, 34 %; p < 0.001). Conclusion: The critical and sequential incident techniques are suitable to measure the subjective satisfaction with the delivery of radiological services such as CT examinations. Positive comments confirm the adequacy of the existing procedures, while negative comments provide direct information about how service quality can be improved. (orig.)

  9. The role of the Swiss EIR Health Physics Division in the national and the Institute's radiological emergency organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, E.; Brunner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Owing to the geographical concentration in Switzerland of the activities related to radioactivity (power plants, research, industry, transport) in a relatively small region between the Alps and the Rhine, it was a logical consequence to centralize the emergency organization for nuclear accidents in this area. Since 1984 the Swiss emergency organization has had an operational, well-equipped national emergency control centre. In the handling of radiation accidents the new organization can call on specialized laboratories and make use of experience and material from over the whole country. Of these facilities the Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR) is of major importance due to its activities and experience in research and radiation protection. Its Health Physics Division takes an active part in the emergency organization of the EIR itself. Both its well-equipped radioanalytical laboratory and trained personnel are at the disposal of the national emergency organization. Frequent training of the whole emergency organization and parts of it have improved preparedness. The evaluation of the exercises always reveals new problems to be solved in which rapid action and safe communications are of major importance. (author)

  10. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  11. Use of bioindicators in the environmental radiological surveillance of Mexican Nuclear Center; Utilizacion de biondicadores en la vigilancia radiologica ambiental del Centro Nuclear de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaso P, M.I.; Segovia, N.; Herrera, T.; Perez S, E.; Cervantes, M.L.; Quintero, E.; Palacios, J.; Acosta, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Herrera, T. [UNAM Instituto Biologia, 04510 Ciudad Univ., Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    Cs-137 and K-40 concentrations were determined in soil samples and wild eatable mushrooms at the forest ecosystem of Mexican Nuclear Center and its surrounding area. The evaluation was carried out with a low bottom gamma spectroscopy system including a high-purity Ge detector (HPGe). The local species that showed greater soil-mushroom transference factor, for Cs-137, were Clavariadelphus truncatus, Cortinarius caerulescenc, Gomphus floccosus and Lyophyllum decastes. The Cs-137 levels obtained in the mushroom samples of Nuclear Center, were in general slightly lower than those of adjacent places, which indicates that this Center is not polluting the atmosphere with such radionuclide. (Author)

  12. Radiologic Predictors for Clinical Stage IA Lung Adenocarcinoma with Ground Glass Components: A Multi-Center Study of Long-Term Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Li

    Full Text Available This study was to define preoperative predictors from radiologic findings for the pathologic risk groups based on long-term surgical outcomes, in the aim to help guide individualized patient management.We retrospectively reviewed 321 consecutive patients with clinical stage IA lung adenocarcinoma with ground glass component on computed tomography (CT scanning. Pathologic diagnosis for resection specimens was based on the 2011 IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of lung adenocarcinoma. Patients were classified into different pathologic risk grading groups based on their lymph node status, local regional recurrence and overall survival. Radiologic characteristics of the pulmonary nodules were re-evaluated by reconstructed three-dimension CT (3D-CT. Univariate and multivariate analysis identifies independent radiologic predictors from tumor diameter, total volume (TV, average CT value (AVG, and solid-to-tumor (S/T ratio. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC studies were carried out to determine the cutoff value(s for the predictor(s. Univariate cox regression model was used to determine the clinical significance of the above findings.A total of 321 patients with clinical stage IA lung adenocarcinoma with ground glass components were included in our study. Patients were classified into two pathologic low- and high- risk groups based on their distinguished surgical outcomes. A total of 134 patients fell into the low-risk group. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified AVG (HR: 32.210, 95% CI: 3.020-79.689, P<0.001 and S/T ratio (HR: 12.212, 95% CI: 5.441-27.408, P<0.001 as independent predictors for pathologic risk grading. ROC curves studies suggested the optimal cut-off values for AVG and S/T ratio were-198 (area under the curve [AUC] 0.921, 2.9 (AUC 0.996 and 54% (AUC 0.907, respectively. The tumor diameter and TV were excluded for the low AUCs (0.778 and 0.767. Both the cutoff values of AVG and S/T ratio were correlated with pathologic

  13. Safety aspects in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D.C. da.

    1991-05-01

    The development of a program for the evaluation of the physical installations and operational procedures in diagnostic radiology with respect to radiation-safety is described. In addition, a proposal for the quality analysis of X-ray equipment and film-processing is presented. The purpose is both to ensure quality and safety of the radiology service, as well as to aid in the initial and in-service training of the staff. Interviews with patients, staff practicing radiology at a wide range of levels and the controlling authorities were carried out in the State of Rio de Janeiro in order to investigate the existence and the effective use of personal radioprotection equipment as well as user's and staff's concern for radiation safety. Additionally physical measurements were carried out in University Hospitals in Rio de Janeiro to assess the quality of equipment in day-to-day use. It was found that in the locations which did not have routine maintenance the equipment was generally in a poor state which lead to a high incidence of repetition of examinations and the consequent financial loss. (author)

  14. Radiological response and dosimetry in physical phantom of head and neck for 3D conformational radiotherapy; Resposta radiologica e dosimetria em phantom fisico de cabeca e pescoco para radioterapia conformacional 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa

    2013-07-01

    Phantoms are tools for simulation of organs and tissues of the human body in radiology and radiotherapy. This thesis describes the development, validation and, most importantly, the use of a physical head and neck phantom in radiology and radiotherapy, with the purpose of evaluating dose distribution using Gafchromic EBT2 film in 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy. The work was divided in two stages, (1) development of new equivalent tissues and improvement of the physical phantom, and (2) use of the physical phantom in experimental dosimetry studies. In phase (1) parameters such as mass density, chemical composition of tissues, anatomical and biometric measurements were considered, as well as aspects of imaging by computed tomography (CT) and radiological response representation in Hounsfield Units (HU), which were compared with human data. Radiological experiments of in-phantom simulated brain pathologies were also conducted. All those results matched human-sourced data, therefore the physical phantom is a suitable simulator that may be used to enhance radiological protocols and education in medical imaging. The main objective in phase (2) was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution in a brain tumor simulator inserted inside the head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI), exposed to 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy, for internal dose assessment. Radiation planning was based on CT images of the physical phantom with a brain tumor simulator made with equivalent material. The treatment planning system (TPS), CAT3D software, used CT images and prescribed a dose of 200 cGy, distributed in three fields of radiation, in a T-shaped pattern. The TPS covered the planning treatment volume (PTV) with 97% of the prescribed dose. A solid water phantom and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film were used for calibration procedures, generating a dose response curve as a function of optical density (OD). After calibration and irradiation, the film

  15. Radiological diagnosis in traumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahm, R.

    2001-01-01

    This loose-leaf publication covers all radiological problems that may possibly occur in accident surgery. The focus is on conventional radiological diagnosis. The physical and technical fundamentals of diagnostic examination methods are discussed, followed by practical hints on radiation protection, technical equipment and quality assurance, as well as accurate information on the procedure of taking and interpreting standard X-ray pictures. The indications for standard X-raying, tomography, CT and MRT are presented in consideration of the radiation exposure incurred by the patient. The reader is also informed on the dynamics and varying morphology of bone fracture healing, potential disturbances of callus formation and reconstruction, as well as on possible complications. The main section of the book discusses injuries of the skull, spinal cord, pectoral girdle, upper arm, elbow and lower arm, wrist and hands, pelvis, hip joint, knee and upper and lower leg, ankle joint and foot, thorax and abdomen. (orig.)

  16. Radiology for veterinarians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempel, K.

    1983-01-01

    The author has made an attempt to comprise the extensive and heterogenic area of radiological topics in the sense of a studying support for the second part of the veterinary examination and as an introduction to the entire area. Numerous details, exact physical derivations and more extensive radiological tables and graphs had to be left out to achieve the brief and understandable form. On the other hand, in addition to the test subjects, at least a few of the particularly up-to-date problems of this branch had to be emphasized and the data necessary to assess them had to be given. This explains the extensive form of the manuscript and the frequent occurrence of numbers, especially in the chapters radioecology, radiobiology and radiotoxicology. (orig./MG) With 65 figs., 76 tabs [de

  17. Radiological control implementation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamley, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program

  18. Theoretical studies in medium-energy nuclear and hadronic physics. [Indiana Univ. Nuclear Theory Center and Department of Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, C J; Macfarlane, M H; Matsui, T; Serot, B D

    1993-01-01

    A proposal for theoretical nuclear physics research is made for the period April 1, 1993 through March 31, 1996. Research is proposed in the following areas: relativistic many-body theory of nuclei and nuclear matter, quasifree electroweak scattering and strange quarks in nuclei, dynamical effects in (e,e[prime]p) scattering at large momentum transfer, investigating the nucleon's parton sea with polarized leptoproduction, physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus[endash]nucleus collisions, QCD sum rules and hadronic properties, non-relativistic models of nuclear reactions, and spin and color correlations in a quark-exchange model of nuclear matter. Highlights of recent research, vitae of principal investigators, and lists of publications and invited talks are also given. Recent research dealt primarily with medium-energy nuclear physics, relativistic theories of nuclei and the nuclear response, the nuclear equation of state under extreme conditions, the dynamics of the quark[endash]gluon plasma in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and theories of the nucleon[endash]nucleon force.

  19. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  20. Current state of a dosimetric evaluation programme in diagnostic radiology installations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Gonzalez, L.; Calzado, A.; Delgado, V.; Moran, P.; Sanchez, B.; Murias, F.

    1988-01-01

    The Medical Physics Group at the School of Medicine of the Complutense University of Madrid, started a programme on the study of radiation doses in relation to Diagnostic Radiology in the area of Madrid in 1986, in cooperation with the Department of Health and Consumer Affairs, and several Madrid area hospitals as well as some Outpatient Centers. In Spain, the National Health Service (NHS) (through the National Institute of Health, INSALUD), potentially cares for the health of approximately 94% of the population. This figure reaches 99% at the Community of Madrid. Radiological examinations are performed mainly in Hospitals and Outpatient Centers (the latter making up a first link in the patient's radiological diagnosis). Private Diagnostic Radiology is used by the remaining 6% of the population (not taking into account the population attended in military hospitals), and by patients who in spite of having access to NHS Diagnostic Radiology Services, prefer to choose the private sector for different reasons. Besides the data we obtained during the first year of study from four large Madrid-area hospitals (and a few outpatient centers); we have used data furnished by the Department of Health and Consumer Affairs, the INSALUD and other sources

  1. Cardiothoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    A wealth of cardiothoracic websites exist on the internet. What follows is a list of the higher quality resources currently available which should save you time searching them out for yourself. Many of the sites listed cater for undergraduates and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, nevertheless these may also be of interest to specialists in thoracic radiology, particularly for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (April 2005)

  2. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  3. Physics Myth Busting: A Lab-Centered Course for Non-Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Martin John

    2011-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in how and what we teach in physics courses for non-science students, so-called "physics for poets" courses. Art Hobson has effectively argued that teaching science literacy should be a key ingredient in these courses. Hobson uses Jon Millers definition of science literacy, which has two components: first, "a basic…

  4. Breaking Barriers: Women-Centered Physical Education Programming in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Elaine; Appleby, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    In general, physical activity subsides for females after high school. Researchers have found that women experience unique barriers to remaining physically active during their college years. Obstacles such as social anxiety, lack of social support, and life balance have been cited as challenges for women in relation to maintaining consistent…

  5. Radiological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant has been shown the radiation dose to the public from plant operation to be quite small. Calculations from the reported release rates yield 0.2 mrem whole body dose and 0.6 mrem skin dose for the calendar quarter of maximum release. Radioactivity discharges to the Chesapeake Bay have resulted in detectable concentrations of /sup 110m/Ag, 58 Co, and 60 Co in sediments and shellfish. The area yielding samples with detectable concentrations of plant effluents extends for roughly six miles up and down the western shore, with maximum values found at the plant discharge area. The radiation dose to an individual eating 29 doz oysters and 15 doz crabs (5 kg of each) taken from the plant discharge area would be about 4/1000 mrem whole body dose and 0.2 mrem gastrointestinal tract dose (about 0.007% and 0.5% of the applicable guidelines, respectively.) Comparison of these power plant-induced doses with the fluctuations in natural radiation dose already experienced by the public indicates that the power plant effects are insignificant. The natural variations are tens of times greater than the maximum doses resulting from Calvert Cliffs Power Plant. Although operations to date provide an insufficient basis to predict radiological impact of the Calvert Cliffs Plant over its operational lifetime, available data indicate that the plant should continue to operate with insignificant radiological impact, well within all applicable guidelines

  6. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  7. Radiological malpractice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.

    1987-01-01

    As medico-legal statistics show, compared with other branches of medicine, cases of liability of the radiologist or his assistants are relatively rare. The duty to exercise due care as set out in Paragraph 6 of the Austrian penal code or Paragraph 276 of the German civil code, respectively, provide a basic rule of law also for radiology. Due to the risk inherent in the investigation method, incidents in angiography cannot be totally excluded. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that all steps be taken with regard to staff, equipment and drugs to be able to deal with any complications and incidents that may arise. The courts of law require the employer to produce strongest exonerating evidence to prove that the duty to exercise due care in the selection and supervision of the assistants has been duly fulfilled. For the practical execution of radiological investigations of the digestive tract, also the RTA is responsible; her liability when performing an irrigoscopy is particularly great, as perforation of the intestine is often lethal. The introduction of the rectal tube into the vagina by mistake, with resultant injury or death of the patient, will regularly lead to conviction under penal law. (orig.) [de

  8. User-centered development and testing of a monitoring system that provides feedback regarding physical functioning to elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan Vermeulen,1 Jacques CL Neyens,1 Marieke D Spreeuwenberg,1 Erik van Rossum,1,2 Walther Sipers,3 Herbert Habets,3 David J Hewson,4 Luc P de Witte1,2 1School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 2Research Center for Technology in Care, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, The Netherlands; 3Expertise Center for Elderly Care, Orbis Medical Center, Sittard, The Netherlands; 4Institute Charles Delaunay, Université de Technologie de Troyes, Troyes, France Purpose: To involve elderly people during the development of a mobile interface of a monitoring system that provides feedback to them regarding changes in physical functioning and to test the system in a pilot study. Methods and participants: The iterative user-centered development process consisted of the following phases: (1 selection of user representatives; (2 analysis of users and their context; (3 identification of user requirements; (4 development of the interface; and (5 evaluation of the interface in the lab. Subsequently, the monitoring and feedback system was tested in a pilot study by five patients who were recruited via a geriatric outpatient clinic. Participants used a bathroom scale to monitor weight and balance, and a mobile phone to monitor physical activity on a daily basis for six weeks. Personalized feedback was provided via the interface of the mobile phone. Usability was evaluated on a scale from 1 to 7 using a modified version of the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ; higher scores indicated better usability. Interviews were conducted to gain insight into the experiences of the participants with the system. Results: The developed interface uses colors, emoticons, and written and/or spoken text messages to provide daily feedback regarding (changes in weight, balance, and physical activity. The participants rated the usability of the monitoring and feedback system with a mean score of 5

  9. Barriers to physical activity in chronic hemodialysis patients: a single-center pilot study in an Italian dialysis facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaccadori, Enrico; Sabatino, Alice; Schito, Franco; Angella, Francesca; Malagoli, Martina; Tucci, Marco; Cupisti, Adamasco; Capitanini, Alessandro; Regolisti, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In patients on chronic dialysis a sedentary lifestyle is a strong, yet potentially modifiable, predictor of mortality. The present single-center pilot study evaluated social, psychological and clinical barriers that may hinder physical activity in this population. We explored the association between barriers to physical activity and sedentarism in adult patients at a chronic dialysis facility in Parma, Italy. We used different questionnaries exploring participation in physical activity, physical functioning, patient attitudes and preferences, and barriers to physical activity perceived by either patients or dialysis doctors and nurses. We enrolled 104 patients, (67 males, 65%), mean age 69 years (79% of patients older than 60 years); median dialysis vintage 60 months (range 8-440); mean Charlson score 5.55, ADL (Activities of Daily Living) score 5.5. Ninety-two participants (88.5%) reported at least one barrier to physical activity. At multivariable analysis, after adjusting for age and sex, feeling to have too many medical problems (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.27 to 7.07; P=0.012), chest pain (OR 10.78, 95% CI 1.28 to 90.28; P=0.029) and sadness (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.10 to 6.09; P=0.030) were independently associated with physical inactivity. Lack of time for exercise counseling and the firm belief about low compliance/interest by the patients toward exercise were the most frequent barriers reported by doctors and nurses. We identified a number of patient-related and health personnel-related barriers to physical activity in patients on chronic dialysis. Solutions for these barriers should be addressed in future studies aimed at increasing the level of physical activity in this population. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Physical activity counseling intervention at a federally qualified health center: improves autonomy-supportiveness, but not patients' perceived competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jennifer K; Fiscella, Kevin; Epstein, Ronald M; Sanders, Mechelle R; Winters, Paul C; Moorhead, S Anne; van Osch, Liesbeth; Williams, Geoffrey C

    2013-09-01

    To assess the effect of a pilot intervention to promote clinician-patient communication about physical activity on patient ratings of their perceived competence for physical activity and their clinicians' autonomy-supportiveness. Family medicine clinicians (n=13) at two urban community health centers were randomized to early or delayed (8 months later) communication training groups. The goal of the training was to teach the 5As (Ask, Advise, Agree, Assist, Arrange) for physical activity counseling. Outcome measures were changes in patient perceptions of autonomy support (modified Health Care Climate Questionnaire, mHCCQ) and perceived competence (Perceived Competence Scale for physical activity, PCS) completed via surveys at baseline, post-intervention and six-month follow-up. Patients (n=326) were mostly female (70%) and low income. Using a generalized estimating equations model (GEE) with patients nested within clinician, patient perceived autonomy support increased at post-intervention compared to baseline (mean HCCQ scores 3.68-4.06, p=0.03). There was no significant change in patient perceived competence for physical activity. A clinician-directed intervention increased patient perceptions of clinician autonomy support but not patient perceived competence for physical activity. Clinicians working with underserved populations can be taught to improve their autonomy supportiveness, according to patient assessments of their clinicians. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.; Hare, W.S.C.; Thomson, K.; Tess, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book outlines the various procedures necessary for the successful practice of diagnostic radiology. Topics covered are: general principles, imaging of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, vascular radiology, arthrography, and miscellaneous diagnostic radiologic procedures

  12. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

  13. Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Marino, S.A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hall, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which can be used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology and radiological physics. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL), and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy. RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, with priorities based on the recommendations of a Scientific Advisory Committee. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This chapter presents a brief description of current experiments being carried out at RARAF and of the operation of the Facility from January through June, 1986. Operation of the Facility for all of 1985 was described in the 1985 Progress Report for RARAF. The experiments described here were supported by various Grants and Contracts from NIH and DOE and by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut of Sweden

  14. Differences between the family-centered "COPCA" program and traditional infant physical therapy based on neurodevelopmental treatment principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Tineke; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H; Hulshof, Lily J; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-09-01

    Evidence for effectiveness of pediatric physical therapy in infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders is limited. Therefore, "Coping With and Caring for Infants With Special Needs" (COPCA), a family-centered, early intervention program, was developed. The COPCA program is based on 2 components: (1) family involvement and educational parenting and (2) the neuromotor principles of the neuronal group selection theory. The COPCA coach uses principles of coaching to encourage the family's own capacities for solving problems of daily care and incorporating variation, along with trial and error in daily activities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the content of sessions of the home-based, early intervention COPCA program differs from that of traditional infant physical therapy (TIP) sessions, which in the Netherlands are largely based on neurodevelopmental treatment. The study was conducted at the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands. A quantitative video analysis of therapy sessions was conducted with infants participating in a 2-arm randomized trial. Forty-six infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders were randomly assigned to receive COPCA (n=21) or TIP (n=25) between 3 and 6 months corrected age. Intervention sessions were videotaped at 4 and 6 months corrected age and analyzed with a standardized observation protocol for the classification of physical therapy actions. Outcome parameters were relative amounts of time spent on specific physical therapy actions. The content of COPCA and TIP differed substantially. For instance, in TIP sessions, more time was spent on facilitation techniques, including handling, than in COPCA sessions (29% versus 3%, respectively). During COPCA, more time was spent on family coaching and education than during TIP (16% versus 4%, respectively). The major limitation of the study was its restriction to the Netherlands, implying that findings cannot be generalized automatically to

  15. Laboratory for Calibration of Gamma Radiation Measurement Instruments (LabCal) of Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (IDQBRN) from Brazilian Army Technology Center (CTEx)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Aneuri de; Balthar, Mario Cesar V.; Santos, Avelino; Vilela, Paulo Ricardo T. de; Oliveira, Luciano Santa Rita; Penha, Paulo Eduardo C. de Oliveira; Gonzaga, Roberto Neves; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Oliveira, Celio Jorge Vasques de; Fagundes, Luiz Cesar S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration laboratory deployment steps (LABCAL) gamma ionizing radiation measuring instruments in the Army Technology Center, CTEx. Initially the calibration of radiation monitors will be held in the dosimetric quantity air kerma and operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(d). The LABCAL / CTEx has not yet authorized by CASEC / CNEN. This laboratory aims to calibrate the ionizing radiation instruments used by the Brazilian Army. (author)

  16. Active Living: development and quasi-experimental evaluation of a school-centered physical activity intervention for primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kann, Dave H H; Jansen, M W J; de Vries, S I; de Vries, N K; Kremers, S P J

    2015-12-29

    The worldwide increase in the rates of childhood overweight and physical inactivity requires successful prevention and intervention programs for children. The aim of the Active Living project is to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior of Dutch primary school children by developing and implementing tailored, multicomponent interventions at and around schools. In this project, school-centered interventions have been developed at 10 schools in the south of the Netherlands, using a combined top-down and bottom-up approach in which a research unit and a practice unit continuously interact. The interventions consist of a combination of physical and social interventions tailored to local needs of intervention schools. The process and short- and long-term effectiveness of the interventions will be evaluated using a quasi-experimental study design in which 10 intervention schools are matched with 10 control schools. Baseline and follow-up measurements (after 12 and 24 months) have been conducted in grades 6 and 7 and included accelerometry, GPS, and questionnaires. Primary outcome of the Active Living study is the change in physical activity levels, i.e. sedentary behavior (SB), light physical activity (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and counts-per-minute (CPM). Multilevel regression analyses will be used to assess the effectiveness of isolated and combined physical and social interventions on children's PA levels. The current intervention study is unique in its combined approach of physical and social environmental PA interventions both at school(yard)s as well as in the local neighborhood around the schools. The strength of the study lies in the quasi-experimental design including objective measurement techniques, i.e. accelerometry and GPS, combined with more subjective techniques, i.e. questionnaires, implementation logbooks, and neighborhood observations. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN25497687 (registration date 21

  17. Digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is vital to the life-saving efforts of surgeons and other physicians, but precious time can be lost generating the images and transferring them to and from the operating room. Furthermore, hospitals are straining under the task of storing and managing the deluge of diagnostic films produced every year. A 300-bed hospital generates about 1 gigabyte (8 x 10 9 bits) of picture information every day and is legally bound to hold it for three to seven years--30 years in the case of silicosis or black lung disease, illnesses that may have relevance to future lawsuits. Consequently, hospital warehouses are filling with x-ray film and written reports that are important for analysis of patient histories, for comparison between patients, and for analyzing the progress of disease. Yet only a fraction of the information's potential is being used because access is so complicated. What is more, films are easily lost, erasing valuable medical histories

  18. Radiological design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Andersen, B.V.; Carter, L.A.; Waite, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Many new nuclear facilities are unsatisfactory from a radiation protection point of view, particularly when striving to maintain occupational exposure as low as practicable 'ALAP'. Radiation protection is achieved through physical protective features supplemented by administrative controls. Adequate physical protective feature should be achieved during construction so that supplemental administrative controls may be kept simple and workable. Many nuclear facilities fall short of adequate physical protective features, thus, remedial and sometimes awkward administrative procedures are required to safely conduct work. In reviewing the various handbooks, reports and regulations which deal with radiation protection, it may be noted that there is minimal radiological design guidance for application to nuclear facilities. A set of criteria or codes covering functional areas rather than specific nuclear facility types is badly needed. The following are suggested as functional areas to be considered: characterization of the Facility; siting and access; design exposure limits; layout (people and materials flow); ventilation and effluent control; radiation protection facilities and systems. The application of such radiological design criteria early in the design process would provide some assurance that nuclear facilities will be safe, flexible, and efficient with a minimum of costly retrofitting or administrative restrictions. Criteria which we have found helpful in these functional areas is discussed together with justification for adoption of such criteria and identification of problems which still require solution

  19. Laboratory of environmental radiological surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez G, A.; Marcial M, F.; Giber F, J.; Montiel R, E.; Leon del V, E.; Rivas C, I.; Leon G, M.V.; Lagunas G, E.; Aragon S, R.; Juarez N, A.; Alfaro L, M.M.

    1991-12-01

    The department of radiological protection of the ININ requests the collaboration of the Engineering Unit for the elaboration of the work project of the laboratory of environmental radiological surveillance. The emission of radioactive substances to the atmosphere like consequence of the normal operation of the Nuclear Center, constitutes an exhibition source from the man to the radiations that it should be appropriately watched over and controlled to be able to determine the population's potential exhibition that it lives in the area of influence of the installation. (Author)

  20. Radiological health training resources, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The Division of Training and Medical Applications is the component of the Bureau of Radiological Health which has the responsibility for providing training assistance to the Nation's radiological health agencies. Recognizing that these agencies are establishing their own user and personnel training programs, the Division offers through the Training Resources Center a variety of educational materials which may be utilized for specific training purposes. This bulletin contains a list of educational materials, including publications, booklets, slides and transparencies, movies, video tapes, training guides, and training seminars for the education of x-ray technicians in radiation protection

  1. Radiologic findings of dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, M. S.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, D. H. [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D. H. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-06-15

    The stature of human is very important factor in human-being, especially in childhood. The stature depends on various different conditions, such as familial factor, constitutional factor, chromosomal anomalies, skeletal disorders, or endocrinopathies. The early diagnosis of dwarfism is very important problem, because if appropriate treatment is delayed, the complication or sequales are more increased. The survey of familial history or patient's past history, detail check up of physical examination, radiological evaluation, and other laboratory examinations are essentially needed for the accurate diagnosis of dwarfism. Among the patients admitted to Yonsei University college of Medicine, Severance Hospital since 1963, with chief complaint of short stature or other associated diseases, an analysis of radiological findings were made for the 72 cases of chromosomal anomalies, skeletal dysplasia, and cretinism in which radiologic evaluation was available. The conclusions are as follows; 1. The cause of short stature are chromosomal anomalies (48 cases), skeletal dysplasia (14 cases) and cretinism (10 cases). 2. in chromosomal anomalies, 43 cases of mongolism and 5 cease of Turner's syndrome are noted. In mongolism, 18 cases among the 30 cases below 1 year old are distributed below the 10 percentile of height. On radiologic findings, 11 paired ribs (22/43), congenital heart disease (14/43), decreased iliac index (8/12), and associated anomalies or diseases, such as pneumonia (14 cases), C1-C2 dislocation (1 case), imperforated anus (1 case), Morgagni's hernia (1 case) and leukemia with sepsis (1 case). In Turner's syndrome, decreased bone density (5/5), positive metacarpal sign (2/5), positive carpal sign (1/5), change of knee joint (3/5), hypoplasia of (1/3), and increased carrying angle of elbows (1/3) are noted.

  2. Radiologic findings of dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M. S.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The stature of human is very important factor in human-being, especially in childhood. The stature depends on various different conditions, such as familial factor, constitutional factor, chromosomal anomalies, skeletal disorders, or endocrinopathies. The early diagnosis of dwarfism is very important problem, because if appropriate treatment is delayed, the complication or sequales are more increased. The survey of familial history or patient's past history, detail check up of physical examination, radiological evaluation, and other laboratory examinations are essentially needed for the accurate diagnosis of dwarfism. Among the patients admitted to Yonsei University college of Medicine, Severance Hospital since 1963, with chief complaint of short stature or other associated diseases, an analysis of radiological findings were made for the 72 cases of chromosomal anomalies, skeletal dysplasia, and cretinism in which radiologic evaluation was available. The conclusions are as follows; 1. The cause of short stature are chromosomal anomalies (48 cases), skeletal dysplasia (14 cases) and cretinism (10 cases). 2. in chromosomal anomalies, 43 cases of mongolism and 5 cease of Turner's syndrome are noted. In mongolism, 18 cases among the 30 cases below 1 year old are distributed below the 10 percentile of height. On radiologic findings, 11 paired ribs (22/43), congenital heart disease (14/43), decreased iliac index (8/12), and associated anomalies or diseases, such as pneumonia (14 cases), C1-C2 dislocation (1 case), imperforated anus (1 case), Morgagni's hernia (1 case) and leukemia with sepsis (1 case). In Turner's syndrome, decreased bone density (5/5), positive metacarpal sign (2/5), positive carpal sign (1/5), change of knee joint (3/5), hypoplasia of (1/3), and increased carrying angle of elbows (1/3) are noted

  3. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP) in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Fatemeh; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Emadi, Alireza; Mirmohammadkhani, Majid; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Abedelahi, Ali; Bokharaeian, Mitra; Masoumi, Hamed; Seifi, Danial; Khani, Tahereh; Sanchooli, Mohamad; Moshfegh, Shima; Ziari, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Due to increasing cardiac disease and its mortality rate, the frequency of cardiac imaging has grown and, as a result, interventional cardiologists potentially receive high radiation doses in cardiac examinations. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) level of radiation protection (RP) among interventional radiology staff in Iranian health care centers across the country. We used a validated questionnaire survey consisting of 30 multiple-choice questions to perform a cross-sectional study. Participants were healthcare personnel working professionally with radiation at different levels (i.e., secretary, radiology technologists, nurse, and physician). The questionnaire was divided into three sections to assess KAP regarding RP. Significant differences exist in RP KAP mean scores based on educational age (p 0.050). We found a significant difference between RP KAP mean scores and different regions (p < 0.050). Educational and practice age, sex, type of hospital, and geographical region affect he KAP of interventional radiology staff regarding RP. Since many of the subjective radiation harms for both medical team and patients, this can be easily controlled and prevented; a checkup for personnel of interventional radiology departments, considering samples from different parts of the country with different levels of education, continuous training, and practical courses may help map the status of KAP. The results of this study may also help authorized health physics officers design strategic plans to enhance the quality of such services in radiation departments.

  4. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP in Interventional Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shabani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Due to increasing cardiac disease and its mortality rate, the frequency of cardiac imaging has grown and, as a result, interventional cardiologists potentially receive high radiation doses in cardiac examinations. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP level of radiation protection (RP among interventional radiology staff in Iranian health care centers across the country. Methods: We used a validated questionnaire survey consisting of 30 multiple-choice questions to perform a cross-sectional study. Participants were healthcare personnel working professionally with radiation at different levels (i.e., secretary, radiology technologists, nurse, and physician. The questionnaire was divided into three sections to assess KAP regarding RP. Results: Significant differences exist in RP KAP mean scores based on educational age (p 0.050. We found a significant difference between RP KAP mean scores and different regions (p < 0.050. Conclusions: Educational and practice age, sex, type of hospital, and geographical region affect he KAP of interventional radiology staff regarding RP. Since many of the subjective radiation harms for both medical team and patients, this can be easily controlled and prevented; a checkup for personnel of interventional radiology departments, considering samples from different parts of the country with different levels of education, continuous training, and practical courses may help map the status of KAP. The results of this study may also help authorized health physics officers design strategic plans to enhance the quality of such services in radiation departments.

  5. Expectancy violation in physics and mathematics classes in a student-centered classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Carolina; Dominguez, Angeles; Rodriguez, Ruth; Zavala, Genaro

    2012-02-01

    This report analyzes the results of the implementation at a large private Mexican university of the Pedagogical Expectancy Violation Assessment (PEVA), developed by Gaffney, Gaffney and Beichner [1]. The PEVA was designed to evaluate shifts of the first student's expectations due to the initial orientation and experiences in the classroom. The data was collected at the Student-Centered Learning (ACE) classroom, based on the Student Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) classroom. Three professors participated with their groups during the first semester they implemented their courses in this environment. Participants were enrolled either in a Pre-Calculus, Differential Equations, or Electricity and Magnetism course. The results indicate shifts in students' expectations during the semester and reveals differences in shifts among the different courses.

  6. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe

  7. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  8. The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D

    2009-01-01

    The development of Russian (formerly Soviet) radio astronomy is indissolubly linked with the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Russian Academy of Sciences. From the late 1940s, the institute conducted most of its radio astronomy research in the Crimea, at stations or on field trips; in the late 1950s, the center of gravity of research moved to the southern Moscow region, where one of the largest radio astronomy observatories in the country and in the world was developed within less than twenty years. The observatory unique instrumentation system is briefly reviewed in a historical perspective. Key research areas and some major achievements are outlined, and the prospects of the observatory as (currently) part of the LPI Astro Space Center are examined. (conferences and symposia)

  9. The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D [Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory, Astro Space Center, Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-30

    The development of Russian (formerly Soviet) radio astronomy is indissolubly linked with the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Russian Academy of Sciences. From the late 1940s, the institute conducted most of its radio astronomy research in the Crimea, at stations or on field trips; in the late 1950s, the center of gravity of research moved to the southern Moscow region, where one of the largest radio astronomy observatories in the country and in the world was developed within less than twenty years. The observatory unique instrumentation system is briefly reviewed in a historical perspective. Key research areas and some major achievements are outlined, and the prospects of the observatory as (currently) part of the LPI Astro Space Center are examined. (conferences and symposia)

  10. Event generator for RHIC spin physics. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A major objective of the workshop was to establish a firm collaboration to develop suitable event generators for the spin physics program at RHIC. With the completion of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as a polarized collider a completely new domain of high-energy spin physics will be opened. The planned studies address the spin structure of the nucleon, tests of the standard model, and transverse spin effects in initial and final states. RHIC offers the unique opportunity to pursue these studies because of its high and variable energy, 50 ≤ √s ≤ 500 GeV, high polarization, 70%, and high luminosity, 2 x 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 or more at 500 GeV. To maximize the output from the spin program at RHIC, the understanding of both experimental and theoretical systematic errors is crucial. It will require full-fledged event generators, to simulate the processes of interest in great detail. The history of event generators shows that their development and improvement are ongoing processes taking place in parallel to the physics analysis by various experimental groups. The number of processes included in the generators has been increasing and the precision of their predictions is being improved continuously. This workshop aims at getting this process well under way for the spin physics program at RHIC, based on the first development in this direction, SPHINX

  11. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.; Bermudez Jimenez, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  13. Radiotherapy. Radiological oncology. Strahlentherapie. Radiologische Onkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, E [ed.; Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany, F.R.). Radiologisches Zentrum

    1976-01-01

    This book attempts to give a survey of the present status of radiological tumour therapy with some emphasis on the clinical aspect of neoplasms. The physical and radiobiological fundamentals important for practical radiotherapy are discussed in great detail.

  14. The application of geographic information system to radiological and nuclear emergency monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaniowski, I.V.; Rodriguez, M.; Rojas, C.A.; Jordan, O.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Geographic Information System (GIS) implementation for the preparation and response in case of to radiological and nuclear emergencies is being developed in the Emergency Control Center of the Argentina Nuclear Regulatory Authority, since many years ago. Additionals features have been incorporated such as integration with the results of radiological monitoring, improving and expanding its benefits both in the preparation stage and during the work of emergency response. This paper shows the specific application of GIS to radiological monitoring in case of emergency situations such as during the search of orphan sources and the characterization of geographic context around nuclear power plants and atomic centers. The GIS provides essential data cartographic for the monitoring with sophisticated detectors, to integrate with the information received with infrastructure, urban and rural population maps, physical features of the place, satellite images, etc. The monitoring results are analyzed and compared with relevant information for decision making during the response, like evacuation routes, affected population, security forces in the area, radiological characterization, application of protective actions, hospitals, schools, etc. These two integrated tools improve preparedness and response system in case of radiological or nuclear emergency. (authors) [es

  15. European Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR): the new international center for fundamental physics and its research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Sharkov, Boris Yu; Stöker, H

    2012-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) accelerator center at Darmstadt, Germany, will provide the international scientific community with unique experimental opportunities of a scope and scale out of reach for any other large-scale facility in the world. With its staff of over 2500, it is expected to fundamentally expand our knowledge of hadron, nuclear, and atomic physics and their application to cosmology, astrophysics, and technology. In this review, the design details of the accelerator complex are discussed and the experimental research program for FAIR is presented. Particular attention is paid to experiments on the extreme state of matter arising from the isochoric heating of a material by heavy-ion beams. One of the largest facilities of its kind in Europe, FAIR is a part of the strategic development roadmap for the European Strategic Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). (physics of our days)

  16. Current radiology. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular

  17. Is improved lane keeping during cognitive load caused by increased physical arousal or gaze concentration toward the road center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Penghui; Markkula, Gustav; Li, Yibing; Merat, Natasha

    2018-08-01

    Driver distraction is one of the main causes of motor-vehicle accidents. However, the impact on traffic safety of tasks that impose cognitive (non-visual) distraction remains debated. One particularly intriguing finding is that cognitive load seems to improve lane keeping performance, most often quantified as reduced standard deviation of lateral position (SDLP). The main competing hypotheses, supported by current empirical evidence, suggest that cognitive load improves lane keeping via either increased physical arousal, or higher gaze concentration toward the road center, but views are mixed regarding if, and how, these possible mediators influence lane keeping performance. Hence, a simulator study was conducted, with participants driving on a straight city road section whilst completing a cognitive task at different levels of difficulty. In line with previous studies, cognitive load led to increased physical arousal, higher gaze concentration toward the road center, and higher levels of micro-steering activity, accompanied by improved lane keeping performance. More importantly, during the high cognitive task, both physical arousal and gaze concentration changed earlier in time than micro-steering activity, which in turn changed earlier than lane keeping performance. In addition, our results did not show a significant correlation between gaze concentration and physical arousal on the level of individual task recordings. Based on these findings, various multilevel models for micro-steering activity and lane keeping performance were conducted and compared, and the results suggest that all of the mechanisms proposed by existing hypotheses could be simultaneously involved. In other words, it is suggested that cognitive load leads to: (i) an increase in arousal, causing increased micro-steering activity, which in turn improves lane keeping performance, and (ii) an increase in gaze concentration, causing lane keeping improvement through both (a) further increased micro

  18. Nuclear/High Energy Physics (NuHEP) research center of excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains the manuscripts from the proceedings of the third annual Undergraduate Institute in Physics Program. The titles of these manuscripts are: flow measurements for the hall c cryogenic target loops; calibrations for the hall c drift chambers gas mixing system; the electromagnetic structure of the nucleon; investigation of drift chambers in hall c at CEBAF; seek and ye shall find; commissioning techniques; and instruments used in particle detection

  19. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  20. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  1. Calculations of doses for the personnel wrapped up in the radiological accident of the Specialties Hospital of the National Medical Center ''Siglo XXI''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes C, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work the methodology used by the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards for the determination of the internal dose due to the ingestion of coffee with I-131 for the personnel of the service of nuclear medicine of the Hospital of Specialties of the National Medical Center ''Siglo XXI'' of the Mexican Institute of the Social Insurance (IMSS), that was poured in the coffeepot of the service by a deliberate act before mentioned, is presented. Three different techniques were used to determine the initial activity incorporated starting from the measurements of retained activity in thyroid for 6 people of the service of nuclear medicine; the techniques employee provided consistent results. Using the results of the technique of the best estimator, it was applied the proposed methodology by the International Commission of Radioprotection in its publication 30 to determine the absorbed doses by the personnel involved in the accident, with which the Commission determines the administrative consequences to those that it should be held the personnel and the directive of the service of nuclear medicine of the one nosocome. (Author)

  2. IAEA Perspectives on Radiological Characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Patrick; Ljubenov, Vladan

    2012-01-01

    quantity and type of radionuclides, their distribution and their physical and chemical states - e.g. see IAEA report no. TRS-389, Radiological Characterization of Shut Down Nuclear Reactors for Decommissioning Purposes. The collection of detailed data on the physical, chemical and radiological conditions in a nuclear facility, including activity calculations, in situ measurements and/or sampling and analysis, facilitates a detailed estimation of risk, cost and waste generation during decommissioning, and supports the selection of the overall dismantling strategy - e.g. partial vs. full decontamination, requirements for shielding and for partial removal of equipment and services - and its detailed planning. It also supports the assessment of different dismantling options and their consequences, including decontamination and dismantling procedures and tools required, and arrangements to ensure the radiological protection of workers, general public and the environment. (authors)

  3. Training and technical assistance for compliance with beverage and physical activity components of New York City's regulations for early child care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakietek, Jakub; Dunn, Lillian; O'Dell, Sarah Abood; Jernigan, Jan; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-10-16

    In 2006, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) passed regulations for child care centers that established standards for beverages provided to children and set a minimum amount of time for daily physical activity. DOHMH offered several types of training and technical assistance to support compliance with the regulations. This article analyzes the association between training and technical assistance provided and compliance with the regulations in a sample of 174 group child care centers. Compliance was measured by using a site inventory of beverages stored on premises and a survey of centers' teachers regarding the amount of physical activity provided. Training and technical assistance measures were based on the DOHMH records of training and technical assistance provided to the centers in the sample and on a survey of center directors. Ordinal logistic regression was used to assess the association between training and technical assistance measures and compliance with the regulations. Measures of training related to physical activity the center received: the number of staff members who participated in Sport, Play and Active Recreation for Kids (SPARK) and other training programs in which a center participated were associated with better compliance with the physical activity regulations. Neither training nor technical assistance were associated with compliance with the regulations related to beverages. Increased compliance with regulations pertaining to physical activity was not related to compliance with beverage regulations. Future trainings should be targeted to the specific regulation requirements to increase compliance.

  4. Implementation-effectiveness trial of an ecological intervention for physical activity in ethnically diverse low income senior centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porchia Rich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the US population ages, there is an increasing need for evidence based, peer-led physical activity programs, particularly in ethnically diverse, low income senior centers where access is limited. Methods/design The Peer Empowerment Program 4 Physical Activity’ (PEP4PA is a hybrid Type II implementation-effectiveness trial that is a peer-led physical activity (PA intervention based on the ecological model of behavior change. The initial phase is a cluster randomized control trial randomized to either a peer-led PA intervention or usual center programming. After 18 months, the intervention sites are further randomized to continued support or no support for another 6 months. This study will be conducted at twelve senior centers in San Diego County in low income, diverse communities. In the intervention sites, 24 peer health coaches and 408 adults, aged 50 years and older, are invited to participate. Peer health coaches receive training and support and utilize a tablet computer for delivery and tracking. There are several levels of intervention. Individual components include pedometers, step goals, counseling, and feedback charts. Interpersonal components include group walks, group sharing and health tips, and monthly celebrations. Community components include review of PA resources, walkability audit, sustainability plan, and streetscape improvements. The primary outcome of interest is intensity and location of PA minutes per day, measured every 6 months by wrist and hip accelerometers and GPS devices. Secondary outcomes include blood pressure, physical, cognitive, and emotional functioning. Implementation measures include appropriateness & acceptability (perceived and actual fit, adoption & penetration (reach, fidelity (quantity & quality of intervention delivered, acceptability (satisfaction, costs, and sustainability. Discussion Using a peer led implementation strategy to deliver a multi-level community based PA

  5. Validation of Using Fitness Center Attendance Electronic Records to Assess the Frequency of Moderate/Vigorous Leisure-Time Physical Activity among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amireault, Steve; Godin, Gaston

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide three construct validity evidence for using fitness center attendance electronic records to objectively assess the frequency of leisure-time physical activity among adults. One hundred members of a fitness center (45 women and 55 men; aged 18 to 64 years) completed a self-report leisure-time physical…

  6. Dictionary of radiology. Radiologisches Woerterbuch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freye, K; Lammers, W

    1982-01-01

    The dictionary of radiology is based on practical experience in diagnostic radiology. Following a brief clinical introduction, radiological methods including nuclear medicine and the increasingly important field of sonography are presented in alphabetic order, each term with a short definition. The most favourable order of application is determined by the diagnostic value, technical requirements and discomfort of the various methods. Preparative measures, the duration of the examinations, and problems of radiation hygiene are discussed. Illustrative drawings supplement the text. The fields of application given for the various methods are based on the latest state of knowledge. Other methods, e.g. endoscopy in all its variants and thermography, are mentioned whereever they are of diagnostic value. The book has a brief appendix in which the fundamental physical and technical context are explained, also in alphabetic order. Detailed cross-references establish a connection between diseases and diagnostic methods, thus facilitating access to the desired information.

  7. Remote Experimental Site: A command and analysis center for ''Big Physics'' experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, T.A.; Lennon, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The next generation of tokamaks, ITER or BPX, will be characterized by an even greater emphasis on joint operation and experimentation. With anticipation of an increased number and diversity of collaborations, we are preparing for such shared facilities by developing a systematic approach to remote, joint physics operation involving experimental teams at several locations. The local area network of computers used for control and data acquisition on present and future experiments can be extended over a wide area network to provide a mechanism for remote operation of subsystems required for physics experiments. The technology required for high bandwidth (≥45Mbps) connections between multiple sites either exists or will be available over the next few years. With the rapid development of high performance workstations, network interfaces, distributed computing, and video conferencing, we can proceed with the development of a system of control and analysis sites to provide for consistent, efficient, and continuing collaborations. Early establishment of such sites could also enhance existing joint design and development efforts. 2 refs., 3 figs

  8. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  9. Do physical environmental changes make a difference? Supporting person-centered care at mealtimes in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Habib; Hung, Lillian; Rust, Tiana; Wu, Sarah

    2017-10-01

    Purpose Drawing on therapeutic physical environmental design principles and Kitwood's theoretical view of person-centered care, this study examined the impact of environmental renovations in dining spaces of a long-term care facility on residents' mealtime experience and staff practice in two care units. Method The research design involved pre- and post-renovation ethnographic observations in the dining spaces of the care units and a post-renovation staff survey. The objective physical environmental features pre- and post-renovations were assessed with a newly developed tool titled Dining Environment Audit Protocol. We collected observational data from 10 residents and survey responses from 17 care aides and nurses. Findings Based on a systematic analysis of observational data and staff survey responses, five themes were identified: (a) autonomy and personal control, (b) comfort of homelike environment, (c) conducive to social interaction, (d) increased personal support, and (e) effective teamwork. Implications Although the physical environment can play an influential role in enhancing the dining experience of residents, the variability in staff practices reveals the complexity of mealtime environment and points to the necessity of a systemic approach to foster meaningful culture change.

  10. The definition of psychological aspects in the formation of student-centered motivation of students for classes in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Gruzhevsky

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the publications, which demonstrates the importance of the emotional state in the formation of motivation as a psychological phenomenon. Shows the impact of physical education on the state of mental and emotional stress. Presented scientific analysis of psycho-emotional states in the 3rd year students with the region of residence and ethnicity. The study used survey results found that the circumstances are displayed on the psycho-emotional state of students. In their view, were: irritability, lack of confidence, fatigue, concern, guilt, etc. These conditions are more common in women of ethnic groups and from rural areas. It should be noted that the girls are very carefully described their emotional state and chose the answer in the questionnaire (sometimes, this response was dominant. Young men in many positions were more restrained. It is established that the formation of student-centered motivation of students to physical education should be adjusted in their emotional state. In this strategy the learning process of physical education is built on individual, ethnic differences.

  11. Controlled, cross-sectional, multi-center study of physical capacity and associated factors in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Bjersing, Jan; Löfgren, Monika; Ernberg, Malin; Kosek, Eva; Gerdle, Björn; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2018-04-19

    Health and physical capacity are commonly associated with disease, age, and socioeconomic factors. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the degree to which physical capacity, defined as muscle strength and walking ability, is decreased in women with fibromyalgia (FM), as compared to healthy women, who are matched for age and level of education. The secondary aim was to investigate whether muscle strength and walking ability are associated with age, symptom duration, activity limitations and, Body Mass Index (BMI) in women with FM and control subjects. This controlled, cross-sectional, multi-center study comprised 118 women with FM and 93 age- and education-level-matched healthy women. The outcome measures were isometric knee-extension force, isometric elbow-flexion force, isometric hand-grip force, and walking ability. Differences between the groups were calculated, and for the women with FM analyses of correlations between the measures of physical capacity and variables were performed. The women with FM showed 20% (p BMI. It seems important to address this problem and to target interventions to prevent decline in muscle strength. Assessments of muscle strength and walking ability are easy to administer and should be routinely carried out in the clinical setting for women with FM. ClinicalTrials.gov identification number: NCT01226784 , Oct 21, 2010.

  12. Compression for radiological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1992-07-01

    The viewing of radiological images has peculiarities that must be taken into account in the design of a compression technique. The images may be manipulated on a workstation to change the contrast, to change the center of the brightness levels that are viewed, and even to invert the images. Because of the possible consequences of losing information in a medical application, bit preserving compression is used for the images used for diagnosis. However, for archiving the images may be compressed to 10 of their original size. A compression technique based on the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) takes the viewing factors into account by compressing the changes in the local brightness levels. The compression technique is a variation of the CCITT JPEG compression that suppresses the blocking of the DCT except in areas of very high contrast.

  13. Workshop of Advanced Science Research Center, JAERI. Nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry of superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ikezoe, Hiroshi; Nagame, Yuichiro

    2004-03-01

    A liquid drop model predicts that the fission barrier of a nucleus whose atomic number (Z) is larger than 106 disappears, so that such heavier nuclei as Z > 106 cannot exist. The shell effect, however, drastically changes structure of the fission barrier and stabilizes nucleus against fission, predicting the presence of super heavy element (SHE, Z=114-126) with measurable half-life. In the SHE region, a wave function of outermost electron of an atom, which controls chemical properties of an elements, is disturbed or changed by relativistic effects compared to the one from the non-relativistic model. This suggests that the SHEs have different chemical properties from those of lighter elements belonging to the same family. The chemistry of SHEs requires event by event analysis to reveal their chemical properties, thus is called 'atom-at-a-time chemistry'. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been investigating fusion mechanism between heavy nuclei to find out favorable reactions to produce SHE by using JAERI-tandem and booster accelerator. In the JAERI-tandem facility, isotopes of Rf and Db are produced by using actinide targets such as 248 Cm in order to investigate their chemical properties. The present workshop was held in Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI at February 27-28 (2003) in order to discuss current status and future plans for the heavy element research. The workshop also included topics of the radioactive nuclear beam project forwarded by the JAERI-KEK cooperation and the nuclear transmutation facility of J-PARC. Also included is the nuclear fission process as a decay characteristic of heavy elements. There were sixty participants in the workshop including graduate and undergraduate eleven students. We had guests from Germany and Hungary. Through the workshop, we had a common knowledge that researches on SHE in Japan should fill an important role in the world. (author)

  14. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  15. The implementation of the ICF among Israeli rehabilitation centers--the case of physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Tamar

    2013-10-01

    The extent of the implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), developed by the WHO, in rehabilitation units and in physical therapy (PT) departments is unknown. The study aims to describe the extent to which the ICF has been implemented in PT services within rehabilitation units in Israel. To update data on ICF implementation since its inception. An online semi-structured survey was administered to 25 physiotherapists in charge of PT departments in all rehabilitation units throughout Israel. Rehabilitation units were grouped into three categories: general, geriatric and pediatric. The questionnaire included items regarding the ICF implementation, its strengths, and weaknesses. Twenty two physiotherapists (88%) completed the questionnaire. The majority was familiar with the ICF and nearly two thirds reported partial implementation in their units. Implementation focused mostly on adopting the biopsychosocial concepts and using ICF terms. The ICF was not used either for evaluating patients, or for reporting or encoding patient information. Physiotherapists, directors of most Israeli PT departments in rehabilitation units are familiar with the ICF; however, its clinical implementation is very limited. There is need for further research into the processes of knowledge transfer and implementation of the ICF, in order to better understand the factors that facilitate and those that impede ICF implementation.

  16. Annual report of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. 1994 (April 1, 1994 - March, 31, 1995)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itahashi, Takahisa; Futakuchi, Atsuko

    1995-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the research activities and operations of the Research Center For Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, during the period of the academic year 1994, April 1994 to March 1995. RCNP is the national laboratory for nuclear physics in Japan. The AVF cyclotron with K = 0.14GeV and the ring cyclotron with K = 0.4GeV and E P = 0.4GeV are the major user facilities at RCNP. They have been extensively used for studying nuclear nucleon-meson systems. All facilities are open for users from universities and research institutes in Japan as well as those in foreign countries. The research activities at the RCNP cyclotron laboratory include studies of nuclear interactions and nuclear potentials, spin isospin excitations and decays nuclear reaction dynamics and others. Studies of solid state and atomic physics and medical applications were carried out also at the cyclotron laboratory. New external ion sources have been instaled for the injector cyclotron. New extensions of the RCNP research activities are under progress. One is the possible use of the 8 GeV electron storage ring built at the synchrotron radiation laboratory SPring-8. It is located 100 Km west of Osaka. It is expected to start its operation in 1997. The Compton back-scattering of laser photons from the 8 GeV electron beam provides 1-3.5 GeV γ-rays, which are very promising for studying nuclear quark and meson systems. Other is the non-accelerator physics for ultra-rare nuclear processes at the new under ground laboratory 'Ohto Cosmo Observatory'. It is located 100 km south of Osaka. Neutrino studies by investigating double beta decays, dark matter studies by investigating nuclear responses to them, and studies of other weak processes are planned to be studied there. (J.P.N.)

  17. User-centered development and testing of a monitoring system that provides feedback regarding physical functioning to elderly people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Joan; Neyens, Jacques CL; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; van Rossum, Erik; Sipers, Walther; Habets, Herbert; Hewson, David J; de Witte, Luc P

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To involve elderly people during the development of a mobile interface of a monitoring system that provides feedback to them regarding changes in physical functioning and to test the system in a pilot study. Methods and participants The iterative user-centered development process consisted of the following phases: (1) selection of user representatives; (2) analysis of users and their context; (3) identification of user requirements; (4) development of the interface; and (5) evaluation of the interface in the lab. Subsequently, the monitoring and feedback system was tested in a pilot study by five patients who were recruited via a geriatric outpatient clinic. Participants used a bathroom scale to monitor weight and balance, and a mobile phone to monitor physical activity on a daily basis for six weeks. Personalized feedback was provided via the interface of the mobile phone. Usability was evaluated on a scale from 1 to 7 using a modified version of the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ); higher scores indicated better usability. Interviews were conducted to gain insight into the experiences of the participants with the system. Results The developed interface uses colors, emoticons, and written and/or spoken text messages to provide daily feedback regarding (changes in) weight, balance, and physical activity. The participants rated the usability of the monitoring and feedback system with a mean score of 5.2 (standard deviation 0.90) on the modified PSSUQ. The interviews revealed that most participants liked using the system and appreciated that it signaled changes in their physical functioning. However, usability was negatively influenced by a few technical errors. Conclusion Involvement of elderly users during the development process resulted in an interface with good usability. However, the technical functioning of the monitoring system needs to be optimized before it can be used to support elderly people in their self-management. PMID

  18. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  19. Annual report of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. 1982 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itahashi, T.; Morinobu, S.; Sakai, H.

    1983-01-01

    The major activity at RCNP in the fiscal year 1982 is the nuclear physics research based on use of the AVF cyclotron. Other fields of research include a study for the new accelerator project, developments of the existing facilities and applied researches. The cyclotron and the experimental facilities have operated satisfactorily in the fiscal year 1982. A total of about five thousand hours of machine time was allocated to about fifty experiments and various machine developments approved by the research program committee. The main subjects of the nuclear research carried out in the fiscal year 1982 are as follows: (1) Few nucleon problems. (2) Scattering of polarized protons and deuterons and optical model analyses. (3) Study of elastic and inelastic scatterings of protons, deuterons and alpha particles related to nuclear deformations. (4) Radiative capture reactions of polarized protons. (5) Breakup of deuterons, 3 He and heavy ions. (6) Ml states investigated by proton inelastic scattering. (7) Giant multipole resonances. (8) Highly excited states. (9) Direct, preequilibrium and equilibrium deexcitation processes. (10) Heavy ion reactions. (11) Beta decay. The recently developed technique of an acceleration of horizontally polarized beam is progressing. It has been successfully applied to the measurements of A sub(XZ) in d vector-p and d vector-nucleus scatterings. Accelerations of heavy ions, such as 6 Li 3+ and 7 Li 3+ are also successful using solid elements as source materials. Great progress is made this year in the construction of the two big experimental facilities which are an important addition to the laboratory facilities. The spin-transfer spectrograph named DUMAS is almost completed. Focussing properties and counter systems of the spectrograph is being tested successfully using the proton beam from the cyclotron

  20. Center of Nuclear-Physics Data (CNPD) RFNC-VNIIEF. Status report. P5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunaeva, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The correction and translation to the EXFOR format of experimental data and the compilation of the new experimental data were performed. The EXFOR library is being prepared. Experimental data compilation and checking have been made using the VMS operating system with the help of NNDC software. Cooperation with the NNDC lasted two months. Charged particle data from the 'Nuclear Physics' have been scanned (1980 - 2000) and compiled. In collaboration with BBDC a project to CRDF were prepared. The results of this efforts will be cleared up in November 2001. In cooperation with NNDC and IAEA, the discussion about the migration strategy for the existing databases is taking place. The evaluation activity was stimulated by participation of the CNPD staff in some international projects. New experimental data were compared with the data from the literature and from EXFOR and ENDF libraries. Results of the experiments were compiled into EXFOR in collaboration with CJD. In the framework of the ISTC No.731 project new experiments have been performed and adopted data prepared for neutron-gamma-production cross-sections on 28 nuclei. According to the ISTC No.1145 project the evaluated nuclear library for transmutation (TENDL) was prepared. 103 isotopes including 4 effective fission fragments from the following world libraries of evaluated constants ( ENDF/B-IV, ENDL-82, JENDL-3, CENDL-2, BROND-2) were involved into the current version of TENDL library. The methods and criteria of data selection, the content of TENDL library and functional potentialities of the special program shell are described in the report that will be presented in October 2001 at the International Conference in Japan ('Nuclear Data and Technology')

  1. Paediatric doses from diagnostic radiology in Victoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, T.J.; Cardillo, I.; Einsiedel, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    This study examines doses to paediatric patients from diagnostic radiology. Measurements were made at 29 hospitals and private radiology practices in the state of Victoria. Entrance skin doses in air were measured for the exposure factors used by hospital radiology departments and private radiology practices for a standard size 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old child, for the following procedures: chest AP/PA, lat; abdomen AP; pelvis AP; lumbar spine AP, lat; and skull AP, lat. There was a large range of doses for each particular procedure and age group. Factors contributing to the range of doses were identified. Guidance levels for paediatric radiology based on the third quartile value of the skin entrance doses have been recommended and are compared with guidance levels. Copyright (1998) Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine

  2. An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Rachlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

    1980-01-01

    To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology

  3. Absence of the predisposing factors and signs and symptoms usually associated with overreaching and overtraining in physical fitness centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ackel-D'Elia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of the well-known predisposing factors and signs and symptoms usually associated with either overreaching or overtraining syndrome in physical fitness centers in São Paulo City, Brazil. METHOD: A questionnaire consisting of 13 question groups pertaining to either predisposing factors (1-7 or signs and symptoms (8-13 was given to 413 subjects. The general training schedule of the volunteers was characterized by workout sessions of 2.18 ± 0.04 h for a total of 11.0 ± 0.3 h/week for 33 ± 2 months independent of the type of exercise performed (walking, running, spinning, bodybuilding and stretching. A mean score was calculated ranging from 1 (completely absent to 5 (severe for each question group. A low occurrence was considered to be a question group score lower than 4, which was observed in all 13 question groups. RESULTS: The psychological evaluation by POMS Mood State Questionnaire indicated a normal non-inverted iceberg. The hematological parameters, creatine kinase activity, cortisol, total testosterone and free testosterone concentrations were within the normal ranges for the majority of the volunteers selected for this analysis (n = 60. CONCLUSION: According to the questionnaire score analysis, no predisposing factors or signs and symptoms usually associated with either overreaching or overtraining were detected among the members of physical fitness centers in São Paulo City, Brazil. This observation was corroborated by the absence of any significant hematological or stress hormone level alterations in blood analyses of the majority of the selected volunteers (n = 60.

  4. Measuring the evolution and output of cross-disciplinary collaborations within the NCI Physical Sciences–Oncology Centers Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Jodi E.; Theisz, Katrina I.; Jensen, Unni S.; Jones, C. David; Ponomarev, Ilya; Sulima, Pawel; Jo, Karen; Eljanne, Mariam; Espey, Michael G.; Franca-Koh, Jonathan; Hanlon, Sean E.; Kuhn, Nastaran Z.; Nagahara, Larry A.; Schnell, Joshua D.; Moore, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Development of effective quantitative indicators and methodologies to assess the outcomes of cross-disciplinary collaborative initiatives has the potential to improve scientific program management and scientific output. This article highlights an example of a prospective evaluation that has been developed to monitor and improve progress of the National Cancer Institute Physical Sciences—Oncology Centers (PS-OC) program. Study data, including collaboration information, was captured through progress reports and compiled using the web-based analytic database: Interdisciplinary Team Reporting, Analysis, and Query Resource. Analysis of collaborations was further supported by data from the Thomson Reuters Web of Science database, MEDLINE database, and a web-based survey. Integration of novel and standard data sources was augmented by the development of automated methods to mine investigator pre-award publications, assign investigator disciplines, and distinguish cross-disciplinary publication content. The results highlight increases in cross-disciplinary authorship collaborations from pre- to post-award years among the primary investigators and confirm that a majority of cross-disciplinary collaborations have resulted in publications with cross-disciplinary content that rank in the top third of their field. With these evaluation data, PS-OC Program officials have provided ongoing feedback to participating investigators to improve center productivity and thereby facilitate a more successful initiative. Future analysis will continue to expand these methods and metrics to adapt to new advances in research evaluation and changes in the program. PMID:24808632

  5. Radiology in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrusovsky, J.; Benes, J.

    1985-01-01

    A textbook is presented for pregraduate and postgraduate students of veterinary medicine, offering an extensive review of all aspects of radiology as applied in veterinary sciences. Based on findings published in the literature and the authors' own research, the textbook familiarizes the reader with the problems of nuclear physics, biological effects of ionizing radiation on animals, the principles of biological cycles of radionuclides in the atmosphere, the fundamentals of radiochemistry, dosimetry, radiometry and nuclear medicine. Radiation protection of animals, raw materials, feeds, foodstuff and water, and the questions of the aplications of ionizing radiation and of radionuclides in veterinary medicine are discussed in great detail. The publication is complemented with numerous photographs, figures and graphs. (L.O.)

  6. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Erlt-Wagner, B.

    2006-01-01

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  7. Radiological diagnostics in hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, U.; Kuhn, F.P.; Gruetzner, G.

    1991-01-01

    The most important radiologically detectable effects of the primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism of the skeletal system and the periarticular soft tissue structures are presented. In the following sensitivity and specificity of radiological imaging - sonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, arteriography and selective venous sampling - in the preoperative diagnostic of the parathyroid adenomas are discussed. Therefore, radiological imaging can be omitted before primary surgery. It was only in secondary surgery that radiological process proved useful and a guide during surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  8. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC IN YEAR-1 AND BEYOND.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND, L.; BOER, D.; SAITO, N.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2001-05-14

    The much anticipated RHIC spin physics program will commence this fall when the first physics run with colliding beams of polarized protons is expected. More specifically, the planned year-1 RHIC-Spin measurements are (1) the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} in production of pions by collisions of longitudinally polarized protons (in order to obtain first information on the proton's spin-dependent gluon density, {Delta}g); (2) the transverse single-spin asymmetry A{sub N}{sup {pi}} for pion production. These two reactions provided part of the motivation for our workshop. On the first day there were informative talks on the specific plans of STAR (by Rakness) and PHENIX (by Goto) for the polarized run of Year-1. Some of the theoretical questions related to the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} were discussed on the first day by Vogelsang and Kretzer, which centered mostly around the questions of how well the unpolarized fragmentation functions are known, the need for next-to-leading order calculations, and on how sensitive the asymmetry is to the possible {Delta}g distributions. Vetterli presented HERMES measurements of fragmentation functions, which overlap in Q{sup 2} with the future lower-p{sub T} measurements at RHIC.

  9. Parents' Perception of Receiving Family-Centered Care for Their Children with Physical Disabilities: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasri, Nihad A; An, Mihee; Palisano, Robert J

    2017-07-28

    Understanding parent perceptions of family-centered care (FCC) is important to improve processes and outcomes of children's services. A systematic review and meta-analysis of research on the Measures of Processes of Care (MPOC-20) were performed to determine the extent parents of children with physical disabilities perceive they received FCC. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using four databases. A total of 129 studies were retrieved; 15 met the criteria for the synthesis. Meta-analysis involving 2,582 mothers and fathers of children with physical disabilities mainly cerebral palsy was conducted for the five scales of the MPOC-20. Aggregated mean ratings varied from 5.0 to 5.5 for Providing Specific Information about the Child; Coordinated and Comprehensive Care; and Respectful and Supportive Care (relational behaviors) and Enabling and Partnership (participatory behaviors) indicating that, on average, parents rated FCC as having been provided to "a fairly great extent." The aggregated mean rating was 4.1 for Providing General Information, indicating FCC was provided "to a moderate extent." Service providers are encouraged to focus on child and family needs for general information. Research is needed to better understand parent perspectives of service provider participatory behaviors which are important for engaging families in intervention processes.

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC IN YEAR-1 AND BEYOND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLAND, L.; BOER, D.; SAITO, N.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2001-01-01

    The much anticipated RHIC spin physics program will commence this fall when the first physics run with colliding beams of polarized protons is expected. More specifically, the planned year-1 RHIC-Spin measurements are (1) the double-spin asymmetry A LL π in production of pions by collisions of longitudinally polarized protons (in order to obtain first information on the proton's spin-dependent gluon density, Δg); (2) the transverse single-spin asymmetry A N π for pion production. These two reactions provided part of the motivation for our workshop. On the first day there were informative talks on the specific plans of STAR (by Rakness) and PHENIX (by Goto) for the polarized run of Year-1. Some of the theoretical questions related to the double-spin asymmetry A LL π were discussed on the first day by Vogelsang and Kretzer, which centered mostly around the questions of how well the unpolarized fragmentation functions are known, the need for next-to-leading order calculations, and on how sensitive the asymmetry is to the possible Δg distributions. Vetterli presented HERMES measurements of fragmentation functions, which overlap in Q 2 with the future lower-p T measurements at RHIC

  11. Radiology systems architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibel, S R; Greenes, R A

    1996-05-01

    This article focuses on the software requirements for enterprise integration in radiology. The needs of a future radiology systems architecture are examined, both at a concrete functional level and at an abstract system-properties level. A component-based approach to software development is described and is validated in the context of each of the abstract system requirements for future radiology computing environments.

  12. Trends of Training Courses Conducted in the Human Resources Development Center of the National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology After the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuko; Iida, Haruzo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-07-01

    Environmental contamination with radioactive materials caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in 2011 raised a serious health concern among residents in Japan, and the demand for radiation experts who can handle the radiation-associated problems has increased. The Human Resources Development Center (HRDC) of the National Institute of for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology in Japan has offered a variety of training programs covering a wide range of technologies associated with radiation since 1959. In this study, the time-course change in the number and age of the applicants for training programs regularly scheduled at HRDC were analyzed to characterize the demand after the NPP accident. The results suggested that the demand for the training of industrial radiation experts elevated sharply after the NPP accident followed by a prompt decrease, and that young people were likely stimulated to learn the basics of radiation. The demand for the training of medical radiation experts was kept high regardless of the NPP accident. The demand for the training of radiation emergency experts fluctuated apparently with three components: a terminating demand after the criticality accident that occurred in 1999, an urgent demand for handling of the NPP accident, and a sustained demand from local governments that undertook reinforcement of their nuclear disaster prevention program. The demand for the training of school students appeared to be increasing after the NPP accident. It could be foreseen that the demand for training programs targeting young people and medical radiation experts would be elevated in future.

  13. Radiological Situation at the Bomb Test Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of radiological situation at the selected bomb test sites is presented. The report is based on the reports and measurements performed by IAEA while the author was a head of its Physics-Chemistry-Instrumentation Laboratory. Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll (USA testing ground), Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls (French testing ground) and Semipalatinsk (SSSR testing ground) have been discussed in some details. (author)

  14. Radiological Protection Miscellaneous Provisions Act 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish Legislation

    2014-07-01

    This Act provides for the dissolution of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and the transfer of all its functions, assets, liabilities and staff to the Environmental Protection Agency, to give effect to the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material done at Vienna on 8 July 2005, to amend the Radiological Protection Act 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency Act 1992 and certain other enactments, and to provide for matters connected therewith

  15. Radiological safety and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, P.H.; Barg, D.C.; Baird, R.D.; Card, D.H.; de Souza, F.; Elder, J.; Felthauser, K.; Jensen, C.; Winkler, V.

    1982-02-01

    A brief radiological safety and risk assessment of a nuclear power generation center with an adjacent on-site waste disposal facility at a specific site in the State of Utah is presented. The assessment was conducted to assist in determining the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) in Utah consisting of nine 1250 MWe nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) electrical generating units arranged in 3 clusters of 3 units each known as triads. The site selected for this conceptual study is in the Horse Bench area about 15 miles directly south of the town of Green River, Utah. The radiological issues included direct radiation exposures to on-site workers and the off-site population, release of radioactive material, and effects of these releases for both normal operations and accidental occurrences. The basic finding of this study is that the concept of an NEC in the Green River area, specifically at the Horse Bench site, is radiologically feasible

  16. A radiological control implementation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamley, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program. The manual is now in draft form and includes information that will be of use to line managers dealing with improving radiological performance and the practical aspects of radiological controls implementation. The manual is expected to be completed by the fall of 1993 and to be used in conjunction with a performance-based self-assessment training program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  17. Radiology and fine art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stošić-Opinćal, Tatjana; Tomić, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    The radiologic aesthetics of some body parts and internal organs have inspired certain artists to create specific works of art. Our aim was to describe the link between radiology and fine art. We explored 13,625 artworks in the literature produced by 2049 artists and found several thousand photographs in an online image search. The examination revealed 271 radiologic artworks (1.99%) created by 59 artists (2.88%) who mainly applied radiography, sonography, CT, and MRI. Some authors produced radiologic artistic photographs, and others used radiologic images to create artful compositions, specific sculptures, or digital works. Many radiologic artworks have symbolic, metaphoric, or conceptual connotations. Radiology is clearly becoming an original and important field of modern art.

  18. THE WORK PROCESS IN RADIOLOGICAL NURSING: INVISIBILITY OFIONIZING RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Melo,Juliana Almeida Coelho de; Gelbcke,Francine Lima; Huhn,Andrea; Vargas,Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Qualitative descriptive and exploratory research, performed with 20 nursing professionals working in a general radiology unit and surgery center with the "C-arm" equipment, and the hemodynamics unit of a southern Brazilian teaching hospital. Aim was to analyze the dimensions of the work process for radiological technology nurse professionals. This paper made clear that radiological technologies are outside nursing, which leads to the invisibility of ionizing radiation, leading to ina...

  19. Training on Radiological Protection in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.

    2004-01-01

    Since they were created in 1973 and 1988 respectively, the Superior Center of Nuclear Studies (CSEN) of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), together with the Peruvian Radioprotection Society (SPR) have carried out different training courses on radiological protection so that people can work safely with ionizing radiations in medicine, industry and investigation. Additionally, radiological protection is taught to pre graduate students of Medical Technology in four Universities. These courses are a must since national regulations demand that people working with ionizing radiations have an authorization, which is granted by the Technical Office of the National Authority - the technical organ of IPEN - after the candidate demonstrates that he or she knows the specific use of the technique using radiations, as well as all aspects related to safety and radiological protection. The analysis of the radiological protection programs is presented in this document. These programs were carried out by CSEN, during the last 30 years, and by the SRP, and they allowed the training of more than 2200 and 1500 people in the country, respectively. The content of both courses is aimed at specific work with radiations (diagnostic radiology, dental radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, industrial radiography, nuclear gauges, gamma irradiator, etc..) and fulfill the regulatory requirements. The Universities have different programs on radiological protection for the students of Medical Technology. (Author)

  20. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015.

  1. Radiological assessment of decommissioned nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Cottrell, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    A radiological survey of the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey, has been completed. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's. It was released for unrestricted use in 1967 following a radiological survey by the Atomic Energy Commission and is now a reserve training center for the U. S. Marine Sixth Motor Transport Battalion. The present survey was undertaken to determine whether the existing radiological status of the property is consistent with current health standards and radiation protection practices. The radiological survey included measurement of residual alpha, beta, and gamma contamination levels, radon and radon daughter concentrations in buildings, external gamma radiation levels on the site and on adjacent property, and radium concentrations in soil on the site and on adjacent property

  2. Occupational radiological protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: occupational expossure (the ALARA principle, dose-equivalent limit, ICRP justification); radiological protection planning (general aspects, barrier estimation) and determination of the occupational expossures (individual monitoring). (M.A.) [pt

  3. Prediction of attendance at fitness center: a comparison between the theory of planned behavior, the social cognitive theory, and the physical activity maintenance theory

    OpenAIRE

    Jekauc, Darko; Völkle, Manuel; Wagner, Matthias O.; Mess, Filip; Reiner, Miriam; Renner, Britta

    2015-01-01

    In the processes of physical activity (PA) maintenance specific predictors are effective, which differ from other stages of PA development. Recently, Physical Activity Maintenance Theory (PAMT) was specifically developed for prediction of PA maintenance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the predictability of the future behavior by the PAMT and compare it with the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). Participation rate in a fitness center was observed...

  4. Proton therapy with spot scanning: the Rinecker Proton Therapy Center in Munich. Part 2: Technical and physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, H. J.; Mayr, M.; Schneider, R. A.; Arnold, M. R.; Geismar, D. E.; Wilms, M.; Wisser, L.; Herbst, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Rinecker Proton Therapy Center (RPTC) in Munich is about to introduce into clinical radiation therapy, a 2D scanning technique (spot scanning) of a single proton pencil beam. It will be available at four gantries and a fifth treatment room allocates a fixed beam unit for a scattering technique. A superconducting cyclotron extracts protons with a constant energy of 250 MeV. Far upstream of the patient follows modulation of the energy with a degrader according to the prescription of the patients treatment planning. A 10 mm pencil beam at full width of half maximum (FWHM) will enable scanning of individual tumour volumes at any depth i.e. 1 minute for a target volume of 1 litre and a dose of 2 Gy. Innovative solutions will be established for other important issues such as dosimetric monitoring, safety concepts and positioning of the patient. The physical characteristics of proton beam spot scanning offer exceptional possibilities in conformal radiation therapy. Together with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) it significantly improves the sparing of organs at risk and of healthy tissues. (author)

  5. The DKIST Data Center: Meeting the Data Challenges for Next-Generation, Ground-Based Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, A. R.; Reardon, K.; Berukoff, S. J.; Hays, T.; Spiess, D.; Watson, F. T.; Wiant, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) is under construction on the summit of Haleakalā in Maui, and scheduled to start science operations in 2020. The DKIST design includes a four-meter primary mirror coupled to an adaptive optics system, and a flexible instrumentation suite capable of delivering high-resolution optical and infrared observations of the solar chromosphere, photosphere, and corona. Through investigator-driven science proposals, the facility will generate an average of 8 TB of data daily, comprised of millions of images and hundreds of millions of metadata elements. The DKIST Data Center is responsible for the long-term curation and calibration of data received from the DKIST, and for distributing it to the user community for scientific use. Two key elements necessary to meet the inherent big data challenge are the development of flexible public/private cloud computing and coupled relational and non-relational data storage mechanisms. We discuss how this infrastructure is being designed to meet the significant expectation of automatic and manual calibration of ground-based solar physics data, and the maximization the data's utility through efficient, long-term data management practices implemented with prudent process definition and technology exploitation.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy physical protection upgrades at the Latvian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Research Center, Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, M.; Hine, C.; Robertson, C.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately five years ago, the Safe, Secure Dismantlement program was started between the US and countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU). The purpose of the program is to accelerate progress toward reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, including such threats as theft, diversion, and unauthorized possession of nuclear materials. This would be accomplished by strengthening the material protection, control, and accounting systems within the FSU countries. Under the US Department of Energy''s program of providing cooperative assistance to the FSU countries in the areas of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A), the Latvian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Research Center (LNRC) near Riga, Latvia, was identified as a candidate site for a cooperative MPC and A project. The LNRC is the site of a 5-megawatt IRT-C pool-type research reactor. This paper describes: the process involved, from initial contracting to project completion, for the physical protection upgrades now in place at the LNRC; the intervening activities; and a brief overview of the technical aspects of the upgrades

  7. 2016 New Horizons Lecture: Beyond Imaging-Radiology of Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricak, Hedvig

    2018-03-01

    This article is based on the New Horizons lecture delivered at the 2016 Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting. It addresses looming changes for radiology, many of which stem from the disruptive effects of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. This is an emerging era of unprecedented rapid innovation marked by the integration of diverse disciplines and technologies, including data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence-technologies that narrow the gap between man and machine. Technologic advances and the convergence of life sciences, physical sciences, and bioengineering are creating extraordinary opportunities in diagnostic radiology, image-guided therapy, targeted radionuclide therapy, and radiology informatics, including radiologic image analysis. This article uses the example of oncology to make the case that, if members in the field of radiology continue to be innovative and continuously reinvent themselves, radiology can play an ever-increasing role in both precision medicine and value-driven health care. © RSNA, 2018.

  8. Radiological sciences in Turkey: its past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozyar, E.

    2002-01-01

    After the discovery of X-rays in 1895, first X-rays was produced with an X-ray tube one year after in Istanbul and used with diagnostic and therapeutic aims thereafter. Parallel to the technological advances in radiology, radiation oncology and nuclear medicine, all kind of modern tools became available in Turkish Republic. There are two oncology institutes affiliated with major universities in Turkey currently. These institutions are located in Ankara and Istanbul and aimed for the research, education, and the application of the newest technology for the diagnosis and treatment in the field of basic and clinical oncology as well as in cancer epidemiology and prevention. Beside these comprehensive cancer centers there were more than 50 university hospitals with radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology facilities in Turkey. Diagnostic and interventional radiology was widely available in university and governmental hospitals. Currently conventional X-ray techniques, ultrasonography, mammography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, was available in most of the cities. Interventional procedures are performed in most of the centers. There are more than 20 university hospitals equipped with Cobalt-60 units, linear accelerators, LDR, MDR, HDR brachytherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, gamma knife, computerized treatment planning systems. All these departments have all facilities for precise in-vivo and in-vitro measurements mandatory for precise radiotherapy. Two comprehensive cancer centers have post graduate programs of radiation physics and treatment planning. The field of .nuclear medicine is rapidly growing in Turkey. Routine diagnostic services are given in almost every city. These diagnostic studies frequently performed include bone, renal, thyroid, lung and myocardial Perfusion, whole body Gallium scans, and other scintigraphic images such as gastrointestinal bleeding, gastroesophageal reflux, I-131-MIBG studies etc. Treatment is also

  9. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board...... of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology....

  10. Socioeconomic trends in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. (orig.)

  11. Saclay Center of Nuclear Studies, Direction of Materials and Nuclear Fuels, Department of Physico-Chemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry. 1968 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Clerc, M.; Le Calve, J.; Bourene, M.; Lesigne, B.; Gillois, M.; Devillers, C.; Arvis, M.; Gilles, L.; Moreau, M.; Sutton, J.; Faraggi, M.; Desalos, J.; Tran Dinh Son; Barat, F.; Hickel, B.; Chachaty, C.; Forchioni, A.; Shiotani, M.; Larher, Y.; Maurice, P.; Le Bail, H.; Nenner, T.

    1969-03-01

    This document is the 1968 annual report of research activities at the Physico-Chemistry Department (Physical Chemistry Division), part of the Directorate of Materials and Nuclear Fuels of the CEA Saclay center of nuclear studies. The report is divided into two main parts: radiolysis and photolysis studies (gaseous phase, condensed phase), and general physico-chemical studies (sorption, molecular jets)

  12. 76. German radiology congress. Book of abstracts and posters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    This issue presents the abstracts and posters of the 76th German radiology congress held from 24-27 May 1995. The session topics are the abdomen, general radiology and interventional radiology, the thorax, cardiovascular system, neck, head, mamma, muscles and skeleton, neuroradiology, pediatrics, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, computer applications, diagnostic techniques, physics, and radiobiology. Further information given includes videos, a multimedia forum, a historical poster session, and an author index. (VHE) [de

  13. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  14. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  15. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  16. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  17. Machine learning and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, H. W. Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration

  19. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  20. Physical aspects of quality assurance in nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, regulatory approach of the National Nuclear Safety Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez C, D.; Fuente P, A. de la; Quevedo G, J.R.; Lopez F, Y.; Varela C, C.

    2006-01-01

    The physical aspects of the quality guarantee in Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy its are of cardinal importance to guarantee the quality of the diagnoses and treatments that are carried out to the patients in this type of services. The OIEA, the OMS and other scientific and professional organizations have contributed significantly to the elaboration of recommendations, Protocols, etc. applicable in the quality control programs and safety of the Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy departments. In spite of the great effort developed in this sense the Installation of the programs of quality control and safety of the Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy departments can fail if the same ones are not based in three decisive elements that are: the existence of national regulations, the existence of the infrastructure required for it and the existence of enough qualified personnel to develop this programs. The present work shows the regulatory focus that on this topic, it has followed the National Center of Nuclear Safety of Cuba (CNSN). The same left of strengthen all the existent Synergies in the different organizations of the country and it went in two fundamental directions: installation of the regulatory requirements that govern this activity and the Authorization of a Cuban Entity, specialized in carrying out audits to the quality control and safety programs of the Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy departments. After 4 work years in this direction, the results confirm the validity of the experience developed by the CNSN, at the moment all the services of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy of Cuba possess quality control and safety programs, these programs are annually Auditing by an Authorized entity by the CNSN and the Inspectors of the Regulatory Authority, control, during the inspections, the one execution of the established requirements in the national regulations. The work developed so far can serve, modestly, of reference to others countries of Latin America that

  1. Implementation of procedures of radiological protection in the section of Radiology of the emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre-Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, F.; Rizzati, M.R. [Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre, HPS (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre (HPS) is one of the main reference centers for the population in the attendance of medical emergencies/urgencies. The Section of Radiology, which informs the patients clinical conditions based on radiological images, is the most demanded section of the hospital (81.43 % of the medical cases request radiological exams) in the aid of the diagnosis, in which excels for the search of the quality in the health branch. In this work are presented the procedures to have been implemented about radiological protection according to effective norm, methods, ways and conditions to satisfy the radiation workers and the internal and external patients. (Author)

  2. Implementation of procedures of radiological protection in the section of Radiology of the emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzini, F.; Rizzati, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    The Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre (HPS) is one of the main reference centers for the population in the attendance of medical emergencies/urgencies. The Section of Radiology, which informs the patients clinical conditions based on radiological images, is the most demanded section of the hospital (81.43 % of the medical cases request radiological exams) in the aid of the diagnosis, in which excels for the search of the quality in the health branch. In this work are presented the procedures to have been implemented about radiological protection according to effective norm, methods, ways and conditions to satisfy the radiation workers and the internal and external patients. (Author)

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  4. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report: Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, October 1977-September 1978. [Summary of research activities at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, R. E.; Inokuti, Mitio [eds.

    1978-01-01

    Research presented includes 32 papers, six of which have appeared previously in ERA, and 26 appear in this issue of ERA. Molecular physics and chemistry including photoionization, molecular properties, oscillator strengths, scattering, shape resonances, and photoelectrons are covered. A list of publications is included. (JFP)

  5. Effect of Sex and Body Mass Index on Children's Physical Activity Intensity during Free Play at an Indoor Soft Play Center: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michelle A

    2017-09-12

    Background : Indoor soft play can provide a safe but exciting physical activity opportunity regardless of environmental conditions. Relatively little is known about the quality or quantity of physical activity engaged in by children during indoor free soft play. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution indoor free soft play can make in enabling children to meet physical activity guidelines and to evaluate the effects of sex and body mass index category. Methods : Seventy-two boys and girls aged five to 10 years engaged in un-controlled indoor free soft play with a mean duration of 120.7 (27.1) min, during which physical activity was monitored using Actigraph accelerometers. Results : Children spent an average of 61.7 (24.2) min engaging in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and 51.4% ( n = 37) achieved the recommended 60 min of MVPA through the single visit to the indoor soft play center. Boys (68.3 (25.7) min) engaged in significantly ( p < 0.05) more MVPA than girls (55.8 (21.4) min). Normal weight (65.7 (23.3) min) children engaged in significantly more MVPA than overweight children (48.0 (18.9) min). Conclusions : Attendance at a soft play indoor center has the potential to support children to engage in sufficient MVPA and overcome environmental factors that can restrict physical activity opportunities.

  6. Effect of Sex and Body Mass Index on Children’s Physical Activity Intensity during Free Play at an Indoor Soft Play Center: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background: Indoor soft play can provide a safe but exciting physical activity opportunity regardless of environmental conditions. Relatively little is known about the quality or quantity of physical activity engaged in by children during indoor free soft play. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution indoor free soft play can make in enabling children to meet physical activity guidelines and to evaluate the effects of sex and body mass index category. Methods: Seventy-two boys and girls aged five to 10 years engaged in un-controlled indoor free soft play with a mean duration of 120.7 (27.1) min, during which physical activity was monitored using Actigraph accelerometers. Results: Children spent an average of 61.7 (24.2) min engaging in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and 51.4% (n = 37) achieved the recommended 60 min of MVPA through the single visit to the indoor soft play center. Boys (68.3 (25.7) min) engaged in significantly (p < 0.05) more MVPA than girls (55.8 (21.4) min). Normal weight (65.7 (23.3) min) children engaged in significantly more MVPA than overweight children (48.0 (18.9) min). Conclusions: Attendance at a soft play indoor center has the potential to support children to engage in sufficient MVPA and overcome environmental factors that can restrict physical activity opportunities. PMID:28895904

  7. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  8. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  9. Gout. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Calvo Paramo, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the clinical and radiological aspects of gout, showing the most frequent radiological findings that can guide to the correct diagnosis of the disease. The cases that we presented here have been analyzed for many years in our rheumatology service, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Bogota

  10. WE-E-16A-01: Medical Physics Economics Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, J; Dirksen, B; White, G

    2014-01-01

    Radiology and Medical Physics reimbursement for Medicare services is constantly changing. In this presentation we will review the proposed reimbursement rules and levels for 2015 and compare them with those currently in effect for 2014. In addition, we will discuss the challenges that may lie ahead for the medical physics profession as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) moves away from a fee for service payment model and towards one of prospective payment. Learning Objectives: Understand the differences in the Medicare reimbursement systems for outpatient departments as opposed to physicians and free standing centers. Learn the proposed Medicare rules for 2015 and how they may affect Radiology and Medical Physics revenues. Be aware of possible long term changes in reimbursement and how they may affect our employers, our pocket books and our profession

  11. WE-E-16A-01: Medical Physics Economics Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, J [Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, VT (United States); Dirksen, B [Mercy Medical Center, Coralville, IA (United States); White, G [Colorado Associates in Medical Phys, Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Radiology and Medical Physics reimbursement for Medicare services is constantly changing. In this presentation we will review the proposed reimbursement rules and levels for 2015 and compare them with those currently in effect for 2014. In addition, we will discuss the challenges that may lie ahead for the medical physics profession as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) moves away from a fee for service payment model and towards one of prospective payment. Learning Objectives: Understand the differences in the Medicare reimbursement systems for outpatient departments as opposed to physicians and free standing centers. Learn the proposed Medicare rules for 2015 and how they may affect Radiology and Medical Physics revenues. Be aware of possible long term changes in reimbursement and how they may affect our employers, our pocket books and our profession.

  12. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Goldhagen, P.

    1988-07-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generated a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the U.S. Department of Energy. As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the RRL are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. RARAF was located at BNL from 1967 until 1980, when it was dismantled and moved to the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University, where it was then reassembled and put back into operation. Data obtained from experiment using RARAF have been of pragmatic value to radiation protection and to neutron therapy. At a more fundamental level, the research at RARAF has provided insight into the biological action of radiation and especially its relation to energy distribution in the cell. High-LET radiations are an agent of special importance because they can cause measurable cellular effects by single particles, eliminating some of the complexities of multievent action and more clearly disclosing basic features. This applies particularly to radiation carcinogenesis. Facilities are available at RARAF for exposing objects to different radiations having a wide range of linear energy transfers (LETs)

  13. 84-KILOMETER RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING GRID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. Roe

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to document the development of a radial grid that is suitable for evaluating the pathways and potential impacts of a release of radioactive materials to the environment within a distance of 84 kilometers (km). The center of the grid represents an approximate location from which a potential release of radioactive materials could originate. The center is located on Nevada State Plane coordinates Northing 765621.5, and Easting 570433.6, which is on the eastern side of Exile Hill at the Yucca Mountain site. The North Portal Pad is located over this point. The grid resulting from this calculation is intended for use primarily in the Radiological Monitoring Program (RadMP). This grid also is suitable for use in Biosphere Modeling and other Yucca Mountain Site Characteristic Project (YMP) activities that require the evaluation of data referenced by spatial or geographic coordinates

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  15. Mobilization suited for each radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambrette, V.

    2013-01-01

    This poster presents the role played by IRSN (French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety) in case of radiological alert. This alert can be sent by the administration, a fire brigade, a nuclear operator or a remote monitor of radioactivity. In case of an emergency situation: IRSN provides radiological intervention and assistance on the site. In case of national crisis organization, IRSN will implement the emergency technical center and will send a mobile cell to the Operational Command Station of the Prefecture concerned. In both cases IRSN will be in charge of assessing the individuals' exposure and the impact on the environment

  16. Problems with radiological surveillance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.; Tanner, J.E.; Fleming, D.M.

    1984-09-01

    Many radiological surveillance instruments are in use at DOE facilities throughout the country. These instruments are an essential part of all health physics programs, and poor instrument performance can increase program costs or compromise program effectiveness. Generic data from simple tests on newly purchased instruments shows that many instruments will not meet requirements due to manufacturing defects. In other cases, lack of consideration of instrument use has resulted in poor acceptance of instruments and poor reliability. The performance of instruments is highly variable for electronic and mechanical performance, radiation response, susceptibility to interferences and response to environmental factors. Poor instrument performance in these areas can lead to errors or poor accuracy in measurements

  17. Problems with radiological surveillance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.; Tanner, J.E.; Fleming, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Many radiological surveillance instruments are in use at DOE facilities throughout the country. These instruments are an essential part of all health physics programs, and poor instrument performance can increase program costs or compromise program effectiveness. Generic data from simple tests on newly purchased instruments shows that many instruments will not meet requirements due to manufacturing defects. In other cases, lack of consideration of instrument use has resulted in poor acceptance of instruments and poor reliability. The performance of instruments is highly variable for electronic and mechanical performance, radiation response, susceptibility to interferences and response to environmental factors. Poor instrument performance in these areas can lead to errors or poor accuracy in measurements

  18. TH-E-201-00: Teaching Radiology Residents: What, How, and Expectation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  19. TH-E-201-00: Teaching Radiology Residents: What, How, and Expectation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant.

  20. The Effect of Dining Room Physical Environmental Renovations on Person-Centered Care Practice and Residents' Dining Experiences in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Lillian; Chaudhury, Habib; Rust, Tiana

    2016-12-01

    This qualitative study evaluated the effect of dining room physical environmental changes on staff practices and residents' mealtime experiences in two units of a long-term care facility in Edmonton, Canada. Focus groups with staff (n = 12) and individual interviews with unit managers (n = 2) were conducted. We also developed and used the Dining Environment Assessment Protocol (DEAP) to conduct a systematic physical environmental evaluation of the dining rooms. Four themes emerged on the key influences of the renovations: (a) supporting independence and autonomy, (b) creating familiarity and enjoyment, (c) providing a place for social experience, and (d) challenges in supporting change. Feedback from the staff and managers provided evidence on the importance of physical environmental features, as well as the integral nature of the role of the physical environment and organizational support to provide person-centered care for residents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, R.J.; Cooper, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building. A total of 85 technical (100 square centimeter (cm 2 )) smears were collected from the Room 147 hoods, the Shielded Materials Facility (SMF), and the Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC). Exposure rate readings (window open and window closed) were taken at a distance of 2.5 centimeters (cm) and 30 cm from the surface of each smear. Gross beta-gamma and alpha counts of each smear were also performed. The smear samples were analyzed by gamma energy analysis (GEA). Alpha energy analysis (AEA) and strontium-90 analysis were also performed on selected smears. GEA results for one or more samples reported the presence of manganese-54, cobalt-60, silver-108m antimony-125, cesium-134, cesium-137, europium-154, europium-155, and americium-241. AEA results reported the presence of plutonium-239/240, plutonium-238/ 241 Am, curium-243/244, curium-242, and americium-243. Tables 5 through 9 present a summary by location of the estimated maximum removable and total contamination levels in the Room 147 hoods, the SMF, and the REC. The smear sample survey data and laboratory analytical results are presented in tabular form by sample in Appendix A. The Appendix A tables combine survey data documented in radiological survey reports found in Appendix B and laboratory analytical results reported in the 324 Building Physical and Radiological Characterization Study (Berk, Hill, and Landsman 1998), supplemented by the laboratory analytical results found in Appendix C.

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  4. The radiological research accelerator facility. Progress report, December 1, 1995--November 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1996-08-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) - of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. RARAF was conceived in the mid-1960s by Drs. Victor P. Bond of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Harald H. Rossi of Columbia University as a research resource dedicated to radiobiology and radiological physics and was officially established on January 1, 1967. The RARAF Van de Graaff accelerator originally served as the injector for the Cosmotron, a 2-GeV accelerator operated at BNL in the 1950s and early 1960s. The immediate aim was to provide a source of monoenergetic neutrons for studies in radiation biology, dosimetry, and microdosimetry. In other major projects the energetic ions produced were utilized directly. RARAF was located at BNL from 1967 until 1980, when it was dismantled and moved to the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University, where it was then reassembled and returned to operation. This report contains the following information on RARAF: RARAF user's guide; scientific advisory committee; research using RARAF; accelerator utilization and operation; and development of the facilities

  5. Preliminary analysis of radiologic consequence in accident cases with radiation sources in laboratories of the Physics Department of the IEN, cyclotrons and laboratories annexed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Silva, J.J.G. da.

    1987-03-01

    The requirements necessaries to the elaboration of the situation of Emergency PLans of the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN), Brazil, in particular, cases of radiation emergency are presented. An estimate of radiation in the laboratories of the Physic Department of the IEN, in case of accident, are given. The results presented are based in some hypothesis, values of radionuclide activity furnished by Radioisotopes Division and values of activities estimated by Radiation Protection Section of the IEN in function of datas achieved with cyclotron Division. The dose calculations are done to the cases of radionuclides inhalation and immersion of person in a semi-infinite cloud of contaminants. (V.R.B.)

  6. On the Way of Educational Reform: Thai High School Physics Teachers' Conceptions of the Student-Centered Approach and Their Perceptions of Their Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumklang, Kawin

    During the past two decades, the student-centered approach has been widely promoted and accepted by the educational community as one of the most effective instructional approaches. It has been continually developed and revised to match our current understanding of how humans learn (American Psychological Association, 1997). It is based upon the belief that students should take responsibility for their own learning. Thus, curriculum, instruction, and assessment should be carefully designed to stimulate, facilitate, and accelerate students' learning as much as possible. In order to do so, the teacher needs to take the following factors into consideration: students' cognitive structures, metacognitive and regulative skills, motivation and affective states, developmental and individual differences, and social supports. However, the term student-centered has been defined and described by researchers and scholars in many different ways. Little is known about how practicing teachers conceptualize this term and how they perceive their classroom practices in relation to these conceptions. The purpose of this study was to utilize a qualitative multiple-case study approach to investigate teachers' conceptions of the student-centered approach and their perceptions of their classroom practices. Four Thai high school physics teachers, who were considered products of the current student-centered educational reform movement in Thailand, participated in this study. Data were collected for one learning unit (three to eight weeks) through classroom observations, semi-structured interviews, and document analysis. The data analysis revealed that teachers' conceptions of student-centered curriculum, instruction, and assessment had three common characteristics: (a) students' active participation; (b) special emphasis on students' background knowledge, understanding, motivation, affective states, and learning capability; and (c) benefits to students. The results also indicated that there

  7. Radiological control in fires involving radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, J.O.A.; Coelho, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    The copies used during the chatter by techniques from CDTN in the I Mineiro Symposium of Fire Engineering, are presented. The chatter was based on emergency radiation control course, given by CDTN. Basic concepts, such as nuclear physics fundaments, radiation nature and detection, radiation protection and practical aspects of radiological fire emergency, were enphasized. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  9. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  10. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Guidelines for radiological interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    The German Radiological Society, in cooperation with other German professional bodies, set up draft Guidelines for Radiological Interventions and submitted them to the professional community for discussion. The Guidelines are meant to assess the potential of radiological interventions as treatment alternatives to surgery or aggressive therapy such as chemotherapy. In fact, technical practicability on its own is insufficient to warrant intervention. The Guidelines are systematically compiled notions and recommendations whose aim it is to provide support to physicians and patients in choosing suitable medical care provisions (prevention, diagnosis, therapy, aftertreatment) in specific circumstances. A complete Czech translation of the Guidelines is given. (P.A.)

  12. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  13. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  14. RIMS/sup tm/ - radiological information management system: software package EI-029-S86

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    RIMS/sup tm/ has been developed for health physics record keeping and reporting. It provides for the management needs relating to radiological information control at a nuclear facility. The program is comprised of the following modules: Personnel Radiological Information, Radiological Work Permit, Radiation Survey Records, Access Control, ALARA Reporting, and Respirator and Survey Instrument Inventory Modules.

  15. RIMS/sup tm/ - radiological information management system: software package EI-029-S86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    RIMS/sup tm/ has been developed for health physics record keeping and reporting. It provides for the management needs relating to radiological information control at a nuclear facility. The program is comprised of the following modules: Personnel Radiological Information, Radiological Work Permit, Radiation Survey Records, Access Control, ALARA Reporting, and Respirator and Survey Instrument Inventory Modules

  16. Automated Calibration of Dosimeters for Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Acosta, A.; Gutierrez Lores, S.

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of dosimeters for diagnostic radiology includes current and charge measurements, which are often repetitive. However, these measurements are usually done using modern electrometers, which are equipped with an RS-232 interface that enables instrument control from a computer. This paper presents an automated system aimed to the measurements for the calibration of dosimeters used in diagnostic radiology. A software application was developed, in order to achieve the acquisition of the electric charge readings, measured values of the monitor chamber, calculation of the calibration coefficient and issue of a calibration certificate. A primary data record file is filled and stored in the computer hard disk. The calibration method used was calibration by substitution. With this system, a better control over the calibration process is achieved and the need for human intervention is reduced. the automated system will be used in the calibration of dosimeters for diagnostic radiology at the Cuban Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene. (Author)

  17. Establishment of exposure dose assessment laboratory in National Radiation Emergency Medical Center (NREMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Ryong; Ha, Wi Ho; Yoon, Seok Won; Han, Eun Ae; Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    As unclear industry grown, 432 of the nuclear power plants are operating and 52 of NPPs are under construction currently. Increasing use of radiation or radioisotopes in the field of industry, medical purpose and research such as non-destructive examination, computed tomography and x-ray, etc. constantly. With use of nuclear or radiation has incidence possibility for example the Fukushima NPP incident, the Goiania accident and the Chernobyl Nuclear accident. Also the risk of terror by radioactive material such as Radiological Dispersal Device(RDD) etc. In Korea, since the 'Law on protection of nuclear facilities and countermeasure for radioactive preparedness was enacted in 2003, the Korean institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences(KIRAMS) was established for the radiation emergency medical response in radiological disaster due to nuclear accident, radioactive terror and so on. Especially National Radiation Emergency Medical Center(NREMC) has the duty that is protect citizens from nuclear, radiological accidents or radiological terrors through the emergency medical preparedness. The NREMC was established by the 39-article law on physical protection of nuclear material and facilities and measures for radiological emergencies. Dose assessment or contamination survey should be performed which provide the radiological information for medical response. For this reason, the NREMC establish and re-organized dose assessment system based on the existing dose assessment system of the NREMC recently. The exposure dose could be measured by physical and biological method. With these two methods, we can have conservative dose assessment result. Therefore the NREMC established the exposure dose assessment laboratory which was re-organized laboratory space and introduced specialized equipment for dose assessment. This paper will report the establishment and operation of exposure dose assessment laboratory for radiological emergency response and discuss how to enhance

  18. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  19. Implementation of a remote system for monitoring of radiological areas of radiological areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez E, Walter; Galuppo G, Emiliano; Gutierrez G, Jorge; Reyes R, Jerson

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The present work shows the development of a radiation remote monitoring system which control radiological areas in the principal facilities at CCHEN and the development in the last years to use this system called SMARR (Remote Radiological Area Monitoring System). This is an important issue in radiological safety is to know 'on line' and in a 'continuously way' the radiological variables of areas, especially if in these areas people manage radioactive sources or material, the monitoring system are operative on La Reina and Lo Aguirre Nuclear Centers. This 'knowledge' gets a good support to the radiological safety to safeguard the environment and people in the facilities. Nuclear Chilean Commission: Actually, this system is daily operating to register the background radiation and level operation, for example of the facilities research reactor, cyclone, irradiators, in order to probe the behaviors under operational requirements. The system was made using common Geiger Muller and NaI detectors. This signal is received, data by data, for a collector computer which uses a Labview program to do this displayed on a screen computer using graphics to show the activity on a radiological area, and when the lectures pass a setting value automatically the system send by e-mail and text message which also can be received for cell phones enabled for this for the supervisor. Each monitored facility is completely independent of each other and store a data backup, also every installation are monitoring with server computer, it's concentrating the information and allow to view it on line in real time, trough the intranet and internet network. In addition, the information is stored in the special report in the server and available for to do a statistics and identify the operation periods, and control of radioactive sources. The Industry: The radiological protection on industry is necessary today, the typical instrumentation on the industry is growing up in the

  20. Active Living: development and quasi-experimental evaluation of a school-centered physical activity intervention for primary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kann, D.H.H. van; Jansen, M.W.J.; Vries, S.I. de; Vries, N.K. de; Kremers, S.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The worldwide increase in the rates of childhood overweight and physical inactivity requires successful prevention and intervention programs for children. The aim of the Active Living project is to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior of Dutch primary school children

  1. Streamlining interventional radiology admissions: The role of the interventional radiology clinic and physician's assistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.I. Jr.; Rizer, D.M.; Shuman, K.; White, E.J.; Adams, P.; Doyle, K.; Kinnison, M.

    1987-01-01

    During a 5-year period (1982-1987), 376 patients were admitted to an interventional radiology service where they were managed by the senior physician and interventional radiology fellows. Sixty-eight percent of patients were admitted for angioplasty and 32% for elective embolotherapy/diagnostic angiography. A one-half-day, twice weekly interventional radiology clinic and employment of a physician's assistant who performed preadmission history and physicals and wrote orders accounted, in part, for a decrease in hospital stay length from 3.74 days (1982-1983) to 2.41 days (1986-1987). The authors conclude that use of the clinic and the physician's assistant streamlines patient flow and the admitting process and is partially responsible for a decreased length of stay for patients admitted to an interventional radiology service

  2. Radiological assessment and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.; Sohier, A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised

  3. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi......Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP...... and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...

  4. Diagnostic radiology: I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter describes the historic development of diagnostic equipment for radiology. The problems associated with fluoroscope design are detailed and the current uses of updated technology, particularly digitization, are considered. Numerous historical photographs are included. 13 refs

  5. Ergonomics in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, N. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.uk; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations.

  6. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Ergonomics in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, N.; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V.

    2009-01-01

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations

  9. Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Picture yourself in L.A. Register now SIR Essentials Purchase/register Search SIR's entire catalog for educational ... Quality Improvement Clinical practice MACRA Matters Health Policy, Economics, Coding Toolkits Society of Interventional Radiology 3975 Fair ...

  10. Radiology and the law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Law of Medical Malpractice: An Overview; The Radiologist as Defendant; The Radiologist as an Expert Witness; The Missed Diagnosis; Legalities of the Radiograph; and Angiography and Interventional Radiology

  11. Radiological clerkships as a critical curriculum component in radiology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore the perceived value of clinical clerkships in the radiology curriculum as well as the impact of radiology clerkship on students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole and as a career. Methods: This study is a sequel to a previous survey in which student perceptions about radiology curriculum components were investigated. The present study focuses on a further analysis of a subsection in this study, based on 14 statements about radiology clerkship and two statements about radiology as a career. Results: Perceived usefulness of the aspects of radiology clerkship as 'radiology examination', 'skills development' and 'diagnosis focus' were awarded the highest scores. The predict value of the subscale 'radiology examination' on the level of performance was very high (adjusted R 2 = 0.19, p < .001). Conclusion: Students expressed highly favorable evaluation of clerkship as a learning environment to learn to order and to interpret imaging studies as well as an unique possibility to attend various radiological examinations and to access to specific radiology software systems, as well as to get a better view on radiology and to improve image interpretation skills. This positive attitude towards clerkship is closely tied to students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole. These aspects of dedicated radiology clerkship are crucial for effective and high-quality education as well as for the choice of radiology as a career.

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  14. 1987 year book of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg, D.G.; Keats, T.E.; Kieffer, S.A.; Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.; Koehler, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book is divided into seven sections, which cover neuroradiology, the thorax, the abdomen, the musculoskeletal system, pediatric radiology, radiation physics, and cardiovascular and interventional radiology. Each of the seven editors was responsible for one section. These editors gleaned what they thought were the most important articles from 78 medical journals worldwide, wrote abstracts, and then commented on their relevance. For each journal article, the heading lists the title of the paper, the authors, the authors' affiliations, and the journal name. If an article contained an important table or figure, it was reproduced for the review

  15. Radiological protection at particle accelerators: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Radiological protection began with particle accelerators. Many of the concerns in the health physics profession today were discovered at accelerator laboratories. Since the mid-1940s, our understanding has progressed through seven stages: observation of high radiation levels; shielding; development of dosimetric techniques; studies of induced activity and environmental impact; legislative and regulatory concerns; and disposal. The technical and scientific aspects of accelerator radiation safety are well in hand. In the US, there is an urgent need to move away from a ''best available technology'' philosophy to risk-based health protection standards. The newer accelerators will present interesting radiological protection issues, including copious muon production and high LET (neutron) environments

  16. Hygiene in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp-Schwoerer, A.; Daschner, F.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the hygienic management in radiological departments with special regard to the handling of injections and infusions. It includes prevention of bacterial as well as viral infections. In radiological departments disinfection of X-ray tables is necessary only in exceptional cases. A special proposal for disinfection is added. A safe method of sterilisation of flexible catheders is included, which proved to prevent bacterial infection. (orig.) [de

  17. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...... is cyclic: exacerbations relieved by asymptomatic periods. New imaging modalities, including the combination of MR imaging and multiplanar 3-D CT scans, have broadened our awareness of possible pain-generating degenerative processes of the lumbar spine other than disc degeneration....

  18. Evaluation of the radiological protection and proposal of a PGC in physical aspects for Roentgen therapy facilities; Evaluacion de la proteccion radiologica y propuesta de un PGC en aspectos fisicos para una instalacion de Roentgenterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia R, L M; Silvestre, I; Laguardia, R A; Almeida, A de [Depto. de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade de Sao Paulo-FFCLRP (Brazil)

    1999-12-31

    The present work was realized in a first stage in the Hnos Ameijeiras Hospital in Cuba and its objective in this phase is to present at the Regulatory Agency (OR) the documentation for obtaining the Institutional Exploitation License (LE) of a Roentgen therapy equipment, according with the IAEA Safety Series No. 115 and propose the Quality Assurance Program (PGC) in the physical aspects that it will be applied in this practice. For obtaining the LE it was made up a safety report, a safety manual and a radiological emergency plan. For making up the PGC it was established the reference state of the equipment (ER), realizing the tests which determine the value or stability of the physical parameters involved in the treatment through the adaptation of International protocols, mainly the `Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy` derived of Arcal XXX. In a second stage were applied some of the acquired experiences in the Das Clinicas Hospital at Ribeirao Preto in Brazil. As more important results it was had that was renewed the Roentgen therapy Service of the Hnos. Ameijeiras Hospital and was made the PGC which will govern this practice. Moreover it was obtained the dose percentage curves in depth (PDP) for X-rays low energies. It was proposed procedures for the parameters control like the PDP, the absolute dose and the hemi reducing layer (CHR). With this work it was started doing the fulfilment of one of the main objectives of the Arcal XXX Project related with the Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy extending its application toward area of Latin American countries. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of the radiological protection and proposal of a PGC in physical aspects for Roentgen therapy facilities; Evaluacion de la proteccion radiologica y propuesta de un PGC en aspectos fisicos para una instalacion de Roentgenterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia R, L.M.; Silvestre, I.; Laguardia, R.A.; Almeida, A. de [Depto. de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade de Sao Paulo-FFCLRP (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The present work was realized in a first stage in the Hnos Ameijeiras Hospital in Cuba and its objective in this phase is to present at the Regulatory Agency (OR) the documentation for obtaining the Institutional Exploitation License (LE) of a Roentgen therapy equipment, according with the IAEA Safety Series No. 115 and propose the Quality Assurance Program (PGC) in the physical aspects that it will be applied in this practice. For obtaining the LE it was made up a safety report, a safety manual and a radiological emergency plan. For making up the PGC it was established the reference state of the equipment (ER), realizing the tests which determine the value or stability of the physical parameters involved in the treatment through the adaptation of International protocols, mainly the `Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy` derived of Arcal XXX. In a second stage were applied some of the acquired experiences in the Das Clinicas Hospital at Ribeirao Preto in Brazil. As more important results it was had that was renewed the Roentgen therapy Service of the Hnos. Ameijeiras Hospital and was made the PGC which will govern this practice. Moreover it was obtained the dose percentage curves in depth (PDP) for X-rays low energies. It was proposed procedures for the parameters control like the PDP, the absolute dose and the hemi reducing layer (CHR). With this work it was started doing the fulfilment of one of the main objectives of the Arcal XXX Project related with the Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy extending its application toward area of Latin American countries. (Author)

  20. Radiological signs of childhood Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, F.; Menor, F.; Moreno, A.; Vallcanera, A.; Esteban, M.J.; Muro, D.; Cortina, H.

    1997-01-01

    To describe the most prominent radiological sings of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in childhood and review the general aspects of greatest interest to the general radiologist. The clinical and radiological histories of 40 children diagnosed on the basis of biopsy and/or cytology as having LCH in our center over a 16-year period were reviewed. Bone involvement was observed in 95% of patients; flat bones were affected in 95% of the cases, most frequently the cranium. Radiological changes in temporal bone were viewed in 15% of cases. There were long-bone lesions in 21% of the patients, involving, metaphyseal-diaphyseal bones in every case; multiple epiphyseal dysplasia was found in one and a purely cortical lesion in another. Vertebral involvement was detected in 18% of patients. Clinical evidence of diabetes insipidus (DI) was present in 22.5% of cases, while there were clinical or radiological signs of lung involvement in 15%. Bone involvement is the most common association reported in childhood LCH and is usually the reason for medical consultation. The flat bones, especially the cranium, are those most often affected. Diagnosis and follow-up studies are mainly based on plain radiography. DI due to hypothalamic infiltration in usually associated with normal CT scan. Lung involvement, uncommon in pediatric patients, is the major clinical and radiological difference with respect to the adult form. (Author) 33 refs