WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiological area monitoring

  1. Implementation of a remote system for monitoring of radiological areas of radiological areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez E, Walter; Galuppo G, Emiliano; Gutierrez G, Jorge; Reyes R, Jerson

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The present work shows the development of a radiation remote monitoring system which control radiological areas in the principal facilities at CCHEN and the development in the last years to use this system called SMARR (Remote Radiological Area Monitoring System). This is an important issue in radiological safety is to know 'on line' and in a 'continuously way' the radiological variables of areas, especially if in these areas people manage radioactive sources or material, the monitoring system are operative on La Reina and Lo Aguirre Nuclear Centers. This 'knowledge' gets a good support to the radiological safety to safeguard the environment and people in the facilities. Nuclear Chilean Commission: Actually, this system is daily operating to register the background radiation and level operation, for example of the facilities research reactor, cyclone, irradiators, in order to probe the behaviors under operational requirements. The system was made using common Geiger Muller and NaI detectors. This signal is received, data by data, for a collector computer which uses a Labview program to do this displayed on a screen computer using graphics to show the activity on a radiological area, and when the lectures pass a setting value automatically the system send by e-mail and text message which also can be received for cell phones enabled for this for the supervisor. Each monitored facility is completely independent of each other and store a data backup, also every installation are monitoring with server computer, it's concentrating the information and allow to view it on line in real time, trough the intranet and internet network. In addition, the information is stored in the special report in the server and available for to do a statistics and identify the operation periods, and control of radioactive sources. The Industry: The radiological protection on industry is necessary today, the typical instrumentation on the industry is growing up in the

  2. Radiological Monitoring Equipment For Real-Time Quantification Of Area Contamination In Soils And Facility Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. V. Carpenter; Jay A. Roach; John R Giles; Lyle G. Roybal

    2005-01-01

    The environmental restoration industry offers several systems that perform scan-type characterization of radiologically contaminated areas. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of field systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze radiological contamination in surface soils. The base system consists of a detector, such as sodium iodide (NaI) spectrometers, a global positioning system (GPS), and an integrated user-friendly computer interface. This mobile concept was initially developed to provide precertification analyses of soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and radium at the Fernald Closure Project, near Cincinnati, Ohio. INL has expanded the functionality of this basic system to create a suite of integrated field-deployable analytical systems. Using its engineering and radiation measurement expertise, aided by computer hardware and software support, INL has streamlined the data acquisition and analysis process to provide real-time information presented on wireless screens and in the form of coverage maps immediately available to field technicians. In addition, custom software offers a user-friendly interface with user-selectable alarm levels and automated data quality monitoring functions that validate the data. This system is deployed from various platforms, depending on the nature of the survey. The deployment platforms include a small all-terrain vehicle used to survey large, relatively flat areas, a hand-pushed unit for areas where maneuverability is important, an excavator-mounted system used to scan pits and trenches where personnel access is restricted, and backpack- mounted systems to survey rocky shoreline features and other physical settings that preclude vehicle-based deployment. Variants of the base system include sealed proportional counters for measuring actinides (i.e., plutonium-238 and americium-241) in building demolitions, soil areas, roadbeds, and process line routes at the Miamisburg Closure

  3. Program of environmental radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirement of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.14, related to the Program of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (PMRA)

  4. Development of a Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring Network for Emergency Response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoldo, N; Hunter, S; Fertig, R; Laguna, G; MacQueen, D

    2004-01-01

    A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety of LLNL personnel. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These loW--power sensors are supported by a central command center (CCC) and transmit measurement data back to the CCC computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio and computer based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. The RTRAM network has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions

  5. Radiological protection and environmental monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Mueller-Lyda, I.

    1992-05-01

    The personnel at the site has been monitored in accordance with the provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In addition, ambient dose, ambient dose rate, and radioactivity levels of the air in the mine have been measured pursuant to the health physics provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. None of the measured results indicated any dose received by the persons, or ambient radioactivity levels, exceeding the maximum permissible values determined for occupational exposure. Continuous monitoring of the mine off-gas has shown a minor accumulation of the nuclides, H-3, C-14, Pb-210 and of the short-lived daughter products of Rn-222 and Rn-220. The average annual emission values serving as input data, the concentration levels computed for the environment of the mine for some part have been below the levels of the naturally occurring concentrations of these nuclides. The emission-induced radiation dose measured at the least favourable place in the plant's vicinity has been far below the maximum permissible dose defined in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. All activities carried out in the Asse salt mine for the purpose of research work and storage of radioactive waste in the period under review have been contributing only a negligible amount to the radiation exposure of the population or personnel, as compared to the natural or other man-made radioactivity levels in that area. (orig.) [de

  6. Radiological protection and environmental monitoring in the area of the Asse mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Mueller-Lyda, I.

    1993-01-01

    The personnel at the site has been monitored in accordance with the provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In addition, ambient dose, ambient dose rate, and radioactivity levels of the air in the mine have been meassured pursuant to the health physics provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. None of the measured results indicated any dose received by the persons, or ambient radioactivity levels, exceeding the maximum permissible values determined for occupational exposure. Continuous monitoring of the mine off-gas has shown a minor accumulation of the nuclides. H-3, C-14, Pb-210 and of the short-lived daughter products of Rn-222 and Rn-220. The average annual emission values serving as input data, the concentration levels computed for the environment of the mine for some part have been below the levels of the naturally occurring concentrations of these nuclides. The emission-induced radiation dose measured at the least favourable place in the plant's vicinity has been far below the maximum permissible dose defined in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. All activities carried out in the Asse salt mine for the purpose of research work and storage of radioactive waste in the period under review have been contributing only a negligible amount to the radiation exposure of the population or personnel, as compared to the natural or other man-made radioactivity levels in that area. (orig.) [de

  7. Radiological protection and environmental monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Mueller-Lyda, I.

    1991-07-01

    The personnel at the site has been monitored in accordance with the provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In addition, ambient dose, ambient dose rate, and radioactivity levels of the air in the mine have been measured pursuant to the health physics provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. None of the measured results indicated any dose received by the persons, or ambient radioactivity levels, exceeding the maximum permissible values determined for occupational exposure. Continuous monitoring of the mine off-gas has shown a minor accumulation of the nuclides. H-3, C-14, Pb-210 and of the short-lived daughter products of Rn-222 and Rn-220. The average annual emission values serving as input data, the concentration levels computed for the environment of the mine for some part have been below the levels of the naturally occurring concentrations of these nuclides. The emission-induced radiation dose measured at the least favourable place in the plant's vicinity has been far below the maximum permissible dose defined in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. All activities carried out in the Asse salt mine for the purpose of research work and storage of radioactive waste in the period under review have been contributing only a negligible amount to the radiation exposure of the population or personnel, as compared to the natural or other man-made radioactivity levels in that area. (orig.) [de

  8. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  9. Radiological effluent and onsite area monitoring report for the Nevada Test Site (January 1986-December 1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program at the Nevada Test Site as conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) onsite radiological safety contractor from January 1986 through December 1986. It presents results and evaluations of radioactivity measurements in air and water, and of direct gamma radiation exposure rates. It establishes relevant correlations between the data recorded and DOE concentration guides (CG's). External gamma exposure levels and radioactivity in air and water on the Nevada Test Site were low compared to DOE guidelines. The highest average gross beta concentration in air was 0.005% of the DOE concentration guide (CG). The highest average Pu-239 concentration was 7.7% of the standard. The highest average tritium concentration was 0.39% of the standard. Kr-85 concentrations increased slightly from CY-1985 to CY-1986. Xe-133 remained nondetectable with some exceptions. The highest average gross beta concentration in potable water remained within the applicable standard for drinking water. The highest average Pu-239 concentration from contaminated waters was 0.0005% of the concentration guide. The highest average tritium concentration in noncontaminated water was 6% of the level for drinking water required by the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulation. The amounts of tritium-bearing effluent released to contaminated waste ponds was calculated and reported to DOE Headquarters. Gamma radiation measurements were roughly the same in CY-1986 relative to the previous year. All surveillance results from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) indicate that no detectable releases of radioactive materials occurred in that network in 1986. 29 refs., 14 figs., 23 tabs

  10. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Overview of FRMAC Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This cooperative effort will ensure that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas

  11. Airborne systems for emergency radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupiter, C.; Boyns, P.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of aerial radiological monitoring systems are available to respond to a radiological accident or incident affecting large areas. These are operated by EG and G, Inc. for ERDA's Division of Operational Safety. A survey system can be airborne within approximately two hours after notification. Both airborne and terrestrial radioactivity can be measured and mapped. Special analysis procedures allow discrimination between radioactivity from most man-made radioelements and naturally occurring radioelements. A position accuracy of +-54 feet can be maintained over a large area survey. Detection sensitivity for gamma sources employing NaI detector arrays on board an airplane flying at 500 feet altitude is better than 2 μR/hr for surface planar contaminants and approximately 10 mCi for a point gamma source

  12. Monitoring in radiological protection scheme; Pemonitoran dalam skim perlindungan radiologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-31

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: function and responsibility of the monitoring, planning of monitoring programme i.e working area for external radiation, monitoring of workers for external radiation, monitoring of working area for surface contamination, monitoring of working area for air contamination, monitoring of workers for internal contamination, and the evaluation of monitoring results.

  13. 84-KILOMETER RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING GRID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. Roe

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to document the development of a radial grid that is suitable for evaluating the pathways and potential impacts of a release of radioactive materials to the environment within a distance of 84 kilometers (km). The center of the grid represents an approximate location from which a potential release of radioactive materials could originate. The center is located on Nevada State Plane coordinates Northing 765621.5, and Easting 570433.6, which is on the eastern side of Exile Hill at the Yucca Mountain site. The North Portal Pad is located over this point. The grid resulting from this calculation is intended for use primarily in the Radiological Monitoring Program (RadMP). This grid also is suitable for use in Biosphere Modeling and other Yucca Mountain Site Characteristic Project (YMP) activities that require the evaluation of data referenced by spatial or geographic coordinates

  14. Hyperion technology enables unified meteorological and radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigic, A.; Saponjic, D.; Arandjelovic, V.; Zunic, Z. . E-mail address of corresponding author: alex@vin.bg.ac.yu; Zigic, A.)

    2005-01-01

    The present state of meteorological and radiological measurement and monitoring are quite localized to smaller areas which implies the difficulties in knowing the measurement results in the wider region instantly. The need for establishing a distributed, flexible, modular and centralized measurement system for both meteorological and radiological parameters of environment is arising. The measurement and monitoring of radiological parameters of environment are not sufficient since there is a strong correlation between radiological and meteorological parameters which implies a unified distributed automatic monitoring system. The unified monitoring system makes it possible to transfer, process and store measured data in local and central databases. Central database gives a possibility of easy access to all measured data for authorized personnel and institutions. Stored measured data in central database gives a new opportunity to create a base for meteorological and radiological modelling and studies. (author)

  15. Radiological effluent and onsite area monitoring report for the Nevada Test Site (January 1985 through December 1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.A.

    1986-09-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program at the Nevada Test Site as conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) onsite radiological safety contractor from January 1985 through December 1985. The results and evaluations of measurements of radioactivity in air and water, and of direct gamma radiation exposure rates are presented. Relevancy to DOE concentration guides (CG'S) is established. This report was formerly titled ''Environmental Surveillance Report for the Nevada Test Site.''

  16. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  17. Radiological monitoring. Controlling surface water pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Maxime

    2018-01-01

    Throughout France, surface waters (from rivers to brooks) located at the vicinity of nuclear or industrial sites, are subject to regular radiological monitoring. An example is given with the radiological monitoring of a small river near La Hague Areva's plant, where contaminations have been detected with the help of the French IRSN nuclear safety research organization. The sampling method and various measurement types are described

  18. Radiological monitoring of northern slopes of Mogoltau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtazaev, Kh.; Boboev, B.D.; Bolibekov, Sh.; Akhmedov, M.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to radiological monitoring of northern slopes of Mogoltau. The physicochemical properties of water of northern slopes of Mogoltau were studied. The radiation monitoring of northern slopes of Mogoltau was carried out during several years under various weather conditions. The exposure rate of human settlements of northern part of Mogoltau was defined.

  19. Neutron monitoring for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron monitoring is a subject of increasing general interest and considerable attention is being paid to the development of improved techniques and methods for neutron monitoring. The Agency, therefore, considered it important to prepare a guide on the subject of neutron monitoring for radiation protection purposes. The present Manual is intended for those persons or authorities in Member States, particularly developing countries, who are responsible for the organization of neutron monitoring programmes and practical neutron monitoring. This Manual consequently, deals with topics such as neutron dosimetry, sources of neutrons and neutron detection as well as field instruments and operational systems used in this context

  20. Legal provisions governing liquid effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, I.; Ruehle, H.

    1985-01-01

    The KTA rule 1504 for radiological monitoring of liquid effluents from nuclear installations is explained. As there are no such rules published to date for establishments handling isotopes, some criteria are discussed which in the future ought to form part of a practical guide for liquid effluents monitoring in isotope handling installations. Monitoring measures described refer to liquid effluents from transfer containers, auxiliary cooling equipment, turbine buildings, main cooling installations, and waste air discharges from closed-circuit cooling systems. (DG) [de

  1. Radiological monitoring of food in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerez V, S.F.

    1996-01-01

    The appearing of the problem for protecting the environment from radioactive contamination is not an accidental matter. The introduction into the earth crust of radioactive material coming from nuclear weapons, accidents, wastes, etc, has caused, as a consequence, the contamination of the biosphere. The extensive trade of food in our country has made necessary the establishment of radiological monitoring in food, which was organized by the Department of Public Health. The structure, functions, characteristics and aspects related to radiological monitoring of food in Cuba are shown in the present paper. The organization and resources for performing the monitoring program, both for normal conditions and for nuclear and/or radiological emergency cases, are detailed. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs

  2. REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NELSON RL

    2008-01-01

    The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel

  3. Radiological aerial monitoring in a nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyeongki; Kim, Juyoul; Jung, Gunhyo

    2008-01-01

    Since North Korea announced the underground nuclear test on last October 9th, 2006, many countries around the world have worried about the atmospheric dispersion and pollution of radioactive materials crossing the border by the clandestine nuclear test. After that time, verifying the existence of nuclear test by detecting radioactive materials such as xenon, I-131, and Cs-134 at the early stage of radiological emergency, locating the position of test site by backward trajectory analysis, and chasing the moving path of airborne radionuclide have been heavily issued. And collection of airborne radioactivity and gamma radiation monitoring technology using an aircraft have been recently examined by an authority concerned in South Korea. Although various techniques of radiological aerial monitoring have been developed and operated around the world, the relevant technical development or research is still required. In order to decide potential measuring location and time within the framework of radiological monitoring system, we use HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of U.S. Department of Commerce. The model is validated and assessed against North Korea's nuclear test. Calculation results of radionuclide trajectory show a good agreement with measured values. Backward trajectory analysis is useful to track the radiological source term, possible time and place of nuclear accidents and/or activities. Nationwide early warning system using aircraft and atmospheric dispersion model can help a nearly real-time forecasting and warning in preparation for radiological emergencies. (author)

  4. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook

  5. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis: Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted State(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division (M ampersand A) is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC M ampersand A and the content and preparation of the manual

  6. Offsite emergency radiological monitoring system and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yongze

    1994-01-01

    The study and advance of the offsite radiological monitoring system and technology which is an important branch in the field of nuclear monitoring technology are described. The author suggests that the predicting and measuring system should be involved in the monitoring system. The measuring system can further be divided into four sub-systems, namely plume exposure pathway, emergency worker, ingestion exposure pathway and post accident recovery measuring sub-systems. The main facilities for the monitoring system are concluded as one station, one helicopter, one laboratory and two vehicles. The instrumentation for complement of the facilities and their good performance characteristics, up-to-date technology are also introduced in brief. The offsite emergency radiation monitoring system and technology are compared in detail with those recommended by FEMA U.S.A.. Finally the paper discusses some trends in development of emergency radiation monitoring system and technology in the developed countries

  7. Legal provisions governing gaseous effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.

    1985-01-01

    This contribution explains the main provisions governing radiological monitoring of gaseous effluents from LWR type nuclear power plants. KTA rule 1503.1 defines the measuring methods and tasks to be fulfilled by reactor operators in order to safeguard due monitoring and accounting of radioactive substances in the plants' gaseous effluents. The routine measurements are checked by a supervisory programme by an independent expert. The routine controls include analysis of filter samples, comparative measurement of radioactive noble gases, interlaboratory comparisons, and comparative evaluation of measured values. (DG) [de

  8. Radiological assessments, environmental monitoring, and study design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.R.; Elle, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of the behavior of transuranic elements in the environment form the basic data for applied programs in radiological assessment, environmental monitoring, derivation of radiation-protection standards, and environmental impact statements. This chapter introduces some of the major information requirements of these applications of transuranic research data. Characteristics of the source terms from nuclear activities usually are needed for an analysis of environmental pathways or deployment of monitoring systems. Major inhalation and ingestion pathways are considered in assessments of hazards from transuranics and are discussed from the viewpoint of research needed

  9. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  10. Geoinformation dataware for radiological monitoring of territories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatserkovnyi, V. I.; Kozachenko, E. V.; Shishenko, O. I.

    2015-10-01

    The paper provides a study, during which the fully accessible and open information from the literature and thematic maps is processed and systemized, reflecting the state of the problem of the radiological monitoring of the territories using the geoinformation technology. The stated ArcGIS technologies is used in the Web ecological Chernihiv region atlas for the map binding of sites and zones of the radioactive and chemical contamination of the territories as well as filling the atlas data with ecological and economical resources of the region.

  11. Analgosedation and monitoring in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girolami, Guido; Steinbrich, Roman; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the change of treatment in interventional radiology during the last decade adding a wider margin of safety through automated monitoring and better patient comfort through a combination of sedation and analgetics. In this regard it is very important to ensure adherence to standard procedures that are as simple as possible, to provide adequate training of staff members and to keep a succinct procedure protocol to ensure a high quality of care. Guidelines and checklists for the safe performance of this 'comfort-therapy' are given. (orig.)

  12. Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuaqui, C A; Petkau, A; Greenstock, C L; Brown, C P [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1995-09-01

    This study examines the feasibility of identifying and monitoring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in the workplace at Canadian nuclear establishments (Whiteshell Laboratories, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Cameco Limited and Canadian General Electric Company Limited). Recent epidemiological studies recommended that potential confounding factors of a non-radiological nature be identified and analyzed, particularly non-radiological carcinogens that may be present in the workplace at nuclear facilities. The feasibility of identifying and measuring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in Canadian nuclear facilities is examined. Also, the report describes the problem of chemical carcinogens and the mechanisms involved in chemical carcinogenesis; the epidemiology related to the problem, followed by a description of the analytical aspects of detection, monitoring and analysis of carcinogens, as well as a discussion on the regulatory aspects and the regulations in place; and the findings, recommendations and concluding remarks of this study. Several problem areas became apparent as the study proceeded. For example, the classification of a chemical as a human carcinogen is a difficult problem, as is its adequate monitoring and analysis. This situation reflects, in turn, the regulatory aspects in the workplace. A list of chemical carcinogens used industrially at the four Canadian nuclear facilities has been identified. The list includes arsenic, asbestos, benzene, cadmium, beryllium, nickel, polychlorinated biphenyls, lead and trichloroethylene. Several recommendations are made in relation to the need for practical and efficient monitoring methods for chemical carcinogens, the definition of radiation and chemical dose equivalencies, and the classification of human chemical carcinogens, as well as their disposal. (author). 122 refs., 8 tabs., 6 figs.

  13. Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuaqui, C.A.; Petkau, A.; Greenstock, C.L.; Brown, C.P.

    1995-09-01

    This study examines the feasibility of identifying and monitoring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in the workplace at Canadian nuclear establishments (Whiteshell Laboratories, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Cameco Limited and Canadian General Electric Company Limited). Recent epidemiological studies recommended that potential confounding factors of a non-radiological nature be identified and analyzed, particularly non-radiological carcinogens that may be present in the workplace at nuclear facilities. The feasibility of identifying and measuring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in Canadian nuclear facilities is examined. Also, the report describes the problem of chemical carcinogens and the mechanisms involved in chemical carcinogenesis; the epidemiology related to the problem, followed by a description of the analytical aspects of detection, monitoring and analysis of carcinogens, as well as a discussion on the regulatory aspects and the regulations in place; and the findings, recommendations and concluding remarks of this study. Several problem areas became apparent as the study proceeded. For example, the classification of a chemical as a human carcinogen is a difficult problem, as is its adequate monitoring and analysis. This situation reflects, in turn, the regulatory aspects in the workplace. A list of chemical carcinogens used industrially at the four Canadian nuclear facilities has been identified. The list includes arsenic, asbestos, benzene, cadmium, beryllium, nickel, polychlorinated biphenyls, lead and trichloroethylene. Several recommendations are made in relation to the need for practical and efficient monitoring methods for chemical carcinogens, the definition of radiation and chemical dose equivalencies, and the classification of human chemical carcinogens, as well as their disposal. (author). 122 refs., 8 tabs., 6 figs

  14. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) overview of FRMAC operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the designated Lead Federal Agency (LFA) and the state(s) that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. The mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Operations describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas. These off-site areas may include one or more affected states

  15. Optimal layout of radiological environment monitoring based on TOPSIS method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sufen; Zhou Chunlin

    2006-01-01

    TOPSIS is a method for multi-objective-decision-making, which can be applied to comprehensive assessment of environmental quality. This paper adopts it to get the optimal layout of radiological environment monitoring, it is proved that this method is a correct, simple and convenient, practical one, and beneficial to supervision departments to scientifically and reasonably layout Radiological Environment monitoring sites. (authors)

  16. Role of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) following a radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.F. III.

    1986-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) calls for the Department of Energy to establish a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) immediately following a major radiological accident to coordinate all federal off-site monitoring efforts in support of the State and the Cognizant Federal Agency (CFA) for the facility or material involved in the accident. Some accidents are potentailly very complex and may require hundreds of radiation specialists to ensure immediate protection of the public and workers in the area, and to identify priorities for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) long-term efforts once the immediate protective actions have been carried out. The FRMAC provides a working environment with today's high technology tools (i.e., communication, computers, management procedures, etc.) to assure that the State and CFA decision makers have the best possible information in a timely manner on which to act. The FRMAC planners also recognize an underlying responsibility to continuously document such operations in order to provide the State, the CFA, and the EPA the technical information they will require for long term assessments. In addition, it is fully recognized that information collected and actions taken by the FRMAC will be subjected to the same scrutiny as other parts of the accident and the overall response

  17. Wide area monitoring study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.A.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Environmental sampling can be used to complement the safeguarding of nuclear material, especially in the detection of undeclared nuclear activities. Routine monitoring of nuclear installations has provided valuable information about the fate of key signature materials within different environmental settings. The approach collates information regarding the generation of individual radiochemical signatures within different nuclear processes, the potential for release of these signatures to the environment and, the chemical form and mobility of the signatures in environmental media along which the material could migrate. Meteorological, geological and hydrological information is used to determine where to sample, what to sample, and how often to sample to provide the greatest likelihood for detection. Multiple strategies can be used to implement wide area monitoring for safeguards purposes. The most complex, and expensive of these, involves establishing extensive networks of fixed location sampling sites. The sites would be operated continuously, and would be instrumented with automated sampling, analysis, and communication equipment to relay information regarding potential anomalies to control centers in near-real time. Alternative strategies can be used to supplement fixed location monitoring equipment, especially in regions that cannot support (financially or logistically) the fixed stations. Through combinations of these various strategies, using a variety of environmental media to monitor a region, we believe that a competent network, one with a quantifiable probability for detecting undeclared nuclear activities, can be designed. While this approach cannot and should not replace other inspection and monitoring activities, it can potentially contribute valuable information to an international safeguards system. (author)

  18. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  19. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Phased Response Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.A.; Bowman, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to the Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or state request when a major radiological emergency is anticipated of has occurred. The FRMAC becomes a coalition of federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities to assist the LFA, state(s), local, and tribal authorities. State, local, and tribal authorities are invited to co-locate and prioritize monitoring and assessment efforts in the FRMAC. The Department of Energy is tasked by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate the FRMAC

  20. Development of web monitoring radiation area monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hoon Jin; Lee, Jun Hee; Namkoong, Phil; Lee, Dong Hoon; Lee, Su Hong; Lee, Gun Bae

    2005-01-01

    Recently the increasing number of radioisotope industry and nuclear facility have ever raised the possibility of radiation safety accident. As such a result, radioisotope companies and nuclear facility operators have become to be much interested in radiation area monitoring for efficient radiation protection. At present, almost of the radiation area monitors which are imported products are outdated in aspect of their functions. Diversification of the monitoring work is urgently demanding additional functions to be added. Thus we have developed new-type digital area monitor which enables remote web monitoring with image and radiation dose rate value at distant places through using internet, the latest IT technology, and radiation measurement technology

  1. Radiological monitoring related to the operation of PUSPATI's Triga Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatimah Mohamad Amin; Mohamad Yusof Mohamad Ali; Lau How Mooi; Idris Besar.

    1983-01-01

    Reactor operation is one of the main activities carried out at the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Centre (PUSPATI) which requires radiological monitoring. This paper describes the programme for radiological monitoring which is related to the operation of the 1 MW Triga MK II research reactor which was commissioned in July, 1982. This programme includes monitoring of the radiation and contamination levels of the reactor and its associated facilities and environmental monitoring of PUSPATI's site and its environs. The data presented in this paper covers the period between 1982 to 1983 which includes both the pre-operational and operational phases of the monitoring programme. (author)

  2. Area monitoring intelligent system - SIMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhoem, P.; Hisas, F.; Gelardi, G.

    1990-01-01

    The area monitoring intelligent system (SIMA) is an equipment to be used in radioprotection. SIMA has the function of monitoring the radiation levels of determined areas of the installations where radioactive materials are handled. (Author) [es

  3. Noise control of radiological monitoring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubick, R.D.; Stevens, W.W.; Burke, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    Although vacuum pumps on continuous air monitors (CAMs) do not produce noise levels above regulatory limits, engineering controls were used to establish a safer work environment. Operations performed in areas where CAMs are located are highly specialized and require precision work when handling nuclear materials, heavy metals, and inert gases. Traditional methods for controlling noise such as enclosing or isolating the source and the use of personal protection equipment were evaluated. An innovative solution was found by retrofitting CAMs with air powered multistage ejectors pumps. By allowing the air to expand in several chambers to create a vacuum, one can eliminate the noise hazard altogether. In facilities with adequate pressurized air, use of these improved ejector pumps may be a cost-effective replacement for noisy vacuum pumps. A workplace designed or engineered with noise levels as low as possible or as close to background adds to increased concentration, attention to detail, and increased production

  4. Radiological Protection and Environmental Monitoring in Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez Pacheco, J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the main activities of the Department of Radiological Protection, Nuclear Energy Commission of Bolivia. The following topics are covered: organization, environmental control of air, water, milk and plants, personal dosimetry, instrumentation and calibration, protection in uranium mines. Standard setting and international cooperation aspects are also presented

  5. The Emergency Radiological Monitoring and Analysis Division of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorises the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to co-ordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted States and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for co-ordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. This program includes: 1. Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed-Wing and Helicopter; 2. Field Monitoring and Sampling; 3. Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories; 4. Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance; 5. Environmental Dosimetry; 6. Integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC Monitoring and Analysis Division and the content and preparation of the manual. (author)

  6. The role of national system of radiological survey in short, intermediate and long term monitoring the environment radioactivity and health status in uranium industry areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, Alina; Milu, C.

    2000-01-01

    The environment radioactivity survey in Romania is performed by CNCAN (National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control) national network. The health status survey of population is carried out by national network of Health Ministry which comprises 23 laboratories. The tasks of the these networks are the following: assessment of natural and artificial irradiation of occupationally exposed personnel and population, as well as goods used by them; determination of population irradiation, survey of environment, food and human internal contamination; survey of health status of the population exposed to radiation, monitoring the medical checkups of the occupationally exposed personnel as well as their dosimetric monitoring; specific enactment, authorization and supervision of nuclear facilities, sanitary expertise and medical examinations; educational activities related to hygiene, radiotoxicology, radioecology and radiobiology. (authors)

  7. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Lambert, R.; Tighe, R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions

  8. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: First quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The surveys included in this program consist of inactive waste sites; outdoor radiological control areas; tank farm perimeters and associated diversion boxes, lift stations, and vent stations; perimeters of active or uncovered waste sites such as burial grounds, retention basins, ponds, process trenches, and ditches; and road and rail surfaces. This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed during the First Quarter of 1995. The status of corrective actions required from current and past reports are also discussed

  9. Annual radiological environmental monitoring report, Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the preoperational environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) in 1988. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas that will not be influenced by plant operations. Station locations are selected after careful consideration of the weather patterns and projected radiation doses to the various areas around the plant. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. During plant operations, results from stations near the plant will be compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts to the public. The exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials, from materials commonly found in the environment as a result of atmospheric fallout, or from the operation of other nuclear facilities in the area. Since WBN has not operated, there has been no contribution of radioactivity from the plant to the environment. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Android Based Area Web Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanigoro, Bayu; Galih Salman, Afan; Moniaga, Jurike V.; Chandra, Eric; Rezky Chandra, Zein

    2014-03-01

    The research objective is to develop an application that can be used in the monitoring of an area by using a webcam. It aims to create a sense of security on the user's application because it can monitor an area using mobile phone anywhere. The results obtained in this study is to create an area with a webcam monitoring application that can be accessed anywhere as long as the monitoring results have internet access and can also be accessed through Android Based Mobile Phone.

  11. Android Based Area Web Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanigoro Bayu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to develop an application that can be used in the monitoring of an area by using a webcam. It aims to create a sense of security on the user's application because it can monitor an area using mobile phone anywhere. The results obtained in this study is to create an area with a webcam monitoring application that can be accessed anywhere as long as the monitoring results have internet access and can also be accessed through Android Based Mobile Phone.

  12. RadNet Radiological Air Monitoring Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Telofski, J.; Askren, D.R.; Petko, Ch.M.; Fraass, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency operates a national environmental radiation monitoring program called RadNet. RadNet monitors airborne particulates, precipitation, milk, and drinking water for radiation levels. The primary purpose of the original program in the 1950's and 1960's was to collect and analyze samples in various media to assess the effects of radioactive fallout from above-ground nuclear weapon testing. As above-ground testing diminished in the 1970's, the program, especially the air network, became critical in evaluating effects of other types of nuclear incidents, such as the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl, as well as monitoring trends in environmental radioactive contamination. The value of rapid data collection subsequent to such incidents led to the consideration of developing air monitors with radiation detectors and telecommunication equipment for real-time radiation measurement. The strengthened United States homeland security posture after 2001 led to production and installation of the current real-time RadNet air monitors. There are now 118 stationary, continuously operating air monitoring stations and 40 mobile air monitors for site specific monitoring. The stationary air monitors include radiation detectors, meteorological sensors, a high-volume air sampler, and communication devices for hourly data transfers. When unusual levels are detected, scientists download a full sodium iodide detector spectrum for analysis. The real-time data collected by RadNet stationary systems permit rapid identification and quantification of airborne nuclides with sufficient sensitivity to provide critical information to help determine protective actions. The data also may help to rapidly refine long-range radioactive plume models and estimate exposure to the population. This paper provides an overview of the airborne particulate monitoring conducted during above-ground nuclear weapon testing, summarizes the uses of data from the program

  13. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST

  14. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, J R

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  15. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COOPER, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual

  16. Annual radiological environmental monitoring report: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the preoperational environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) in 1991. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas that will not be influenced by plant operations. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. During plant operations, results from stations near the plant will be compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts to the public. Exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials, from materials commonly found in the environment a a result of atmospheric fallout, or from the operation of other nuclear facilities in the area. Since WBN has not operated, there has been no contribution of radioactivity from the plant to the environment

  17. Annual radiological environmental monitoring report: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the preoperational environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas that will not be influenced by plant operations. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. During plant operations, results from stations near the plant will be compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts to the public. Exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials, from materials commonly found in the environment as a result of atmospheric fallout, or from the operation of other nuclear facilities in the area. Since WBN has not operated, there has been no contribution of radioactivity from the plant to the environment

  18. Guidelines for radiological monitoring of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This Standard provides criteria to be used in deciding whether an environmental monitoring program is required for a given nuclear facility. It also sets out a systematic approach to monitoring the environment, which is considered to be outside the facility boundary. It provides guidelines for establishing an environmental program covering sampling and analysis protocols, analytical techniques and sensitivity, statistical treatment of monitoring results, quality assurance, methods for expressing results, and record keeping. The standard applies to the environment of a nuclear facility operating mainly under normal conditions; in addition, certain of these requirements may also apply to situations involving abnormal releases

  19. Environmental Radiological Impact of Nuclear Power. Monitoring and Control Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment and public exposure to ionizing radiation may result from releases from programmed or accidental operations in regulated activities, or they may be due to preexisting situations such as contamination caused by past accidents, radioactive rain caused by nuclear tests, or increased natural radioactivity resulting from human activities. In many cases, both the emission sources and the environment should be monitored to determine the risk to the population and verify to what extent the limits and conditions established by competent authorities are being observed. Monitoring can be divided into three categories: monitoring of the emission source, of the receiving medium and of members of the public; individual monitoring of the population is extremely rare and would only be considered when estimated doses substantially exceed the annual public dose limit. In practices likely to produce significant radioactive releases, as is the case of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the limits and conditions for monitoring and controlling them and the requirements for environmental radiological monitoring are established in the licensing process. Programs implemented during normal operation of the facilities form the basis for monitoring in the event of accidents. in addition to environmental radiological monitoring associated with facilities, different countries have monitoring programs outside the facilities zones of influence, in order to ascertain the nationwide radiological fund and determine possible increases in this fund. In Spain, the facilities that generate radioactive waste have effluent storage, treatment and removal systems and radiological monitoring programs based on site and discharge characteristics. The environmental radiological monitoring system is composed of the network implemented by the owners in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities zones of influence, and by nationwide monitoring networks managed by the Consejo de

  20. Radiological monitoring of food on the French territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boissieux, T.; Leprieur, F.; Pierrard, O. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (France)

    2014-07-01

    Drink the milk of cows grazing near French nuclear power plants is it really safe in normal times? In case of a nuclear accident leading to release in the environment, what kind of foodstuff can we still eat? In his regulatory mission of environmental monitoring, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) tends to answer these questions by acquiring radioactivity data in the food chain. Food radiological monitoring program by IRSN is implemented with a three scale strategy. Locally, i.e. within the range 0 to 10 kilometers of nuclear installations, foodstuff locally produced and thus potentially exposed to radioactive sources are frequently sampled and analyzed. At the regional level, specific studies are carried out to establish an updated levels baseline of radioactivity in the environment, especially in agricultural productions characteristic of the area concerned. At the national level, monitoring food aims to map the average contamination observed all around the French territory. This work of vigilance is organized in partnerships with other French actors involved in food monitoring. In the event of a nuclear accident or small-scale incidents, it would allow having an efficient support network of samplers and measurers located on the whole French territory and quickly mobilized in short or medium terms. Since 2008, IRSN has developed a food monitoring program with the Directorate general for food (DGAL) and the Directorate general for competition policy, consumer affairs and fraud control (DGCCRF). These directions have a general mission of food safety control (animal and plant products) and animal feed-stuff, which requires the search for chemical, physical, biological and radioactive substances. Likewise, a sampling program of grain products is efficient since 1969 with the support of France Agrimer. In 2013, the food monitoring is based on multi-radionuclides analysis (cesium, iodine, tritium, alpha emitters...) in about 650

  1. Public monitoring during the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, W.M.

    2000-01-01

    During the radiological accident with Cs 137 occurred at Goiania, Brazil, many people were contaminated. To identify the people with possible contamination a large place in the center of the city was selected for screening people with a possibility of contamination. This paper describes the work involved monitoring about 112.800 persons in a period of three month. (author)

  2. The Vaalputs radiological environmental monitoring programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van As, D.; Posnik, S.J.; Bain, C.A.R.

    1986-01-01

    An environmental monitoring programme was initiated two years before radioactive waste was due to be disposed of at the Vaalputs site. During this time a database was established against which future changes in the radiation levels of the environment could be measured. The monitoring network included the measurement of radiation doses, radioactivity levels in soil, vegetation, groundwater, and agricultural produce. A natural radiation dose to the average individual of 2,2 mSv per annum was established. Meteorological parameters were collected and used to assess the potential release and transport of radioactivity through the environment. A survey of the habits of the surrounding population was conducted to identify the principal food chains. In addition to complying with the licensing requirements for the waste disposal site, the environmental monitoring programme is contributing valuable scientific information on evapotranspiration and percolation in semi-arid environments

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center. The analytical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local governments, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. Emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations are discussed. (author)

  4. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FR-MAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FR-MAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant FR-om the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FR-MAC operations

  5. Monitoring techniques for the impact assessment during nuclear and radiological emergencies: current status and the challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    Preparedness and response capability for Nuclear and Radiological emergencies, existing world over, are mainly based on the requirement of responding to radiation emergency caused by nuclear or radiological accidents. Cosmos satellite accident, plutonium contamination at Polaris, nuclear accidents like Kystium, Windscale, TMI and Chernobyl, radiological accidents at Goiania etc have demonstrated the requirement of improved radiation monitoring techniques. For quick decision making, state of the art monitoring methodology which can support quantitative and qualitative impact assessment is essential. Evaluation of radiological mapping of the area suspected to be contaminated needs ground based as well as aerial based monitoring systems to predict the level of radioactive contamination on ground. This will help in delineating the area and deciding the required countermeasures, based on the quantity and type of radionuclides responsible for it. The response can be successful with the effective use of i) Early Warning System ii) Mobile Monitoring System and iii) Aerial Gamma Spectrometric System. Selection of the monitoring methodology and survey parameters and assessment of situation using available resources etc. are to be optimized depending on the accident scenario. Recently, many countries and agencies like IAEA have expressed the requirement for responding to other types of nuclear/radiological emergencies i.e, man made radiation emergency situations aimed at harming public at large that can also lead to environmental contamination and significant exposure to public. Reports of lost / misplaced / stolen radioactive sources from many countries are alarming as safety and security of these radioactive sources are under challenge. The monitoring methodology has to take into account of the increase in such demands and more periodic monitoring in suspected locations is to be carried out. Detection of orphan sources possible amidst large heap of metallic scraps may pose

  6. The application of geographic information system to radiological and nuclear emergency monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaniowski, I.V.; Rodriguez, M.; Rojas, C.A.; Jordan, O.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Geographic Information System (GIS) implementation for the preparation and response in case of to radiological and nuclear emergencies is being developed in the Emergency Control Center of the Argentina Nuclear Regulatory Authority, since many years ago. Additionals features have been incorporated such as integration with the results of radiological monitoring, improving and expanding its benefits both in the preparation stage and during the work of emergency response. This paper shows the specific application of GIS to radiological monitoring in case of emergency situations such as during the search of orphan sources and the characterization of geographic context around nuclear power plants and atomic centers. The GIS provides essential data cartographic for the monitoring with sophisticated detectors, to integrate with the information received with infrastructure, urban and rural population maps, physical features of the place, satellite images, etc. The monitoring results are analyzed and compared with relevant information for decision making during the response, like evacuation routes, affected population, security forces in the area, radiological characterization, application of protective actions, hospitals, schools, etc. These two integrated tools improve preparedness and response system in case of radiological or nuclear emergency. (authors) [es

  7. The Mobile Surface Contamination Monitor II environmental radiological characterization utilizing GPS/GIS technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendling, M.A.

    1993-05-01

    Time, cost, and most importantly quality of data are the three factors to measure the success of field radiological characterizations. The application of coupling radiation detection instrumentation to a GPS receiver has dramatically increased the data quality achievable compared to traditional environmental radiological survey methods. Improvements in verifying adequate spatial coverage of an area while collecting data and at,the same time reducing field time requirements can be realized. Data acquired during the recent implementation of the Mobile Surface Contamination Monitor 11 (MSCM-11) will be presented to demonstrate the advantages of this system over traditional radiological survey methods. The comparison will include time and manpower requirements. Linking the complimentary GPS, GIS and radiation detection technologies on a mobile tractor based platform has provided a tool to provide radiological characterization data faster, cheaper, and better to assist in the Environmental Restoration Mission of the Hanford Site

  8. A review of radiology staff doses and dose monitoring requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of radiation doses received during X-ray procedures by radiology, cardiology and other clinical staff have been reviewed. Data for effective dose (E), and doses to the eyes, thyroid, hands and legs have been analysed. These data have been supplemented with local measurements to determine the most exposed part of the hand for monitoring purposes. There are ranges of 60-100 in doses to individual tissues reported in the literature for similar procedures at different centres. While ranges in the doses per unit dose-area product (DAP) are between 10 and 25, large variations in dose result from differences in the sensitivity of the X-ray equipment, the type of procedure and the operator technique, but protection factors are important in maintaining dose levels as low as possible. The influence of shielding devices is significant for determining the dose to the eyes and thyroid, and the position of the operator, which depends on the procedure, is the most significant factor determining doses to the hands. A second body dosemeter worn at the level of the collar is recommended for operators with high workloads for use in assessment of effective dose and the dose to the eye. It is proposed that the third quartile values from the distributions of dose per unit DAP identified in the review might be employed in predicting the orders of magnitude of doses to the eye, thyroid and hands, based on interventional operator workloads. Such dose estimates could be employed in risk assessments when reviewing protection and monitoring requirements. A dosemeter worn on the little finger of the hand nearest to the X-ray tube is recommended for monitoring the hand. (authors)

  9. Radiological protection in the industrial area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, H.

    2008-12-01

    Radiation protection (RP) in industrial applications is composed of four major themes that are recruiting and training personnel, equipment and instrumentation, materials used and also the acquisition of new technologies to improve their own RP. To carry out the recruitment of staff and train them to serve as occupationally exposed personnel in the industry continues with the Mexican Official Standard NOM-031-NUCL-1999, R equirements for qualification and training of personnel occupationally exposed to radiation ionizing , what will be done regarding the physical fitness of personnel by NOM-026-NUCL-1999, M edical surveillance of personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation . The principle of optimization of the RP, or ALARA principle (keeping the risk as low as reasonably achievable), is assumed to be the safety philosophy in the field of industrial applications of ionizing radiation. Practically all the elements that make up the equipment, instrumentation and materials used in industrial radiography and other industrial applications, has an orientation towards the protection, along with procedures that operate. For example, in industrial radiography the technician always has several instruments for radiation detection and measurement, some with visible and audible alarms. The equipment characteristics and transport (containers) are regulated by the standards NOM-025/1- 2000 and NOM-025/2-2996, which contains requirements for radiological safety in design and operation, respectively, for both as containers for some of its parts and accessories. As part of the technological innovation with benefits to the RP itself and eventually target practice today are venturing into the radiography digital, which involves the exposure of a plate image phosphorus-based with the later download to a computer. In combination with the use of sources of X-rays, there is a real contribution to reducing the dose, since the later are nowadays equipped with programmable

  10. Radiological waters monitoring in Rhineland-Palatinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, D.

    1977-01-01

    Following an introduction the occurrence and origin of radioactive radiation in water and its consequences for the population, the resulting measuring programmes in Rhineland-Palatinate are described according to type and extent. The measured results are shown in tabular and summarized form, and their importance for environmental protection is discussed. It is found that the radioactivity of the waters in Rhineland-Palatinate so far determined is no cause for anxiety. The monitoring is being continued in the same manner and further developed according to needs. (orig.) [de

  11. Monitoring activities review of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, P.D.

    1992-03-01

    The 1992 Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) is directed at the Radiological Environment Surveillance Program (RESP) activities at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL). MAR panelists studied RESP documents and discussed their concerns with Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) staff and other panel members. These concerns were subsequently consolidated into a collection of recommendations with supporting discussions. Recommendations focus on specific monitoring activities, as well as the overall program. The MAR report also contains pertinent comments that should not require further action

  12. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), US response to major radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    radiological materials from: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities, Space Craft Launches, Weapon (Department of Defence or DOE) Transportation, Weapon Production Facilities, Spacecraft Re-entry (domestic or foreign), Terrorist Incidents, High-Level Waste Transportation, Nuclear Power Plants. Key to the FRERP would be the establishment of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Development and implementation was assigned to DOE as the agency most capable of providing sufficient resources, assets, and support. In 1987, DOE subsequently assigned programmatic responsibility, with limited funding, to the Nevada Operations Office in Las Vegas, Nevada. (author)

  13. Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately assess the need for protective actions. Protective action accident management must make use of the key relevant information available. Decision-making and accident assessment will be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at refining the initial evaluation as more detailed and complete information becomes available. Emergency monitoring is one of the main sources for obtaining needed information. This publication is in the scope of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Legal Series No. 14) under which the IAEA is authorized to assist a State Party or a Member State among other matters in developing appropriate radiation monitoring programmes, procedures and standards (Article 5). The scope of this manual is restricted to practical guidance for environmental and source monitoring during a nuclear or other radiological emergency. It does not address emergency response preparedness, nor does it cover the emergency management aspects of accident assessment. This manual is organised into sections relating to measurements in order of priority of a major reactor accident, namely: ambient gamma/beta dose rates from plume, ground deposition or source; radionuclide concentrations in air; deposition maps for 131 I and 137 Cs and other important radionuclides; radionuclide mix in deposition and radionuclide concentrations in food, drinking water and other samples. The introductory section provides an overview of the design of emergency monitoring and sampling programmes, monitoring teams and their qualifications and training, monitoring equipment and instrumentation, protective actions for emergency monitoring teams and quality assurance and quality control checks

  14. Quality control of the interpretation monitors of digital radiological images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favero, Mariana S.; Goulart, Adriano Oliveira S.

    2016-01-01

    The performance monitors has great importance in image quality of digital radiographic systems. In environments without films, it became necessary to implement acceptance testing and quality control monitors used for interpretation of medical images. The monitors dedicated to radiodiagnostic should provide information that represent slight differences in x-ray attenuation or minor differences in some anatomical region of interest. This should also result in small differences in luminance of an image represented. Factors affecting the quality of medical imaging are contrast, noise, resolution, artifacts and distortions. Therefore, a monitor must have specific characteristics, making it possible for the observer to carry out an assessment that leads to better diagnosis. Based on the need to evaluate diagnostic monitors in various radiological applications, this paper presents a summary for implementation and standardization of tests that are recommended by the publication AAPM Report 03. (author)

  15. Program of radiological monitoring environmental a nuclear facility in latency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, A. de; Riego, A.; Batalla, E.; Tapia, C.; Garcia, R.; Sanchez, J.; Toral, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the Radiological Environmental Monitoring program of the Vandellos I nuclear power plant in the latency period. This facility was dismantled to level 2, as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The program is an adaptation of the implanted one during the dismantling, taking into account the isotopes that may be present, as well as the main transfer routes. Along with the description of the program the results obtained in the latent period from 2005 until 2012 are presented.

  16. Dose monitoring in radiology departments. Status quo and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, J.; Bethge, O.T.; Antoch, G.; Kroepil, P.

    2016-01-01

    The number of computed tomography examinations has continuously increased over the last decades and accounts for a major part of the collective radiation dose from medical investigations. For purposes of quality assurance in modern radiology a systematic monitoring and analysis of dose related data from radiological examinations is mandatory. Various ways of collecting dose data are available today, for example the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine - Structured Report (DICOM-SR), optical character recognition and DICOM-modality performed procedure steps (MPPS). The DICOM-SR is part of the DICOM-standard and provides the DICOM-Radiation Dose Structured Report, which is an easily applicable and comprehensive solution to collect radiation dose parameters. This standard simplifies the process of data collection and enables comprehensive dose monitoring. Various commercial dose monitoring software devices with varying characteristics are available today. In this article, we discuss legal obligations, various ways to monitor dose data, current dose monitoring software solutions and future perspectives in regard to the EU Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM.

  17. Online remote radiological monitoring during operation of Advance Vitrification System (AVS), Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deokar, U.V.; Kulkarni, V.V.; Mathew, P.; Khot, A.R.; Singh, K.K.; Kamlesh; Deshpande, M.D.; Kulkarni, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Vitrification System (AVS) is commissioned for vitrification of high level waste (HLW) by using Joule heated ceramic melter first time in India. The HLW is generated in fuel reprocessing plant. For radiological surveillance of plant, Health Physics Unit (HPU) had installed 37 Area Gamma Monitors (AGM), 7 Continuous Air Monitors (CAM) and all types of personal contamination monitors. Exposure control is a major concern in operating plant. Therefore in addition to installed monitors, we have developed online remote radiation monitoring system to minimize exposures to the surveyor and operator. This also helped in volume reduction of secondary waste. The reliability and accuracy of the online monitoring system is confirmed by calibrating the system by comparing TLD and DRD readings and by theoretical analysis. In addition some modifications were carried in HP instruments to make them user friendly. This paper summarizes different kinds of remote radiological monitoring systems installed for online monitoring of Melter off Gas (MOG) filter, Hood filter, three exhaust filter banks, annulus air sampling and over pack monitoring in AVS. Our online remote monitoring system has helped the plant management to plan in advance for replacement of these filters, which resulted in considerable saving of collective dose. (author)

  18. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  19. Radiation monitoring systems and methodologies for radiological impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhury, Probal

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive sources of various strengths are used in large number of applications in industry, healthcare, agriculture and research. Though all the sources are transported and used under regulatory control, there is always a possibility of some of the sources getting into the hands of committed antisocial non state actors. In addition to this, there is a possible threat of radioactive material being illegally brought into a country. These gives rise to an increase in the global radiological threat and security experts world over are concerned about the possibility of malicious use of radiation in the public domain. Radiation detection systems are installed at various entry and exit ports of some of the countries to detect illicit trafficking of radioactive materials. IAEA has recommended that all States should have a national response plan for nuclear security events to provide for an appropriate and coordinated response. Considering the requirement of radiological emergency preparedness, various radiation monitoring systems and methodologies have been developed. A few aerial radiation monitoring systems developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for radiological impact assessment are described here

  20. Environmental radioactivity in Canada 1988. Radiological monitoring annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The radiological surveillance program of the Department of National Health and Welfare is conducted for the purpose of determining levels of environmental radioactivity in Canada and assessing the resulting population exposures. Following major changes to the CAMECO Port Hope operations to reduce uranium emissions, a study was initiated to measure uranium levels in air in the community. Studies continued on lung cancer and domestic exposure to radon, and current levels of cesium-137 in caribou, a major source of food in northern communities. The movement of tritium on the Ottawa and St. Lawrence rivers was studied following an accidental release into the Ottawa River. Monitoring continued of fallout contamination from Chernobyl in imported foods. All measurements recorded during 1988 were below the limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. (14 refs., 14 figs., 15 tabs.).

  1. Registration and monitoring of radiation exposure from radiological imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, F.; Pinto dos Santos, D.; Hempel, J.; Dueber, C.; Mildenberger, P.

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for reducing radiation exposure are an important part of optimizing medical imaging and therefore a relevant quality factor in radiology. Regarding the medical radiation exposure, computed tomography has a special relevance. The use of the integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE) radiation exposure monitoring (REM) profile is the upcoming standard for organizing and collecting exposure data in radiology. Currently most installed base devices do not support this profile generating the required digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) dose structured reporting (SR). For this reason different solutions had been developed to register dose exposure measurements without having the dose SR object. Registration and analysis of dose-related parameters is required for constantly optimizing examination protocols, especially computed tomography (CT) examinations based on the latest research results in order to minimize the individual radiation dose exposure from medical imaging according to the principle as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). (orig.) [de

  2. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary - first quarter 1997 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckinney, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The First Quarter 1997 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized below: (1) All of the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during January, February, and March 1997, were performed as planned. (2) One hundred four environmental radiological surveys were performed during the first quarter 1997, twenty-nine at the active waste sites and seventy-five at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels was found at eight of the active waste sites and seven of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as >1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys twelve were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas and three were in contamination areas. The contamination found within ten of the URM areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining five sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required. (3) During the first quarter of 1997, 5.6 hectares (13.8 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (4) During the first quarter of 1997, the size of 216-A-25 Gable Mountain Pond was increased from 30.4 to 34.5 hectares (75.0 to 85.2 acres). This increase in size was due to the correction of the original boundary area by using the advanced technology of a global positioning system (GPS). An area, 1.6 hectares (4.0 acres), east of and adjacent to the 241-S/SX/SY tank farm complex was posted as a contamination/soil contamination area. (5) Five open Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) had not been resolved

  3. Doses monitoring in radiology: calibration of air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}) meters; Monitoracao de doses em radiologia: a calibracao de medidores do produto kerma-area (P{sub KA})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terini, Ricardo Andrade; Campelo, Maria Carolina de Santana; Almeida Junior, Jose Neres de, E-mail: rterini@pucsp.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC-SP), SP (Brazil); Herdade, Silvio Bruni; Pereira, Marco Aurelio Guedes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Energia e Ambiente

    2013-11-15

    Materials and methods: different qualities of both incident and transmitted beams were utilized in conditions similar to a clinical setting, analyzing the influence from the reference dosimeter, from the distance between meters, from the filtration and from the average beam energy. Calibrations were performed directly against a standard 30 cm{sup 3} cylindrical chamber or a parallel-plate monitor chamber, and indirectly against the PDC meter. Results: the lowest energy dependence was observed for transmitted beams. The cross calibration between the Diamentor E2 and the PDC meters, and the PDC presented the greatest propagation of uncertainties. Conclusion: the calibration coefficient of the PDC meter showed to be more stable with voltage, while the Diamentor E2 calibration coefficient was more variable. On the other hand, the PDC meter presented greater uncertainty in readings (5.0%) than with the use of the monitor chamber (3.5%) as a reference. (author)

  4. Baseline radiological monitoring at proposed uranium prospecting site at Rohil Sikar, Rajasthan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jha, V.N.; Sahoo, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Once economically viable grades of uranium deposits are proposed for mining and processing by the industry radiological baseline studies are required for future comparison during operational phases. The information collected during such studies serve as connecting feature between regulatory compliance and technical information. Present paper summarizes the results of baseline monitoring of atmospheric 222 Rn and gamma level in the area at prospecting mining, milling and waste disposal sites of Rohil Rajasthan

  5. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Mullen, A.A.; Potter, G.D.; Smith, D.D.

    1983-07-01

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982

  6. Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book is a Japanese version of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publication (Report No., IAEA-TECDOC-1092, published in Vienna, 1999) of the same title. The translation of the original English into Japanese was done by the Department of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Since the Department was organized in addition to the Emergency Medicine Dept. in the Center in 2003 to establish a system for rapid and accurate dose assessment at emergent radiation exposure, the translation is thus a result of the department works, and is published with permission by IAEA as one of a series of NIRS Report (NIRS-M--179) for use in the country. The book is essentially a manual for providing technical requirements and procedures for radiation monitoring, environmental sampling and laboratory analyses for a nuclear or other radiological emergency. The contents are: Introduction, Outline of monitoring, Monitoring of outdoor radiation and contamination, Outdoor sampling, Gross alpha/beta measurement, Gamma spectrometry, Activation analyses, Basic data assessment, Work-sheets, Check-list for measuring equipments, Appendices, References, and others. (S.I.)

  7. White paper on radiological monitoring of workers exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shettle, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This article comments the content of a white paper which aimed at proposing new regulatory bases to update the French Code of Labour and other legal texts related to the radiation protection of workers. The author briefly comments the objectives of this white paper (to put the initial regulatory basis into question again), briefly describes the adopted approach, the new definition of risk related to ionizing radiations within the frame of a global approach to the prevention of occupational risks. She notices and comments the removal of a reference to an exposure limit for the public as input criterion in the system of radiological monitoring of workers exposures. She also comments the introduction of some concepts: the concept of a worker submitted to a risk related to ionizing radiation, and the concept of exposure value entailing a strengthened preventive action. She indicates the different modalities adopted for exposure monitoring (radiological monitoring and dose follow-up), addresses the issue of communication of dosimetry data and the access to all dosimetry information for the person in charge of radiation protection, and finally briefly evokes the idea of publishing guides for each specific sectors

  8. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COOPER, J.R.

    2000-04-17

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  9. National automatic network of environmental radiological monitoring (RENAMORA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, J.L.; Sanchez H, L.

    2003-01-01

    Inside the programs of Environmental Radiological Surveillance that it carries out the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safeguards (CNSNS), it develops an National Automatic Network of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (RENAMORA), where it is carried out a registration of speed of environmental dose in continuous and simultaneous forms with the same moment of the measurement. This net allows to account with the meticulous and opportune information that will help to characterize, in dynamics form, the radiological conditions of diverse geographical zones of the country, including the sites that by normative require bigger surveillance, like its are the Laguna Verde Nuclear power station (CNLV), the Nuclear Center of Mexico (ININ) and the Radioactive waste storage center (CADER). This net is in its first development stage; three points inside the state of Veracruz, in the surroundings of the CNLV, already its are operating; the obtained data of rapidity of environmental dose are being stored in a database inside a primary data center located in the facilities of the CNSNS in Mexico city and its will be analyzed according to the project advances. At the moment, its are installing the first ten teams corresponding to the first phase of the RENAMORA (three stages); its are carried out operation tests, transmission, reception and administration of data. The obtained data will be interpreted, analyzed and inter compared to evaluate the risk levels to that it would be hold the population and to determine thresholds that allow to integrate the alarm systems that its had considered for emergency situations. (Author)

  10. Physicochemical and radiological studies on some egyptian aquatic areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, S.K.; Abdel Malik, W.E.Y.; Seifin, S.M.; Abou-zeid, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    For the purpose of estimating the radiological health and safety to the Egyptian population arises from the natural background involved with coastal areas, it is necessary to make a comprehensive study to investigate the natural radionuclides activities in this environmental ecology. The locations of such areas were chosen from those in which people spend some time (e.g. the Mediterranean and Red Sea beaches, Suez Canal in addition to the River Nile Ismailia Canal and Quaroun Lake). Water and soil samples were brought from these locations and subjected to intensive physical, chemical analysis and radiological investigations. The densities of the collected soil samples were found to fall in the region of clay densities (2.30 - 2.70 g/cm 3 ). The particle size distribution analysis, of these soil samples showed values ranging from 128 Μ m to 1303 Μ according to sample site. The collected samples are mainly silicates with variable amounts of the major cations; Ca + +, Mg + +, Na + , K + with some other trace elements. For the radiological investigations 238 U , 226 R a, 232 T h and 40 K activity concentrations were resolved by spectroscopy technique. The majority of samples examined in this work showed variable activities of the naturally occurring radionuclides with fairly low levels compared with literature values reported in other countries. The analysis and discussions of the obtained data are thoroughly performed with the use of equations to estimate the radiation doses

  11. Quarterly Environmental Radiological Survey Summary Third Quarter 1998, 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCKINNEY, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Third Quarter 1998 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized: (1) All of the eighty-five environmental radiological surveys scheduled during July, August and September were performed as planned. Fifty-one of the surveys were conducted at Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) sites and thirty-four at Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) sites. Contamination above background levels was found at seventeen of the PHMC waste sites and two of the ERC waste sites. Contamination levels as high and gt;1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) per 100 cm(sup 2) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys nine were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas, three were in unposted areas and seven were in contamination areas. The contamination found within four of the URM and three of the CA areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. The remaining five URM and two unposted sites were posted and along with the five CA sites will require remediation. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action as required. (2) During the second quarter of 1998, 1.2 hectares (3.0 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (3) Four hectares (10 acres) located south and west of B-Plant were posted as a radiological buffer area as a result of a contamination spread. This off-normal occurrence is currently being investigated. (4) Four Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) remained open and had not been resolved. Tank Farms Operations has responsibility for the unresolved SCIRs

  12. Chemical and radiological vulnerability assessment in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Božidar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities and towns are faced with various types of threat from the extraordinary events involving chemical and radiological materials as exemplified by major chemical accidents, radiological incidents, fires, explosions, traffic accidents, terrorist attacks, etc. On the other hand, many sensitive or vulnerable assets exist within cities, such as: settlements, infrastructures, hospitals, schools, churches, businesses, government, and others. Besides emergency planning, the land use planning also represents an important tool for prevention or reduction of damages on people and other assets due to unwanted events. This paper considers development of method for inclusion vulnerability assessment in land use planning with objective to assess and limit the consequences in cities of likely accidents involving hazardous materials. We made preliminary assessment of criticality and vulnerability of the assets within Belgrade city area in respect to chemical sites and transportation roads that can be exposed to chemical accidents, or terrorist attacks.

  13. Wide area continuous offender monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshen, J. [Lucent Technologies (United States); Drake, G. [New Mexico Dept. of Corrections, Santa Fe, NM (United States); Spencer, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The corrections system in the U.S. is supervising over five million offenders. This number is rising fast and so are the direct and indirect costs to society. To improve supervision and reduce the cost of parole and probation, first generation home arrest systems were introduced in 1987. While these systems proved to be helpful to the corrections system, their scope is rather limited because they only cover an offender at a single location and provide only a partial time coverage. To correct the limitations of first-generation systems, second-generation wide area continuous electronic offender monitoring systems, designed to monitor the offender at all times and locations, are now on the drawing board. These systems use radio frequency location technology to track the position of offenders. The challenge for this technology is the development of reliable personal locator devices that are small, lightweight, with long operational battery life, and indoors/outdoors accuracy of 100 meters or less. At the center of a second-generation system is a database that specifies the offender`s home, workplace, commute, and time the offender should be found in each. The database could also define areas from which the offender is excluded. To test compliance, the system would compare the observed coordinates of the offender with the stored location for a given time interval. Database logfiles will also enable law enforcement to determine if a monitored offender was present at a crime scene and thus include or exclude the offender as a potential suspect.

  14. Calibration of instrument and personnel monitoring in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Aziz Mohamad Ramli; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah

    1987-01-01

    It is difficult to choose radioprotection equipments that are not too expensive and suit the purpose. Some of the dosimetric characteristics of good dosemeters outlined by ISO 4071-1978 (E) namely scale linearity, energy dependence, radiation quality dependence and angular dependence for some of the commercially available dosemeters are discussed. The calibration procedures practised at the National Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), of the Nuclear Energy Unit (NEU) is also explained. The radiological equipments for personnel monitoring such as film badge and TLD are widely used to estimate the radiation dose delivered to the whole or partial body of a personnel. Both of the personnel monitoring procedures have been established at the NEU. The objective, use and maintenance of the devices are also discussed in detail. The evaluation of the monthly dose received by a personnel from various establishments in the country are also presented. (author). 17 figs

  15. Results of the radiological environmental monitoring network in the Central Eastern region of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montalvan Estrada, O.; Brigido Flores, R.; Rosa Suarez, R.; Barreras Caballero, A.; Damera Martinez, A.

    1998-01-01

    The radiological environmental monitoring laboratory of Camaguey is a member of the Cuban radiological environmental network and it has been carried out a series of measures about radioactivity in the atmosphere: gamma-dose rate, gross-beta activities in fallout and in aerosols. The results show that this region has a low radiological background and it has been exposure contamination

  16. X-ray area monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nintrakit, N.

    1983-01-01

    The X-ray area monitor is a nuclear electronic device that is essential in radiation protection in high radiation laboratories, e.g. in medical diagnosis using X-rays and in industrial X-radiography. Accidentally the level of X-radiator may arise above the safe permissible level and in such a case the alarm system of the area monitor will work and disconnect the ac power supply form the X-ray unit. Principally the device is a radiation counter using G.M.tube as radiation detector with high voltage supply variable form 200 to 2,000 volts. The maximum count rate of the scaler is 1.5 MHz and the total count is displayed on 4 digit LED's. A time base is used to control the counting time, the frequency multiplier, radiation safety limit, comparator and the radiation hazard warning signal. The reliability of the instrument is further enhanced through the addition of the random correction circuit, and it is applicable both in X- and γ -radiation

  17. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  18. A Low-Cost, Real-Time Network for Radiological Monitoring Around Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoldo, N A

    2004-01-01

    A low-cost, real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response has been developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the site perimeter to continuously monitor radiological conditions as part of LLNL's comprehensive environment/safety/health protection program. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These low-power sensors transmit measurement data back to a central command center (CCC) computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio- and computer- based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. This system provides a low-cost real-time radiation monitoring solution that is easily converted to incorporate both a hard-wired interior perimeter with strategically positioned wireless secondary and tertiary concentric remote locations. These wireless stations would be configured with solar voltaic panels that provide current to recharge batteries and power the sensors and radio transceivers. These platforms would supply data transmission at a range of up to 95 km from a single transceiver location. As necessary, using radio transceivers in repeater mode can extend the transmission range. The RTRAM network as it is presently configured at LLNL has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions. With the proposed

  19. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC): Overview of FRMAC operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Management Overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is to explain the federal preparation for a radiological accident and to describe the subsequent response activities which provide radiological monitoring and assessment outside the boundaries of the monitoring which support the radiological accident site. In the event of a radiological accident, federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the accident scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the state(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA) that all federal technical assistance is fully supporting their efforts to protect the public and will provide these monitoring results in a working data center for immediate use by the state(s) and LFA decision makers. The federal agencies do not relinquish their statutory responsibilities. However, the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibility

  20. Radiological environmental monitoring around the mining sites in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, Eduardo E.; Gomez, Juan C.; Palacios, Miguel A.

    2004-01-01

    The uranium mining industry began its development in Argentina in the fifties. Since then, several installations have operated as uranium underground mining until late seventies, when that mines were closed. Since then, open pit exploitation has been used. Milling facilities were installed in the mining areas or close to them. The environmental radiological surveillance and the impact assessment presented in this work are referred to the uranium ore mining and milling plants Tonco, in Salta province; Pichinan, in Chubut province; San Rafael and Malargue, in Mendoza province; Los Gigantes, in Cordoba province; La Estela, in San Luis province and Los Colorados in La Rioja province. The environmental radiological surveillance programme results carried out from the beginning of the operations are presented and include uranium and radium concentrations in surface waters and sediments. The results obtained in waters upstream and downstream the uranium mining complexes are compared and no significant differences were observed. Moreover, taking into consideration the critical exposition pathways of the population living in the area, no significant levels of exposition were observed. (author)

  1. Specific radiological monitoring experiences and the challenges at offshore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mod Omar Hassan

    2005-01-01

    Lately, EASELAB / PROJEK KHAS has performed Specific Radiological Monitoring job at offshore rigs off Terengganu for Syarikat Petronas Carigali [M] Sdn Bhd. In order to perform the job, every worker must attend a Basic Offshore Safety and Emergency Training Course and pass the theory and practical test. Before a license or safety passport is issued, the worker must undergo Medical Checkup and certified physically and mentally fit. The passport is recognized by most of international oil companies. During performing the jobs, MINT staff has faced some difficulties such as weather conditions, to suit with the working environment and life at the oil platform. There were a few staff has withdrew (resigned) from performing the jobs. (Author)

  2. Mobile radiological monitoring around Nuclear Power Plant site at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.S.; Saindane, S.S.; Sharma, R.; Suri, M.M.K.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Rao, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Real time mobile radiological monitoring around nuclear facilities is required for establishing background radiation dose rate data and to detect any increase in the radiation level which is attributable to the atmospheric releases from Nuclear facilities. Mobile radiation survey using mobile monitoring systems was carried out in the Emergency Planning Zone around Tarapur Atomic Power station during plant operation, taking the wind direction also into consideration. For identifying the potential difficulties during an emergency scenario and to understand the variation of the measured values several systems/instruments were used simultaneously for mapping the dose rates. As demonstrated during this monitoring programme, 40mm x 40mm NaI(Tl) detector based Portable Mobile Gamma Spectrometry System (PMGSS) which is attached with a GPS can acquire and store large amount of gamma spectra tagged with positional coordinates and can enhance the capacity of decision makers during any accidental situation. The average of dose rates measured from various locations around Tarapur Atomic Power Station is 70 - 80 nGy.h -1 . The higher dose rate in the range of 110-125 nGy.h -1 measured at one of the location is due to higher concentration of natural radioactivity mainly by 40 K which was confirmed by the gamma spectrometric measurement. (author)

  3. Environmental radiological monitoring methods in TENORM facilities and its relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng Iyu Lin; Ismail Bahari; Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2011-01-01

    In Malaysia, mineral processing plant is one of the Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) processing industries controlled by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) through the enforcement of Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304). The activities generated waste which is called as TENORM wastes. TENORM wastes are mainly found in thorium hydroxide from the processing of xenotime and monazite, and iron oxide and red gypsum from the processing of ilmenite. Other TENORM wastes are scales and sludge from the oil and gas industries, tin slag produced from the smelting of tin, and ilmenite, zircon, and monazite produced from the processing of tin tailing (amang). The environmental and radiological monitoring program is needed to ensure that the TENORM wastes did not caused any contamination to the environment. The wastes vary in the types of samples, parameters of analysis as well as the frequency of monitoring based on licenses conditions issued by the AELB. The main objective of this study is to assess the suitability of licenses condition and the monitoring program required in oil and gas, and mineral processing industries. Study was done by assessing the data submitted to the AELB in order to comply with the licensing requirement. This study had found out that there are a few of licenses conditions that need to be reviewed accordingly based on the processing activity. (Author)

  4. Specific radiological monitoring (SRM) in oil and gas production platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairul Nizam Idris, Syed Asraf Fahlawi Wafa S.M Ghazi and Fadzley Izwan Abd Manaf

    2007-01-01

    Technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) are present in components of both oil and natural gas production facilities. TENORM can be associated with the presence of crude oil, produced water and natural gas. The radiation exposure pathways to the workers in oil and gas production are similar to those in the uranium and heavy mineral sand mining and processing industry. This paper work provides a short review on the Specific Radiological Monitoring (SRM) program were carried out at oil and gas platforms in the east cost of Peninsular Malaysia. The objective of this paper work is to observe the monitoring parameters levels and to evaluate whether these levels are exceeding the limits set by Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB). The monitoring results showed that the surface contamination, airborne contamination and concentration of radon and thoron are well below the set limit stipulated in LEM/TEK/30 SEM.2, except for external radiation and radioactivity concentration of sludge and scales. About 2 (2.35%) from the 85 external radiation measurements performed were found above the permissible limit. While about 11 (36.6%) and 7 (23.3%) of the 30 collected sludge and scales samples were found containing higher Ra-226 and Ra-228, respectively, than the mean concentrations in normal soils of Peninsular Malaysia. In general, it can be concluded that a few of oil and gas production platform are producing TENORM. (Author)

  5. Radiological assessment of an area with uranium residual material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl; Cancio, David; Alvarez, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decays series as 230 Th, 226 Ra and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirm their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modelling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of outdoor radon ( 222 Rn). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of 226 Ra in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g-1 , the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (author)

  6. Radiation monitoring strategy in nuclear or radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radiation measurements provide indispensable data needed for the management of a nuclear or radiological emergency. There must exist pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies, with accompanying procedures and methods, that help the authorities to perform measurements efficiently and, consequently, to evaluate the radiological situation correctly and to carry out proper countermeasures on time. However, defining a realistic yet comprehensive radiation monitoring strategy for emergencies is far from being an easy task. The very concept of 'emergency monitoring strategy' should be understood in a broad sense. In an ideal case, a strategy has interfaces with all related emergency and information exchange arrangements and agreements both at the national and international level. It covers all activities from the recognition of a potential hazard situation to environmental sampling performed during the late phases of an accident. It integrates routine-monitoring practices with the special requirements set by emergency monitoring and the use of fixed monitoring stations with that of mobile measurement teams. It includes elements for gathering, analyzing, transmitting and presenting data, as well as for combining them with different kinds of forecasts. It also takes into account the various intrinsic characteristics of possible threat scenarios and contains options for adapting measuring activities according to prevailing environmental conditions. Furthermore, a strategy must have relevant links to the social and economical realities and to the primary interests of different stakeholders. In order to assist individual countries in establishing national strategies, international organisations (IAEA, OECD/NEA, EU) have published basic guidelines for emergency response and radiation measurements. Nuclear accidents, especially the Chernobyl case with its large-scale environmental consequences, and other kinds of shocking events (like the one on September 11, 2001

  7. OPTIMIZING RADIOLOGICAL MONITOR SITING OVER THE CONTINENTAL U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Kurzeja, R; Lance Osteen, L; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is installing a network of sensors in the US to monitor background radiation and elevated radiation levels expected from a possible nuclear incident. The network (RadNet) of 180 fixed sensors is intended to provide a basic estimate of the radiation level throughout the US and enhanced accuracy near population centers. This report discusses one of the objective methods for locating these monitors based on criteria outlined by the EPA. The analysis employs a representative climatology of incident scenarios that includes 50 release locations, four seasons and four times of the day. This climatology was calculated from 5,600 simulations generated with NOAA-ARL's HYSPLIT Lagrangian trajectory model. The method treats the release plumes as targets and monitors are located to maximize the number of plumes detected with the network. Weighting schemes based on detection only, dose-weighted detection and population-dose weighted detection were evaluated. The result shows that most of the monitors are located around the population centers, as expected. However, there are monitors quite uniformly distributed around the less populated areas. The monitors at the populated areas will provide early warning to protect the general public, and the monitors spread across the country will provide valuable data for modelers to estimate the extent and the transport of the radioactive contamination

  8. Radiological survey of Goiania by a mobile monitoring unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, M.C.F.

    1989-01-01

    After the initial response to the radiological accident in Goiania, a radiological survey throughout the city was performed using a mobile unit. This unit was equipped with two Geiger Muller detectors outsise the vehicle and one 4' x 4' NaI(Tl) detector connected to a dual recorder. All three detectors were placed 1 m above the ground. The survey system covers a wide range of exposure rate, since environmental levels up to 10 R h -1 . Eighty percent of the Goiania urban area was covered by this survey and except for some specific locations the contamination was restricted to the main foci surroundings ocurring in a non homogenous pattern. The highest value observed in the city after the main foci decontamination was of 0.7 mR h -1 in the 57 th street - where the source was opened. Results of the main foci and some other locations are apresented in the paper. The system designed to perform the survey in the city played a fundamental role during the decontamination process (author) [pt

  9. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring. CY2014 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikoloch, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Chapman, Jenny [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mizell, Steve A. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vicken [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2014 monitoring are: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2014 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations; (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. Differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely the result of differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  10. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  11. Nuclear radiation sensors and monitoring following a nuclear or radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Management of Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies arising from Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND), Nuclear Reactors/Power plants and Nuclear War require measurement of ionizing radiations and radioactivity on an enhanced scale relative to the levels encountered in peaceful uses of ionizing radiations and radioactivity. It is heartening that since Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear disaster, the world has been quiet but since early 2000 there has been a fear of certain devices to be used by terrorists, which could lead to panic, and disaster due to dispersal of radioactivity by RDD, IND. Nuclear attack would lead to blast, thermal, initial nuclear radiation, nuclear fall out leading to gamma and neutron dose, dose rates in range from few R, R/h to kR, kR/h, and determinations of k Bq or higher order. Such situations have been visualized at national levels and National Disaster Management Authority NDMA has been established and Disaster Management Act 2005 has come into existence. NDMA has prepared guidelines for Nuclear and radiological emergency management highlighting preparedness, mitigation, response, capacity building, etc. Critical point in all these issues is detection of emergency, quick intimation to the concerned for action in shortest possible time. Upper most requirement by those involved in pursuing action, is radiation sensor based radiation monitors for personnel, area, and to assess contamination due to radioactivity.This presentation briefly describes the Indian scenario in the development of the radiation sensors and the sensor-based radiation monitors. (author)

  12. Nuclear radiation sensors and monitoring following a nuclear or radiological emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, P K [Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (India)

    2009-01-15

    Management of Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies arising from Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND), Nuclear Reactors/Power plants and Nuclear War require measurement of ionizing radiations and radioactivity on an enhanced scale relative to the levels encountered in peaceful uses of ionizing radiations and radioactivity. It is heartening that since Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear disaster, the world has been quiet but since early 2000 there has been a fear of certain devices to be used by terrorists, which could lead to panic, and disaster due to dispersal of radioactivity by RDD, IND. Nuclear attack would lead to blast, thermal, initial nuclear radiation, nuclear fall out leading to gamma and neutron dose, dose rates in range from few R, R/h to kR, kR/h, and determinations of k Bq or higher order. Such situations have been visualized at national levels and National Disaster Management Authority NDMA has been established and Disaster Management Act 2005 has come into existence. NDMA has prepared guidelines for Nuclear and radiological emergency management highlighting preparedness, mitigation, response, capacity building, etc. Critical point in all these issues is detection of emergency, quick intimation to the concerned for action in shortest possible time. Upper most requirement by those involved in pursuing action, is radiation sensor based radiation monitors for personnel, area, and to assess contamination due to radioactivity.This presentation briefly describes the Indian scenario in the development of the radiation sensors and the sensor-based radiation monitors. (author)

  13. How conservative is routine personal dosimetry monitoring in diagnostic radiology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetticher, H. von; Lachmund, J.; Hoffmann, W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Dose values obtained by official personal radiation exposure monitoring are often considered equivalent to the effective dose of a person. This paper provides estimates of the extent of deviation between the two dose concepts under various conditions. Materials and Methods: Doses for patients and personnel were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters for five different geometries at three work settings in a radiology department. Patients and personnel were simulated with anthropomorphic phantoms. Different types of protective clothing as well as permanent protection shields were considered in the calculations. Results: Dose values obtained by official personal dose monitoring are conservative only for specific radiation protection situations. With state-of-the-art personal protective equipment (wrap-around style lead apron with thyroid shield), the ratio between effective dose and personal dose varies between 0.6 and 1.25. Without thyroid protection the official personal dose systematically underestimates the effective dose: for protective clothing with 0.5 mm lead equivalent without thyroid shielding, the effective dose exceeds the personal dose by factors between 1.7 and 3.1. If protective clothing with lead equivalent 0.35 mm is used, this factor varies between 1.1 and 1.82. (orig.)

  14. A unique radiation area monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.C.; Allen, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Remote Area Monitoring Systems (RAMS) monitors four radiation areas with two independent systems in each area. Each system consists of power supplies, four ionization chambers, and four analog and digital circuits. The first system controls the warning beacons, horns, annunciation panel and interlocks. The second system presents a quantitative dose rate indication at the console and in the radiation area

  15. Summary of radiological monitoring of Columbia River water along the Hanford Reach, 1980 through 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirkes, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Columbia River monitoring program, conducted as part of the SESP, provides a historical record of contaminant concentrations in the river attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and operations conducted at the Hanford Site. In addition to ongoing monitoring, special studies are conducted periodically to enhance the understanding of the transport and fate of contaminants in the river. The Columbia River monitoring program includes sampling of river water, river sediment, river-bank springs entering the river, and various types of aquatic biota found in or along the river. These samples are analyzed for radiological constituents and a wide range of chemical parameters. This report describes the water sampling component of the overall Columbia River monitoring program conducted during the years 1980 through 1989 and summarizes the radiological results generated through the program during this time period. The only radionuclides found in the river that were consistently influenced by Hanford were tritium and iodine-129. Strontium-90 and uranium, also attributable to Hanford operations, were present in localized areas within the river near ground-water discharge points; however, these contaminants are quickly dispersed within the river to concentrations similar to background

  16. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  17. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivins, Steven R; Stoetzel, Gregory A

    2001-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2000 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program

  18. Automated radiological monitoring at a Russian Ministry of Defence Naval Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Pomerville, J.; Gavrilov, S.; Kisselev, V.; Daniylan, V.; Belikov, A.; Egorkin, A.; Sokolovski, Y.; Endregard, M.; Krosshavn, M.; Sundling, C.V.; Yokstad, H.

    2001-01-01

    The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel

  19. Bacteriological Monitoring of Radiology Room Apparatus in the Department of Radiological Technology and Contamination on Hands of Radiological Technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Chil

    2008-01-01

    Distribution of microorganisms were examined for the bucky tables in the radiology rooms of the department of radiological technology, the aprons, handles of various apparatus, handles of mobile radiological apparatus, and hands of the radiological technologists. As a result, relatively larger amounts of bacteria were found on the handles of the mobile radiological apparatus and the aprons. Among the isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter baumanni (7.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.9%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.7%), Enterobacter cloaceae (0.6%), Providenica rettgeri (0.6%) are known as the cause of nosocomial infection (hospital acquired infection). In addition, similar colonies were also found on the hands of the radiological technologists such as microorganisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (6.6%), Yersinia enterocolotica (5.4%), Acinetobacter baumanni (4.2%), Enterobacter cloaceae (2.4%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.8%), Yersinia pseuotuberculosis (18%), Enterobacter sakazakii (1.2%), and Escherichia coli (0.6%). In particular, this result indicates clinical significance since Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli show strong pathogenicity. Therefore, a continuous education is essential for the radiological technologists to prevent the nosocomial infection.

  20. Bacteriological Monitoring of Radiology Room Apparatus in the Department of Radiological Technology and Contamination on Hands of Radiological Technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Chil [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Distribution of microorganisms were examined for the bucky tables in the radiology rooms of the department of radiological technology, the aprons, handles of various apparatus, handles of mobile radiological apparatus, and hands of the radiological technologists. As a result, relatively larger amounts of bacteria were found on the handles of the mobile radiological apparatus and the aprons. Among the isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter baumanni (7.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.9%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.7%), Enterobacter cloaceae (0.6%), Providenica rettgeri (0.6%) are known as the cause of nosocomial infection (hospital acquired infection). In addition, similar colonies were also found on the hands of the radiological technologists such as microorganisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (6.6%), Yersinia enterocolotica (5.4%), Acinetobacter baumanni (4.2%), Enterobacter cloaceae (2.4%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.8%), Yersinia pseuotuberculosis (18%), Enterobacter sakazakii (1.2%), and Escherichia coli (0.6%). In particular, this result indicates clinical significance since Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli show strong pathogenicity. Therefore, a continuous education is essential for the radiological technologists to prevent the nosocomial infection.

  1. Radiological environmental monitoring with LiF-700-H dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarnichia, E.; Levanon, I.; Andres, P.; Miani, C.; Ramirez, S.

    2011-10-01

    Since 2008 a radiological environmental monitoring with LiF-700-H has been carried out as a result of increasing the Ra-6 research reactor core power. The information obtained is used to evaluate and to quantify analytically the air kerma rate, the fading and the associated uncertainty by developing software tools (deconvolution and uncertainty algorithms). LiF-700-H dosemeters were chosen because of their high sensitivity to low air kerma rates. They show a very good stability and a negligible fading for two-month working periods. The air kerma rate detection limit (based on the 3σ criterion) during these working periods is about 0.4 n Gy/h. Air kerma rates of about 70 n Gy/h are measured with this detection limit. Following the Nist guidelines, an algorithm was developed in order to find the associated uncertainty. It considers several aspects, such as the source activity decay, distance source-dosemeter during the calibration procedure, irradiation time, calibration factor, dosemeter readout, dosemeter sensitivity, TLD reader stability and fading. The associated uncertainty is found to be about 25% for a 95% confidence interval (k = 2.025), which can be considered acceptable when taking into account the very low air kerma rates estimated. The LiF-700-H response to different energies and its relationship with climate changes over the calendar year are planned as future tasks. (Author)

  2. Results of the radiological environmental monitoring network in Cantabria, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, J.; Rodenas, C.; Gomez, J.; Quindos, L.S.; Fernandez, P.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Medical Physics Department in the University of Cantabria, Spain as member belonging to the radiological environmental Monitoring Network has been carried out a series of measures about radioactive elements in air, rain water and soil. This report shows the methodology used and the results obtained in the measurement of the gross-alpha and gross beta activities. 90S r and gamma spectrometry in atmospheric aerosols; the activity of 131I in air; the gross-beta activity 90 Sr and gamma spectrometry in rain water and dry deposition: and the activity of 90S r gamma spectrometer in soils. The average values of the gross-alpha and gross beta activities in air has been 4 x 10 -5 and 32 x10 -5B q/m 3, respectively. The concentration of 131I has been inferior to the limit of detection in the whole of measurements. Finally, has been found small concentrations of 90S r and the 137C s in soils samples

  3. Uranium mining and milling sites in Argentina: environmental radiological monitoring (1980-1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, A.M.; Gomez, J.C.; Oliveira, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental radiological monitoring in the vicinity of uranium mining and milling plants in Argentina is performed on a routine basis, in order to assess the possibility of significant environmental contamination due to uranium mill wastes and mill tailings of plants still operating or those where the exploitation have concluded. Dissolved natural uranium and 226 Ra concentrations in surface waters are measured in samples taken from rivers near the mills, according to a special monitoring plan set up for each facility. In addition, 222 Rn emanation rates from ore tailings are measured at times. In this paper the environmental radiological monitoring program results obtained for the 1980-1994 period are shown. From the data analyses it can be concluded that there are not significant differences for the concentrations of the radionuclides of interest, between the surface water samples taken from river location above and below the plants discharge points. Besides, no significant exposure results for the population living in the surrounding areas due to the uranium mining and milling plants operation or their wastes. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs

  4. Release protocol to address DOE moratorium on shipments of waste generated in radiologically controlled areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, L.A.; Boothe, G.F.

    1992-10-01

    On May 17, 1991 the US DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a moratorium on the shipment of hazardous waste from radiologically contaminated or potentially contaminated areas on DOE sites to offsite facilities not licensed for radiological material. This document describes a release protocol generated by Westinghouse Hanford submitted for US DOE approval. Topics considered include designating Radiological Materials Management Areas (RMMAs), classification of wastes, handling of mixed wastes, detection limits

  5. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2016 Meteorological, Radiological, and Wind Transported Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jenny [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vicken [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mizell, Steve [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if wind blowing across the Clean Slate sites is transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites.

  6. The basis for a radiological protection program to the health area of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Rosangela Franco.

    1994-01-01

    There are some sectors in the Health Area of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) that present great potential risks from the viewpoint of radiation protection. The aim of this work is to establish the basis a radiological protection program applicable to these sectors. The Diagnostic Radiology Services and the Laboratory of Cardiac Catheterization of the Hospital de Clinicas have been analyzed, as well as the Radiotherapy Services of the Center for Integral Assistance to the Women Health (CAISM). This work was mainly supported by national and international regulations related to the operative and employment aspects of the equipment and radiation sources used in the health area. Regulations related to area and individual monitoring of workers were also used. Results show that the interior of the rooms where the equipment and radiation sources are located is classified as controlled area, whereas the neighborhoods of the rooms are mostly free areas. In order to improve the radiological protection conditions, only some of the operative and employment aspects need to be modified regarding equipment and radiation sources. In this way, routine personal monitoring would not be further required. Since all the workers have their annual mean equivalent doses below 3/10 of the primary limits of the applicable equivalent dose, routine individual monitoring could be exempted. (author). 23 refs., 51 figs., 83 tabs

  7. Radiological monitoring: terrestrial natural radionuclides in Kinta District, Perak, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Siak Kuan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)], E-mail: sklee88@hotmail.com; Wagiran, Husin; Termizi Ramli, Ahmad; Heru Apriantoro, Nursama [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Khalik Wood, A. [Malaysia Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-05-15

    Natural background gamma radiation and radioactivity concentrations were investigated from 2003 to 2005 in Kinta District, Perak, Malaysia. Sample locations were distant from any 'amang' processing plants. The external gamma dose rates ranged from 39 to 1039 nGy h{sup -1}. The mean external gamma dose rate was 222 {+-} 191 nGy h{sup -1}. Small areas of relatively enhanced activity were located having external gamma dose rates of up to 1039 {+-} 104 nGy h{sup -1}. The activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K were analyzed by using a high-resolution co-axial HPGe detector system. The activity concentration ranges were 12-426 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, 19-1377 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th and <19-2204 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40} K. Based on the radioactivity levels determined, the gamma-absorbed dose rates in air at 1 m above the ground were calculated. The calculated dose rates and measured dose rates had a good correlation coefficient, R of 0.94. To evaluate the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity, the radium equivalent activity, the gamma-absorbed dose rate and the mean population weighted dose rate were calculated. An isodose map for the Kinta District was also produced.

  8. Radiological monitoring: terrestrial natural radionuclides in Kinta District, Perak, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Siak Kuan; Wagiran, Husin; Termizi Ramli, Ahmad; Heru Apriantoro, Nursama; Khalik Wood, A.

    2009-01-01

    Natural background gamma radiation and radioactivity concentrations were investigated from 2003 to 2005 in Kinta District, Perak, Malaysia. Sample locations were distant from any 'amang' processing plants. The external gamma dose rates ranged from 39 to 1039 nGy h -1 . The mean external gamma dose rate was 222 ± 191 nGy h -1 . Small areas of relatively enhanced activity were located having external gamma dose rates of up to 1039 ± 104 nGy h -1 . The activity concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K were analyzed by using a high-resolution co-axial HPGe detector system. The activity concentration ranges were 12-426 Bq kg -1 for 238 U, 19-1377 Bq kg -1 for 232 Th and -1 for 40 K. Based on the radioactivity levels determined, the gamma-absorbed dose rates in air at 1 m above the ground were calculated. The calculated dose rates and measured dose rates had a good correlation coefficient, R of 0.94. To evaluate the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity, the radium equivalent activity, the gamma-absorbed dose rate and the mean population weighted dose rate were calculated. An isodose map for the Kinta District was also produced.

  9. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daegu area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H. D.; Lee, S. Y. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-15

    The objectives of the project are to monitor an abnormal radiation level in Taegu and Kyungpook region, and to enhance our ability to prepare for the radiological emergency situation by establishing the radioactivity monitoring system in Taegu and Kyungpook region. Gross beta activities were measured and gamma radionuclides were analysed for the environmental samples of air-borned dust. precipitation. fallout and drinking water collected in Taegu radioactivity monitoring center. and gamma exposure rates were also measured. To establish the basic data base on the environmental radioactivity, gamma radionuclide analyses were carried out for the samples of soil, drinking water, grain, vegetable, milk, and fish which were obtained from 31 different areas, and the spatial gamma exposure rates from 61 different points were also measured in Taegu and Kyungpook region. In conclusion, it didn't appear any evidence for newly pollution of artificial radioactivity in Taegu and Kyungpook region.

  10. Radiation protection study of radiology medical workers in radiodiagnosis area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.; Orozco, M.; Rincon, A.; Padilla, Y.; Martinez, A.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects related to radiological safety and its organization in radiodiagnosis were evaluated by means of scanning carried out in 18 hospitals of Mexico City, divided in 11 public institutions and 7 private ones. The population being studied was: hospital personnel that works in radiodiagnosis. The survey was made with 31 dichotomic variables, being obtained 132 surveys. The personnel characteristics are 83% works in public institutions, 49% works in radiodiagnosis, 3% has an academic degree, 13% is member of a hospital professional association, 13% has updated information on radiological protection, 36% was trained, 45% works for more than 2 years, 52% uses personal dosemeter, less than the 20% knows about the fundamentals of the radiological protection and 24% states to suffer from biological radiation effects, due to the exposure to x-rays. As result of the study, it was found that the main problems that the radiological protection has, are: lack of training programs in radiological protection and supervision, medical surveillance and the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  11. Systematic Layout Planning of a Radiology Reporting Area to Optimize Radiologists' Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Guilherme Brittes; Fogliatto, Flavio Sanson; Cardoso, Ricardo Bertoglio; Torres, Felipe Soares; Faccin, Carlo Sasso; Dora, José Miguel

    2018-04-01

    Optimizing radiologists' performance is a major priority for managers of health services/systems, since the radiologists' reporting activity imposes a severe constraint on radiology productivity. Despite that, methods to optimize radiologists' reporting workplace layout are scarce in the literature. This study was performed in the Radiology Division (RD) of an 850-bed University-based general hospital. The analysis of the reporting workplace layout was carried out using the systematic layout planning (SLP) method, in association with cluster analysis as a complementary tool in early stages of SLP. Radiologists, architects, and hospital managers were the stakeholders consulted for the completion of different stages of the layout planning process. A step-by-step description of the proposed methodology to plan an RD reporting layout is presented. Clusters of radiologists were defined using types of exams reported and their frequency of occurrence as clustering variables. Sectors with high degree of interaction were placed in proximity in the new RD layout, with separation of noisy and quiet areas. Four reporting cells were positioned in the quiet area, grouping radiologists by subspecialty, as follows: cluster 1-abdomen; cluster 2-musculoskeletal; cluster 3-neurological, vascular and head & neck; cluster 4-thoracic and cardiac. The creation of reporting cells has the potential to limit unplanned interruptions and enhance the exchange of knowledge and information within cells, joining radiologists with the same expertise. That should lead to improvements in productivity, allowing managers to more easily monitor radiologists' performance.

  12. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  13. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease

  14. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  15. Monitoring System for ALICE Surface Areas

    CERN Document Server

    Demirbasci, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    I have been at CERN for 12 weeks within the scope of Summer Student Programme working on a monitoring system project for surface areas of the ALICE experiment during this period of time. The development and implementation of a monitoring system for environmental parameters in the accessible areas where a cheap hardware setup can be deployed were aim of this project. This report explains how it was developed by using Arduino, Raspberry PI, WinCC OA and DIM protocol.

  16. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2015 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Chapman, Jenny; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve

    2016-01-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). The operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Radionuclide assessment of airborne particulates in 2015 found the gross alpha and gross beta values of dust collected from the filters at the monitoring stations are consistent with background conditions. The meteorological and particle monitoring indicate that conditions for wind-borne contaminant movement exist at the Clean Slate sites and that, although the transport of radionuclide-contaminated soil by suspension has not been detected, movement by saltation is occurring.

  17. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2015 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolich, George [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Shadel, Craig [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Chapman, Jenny [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; McCurdy, Greg [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Etyemezian, Vicken [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Miller, Julianne J. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Mizell, Steve [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    2016-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). The operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Radionuclide assessment of airborne particulates in 2015 found the gross alpha and gross beta values of dust collected from the filters at the monitoring stations are consistent with background conditions. The meteorological and particle monitoring indicate that conditions for wind-borne contaminant movement exist at the Clean Slate sites and that, although the transport of radionuclide-contaminated soil by suspension has not been detected, movement by saltation is occurring.

  18. Implementation of an occupational monitoring program in diagnostic radiology at the 'Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio Ricardo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Azevedo, Ana Cecilia Pedrosa de

    2003-01-01

    An occupational monitoring program in diagnostic radiology was implemented at the Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho of the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Brazil, in accordance with the Brazilian legislation. Previously, a survey of all personnel involved with ionizing radiation was performed. Many problems were observed: the great majority of the workers were not properly monitored; only three departments of the hospital kept an independent survey of the occupational doses; there was not a follow-up control of the high doses. With the implementation of the program, a new laboratory was chosen to read the dosemeters and this initiative resulted in reduction of the hospital costs. The inclusion of seven more departments in the program represented an increase of 60% in the number of monitored workers. The program also provided a system to control the high doses, especially in the Hemodynamics department, which presented the highest mean dose value (0.32 mSv/month). An area survey program was performed during different periods in places considered of high risk for the workers and for the public as well. At the same time, a software was used to build a database with the aim of controlling all personnel data. The implementation of the program provided all personnel involved a better knowledge of the risks associated with ionizing radiation and of radioprotection, and also awareness of the need of correct use of the personal dose monitors. (author)

  19. New method for presenting offsite radiological monitoring data during emergency preparedness exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Hickey, E.E.; Jamison, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    As scenarios for exercises become more complicated and flexible to challenge emergency response personnel, improved means of presenting data must be developed. To provide maximum realism and free play during an exercise, staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have recently devised a simple method of presenting realistic radiological field monitoring information for a range of possible releases. The method uses only two pieces of paper. The first is a map of the offsite area showing the shape of the plume for the duration of the exercise. The second is a semilog graph containing curves that relate exposure rate and iodine concentration to downwind distance and time. Several techniques are used to maximize the information on the graph

  20. New method for presenting off-site radiological monitoring data during emergency preparedness exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Hickey, E.E.; Jamison, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    As scenarios for exercises become more complicated and flexible to challenge emergency response personnel, improved means of presenting data must be developed to meet this need. To provide maximum realism and free play during an exercise, staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have recently devised a simple method of presenting realistic radiological field monitoring information for a range of possible releases. The method utilizes only two pieces of paper. The first is a map of the offsite area showing the shape of the plume for the duration of the exercise. The second is a semi-log graph containing curves relating exposure rate and iodine concentration to downwind distance and time. Several techniques are used to maximize the information on the graph

  1. Findings of the first comprehensive radiological monitoring program of the Republic of the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, S.L.; Graham, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Marshall Islands was the primary site of the United States atomic weapons testing program in the Pacific. From 1946 through 1958, 66 atomic weapons were detonated in the island country. For several decades, monitoring was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (or its predecessor agencies) on the test site atolls and neighboring atolls. However, 70% of the land area of the over 1,200 islands in the Marshall Islands was never systematically monitored prior to 1990. For the 5-y period from 1990 through 1994, the Government of the Republic of the Marshall Islands undertook an independent program to assess the radiological conditions throughout its 29 atolls. The scientific work was performed under the auspices of the Section 177 Agreement of the Compact of Free Association, U.S. public law 99-239, signed in 1986 by President Ronald Reagan. Although the total land area of the nations is a scant 180 km 2 , the islands are distributed over 6 X 10 5 km 2 of ocean. Consequently, logistics and instrumentation were main considerations, in addition to cultural and language issues. The objective of this paper is to report findings for all atolls of the Marshall Islands on the 137 Cs areal inventory (Bq m -2 ) and the external effective dose-rate (mSv y -1 ), the projected internal effective dose-rate (mSv y -1 ) from an assumed diet model, and surface soil concentrations of 239,240 Pu (Bq kg -1 ) for selected northern atolls. Interpretation is also provided on the degree of contamination above global fallout levels. This report provides the first comprehensive summary of the radiological conditions throughout the Marshall Islands. 37 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab

  2. Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

    2003-01-01

    Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions

  3. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2009-01-01

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man

  4. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station

  5. The novel application of Benford's second order analysis for monitoring radiation output in interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, S; Sheehy, N; Cooke, J

    2014-06-01

    Benford's law is an empirical observation which predicts the expected frequency of digits in naturally occurring datasets spanning multiple orders of magnitude, with the law having been most successfully applied as an audit tool in accountancy. This study investigated the sensitivity of the technique in identifying system output changes using simulated changes in interventional radiology Dose-Area-Product (DAP) data, with any deviations from Benford's distribution identified using z-statistics. The radiation output for interventional radiology X-ray equipment is monitored annually during quality control testing; however, for a considerable portion of the year an increased output of the system, potentially caused by engineering adjustments or spontaneous system faults may go unnoticed, leading to a potential increase in the radiation dose to patients. In normal operation recorded examination radiation outputs vary over multiple orders of magnitude rendering the application of normal statistics ineffective for detecting systematic changes in the output. In this work, the annual DAP datasets complied with Benford's first order law for first, second and combinations of the first and second digits. Further, a continuous 'rolling' second order technique was devised for trending simulated changes over shorter timescales. This distribution analysis, the first employment of the method for radiation output trending, detected significant changes simulated on the original data, proving the technique useful in this case. The potential is demonstrated for implementation of this novel analysis for monitoring and identifying change in suitable datasets for the purpose of system process control. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

    2012-03-20

    This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

  7. Experience and improved techniques in radiological environmental monitoring at major DOE low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    A summary of routine radiological environmental surveillance programs conducted at major active US Department of Energy (DOE) solid low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites is provided. The DOE disposal sites at which monitoring programs were reviewed include those located at Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Plant (SRP). The review is limited to activities conducted for the purpose of monitoring disposal site performance. Areas of environmental monitoring reviewed include air monitoring for particulates and gases, monitoring of surface water runoff, surface water bodies, ground water, monitoring of surface soils and the vadose zone, and monitoring of ambient penetrating radiation. Routine environmental surveillance is conducted at major LLW disposal sites at various levels of effort for specific environmental media. In summary, all sites implement a routine monitoring program for penetrating radiation. Four sites (INEL, NTS, LANL, and SRP) monitor particulates in air specifically at LLW disposal sites. Hanford monitors particulates at LLW sites in conjunction with monitoring of other site operations. Particulates are monitored on a reservationwide network at ORNL. Gases are monitored specifically at active LLW sites operated at NTS, LANL, and SRP. Ground water is monitored specifically at LLW sites at INEL, LANL, and SRP, in conjunction with other operations at Hanford, and as part of a reservationwide program at NTS and ORNL. Surface water is monitored at INEL, LANL, and SRP LLW sites. Surface soil is sampled and analyzed on a routine basis at INEL and LANL. Routine monitoring of the vadose zone is conducted at the INEL and SRP. Techniques and equipment in use are described and other aspects of environmental monitoring programs, such as quality assurance and data base management, are reviewed

  8. The development of web monitoring digital area monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hoon-Jin; Lee, Jun-Hee; Namkoong, Phil; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Su-Hong; Kim, We-Su

    2005-01-01

    As CCTV and radiation area monitor have been used separately to date, there have existed inconveniences in managing the view images and radiation dose rates from them. Thus we became to develop the web monitoring digital area monitor which incorporated the existing two factors, CCTV and radiation area monitor, into one. As incorporated with digitalisation, this device will usually become linked with PC, so that the view image and radiation dose rate can be concurrently identified in convenience. These measured figures automatically become data-based on PC by SW program, and become displayed in various format. Moreover, they can be monitored in remote and real time basis in the internet environment. Its local unit uses the cost-effective GM tube and CMOS image sensor, and has the small LCD which directly indicates the measured dose rate. The image sensor is designed to be operated with pan and tilt motion, thus can eliminate the dead view zone. It is thought that the developed device at this time could make the radiation safety management of each work field be done with low cost-high efficiency manner, making role of the CCTV inspection system

  9. The development of web monitoring digital area monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hoon-Jin; Lee, Jun-Hee; Namkoong, Phil; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Su-Hong; Kim, We-Su [Iljin Radiation Engineering Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    As CCTV and radiation area monitor have been used separately to date, there have existed inconveniences in managing the view images and radiation dose rates from them. Thus we became to develop the web monitoring digital area monitor which incorporated the existing two factors, CCTV and radiation area monitor, into one. As incorporated with digitalisation, this device will usually become linked with PC, so that the view image and radiation dose rate can be concurrently identified in convenience. These measured figures automatically become data-based on PC by SW program, and become displayed in various format. Moreover, they can be monitored in remote and real time basis in the internet environment. Its local unit uses the cost-effective GM tube and CMOS image sensor, and has the small LCD which directly indicates the measured dose rate. The image sensor is designed to be operated with pan and tilt motion, thus can eliminate the dead view zone. It is thought that the developed device at this time could make the radiation safety management of each work field be done with low cost-high efficiency manner, making role of the CCTV inspection system.

  10. Nevada Test Site Area 25. Radiological survey and cleanup project, 1974-1983. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.K.; Rosenberry, C.E.; Orcutt, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The cleanup was part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program funded by the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for alpha and beta plus gamma radiation contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 12 figures

  11. Monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercat, C.; Brun, F.; Florens, P.; Petit, J.; Garnier, F.; Devin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Set up at the beginning of the site's operations, in 1962, the monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin has evolved over time to meet more specifically the multiple objectives of environmental monitoring: to prove the respect of the commitments required by the authorities, to be able to detect a dysfunction in the observed levels, to enable the assessment of impacts of industrial activities, to ensure the balance between environmental quality and the use made by the local population and to inform the public of the radiological state of the environment. Thousands of data were acquired on the radioactivity of all environmental compartments as well as on the functioning of local ecosystems. Today, the Network of Environmental Monitoring of AREVA Tricastin goes beyond the requirements of routine monitoring to provide innovative solutions for monitoring the radioactivity (especially for uranium) in the environment. (author)

  12. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-12-31

    Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

  13. Area monitoring dosimeter program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivins, S.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)--(3) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years (CY) 1993--1996 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 93 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during CY 1997. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusions that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas

  14. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GA Stoetzel; SR Bivins

    1999-01-01

    In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-1997 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 97 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during calendar year 1998. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusion that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas

  15. Radiological impact on the surrounding area of Cernavoda NPP operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busnita, M.; Penescu, M.; Neacsu, L.; Ion, M.; Moldoveanu, E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the protective measures provided to Cernavoda NPP for population and environment in case of normal operation and accidental situations. The paper describes the nuclear safety concept with the two aspects, the technical safety and the radiation protection, respectively, which represent the theoretical basis of the NPP design, construction and operation. The assessment of the potential radiological effects of Cernavoda NPP operation on the population and other environmental factors have been done by using the following input data: the natural and social characteristics of the site and the technical characteristics of the plant. The effects of Cernavoda NPP operation are also exposed in health risks which are compared with the daily risks of the population exposed of the natural phenomena or to the activities like transportation, domestics or industrial. (author). 1 tab., 6 refs

  16. Radiological interference from personal articles in occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, P.; Jayan, M.P; Pawar, V.J; Patil, S.L; Selvamani, N.; Vedram; Sureshkumar, M.K.; Chinnaesakki, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the presence of radioactivity in some personal articles worn on sacred thread and the related difficulties faced by health physicists during occupational radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities. In an incident, the portal monitor installed at the exit gate of a nuclear facility indicated contamination on self of a radiation worker while passing through it. The worker was therefore, subjected to thorough check for external contamination by the plant health physicist, using a pan-cake contamination monitor. All the clothing of the person was also checked for contamination. On further detailed examination, a dark brownish personal article hanging on a sacred thread from his neck was found to be the source of contamination. This presentation aims at giving information to the health physics community on the possibility of such interferences during personal monitoring in nuclear facilities

  17. Mechanical analysis of flying robot for nuclear safety and security control by radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hyo Sung; Woo, Tae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiological monitoring of the NPPs site is performed by the flying robot. • The mechanics of drone is investigated in the NPPs. • Yaw and Pitch motions are simulated for the robotic behaviors. • The flying robot is analyzed for the nuclear safety and security successfully. - Abstract: The flying robot is investigated for the nuclear accident and security treatment. Several mechanics are introduced for the movement of the drone. The optimized motion of the drone should cover all areas of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) over the site where the circular and surmounting motions are needed with traverse of zigzag shapes. There is the Yaw motion in the circular moving and the Pitch motion in the climbing and downing against reactor facility. The fallout is calculated from the radiation concentration in the breaking part of the NPPs where the radioactive material leaks from the containment, coolant loop, plant facility and so on. The dose equivalents are obtained where the values are changeable following the random values of the y value, average wind speed, and dispersed concentration in the detection position. The simulation of new positions of x, y, and z are normalized from 0.0 to 1.0. The mechanics of flying robot produces the multidisciplinary converged technology incorporated with the aerial radiation monitoring information.

  18. Radiological safety system based on real-time tritium-in-air monitoring in room and effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidica, N.; Sofalca, N.; Balteanu, O.; Stefan, I. [National Institute of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Ramnicu Valcea (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    The conceptual design of the radiological safety system based on real time-in-air monitoring in room and effluents is intended to provide the maximum achievable safety level, basing no the ALARA concept. the capabilities of this system are not only to inform any time personnel about tritium in air concentration level, but it will be able to: initiate the shut down procedure and drain off the plant, as well to start the Air cleaning System when the tritium-in-air concentration exceed pre-established threshold; estimate tritium effective dose rate before starting an activity into the monitored area, or during this activity, or soon as the activity was finished; estimate tritium effective dose and instantly record and update individual effective doses, using a special computer application called 'dose record'; lock access into the radiological area for individuals when tritium dose rate in the monitoring area will exceed the pre-established thresholds, or when any individual dose data provided by 'dose records' application ask for, or for other protection consideration; calculate the total tritium activity released to the environment (per day, week, or month). (N.C.)

  19. Radiological safety system based on real-time tritium-in-air monitoring in room and effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidica, N.; Sofalca, N.; Balteanu, O.; Stefan, I.

    2006-01-01

    The conceptual design of the radiological safety system based on real time-in-air monitoring in room and effluents is intended to provide the maximum achievable safety level, basing no the ALARA concept. the capabilities of this system are not only to inform any time personnel about tritium in air concentration level, but it will be able to: initiate the shut down procedure and drain off the plant, as well to start the Air cleaning System when the tritium-in-air concentration exceed pre-established threshold; estimate tritium effective dose rate before starting an activity into the monitored area, or during this activity, or soon as the activity was finished; estimate tritium effective dose and instantly record and update individual effective doses, using a special computer application called 'dose record'; lock access into the radiological area for individuals when tritium dose rate in the monitoring area will exceed the pre-established thresholds, or when any individual dose data provided by 'dose records' application ask for, or for other protection consideration; calculate the total tritium activity released to the environment (per day, week, or month). (N.C.)

  20. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: Second Quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized

  1. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary. Fourth quarter, 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Fourth Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are described

  2. Model for the elaboration of program of environmental radiological monitoring reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirements of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01 'Basic Guidelines for Radiation Protection', expressed in the section 5.14, and its application related to the emission of reports of Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program to be submitted to CNEN evaluation

  3. Annual evaluation of routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivating Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Bethel Valley Watershed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several Environmental Management (EM) facilities that are designated for deactivation and subsequent decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The Surplus Facilities Program at ORNL provides surveillance and maintenance support for these facilities as deactivation objectives are completed to reduce the risks associated with radioactive material inventories, etc. The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program has established requirements for radiological monitoring and surveying radiological conditions in these facilities. These requirements include an annual evaluation of routine radiation survey and monitoring frequencies. Radiological survey/monitoring frequencies were evaluated for two High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project facilities, the Bulk Shielding Facility and Tower Shielding Facility. Considerable progress has been made toward accomplishing deactivation objectives, thus the routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies are being reduced for 1999. This report identifies the survey/monitoring frequency adjustments and provides justification that the applicable RADCON Program requirements are also satisfied

  4. Radiological investigation in the outside area of expedition's room during radiopharmaceuticals' expedition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reina, Luiz C.; Monteiro, Ilka H.T.S.; Silva, Joao Carlos P. da; Teixeira, Danilo L.; Pedro, C.R.; Santos, J. Regis dos

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals produced in IEN - Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, are issued by the radiation protection team, which is responsible for preparing and issuing the packaged documentation required for movement in modal transportation. The documents are: Invoice , Shipper's Declaration of Radioactive Material , Shipper's Declaration of Dangerous Goods - (form IATA ) , Emergency Sheet, sketch of packed. All this documentation is inserted in an envelope of emergency. The Department of Radiological Protection is responsible for issuing such documents except the invoice that is issued by the Commercial Sector (Setcom). A employee of this sector is responsible for delivering it to the shipment sector. The preparation of packaged and documentation is performed in a room located in the building of Radiopharmaceutical Division. The vehicles which are used in the transport are parked outside this building, where are monitored after commissioning of packaged. The present study aims to evaluate potential and occupational radiation risks of people in transit or remain in the area where radioactive material circulates due to the shipment of radiopharmaceuticals for the classification of the area during the operation of dispatch

  5. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  6. Neutron area monitor with TLD pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-11-01

    The response of a passive neutron area monitor with pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The response was calculated for one TLD 600 located at the center of a polyethylene cylinder, as moderator. When neutrons collide with the moderator lose their energy reaching the TLD with thermal energies where the ambient dose equivalent is calculated. The response was calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources ranging from 1E(-9) to 20 MeV. Response was calculated using two irradiation geometries, one with an upper source and another with a lateral source. For both irradiation schemes the response was calculated with the TLDs in two positions, one parallel to the source and another perpendicular to the source. The advantage of this passive neutron monitor area is that can be used in locations with intense, pulsed and mixed radiation fields. (Author)

  7. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary - second quarter 1997 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.; Marks, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1997 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized below: All of the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during April, May, and June 1997, were performed as planned with the exception of UN-216-E-9. This site was not surveyed as stabilization activities were in progress. The sites scheduled for the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) team were switched with those identified for the third quarter as there was a conflict with vegetation management activities

  8. Radiological Conditions in Selected Areas of Southern Iraq with Residues of Depleted Uranium. Report by an International Group of Experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This publication describes the methods, assumptions and parameters used by the IAEA during the assessment of the post-conflict radiological conditions of the environment and populations in relation to the residues of depleted uranium munitions from 2003 that exist at four selected areas in southern Iraq. The studies conducted by the IAEA used the results of measurements provided by UNEP from the 2006-2007 environmental monitoring campaigns performed by the Iraqi Ministry for the Environment. It presents the data used, the results of the assessment, and the findings and conclusions in connection therewith.

  9. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Tracy A [ORNL; Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  10. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Tracy A.; Walker, Randy M.; Hill, David E.; Gross, Ian G.; Smith, Cyrus M.; Abercrombie, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies

  11. Sedation and patient monitoring in vascular and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, V G.M.; Chapman, M E; Gillespie, I [Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1993-08-01

    A postal survey of British and Irish interventional radiologists was carried out in 1991 to assess current practice with respect to sedation and monitoring of patients during angiography and interventional procedures. The response rate was 65%, 49% of patients are fasted prior to angiography and 68% prior to interventional procedures. Radiologists participate in obtaining consent in 60% of cases. Patients are often (50%) sedated for angiography and usually (62-94% depending on the procedure) sedated for interventional procedures. Nurses are present for most procedures, but are given the task of monitoring the patient's vital signs in only 49% of cases. Anaesthetists are present for less than 10% of interventional procedures. The findings indicate a wide variation in practice and a need to standardize practice at a uniform high level. (author).

  12. The radiological study of areas gastricae in chronic gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, D. I.; Jaun, W. K.; Lee, S. W.; Han, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    A chronic gastritis is common and clinically significant, but specific findings were rarely described in UGIS. And the authors attempted to clarify the area gastrica of the stomach related to the chronic gastritis. The authors reviewed 'Areae gastricae' micromucosal patterns of stomach, retrospectively with double contrast barium meal study in 16 cases, histologically proven cases of chronic gastritis by endoscopic biopsy from January 1, 1980 to June 30, 1980. Here the commonest site of chronic gastritis is evident in 12 cases in pyloric gland area, and a sixe of area gastrica shows above 2.5mm in longest diameter with combinding morphology, regular to irregular, 3 to 1 and coarse barium accumulations of intervening sulci. The chronic gastritis could be suggested with this better technique of UGIS

  13. The radiological study of areas gastricae in chronic gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, D. I.; Jaun, W. K.; Lee, S. W.; Han, C. Y. [Inje Medical College Paik Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    A chronic gastritis is common and clinically significant, but specific findings were rarely described in UGIS. And the authors attempted to clarify the area gastrica of the stomach related to the chronic gastritis. The authors reviewed 'Areae gastricae' micromucosal patterns of stomach, retrospectively with double contrast barium meal study in 16 cases, histologically proven cases of chronic gastritis by endoscopic biopsy from January 1, 1980 to June 30, 1980. Here the commonest site of chronic gastritis is evident in 12 cases in pyloric gland area, and a sixe of area gastrica shows above 2.5mm in longest diameter with combinding morphology, regular to irregular, 3 to 1 and coarse barium accumulations of intervening sulci. The chronic gastritis could be suggested with this better technique of UGIS.

  14. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2010-05-25

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. Radiological emissions at the PNNL Site result from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site would meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor and estimate offsite air emissions of radioactive materials. The result is a program that monitors the impact to the public from the PNNL Site.

  15. Recent Japanese Industrial Standards concerned with radiological monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Akira

    1983-01-01

    JIS has achieved large role to keep the quality and performance of products above certain levels and to assure the uniformity and interchangeability. The JIS in radiation field is roughly divided into that of radiation measurement and that of X-ray generators, and there were about 90 standards as of the end of March, 1983. The equipment related to radiation is large variety, small quantity products, and highly technical compound products. For the inspection and test, special instruments are required. Though some merchandise related to radiation is specified to indicate JIS marks, actually there is not anything that obtained the approval. The JIS related to radiation can be said the recommendation standards, and it is a feature that the standards of software are regarded as important. Two or three drafts of new JIS related mainly to environmental gamma-ray monitoring and X-ray equipment have been drawn up every year. Here, the JIS regarding radiation measurement, which is published after March 1, 1983, is outlined. The method of establishing JIS, JIS published or expected to be published, JIS of hardware and software, the contents of four standards, that is, environmental gamma-ray continuous monitor, method of its calibration, thermo-luminescence dosimeter and survey meter for X-ray and gamma-ray, the international standards and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Radiological environmental study in area to future anthropogenic transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinnan, T.; MIller, C.R.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this work the existent relationship is identified between the data radioecologics and the geological formations to the north area Holguin with the objective to study the possible incidence that this can have in the rate environmental dose in the event of transformations anthropogenic the place

  17. Radiological monitoring plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant: Surface Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The Y-12 Plant conducts a surface water monitoring program in response to DOE Orders and state of Tennessee requirements under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The anticipated codification of DOE Order 5400.5 for radiation protection of the public and the environment (10 CFR Part 834) will require an environmental radiation protection plan (ERPP). The NPDES permit issued by the state of Tennessee requires a radiological monitoring plan (RMP) for Y-12 Plant surface waters. In a May 4, 1995 memo, the state of Tennessee, Division of Water Pollution Control, stated their desired needs and goals regarding the content of RMPs, associated documentation, and data resulting from the RMPs required under the NPDES permitting system (L. Bunting, General Discussion, Radiological Monitoring Plans, Tennessee Division of Water Pollution Control, May 4,1995). Appendix A provides an overview of how the Y-12 Plant will begin to address these needs and goals. It provides a more complete, documented basis for the current Y-12 Plant surface water monitoring program and is intended to supplement documentation provided in the Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), NPDES reports, Groundwater Quality Assessment Reports, and studies conducted under the Y-12 Plant Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The purpose of this update to the Y-12 Plant RMP is to satisfy the requirements of the current NPDES permit, DOE Order 5400.5, and 10 CFR Part 834, as current proposed, by defining the radiological monitoring plan for surface water for the Y-12 Plant. This plan includes initial storm water monitoring and data analysis. Related activities such as sanitary sewer and sediment monitoring are also summarized. The plan discusses monitoring goals necessary to determine background concentrations of radionuclides, to quantify releases, determine trends, satisfy regulatory requirements, support consequence assessments, and meet requirements that releases be ''as low as

  18. Information support for analysing the radiological impact of areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shershakov, V.M.; Baranov, A.Yu.; Borodin, R.V.; Golubenkov, A.V.; Godko, A.M.; Kosykh, V.S.; Korenev, A.I.; Meleshkin, M.A. [SPA `Typhoon`, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-09-01

    The organisation and management of data banks generated using data from monitoring the radiological situation after the Chernobyl accident is of key importance to health care and rehabilitation in the contaminated areas. Measures following the accident were based on large scale studies involving analysis and prediction of radioactive contamination. These studies included measurements of radioactivity in air, soil and water, modelling and prediction of radionuclides transport and transformation. This required the development of a computer system RECASS (RadioEcological Analysis Support System) which is currently being developed in SPA ``Typhoon``. The main tasks of RECASS are to integrate data on existing characteristics of the environment, and data on air, soil, water and biota-contamination with numerical models that account for radionuclide behaviour in all environmental media, and with radiation dose formations that are based on geographic information system (GIS) principles. The data bank of the system includes the following data bases: a data base with measurement of radioactive contamination levels in environmental media (soil, air, water); a meteorological data base; and a data base with administrative and demographic data. A set of models for radionuclide transfer in various environments incorporated in the chain permits short or long-term predictions to be made. The results of implementing RECASS to reconstruct the time and space picture of contamination in the first days after the Chernobyl accident are presented. (Author).

  19. Informatics support for analysing the radiological impact of areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shershakov, V.M.; Baranov, A.Yu.; Borodin, R.V.; Golubenkov, A.V.; Godko, A.M.; Kosykh, V.S.; Korenev, A.I.; Meleshkin, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The organisation and management of data banks generated using data from monitoring the radiological situation after the Chernobyl accident is of key importance to health care and rehabilitation in the contaminated areas. Measures following the accident were based on large scale studies involving analysis and prediction of radioactive contamination. These studies included measurements of radioactivity in air, soil and water, modelling and prediction of radionuclides transport and transformation. This required the development of a computer system RECASS (RadioEcological Analysis Support System) which is currently being developed in SPA ''Typhoon''. The main tasks of RECASS are to integrate data on existing characteristics of the environment, and data on air, soil, water and biota-contamination with numerical models that account for radionuclide behaviour in all environmental media and with radiation dose formations that are based on geographic information system (GIS) principles. The data bank of the system includes the following databases: a data base with measurement of radioactive contamination levels in environmental media (soil, air, water); a meteorological data base; and a data base with administrative and demographic data. A set of models for radionuclide transfer in various environments incorporated in the chain permits short or long-term predictions to be made. The results of implementing RECASS to reconstruct the time and space picture of contamination in the first days after the Chernobyl accident are presented. (Author)

  20. Information support for analysing the radiological impact of areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shershakov, V.M.; Baranov, A.Yu.; Borodin, R.V.; Golubenkov, A.V.; Godko, A.M.; Kosykh, V.S.; Korenev, A.I.; Meleshkin, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The organisation and management of data banks generated using data from monitoring the radiological situation after the Chernobyl accident is of key importance to health care and rehabilitation in the contaminated areas. Measures following the accident were based on large scale studies involving analysis and prediction of radioactive contamination. These studies included measurements of radioactivity in air, soil and water, modelling and prediction of radionuclides transport and transformation. This required the development of a computer system RECASS (RadioEcological Analysis Support System) which is currently being developed in SPA ''Typhoon''. The main tasks of RECASS are to integrate data on existing characteristics of the environment, and data on air, soil, water and biota-contamination with numerical models that account for radionuclide behaviour in all environmental media, and with radiation dose formations that are based on geographic information system (GIS) principles. The data bank of the system includes the following data bases: a data base with measurement of radioactive contamination levels in environmental media (soil, air, water); a meteorological data base; and a data base with administrative and demographic data. A set of models for radionuclide transfer in various environments incorporated in the chain permits short or long-term predictions to be made. The results of implementing RECASS to reconstruct the time and space picture of contamination in the first days after the Chernobyl accident are presented. (Author)

  1. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Richland Campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Sandra F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moleta, Donna Grace L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meier, Kirsten M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Barnett, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-12-31

    This is the second revision of the DQO Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland Campus. In January 2017, the PNNL Richland Campus expanded to the north by 0.35 km2 (85.6 acres). Under the requirements of Washington State Department of Health Radioactive Air Emissions License (RAEL)-005, the PNNL Campus operates and maintains a radiological air monitoring program. This revision documents and evaluates the newly acquired acreage while also removing recreational land at the southwest, and also re-examines all active radioactive emission units on the PNNL Campus. No buildings are located on this new Campus land, which was transferred from the U.S. DOE Hanford Site. Additionally, this revision includes information regarding the background monitoring station PNL-5 in Benton City, Washington, which became active in October 2016. The key purpose of this revision is to determine the adequacy of the existing environmental surveillance stations to monitor radiological air emissions in light of this northern boundary change.

  2. Technological and operational structure of the National Automatic Network for Environmental Radiological Monitoring (RENAMORA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez G, E.; Lopez G, M.; Aguirre G, J.; Fabian O, R.; Hernandez A, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) in Mexico is a decentralized body, under the Secretaria de Energia whose main mission is to ensure that activities involving nuclear and radioactive materials as well as ionizing radiation sources are carried out with maximum security, considering the current technological developments. In order to monitor the levels of environmental radiation to which the population is exposed, the CNSNS has established a series of radiological monitoring programs that allow characterize the environmental radiation levels in each zone or region in the country; to identify the occurrence of natural or artificial radiological events, such as nuclear tests and accidents in radioactive or nuclear facilities. The National Automatic Network for Environmental Radiological Monitoring (RENAMORA) project was initiated with the support of the IAEA through MEX9/049 project and its purpose is to have a network of instruments that automatically and in real time, transmit information of the gamma radiological environmental status of the national territory and changes occurring in it. This network provides data such as the speed of ambient dose equivalent, temperature and humidity in different regions of the country. The network is composed of 92 stations that are distributed throughout the national territory. The structure of the stations has evolved since its inception, now allowing detection tasks, data transmission and managing them remotely from the main server, which is located in the CNSNS, which is performed a statistical dose for each monitoring station. Each monitoring station is formed in its current structure by a probe detection of gamma radiation, a communication module and associated electronics, a mini Web server DataGATE, a cellular modem and an interface converter. (Author)

  3. An aerial radiological survey of the southwest drainage basin area of the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1994-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 106-square-mile area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), formerly the Savannah River Plant. The survey was conducted from August 24 through September 8, 1988, to collect baseline radiological data over the area. Both natural and man-made gamma emitting radionuclides were detected in the area. The detected man-made sources were confined to creeks, branches, and SRS facilities in the surveyed area and were a result of SRS operations. Naturally-occurring radiation levels were consistent with those levels detected in adjacent areas during previous surveys. The annual dose levels were within the range of levels found throughout the United States

  4. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Nevada Test Site - Area 10 Corrective Action Unit 367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2010-01-01

    A series of aerial radiological surveys were conducted over the Sedan, Uncle, and Ess ground zero areas in Area 10. The surveys were performed in November 2009 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the ground zeros. Gross Counts, inferred exposure rates, man-made activity, and Americium-241 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed areas. In addition, spectral products are included that identify Cesium-137, Americium-241 and Cobalt-60 as the primary radionuclides present within the survey area.

  5. Data Management and Tools for the Access to the Radiological Areas at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Corral Mena, E; Dorsival, A; Dumont, G; Foraz, K; Hakulinen, T; Havart, F; Kepinski, M P; Mallon Amerigo, S; Martel, P; Ninin, P; Nunes, R; Valentini, F; Vollaire, J

    2014-01-01

    As part of the refurbishment of the PS accelerator complex Personnel Protection System, the Radiation Protection (RP) checkpoints and buffer zones, for the radiological controls of equipment removed from the beam areas, have been incorporated into the design of the new access points.

  6. Radiological protection principles concerning the safeguard, use or release of contaminated materials, buildings, areas or dumps from uranium mining. Recommendations of the Commission on Radiological Protection with explanations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Neumann, M.

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents the full texts of the SSK Recommendations addressing the aspects and problems involved, and which can be separately retrieved from the database: 1) Radiological protection principles concerning the release of scrap from the shut-down of uranium mining plants; 2) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for industrial use of areas contaminated from uranium mining; 3) Radiological protection principles concerning the use for forest and agricultural purposes and as public gardens (parks) and residential areas of areas contaminated from uranium mining; 4) Radiological protection principles concerning the safeguard and use of mine dumps; 5) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for further commercial or industrial use of buildings used for commercial or industrial purposes and the disposal of building debris from uranium mining and milling; 6) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for general use of reusable equipment and installations from uranium mining. The following appendices round up the material: 1) Radiation exposure from mining in Saxony and Thuringia and its evaluation (Summary of the results of consultations during the 1990 closed meeting); 2) Radiological protection principles for the limitation of the radiation exposure of the public to radon and its daughters; 3) Epidemiological studies on the health state of the inhabitants of the mining region and the miners in Saxony and Thuringia. (orig.) [de

  7. An aerial radiological survey of the Trinity Fallout Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    An aerial gamma survey was conducted during May and June of 1992 to define the Trinity fallout field, which lies primarily in the White Sands Missile Range in the state of New Mexico. The field was mapped almost entirely from the gamma ray emissions of cesium-137 ( 137 Cs), a fission product. The field, as measured, extends from Trinity ground zero, over the Oscura Mountains, across the Chupadera Mesa, and thence past Cedarvale, New Mexico, a distance of more than 100 kilometers. An estimate of 137 Cs activity inventory is 100 Ci in an area covering 1,400 square kilometers. Another isotope, europium-152, is significant at ground zero. A 137 Cs concentration contour plot overlaid on a U.S. Geological Survey map indicates the location and intensity of the fallout field. A contour map of terrestrial exposure rate is presented in a similar fashion

  8. Technical basis for removal of 221-T tunnel from airborne radiological area status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geuther, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides the technical basis for removal of the 221-T Tunnel from airborne radiological control. T Plant Radiological Control has evaluated air sampling data and engineering controls, and determined the necessary administrative controls to make this transition. With these administrative controls (specified within document) in place, the tunnel can be removed from Airborne Radioactive Area status. The removal of the tunnel from airborne status will allow work to be performed within the tunnel under controlled conditions, as outlined in this technical basis, without the use of respiratory protection equipment

  9. Online dose rate monitoring: Better information by using the IRMA concept (Integral Radiological Multidetector Arrays)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genrich, V.

    1989-01-01

    A new GM detector system has been developed for online environmental monitoring. The approach is unorthodox, but simple: A) Take a set of radiological probes and feed all their information to an 'intelligent' front-end. B) Elaborate some algorithms, so that the system will give out just one gamma dose rate (running over more than nine decades). C) If necessary, associate some additional sensors, and the system will exhibit better discriminating qualities for the detection of artificial nuclides in the environment. (orig.)

  10. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume is a study guide for training Radiological Control Technicians. Provided herein are support materials for learning radiological documentation, communication systems, counting errors and statistics, dosimetry, contamination control, airborne sampling program methods, respiratory protection, radiological source control, environmental monitoring, access control and work area setup, radiological work coverage, shipment and receipt for radioactive material, radiological incidents and emergencies, personnel decontamination, first aid, radiation survey instrumentation, contamination monitoring, air sampling, and counting room equipment

  11. Unmanned airborne system in real-time radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafrir, H.; Pernick, A.; Yaffe, U.; Grushka, A.

    1993-01-01

    The unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) platform, equipped with an appropriate payload and capable of carrying a variety of modular sensors, is an effective tool for real-time control of environmental disasters of different types (e.g. nuclear or chemical accidents). The suggested payloads consist of a miniaturised self-collimating nuclear spectrometry sensor and electro-optical sensors for day and night imagery. The system provides means of both real-time field data acquisition in an endangered environment and on-line hazard assessment computation from the down link raw data. All the processing, including flight planning using an expert system, is performed by a dedicated microcomputer located in a Mobile Ground Control Station (MGCS) situated outside the hazardous area. The UAV equipment is part of a system designed especially for the critically important early phase of emergency response. Decisions by the Emergency Response Manager (ERM) are also based on the ability to estimate the potential dose to individuals and the mitigation of dose when protection measures are implemented. (author)

  12. Request for information about radiological risks in the health area. A cross-cultural study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prades, A. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Arias, R. [Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Arranz, L. [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Macias, M.T. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-05-01

    This paper will present some of the key findings of a comparative Latin-American study on radiological risk perception in the health area. The project used a survey method to examine the social demands for information about radiological risks with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The following topics will be analysed: 1) The role of information as a means for feeling safe; 2) who should inform the public on radiological risks; and 3) what type of information the public would like to receive. A questionnaire was distributed to outpatient samples from ten countries: Argentine, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Uruguay, and Spain, thanks to the collaboration of the different National Radioprotection Societies of the above mentionned countries, and of other concerned professionals (in case they didn't had any association at the time). Correspondence analysis and other techniques of optimal scaling will be used. The paper will discuss the main cross-cultural differences with regard to social demand for information about radiological risks. Our findings may have relevant implications for radiological risks communication programs. (author)

  13. Request for information about radiological risks in the health area. A cross-cultural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prades, A.; Martinez-Arias, R.; Arranz, L.; Macias, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper will present some of the key findings of a comparative Latin-American study on radiological risk perception in the health area. The project used a survey method to examine the social demands for information about radiological risks with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The following topics will be analysed: 1) The role of information as a means for feeling safe; 2) who should inform the public on radiological risks; and 3) what type of information the public would like to receive. A questionnaire was distributed to outpatient samples from ten countries: Argentine, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Uruguay, and Spain, thanks to the collaboration of the different National Radioprotection Societies of the above mentionned countries, and of other concerned professionals (in case they didn't had any association at the time). Correspondence analysis and other techniques of optimal scaling will be used. The paper will discuss the main cross-cultural differences with regard to social demand for information about radiological risks. Our findings may have relevant implications for radiological risks communication programs. (author)

  14. Radiation area monitoring by wireless-communicating area monitor with surveillance camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Mitsuo; Kobayashi, Hiromitsu; Kitahara, Hideki; Kobayashi, Hironobu; Okamoto, Shinji

    2004-01-01

    Aiming at a dose reduction and a work efficiency improvement for nuclear power plants that have high dose regions, we have developed our system of wireless-communicating Area Monitor with Surveillance Camera, and have performed an on-site test. Now we are implementing this Area Monitor with Surveillance Camera for a use as a TV camera in the controlled-area, which enables a personal computer to simultaneously display two or more dose values and site live images on the screen. For the radiation detector of this Area Monitor System, our wireless-communicating dosimeter is utilized. Image data are transmitted via a wireless Local Area Network (LAN). As a test result, image transmission of a maximum of 20 frames per second has been realized, which shows that this concept is a practical application. Remote-site monitoring also has been realized from an office desk located within the non-controlled area, adopting a Japan's wireless phone system, PHS (Personal Handy Phone) for the transmission interface. (author)

  15. Environment radiological monitoring by JNC related to the JCO criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    Concerning the criticality accident at JCO Co., Ltd. (JCO) which occurred at 10:35 on 30th Sep. 1999, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) established ''JNC's task force'' at 12:35 on the same data in conjunction with Head Office and Tokai Works. JNC's task force had collaborated on environmental radiological monitoring with the government of Japan and the local governments. This report compiles the results of the environmental monitoring performed by JNC's task force based on the request from the government of Japan and the local governments. (author)

  16. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center advanced part phase response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, B.

    1997-01-01

    Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response actions are carried out in Advance Party and Main Party phases of deployment. Response activities are initiated by a FRMAC Home Team prior to and during Advance Party deployment, with Home Team support continuing until the FRMAC Main Party is fully deployed. Upon arrival at the incident scene, the Advance Party establishes communications with other federal, state, and local response organizations, Following an Advance Party Meeting with these response organizations, FRMAC begins formulation of an initial monitoring and sampling plan, in coordination with the jurisdictional state and the Lead Federal Agency, and initiates detailed logistical arrangements for Main Party deployment and operations

  17. Vehicle tracking based technique for radiation monitoring during nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saindane, Shashank S.; Otari, Anil D.; Suri, M.M.K.; Patil, S.S.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC has developed an advanced online radiation measurement cum vehicle tracking system for use. For the preparedness for response to any nuclear/radiological emergency scenario which may occur anywhere, the system designed is a Global System for Mobile (GSM) based Radiation Monitoring System (GRaMS) along with a Global Positioning System (GPS). It uses an energy compensated GM detector for radiation monitoring and is attached with commercially available Global Positioning System (GPS) for online acquisition of positional coordinates with time, and GSM modem for online data transfer to a remote control centre. The equipment can be operated continuously while the vehicle is moving

  18. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  19. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods

  20. Transition in occupational radiation exposure monitoring methods in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennroth, N.; Hirvonen-Kari, M.; Timonen, M.; Savolainen, S.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposure monitoring is a traditional keystone of occupational radiation safety measures in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to review the data on occupational exposures in a large central university hospital radiology organisation and propose changes in the radiation worker categories and methods of exposure monitoring. An additional objective was to evaluate the development of electronic personal dosimeters and their potential in the digitised radiology environment. The personal equivalent dose of 267 radiation workers (116 radiologists and 151 radiographers) was monitored using personal dosimeters during the years 2006-2010. Accumulated exposure monitoring results exceeding the registration threshold were observed in the personal dosimeters of 73 workers (59 radiologists' doses ranged from 0.1 to 45.1 mSv; 14 radiographers' doses ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mSv). The accumulated personal equivalent doses are generally very small, only a few angiography radiologists have doses >10 mSv per 5 y. The typical effective doses are -1 and the highest value was 0.3 mSv (single interventional radiologist). A revised categorisation of radiation workers based on the working profile of the radiologist and observed accumulated doses is justified. Occupational monitoring can be implemented mostly with group dosimeters. An active real-time dosimetry system is warranted to support radiation protection strategy where optimisation aspects, including improving working methods, are essential. (authors)

  1. IRSN's monitoring strategy for former uranium mining sites: regional radiological report approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audrey, L.L.; Marie-Odile, G.; Damien, T. [Institut de radioportection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN (France)

    2014-07-01

    Radiological monitoring of the environment in France was one of the basic missions assigned to the IRSN upon its creation. It is performed regularly through measurement and sampling networks across France, particularly around nuclear facilities. To supplement this system and increase its effectiveness and utility, IRSN recently began issuing regional baseline reference states using radiological reporting. Application of this reporting is currently underway in regions where uranium was mined. The Dordogne river basin is one of twenty basins impacted by uranium mining. Covering some twenty sites, it was selected by IRSN for its initial mining reporting. The objective is to gain detailed knowledge of the distribution of natural radioactivity related to the presence of uranium and its radioactive decay products, including radium, in mining areas and the river basin in general. This knowledge will supplement data already available as part of AREVA's regulatory site reporting, and provide access to a baseline reference state for radioactivity in the environment at local and regional levels. Since the impact of former uranium mining sites is basically tied to water circulation, sampling projects are designed based on the drainage system. Samples are taken of water, sediment and biological indicators such as fish and aquatic plants. Samples are then analysed to determine uranium, radium and polonium concentration. An initial sampling campaign took place in October 2012. It involved an initial contact with local organisations (Regional Directorate for the Environment, Town and Country Planning and Housing (DREAL), local information and oversight committee (Clis), regional public watershed board (EPIDOR), water agencies, mayors, hunting clubs, fishing federation, farmers, etc.). It will be supplemented by a second sampling campaign in late spring 2013 designed to take into account any local issues, including those associated with local water usage (irrigation, livestock

  2. Endoscopy versus radiology in post-procedural monitoring after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, Jan Friso; Berliner, Christoph; Rösch, Thomas; von Renteln, Daniel; Noder, Tania; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Ittrich, Harald; Kersten, Jan F; Adam, Gerhard; Werner, Yuki B

    2018-03-15

    The newly developed technique of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been shown to be effective in several short- and mid-term studies. Limited information is available about the adequacy of immediate post-POEM monitoring tests. POEM was performed under general anesthesia in 228 patients (59.6% male, mean age 45.6 ± 15.5 years). Post-procedural checks comprised clinical and laboratory examination, and, during post-procedure days 1-5, endoscopy and-in the first 114 cases-radiologic examination using water-soluble contrast (1st group); the remaining patients underwent post-procedure controls without radiology (2nd group). Main outcome was value of endoscopic compared to radiologic control for recognition of early adverse events. In the first group, routine fluoroscopic contrast swallow suggested minor leakages at the mucosal entry site in two cases which was confirmed endoscopically in only one. Endoscopy revealed two minor entry site leakages and, in six additional cases, dislocated clips without leakage (overall 5.3%). All eight patients underwent reclipping and healed without clinical sequelae. In the 2nd group, endoscopy showed 5 clip dislocations (all reclipped) and one ischemic cardiac perforation in a patient with clinical deterioration on post-POEM day 1 who had to undergo surgery after confirmation of leakage by CT. Radiologic monitoring (contrast swallow) after POEM is not useful and can be omitted. Even routine endoscopic monitoring for detection and closure of minor defects of the mucosal entry site yields limited information with regards to final outcome; major complications are very rare and probably associated with clinical deterioration. Clinical Trials Gov Registration number of the main study: NCT01405417.

  3. A comparison of four aerial radiological surveys of Par Pond and the surrounding area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1993-09-01

    A series of gamma radiation surveys was conducted over Par Pond at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in August 1993, October 1991, and August 1992 as part of an effort to monitor the radiological changes around Par Pond as its water level was lowered. The results of an April 1989 survey, which was about one-half the area of those surveys listed above, were used as baseline data for the comparison. Gamma energy spectrum analysis revealed that the only man-made gamma ray emitter detected during the four surveys in the Par Pond area was cesium-137. The comparisons revealed that: (1) significant change in the radiological environment occurred along the Par Pond shoreline as the water levels were lowered, (2) the activity in Lower Three Runs Creek varied slightly as the level/flow rate changed during the pumping process, (3) minor changes occurred in areas adjacent to the Par Pond, and (4) little or no change occurred between surveys in the spatial distribution or kind of sources detected. All changes were directly related to the moisture variations (Par Pond water lowering, rainfall, waterway flow rates) between the survey periods. The distribution, kind, and activity of sources detected beyond the pond bed were consistent between surveys. 60 figs., 14 tabs

  4. Evaluation of the radiological situation of the remedied areas - 30 years after the radiological accident with Cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, R. da S.; Santos, E.E. dos; Barbosa, R.C.; Borges, A.F. de Almeida; Costa, H.F.; Pimenta, L.

    2017-01-01

    In September 1987, the radiation accident resulting from the removal and dismantling of a sealed source containing Cesium-137 chloride happened in Goiânia, GO, Brazil. Due to its high solubility and the weather conditions of the time, there were dispersion in the environment around seven main concentrations, located in the central region. This study aimed to present the evaluation of the radiological situation of the remedied areas - 30 years after the radiation accident with cesium-137. The three main focuses were studied, being the plot of land at the 57 street, Scrap Metal I and II. Radiometric surveys were performed using a SPP2 detector, 10 cm from the floor to evaluate the integrity of the concrete and 1 m from the soil, using the IDENTIFIDER detector model NG + , to compare with the values of background radiation. A 2 x 2m pre-fixed sampling loop was used. In the plot of land at the 57 street, measurements were made at 154 points, at 10 cm from the floor, at a mean of 150 ± 121 cps, while at 1 m from the soil, the average was 0.19 ± 0.10 μSv / h. In the Scrap Metal I were 262 measurements and the average at 10 cm of the floor was 147 ± 113 cps and the 1 meter of the soil was of 0.18 ± 0.12 μSv / h. In Scrap Metal II the average of the 66 measurements carried out at 10 cm was 117 ± 58 cps and at 1 meter it was 0.13 ± 0.03 μSv / h. Currently the radiological situation of the lots, are below the limits established by the norms of CNEN

  5. The radiological monitoring protocol for metallic products and cleared scrap management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Lopez, E.

    2003-01-01

    Event though the use of nuclear and radiological techniques is subject to strict controls in most countries, the presence of radioactive material in batches of metallic scrap has been detected with relative frequency in the last few years. This circumstance has motivated the implementation of a series of national and international initiatives aimed at detecting and preventing this type of events, whether they be intentional or involuntary. The Spanish iron and steel industry is one of the country's most important industrial sectors, and to a great extent it depends on the importation of a very significant amount of metallic scrap that it uses as raw material. Experience has shown that countries that import large amounts of scrap, apart from supporting the mentioned international initiatives, should complement them with other national initiatives to reduce the risks resulting from the presence of radioactive material in scrap. In this context, the Spanish authorities, together with trade unions and entrepreneurial associations in the metal reclamations and smelting sectors and ENRESA, have signed a voluntary Protocol that defines and implements a national radiological monitoring and control system for scrap materials and their byproducts. The Protocol defines the obligations and rights of the signatories, and it describes the monitoring and control system and its legal bases, the operation of both specific and other general-purpose radiological monitoring equipment that existed prior to this initiative, the development of radiological training and dissemination plans for professionals in the metal reclamation and smelting sectors, the establishment of effective systems for the safe management of any radioactive materials detected, and the general improvement of the national response system in the event of radiological emergencies. Since the Protocol took effect in November 1999, more than 100 enterprises from the metallurgical (steel, copper, lead and aluminum

  6. Individual radiological monitoring for exposed personnel of Nuclear Fuel Plant at Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivana, T.; Epure, Gh.

    2010-01-01

    In the activity of nuclear fuel fabrication of CANDU type, based on natural and depleted uranium, individual radiological monitoring of the personnel exposed to ionizing radiation is very carefully approached. For Nuclear Fuel Plant (NFP) facility, where uranium appears in bulk and itemized form, measures for individual radiological monitoring are established by Radiological Safety Manual (MSR) in accordance with national and international legislation. All NFP employees are classified in either category A or category B of exposure to ionizing radiation. The classification is a function of type of activity and magnitude of exposure. All the exposed personnel are monitored for external doses (from gamma radiation) by measuring the equivalent dose H p (10) with monthly frequency. The system used for external individual dosimetric monitoring is based on the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) of PANASONIC type UD813AS14. The NFP incorporates an in-house dosimetric laboratory notified by Romanian regulatory body CNCAN (National Commission for Control of Nuclear Activities). The workers handling nuclear materials are exposed to internal intake of uranium, mainly by inhalation. For internal doses monitoring is included part of exposed employees working directly with radioactive open sources (pulverulent or liquid nuclear materials), UO 2 sinterable powder, green pellets, sintered pellets, scrap and radioactive effluents. The estimation of internal exposure is made quarterly using the results from radioactive airborne monitors operating in the working places. The internal dose of each person exposed to open sources is calculated taking into account the rate of breathing, the time spent at the work place and the dose-activity coefficient (variable function of uranium absorption rate). The total effective individual dose is obtained by summing the external dose and internal dose (E=E ext +E int ). For conformity, the total effective individual dose (E) is compared with dose

  7. Radiation area monitor device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencelj, Matjaz; Stowe, Ashley C.; Petrovic, Toni; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Kosicek, Andrej

    2018-01-30

    A radiation area monitor device/method, utilizing: a radiation sensor; a rotating radiation shield disposed about the radiation sensor, wherein the rotating radiation shield defines one or more ports that are transparent to radiation; and a processor operable for analyzing and storing a radiation fingerprint acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor. Optionally, the radiation sensor includes a gamma and/or neutron radiation sensor. The device/method selectively operates in: a first supervised mode during which a baseline radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor; and a second unsupervised mode during which a subsequent radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor, wherein the subsequent radiation fingerprint is compared to the baseline radiation fingerprint and, if a predetermined difference threshold is exceeded, an alert is issued.

  8. Aerial radiological survey of the Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant and surrounding area, Dothan, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, T.C.; Shipman, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed during the period 8 to 19 December 1979 over a 2000 square kilometer area centered on the two unit Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant near Dothan, Alabama. Radiological data were collected by flying north-south lines spaced 900 meters apart at an altitude of 150 meters above ground level. Processed data showed that all gamma rays detected within the survey area were those expected from naturally occurring radionuclides. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground and are presented in the form of a radiation contour map. The observed exposure rates were between 4 and 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), with most of the area ranging between 4 and 10 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 4.0 μR/h but do not include any contribution from airborne radionuclides, i.e., radon. Exposure rates obtained from ground measurements taken within the survey area were in close agreement with the aerial data. The data were also in close agreement with those obtained from a similar survey conducted during March 1977. Comparison of the results from both surveys indicated that no detectable change in the radiological characteristics of the survey area has occurred due to the operation of unit number 1 during the intervening period. The same equipment and procedures were utilized for both surveys

  9. Present state and problems of radiological protection monitoring for high energy electron accelerator facilities in SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Yukihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Ueda, Hisao

    1998-09-01

    The present state and problems of the radiological protection monitoring for the high-energy electron accelerator are summarized. In the radiological protection monitoring for SPring-8, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility, there are many problems specific to the high-energy electron accelerator. This report describes the monitoring technique of pulsed radiation, high-energy radiation and low-energy radiation, and their problems. The management of induced radioactivity and the effects of electro-magnetic noise to monitoring instruments are also discussed. (author)

  10. Planning for exercises of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, M.V.

    1985-11-01

    This report is to be used in planning radiological emergency exercises to test the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Plan (FRMAP). Although developed for this specific purpose, the document also contains material that may be useful for planning other types of exercises. This report describes the types of exercises that might be used, the steps in planning and conducting the exercises, and the special considerations required for exercises to test the FRMAP. FRMAP exercises typically involve several federal and state agencies. General and specific objectives that could guide these exercises, as well as the possible activities of all the participants - players, controllers, and evaluators - are discussed. The resources that each participating federal agency might provide during an exercise are listed

  11. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo; Park, Won Pyo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2002. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  12. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Z. K.; Oh, S. H. [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 1997. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  13. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo; Park, Won Pyo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2001. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  14. Radioactivity in the environment. A summary and radiological assessment of the Environment Ageny's monitoring programmes. Report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    authorisations except for the presence of aerosol canisters in waste from both sites and a small quantity of free liquid in the Amersham waste. Environment monitoring: Instrumental surveys of radiation levels and laboratory analyses of samples collected mainly within the vicinity of nuclear sites are carried out. The results are used to assess the exposure of members of the public to radiation from non-food pathways, such as might arise from the occupation of beaches, river banks and inter-tidal areas. (MAFF undertake monitoring of radioactivity in foodstuffs.) Radiological assessment of the results confirmed that exposures remained similar to those in previous years and in all cases were substantially less than the dose limit of 1 milliSievert per year. As in previous years elevated levels of tritium were observed in leachates from a number of landfill sites. Although higher than expected the elevated levels do not pose a radiological hazard. Radioactivity in air and rainwater: This routine monitoring programme has been carried out for many years to provide information on radioactivity in air and deposited in rainwater. Airborne dust and rainwater were sampled continuously at locations throughout the UK. The concentrations in air of beryllium-7, a naturally occurring radionuclide formed by cosmic rays in the upper atmosphere, caesium-137, plutonium 239+240 and americium-241 were very low and similar to results recorded since 1990. Caesium-137 was undetectable in rainwater, and the concentration of tritium, plutonium 239+240 and americium-241 were at low levels, as expected. Radioactivity in drinking water sources: This routine monitoring programme has also been carried out for many years. Samples of water were provided by the water companies from 32 sources comprising reservoirs, rivers and groundwater boreholes providing drinking water to over 10 million people. The results show that all the monitored sources are generally below the World Health Organisation's (WHO) guideline

  15. Radiation risk assessment in professionals working in dental radiology area using buccal micronucleus cytome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatullah, Syed; Dawasaz, Ali Azhar; Luqman, Master; Assiry, Ali A; Almeshari, Ahmed A; Togoo, Rafi Ahmad

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of micronuclei (MN) in buccal mucosal cells of professionals working in radiology area to determine the risk of stochastic effects of radiation. All the professionals and students working in King Khalid University - College of Dentistry radiology area were included in the Risk Group (RG = 27). The Control Group (CG = 27) comprised of healthy individual matching the gender and age of the RG. Buccal mucosal scraping from all the 54 subjects of RG and CG were stained with Papanicolaou stain and observed under oil immersion lens (×100) for the presence of micronuclei (MN) in the exfoliated epithelial cells. There was no significant difference between the incidence of MN in RG and CG (p = >0.05) using t-test. Routine radiation protection protocol does minimize the risk of radiation induced cytotoxicity, however, screening of professionals should be carried out at regular intervals.

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and surrounding area, Batavia, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1990-11-01

    An aerial radiological gamma survey was conducted over the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1 through 6 June 1989. Flight lines at 150-foot altitude and 250-foot line spacings assured nearly 100% coverage. The terrestrial exposure at about 6 μR/h was nearly the same as that measured by the previous survey of this area (May 1977). Ten anomalous areas, mostly Na-22 and Mn-54, were detected within buildings and laboratories in the area. Although these locations have changed somewhat from the 1977 survey, the aerial data shows good agreement with the ground-based ion chamber and soil sample data. 7 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  17. Aerial radiological survey of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and surrounding area, San Clemente, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, L.K.

    1980-12-01

    An airborne radiological survey of an 11 km 2 area surrounding the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station was made 9 to 17 January 1980. Count rates observed at 60 m altitude were converted to exposure rates at 1 m above the ground and are presented in the form of an isopleth map. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from normal background emitters, except directly over the plant

  18. Aerial radiological survey of the Industrial Reactor Laboratory and surrounding area Plainsboro, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    An airborne radiological survey of a 6 km 2 area centered over the Industrial Reactor Laboratory was made 25-27 July 1979. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from normal background emitters, except at two locations described in this report. Count rates observed at 46 m altitude were converted to exposure rates at 1 m above the ground and are presented in the form of an isopleth map

  19. NCRP Program Area Committee 3: Nuclear and Radiological Security and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tammy P; Buddemeier, Brooke

    2016-02-01

    Program Area Committee (PAC) 3 provides guidance and recommendations for response to nuclear and radiological incidents of both an accidental and deliberate nature. Leadership of PAC 3 was transitioned in March 2015, and the newly composed PAC has been working to delineate and then prioritize the landscape of possible activities for PAC 3. The major activity of PAC 3 during the past year was the establishment of Scientific Committee 3-1 to begin producing a report on Guidance for Emergency Responder Dosimetry.

  20. Assessment of radiological profile of Mumbai - Kota rail route using mobile monitoring methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saindane, Shashank S.; Anoj Kumar; Narsaiah, M.V.R.; Mishra, A.K.; Solase, Sachin; Murali, S.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological mapping is useful for updates on the trend of the radiation level at various locations/routes. As a part of this, the radiation mapping of Mumbai - Kota rail route (∼ 1230 km) was carried out by using various state of the art monitoring systems/instruments to record the radiation level both on online and offline modes. The state of the art monitoring systems/instruments such as Compact Radiation monitoring system, Gamma Tracer, Field Spec and portable spectrometer equipped with Global Positioning System were installed inside the train compartment. The dose rate data were noted manually also at various stations using highly sensitive portable instruments like Micro R (μR) survey meter, Field spec, Personal Radiation Detector (PRD) etc. With the help of portable spectrometer, spectral data were continuously collected along the route

  1. Radiological monitoring plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant: Surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit TN0002968, issued April 28, 1995, requires that the Y-12 Plant Radiological Monitoring Plan for surface water be modified (Part 111-H). These modifications shall consist of expanding the plan to include storm water monitoring and an assessment of alpha, beta, and gamma emitters. In addition, a meeting was held with personnel from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on May 4, 1995. In this meeting, TDEC personnel provided guidance to Y-12 Plant personnel in regard to the contents of the modified plan. This report contains a revised plan incorporating the permit requirements and guidance provided by TDEC personnel. In addition, modifications were made to address future requirements of the new regulation for radiation protection of the public and the environment in regards to surface water monitoring

  2. Radiological and chemical characterization report for the planned Quarry Construction Staging Area and Water Treatment Plant: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The Quarry Construction Staging Area and Water Treatment Plant (QCSA) will be used in the support of the bulk waste removal of the Weldon Spring Quarry. Radiological and chemical characterization was performed on a 12 acre site where the QCSA will be constructed. The characterization revealed approximately .5 acres of radiologically contaminated land. No chemical contamination was found. 8 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  3. Overview of environmental radiological monitoring program of Institute of Radiation Protection And Dosimetry - IRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Sarah Barreto Oliveira de Christo; Peres, Sueli da Silva, E-mail: suelip@ird.gov.br, E-mail: sarah.barreto1@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radioproteção

    2017-07-01

    As a branch of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) performs extensive activities in the fields of radiation protection, metrology, and dosimetry, as well as specific education, onto a wide operational scope that includes the technical support to national regulatory authorities in the licensing process for nationwide nuclear and radioactive facilities. IRD has several laboratories where are performed radiometric and radiochemical analyses and others radioactivity evaluation procedures in different types of samples obtained in the inspection activities, production of radioactivity metrological standards and reference material by National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI), besides others research activities. In this laboratories can be used sealed or unsealed radioactive sources and radiation-producing devices and are classified with radioactive installations in accordance to national regulations. This way, radioactive liquid effluents can be eventually produced and released into the environment in the course of such activities and an effluent monitoring program to control and reduce the releases to environment is carried out. Additionally, IRD maintains the Radioactive Waste Management Program and Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program (ERMP) in accordance to national regulations requirements. The primary focus of ERMP comprises the validation of the dose prognostics for the public members due to effluents discharge and the provision of consistent projections of the radiation levels at the monitoring sites. In this study, a long term ERMP data survey is discussed, spanning the last thirteen years of activities. On the basis of such discussions and prognostics, it could be observed that the radiological environmental radiological impact due to operation of IRD installations is negligible. (author)

  4. Overview of environmental radiological monitoring program of Institute of Radiation Protection And Dosimetry - IRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Sarah Barreto Oliveira de Christo; Peres, Sueli da Silva

    2017-01-01

    As a branch of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) performs extensive activities in the fields of radiation protection, metrology, and dosimetry, as well as specific education, onto a wide operational scope that includes the technical support to national regulatory authorities in the licensing process for nationwide nuclear and radioactive facilities. IRD has several laboratories where are performed radiometric and radiochemical analyses and others radioactivity evaluation procedures in different types of samples obtained in the inspection activities, production of radioactivity metrological standards and reference material by National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI), besides others research activities. In this laboratories can be used sealed or unsealed radioactive sources and radiation-producing devices and are classified with radioactive installations in accordance to national regulations. This way, radioactive liquid effluents can be eventually produced and released into the environment in the course of such activities and an effluent monitoring program to control and reduce the releases to environment is carried out. Additionally, IRD maintains the Radioactive Waste Management Program and Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program (ERMP) in accordance to national regulations requirements. The primary focus of ERMP comprises the validation of the dose prognostics for the public members due to effluents discharge and the provision of consistent projections of the radiation levels at the monitoring sites. In this study, a long term ERMP data survey is discussed, spanning the last thirteen years of activities. On the basis of such discussions and prognostics, it could be observed that the radiological environmental radiological impact due to operation of IRD installations is negligible. (author)

  5. LAMPF experimental-area beam current monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and operational performance of a wide- range current monitor system used to measure charged-particle currents in the experimental areas of the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), a proton accelerator. The major features of the system are high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and the ability to withstand high levels of radiation. The current pulses detected are from 50 μs to 1 ms in duration at repetition rates of from 1 to 120 Hz. The pulse amplitude varies from 1 μA to 17 mA of protons or H - ions. Both real-time and integrated outputs are available, and the minimum detectable currents are 1 μA at the video output and 50 nA at the integrated output. The basic system is comprised of toroids, preamplifiers, signal conditioners, voltage-to-frequency converters, and digital accumulators. The entire system is spread out over 1 km of beam pipe. Provision is made for calibration and for sending the outputs to remote users. The system is normally controlled by a small digital computer, which allows the system to be quite flexible in operation. The design features of the toroids and the associated electronics are discussed in detail, with emphasis on the steps taken to reduce noise and make the toroids temperature and radiation resistant

  6. Development of a real-time extremity dose monitor for personnel in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Nobuhiko; Kusama, Tomoko; Adachi, Akiko

    2000-01-01

    Protection of personnel in interventional radiology is one of the most important issues of radiological protection in medicine. Fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures require the operation near X-ray beam, which brings a considerable hand exposure to the operators. For the purpose of effectual control of their extremity doses, we have developed a real-time extremity dose monitor which is worn on a strap around the wrist. The monitor consists of a silicon semiconductor detector, thin lithium battery and a waterproof frame with a four-digit LED display. Experiment was carried out to examine a response of the monitor to diagnostic X-rays. A practical test was also performed to evaluate usability in the actual interventional procedures. In the experiment, the extremity dose monitor was placed on an arm phantom and exposed to diagnostic X-rays. Readings of the monitor were compared to those of Capintec PS-033 shallow chamber. The monitor was highly sensitive to diagnostic X-rays. It showed a linear response down to doses of a few tens of microsieverts. For high dose-rate exposure, however, a slight decrease in the response was observed, about 10% of counting loss for 80 kV, 40 mA X-ray at one meter from the focus. With regard to energy dependence, variation was within 20% for 60 to 100 kV X-rays. The monitor showed a good angular response in general, except lateral geometry facing the far side from a detector center. In the practical test, hand exposures of medical staff were measured with the extremity dose monitor. They were also asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding size and weight of the monitor, clarity of the display and usefulness. The subjects consisted of physicians, technicians and nurses who engaged in angiography, PTCD, CT-biopsy, barium enema and so on. The readings of the monitor were less than 1 mSv in most cases while 93 mSv was recorded in an extreme case due to direct-beam exposure. In some cases, TLD rings were used together with the

  7. Development of a real-time extremity dose monitor for personnel in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Nobuhiko; Kusama, Tomoko [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita (Japan); Adachi, Akiko [Oita Medical University, Oita (JP)] [and others

    2000-05-01

    Protection of personnel in interventional radiology is one of the most important issues of radiological protection in medicine. Fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures require the operation near X-ray beam, which brings a considerable hand exposure to the operators. For the purpose of effectual control of their extremity doses, we have developed a real-time extremity dose monitor which is worn on a strap around the wrist. The monitor consists of a silicon semiconductor detector, thin lithium battery and a waterproof frame with a four-digit LED display. Experiment was carried out to examine a response of the monitor to diagnostic X-rays. A practical test was also performed to evaluate usability in the actual interventional procedures. In the experiment, the extremity dose monitor was placed on an arm phantom and exposed to diagnostic X-rays. Readings of the monitor were compared to those of Capintec PS-033 shallow chamber. The monitor was highly sensitive to diagnostic X-rays. It showed a linear response down to doses of a few tens of microsieverts. For high dose-rate exposure, however, a slight decrease in the response was observed, about 10% of counting loss for 80 kV, 40 mA X-ray at one meter from the focus. With regard to energy dependence, variation was within 20% for 60 to 100 kV X-rays. The monitor showed a good angular response in general, except lateral geometry facing the far side from a detector center. In the practical test, hand exposures of medical staff were measured with the extremity dose monitor. They were also asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding size and weight of the monitor, clarity of the display and usefulness. The subjects consisted of physicians, technicians and nurses who engaged in angiography, PTCD, CT-biopsy, barium enema and so on. The readings of the monitor were less than 1 mSv in most cases while 93 mSv was recorded in an extreme case due to direct-beam exposure. In some cases, TLD rings were used together with the

  8. Off-site environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States Nuclear Test areas, Calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, R.G.; Fontana, C.A.; Grossman, R.F.; Black, S.C.; Dye, R.E.; Smith, D.D.; Thome', D.J.; Mullen, A.A.

    1987-05-01

    The principal activity at the NTS is testing of nuclear devices, though other related projects are also conducted. The principal activities of the Off-Site Radiological Safety Program are routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests; and protective actions in support of the nuclear testing program. These are conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. 28 refs., 37 figs., 30 tabs

  9. National automatic network of environmental radiological monitoring (RENAMORA); Red Nacional automatica de monitoreo radiologico ambiental (RENAMORA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, J.L.; Sanchez H, L. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlgonzalez@cnsns.gob.mx

    2003-07-01

    Inside the programs of Environmental Radiological Surveillance that it carries out the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safeguards (CNSNS), it develops an National Automatic Network of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (RENAMORA), where it is carried out a registration of speed of environmental dose in continuous and simultaneous forms with the same moment of the measurement. This net allows to account with the meticulous and opportune information that will help to characterize, in dynamics form, the radiological conditions of diverse geographical zones of the country, including the sites that by normative require bigger surveillance, like its are the Laguna Verde Nuclear power station (CNLV), the Nuclear Center of Mexico (ININ) and the Radioactive waste storage center (CADER). This net is in its first development stage; three points inside the state of Veracruz, in the surroundings of the CNLV, already its are operating; the obtained data of rapidity of environmental dose are being stored in a database inside a primary data center located in the facilities of the CNSNS in Mexico city and its will be analyzed according to the project advances. At the moment, its are installing the first ten teams corresponding to the first phase of the RENAMORA (three stages); its are carried out operation tests, transmission, reception and administration of data. The obtained data will be interpreted, analyzed and inter compared to evaluate the risk levels to that it would be hold the population and to determine thresholds that allow to integrate the alarm systems that its had considered for emergency situations. (Author)

  10. Model to predict radiological consequences of transportation accidents involving dispersal of radioactive material in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.; Daniel, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis of accidental releases of radioactive material which may result from transportation accidents in high-density urban areas is influenced by several urban characteristics which make computer simulation the calculational method of choice. These urban features fall into four categories. Each of these categories contains time- and location-dependent parameters which must be coupled to the actual time and location of the release in the calculation of the anticipated radiological consequences. Due to the large number of dependent parameters a computer model, METRAN, has been developed to quantify these radiological consequences. Rather than attempt to describe an urban area as a single entity, a specific urban area is subdivided into a set of cells of fixed size to permit more detailed characterization. Initially, the study area is subdivided into a set of 2-dimensional cells. A uniform set of time-dependent physical characteristics which describe the land use, population distribution, traffic density, etc., within that cell are then computed from various data sources. The METRAN code incorporates several details of urban areas. A principal limitation of the analysis is the limited availability of accurate information to use as input data. Although the code was originally developed to analyze dispersal of radioactive material, it is currently being evaluated for use in analyzing the effects of dispersal of other hazardous materials in both urban and rural areas

  11. Radiological risk assessment for an urban area: Focusing on a drinking water contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyo-Joon; Hwang, Won-Tae; Kim, Eun-Han; Han, Moon-Hee

    2009-01-01

    This paper specifically discusses a water quality modeling and health risk assessment for cesium-137 to assess the potential and actual effects on human health from drinking water contaminated by a radiological terrorist attack in the Seoul metropolitan area, Korea. With respect to the source term caused by a terrorist attack, it was assumed that 50 TBq of cesium-137 was introduced into the Paldang Lake which is a single water resource for the Seoul metropolitan area. EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) model was used to calculate the hydrodynamic and water quality for the model domain, Paldang Lake. Mortality risk and morbid risk coefficients caused by the ingestion of tap water were used to assess a human health risk due to cesium-137. The transport of cesium-137 in the Paldang water system was mainly dependent on the flow streamlines and the effect of the dilution from the other branches. The mortality and morbidity risks due to the drinking water contamination by cesium-137 were 4.77 x 10 -7 and 6.92 x 10 -7 , respectively. Accordingly, it is very important to take appropriate countermeasures when radiological terrorist attacks have occurred at water resources to prevent radiological risks by radionuclides.

  12. Radiological characteristic of an area reclaimed by means of an ash-gravel power plant wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, A.; Biernacka, M.; Kusyk, M.; Mamont-Ciesla, K.; Florowska, K.

    2002-01-01

    A sand excavation after extraction of gravel and sand was filled with an ash-gravel mix. The mix was covered with shielding layers of clay and soil and grass was cultivated on it. Investigations of radiological characteristic such as: gamma radiation dose rate, radon concentration in soil air and radionuclide concentration in the ground were carried out in the both areas reclaimed one and in the vicinity of it. Radon exhalation coefficients were determined for uncovered ash-gravel mix layer, the shielding soil layer and for the ground in the vicinity. Analysis of the results revealed that the reclaimed area can be used for building development. (author)

  13. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    An airborne radiological survey was conducted in July 1976. It was centered on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Two areas were surveyed: one 35 km 2 and the other 16 km 2 . Using Nal(Tl) scintillation detectors, measurements were made of the terrestrial gamma radiation over the areas with a series of north-south flight lines. The processed data indicated that on-site radioactivity was due to nuclear matterials currently or previously handled, processed, or stored. Off-site activities were found to be due wholly to the naturally occurring 40 K, the 238 U chain, and thorium chain gamma emitters

  14. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: Third quarter 1994--100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed on waste disposal sites located at the Hanford Site. The Third Quarter 1994 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports and are summarized below: (1) All the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during July, August, and September 1994 were completed except for the D Island vent riser area. The surveys for the 200-W railways, spurs, and sidings were completed during this period after being delayed by equipment problems during the second quarter. (2) No Compliance Assessment Reports (CARs) were issued for sites found out of compliance with standards identified in WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance. (3) Two Surveillance Compliance/Inspection Reports (SCIRs) were closed during the Third Quarter of 1994. (4) Eleven open SCIRs had not been resolved

  15. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2012-11-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1

  16. Assessment of the radiological conditions in areas of Kuwait with residues of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabianca, T.; Danesi, P.R.; Linsley, G.

    2004-01-01

    The 1991 Gulf War was the first conflict in which DU munitions were used extensively. After this conflict, questions arose regarding the possible link between exposure to ionizing radiation from DU and harmful biological effects. In view of these concerns, the Government of Kuwait, in February 2001, requested the IAEA to conduct an assessment to evaluate the possible radiological impact of residues of DU munitions from the 1991 Gulf War at 11 locations in Kuwait. For this purpose, the IAEA assembled a team of senior experts, who visited Kuwait in September 2001 to carry out a preliminary assessment of the sites and to evaluate the available information. In February 2002 scientists from the IAEA, the Spiez Laboratory (Switzerland), representing UNEP, and the Radiation Protection Department of the Ministry of Health of Kuwait, carried out a sampling campaign at these sites. Around 200 environmental samples, including soil, water and vegetation, were collected during the campaign and subsequently analysed. This study constitutes the first comprehensive radiological assessment of compliance with international radiation protection criteria and standards for areas with residues of DU munitions conducted under the auspices of the IAEA. The findings of this investigation indicate that DU does not pose a radiological hazard to the population of Kuwait. Annual radiation doses arising from exposure to DU residues would be of a few micro-sieverts, well below the annual doses from natural sources of radiation and far below the reference level recommended by the IAEA as a criterion to help establish whether remedial actions are necessary. DU penetrators can still be found at some of the locations visited. Prolonged skin contact with these residues is the only possible pathway that could result in exposures of radiological significance. As long as access to these areas remains restricted, the likelihood that members of the public could come into contact with these residues is low

  17. Radiological conditions in areas of Kuwait with residues of depleted uranium. Report by an international group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    receive doses from exposure to residues of DU have been identified, either by the authorities of Kuwait or in the IAEA's investigation. Annual radiation doses that could arise from exposure to DU residues would be very low and of little radiological concern. Annual radiation doses in the areas where residues do exist would be of the order of a few microsieverts, well below the annual doses received by the population of Kuwait from the natural sources of radiation in the environment and far below the reference level recommended by the IAEA as a criterion to help establish whether remedial actions are necessary. Complete DU penetrators or fragments can still be found at some locations where DU weapons were used during the Gulf War, such as at the oilfields at Manageesh. Prolonged skin contact with these DU residues is the only possible exposure pathway that could result in exposures of radiological significance. As long as access to the areas remains restricted, the likelihood that members of the public could pick up or otherwise come into contact with these residues is low. The authorities of Kuwait have the competence and equipment to carry out the necessary monitoring and survey activities in relation to DU. The analysis techniques used by the Radiation Protection Department of the Ministry of Health of Kuwait are sufficient to determine whether concentrations of uranium in environmental samples are of radiological concern

  18. New software tool for dynamic radiological characterisation and monitoring in nuclear sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoeke, Istvan; Louka, Michael N.; Mark, Niels K.; Bryntesen, Tom R.; Bratteli, Joachim; Edvardsen, Svein T.; Gustavsen, Morten A.; Toppe, Aleksander L.; Johnsen, Terje; Rindahl, Grete

    2012-01-01

    The Halden Reactor Project (HRP) is a jointly sponsored international cooperation, under the aegis of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency. Extensive and valuable guidance and tools, connected to safe and reliable operation of nuclear facilities, has been elaborated throughout the years within the frame of this programme. The HRP has particularly high level results in virtual-reality based tools for real-time areal and personal monitoring. The techniques, developed earlier, are now being supplemented to enhance the planning and monitoring capabilities, and support general radiological characterisation connected to nuclear sites and facilities. Due to the complexity and abundance of the input information required, software tools, dedicated to the radiological characterization of contaminated materials, buildings, land and groundwater, are applied to review, evaluate and visualize the data. Characterisation of the radiation situation in a realistic environment can be very complex, and efficient visualisation of the data to the user is not straight forward. The monitoring and planning tools elaborated in the frame of the HRP feature very sophisticated three-dimensional (3D) high definition visualisation and user interfaces to promote easy interpretation of the input data. The visualisation tools permit dynamic visualisation of radiation fields in virtual or augmented reality by various techniques and real-time personal monitoring of humanoid models. In addition new techniques are being elaborated to visualise the 3D distribution of activities in structures and materials. The dosimetric algorithms, feeding information to the visualisation and user interface of these planning tools, include deterministic radiation transport techniques suitable for fast photon dose estimates, in case physical and radio- and spectrometric characteristics of the gamma sources are known. The basic deterministic model, implemented in earlier

  19. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2013-03-19

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  20. Individual monitoring of medical staff working in interventional radiology in Switzerland using double dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damet, J.; Bailat, C.; Bize, P.; Buchillier, Th.; Tosic, M.; Verdun, F.R.; Baechler, S.

    2011-01-01

    Physicians who frequently perform fluoroscopic examinations are exposed to high intensity radiation fields. The exposure monitoring is performed with a regular personal dosimeter under the apron in order to estimate the effective dose. However, large parts of the body are not protected by the apron (e.g. arms, head). Therefore, it is recommended to wear a supplemental dosimeter over the apron to obtain a better representative estimate of the effective dose. The over-apron dosimeter can also be used to estimate the eye lens dose. The goal of this study was to investigate the relevance of double dosimetry in interventional radiology. First the calibration procedure of the dosimeters placed over the apron was tested. Then, results of double dosimetry during the last five years were analyzed. We found that the personal dose equivalent measured over a lead apron was underestimated by ∼20% to ∼40% for X-ray beam qualities used in radiology. Measurements made over five-year period confirm that the use of a single under-apron dosimeter is inadequate for personnel monitoring. Relatively high skin dose (>10 mSv/month) would have remained undetected without a second dosimeter placed on the apron.

  1. Development of a Data acquisition node for the environmental radiological monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez S, R.

    2000-01-01

    This work consists in the development of a data acquisition system related to the radiation levels of each one of the laboratories or installations of the ININ, setting up an interconnection of the existing radiological monitoring system (RMS-II), with a personal computer through the use and programming of a data acquisition card (PC-LPM-16). This system works in real time, presenting on the PC screen the measurement of each one of the connected detectors, the alarm signals that are being had been when the allowed levels have been exceeded and the registry of these alarm levels; for their later processing in rapidity graphs of exposure against time. Also aspects such as : brief history of the ionizing radiations and their nature, their interaction with matter and the method which were discovered are treated as well as how it is possible to detect and to measure them. The radiological protection and the standards on which that is based. The RMSII radiation monitoring system and its calibration as well as the obtention of performance curves are treated too. Finally, it is described the performance of the Data acquisition circuit, the based programming in virtual instrumentation and its importance. (Author)

  2. Proposed procedure and analysis of results to verify the indicator of the product dose-area in radiology equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Marcos, R.; Gallego Franco, P.; Sierra Diaz, F.; Gonzalez Ruiz, C.; Rodriguez Checa, M.; Brasa Estevez, M.; Gomez Calvar, R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to establish a procedure to verify the value of the product dose-area showing certain teams of Radiology, with an alternative to the use of external transmission cameras. (Author)

  3. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Nevada Test Site - Areas 18 and 20 Corrective Action Unit 372

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2010-01-01

    A series of aerial radiological surveys were conducted over the Little Feller I and II ground zero areas in Area 18 and the Palanquin and Cabriolet ground zero areas in Area 20. The surveys were performed in October and November 2009 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the ground zeros. Gross Counts, inferred exposure rates, man-made activity, and Americium-241 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed areas.

  4. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Yucca Mountain Project Proposed Land Withdrawal and Adjacent Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig Lyons, Thane Hendricks

    2006-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) proposed land withdrawal was conducted from January to April 2006, and encompassed a total area of approximately 284 square miles (73,556 hectares). The aerial radiological survey was conducted to provide a sound technical basis and rigorous statistical approach for determining the potential presence of radiological contaminants in the Yucca Mountain proposed Land withdrawal area. The survey site included land areas currently managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Air Force as part of the Nevada Test and Training Range or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The survey was flown at an approximate ground speed of 70 knots (36 meters per second), at a nominal altitude of 150 ft (46 m) above ground level, along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 250 ft (76 m) apart. The flight lines were oriented in a north-south trajectory. The survey was conducted by the DOE NNSA/NSO Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis, which is located in Las Vegas, Nevada. The aerial survey was conducted at the request of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The primary contaminant of concern was identified by YMP personnel as cesium-137 ( 137 Cs). Due to the proposed land withdrawal area's proximity to the historical Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) facilities located on the NTS, the aerial survey system required sufficient sensitivity to discriminate between dispersed but elevated 137 Cs levels from those normally encountered from worldwide fallout. As part of that process, the survey also measured and mapped the exposure-rate levels that currently existed within the survey area. The inferred aerial exposure rates of the natural terrestrial background radiation varied from less than 3 to 22 microroentgens per hour. This range of exposure rates was primarily due to the surface

  5. MARSAME Radiological Release Report for Archaeological Artifacts Excavated from Area L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gillis, Jessica Mcdonnel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-03

    In 1991 Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL’s) cultural resources team excavated archaeological site LA 4618 located at Technical Area 54, within Material Disposal Area L (MDA L). MDA L received non-radioactive chemical waste from the early 1960s until 1985. Further development of the MDA required excavation of several cultural sites under National Historic Preservation Act requirements; artifacts from these sites have been subsequently stored at LANL. The LANL cultural resources group would now like to release these artifacts to the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe for curation. The history of disposal at Area L suggests that the artifact pool is unlikely to be chemically contaminated and LANL staff washed each artifact at least once following excavation. Thus, it is unlikely that the artifacts present a chemical hazard. LANL’s Environmental Stewardship group (EPC-ES) has evaluated the radiological survey results for the Area L artifact pool and found that the items described in this report meet the criteria for unrestricted radiological release under Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment and are candidates for release without restriction from LANL control. This conclusion is based on the known history of MDA L and on radiation survey data.

  6. An aerial radiological survey of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period of September 10 to 18, 1990, over a 40-square-mile (104-square-kilometer) area surrounding the Millstone Nuclear Power Station (MNPS). The MNPS is located on the Long Island Sound shoreline, three kilometers south of Waterford, Connecticut. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial gamma ray environment of the plant and surrounding areas. A contour map showing radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a United States Geological Survey map of the area. The exposure rates within the survey region are quite uniform. The area is characterized by an exposure rate of 10-12 microroentgens per hour including an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 μR/h. This is typical of natural background. The only exception to the natural background readings is the Millstone station itself, which is characterized by an exposure rate consistent with the standard operation of the reactor units. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized-ion-chamber gamma ray measurements were obtained at five locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of, and are in agreement with, the aerial data. The radiological environment near the plant is consistent with normal plant operation

  7. Assessment of radiological environment around coal mining area of Dhanbad, Jharkhand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnaik, R.L.; Thakur, V.K.; Jha, V.N.; Sethy, N.K.; Srivastava, V.S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides present in the earth crust is a significant source of human exposure. Variation in natural background radiation is expected in different geological formations. Anthropogenic activities in geological formation of elevated radionuclide level may enhance the area background. In areas of coal mining industries investigation of radiological environment is required as the residues contains significant amount of uranium and thorium series radionuclides (Van Hook, 1 979, Balogun, 2003). Radon and its short-lived progeny present in the environment contributes maximum natural background radiation dose due to inhalation. Apart from this radionuclide content in key environmental matrices may also contribute to inhalation and ingestion exposure for members of public. Present investigation was carried out in coal mining areas of Dhanbad, Jharkhand to assess the existing radiological status. A detailed investigation is required to evaluate the environmental impact of coal handling activities in the area. The contribution of 222 Rn progeny towards outdoor inhalation dose compares with global average reported by UNSCEAR (2006)

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period of September 10 to 18, 1990, over a 40-square-mile (104-square-kilometer) area surrounding the Millstone Nuclear Power Station (MNPS). The MNPS is located on the Long Island Sound shoreline, three kilometers south of Waterford, Connecticut. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial gamma ray environment of the plant and surrounding areas. A contour map showing radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a United States Geological Survey map of the area. The exposure rates within the survey region are quite uniform. The area is characterized by an exposure rate of 10-12 microroentgens per hour including an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 {mu}R/h. This is typical of natural background. The only exception to the natural background readings is the Millstone station itself, which is characterized by an exposure rate consistent with the standard operation of the reactor units. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized-ion-chamber gamma ray measurements were obtained at five locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of, and are in agreement with, the aerial data. The radiological environment near the plant is consistent with normal plant operation.

  9. Design of movable fixed area γ dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongyu; Cheng Wen; Li Jikai; Huang Hong; Shen Qiming; Zhang Qiang; Liu Zhengshan

    2005-10-01

    Movable fixed area γ dose rate monitor has not only the characteristics of fixed area γ dose rate monitor, but that of portable meter as well. Its main function is to monitor the areas where dose rate would change without orderliness to prevent unplanned radiation exposure accidents from happening. The design way of the monitor, the main indicators description, the working principle and the comprising of software and hardware are briefly introduced. The monitor has the characteristics of simple installation, easy maintenance, little power consumption, wide range, notability of visual and audible alarm and so on. Its design and technique have novelty and advancement. (authors)

  10. Eye lens monitoring for interventional radiology personnel: dosemeters, calibration and practical aspects of Hp(3) monitoring. A 2015 review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, Eleftheria; Ferrari, Paolo; Bjelac, Olivera Ciraj; Gingaume, Merce; Merce, Marta Sans; O’Connor, Una

    2015-01-01

    A thorough literature review about the current situation on the implementation of eye lens monitoring has been performed in order to provide recommendations regarding dosemeter types, calibration procedures and practical aspects of eye lens monitoring for interventional radiology personnel. Most relevant data and recommendations from about 100 papers have been analysed and classified in the following topics: challenges of today in eye lens monitoring; conversion coefficients, phantoms and calibration procedures for eye lens dose evaluation; correction factors and dosemeters for eye lens dose measurements; dosemeter position and influence of protective devices. The major findings of the review can be summarised as follows: the recommended operational quantity for the eye lens monitoring is H p (3). At present, several dosemeters are available for eye lens monitoring and calibration procedures are being developed. However, in practice, very often, alternative methods are used to assess the dose to the eye lens. A summary of correction factors found in the literature for the assessment of the eye lens dose is provided. These factors can give an estimation of the eye lens dose when alternative methods, such as the use of a whole body dosemeter, are used. A wide range of values is found, thus indicating the large uncertainty associated with these simplified methods. Reduction factors from most common protective devices obtained experimentally and using Monte Carlo calculations are presented. The paper concludes that the use of a dosemeter placed at collar level outside the lead apron can provide a useful first estimate of the eye lens exposure. However, for workplaces with estimated annual equivalent dose to the eye lens close to the dose limit, specific eye lens monitoring should be performed. Finally, training of the involved medical staff on the risks of ionising radiation for the eye lens and on the correct use of protective systems is strongly recommended. (review)

  11. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Gregory Graham

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the 2001 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the two predominant radiation exposure pathways, potential airborne radioactivity releases and direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  12. Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    This report is the first revision to ''Radiological Performance Assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility, Revision 0'', which was issued in April 1994 and received conditional DOE approval in September 1994. The title of this report has been changed to conform to the current name of the facility. The revision incorporates improved groundwater modeling methodology, which includes a large data base of site specific geotechnical data, and special Analyses on disposal of cement-based wasteforms and naval wastes, issued after publication of Revision 0

  13. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Baxley, Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, L.K.

    1978-11-01

    An airborne radiological survey of a 2146 km 2 area surrounding the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant was made 28-31 March 1977. Detected radioisotopes, and their associated gamma ray exposure rates, were consistent with that expected from the normal background emitters. Count rates observed at 152 m altitude are converted to equivalent exposure rates at 1 m above the ground, and are presented in the form of an isopleth map. Exposure rates measured with small portable instruments and soil sample analysis showed agreement with the airborne data

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area, Ames, Iowa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area in Ames, Iowa, was conducted during the period July 15--25, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the Ames Laboratory and the surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 200 feet (61 meters) along a series of parallel lines 350 feet (107 meters) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 36 square miles (93 square kilometers) and included the city of Ames, Iowa, and the Iowa State University. The results are reported as exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level (inferred from the aerial data) in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 7 to 9 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). No anomalous radiation levels were detected at the Ames Laboratory. However, one anomalous radiation source was detected at an industrial storage yard in the city of Ames. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within the expected uncertainty of ±15%

  15. An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) and surrounding area in Paducah, Kentucky, was conducted during May 15--25, 1990. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the PGDP and surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) along a series of parallel lines 107 meters (350 feet) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 62 square kilometers (24 square miles), bordered on the north by the Ohio River. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 5 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). Protactinium-234m, a radioisotope indicative of uranium-238, was detected at several facilities at the PGDR. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within ±15%

  16. The Department of Energy Nevada Test Site Remote Area Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, L.D.; Hart, O.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Remote Area Monitoring System was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for DOE test directors at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to verify radiological conditions are safe after a nuclear test. In the unlikely event of a venting as a result of a nuclear test, this system provides radiological and meteorological data to Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) computers where mesoscale models are used to predict downwind exposure rates. The system uses a combination of hardwired radiation sensors and satellite based data acquisition units with their own radiation sensors to measure exposure rates in remote areas of the NTS. The satellite based data acquisition units are available as small, Portable Remote Area Monitors (RAMs) for rapid deployment, and larger, Semipermanent RAMs that can have meteorological towers. The satellite based stations measure exposure rates and transmit measurements to the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) where they are relayed to Direct Readout Ground Stations (DRGS) at the NTS and Los Alamos. Computers process the data and display results in the NTS Operations Coordination Center. Los Alamos computers and NTS computers are linked together through a wide area network, providing remote redundant system capability. Recently, LANL, expanded the system to take radiological and meteorological measurements in communities in the western United States. The system was also expanded to acquire data from Remote Automatic Weather Stations (RAWS) that transmit through GOES. The addition of Portable and Semipermanent RAMs to the system has vastly expanded monitoring capabilities at NTS and can be used to take measurements anywhere in this hemisphere

  17. Radiological safety system based on real-time tritium-in-air monitoring indoors and in effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidica, N.; Sofalca, N; Balteanu, O.; Srefan, I.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to tritium is an important health hazard in any tritium processing facility so that implementing a real-time tritium monitoring system is necessary for its operation in safety conditions. The tritium processing facility operators need to be informed at any time about the in-air tritium concentration indoors or in the stack effluents, in order to detect immediately any leaks in tritium containments, or any releases inside the buildings or to the environment. This information is very important for adopting if necessary protection measures and correcting actions as quickly as possible. In this paper we describe an improved real-time tritium monitoring system designed for the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant of National Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopes Separation, Rm. Valcea, Romania. The design of the Radiological Safety System implemented for the ICIT Water Detritiation Pilot Plant is intended to provide the maximum safety level based on the ALARA concept. The main functions of tritium monitoring system are: - monitoring the working areas and gaseous effluents by determination of the tritium-in-air activity concentration; - local and remote data display; - assessing of environment dose equivalent rates and dose equivalents in the working environment (for personnel exposure control and work planning); - assessing the total tritium activity released to the environment through ventilation exhaust stack; - safety functions, i.e., local and remote, locking/unlocking personnel access, process shut-down in emergency conditions and start of the air cleaning systems. With all these features our tritium monitoring system is really a safety system adequate for personnel and environmental protection. (authors)

  18. Aerial radiological survey of the Brookhaven National Laboratory and surrounding area, May 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobaugh, J.L.; Steiner, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed from 15 to 18 May 1980 over approximately a 21-square-kilometer (8-square-mile) area surrounding the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). BNL is located in the center of Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. All gamma radiation data were collected by flying north-south lines spaced 91 meters (300 feet) apart at an altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) above ground level. A total of 17 anomalous areas were identified. The dominant isotopes found over these areas were cesium-137, manganese-54, and cobalt-60. All anomalies identified by the aerial measurements were correlated to site activities and storage facilities. 4 references, 18 figures, 1 table

  19. An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site and surrounding area. Central Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site was conducted in December 1993. An interim report was issued. That report described survey procedures and presented terrestrial exposure rate and wide-area-averaged plutonium isopleth plots. This letter report presents additional plutonium plots and some ''rule-of-thumb'' calculations which should help the reader to properly interpret the data presented. Attached to this report are three isopleth plots produced from the Double Track data. No one processing method provides all the answers regarding a particular surveyed area. Where peak values are most important, isopleth number-sign 1, created from the original unsmoothed data, is the presentation of choice. Isopleth number-sign 2, from smoothed data, is superior for the detection of areas of widespread low-level contamination. Isopleth number-sign 3, also smoothed data, satisfied a particular early mission goal but is not as useful for cleanup operations as the other two

  20. Nevada Test Site Area 25, Radiological Survey and Cleanup Project, 1974-1983 (a revised final report). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.G.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for beta plus gamma and alpha radioactive contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 9 references, 23 figures

  1. ICPP digital wide area portal monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    A portal montior is described which is used to check personnel for contamination. The monitor is extremely sensitive. In addition to personnel contamination control, it serves as an extremely effective SNM detector capable of detecting U-235 in half the quantities specified in Federal Standards

  2. Assessment of radiological risk in vicinity of former uranium mining areas in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciupek, K.; Krajewski, P.; Kardas, M.; Suplinska, M. [Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    The work carried out under the project NCBiR - 'Technologies Supporting Development of Safe Nuclear Power Engineering'; Task 3: Meeting the Polish nuclear power engineering's demand for fuel - fundamental aspects. Human activities related to the use of ionizing radiation and radioactive substances might cause exposure of the population and the environment. However, radiological risk assessment is mainly conducted only to human as an estimation of the effective dose being the sum of external and internal exposure whereas environmental protection assessment is more complex studies. The increased interest in recent years in this aspect and the ability to perform computer simulations contributed the development of models enabling assessment of exposure to certain organisms and estimation the concentrations of radionuclides in the various components of the environment. These models define a possible transition path of radionuclide in the atmosphere or waterways through their physical parameterization. The estimation of the content of radionuclides in plants, animals and human is possible by applying an existing risk assessment methodology. Models assessing human and environmental exposure from natural and artificial radionuclides, such as CROM, RESRAD, IMPACT or ERICA, come to be useful tools not only for researchers but also for regulatory authorities. This case study focused on the uranium mining areas (inactive mines and waste dumps) in the Giant Mountains (Karkonosze Mountains) in the south-west of Poland. On the basis of activity concentrations in samples of soil and mineral material from mine shafts, water samples from ponds, streams and small rivers and vegetation samples, an assessment of radiological impact of the former uranium mining areas was performed. The doses for reference group of inhabitants and biota in the vicinity of the former uranium mine were evaluated using IMPACT (EcoMetrix Inc.) model and ERICA tool. The variability and

  3. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daegu area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Dong; Lee, Hae Young; Yang, Chan Sun

    2001-12-01

    The objectives of the project are to monitor an abnormal radiation level in Taegu and Kyungpook region, and to enhance our ability to prepare for the radiological emergency situation by establishing the radioactivity monitoring system in Taegu and Kyungpook region. In this report, we summarized a gamma exposure rates, a gross beta and gamma radionuclide activities for the environmental samples of airborned-dust. precipitation, fallout and tap water collected in Taegu radioactivity monitoring center, and a gamma radionuclide activities for the 28 grocery samples, such as tea, nut and mushroom, rice, chinese cabbage, wormwood and pine needles, soil and drinking water which were obtained from Taegu and Kyungpook region to establish the basic data base for estimating the internal exposure. In conclusion, it didn't appear any evidence for newly pollution of artificial radioactivity in Taegu and Kyungpook region

  4. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2000. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters. There was no significant difference in environmental radioactivities between 1999 and 2000.

  5. Protected areas system planning and monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugdenhil, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Vth World Parks Congress to be held in Durban, South Africa, September 8-17, 2003 will evaluate progress in protected areas conservation and stipulate strategic policies for the coming decade. Most countries of the world have at least a collection of protected areas, and have signed the

  6. Respiration Symptoms Monitoring in Body Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a framework that monitors particular symptoms such as respiratory conditions (abnormal breathing pattern experienced by hyperthyreosis, sleep apnea, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS patients. The proposed framework detects and monitors respiratory condition using S-Band sensing technique that leverages the wireless devices such as antenna, card, omni-directional antenna operating in 2 GHz to 4 GHz frequency range, and wireless channel information extraction tool. The rhythmic patterns extracted using S-Band sensing present the periodic and non-periodic waveforms that correspond to normal and abnormal respiratory conditions, respectively. The fine-grained amplitude information obtained using aforementioned devices is used to examine the breathing pattern over a period of time and accurately identifies the particular condition.

  7. An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation and surrounding area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, R.J.

    1989-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding area in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was conducted from September 12--29, 1989. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the site's terrestrial radiological environment for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 91 meters (300 feet) along a series of parallel lines 152 meters (500 feet) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 440 square kilometers (170 square miles) as defined by the Tennessee Valley Authority Map S-16A of the entire Oak Ridge Reservation and adjacent area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) in the form of a radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 5 to 14 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). The man-made radionuclides, cobalt-60, cesium-137, and protactinium-234m (a radioisotope indicative of depleted uranium), were detected at several facilities on the site. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several locations within the survey boundary. In addition to the large scale aerial survey, two special flyovers were requested by the Department of Energy. The first request was to conduct a survey of a 1-mile x 2-mile area in south Knoxville, Tennessee. The area had been used previously to store contaminated scrap metals from operations at the Oak Ridge site. The second request was to fly several passes over a 5-mile length of railroad tracks leading from the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, north through the city of Oak Ridge. The railroad tracks had been previously used in the transport of cesium-137

  8. Development of a Real-time Hand Dose Monitor for Personnel in Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, N.; Nakaoka, H.; Haruta, R.; Murakami, Y.; Kubo, T.; Maeda, T.; Kusama, T

    2001-07-01

    Medical procedures denoted as interventional radiology require operation near an X ray beam, which brings high dose exposures to the operators' hands. For the effectual control of their extremity doses, a prototype of a real-time wrist dosemeter has been developed, hand dose monitor (HDM), based on a single silicon detector. Experiments were performed to test its response to diagnostic X rays. The HDM was highly sensitive and showed a linear response down to doses of a few tens of microsieverts. Though dose rate, energy and angular dependence of the response were observed in some extreme conditions, the HDM was proved to be of practical use if it was appropriately calibrated. Since an HDM enables personnel to check their hand doses on a real-time basis, it would enable medical staff to control the exposure themselves. (author)

  9. The impact of regulatory control on monitoring of pregnant hospital staff in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Rawlings, D.J.; Marshall, N.W.

    1997-01-01

    In 1990, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended the introduction of a supplementary dose limit for pregnant staff so that the foetus was adequately protected. This dose limit was framed in terms of an abdomen surface dose of 2 mSv for the duration of the pregnancy, once it had been declared. The philosophical basis underlying this supplementary dose limit was the desire to treat the foetus as a member of the public in respect of the occupational exposure of the mother. In the Basic Safety Standards, the International Atomic Energy Agency endorsed the need to limit the foetal dose, but in this document the dose limit refers to the foetus. The introduction of dose limits for foetal exposure to radiation has significant implications for hospitals as many workers are women of child bearing age. The practical implications of this dose limit will be discussed as well as suggested monitoring arrangements. (author)

  10. Design of a monitoring network over France in case of a radiological accidental release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Rachid; Bocquet, Marc; Vercauteren, Nikki; Isnard, Olivier

    The Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (France) is planning the set-up of an automatic nuclear aerosol monitoring network over the French territory. Each of the stations will be able to automatically sample the air aerosol content and provide activity concentration measurements on several radionuclides. This should help monitor the French and neighbouring countries nuclear power plants set. It would help evaluate the impact of a radiological incident occurring at one of these nuclear facilities. This paper is devoted to the spatial design of such a network. Here, any potential network is judged on its ability to extrapolate activity concentrations measured on the network stations over the whole domain. The performance of a network is quantitatively assessed through a cost function that measures the discrepancy between the extrapolation and the true concentration fields. These true fields are obtained through the computation of a database of dispersion accidents over one year of meteorology and originating from 20 French nuclear sites. A close to optimal network is then looked for using a simulated annealing optimisation. The results emphasise the importance of the cost function in the design of a network aimed at monitoring an accidental dispersion. Several choices of norm used in the cost function are studied and give way to different designs. The influence of the number of stations is discussed. A comparison with a purely geometric approach which does not involve simulations with a chemistry-transport model is performed.

  11. Application of classical versus bayesian statistical control charts to on-line radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVol, T.A.; Gohres, A.A.; Williams, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    False positive and false negative incidence rates of radiological monitoring data from classical and Bayesian statistical process control chart techniques are compared. The on-line monitoring for illicit radioactive material with no false positives or false negatives is the goal of homeland security monitoring, but is unrealistic. However, statistical fluctuations in the detector signal, short detection times, large source to detector distances, and shielding effects make distinguishing between a radiation source and natural background particularly difficult. Experimental time series data were collected using a 1' x 1' LaCl 3 (Ce) based scintillation detector (Scionix, Orlando, FL) under various simulated conditions. Experimental parameters include radionuclide (gamma-ray) energy, activity, density thickness (source to detector distance and shielding), time, and temperature. All statistical algorithms were developed using MATLAB TM . The Shewhart (3-σ) control chart and the cumulative sum (CUSUM) control chart are the classical procedures adopted, while the Bayesian technique is the Shiryayev-Roberts (S-R) control chart. The Shiryayev-Roberts method was the best method for controlling the number of false positive detects, followed by the CUSUM method. However, The Shiryayev-Roberts method, used without modification, resulted in one of the highest false negative incidence rates independent of the signal strength. Modification of The Shiryayev-Roberts statistical analysis method reduced the number of false negatives, but resulted in an increase in the false positive incidence rate. (author)

  12. Areas for US-India civilian nuclear cooperation to prevent/mitigate radiological events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balachandran, Gopalan; Forden, Geoffrey Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Over the decades, India and the United States have had very little formal collaboration on nuclear issues. Partly this was because neither country needed collaboration to make progress in the nuclear field. But it was also due, in part, to the concerns both countries had about the others intentions. Now that the U.S.-India Deal on nuclear collaboration has been signed and the Hyde Act passed in the United States, it is possible to recognize that both countries can benefit from such nuclear collaboration, especially if it starts with issues important to both countries that do not touch on strategic systems. Fortunately, there are many noncontroversial areas for collaboration. This study, funded by the U.S. State Department, has identified a number of areas in the prevention of and response to radiological incidents where such collaboration could take place.

  13. An aerial radiological survey of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory and surrounding area, Waxahachie, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1993-02-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) site from July 22 through August 20,1991. Parallel lines were flown at intervals of 305 meters over a 1,036-square-kilometer (400-square-mile) area surrounding Waxahachie, Texas. The 70,000 terrestrial gamma energy spectra obtained were reduced to an exposure rate contour map overlaid on a United States Geological Survey (USGS) map of the area. The mean terrestrial exposure rate measured was 5.4 μR/h at 1 meter above ground level. Comparison to ground-based measurements shows good agreement. No anomalous or man-made isotopes were detected

  14. Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

    2011-09-30

    Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

  15. Demonstration of mobile radiation monitoring methodology for quick assessment of radiological impact of Mumbai City Using road, rail and sea routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, M.K.; Divkar, J.K.; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    radiation. Through the sea route (Radiation monitoring of Mumbai coast) the average of the dose rates recorded was 35±05 nGy.h -1 . Handheld monitors were used for detail monitoring of the locations like scrap yards, shopping mall, temples etc to rule out the presence of any orphan sources. Elevated radiation levels ranging from 140 - 160 nGy.h -1 were observed at few locations within the Mumbai city. The laboratory based spectrometry analysis of soil/rock samples collected from such locations confirmed the presence of higher concentration of K 40 in these areas up to 1450 Bq.kg -1 compared to Mumbai average of 291.7±14.9 Bq.kg -1 and 394 ± 14.8 Bq.kg -1 for soil and rock respectively. This paper gives the details of the monitoring methodology and systems used along with the results arrived after the radiological mapping of Mumbai city. (author)

  16. Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

  17. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Las Vegas Strip and Adjacent Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thane Hendricks

    2008-01-01

    As proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted aerial radiological surveys of the Las Vegas Strip and adjacent areas on December 11, 2006, and December 26 and 31, 2007. The AMS operation and appropriate law enforcement agencies selected the area as an appropriate urban location to exercise AMS capability for mapping environmental radiation and searching for man-made radioactive sources. The surveys covered ∼11 square miles. Each survey required a 2.5-hour-long flight, performed at an altitude of 300 ft above ground level (AGL) at a line spacing of 600 ft. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to determine the nonterrestrial background contributed by aircraft, radon, and cosmic activity, and to determine the altitude-dependent air mass correction. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Gamma energy spectral data were collected second-by-second over the survey area. This spectral data allows the system to distinguish between natural terrestrial background contributions and man-made radioisotope contributions. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific man-made radioactive isotopes. Data geo-locations were determined with a Real-Time Differential Global Positioning System (RDGPS)

  18. Wide-area decontamination in an urban environment after radiological dispersion: A review and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Lee, Sang Don; Magnuson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We review wide area, urban decontamination techniques for rapid response. • We examine historical data and its application to radiological terrorism scenario. • Data is insufficient to ensure a detailed, organized mitigation response. • Primary deficit is lessons-learned and relations to extrapolate a limited data set. • Research is needed to model a mitigation response and help guide data gathering. - Abstract: Nuclear or radiological terrorism in the form of uncontrolled radioactive contamination presents a unique challenge in the field of nuclear decontamination. Potential targets require an immediate decontamination response, or mitigation plan to limit the social and economic impact. To date, experience with urban decontamination of building materials – specifically hard, porous, external surfaces – is limited to nuclear weapon fallout and nuclear reactor accidents. Methods are lacking for performing wide-area decontamination in an urban environment so that in all release scenarios the area may be re-occupied without evaluation and/or restriction. Also lacking is experience in developing mitigation strategies, that is, methods of mitigating contamination and its resultant radiation dose in key areas during the immediate aftermath of an event and after lifesaving operations. To date, the tremendous strategy development effort primarily by the European community has focused on the recovery phase, which extends years beyond the release event. In this review, we summarize the methods and data collected over the past 70 years in the field of hard, external surface decontamination of radionuclide contaminations, with emphasis on methods suitable for response to radiological dispersal devices and their potentially unique physico-chemical characteristics. This review concludes that although a tremendous amount of work has been completed primarily by the European Community (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), the few studies existing on each

  19. Wide-area decontamination in an urban environment after radiological dispersion: A review and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael D., E-mail: Kaminski@anl.gov [Nuclear Decontamination and Separations, Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Lee, Sang Don; Magnuson, Matthew [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Homeland Security Research Center (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • We review wide area, urban decontamination techniques for rapid response. • We examine historical data and its application to radiological terrorism scenario. • Data is insufficient to ensure a detailed, organized mitigation response. • Primary deficit is lessons-learned and relations to extrapolate a limited data set. • Research is needed to model a mitigation response and help guide data gathering. - Abstract: Nuclear or radiological terrorism in the form of uncontrolled radioactive contamination presents a unique challenge in the field of nuclear decontamination. Potential targets require an immediate decontamination response, or mitigation plan to limit the social and economic impact. To date, experience with urban decontamination of building materials – specifically hard, porous, external surfaces – is limited to nuclear weapon fallout and nuclear reactor accidents. Methods are lacking for performing wide-area decontamination in an urban environment so that in all release scenarios the area may be re-occupied without evaluation and/or restriction. Also lacking is experience in developing mitigation strategies, that is, methods of mitigating contamination and its resultant radiation dose in key areas during the immediate aftermath of an event and after lifesaving operations. To date, the tremendous strategy development effort primarily by the European community has focused on the recovery phase, which extends years beyond the release event. In this review, we summarize the methods and data collected over the past 70 years in the field of hard, external surface decontamination of radionuclide contaminations, with emphasis on methods suitable for response to radiological dispersal devices and their potentially unique physico-chemical characteristics. This review concludes that although a tremendous amount of work has been completed primarily by the European Community (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), the few studies existing on each

  20. A study of professional competence for radiological technology department students in Taiwan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Kai-Yuan; Hsieh Bor-Tsung; Huang W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, so many medical institutions established and the increasing use of the high technological medical imaging equipment, it makes radiological technology become the main instrument for the medical diagnostic and radiation therapy. However, the medical radiological technologies play the important role to operate all the related radiological machines. If they do not use the machines adequately, it will increase the patients' radiation absorbed dose. Then, the whole society health may be influenced. Therefore, constructing the professional competence of the medical radiological technologists is an important course. The purpose of this research are: (1) to construct the index of professional competence with radiological technology students, (2) to discuss the professional competence for the graduates from the department of radiological technology to be the reference for the Ministry of Examination for the license test of radiological technologists, (3) to provide the direction of the radiological technology department development. (author)

  1. Application impact of internal monitoring criteria in radiological protection programs of nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Bernardo M.; Dantas, Ana Leticia A.; Juliao, Ligia Q.C.; Lourenco, Maria Cristina; Melo, Dunstana R.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the simulation of the internal monitoring criteria application for the most used radionuclides by the area of nuclear medicine, taking into consideration the usual conditions of usual source handling and the activity bands authorized by the CNEN. It is concluded that the handling of Iodine 131 for therapeutical purposes is the practice which presents the most risk of internal exposure for the works, requiring the adoption of a program for internal monitoring by the nuclear medicine services

  2. Measurements of radiological background and some chemical pollutants in two areas of greater cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, F.S.; Ramadan, A.; Abdel Aziz, M.A.; Aly, A.I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The present work aims to the evaluation of radiological background levels and chemical pollutants in greater cairo as the most dense populated city in Egypt. The meteorological data of a complete one year of Cairo city have been collected, investigated and processed to determined the behavior of the pollutants in the atmosphere and the sector that is strongly affected by the pollutants. Portable detector for measuring the radiological background was deployed in Nasr City, where two nuclear centers belonging to Atomic Energy Authority are located, to measure the radioactivity levels in the atmosphere and compare them with the international standard limits. Other detectors were deployed in Shobra El- Khema area to study two significant phenomena, the first is the formation of ozone through the photo-chemical oxidation, its level and its behavior in the atmosphere, taking into consideration the international standard limits. The second phenomenon is the impact of the black plume on the capital Cairo started on October (1999) and its association of pollutant levels increment, defining the nature and the site location of the pollutant source. The carbon monoxide concentrations (as an example), before and during the black plume, were calculated using Gaussian equation then compared with the measured data in Shobra El- Khema region. The other available instruments were used to measure nitrogen oxides, ozone and carbon monoxide

  3. Systematic radiological survey distinguishing contaminated from non-contaminated agricultural areas in the Korma district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Dederichs, H.

    1999-01-01

    The results of soil measurements justify the conclusion that the population of the CIS resident in areas heavily affected by the fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident returned to normal life, neglecting or refusing to accept precautionary practice in land use or other restrictions recommended for radiological protection. One factor is the time elapsed since the accident happened, another is the succession of generations. Those who then were young children now are the mothers and fathers of the third post-accident generation, and their anyhow weak awareness of the persisting radiological danger has fallen into oblivion. This may serve as an explanation of the fact that there is an extremely strong increase in the body doses measured in children of pre-school age. Further major factors are the poor agricultural situation and the resulting nutritional problems, forcing people to increasingly live on the fruit of the forest. This is clearly reflected in the increased internal radiation doses measured, while the external doses are decreasing with continuing vertical migration of radionuclides. Increasing internal accumulation of cesium in the population as a dominant contribution to total body doses was revealed by the measuring campaign, extending to the population of villages farther off the forests. (orig./CB) [de

  4. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 400 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination resulted from an evaluation conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 400 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Two major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 400 Area were evaluated: the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Fuels Manufacturing and examination Facility. The determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of these two facilities, only the Fast Flux Test Facility will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Radioactivity in the environment. Report for 1999. A summary and radiological assessment of the Environment Ageny's monitoring programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Environment Agency has wide-ranging responsibilities and powers to protect and, where necessary, improve the environment in England and Wales. The Agency also has a duty to protect the environment in a way that works towards sustainable development. In 1998, the Oslo and Paris Commission (OSPAR) strategy for radioactive substances was agreed by Ministers at Sintra, Portugal, to prevent pollution of the North East Atlantic maritime area through progressive and substantial reductions in discharges, emissions and losses of radioactive substances. In June 2000, the UK Government published for consultation the draft UK Strategy for Radioactive Discharges 2001-2020 which sets out the UK's plans to implement the OSPAR strategy. The Government will be issuing statutory guidance to the Environment Agency which will provide the vehicle through which the UK Strategy will be implemented. Radiological monitoring programmes are carried out in support of the Agency's regulatory functions under RSA 93 and as part of the UK Government's obligations under the Euratom Treaty. This report presents the results of the Agency's regular monitoring of radioactivity in the environment during 1999 and an assessment of the radiological impact. The main findings of the regular monitoring programme during 1999 were as follows: (i) The majority of operator declarations of the radioactive content of wastes discharges and disposals had been assessed accurately or were over estimated. (ii) Radiation dose-rates above sediments and concentrations of radionuclides in water, sediment, soil and grass were generally consistent with those reported in previous years, with no clear trend over the last 10 years. Enhanced levels of artificial radionuclides continue to be found in coastal sediments in the vicinity of Sellafield, which decline with increasing distance from the site. Radioactivity levels around other major sites were mostly low or not detectable. (iii) As in previous years, concentrations of

  6. Emerging Technologies and Techniques for Wide Area Radiological Survey and Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-24

    Technologies to survey and decontaminate wide-area contamination and process the subsequent radioactive waste have been developed and implemented following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant release and the breach of a radiological source resulting in contamination in Goiania, Brazil. These civilian examples of radioactive material releases provided some of the first examples of urban radiological remediation. Many emerging technologies have recently been developed and demonstrated in Japan following the release of radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011. Information on technologies reported by several Japanese government agencies, such as the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) and the National Institute for Environmental Science (NIES), together with academic institutions and industry are summarized and compared to recently developed, deployed and available technologies in the United States. The technologies and techniques presented in this report may be deployed in response to a wide area contamination event in the United States. In some cases, additional research and testing is needed to adequately validate the technology effectiveness over wide areas. Survey techniques can be deployed on the ground or from the air, allowing a range of coverage rates and sensitivities. Survey technologies also include those useful in measuring decontamination progress and mapping contamination. Decontamination technologies and techniques range from non-destructive (e.g., high pressure washing) and minimally destructive (plowing), to fully destructive (surface removal or demolition). Waste minimization techniques can greatly impact the long-term environmental consequences and cost following remediation efforts. Recommendations on technical improvements to address technology gaps are presented together with observations on remediation in Japan.

  7. Aerial Radiological Surveys of the Las Vegas Strip and Adjacent Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, Thane; Reed, Michael

    2008-01-01

    As proficiency training for the Remote Sensing Laboratory's (RSL) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) radiological mapping mission, a survey team from RSL-Nellis conducted aerial radiological surveys of the Las Vegas Strip and adjacent areas on four separate occasions. The dates of the surveys were: December 11, 2006; December 26, 2007; December 31, 2007; and July 1, 2008. The AMS operation and appropriate law enforcement agencies selected the survey area as an appropriate urban location in which to exercise the AMS capability for mapping environmental radiation and searching for man-made radioactive sources. The surveys covered approximately 11 square miles. Each survey required a 2.5 hour-long flight, performed at an altitude of 300 ft above ground level (AGL), at a line spacing of 600 ft. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas in order to quantify the non-terrestrial background contributed by the aircraft, radon, and cosmic activity, and in order to determine the altitude-dependent air mass correction. The gamma data was collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. One second gamma-energy spectral data were recorded continuously while in flight. This spectral data allows the system to distinguish between natural terrestrial background contributions and man-made radioisotope contributions. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific man-made radioactive isotopes. Data geo-locations were determined with a Real-Time Differential Global Positioning System (RDGPS). For the surveys occurring on December 26, 2007, and December 31, 2007, a neutron detection system was also flown. The neutron system consists of an array of eight moderated helium tubes, each cylindrical in nature measuring 6-feet in length with a diameter of 2-inches

  8. Central Nevada Test Area Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brad Lyles; Jenny Chapman; John Healey; David Gillespie

    2006-01-01

    Water level measurements were performed and water samples collected from the Central Nevada Test Area model validation wells in September 2006. Hydraulic head measurements were compared to previous observations; the MV wells showed slight recovery from the drilling and testing operation in 2005. No radioisotopes exceeded limits set in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan, and no significant trends were observed when compared to previous analyses

  9. An aerial radiological survey of the Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation facility and surrounding area, Saxton, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, R.A.

    1991-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period July 5 to 22, 1989, over an 83-square kilometer (32-square-mile) area surrounding the Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC) facility which is owned by General Public Utilities and located near Saxton, Pennsylvania. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a set of United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from about 9 to 11 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) over most of the survey area. The levels over the SNEC family did not differ from the exposure rates seen over the entire survey area. Cesium-137 (Cs-137) levels typical of worldwide fallout deposition were detected throughout the surveyed area. No other trends of Cs-137 were observed. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at six locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data

  10. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gunsan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Ho; Ro, Jeong Suk [Kunsan Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-01-15

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Kunsan have been measured priodically in 2000 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Artificial radionuclide of {sup 137}Cs in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Jeon-buk, vegetables, fishes, shellfishes, drinking water (total 33ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma isotope for all. No significant Changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzig an artificial nuclide concentration in living environmental sample in Jeon-buk are I fee of radiological contaminants.

  11. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gunsan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Ho; Ro, Jeong Suk [Kunsan Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Kunsan have been measured priodically in 2002 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Artificial radionuclide of {sup 137}Cs in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Jeon-buk, vegetables, fishes, shellfishes, drinking water (total 33ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma isotope for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzig an artificial nuclide concentration in living environmental sample in Jeon-buk are fee of radiological contaminants.

  12. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Busan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Soeb; Jang, Young A. [Busan Regional Monitoring Station, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Pusan have been measured periodically in 2003 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Gamma nuclides in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Busan foodstuffs, dust, drinking water (total 24ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma nuclide for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzing an gamma nuclide concentration in environmental samples in Pusan are fee of radiological contaminants.

  13. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Busan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H. S.; Lee, J. [Busan Regional Monitoring Station, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    At Pusan Regional Monitoring Station in Busan have been measured periodically in 2000 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Gamma nuclides in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Pusan, vegetables, fishes, shellfish, drinking water (total 23ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KlNS. We analysis gamma nuclide for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzing an gamma nuclide concentration in environmental samples in Pusan are fee of radiological contaminants.

  14. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Busan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Han Soeb; Jang, Young A.

    2003-12-01

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Pusan have been measured periodically in 2003 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Gamma nuclides in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Busan foodstuffs, dust, drinking water (total 24ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma nuclide for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzing an gamma nuclide concentration in environmental samples in Pusan are fee of radiological contaminants

  15. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gunsan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byoung Ho; Ro, Jeong Suk

    2002-12-01

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Kunsan have been measured priodically in 2002 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Artificial radionuclide of 137 Cs in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Jeon-buk, vegetables, fishes, shellfishes, drinking water (total 33ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma isotope for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzig an artificial nuclide concentration in living environmental sample in Jeon-buk are fee of radiological contaminants

  16. Evaluation of the radiological safety of the working area in the installation of experimental fuel elements in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nudia Barenzani

    2011-01-01

    Evaluations of radiological safety in working areas in IEBE during 2010 have been conducted. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine that the working area in IEBE is safe for workers to conducting research and development of nuclear fuel. The evaluation is done by analyzing the results of routine monitoring in the laboratory of IEBE during the year 2010, such as gamma exposure, alpha radioactivity in air and surface contamination. The result is the highest gamma exposure (3.213 ± 0.121) µSv/h at the desk-work-B in HR-05, alpha Radioactivity in air at (4.980 ± 0.444) Bq/m 3 and the average surface contamination (0.090 ± 0.008) Bq/cm 2 . The result is still above Permissible Maximum Concentration (MPC) and in the Lower Dose Limit Value established by the Regulatory Body. So it can be concluded that IEBE laboratory is safe for workers in conducting research and development nuclear fuel. (author)

  17. CNN's evaluation of the radiological monitoring special programs at the sites of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lareyne, O.; Marugan Tovar, I.; Martinez Moreno, M.; Sanz Alduan, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, occurred in the Spanish plants various events related to the existence on the sites of the Spanish nuclear facilities or areas dotted with radioactive contamination outside the buildings, events that were reported to the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) in accordance with the provisions of the regulation, as a result of the analysis of those events, the CSN issued in July 2008, a complementary technique INSTRUCTIONAL requiring the implementation of environmental monitoring programs in outdoor areas within sites nuclear tacilities. First, the CSN nuclear facilities referred to the programs and methodologies intended to perform such monitoring, and, in late 2009, reports of program results.

  18. Effective radiological contamination control and monitoring techniques in high alpha environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Kevin C

    2003-02-01

    In the decommissioning of a highly contaminated alpha environment, such as the one at Hanford's 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility, one of the key elements of a successful radiological control program is an integrated safety approach. This approach begins with the job-planning phase where the scope of the work is described. This is followed by a brainstorming session involving engineering and craft to identify how to perform the work in a logical sequence of events. Once the brainstorming session is over, a Job Hazard Analysis is performed to identify any potential problems. Mockups are utilized to enable the craft to get hands on experience and provide feedback and ideas to make the job run smoother. Ideas and experience gained during mockups are incorporated into the task instruction. To assure appropriate data are used in planning and executing the job, our principal evaluation tools included lapel and workplace air sampling, plus continuous air monitors and frequent surveys to effectively monitor job progress. In this highly contaminated alpha environment, with contamination levels ranging from 0.3 Bq cm-2 to approximately 100,000 Bq cm-2 (2,000 dpm per 100 cm2 to approximately 600 million dpm per 100 cm2), with average working levels of 1,600-3,200 Bq cm-2 (10-20 million dpm per 100 cm2) without concomitant ambient radiation levels, control of the spread of contamination is key to keeping airborne levels As Low As Reasonably Achievable.

  19. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the St. Lucie Power Plant, Fort Pierce, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1979-06-01

    An airborne radiological survey of an 1100 km 2 area surrounding the St. Lucie Power Plant was conducted 1 to 8 March 1977. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from the normal background emitters. Count rates observed at 150 m altitude are converted to equivalent exposure rates at 1 m above the ground and are presented in the form of an isopleth map. Ground exposure rates measured with small portable instruments and soil sample analysis agreed with the airborne data. Geological data are presented in an isopleth map of rock and soil types. Also included is a brief description of the vegetation and terrain surrounding the site

  20. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 200 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    The following facility effluent monitoring plan determinations document the evaluations conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 200 Area facilities (chemical processing, waste management, 222-S Laboratory, and laundry) on the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. These evaluations determined the need for facility effluent monitoring plans for the 200 Area facilities. The facility effluent monitoring plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438 (WHC 1991). The Plutonium/Uranium Extraction Plant and UO 3 facility effluent monitoring plan determinations were prepared by Los Alamos Technical Associates, Richland, Washington. The Plutonium Finishing Plant, Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility, T Plant, Tank Farms, Low Level Burial Grounds, and 222-S Laboratory determinations were prepared by Science Applications International Corporation of Richland, Washington. The B Plant Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Determination was prepared by ERCE Environmental Services of Richland, Washington

  1. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Z-Area Saltstone Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, D.

    2002-01-01

    Groundwater monitoring has been conducted at the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility since 1987. At that time, groundwater monitoring was not required by the industrial landfill regulations, but a modest monitoring program was required by the operating permit. In 1996 SRS proposed a program based on direct push sampling. This program called for biennial direct push sampling within 25 feet of each waste-containing cell with additional samples being taken in areas where excessive cracking had been observed. The direct push proposal was accepted by The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Regulations were revised in 1998 and now include requirements for groundwater monitoring. The major elements of those regulations and their application at Z-Area are discussed. These are a point of compliance, groundwater protection standards, the groundwater monitoring system, sampling and analysis, and data evaluation and reporting

  2. Monitoring of radiocaesium in Norwegian natural areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaare, E.

    1992-01-01

    Cesium-137 is analysed in plants and animals sampled in various areas in Norway, in addition to samples of jaws of moose, deer and reindeer. A few of the results are given. Radiocesium in mosses and lichens show little seasonal variation. Species of lichens from extremely exposed ridges show a steady decrease over the years. It is suggested that this is because the species had a varying content of water in their thalli at the time of fallout. Snow covered lichens were water saturated at the thaw when melt water containing pollution hit them. The ecological half-life for these species is 5-7 years. There were large differences in measurements of cesium between sites, from 4500 Bq/m 2 to 50000 Bq/m 2 . Mosses and lichens overall have a much higher value than vasculars which have a controlled absorption of cesium in root hairs whilst mosses and lichens absorb throughout their whole surface. (AB)

  3. Aerial radiological survey of the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station and surrounding area, Jenkinsville, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    An aerial radiologic survey was performed from 9 to 16 March 1981 over a 280 square kilometer area centered on the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Power Station near Jenkinsville, South Carolina. All gamma-photon data were collected by flying North-South lines spaced 230 meters apart at an altitude of 122 meters above ground level. Processed data showed that all gamma-photons detected within the survey area were those expected from naturally occurring terrestrial background emitters. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground and are presented in the form of an isoradiation contour map. The observed exposure rates over the land areas were between 6 and 30 microroengtens per hour (μR/h) with most of the area ranging from 6 to 15 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 4.0 μR/h. The exposure rate obtained from soil samples taken at the survey site displayed positive agreement with the aerial data

  4. An aerial radiological survey of the Babcock and Wilcox Nuclear Facilities and surrounding area, Lynchburg, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 18 through July 25, 1988, over a 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) area surrounding the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear facilities located near Lynchburg, Virginia. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 8 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). A search of the data for man-made radiation sources revealed the presence of three areas of high count rates in the survey area. Spectra accumulated over the main plant showed the presence of cobalt-60 ( 60 Co) and cesium-137 ( 137 Cs). A second area near the main plant indicated the presence of uranium-235 ( 235 U). Protactinium-234m ( 234m Pa) and 60 Co Were detected over a building to the east of the main plant. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries in support of the aerial data

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant and surrounding area, Newport, Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant during the period 27 to 30 May 1986. The survey covered a 64-square-kilometer (25-square-mile) area around the plant. The deteted radiation was due to the presence of varying concentrations of naturally-occurring radioactive materials. Radionuclides of the uranium and thorium decay chains and radioactive potassium were found. For the majority of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rate levels varied between 10 and 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). The reported exposure rate values included an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7 μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted concurrently with the aerial survey, were compared to the inferred aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired at five locations within the survey area. The exposure rate values obtained from these ground-based measurements were in good agreement with the corresponding inferred aerial values. No evidence was found of any radioactive contamination which might have occurred as a result of plant operations. This conclusion was supported by the results of the soil samples analyses and the comparison of the current survey data with those obtained in September 1970. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Beaver Valley Power Station and the Surrounding Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Beaver Valley Power Station was conducted during September 18 to 21, 1998, and encompassed a 53.1-square-kilometer area. The survey was conducted by the U. S. Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Laboratory, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and maintained and operated by Bechtel Nevada. The purpose of the survey was to measure and map the general exposure-rate levels that existed within the survey area and to define the areas of man-made radionuclide activity. The inferred exposure rates were generally uniform and typical of the natural background radiation, which varied from less than 5 to 12 microroentgens per hour. Enhanced exposure rates, not attributable to natural background, and activity from man-made radionuclides were detected over the power station. The detected man-made radionuclide activity was due to the presence of cobalt-60, which is a nuclear activation product, and cesium-137, which is a long-lived fission product. The detected man-made radionuclides were generally consistent with those expected from routine plant operations. Areas outside of the power station boundaries were found to be free of any detectable man-made radionuclides. A series of ground-based, pressurized ionization chamber exposure-rate measurements were acquired at four locations within the survey boundaries. The results of these measurements were compared and found to be within 5 to 30 percent of the corresponding 1998 inferred aerial exposure-rate data

  7. Aerial radiological survey of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area Brookhaven, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station during 5 to 9 June 1983. The survey, which covered an area of 338 square kilometers (131 square miles), also encompassed the entire Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) facility. The highest radiation exposure rate, over 1 milliroentgen per hour (mR/h), was inferred from data measured directly over the BNL facility. This detected activity was due to the presence of cobalt-58, cobalt-60 and cesium-137, which was consistent with normal BNL operations. With the exception of the BNL facility, the only detected man-made radioactivity was found near a cottage in Moriches, New York and was due to the presence of cobalt-60. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates varied generally from 6 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7 μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted concurrently with the aerial survey, were compared to the inferred aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired from five locations within the survey area. The exposure rate values obtained from these measurements were consistent with those inferred from the aerial results. 11 references, 12 figures, 3 tables

  8. Radiological surveys of properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.; Cottrell, W.D.

    1981-03-01

    Results of the radiological surveys conducted at three properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area as well as one additional location downstream from the Middlesex Sampling Plant (Willow Lake), are presented. The survey revealed that the yard around the church rectory on Harris Avenue is contaminated with a 226 Ra-bearing material, probably pitchblende ore from the former Middlesex Sampling Plant. The elevated 226 Ra concentrations around and, to a lesser extent, underneath the rectory are leading to elevated 222 Rn concentrations in air in the rectory and elevated alpha contamination levels (from radon daughters) on surfaces inside the rectory. External gamma radiation levels in the rectory yard are well above background levels, and beta-gamma dose rates at many points in the yard are above federal guidelines for the release of property for unrestricted use. The radiological survey of a parking lot at the Union Carbide plant in Bound Brook, New Jersey revealed that a nearly circular region of 50-ft diam in the lot showed above-background external gamma radiation levels. Two isolated spots within this region showed concentrations of uranium in soil above the licensable level stated in 10 CFR 40. Soil samples taken in the area of elevated gamma radiation levels generally showed nearly equal activities of 226 Ra and 238 U. The survey at the residences on William Street in Piscataway, revealed that the front yeard is generally contaminated from near the surface to a depth of 1.5 to 2.5 ft with 226 Ra-bearing material, possibly pitchblende ore. The remainder of the yard shows scattered contaminaion. External gamma radiation levels inside the house are above the background level near some outside walls

  9. The software design of area γ radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chenxin; Deng Changming; Cheng Chang; Ren Yi; Meng Dan; Liu Yun

    2007-01-01

    This paper main introduction the system structure, software architecture, design ideas of the area γ radiation monitoring system. Detailed introduction some programming technology about the computer communication with the local display unit. (authors)

  10. The software design of area γ radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chenxin; Deng Changming; Cheng Chang; Ren Yi; Meng Dan; Liu Yun

    2008-01-01

    This paper main introduction the system structure, software architecture, design ideas of the area γ radiation monitoring system. Detailed introduction some programming technology about the computer communication with the local display unit. (authors)

  11. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), gross alpha, antimony, mercury, lead, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic, and cadmium exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) at the Savannah River Site. This report presents and discusses the groundwater monitoring results in the H-Area for first quarter 1992

  12. Radiological safety and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sea Young; Yoo, Y S; Lee, J C; Lee, T Y; Lee, J L; Kim, B W; Lee, B J; Chung, K K; Chung, R I; Kim, J S; Lee, H S; Han, Y D; Lee, J I; Lee, K C; Yoon, J H; Sul, C W; Kim, C K; Yoon, K S; Seo, K W; Yoon, Y C [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of radiological safety and control program of 1995. This program consists of working area monitoring including HANARO, personnel radiation monitoring, education for radiation protection. As a result, the objectives of radiation protection have been achieved satisfactorily through the activities mentioned above. Also, the calibration services were provided to insure accurate radiation measurement in the radiation working places. 21 figs., 39 tabs., 5 refs. (Author) .new.

  13. Response of a neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: ing_karen_guzman@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The response of a passive neutron monitor area has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The response was the amount of n({sup 6}Li, T){alpha} reactions occurring in a TLD-600 located at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. Fluence, (n, a) and H*(10) responses were calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources. The H*(10) relative response was compared with responses of commercially available neutron monitors being alike. Due to {sup 6}Li cross section (n, {alpha}) reactions are mainly produced by thermal neutrons, however TLD-600 is sensitive to gamma-rays; to eliminate the signal due to photons monitor area was built to hold 2 pairs of TLD-600 and 2 pairs of TLD-700, thus from the difference between TLD-600 and TLD-700 readouts the net signal due to neutrons is obtained. The monitor area was calibrated at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid using a {sup 241}AmBe neutron source; net TLD readout was compared with the H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Performance of the neutron monitor area was determined through two independent experiments, in both cases the H*(10) was statistically equal to H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs can be used in working areas with intense, mixed and pulsed radiation fields. (Author)

  14. Development of management tools for accidental radiological contamination of the French coastal areas - Development of management tools for accidental radiological contamination in the French marine coastal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffa, C.; Charmasson, S. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SESURE/LERCM - Antenne de Radioecologie Marine, Centre Ifremer, Zone portuaire de Bregaillon, 13507 La Seyne sur Mer (France); Bailly du Bois, P.; Fievet, B. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LRC (France); Couvez, C.; Renaud, P. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SESURE/DIR (France); Didier, D. [IRSN/PRP-CRI/SESUC/BMTA (France)

    2014-07-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident led to the most important accidental release of artificial radionuclides into the sea. This accident has underlined the importance of being able to adequately reproduce the fate of radioactive releases and to estimate their consequences for the marine environment. For its Crisis Centre, the French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has operational tools, in order to help experts and decision makers in case of any atmospheric accidental release and terrestrial environment contamination. The on-going project aims to develop tools to manage any marine contamination of the French coastal areas. We should be able to evaluate and anticipate the marine post-accidental situation: contaminated areas localization and contamination levels, and possible consequences. Many sites has be considered as potential source terms into the sea: the Coastal Nuclear Power Plants, the La Hague reprocessing Plant, the Brest and Toulon Military Harbours as home-ports of nuclear powered vessels, and different river mouths (Rhone River, Gironde, Loire, Seine) that could be contaminated by upstream accidental release. To achieve this goal, two complementary approaches are developed: Marine sheets and a dedicated modelling tool (STERNE). - Marine sheets aim to summarize marine environment characteristics for the different sites, identify potential stakes for human protection such as aquaculture areas, beaches, or industrial water intakes, and ecological stakes. Whenever possible, a local climatology (main currents depending on meteorological or tide conditions) that could be a support to first environmental measurement strategy is proposed. A list of available local contacts for any operational management is also provided. - The modelling tool, STERNE (Simulation du Transport et du transfert d'Elements Radioactifs dans l'environNEment marin), must predict radionuclide dispersion and contamination of water, marine species and sediments

  15. Creation and clinical application of real-time dose monitor using dose area product meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Uoyama, Yoshinori; Iida, Hiroji; Mizushima, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    The management of patient dose has become more of an issue in recent years. Dose can be determined non-invasively and in real time through the use of a dose area product meter, but it is the area dose value that is obtained. Therefore, we created a program that estimates entrance skin dose (ESD) in real time from area dose values obtained during procedures. We used Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 (Standard Edition) for the programming language and C language for the programming environment. The value was a maximum 285.4 mGy at ileus tube insertion when measuring ESD for radiography of the digestive organ and non-vascular type interventional radiology (IVR) using the created program and seeking the average according to the procedures. The program that we created can be considered valid for monitoring ESD correctly and in real time. (author)

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampoll-Ramirez, G.

    1994-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from August 10-16, 1993, over a 78-square-kilometer (30-square-mile) area of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The survey was performed at a nominal altitude of 46 meters (150 feet) with a line spacing of 76 meters (250 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level was prepared and overlaid on a set of United States Geological Survey topographic maps of the area and an aerial photograph of the plant. The terrestrial gamma exposure rates varied from about 7 to 14 microroentgens per hour at 1 meter above the ground. Protactinium-234m was observed at six sites within the boundaries of the plant. At a seventh site, only uranium-235 was observed. No other man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was present in a detectable quantity, either on or off the plant property. Soil sample and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within ± 7.5%

  17. An aerial radiological survey of the Salmon Site and surrounding area, Lamar County, Mississippi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the former Atomic Energy Commission Test Site at the Salmon Site and surrounding area between April 20 and May 1, 1992. The Salmon Site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the gamma-ray environment of the Salmon Site and adjacent lands. A contour map showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on a rectified aerial photograph of the area. The exposure rates within the area are between 5 and 8 μR/h. The reported exposure rates include a cosmic-ray contribution estimated to be 3.7 μR/h. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and in situ measurements, taken with a pressurized ion chamber and a high-purity germanium detector, were obtained at 4 locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of and are in agreement with the aerial data

  18. An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phoenix, K.A.

    1997-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant

  19. Determination of Crack Area on Lead Apron used in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norriza Mohd Isa; Muhammad Jamal Muhammad Isa; Asmaliza Hashim

    2014-01-01

    The study was performed to determine crack area of lead aprons used by personnel as radiation protector from unnecessary radiation in diagnostic radiology. The experiment was done using general X-ray and Computed Radiography (CR) systems. Calibration curve was plotted for beam quality at 80 kVp and source to detector distance (SDD) is 100 cm by selecting manual exposure mode. Lead sheet with thickness from 0.1 to 1.0 mm were used for this purpose. It was used to relate the pixel value of lead sheet images with their thickness. A few sample of lead aprons with different thickness from a hospital and our laboratories were obtained and then undergoing the inspection at our laboratory through this procedure. The samples were divided with two groups based on how long they were used which are less 10 years and more than 10 years. The images data of the sample were obtained and analysis using our developed software. The reference object with known its area was also used in the experiment to ensure our output using the software is reliable and acceptable. The results shown that lead aprons used more than 10 years have depicted more crack areas compare with the lead apron used less than 10 years. (author)

  20. An aerial radiological survey of the Sandia National Laboratories and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedhauser, S.R.

    1994-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during March and April 1993. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey includes the areas covered by a previous survey in 1981. The results of the aerial survey show a background exposure rate which varies between 5 and 18 μR/h plus an approximate 6 μR/h contribution from cosmic rays. The major radioactive isotopes found in this survey were: potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228, which are all naturally-occurring isotopes, and cobalt-60, cesium-137, and excess amounts of thallium-208 and actinium-228, which are due to human actions in the survey area. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from this survey's gamma ray measurements agree almost exactly with the exposure rates inferred from the 1981 survey. In addition to the aerial measurements, another survey team conducted in situ and soil sample radiation measurements at three sites within the survey perimeter. These ground-based measurements agree with the aerial measurements within ± 5%

  1. Emergency monitoring strategy and radiation measurements document of the NKS project emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, J. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    This report is one of the deliverables of the NKS Project Emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD) (20022005). The project and the overall results are briefly described in the NKS publication 'Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD' (NKS-137, April 2006). In a nuclear or radiological emergency, all radiation measurements must be performed efficiently and the results interpreted correctly in order to provide the decision-makers with adequate data needed in analysing the situation and carrying out countermeasures. Managing measurements in different situations in a proper way requires the existence of pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies. Preparing a comprehensive yet versatile strategy is not an easy task to perform because there are lots of different factors that have to be taken into account. The primary objective of this study was to discuss the general problematics concerning emergency monitoring strategies and to describe a few important features of an efficient emergency monitoring system as well as factors affecting measurement activities in practise. Some information concerning the current situation in the Nordic countries has also been included. (au)

  2. Emergency monitoring strategy and radiation measurements. Working document of the NKS project emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, J.

    2006-04-01

    This report is one of the deliverables of the NKS Project Emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD) (20022005). The project and the overall results are briefly described in the NKS publication 'Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD' (NKS-137, April 2006). In a nuclear or radiological emergency, all radiation measurements must be performed efficiently and the results interpreted correctly in order to provide the decision-makers with adequate data needed in analysing the situation and carrying out countermeasures. Managing measurements in different situations in a proper way requires the existence of pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies. Preparing a comprehensive yet versatile strategy is not an easy task to perform because there are lots of different factors that have to be taken into account. The primary objective of this study was to discuss the general problematics concerning emergency monitoring strategies and to describe a few important features of an efficient emergency monitoring system as well as factors affecting measurement activities in practise. Some information concerning the current situation in the Nordic countries has also been included. (au)

  3. Radioactivity, radiological risk and metal pollution assessment in marine sediments from Calabrian selected areas, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, F.; Messina, M.; Faggio, G.; Santangelo, S.; Messina, G.; Belmusto, G.

    2018-02-01

    The two most significant categories of physical and chemical pollutants in sediments (radionuclides and metals) were investigated in this article, in order to evaluate pollution levels in marine sediments from eight different selected sites of the Calabria region, south of Italy. In particular samples were analyzed to determine natural and anthropic radioactivity and metal concentrations, in order to assess any possible radiological hazard, the level of contamination and the possible anthropogenic impact in the investigated area. Activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs were measured by High Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry. The obtained results show that, for radium (in secular equilibrium with uranium), the specific activity ranges from ( 14 ± 1) Bq/kg dry weight (d.w.) to ( 54 ± 9) Bq/kg d.w.; for thorium, from ( 12 ± 1) Bq/kg d.w. to ( 83 ± 8) Bq/kg d.w.; for potassium, from ( 470 ± 20) Bq/kg d.w. to ( 1000 ± 70) Bq/kg d.w. and for cesium it is lower than the minimum detectable activity value. The absorbed gamma dose rate in air (D), the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) outdoor and the external hazard index ( H_ex) were calculated to evaluate any possible radiological risk, mainly due to the use of marine sediments for the beach nourishment. The results show low levels of radioactivity, thus discarding any significant radiological risk. Some metals (As, Cd, Cr tot, Hg, Ni, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe), that could be released into the environment by both natural and anthropogenic sources, were investigated through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements and compared with the limits set by the Italian Legislation, to assess any possible contamination. Experimental results show that they are much lower than the contamination threshold value, thus excluding their presence as pollutants. The degree of sediment contaminations were quantified using enrichment factor ( EF) and geoaccumulation index ( I geo) for

  4. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2002. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  5. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2002. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  6. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik.; Noh, Hyung Ah [Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Taejon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2000. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Taejon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  7. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Sik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2001. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  8. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, J. S.; Kim, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Taejon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station in 1998. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Taejon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period

  9. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jae Sik; Noh, Hyung Ah

    2001-12-01

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2001. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period

  10. Mineralogical, geochemical and radiological characterisation of Selmo Formation in Batman area, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Umit; Damla, Nevzat; Akkoca, Dicle Bal; Cevik, Uğur

    2012-06-01

    This work deals with the mineralogical, geochemical and radiological characterisations of Selmo Formation in Batman neighbourhood. The upper Miocene-Pliocene Selmo Formation is common in the centre of Batman and composed of carbonated sandy claystones and silty-sandy stone lenses. The common whole minerals of the samples are quartz, feldspars, calcite and dolomite. The clay minerals are smectite, illite, chlorite and mixed-layer clay (chlorite-smectite). The geochemical mean values of the samples are 51.7% SiO(2); 12.6% Al(2)O(3); 6.2% Fe(2)O(3); 3.6% MgO; 6.3% CaO; 1.1% Na(2)O; 1.7% K(2)O; 0.8% TiO(2); 0.2% P(2)O(5); 0.1% MnO; and 0.03% Cr(2)O(3). In addition, baseline maps for the concentrations of each radionuclide, the radium equivalent activity and the outdoor gamma dose rate distributions have been plotted for the study area. The mean activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were determined to be 32, 24, 210 and 9 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The assessments of the radiological hazard indices, such as radium equivalent activity, absorbed dose rate in air, annual effective dose equivalent, excess lifetime cancer risk, external hazard index and internal hazard index, were calculated and compared with the internationally accepted reference values. This study shows that the concentrations of radioactivities in the measured samples were within the recommended safety limits and did not pose to be any significant source of radiation hazard.

  11. Results of radiological measurements taken in the Niagara Falls, New York, area (NF002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.K.; Berven, B.A.

    1986-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of 100 elevated gamma radiation anomalies in the Niagara Falls, New York, area are presented. These radiation anomalies were identified by a mobile gamma scanning survey during the period October 3-16, 1984, and were recommended for an onsite survey to determine if the elevated levels of radiation may be related to the transportation of radioactive waste material to the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works for storage. In this survey, radiological measurements included outdoor gamma exposure rates at 1 m above the surface; outdoor gamma exposure rates at the surface, range of gamma exposure rates during scan; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in biased surface soil samples. The results show 38 anomalies (35 located along Pletcher Road and 3 associated with other unreleated locations) were found to exceed Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) remedial action guidelines and were recommended for formal characterization surveys. (Since the time of this survey, remedial actions have been conducted on the 38 anomalies identified as exceeding FUSRAP guidelines, and the radioactive material above guidelines has been removed.) The remaining 62 anomalies are associated with asphalt driveways and parking lots, which used a phosphate slag material (previously identified as cyclowollastonite, synthetic CaSiO 3 ). This rocky-slag waste material was used for bedding under asphalt surfaces and in general gravel applications. Most of the contaminated soil and rock samples collected at the latter anomalies had approximately equal concentrations of 226 Ra and 238 U and, therefore, are not related to materials connected with the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), including material that was transported to the NFSS. 13 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs

  12. Aerial radiological survey of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station and surrounding area, Middletown, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, D.P.

    1983-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station during October 26 to 30, 1982. The survey covered an 82-square-kilometer area centered on the nuclear plant and encompassed the communities of Middletown, York Haven, Goldsboro and Royalton, Pennsylvania. The highest radiation exposure rates, up to a maximum of 200 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), were inferred from data measured directly over the TMI facilities. This detected radiation was due to the presence of cobalt-58, cobalt-60 and cesium-137, which was consistent with normal plant operations. Similar activity is routinely observed in aerial surveys over nuclear power plants which have been or are presently in an operational mode. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates varied from 6 to 14 μR/h. The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7 μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted during the time of the aerial survey, were compared to the aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired at several locations within the survey area, along the river banks upstream and downstream of the survey area, and at the ground-based locations used for a previous aerial survey which was conducted in 1976. The exposure rate values obtained from these measurements were in agreement with the corresponding aerial data. With the exception of the activity observed within the TMI facilities, no evidence of any contamination which might have occurred as a result of past reactor operations or the 1979 TMI Unit 2 accident was detected from the aerial survey data. This was further supported by the results of the soil sample analyses and the comparison with the 1976 aerial survey data. 7 references, 12 figures, 4 tables

  13. Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvonne Townsend

    2000-01-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste

  14. Radioanalytical laboratory quality control: Current status at Tennessee Valley Authority's western area radiological laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority operates a laboratory for radiological analysis of nuclear plant environmental monitoring samples and also for analysis of environmental samples from uranium mining and milling decommissioning activities. The laboratory analyzes some 9,000 samples per year and employs approximately 20 people as analysts, sample collectors, and supervisory staff members. The laboratory is supported by a quality control section of four people involved in computer support, production of radioactive standards, quality control data assessment and reporting, and internal reviews of compliance. The entire laboratory effort is controlled by 60 written procedures or standards. An HP-1000 computer and data base software are used to schedule samples for collection, assign and schedule samples within the laboratory for preparation and analysis, calculate sample activity, review data, and report data outside the laboratory. Gamma spectroscopy systems with nine germanium detectors, an alpha spectroscopy system, five alpha/beta counters, two liquid scintillation counters, four beta-gamma coincidence systems, two sodium iodide single-channel systems, and four photomultipliers for counting Lucas cells are all employed. Each device has various calibration and quality control checks performed on it routinely. Logbooks and control charts are in use for each instrument

  15. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gwangju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jeong Ju; Na, Jeong Yeun [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    The objectives of this project are to detect radiation abnormalities In its early stage, to survey the regional environmental radiation/radioactivity levels and me variations of the levels, to prepare the capability of managing the radiological emergencies, and finally to extabish the protective and defence systems against the radiological hazards for the general publics. This report presents the levels of the external gamma dose rates, the gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples, such as airborne dust, fallout, precipitation, and tap water, which were continuously monitored at the environmental research institute at CNU during 2001, and also the levels of the {gamma} - activities in food samples and drinking water which were measured to collect the basic data of the regional environmental radioactivity levels around the Kwangju city and Chonnam province. The levels of the {gamma} - and gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples didn't any significant abnormality during 2001 and were similar to the results obtained in the past 5 years. The {gamma} - activities in almost all food samples, except for a few samples, and drinking water samples were measured to be below the MDA values.

  16. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gwangju area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Jeong Ju; Na, Jeong Yeun

    2001-12-01

    The objectives of this project are to detect radiation abnormalities In its early stage, to survey the regional environmental radiation/radioactivity levels and me variations of the levels, to prepare the capability of managing the radiological emergencies, and finally to extabish the protective and defence systems against the radiological hazards for the general publics. This report presents the levels of the external gamma dose rates, the gross β - activities in the natural samples, such as airborne dust, fallout, precipitation, and tap water, which were continuously monitored at the environmental research institute at CNU during 2001, and also the levels of the γ - activities in food samples and drinking water which were measured to collect the basic data of the regional environmental radioactivity levels around the Kwangju city and Chonnam province. The levels of the γ - and gross β - activities in the natural samples didn't any significant abnormality during 2001 and were similar to the results obtained in the past 5 years. The γ - activities in almost all food samples, except for a few samples, and drinking water samples were measured to be below the MDA values

  17. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gwangju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jeong Ju; Na, Jeong Yeun [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The objectives of this project are to detect radiation abnormalities in its early stage, to survey the regional environmental radiation/radioactivity levels and the variations of the levels, to prepare the capability of managing the radiological emergencies, and finally to extabish the protective and defence systems against the radiological hazards for the general publics. This report presents the levels of the external gamma dose rates, the gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples, such as airborne dust, fallout, precipitation, and tap water, which were continuously monitored at the environmental research institute at CNU in 2000, and also the levels of the {gamma} - activities in food samples and drinking water which were measured to collect the basic data of the regional environmental radioactivity levels around the Kwangju city and Chonnam province. The levels of the {gamma} - and gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples didn't any significant abnormality in 2000 and were similar to the results obtained in the past years. Also levels of the {gamma} - activities of Cs-137 in those samples were below the MDA values. The {gamma} - activities in almost all food samples, except for a few food samples, and drinking water samples were measured to be below the MDA values.

  18. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gwangju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jeong Ju; Na, Jeong Yeun [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The objectives of this project are to detect radiation abnormalities in its early stage, to survey the regional environmental radiation/radioactivity levels and the variations of the levels, to prepare the capability of managing the radiological emergencies, and finally to extabish the protective and defence systems against the radiological hazards for the general publics. This report presents the levels of the external gamma dose rates, the gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples, such as airborne dust, fallout, precipitation, and tap water, which were continuously monitored at the environmental research institute at CNU during 2003, and also the levels of the {gamma} - activities in food samples and drinking water which were measured to collect the basic data of the regional environmental radioactivity levels around the Gwangju city and Chonnam province. The levels of the {gamma} - and gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples didn't any significant abnormality during 2003 and were similar to the results obtained in the past 5 years. The {gamma} - activities in almost all food samples, except for a few samples, and drinking water samples were measured to be below the MDA values.

  19. Wide-area decontamination in an urban environment after radiological dispersion: A review and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael D; Lee, Sang Don; Magnuson, Matthew

    2016-03-15

    Nuclear or radiological terrorism in the form of uncontrolled radioactive contamination presents a unique challenge in the field of nuclear decontamination. Potential targets require an immediate decontamination response, or mitigation plan to limit the social and economic impact. To date, experience with urban decontamination of building materials - specifically hard, porous, external surfaces - is limited to nuclear weapon fallout and nuclear reactor accidents. Methods are lacking for performing wide-area decontamination in an urban environment so that in all release scenarios the area may be re-occupied without evaluation and/or restriction. Also lacking is experience in developing mitigation strategies, that is, methods of mitigating contamination and its resultant radiation dose in key areas during the immediate aftermath of an event and after lifesaving operations. To date, the tremendous strategy development effort primarily by the European community has focused on the recovery phase, which extends years beyond the release event. In this review, we summarize the methods and data collected over the past 70 years in the field of hard, external surface decontamination of radionuclide contaminations, with emphasis on methods suitable for response to radiological dispersal devices and their potentially unique physico-chemical characteristics. This review concludes that although a tremendous amount of work has been completed primarily by the European Community (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), the few studies existing on each technique permit only very preliminary estimates of decontamination factors for various building materials and methods and extrapolation of those values for use in environments outside the EU and UK. This data shortage prevents us from developing an effective and detailed mitigation response plan and remediation effort. Perhaps most importantly, while the data available does include valuable information on the practical aspects of performing

  20. Radiological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant has been shown the radiation dose to the public from plant operation to be quite small. Calculations from the reported release rates yield 0.2 mrem whole body dose and 0.6 mrem skin dose for the calendar quarter of maximum release. Radioactivity discharges to the Chesapeake Bay have resulted in detectable concentrations of /sup 110m/Ag, 58 Co, and 60 Co in sediments and shellfish. The area yielding samples with detectable concentrations of plant effluents extends for roughly six miles up and down the western shore, with maximum values found at the plant discharge area. The radiation dose to an individual eating 29 doz oysters and 15 doz crabs (5 kg of each) taken from the plant discharge area would be about 4/1000 mrem whole body dose and 0.2 mrem gastrointestinal tract dose (about 0.007% and 0.5% of the applicable guidelines, respectively.) Comparison of these power plant-induced doses with the fluctuations in natural radiation dose already experienced by the public indicates that the power plant effects are insignificant. The natural variations are tens of times greater than the maximum doses resulting from Calvert Cliffs Power Plant. Although operations to date provide an insufficient basis to predict radiological impact of the Calvert Cliffs Plant over its operational lifetime, available data indicate that the plant should continue to operate with insignificant radiological impact, well within all applicable guidelines

  1. Study of plutonium and americium contamination in agricultural area, radiological impact caused by consumption of vegetables of this area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, Assuncion; Aragon, Antonio; Cruz, Berta de la; Gutierrez, Jose

    2001-01-01

    The transuranide concentration has been studied for 30 years in vegetable production, crops in wide extensions and in private-owned farms, all of them situated within the Pu-contaminated area of Palomares due to an air accident in 1966. Based on these studies, a preliminary estimation of the radiological risk caused by the consumption of these products by the inhabitants was possible. The results show that most of the fruits present a surface contamination, which disappears or is significantly reduced when they are washed. The contamination present in edible parts of the vegetables, as well as the contamination of other products included in the diet, has facilitated the estimation of the effective dose for ingestion and the committed effective dose for 50 years for the inhabitants. The main conclusions are: those plants, whose cultivation period is less than a year, present a low level of contamination; the green parts of the plants have a higher contamination than the fruits; the Pu soil to plant transfer factor is very low. In general, those plants that have remained in the contaminated land for several years present a high contamination level; the ingestion of products from Palomares does not represent an important risk for the population, even in the case that the products were totally consumed by a critical group.( author)

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area, Vernon, Vermont

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, R.; Bluitt, C.M.

    1993-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Vernon, Vermont, during the period August 7 through August 17, 1989. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 300 feet (91 meters) over a 65-square-mile (168-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Vermont Yankee Power Station and surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 6 and 10 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) and were attributed to naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based open-quotes benchmarkclose quotes exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system

  3. An aerial radiological survey of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area, Rowe, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyns, P.K.; Bluitt, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, during the period August 17--24, 1989. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 300 feet (91 meters) over an 87-square-mile (225-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Yankee Rowe Power Station and the surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 6 and 10 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based ''benchmark'' exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system

  4. An aerial radiological survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 11--20, 1990, over an 83-square-kilometer (32-square-mile) area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 91 meters (300 feet) with line spacings of 122 meters (400 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a set of United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from about 7 to 14 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) at 1 meter above the ground. Analysis of the data for man-made sources and for the uranium decay product, protactinium-234m ( 234m Pa), showed five sites within the boundaries of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant with elevated readings. Spectra obtained in the vicinity of the buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant showed the presence of 234m Pa, a uranium-238 ( 238 U) decay product. In addition, spectral analysis of the data obtained over the processing plant facility showed gamma activity indicative of uranium-235 ( 234 U). No other man-made gamma ray emitting radioactive material was detected, either on or off the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant property. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at five different locations within the survey boundlaries to support the aerial data

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River Site TNX facility and surrounding area, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 3.8-square-kilometer (1.5-square-mile) area, centered on the Savannah River Site (SRS) TNX facility. The survey was flown on July 25, 1986, prior to the Steel Creek Corridor survey. Radiological measurements were used to determine the extent of man-made radionuclides in the TNX area. This survey area had been covered during previous site surveys of the Savannah River Floodplain. Higher than typical levels of thorium-232 daughters were detected in the survey area just west of the TNX facility. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of this and other SRS areas. 5 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Medical preparedness and response in nuclear accidents. The health team's experience in joint work with the radiological protection area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurmo, Alexandre Mesquita

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between the health and the radiological protection areas has proved fundamental, in our work experience, for the quality of response to victims of accidents, involving ionizing radiation. The conceptions and basic needs comprehension of the adequate response, on these two areas, have brought changes to the essential behavior related to the victim's care, the protection response, the environment and waste production. The joint task of health professionals and radiological protection staff, as first responders, demonstrates that it is possible to adjust practices and procedures. The training of professionals of the radiological protection area by health workers, has qualified them on the basic notions of pre-hospital attendance, entitling the immediate response to the victim prior to the health team arrival, as well as the discussion on the basic concepts of radiological protection with the health professionals, along with the understanding of the health area with its specific needs on the quick response to imminent death risk, or even the necessary procedures of decontamination. (author)

  7. Analysis of radiological protection and security in the radioactive diagnosis area in a third level hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin Vega, J.C.; Aazorin Nieto, J.; Rivera Montalvo, T.

    1998-01-01

    Results from the evaluation made to radiological security and protection conditions prevailing in 13 medical diagnosis rooms with X rays at the National Nutrition Institute Zlavador Zubiran (third level hospital), aiming to give adequate protection and radiological security devices to the staff exposed from that hospital and to comply fully with requirements set by the standards

  8. Radiological monitoring of workers exposure - White book. A multidisciplinary collective approach for a shared vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbey, Pierre; Gauron, Christine; LAHAYE, Thierry; Le-Sourd-Thebaud, Viviane; Godet, Jean-Luc; Bardelay, Chantal; PETIT, Sylvain; Vial, Eric; Vallet, Jeremie; Michel Dit Laboelle, Nicolas; Samain, Jean-Paul; Roy, Catherine; Gonin, Michele; Lallier, Michel

    2015-06-01

    access to qualified people in radiation protection (PCR), in order to promote their reactivity and enhance their role in risk prevention; this involves redefining its legal status leading to increased responsibility; - An opening toward more relevant, appropriate radiological exposure monitoring methods, ensuring their operational, applicable and manageable nature; - The implementation of sector guides - developed by the relevant radiation protection stakeholders and approved by the Authorities - defining the means of achieving the general objectives. This graduated approach is part of the general simplification process led by the French Government. Its regulatory declination must enable stakeholders to identify implementation ways that do not call into question the employer's primary responsibility in the occupational risk prevention. (authors)

  9. Development of emergency response tools for accidental radiological contamination of French coastal areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffa, Céline; Bailly du Bois, Pascal; Caillaud, Matthieu; Charmasson, Sabine; Couvez, Céline; Didier, Damien; Dumas, Franck; Fievet, Bruno; Morillon, Mehdi; Renaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident resulted in the largest ever accidental release of artificial radionuclides in coastal waters. This accident has shown the importance of marine assessment capabilities for emergency response and the need to develop tools for adequately predicting the evolution and potential impact of radioactive releases to the marine environment. The French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) equips its emergency response centre with operational tools to assist experts and decision makers in the event of accidental atmospheric releases and contamination of the terrestrial environment. The on-going project aims to develop tools for the management of marine contamination events in French coastal areas. This should allow us to evaluate and anticipate post-accident conditions, including potential contamination sites, contamination levels and potential consequences. In order to achieve this goal, two complementary tools are developed: site-specific marine data sheets and a dedicated simulation tool (STERNE, Simulation du Transport et du transfert d’Eléments Radioactifs dans l'environNEment marin). Marine data sheets are used to summarize the marine environment characteristics of the various sites considered, and to identify vulnerable areas requiring implementation of population protection measures, such as aquaculture areas, beaches or industrial water intakes, as well as areas of major ecological interest. Local climatological data (dominant sea currents as a function of meteorological or tidal conditions) serving as the basis for an initial environmental sampling strategy is provided whenever possible, along with a list of possible local contacts for operational management purposes. The STERNE simulation tool is designed to predict radionuclide dispersion and contamination in seawater and marine species by incorporating spatio-temporal data. 3D hydrodynamic forecasts are used as input data. Direct discharge points or

  10. Radiation protection and ambient radioactivity monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Stippler, R.

    2002-01-01

    The measuring activities for radiological monitoring in the mine and the surrounding area have been continued as usual, in compliance with the relevant programmes. As in previous years, low amounts of the nuclides H 3, C 14, Pb 210 and Rn 222, including Rn 220, and the short-life radon daughter products have been detected. In some cases, the nuclide-specific concentrations in ambient air derived from the annual average were below the mean natural concentrations of those nuclides. The relevant exposure data at the most affected measuring points remained far below the maximum permissible doses given in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. As compared to the natural and anthropogenic ambient radiation levels, the radiation exposure of the population in the area and the personnel on site, emanating from radioactive waste storage and performance of research projects in the Asse mine, represent an unsignificant contribution. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Radiation protection and ambient radioactivity monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Stippler, R.

    2001-01-01

    The measuring activities for radiological monitoring in the mine and the surrounding area have been continued as usual, in compliance with the relevant programmes. As in previous years, low amounts of the nuclides H 3, C 14, Pb 210 and Rn 222, including Rn 220, and the short-life radon daughter products have been detected. In some cases, the nuclide-specific concentrations in ambient air derived from the annual average were below the mean natural concentrations of those nuclides. The relevant exposure data at the most affected measuring points remained far below the maximum permissible doses given in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. As compared to the natural and anthropogenic ambient radiation levels, the radiation exposure of the population in the area and the personnel on site, emanating from radioactive waste storage and performance of research projects in the Asse mine, represent an unsignificant contribution. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Radiation protection and ambient radioactivity monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Stippler, R.

    2000-01-01

    The measuring activities for radiological monitoring in the mine and the surrounding area have been continued as usual, in compliance with the relevant programmes. As in previous years, low amounts of the nuclides H 3, C 14, Pb 210 and Rn 222, including Rn 220, and the short-life radon daughter products have been detected. In some cases, the nuclide-specific concentrations in ambient air derived from the annual average were below the mean natural concentrations of those nuclides. The relevant exposure data at the most affected measuring points remained far below the maximum permissible doses given in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. As compared to the natural and anthropogenic ambient radiation levels, the radiation exposure of the population in the area and the personnel on site, emanating from radioactive waste storage and performance of research projects in the Asse mine, represent an insignificant contribution. (orig./CB) [de

  13. Groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, J.W.; Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1995-05-23

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring program for the Hanford Site 300 Area Process Trenches (300 APT). The 300 APT are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulated unit. The 300 APT are included in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit No. WA890008967, and are subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring. This document describes a compliance monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the 300 APT. This plan describes the 300 APT monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the 300 APT. This plan will be used to meet groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the 300 APT becomes part of the Permit and through the postclosure care period until certification of final closure.

  14. Quality control of the interpretation monitors of digital radiological images; Controle de qualidade dos monitores de interpretacao de imagens radiologicas digitais: uma revisao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favero, Mariana S.; Goulart, Adriano Oliveira S., E-mail: mariana@phymed.com.br [PhyMED - Consultores em Fisica Medica e Radioprotecao Ltda, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The performance monitors has great importance in image quality of digital radiographic systems. In environments without films, it became necessary to implement acceptance testing and quality control monitors used for interpretation of medical images. The monitors dedicated to radiodiagnostic should provide information that represent slight differences in x-ray attenuation or minor differences in some anatomical region of interest. This should also result in small differences in luminance of an image represented. Factors affecting the quality of medical imaging are contrast, noise, resolution, artifacts and distortions. Therefore, a monitor must have specific characteristics, making it possible for the observer to carry out an assessment that leads to better diagnosis. Based on the need to evaluate diagnostic monitors in various radiological applications, this paper presents a summary for implementation and standardization of tests that are recommended by the publication AAPM Report 03. (author)

  15. Product kerma air area and effective dose in dental radiology; Produto kerma no ar-area e dose efetiva em radiodiagnostico odontologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, Rodrigo A.P.; Souza, M. Daiane M.; Costa, Alessandro M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology is to determine dosimetric quantities for the establishment and use of reference levels and comparative risk assessment. The use of the air kerma-area product, P{sub KA}, has been suggested in dental radiology, as this quantity is more closely related to risk. The aim of this study was to perform a preliminary survey of P{sub KA} and effective dose in different types of dental examinations. The future perspective is a large-scale survey for the establishment and use of diagnostic reference levels in dentistry in Brazil. (author)

  16. Product kerma air area and effective dose in dental radiology; Produto kerma no ar area e dose efetiva em radiodiagnostico odontologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, Rodrigo A.P.; Souza, Daiane M.; Costa, Alessandro M., E-mail: rodrigomauro@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology is to determine dosimetric quantities for the establishment and use of reference levels and comparative risk assessment. The use of the air kerma-area product, P{sub KA}, has been suggested in dental radiology, as this quantity is more closely related to risk. The aim of this study was to perform a preliminary survey of P{sub KA} and effective dose in different types of dental examinations. The future perspective is a large-scale survey for the establishment and use of diagnostic reference levels in dentistry in Brazil. (author)

  17. Environmental radiation monitoring system in Tokai and Oarai areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeki

    1983-01-01

    In the Tokai and the Oarai areas there are total of seventeen enterprises, different in size and kind, connected with nuclear energy. Environmental monitoring is carried out in the cooperation of the Government, local governments and enterprises according to the plans by a prefectural monitoring committee. The purpose is in the following three aspects: (1) Estimation of the dose of general people, based on environmental radioactivity and released radioactivity data (2) Grasping the radioactive accumulation on long-terms (3) Detection of abnormal releases from the enterprises at an early stage. By environmental monitoring made thus far, no rise in environmental radioactivities due to the enterprises is indicated. (author)

  18. Zero plastics and the radiologically protected area low level waste lockout program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.

    1995-11-01

    In 1993, EPRI initiated its Integrated LLW Cost and Volume Reduction Program. One key component of the project was the identification of unique or uncommon techniques and approaches to LLW management which could be transported with or without modification to other members of EPRI's Nuclear Power Business Group. Included among these unique approaches were: some nuclear stations had aggressively eliminated most of the plastic materials commonly used in radiologically protected areas (RPA), these included plastic bags, plastic sheeting and plastic sleeving; a few nuclear stations had completely eliminated from the RPA some of the disposable items routinely considered by most nuclear stations as absolutely essential, these included masking tape, duct tape and wood; a couple of leading edge plants were implementing RPA LLW lockout programs in an effort to control absolutely all materials entering or exiting the RPA and making the worker 100% responsible for managing her/his work environment. The above three approaches were so significant in their actual or potential impact that it was decided to initiate an independent research project to evaluate and demonstrate whether all three concepts could be implemented by a single nuclear station and with significant, positive results. This project reports on that research and demonstration project which was implemented at LaSalle and Zion nuclear stations, both of which are operated by Commonwealth Edison Company

  19. Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring Project: Phase I Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Randy M.; Hill, David E.; Gorman, Bryan L.

    2010-01-01

    As a proof of concept tested in an operational context, the Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring (GRadSSTraM) Project successfully demonstrated that radio frequency identification (RFID) and Web 2.0* technologies can be deployed to track controlled shipments between the United States and the European Union. Between November 2009 and May 2010, a total of 19 shipments were successfully shipped from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and tracked to their delivery at England's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) by the United Kingdom Royal Mail. However, the project can only be viewed as a qualified success as notable shortcomings were observed. Although the origin and terminus of all RFID-enabled shipments were recorded and no shipments were lost, not all the waypoints between ORNL and NPL were incorporated into the pilot. Given limited resources, the project team was able to install RFID listeners/actuators at three waypoints between the two endpoints. Although it is likely that all shipments followed the same route between ORNL and NPL, it cannot be determined beyond question that all 19 shipments were routed on identical itineraries past the same three waypoints. The pilot also raises the distinct possibility that unattended RFID tracking alone, without positive confirmation that a tagged item has been properly recorded by an RFID reader, does not meet a rigorous standard for shipping controlled items. Indeed, the proof of concept test strongly suggests that a multifaceted approach to tracking may be called for, including tracking methods that are capable of reading and accepting multiple inputs for individual items (e.g., carrier-provided tracking numbers, Universal Product Codes (UPCs), and RFID tags). For controlled items, another apparent requirement is a confirmation feature, human or otherwise, which can certify that an item's RFID tag, UPC, or tracking number has been recorded.

  20. The Effect of Realtime Monitoring on Dose Exposure to Staff Within an Interventional Radiology Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Frederic, E-mail: fredericbaumann@hotmail.com; Katzen, Barry T. [Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute (MCVI) (United States); Carelsen, Bart [Philips HealthCare, Clinical Science Interventional X-ray (Netherlands); Diehm, Nicolas [Kantonsspital Aarau, Clinical and Interventional Angiology (Switzerland); Benenati, James F.; Peña, Constantino S. [Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute (MCVI) (United States)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate a new device providing real-time monitoring on radiation exposure during fluoroscopy procedures intending to reduce radiation in an interventional radiology setting.Materials and MethodsIn one interventional suite, a new system providing a real-time radiation dose display and five individual wireless dosimeters were installed. The five dosimeters were worn by the attending, fellow, nurse, technician, and anesthesiologist for every procedure taking place in that suite. During the first 6-week interval the dose display was off (closed phase) and activated thereafter, for a 6-week learning phase (learning phase) and a 10-week open phase (open phase). During these phases, the staff dose and the individual dose for each procedure were recorded from the wireless dosimeter and correlated with the fluoroscopy time. Further subanalysis for dose exposure included diagnostic versus interventional as well as short (<10 min) versus long (>10 min) procedures.ResultsA total of 252 procedures were performed (n = 88 closed phase, n = 50 learning phase, n = 114 open phase). The overall mean staff dose per fluoroscopic minute was 42.79 versus 19.81 µSv/min (p < 0.05) comparing the closed and open phase. Thereby, anesthesiologists were the only individuals attaining a significant dose reduction during open phase 16.9 versus 8.86 µSv/min (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a significant reduction of total staff dose was observed for short 51 % and interventional procedures 45 % (p < 0.05, for both).ConclusionA real-time qualitative display of radiation exposure may reduce team radiation dose. The process may take a few weeks during the learning phase but appears sustained, thereafter.

  1. The Effect of Realtime Monitoring on Dose Exposure to Staff Within an Interventional Radiology Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Frederic; Katzen, Barry T.; Carelsen, Bart; Diehm, Nicolas; Benenati, James F.; Peña, Constantino S.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate a new device providing real-time monitoring on radiation exposure during fluoroscopy procedures intending to reduce radiation in an interventional radiology setting.Materials and MethodsIn one interventional suite, a new system providing a real-time radiation dose display and five individual wireless dosimeters were installed. The five dosimeters were worn by the attending, fellow, nurse, technician, and anesthesiologist for every procedure taking place in that suite. During the first 6-week interval the dose display was off (closed phase) and activated thereafter, for a 6-week learning phase (learning phase) and a 10-week open phase (open phase). During these phases, the staff dose and the individual dose for each procedure were recorded from the wireless dosimeter and correlated with the fluoroscopy time. Further subanalysis for dose exposure included diagnostic versus interventional as well as short (<10 min) versus long (>10 min) procedures.ResultsA total of 252 procedures were performed (n = 88 closed phase, n = 50 learning phase, n = 114 open phase). The overall mean staff dose per fluoroscopic minute was 42.79 versus 19.81 µSv/min (p < 0.05) comparing the closed and open phase. Thereby, anesthesiologists were the only individuals attaining a significant dose reduction during open phase 16.9 versus 8.86 µSv/min (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a significant reduction of total staff dose was observed for short 51 % and interventional procedures 45 % (p < 0.05, for both).ConclusionA real-time qualitative display of radiation exposure may reduce team radiation dose. The process may take a few weeks during the learning phase but appears sustained, thereafter

  2. Dose monitoring in radiology departments. Status quo and future perspectives; Dosismonitoring in der Radiologie. Status quo und Zukunftsperspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boos, J. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Meineke, A. [Cerner Healthcare Services, Idstein (Germany); Bethge, O.T.; Antoch, G.; Kroepil, P. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2016-05-15

    The number of computed tomography examinations has continuously increased over the last decades and accounts for a major part of the collective radiation dose from medical investigations. For purposes of quality assurance in modern radiology a systematic monitoring and analysis of dose related data from radiological examinations is mandatory. Various ways of collecting dose data are available today, for example the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine - Structured Report (DICOM-SR), optical character recognition and DICOM-modality performed procedure steps (MPPS). The DICOM-SR is part of the DICOM-standard and provides the DICOM-Radiation Dose Structured Report, which is an easily applicable and comprehensive solution to collect radiation dose parameters. This standard simplifies the process of data collection and enables comprehensive dose monitoring. Various commercial dose monitoring software devices with varying characteristics are available today. In this article, we discuss legal obligations, various ways to monitor dose data, current dose monitoring software solutions and future perspectives in regard to the EU Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM.

  3. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  4. Alternative agriculture as a substitute for environmental remediation. Production of poultry in radiologically contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, E.L.; Brisbin, I.L.; Kennamer, R.A. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Exploiting the physiological and ecological characteristics of domesticated species has seldom been considered as a means of returning radiologically contaminated areas to safe agricultural production. However, the proper choice of cultivated and domesticated species, together with appropriate husbandry practices, may allow safe production of foods, fibre and energy. As an example, factors that could permit safe production of food products for human consumption from poultry raised in contaminated areas are considered. These factors include radionuclide transfer from the environment into poultry and methods for reducing radionuclide uptake and/or decontaminating chickens to yield acceptable food products. Studies of growth and feed intake rates of chickens under intensive management and free-ranging husbandries, 137 Cs uptake by chickens exposed to contaminated sediments, potential effects of husbandry on 137 Cs concentrations and 137 Cs elimination by chickens after removal of contaminated feed are described. Data from these and other studies are combined in simulation models of the 13 '7Cs kinetics of chickens. Chicken product 137 Cs concentrations ([ 137 Cs]s) decrease with increases in body mass, apparently as a result of decreasing mass specific intake rates. Husbandries that increase contaminant intake (e.g. free-ranging rearing conditions versus brooder house production) or access to contaminated soils (e.g. scattering feed directly onto contaminated solid versus the use of feeders) increase total body [ 137 Cs]s. However, model simulations indicate that it is possible to produce safe poultry products (especially eggs) at all but unrealistically high feed contamination levels. Even when dietary 137 Cs levels produce [ 137 Cs]s in poultry products that exceed acceptable limits, the high metabolism of poultry leads to a rapid decrease in [ 137 Cs]s once the chickens are placed on uncontaminated rations. This permits the use of contaminated feed or forage for

  5. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: 100, 200, 300 and 600 Areas. Fourth quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed on waste disposal sites located at the Hanford Site. The Fourth Quarter 1994 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized

  6. An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and surrounding area, West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and the surrounding area was conducted from mid-August through early September 1984 by EG ampersand G Energy Measurements, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy. The radiological survey was part of the United States Department of Energy Comprehensive Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS) program, which provides state-of-the-art remote sensing to support the needs of the various DOE facilities. The survey consisted of airborne measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotopic concentrations in the area surrounding the project site. Results are reported as isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides. 8 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Survey of radiological contaminants in the near-shore environment at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Verst, S.P.; Albin, C.L.; Patton, G.W.; Blanton, M.L.; Poston, T.M.; Cooper, A.T.; Antonio, E.J.

    1998-09-01

    Past operations at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor resulted in the release of radiological contaminants to the soil column, local groundwater, and ultimately to the near-shore environment of the Columbia River. In September 1997, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) initiated a special study of the near-shore vicinity at the Hanford Site's retired 100-N Area reactor. Environmental samples were collected and analyzed for radiological contaminants ( 3 H, 90 Sr, and gamma/ emitters), with both the WDOH and SESP analyzing a portion of the samples. Samples of river water, sediment, riverbank springs, periphyton, milfoil, flying insects, clam shells, and reed canary grass were collected. External exposure rates were also measured for the near-shore environment in the vicinity of the 100-N Area. In addition, samples were collected at background locations above Vernita Bridge

  8. A Business Analytics Software Tool for Monitoring and Predicting Radiology Throughput Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen; Cournane, Seán; Sheehy, Niall; Hederman, Lucy

    2016-12-01

    Business analytics (BA) is increasingly being utilised by radiology departments to analyse and present data. It encompasses statistical analysis, forecasting and predictive modelling and is used as an umbrella term for decision support and business intelligence systems. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether utilising BA technologies could contribute towards improved decision support and resource management within radiology departments. A set of information technology requirements were identified with key stakeholders, and a prototype BA software tool was designed, developed and implemented. A qualitative evaluation of the tool was carried out through a series of semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders. Feedback was collated, and emergent themes were identified. The results indicated that BA software applications can provide visibility of radiology performance data across all time horizons. The study demonstrated that the tool could potentially assist with improving operational efficiencies and management of radiology resources.

  9. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, tritium, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), gross alpha, mercury, lead, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic, and cadmium exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) at the Savannah River Plant. This report gives the results of the analyses of groundwater from the H-Area Seepage Basin

  10. The integrated monitoring area Lheebroekerzand the Netherlands. Data of 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathijssen-Spiekman, E.A.M.; Wolters-Balk, M.A.H.

    1998-12-31

    The objectives of this paper are to compile and present the 1996 monitoring data which are forwarded to the international database in Helsinki, Finland, in November 1997, and to inform participating organizations and volunteers on the scope and progress of the monitoring programme on a national and international level. Additional non-obligatory data are also reported. In 1996, the biological part of the integrated monitoring programme consisted of a regular inventory of birds, leafminers and butterflies in the monitoring area, as well as inventories of the aquatic macrofauna present in the moorland pool Kliplo and observations on the performance of pine trees. The chemical-physical part included meteorological variables like temperature, humidity, the amount of precipitation and irradiation, together with chemical analysis of air, precipitation, leaves, needles, mosses and pool water. Where possible, the series of data are described, interpreted and compared

  11. Radiological demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux. Diagnostic value of barium and bread studies compared with 24-hour pH monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksglaede, K.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.

    1999-01-01

    To correlate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), demonstrated by a radiological method using food, with the reflux events, as determined by 24-h pH monitoring. One hundred and seventeen patients with a median age of 47 years (86 male and 31 female) were examined. In the supine left position, the patient consumed 360 ml of barium contrast. Fluoroscopy was performed with the patient in the supine right oblique position during mastication and swallowing a piece of rye bread with liver pate and barium. The test was positive if barium was observed >= 5 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction. An antimony pH-probe was placed 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter, previously determined by manometry. The position was controlled by radiography after positioning and before removal. The total time of esophageal pH<4 exceeding 5.0% was considered pathological. The radiological method had a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 52% compared to 24-h pH monitoring. The high specificity of this radiological method justify direct therapeutic consequence of a positive test. However, a negative test still renders the problem unsolved

  12. Evaluation and assessment methodology, standards, and procedures manual of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, K.C.; Burson, Z.G.; Smith, J.M.; Blanchard, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, the U.S. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan authorises the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to co-ordinate the Federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities, and is comprised of representatives from several Federal agencies and Department of Energy contractors who provide assistance to the state(s) and Lead Federal Agency. The Evaluation and Assessment (E and A) Division of the FRMAC is responsible for receiving, storing, and interpreting environmental surveillance data to estimate the potential health consequences to the population in the vicinity of the accident site. The E and A Division has commissioned the preparation of a methodology and procedures manual which will result in a consistent approach by Division members in carrying out their duties. The first edition of this manual is nearing completion. In this paper, a brief review of the structure of the FRMAC is presented, with emphasis on the E and A Division. The contents of the E and A manual are briefly described, as are future plans for its expansion. (author)

  13. Radiological demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux. Diagnostic value of barium and bread studies compared with 24-hour pH monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksglaede, K.; Thommesen, P.; Funch-Jensen, P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), demonstrated by a radiological method using food, with the reflux events, as determined by 24-h pH monitoring. Material and Methods: One hundred and seventeen patients with a median age of 47 years (86 male and 31 female) were examinated. In the supine left position, the patient consumed 360 ml of barium contrast. Fluoroscopy was performed with the patient in the supine right oblique position during mastication and swallowing a piece of rye bread with liver pate and barium. The test was positive if barium was observed ≥5 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction. An antimony pH-probe was placed 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter, previously determined by manometry. The position was controlled by radiography after positioning and before removal. The total time of esophageal pH<4 exceeding 5.0% was considered pathological. Results: The radiological method had a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 52% compared to 24-h pH monitoring. Conclusion: The high specificity of this radiological method justify direct therapeutic consequence of a positive test. However, a negative test still renders the problem unsolved. (orig.)

  14. Radiological demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux. Diagnostic value of barium and bread studies compared with 24-hour pH monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksglaede, K.; Thommesen, P. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology R, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Funch-Jensen, P. [Surgical Gastroenterology L, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), demonstrated by a radiological method using food, with the reflux events, as determined by 24-h pH monitoring. Material and Methods: One hundred and seventeen patients with a median age of 47 years (86 male and 31 female) were examinated. In the supine left position, the patient consumed 360 ml of barium contrast. Fluoroscopy was performed with the patient in the supine right oblique position during mastication and swallowing a piece of rye bread with liver pate and barium. The test was positive if barium was observed {>=}5 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction. An antimony pH-probe was placed 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter, previously determined by manometry. The position was controlled by radiography after positioning and before removal. The total time of esophageal pH<4 exceeding 5.0% was considered pathological. Results: The radiological method had a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 52% compared to 24-h pH monitoring. Conclusion: The high specificity of this radiological method justify direct therapeutic consequence of a positive test. However, a negative test still renders the problem unsolved. (orig.)

  15. Area and environmental gamma dose monitoring at PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, M.; Awan, M.A.; Ahmad, S.; Afsar, M.; Orfi, S.D.

    1986-11-01

    Radiation dose monitoring of various radioactive laboratories including PARR building, radioactive waste disposal area and the environment upto initial peripheral limits of PINSTECH has been carried out by TLD's installed at different locations. Average dose rates in terms of percentage of dose limits have been compiled. The results for the year 1985 have been discussed in this report. (author)

  16. Portable system for periodical verification of area monitors for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Luciane de R.; Leite, Sandro Passos; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Patrao, Karla C. de Souza; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da; Pereira, Walsan W.

    2009-01-01

    The Neutrons Laboratory develops a project viewing the construction of a portable test system for verification of functioning conditions of neutron area monitors. This device will allow to the users the verification of the calibration maintenance of his instruments at the use installations, avoiding the use of an inadequate equipment related to his answer to the neutron beam response

  17. Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, J.

    2006-04-01

    In order to manage various nuclear or radiological emergencies the authorities must have pre-prepared plans. The purpose of the NKS project EMARAD (Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents) was to produce and gather various data and information that could be useful in drawing up emergency plans and radiation monitoring strategies. One of the specific objectives of the project was to establish a www site that would contain various radiation-threat and radiation-monitoring related data and documents and that could be accessed by all Nordic countries. Other important objectives were discussing various factors affecting measurements in an emergency, efficient use of communication technology and disseminating relevant information on such topics as urban dispersion and illicit use of radiation. The web server is hosted by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) of Finland. The data stored include pre-calculated consequence data for nuclear power plant accidents as well as documents and presentations describing e.g. general features of monitoring strategies, the testing of the British urban dispersion model UDM and the scenarios and aspects related to malicious use of radiation sources and radioactive material. As regards the last item mentioned, a special workshop dealing with the subject was arranged in Sweden in 2005 within the framework of the project. (au)

  18. Emergency Management and Radiation Moni-toring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, J [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    In order to manage various nuclear or radiological emergencies the authorities must have pre-prepared plans. The purpose of the NKS project EMARAD (Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents) was to produce and gather various data and information that could be useful in drawing up emergency plans and radiation monitoring strategies. One of the specific objectives of the project was to establish a www site that would contain various radiation-threat and radiation-monitoring related data and documents and that could be accessed by all Nordic countries. Other important objectives were discussing various factors affecting measurements in an emergency, efficient use of communication technology and disseminating relevant information on such topics as urban dispersion and illicit use of radiation. The web server is hosted by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) of Finland. The data stored include pre-calculated consequence data for nuclear power plant accidents as well as documents and presentations describing e.g. general features of monitoring strategies, the testing of the British urban dispersion model UDM and the scenarios and aspects related to malicious use of radiation sources and radioactive material. As regards the last item mentioned, a special workshop dealing with the subject was arranged in Sweden in 2005 within the framework of the project. (au)

  19. Radioactivity in the environment. A summary and radiological assessment of the Environment Agency's monitoring programmes; report for 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Radioactive Substances Act 1993 provides for controls to be exercised over the keeping and use of radioactive materials and, in particular, on the accumulation and disposal of radioactive wastes. The Environment Agency is responsible for administration and enforcement of the Act in England and Wales. In support of these regulatory functions and as part of the UK Government's arrangements for providing information to the European Commission under the Euratom Treaty, the Agency commissions independent monitoring of radioactive waste disposals and their impact on the environment, and monitoring of radioactivity in air, rainwater and drinking water sources. This report presents the data from these monitoring programmes and provides a commentary on their radiological significance. It includes assessments of radiation exposure of members of the public for compliance with the annual dose limit recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Concentrations of radioactivity in water are also assessed in relation to the guidelines on drinking water quality recommended by the World Health Organisation. This report for 1997 is one of an annual series published by the Agency. It is being distributed to local authorities as part of the arrangements under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 for provision of access to environmental information. The monitoring programmes and preparation of this report are managed by the Agency's National Compliance Assessment Service. (author)

  20. Preliminary study of a radiological survey in an abandoned uranium mining area in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    N, Rabesiranana; M, Rasolonirina; F, Solonjara A.; Andriambololona., Raoelina; L, Mabit

    2010-05-01

    The region of Vinaninkarena located in central Madagascar (47°02'40"E, 19°57'17"S), is known to be a high natural radioactive area. Uranium ore was extracted in this region during the 1950s and the early 1960s. In the mid-1960s, mining activities were stopped and the site abandoned. In the meantime, the region, which used to be without any inhabitants, has recently been occupied by new settlers with presumed increase in exposure of the local population to natural ionizing radiation. In order to assess radiological risk, a survey to assess the soil natural radioactivity background was conducted during the year 2004. This study was implemented in the frame of the FADES Project SP99v1b_21 entitled: Assessment of the environmental pollution by multidisciplinary approach, and the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Cooperation Project MAG 7002 entitled: Effects of air and water pollution on human health. Global Positioning System (GPS) was used to determine the geographical coordinates of the top soil samples (0-15cm) collected. The sampling was performed using a multi integrated scale approach to estimate the spatial variability of the parameters under investigation (U, Th and K) using geo-statistical approach. A total of 205 soil samples was collected in the study site (16 km2). After humidity correction, the samples were sealed in 100 cm3 cylindrical air-tight plastic containers and stored for more than 6 months to reach a secular equilibrium between parents and short-lived progeny (226Ra and progeny, 238U and 234Th). Measurements were performed using a high-resolution HPGe Gamma-detector with a 30% relative efficiency and an energy resolution of 1.8 keV at 1332.5 keV, allowing the determination of the uranium and thorium series and 40K. In case of secular equilibrium, a non-gamma-emitting radionuclide activity was deduced from its gamma emitting progeny. This was the case for 238U (from 234Th), 226Ra (from 214Pb and 214Bi) and 232Th (from 228Ac, 212Pb or

  1. Suitability of monitoring methods for the optimisation of Radiological Protection in the case of internal exposure through inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrange, J.P.; Gibert, B.; Basire, D.

    2000-01-01

    The radiological protection system recommended by the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) for justified practices relied pn the limitation and optimisation principles. The monitoring of internal exposure is most often based on the periodic assessment of individual exposure in order to essentially insure the simple compliance with the annual dose limits. Optimisation of protection implies a realistic, sensitive and analytical assessment of individual and collective exposures in order to allow the indentification of the main sources of exposure (main sources of contamination, most exposed operators, work activities contributing the most to the exposure) and the selection of the optimal protection options. Therefore the monitoring methods must allow the realistic assessment of individual dose levels far lower than annual limits together with measurements as frequent as possible. The aim of this presentation is to discuss the ability of various monitoring methods (collective and individual air sampling, in vivo and in vitro bioassays) to fulfil those needs. This discussion is illustrated by the particular case of the internal exposure to natural uranium compounds through inhalation. Firstly, the sensitivity and the degree to which each monitoring method is realistic are quantified and discussed on the basis of the application of the new ICRP dosimetric model, and their analytical capability for the optimisation of radiological protection is then indicated. Secondly, a case study is presented which shows the capability of individual air sampling techniques to analyse the exposure of the workers and the inadequacy of static air sampling to accurately estimate the exposures when contamination varies significantly over time and space in the workstations. As far as exposure to natural uranium compounds through inhalation is concerned, the study for assessing the sensitivity, analytic ability and accuracy of the different measuring systems shows that

  2. Radioactivity in the environment. Report for 2001 : a summary and radiological assessment of the Environment Agency's monitoring programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    RSA 93 authorisations. Radiological monitoring programmes are carried out in support of the Agency's regulatory functions under RSA 93 and as part of the UK Government's obligations under the Euratom Treaty. This report presents the results of the Agency's regular monitoring of radioactivity in the environment during 2001 and an assessment of the radiological impact. The main findings of the regular monitoring programme during 2001 were as follows: The majority of operator declarations of the radioactive content of waste discharges and disposals had been assessed accurately or were over-estimate; Radiation dose rates above sediments and concentrations of radionuclides in water, sediment, soil and grass were generally consistent with those reported in previous years. Enhanced levels of artificial radionuclides continue to be found in coastal sediments in the vicinity of Sellafield, which decline with increasing distance from the site. Radioactivity levels around other major sites were mostly low or not detectable; As in previous years, concentrations of radionuclides in samples of airborne dust and rainwater from seven locations in the UK were very low or undetectable; Water from all 31 monitored sources of drinking water in England and Wales, except one in Derbyshire, were consistently below the World Health Organisation (WHO) drinking water screening levels. The enhanced level of uranium in the Derbyshire water is due to the natural levels of uranium in the local geology, and is insignificant from a radiological point of view. Assessments of doses that might be received by members of the public from drinking water and occupation of beaches, inter-tidal areas and river banks around nuclear and major non-nuclear sites were made. In all cases, doses were less than the annual dose limit for members of the public of 1000 microsieverts (1000 μSv). Houseboat dwellers on the Ribble Estuary in Lancashire received the highest total annual dose of 142 μSv. This is due to

  3. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5

  4. A new means of communication with the populations: the Extremadura Regional Government Radiological Monitoring alert WEB Page

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, A.; Vasco, J.; Miralles, Y.; Torrado, L.; Gil, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    In 1990, the Junta (Regional government) of Extremadura encharged the University of Extremadura with the desogm and phased implementation of the Radiological Warning Network of Extremadura, initially limited to the proximity of the Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant. Since then, its structure and objectives have been steadily broadened, but always with priority given to the correct operation of the existing infrastructure. The network currently consists of the following installations. Around the cited nuclear plant, there are seven gamma dosimetry stations, two stations of continuous monitoring of radio iodines and radio particles, two automated meteorology stations, and two stations of continuous monitoring of radiation levels in the water of the River Tagas. Outside this zone, there are three gamma dosimetry stations and two for the continuous monitoring of radiosonde and radio particles. There is also a mobile laboratory equipped with an aerosol trap, a gamma dose rate monitor, and a portable germanium detector, with which it is possible in a minimally reasonable time to reach any location where it is necessary to determine the radiological status. All the information generated by the cited stations and the mobile laboratory are transmitted to the logistic centre located in the Physics Department of the Veterinary Faculty of Caceres, and to the network's strategic centre in the General Directorate for the Environment of the Agriculture and Environment council of the Junta of Extremadura. From the beginning of its operation, particular attention was paid to finding different means of providing the population with basic, truthful, and accessible periodic information on the radiological status of the zones covered by the network. Therefore, as well as sending to the Assembly (Parliament) of Extremadura summaries of the reports that are periodically presented to the Junta, an initial attempt was made to inform the population directly by including in the journal Extremadura

  5. Remote sensing techniques in monitoring areas affected by forest fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianni, Aikaterini Ch.; Lazaridou, Maria A.

    2017-09-01

    Forest fire is a part of nature playing a key role in shaping ecosystems. However, fire's environmental impacts can be significant, affecting wildlife habitat and timber, human settlements, man-made technical constructions and various networks (road, power networks) and polluting the air with emissions harmful to human health. Furthermore, fire's effect on the landscape may be long-lasting. Monitoring the development of a fire occurs as an important aspect at the management of natural hazards in general. Among the used methods for monitoring, satellite data and remote sensing techniques can be proven of particular importance. Satellite remote sensing offers a useful tool for forest fire detection, monitoring, management and damage assessment. Especially for fire scars detection and monitoring, satellite data derived from Landsat 8 can be a useful research tool. This paper includes critical considerations of the above and concerns in particular an example of the Greek area (Thasos Island). This specific area was hit by fires several times in the past and recently as well (September 2016). Landsat 8 satellite data are being used (pre and post fire imagery) and digital image processing techniques are applied (enhancement techniques, calculation of various indices) for fire scars detection. Visual interpretation of the example area affected by the fires is also being done, contributing to the overall study.

  6. Environmental Health Impacts of Nuclear Fuel Cycle With Emphasis to Monitoring and Radiological Safety Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad Allah, A.A.; El- Shanshory, A.I.

    2010-01-01

    facilities, as well as their health impacts instruments and monitors systems for radiological control have been reviewed and evaluated

  7. Radiological protection of populations in contaminated areas: synthesis of tools, concepts and methods elaborated in the ETHOS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepicard, S.; Lochard, J.; Schneider, T.

    2004-01-01

    The ETHOS project has been implemented in Belarus from 1996 to 2001. This report addresses several issues concerning the monitoring of radioactivity of the environment and of persons, and its modalities: organization of measurement devices, restitution of measurements, formatting and exploitation of results by different actors in order to develop strategies adapted to a contaminated environment. Thus, the report discusses the methodological fundamentals, the common information base on a radiological situation, and modalities for information exchange, formatting and processing. Then, it addresses the articulation between individual and public actions in improvement strategies (monitoring of local product quality with example of milk, children health monitoring), and the issue of the management of radioactive wastes in household activities

  8. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report

  9. Aerial radiological survey of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and surrounding area, Princeton, New Jersey. Date of survey: August 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, P.A.

    1981-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during August 1980 to radiometrically survey a 10.4 km 2 area centered on the future site of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) located near Princeton, New Jersey. All detected radionuclides were consistent with normal background emitters and no man-made gamma emitters were detected. Average aerial exposure rates normalized to one meter above the ground are presented in the form of an isopleth map

  10. An aerial radiological survey of Areas 16 and 30, Nevada Test Site: Date of survey: June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluitt, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The survey period was from 1 June to 16 June 1983, during which airborne measurements were obtained over Areas 16 and 30. The data were used to generate exposure rate, cobalt-60, and cesium-137 spatial distribution maps. The aerial survey results are expressed as exposure rate, cesium-137, and cobalt-60 isopleth contours, superimposed on NTS maps. 12 refs., 16 figs

  11. Radiological surveillance of members of the public during earthmoving activities in the area of the Ciemat mound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, A.; Yague, L.; Navarro, N.; Gasco, C.; Ortiz, M. T.; Quinones, J.

    2013-01-01

    In the year 2012 was undertaken excavation and earthwork of the mound. The lands of this area contained remains sterile uranium mining and therefore concentrations of natural radionuclides higher than natural radioactive background activity. In order to assess the radiological impact on the public, was a theoretical evaluation of the dose inhaled that would get a person who remained in the vicinity during the making of the work. (Author)

  12. Moisture Monitoring at Area G, Technical Area 54, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2016 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, Daniel Glenn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay Hanson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jennings, Terry L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-17

    Hydrological characterization and moisture monitoring activities provide data required for evaluating the transport of subsurface contaminants in the unsaturated and saturated zones beneath Area G, and for the Area G Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis. These activities have been ongoing at Area G, Technical Area 54 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since waste disposal operations began in 1957. This report summarizes the hydrological characterization and moisture monitoring activities conducted at Area G. It includes moisture monitoring data collected from 1986 through 2016 from numerous boreholes and access tubes with neutron moisture meters, as well as data collected by automated dataloggers for water content measurement sensors installed in a waste disposal pit cover, and buried beneath the floor of a waste disposal pit. This report is an update of a nearly identical report by Levitt et al., (2015) that summarized data collected through early 2015; this report includes additional moisture monitoring data collected at Pit 31 and the Pit 38 extension through December, 2016. It also includes information from the Jennings and French (2009) moisture monitoring report and includes all data from Jennings and French (2009) and the Draft 2010 Addendum moisture monitoring report (Jennings and French, 2010). For the 2015 version of this report, all neutron logging data, including neutron probe calibrations, were investigated for quality and pedigree. Some data were recalculated using more defensible calibration data. Therefore, some water content profiles are different from those in the Jennings and French (2009) report. All of that information is repeated in this report for completeness. Monitoring and characterization data generally indicate that some areas of the Area G vadose zone are consistent with undisturbed conditions, with water contents of less than five percent by volume in the top two layers of the Bandelier tuff at Area G. These data also

  13. Radiological Survey Results for Areas A1 North, A5A, A6, and B2 at the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project, Washington, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W.C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    Perform radiological surveys of the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project (MWRP) facility in Washington, Pennsylvania. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to provide limited training pertaining to ORISE radiological soil scanning and sampling procedures to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) personnel. In addition, the NRC also requested that ORISE perform radiological surveys of the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project (MWRP) facility in Washington, Pennsylvania (Figure 1). ORISE has and will continue to interface with PADEP personnel in a joint effort to perform confirmatory radiological surveys, consisting of gamma scans and soil sampling, at the MWRP facility. PADEP personnel will continue to submit soil samples that they collect to ORISE for analyses. PADEP sample results, along with ORISE results, will be provided to the NRC and PADEP so that decisions regarding the radiological status of the surveyed areas can be determined. ORISE performed radiological surveys during the period of November 28 and 29, 2006. The survey unit (SU) available for ORISE radiological survey activities was Area A1 North. The MWRP final status survey (FSS) results for Area A1 North were reviewed prior to these survey activities. Prior to ORISE's survey activities, PADEP personnel had performed radiological surveys and collected soil samples from SU Areas A5A and A6. These samples were provided to ORISE for analyses while on site. After the ORISE radiological surveys, PADEP personnel collected soil samples from SU Areas A2 and B2 and these samples were shipped to ORISE for analyses in January 2007. Figure 2 depicts the MWRP Areas A through D; ORISE and PADEP personnel performed survey activities in portions of Areas A and B. For interlaboratory comparison analyses with MWRP's site contractor, Malcolm Pirnie (MP), ORISE requested soil samples from the Area A1 soil stockpiles

  14. Energy response of neutron area monitor with silicon semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Sigeru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kaihara, Akihisa; Nakamura, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype neutron area monitor with a silicon semiconductor detector has been developed which has the energy response of 1 cm dose equivalent recommended by the ICRP-26. Boron and proton radiators are coated on the surface of the silicon semiconductor detector. The detector is set at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. This moderator is covered by a porous cadmium board which serves as the thermal neutron absorber. Neutrons are detected as α-particles generated by the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li and as recoil protons generated by the interaction of fast neutrons with hydrogen. The neutron energy response of the monitor was measured using thermal neutrons and monoenergetic fast neutrons generated by an accelerator. The response was consistent with the 1 cm dose equivalent response required for the monitor within ±34% in the range of 0.025 - 15 Mev. (author)

  15. How should work the thyroid monitoring for inhabitants of the destroyed area and its adjacent areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kunihide; Ito, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The general method of the exposure dose evaluation and the thyroid monitoring for it are explained and stressed. The vast area environmental contamination around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident brought about the anxiety of health risks for the inhabitants, especially probabilistic outbreak of cancer owing to radiation exposure. The report concludes that for the post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) mental care and thyroid monitoring are necessary. (S. Ohno)

  16. 2016 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, David [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) within the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data include direct radiation exposure, as well as radiation from the air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2016 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports, developed by National Security Technologies, LLC Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show that tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. During 2016, precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS was 8% below average, and precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS was 8% above average. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation as measured from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers shows no evidence of precipitation percolating through the covers

  17. Wide-area monitoring to detect undeclared nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.

    1994-09-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is committed to strengthening and streamlining the overall effectiveness of the IAEA safeguards system. The IAEA is investigating the use of environmental monitoring techniques to strengthen its capability to detect undeclared nuclear activities. The IAEA's Program 93+2 Initiative has been established to develop, test, and assess strengthening techniques and measures. Some of the techniques have been validated and are being implemented during routine safeguards inspections. The effectiveness of other techniques is being studied as a part of extensive field trials conducted at nuclear facilities of various Member States during 1993 and 1994. Proposals based on the results of these investigations and recommendations for new safeguards activities are expected to be presented to the March 1995 Board of Governors Meeting. The techniques in use or under study during IAEA field trials address various types of environmental monitoring applications as outlined under Program 93+2's Task 3, Environmental Monitoring Techniques for Safeguards Applications, namely, the use of short-range monitoring during inspections and visits to investigate sites of possible undeclared activities. With the exception of wide-area water sampling in Iraq, the use of long-range monitoring, in the absence of any indication of undeclared nuclear activities, remains largely unexamined by the IAEA. The efficacy of long-range monitoring depends on the availability of mobile signature isotopes or compounds and on the ability to distinguish the nuclear signatures from background signals and attributing them to a source. The scope of this paper is to provide technical information to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on possible wide-area survey techniques for the detection of undeclared nuclear activities. The primary focus is the detection of effluents from reprocessing activities

  18. The Argonne Radiological Impact Program (ARIP). Part II. MONITOR: A Program and Data Base for Retrieval and Utilization of Pollutant Monitoring Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, Keith F.; Stowe, Ralph F.; Frigerio, Norman A.

    1977-02-01

    The Argonne Radiological Impact Program (ARIP) is an ongoing project of the Laboratory's Division of Environmental Impact Studies that aims at developing methodologies for assessing the carcinogenic hazards associated with nuclear power development. The project's first report (ANL/ES-26, Part I), published in September.l973, discussed models of radiation carcinogenesis and the contribution of U .. S. background radiation levels to hazardous dose rates. The current report (Part II) treats the storage and access of available data on radiation and radioactivity levels in the u. S. A compute-r code. (the MONITOR program) is prf!sented, which can serve as a ready-access data. bank for all monitoring data acquired over the past two decades. The MONITOR program currently stores data on monitoring locations, types of monitoring efforts, and types of monitoring data. reported in Radiation Data and Reports by the various state and federal ne-tworks; expansion of this data base to include nuclear power facilities in operation or on order is ongoing ·. The MONITOR code retrieves information within a search radius, or rectangl.e ,. circumscribed by parameters of latitude and longitude, and l:.ists or maps the data_as: requested. The code, with examples, is given in full in the report ..

  19. Recommendations of the AIRP-SEFP-SFPR working group individual radiological monitoring document-dosimetric data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litido, M.; Busuoli, G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Iniiguez Saez, J.; Dollo, R.

    1996-01-01

    On the initiative of the chairmen of the three radiation protection societies (Italian, French, Spanish), it has been decided to extend the study carried out at TAORMINA (Sicily, Italy) joint conference on the harmonization of radiation protection practices. In order to formulate proposals on this topic, a working group was created at the end of 1993 made up of representatives of each society, with the objective of harmonizing the individual radiological monitoring documents and methods of recording and managing dosimetric information in data banks. (author)

  20. Perry Nuclear Power Plant Area/Equipment Temperature Monitoring Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Perry Nuclear Power Plant Area/Equipment Temperature Monitoring Program serves two purposes. The first is to track temperature trends during normal plant operation in areas where suspected deviations from established environmental profiles exist. This includes the use of Resistance Temperature Detectors, Recorders, and Temperature Dots for evaluation of equipment qualified life for comparison with tested parameters and the established Environmental Design Profile. It also may be used to determine the location and duration of steam leaks for effect on equipment qualified life. The second purpose of this program is to aid HVAC design engineers in determining the source of heat outside anticipated design parameters. Resistance Temperature Detectors, Recorders, and Temperature Dots are also used for this application but the results may include design changes to eliminate the excess heat or provide qualified equipment (cable) to withstand the elevated temperature, splitting of environmental zones to capture accurate temperature parameters, or continued environmental monitoring for evaluation of equipment located in hot spots

  1. 1998 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-06-02

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds such as trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride. The Interim Action T-1 Air Stripper System began operation on September 16, 1996. A comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. The Interim Action is meeting its objectives and is capable of continuing to do so until the final groundwater remedial action is in place.

  2. 300 Area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loll, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This monitoring plan describes the activities and methods that will be employed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in order to ensure compliance with the National Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Included in this document are a brief description of the project, the specifics of the sampling effort, including the physical location and frequency of sampling, the support required for sampling, and the Quality Assurance (QA) protocols to be followed in the sampling procedures

  3. Monitoring of protected areas of the Lower Vistula River

    OpenAIRE

    Dawid Aleksander Szatten; Zbigniew Czerebiej

    2018-01-01

    The main aim of the research was to determine the quantitative and qualitative assessment of the condition of surface waters in the protected areas of the Lower Vistula River. The research included the analysis of the surface water monitoring network in the Lower Vistula catchment area in the water management cycle 2010-2015. The research subject was Lower Vistula on the section from the Wloclawek Reservoir (km 675) to the estuary of the river to the Gdańsk Bay (km 941). The most important re...

  4. Area radiation monitor at the intense pulsed-neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichholz, J.J.; Lynch, F.J.; Mundis, R.L.; Howe, M.L.; Dolecek, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent ionization chamber with associated circuitry has been developed for area radiation monitoring in the Intense Pulsed-Neutron Source (IPNS) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The conventional chamber configuration was modified in order to increase the electric field and effective volume thereby achieving higher sensitivity and linearity. The instrument provides local and remote radiation level indications and a high level alarm. Twenty-four of these instruments were fabricated for use at various locations in the experimental area of the IPNS-1 facility

  5. Energy technology monitoring - New areas and in-depth investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigassi, R.; Eicher, H.; Steiner, P.; Ott, W.

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project that examined long-term trends in the energy technology area in order to provide information that is to form the basis for political action and the distribution of energy research funding in Switzerland. Energy-technology areas examined include variable-speed electrical drives, ventilation systems for low-energy-consumption buildings, membrane technology and the use of plastics in lightweight automobiles. Examples are quoted and the current state of the appropriate technologies and market aspects are examined. Also, the potential and future developments in the areas listed are looked at. The consequences for energy policy and future developments in the technology-monitoring area are considered

  6. Calibration of radiation protection area monitoring instruments in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I.I.; Youssif, B.E.; Beineen, A.A.; Hassan, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents results of measurements for the calibration of radiation protection area monitoring instruments carried out during the period 2006-2008 at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of Sudan. The work performed included quality assurance measurements, measurements for the dosimeter calibrations and uncertainty analysis. Calibrations were performed using 137 Cs gamma ray sources produced by OB 85 and OB 34/1 gamma calibrators producing air kerma rate that ranged from 10 μGy/h to 50 mGy/h. Area monitoring instruments were calibrated in terms of ambient dose equivalent, H*(10) derived using air kerma to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. Results are presented for 78 area monitoring instruments representing most commonly used types in Sudan. Radioactive check source measurements for the reference chamber showed deviation within 1% limit. The accuracy in the beam output measurements was within 5% internationally considered as acceptable. The results highlighted the importance of radiation protection calibrations. Regulations are further need to ensure safety aspect really meet the required international standards.

  7. Survey of Radiological and Chemical Contaminants in the Near-Shore Environment at the Hanford Site 300 Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Van Verst, Scott P.; Tiller, Brett L.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.

    2003-01-01

    This updates the original report by correcting some errors and adding new information. This assessment of the 300 Area was completed to identify any contamination present and determine if it could present a risk to humans and plant and animal life. The assessment characterized the radiological and chemical conditions existing in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area by collecting water, biota, and sediment samples and measuring radiation levels during a time when the effects of riverbank spring discharges and groundwater upwelling into the river was likely to be present

  8. Performance test of personal RF monitor for area monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.; Uda, T.; Wang, J.; Fujiwara, O.

    2012-01-01

    For safety management at a magnetic confinement fusion-test facility, protection from not only ionising radiation, but also non-ionising radiation such as the leakage of static magnetic and electromagnetic fields is an important issue. Accordingly, the use of a commercially available personal RF monitor for multipoint area monitoring is proposed. In this study, the performance of both fast- and slow-type personal RF monitors was investigated by using a transverse electromagnetic cell system. The range of target frequencies was between 10 and 300 MHz, corresponding to the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a fusion device. The personal RF monitor was found to have good linearity, frequency dependence and isotropic response. However, the time constant for the electric field sensor of the slow-type monitor was much longer than that for the fast-type monitor. Considering the time-varying field at the facility, it is found that the fast-type monitor is suitable for multipoint monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion test facilities. (authors)

  9. An aerial radiological survey of Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho and surrounding area, June--July 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.

    1987-02-01

    Three aerial radiological surveys were conducted during the period 16 June through 15 July 1986 over the towns of Pocatello, Soda Springs, and Fort Hall, Idaho and the surrounding areas. The surveys were performed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), utilizing the Aerial Measuring System (AMS). This work was completed in cooperation with a study by the EPA to conduct a dose assessment of human radiation exposure for industrial sources in Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho. The aerial surveys were performed to document the natural terrestrial radiological environment of the three localities and to map the spatial extent and degree of contamination due to phosphate milling operations. The results of these surveys will be used for planning ground-based measurements in addition to being incorporated into the dose assessment document. 4 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Surface radiological investigations at the 0816 Site, Waste Area Grouping 13, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiner, P.F.; Uziel, M.S.

    1994-12-01

    A surface radiological investigation was conducted intermittently from July through September 1994 at the 0816 site, located within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 13. The survey was performed by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of ORNL Site Environmental Restoration Program Facility Management. The purpose of the survey was to ascertain and document the surface radiological condition of the site subsequent to remedial action activities completed in May 1994. The survey was designed to determine whether any residual surface sod contamination in excess of 120 pCi/g 137 Cs (Specified by the Interim Record of Decision) remained at the site

  11. Stake holder involvement in remediation programmes in a uranium mining area: changes of radiological concerns in the societal context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatzweiler, R.; Hagen, M.; Leder, F.; Kraus, W.; Zimmermann, G.

    2002-01-01

    In 1990 after the political change in East Germany the public concerns on the radiological legacy of 45 years of uranium mining and milling in a densely populated area led to the launching of a huge remediation programme covering approximately 13 billion DM. Half of the remediation programme has been completed. Since the implementation of this programme the dominating attitude of the affected public has totally changed, from concerns for a great danger to health and mistrust of all planned activities to acceptance of the remediation programme and indifference about the radiological hazards. The success in getting adequate public acceptance in decision-making for remediation actions could be accounted for as more dependent on the societal, i.e. the scientific-technical, political and social-economic context of the radiological problems to be solved, and less due to whether stakeholders are completely and formally involved in the decision process. The scientific-technical context: Within the radiation protection system the missing national and international guidance on intervention and on protection against enhanced natural radiation provides a certain flexibility in decision-making but may negatively affect the credibility of expert judgements and increase uncertainties. Therefore it was important that appropriate parts of the former East German radiation protection legislation were kept in force and flexibility interpreted with regard to the remediation of an area contaminated by natural radionuclides. The political context: After the political change in East Germany suddenly a totalitarian and closed political system that did not provide any information on the radiological and other impacts of uranium mining and milling turned into an open and democratic society delivering full and open information. As part of the following unification process the German Government took over the full ownership of the Wismut company from the Soviet Union and thus the responsibility

  12. The integrated monitoring area Lheebroekerzand the Netherlands. Data of 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathijssen-Spiekman, E.A.M.

    1996-09-01

    The results of the title monitoring programme are presented. The main objective of this paper is to compile and present the 1995 monitoring data which are obliged to be forwarded to the international database in Helsinki, Finland, by the end of September 1996. Additional non-obligatory data are also reported. It is explicitly not within the scope of this report to give a detailed analysis of causes and effects as may be concluded from correlation studies comprising longer time-series and spatial gradient. In 1995, the biological part of the integrated monitoring programme consisted of a regular inventory of birds, leafminers and butterflies in the monitoring area, as well as inventories of the aquatic macrofauna present in the moorland pool Kliplo and observations on the performance of pine trees. The chemical-physical part included meteorological variables like temperature, humidity, the amount of precipitation and irradiation, together with chemical analysis of air, precipitation, leaves, needles and pool water. Where possible, the series of data are described and compared with data of previous years. The obligatory monitoring activities described in the ICP/IM-manual which are possible to be performed in the Dutch area, are carried out with exception of the programmes on trunk epiphytes, aerial green algae and soil water chemistry. Also in 1995, the capacity was lacking to develop these programmes. The improvement which has been carried out in 1995 is increasing the number of rainwater-collectors for bulk- and throughfall deposition from 4 to 5. Due to lack of manpower the running programmes were barely continued. 7 figs., 17 tabs., 23 refs., 3 appendices

  13. PARATI - a dynamic model for radiological assessments in urban areas. Pt. 1. Modelling of urban areas, their contamination and radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochedo, E.R.R.; Conti, L.F.C.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1996-01-01

    The structure and mathematical model of PARATI, a detailed computer programme developed for the assessment of the radiological consequences of an accidental contamination of urban areas, is described with respect to the scenarios used for the estimation of exposure fields in a village or town, the models for the initial and secondary contamination with the radionuclide 137 Cs, the concepts for calculating the resulting radiation exposures and the changes with time of the contamination and radiation fields. Kerma rates at various locations in tropical urban areas are given, and the contribution of different contaminated surfaces to these rates after dry or wet deposition are discussed. (orig.). With 6 figs., 12 tabs

  14. A new code for spectrometric analysis for environmental radiological surveillance on monitors focused on gamma radioactivity on aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos; Riego, Albert; Garcia, Roger; Dies, Javier; Diaz, Pedro [Nuclear Engineering Research Group, Departament of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain); Toral, Juan [Raditel Serveis, Tarragona (Spain); Batalla, Enric [Radiological Activities Corrdination Service - SCAR, Generalitat de Catalunya. Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    pGamma is a code developed by the NERG group of the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech for the analysis of gamma spectra generated by the Equipment for the Continuous Measurement and Identification of Gamma Radioactivity on Aerosols with Paper Filter developed for our group and Raditel Servies company. Nowadays the code is in the process of adaptation for the monitors of the Environmental Radiological Surveillance Network of the Local Government of Catalonia (Generalitat of Catalonia), Spain. The code is a Spectrum Analysis System, it identifies the gamma emitters on the spectrum, determines its Concentration of Activity, generates alarms depending on the Activity of the emitters and generates a report. The Spectrum Analysis System includes a library with emitters of interest, NORM and artificial. The code is being used on the three stations with the aerosol monitor of the Network (Asco and Vandellos, near both Nuclear Power Plants and Barcelona). (authors)

  15. An advanced open path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mani, S. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Over 100 million gallons of radioactive and toxic waste materials generated in weapon materials production are stored in 322 tanks buried within large areas at DOE sites. Toxic vapors occur in the tank headspace due to the solvents used and chemical reactions within the tanks. To prevent flammable or explosive concentration of volatile vapors, the headspace are vented, either manually or automatically, to the atmosphere when the headspace pressure exceeds preset values. Furthermore, 67 of the 177 tanks at the DOE Hanford Site are suspected or are known to be leaking into the ground. These underground storage tanks are grouped into tank farms which contain closely spaced tanks in areas as large as 1 km{sup 2}. The objective of this program is to protect DOE personnel and the public by monitoring the air above these tank farms for toxic air pollutants without the monitor entering the tanks farms, which can be radioactive. A secondary objective is to protect personnel by monitoring the air above buried 50 gallon drums containing moderately low radioactive materials but which could also emit toxic air pollutants.

  16. Compaction monitoring in the Ekofisk area Chalk Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menghini, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    In late Nov. 1984, the subsidence phenomenon was recognized in the Ekofisk field. To determine the magnitude and areal extent of the formation compaction, a program for measuring compaction with electric logging tools was initiated. Initial time-lapse surveys performed with cased-hole neutron tools indicated that reservoir compaction was occurring, but the accuracy of the determination of compaction rate was low. In addition to the cased-hole neutron survey, radioactive markers and a gamma ray (GR) detection tool were used to determine compaction rate in the reservoir more accurately and to determine whether compaction was occurring in the overburden. A program for implanting radioactive-marker bullets and subsequent monitoring with a four-detector GR tool was implemented. There are currently 13 wells equipped with radioactive markers in the compaction monitoring program. Compaction monitoring accuracy using the four-detector GR tool was found to depend on wellbore geometry, completion design, and radioactive-marker placement. This paper gives the results of the program to date and describes the operational procedures and analysis techniques used for compaction monitoring in the greater Ekofisk area chalk fields

  17. Plan of routine environmental radiological monitoring in the vicinity of nuclear and radioactive facilities of the Country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerniczyniec, M.A; Bonetto, J.P.; Giustina, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) carries out the monitoring of the environment surrounding Argentina nuclear power plants, independently from the operators' own monitoring programmes. Recently, there has been a review of the criteria used for selecting target radionuclides, sampling matrix, sampling location, and sampling frequency. This revision was based on ARN objectives for an environmental radiological monitoring programme, which are: verification of discharge monitoring results and detection of unadverted/unauthorized emissions; verification of models assumptions and checking that doses to the critical groups are not exceeded; detection of radionuclides presence in the environment and trend analysis; and to provide information to the public. The criteria proposed for adoption implies the monitoring of the relevant radionuclides mentioned in the discharge authorization license, using specific analysis for those considered indicators and screening techniques for the others. The matrix to be sampled must be related with the different exposure pathways, from those related with direct exposure, which require higher sampling frequencies, to accumulating/concentrating matrices, which imply lower sampling frequencies. At least, three points should be sampled, related to both airborne and liquid emissions: a background location, the representative person location, and that where the concentration of a target radionuclide is expected to be maximum. Available modeling software was used for positioning the sampling points. (author)

  18. The United States Federal Monitoring and Assessment Centre and radiological database management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    In the spring of 1979, a series of events occurring at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power plant near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, resulted in severe core damage. Recognizing that state resources were insufficient to respond to the first major nuclear power plant emergency in the United States, the State of Pennsylvania asked the Federal Government for assistance. The United States Government undertook the preparation of a plan, which would co-ordinate all federal assets. The Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) assigned unique responsibilities and authorities for responding to domestic radiological emergencies to each of 12 different federal agencies which form the FRERP. The overall data collection, analysis, and processing procedures within the FRMAC are overviewed. (author)

  19. Preliminary site characterization radiological monitoring plan for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, Yucca Mountain Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The activities described in this plan occur in the early phases of site characterization. This document presents the Preliminary Site Characterization Radiological Monitoring Plan (PSCRMP) for collecting and evaluating data in support of the NNWSI Project. The PSCRMP defines and identifies control procedures for the monitoring activities. The PSCRMP activity will utilize integrating radon monitoring devices, a continuous radon monitor, and a particulate air sampler. These instruments will be used to establish the baseline radioactivity and/or radioactivity released due to early site characterization activities. The sections that follow provide a general project description, the specifics of the monitoring program, and the practices that will be employed to ensure the validity of the collected data by integrating quality assurance into all activities. Section 2 of this document describes the regulatory base of this document. Section 3 describes the site characterization activities which may lead to release of radioactivity. Section 4 provides a description of the potential sources of radioactivity that site characterization could generate. Section 5 summarizes the sampling and monitoring methodology, which will be used to monitor the potential sources of radioactivity. The network of sampling and monitoring equipment is described in Section 6, and Section 7 summarizes the systems operation activities. The data reporting activities are described in Section 8. Finally, a description of the Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) activities is provided in Section 9. Appendix A contains a summary of the procedures to be used in this program, and Appendix B contains technical specification on equipment and services. 20 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  20. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in wells HAC 1, 2, 3, and 4 during fourth quarter 1992. Tritium activities in upgradient well HAC 4 were similar to tritium levels in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Iron was elevated in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance and manganese were elevated in one downgradient well each. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. During 1992, tritium was the only constituent that exceeded the final PDWS. It did so consistently in all four wells during all four quarters, with little variability in activity

  1. Fault diagnosis method for area gamma monitors in Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas Reddy, P.; Amudhu Ramesh Kumar, R.; Geo Mathews, M.; Amarendra, G.

    2016-01-01

    Area Gamma Monitors (AGM) using Geiger-Muller (GM) counter are deployed in nuclear facilities for detection of gamma radiation. The AGMs display the dose rate locally and in Data Acquisition System (DAS) at central monitoring station. It also provides local visual and audio alarms in case of dose rate exceeding alarm set point. Regular surveillance checking, testing and calibration of AGMs are mandatory as per safety guidelines. This paper describes quick testing the AGMs without using radioactive source. The four point High Voltages (HV) and Discriminator Bias (DB) voltage characteristics are used to diagnose the state of health of GM counter. The profiles of HV and DB voltage are applied during testing of the AGMs

  2. Analysis of the Variability of Classified and Unclassified Radiological Source term Inventories in the Frenchman Flat Area, Nevada test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, P.; Zavarin, M.

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that unclassified source terms used in the reactive transport modeling investigations at NTS CAUs should be based on yield-weighted source terms calculated using the average source term from Bowen et al. (2001) and the unclassified announced yields reported in DOE/NV-209. This unclassified inventory is likely to be used in unclassified contaminant boundary calculations and is, thus, relevant to compare to the classified inventory. They have examined the classified radionuclide inventory produced by 10 underground nuclear tests conducted in the Frenchman Flat (FF) area of the Nevada Test Site. The goals were to (1) evaluate the variability in classified radiological source terms among the 10 tests and (2) compare that variability and inventory uncertainties to an average unclassified inventory (e.g. Bowen 2001). To evaluate source term variability among the 10 tests, radiological inventories were compared on two relative scales: geometric mean and yield-weighted geometric mean. Furthermore, radiological inventories were either decay corrected to a common date (9/23/1992) or the time zero (t 0 ) of each test. Thus, a total of four data sets were produced. The date of 9/23/1992 was chosen based on the date of the last underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site

  3. Evidence-based anatomical review areas derived from systematic analysis of cases from a radiological departmental discrepancy meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, S C; Weir-McCall, J R; Yeap, P M; White, R D; Budak, M J; Duncan, G; Oliver, T B; Zealley, I A

    2017-10-01

    To produce short checklists of specific anatomical review sites for different regions of the body based on the frequency of radiological errors reviewed at radiology discrepancy meetings, thereby creating "evidence-based" review areas for radiology reporting. A single centre discrepancy database was retrospectively reviewed from a 5-year period. All errors were classified by type, modality, body system, and specific anatomical location. Errors were assigned to one of four body regions: chest, abdominopelvic, central nervous system (CNS), and musculoskeletal (MSK). Frequencies of errors in anatomical locations were then analysed. There were 561 errors in 477 examinations; 290 (46%) errors occurred in the abdomen/pelvis, 99 (15.7%) in the chest, 117 (18.5%) in the CNS, and 125 (19.9%) in the MSK system. In each body system, the five most common location were chest: lung bases on computed tomography (CT), apices on radiography, pulmonary vasculature, bones, and mediastinum; abdominopelvic: vasculature, colon, kidneys, liver, and pancreas; CNS: intracranial vasculature, peripheral cerebral grey matter, bone, parafalcine, and the frontotemporal lobes surrounding the Sylvian fissure; and MSK: calvarium, sacrum, pelvis, chest, and spine. The five listed locations accounted for >50% of all perceptual errors suggesting an avenue for focused review at the end of reporting. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preliminary assessment of the radiological impact for individual waste management areas at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, M.B.

    1987-09-01

    This study estimates the radiological impact (i.e., the potential doses) for individual waste management areas at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ranks the areas for remedial action based on the off-site doses that result from these discharges to White Oak Creek. Dose estimates are given for the drinking water pathway based on known discharges from White Oak Dam. Estimates are also made of doses for eating fish caught in the Clinch River near the confluence with White Oak Creek. The results of a search for data concerning the discharges of 90 Sr, 3 H, 137 Cs, and 60 Co from individual waste management areas are presented. A qualitative assessment is presented, and areas are ranked for remedial investigation based on the available information. 29 refs., 8 figs., 45 tabs

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the Seabrook Nuclear Station and surrounding area, Seabrook, New Hampshire, July 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Seabrook Nuclear Station, Seabrook, New Hampshire, during the period 6 July through 14 July 1988. The purpose of the 247-square-kilometer (96-square-mile) survey was to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the station and surrounding area. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. Exposure rates measured in the area typically ranged form 9 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). In areas where water shielded the earth, lower exposure rates were measured. Ground-based exposure rate measurements and soil samples were obtained to support the aerial data. Oblique aerial photographs of the station were also acquired during the survey. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. MONITORING CONCEPTS FOR COASTAL AREAS USING LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas are characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. In order to detect undesired changes at early stages, enabling rapid countermeasures to mitigate or minimize potential harm or hazard, a recurrent monitoring becomes necessary. In this paper, we focus on two monitoring task: the analysis of morphological changes and the classification and mapping of habitats. Our concepts are solely based on airborne lidar data which provide substantial information in coastal areas. For the first task, we generate a digital terrain model (DTM from the lidar point cloud and analyse the dynamic of an island by comparing the DTMs of different epochs with a time difference of six years. For the deeper understanding of the habitat composition in coastal areas, we classify the lidar point cloud by a supervised approach based on Conditional Random Fields. From the classified point cloud, water-land-boundaries as well as mussel bed objects are derived afterwards. We evaluate our approaches on two datasets of the German Wadden Sea.

  7. Lidar system for air-pollution monitoring over urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Irina V.; Shcheglov, Djolinard A.; Molodtsov, Nikolai A.

    1997-05-01

    The atmospheric environmental situation over the urban area of a large city is determined by a complex combination of anthropogenic pollution and meteorological factors. The efficient way to provide three-dimensional mapping of gaseous pollutants over wide areas is utilization of lidar systems employing tunable narrowband transmitters. The paper presented describes activity of RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' in the field of lidar atmospheric monitoring. The project 'mobile remote sensing system based on tunable laser transmitter for environmental monitoring' is developed under financial support of International Scientific and Technology Center (Moscow). The objective of the project is design, construction and field testing of a DIAL-technique system. The lidar transmitter consists of an excimer laser pumping dye laser, BBO crystal frequency doubler, and scanning flat mirror. Sulfur dioxide and atomic mercury have been selected as pollutants for field tests of the lidar system under development. A recent large increase in Moscow traffic stimulated taking into consideration also the remote sensing of lower troposphere ozone because of the photochemical smog problem. The status of the project is briefly discussed. The current activity includes also collecting of environmental data relevant to lidar remote sensing. Main attention is paid to pollutant concentration levels over Moscow city and Moscow district areas.

  8. UAV photogrammetry for topographic monitoring of coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J. A.; Henriques, R.

    2015-06-01

    Coastal areas suffer degradation due to the action of the sea and other natural and human-induced causes. Topographical changes in beaches and sand dunes need to be assessed, both after severe events and on a regular basis, to build models that can predict the evolution of these natural environments. This is an important application for airborne LIDAR, and conventional photogrammetry is also being used for regular monitoring programs of sensitive coastal areas. This paper analyses the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to map and monitor sand dunes and beaches. A very light plane (SwingletCam) equipped with a very cheap, non-metric camera was used to acquire images with ground resolutions better than 5 cm. The Agisoft Photoscan software was used to orientate the images, extract point clouds, build a digital surface model and produce orthoimage mosaics. The processing, which includes automatic aerial triangulation with camera calibration and subsequent model generation, was mostly automated. To achieve the best positional accuracy for the whole process, signalised ground control points were surveyed with a differential GPS receiver. Two very sensitive test areas on the Portuguese northwest coast were analysed. Detailed DSMs were obtained with 10 cm grid spacing and vertical accuracy (RMS) ranging from 3.5 to 5.0 cm, which is very similar to the image ground resolution (3.2-4.5 cm). Where possible to assess, the planimetric accuracy of the orthoimage mosaics was found to be subpixel. Within the regular coastal monitoring programme being carried out in the region, UAVs can replace many of the conventional flights, with considerable gains in the cost of the data acquisition and without any loss in the quality of topographic and aerial imagery data.

  9. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1990 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory -- Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release

  10. Environmental monitoring program for radiological emergencies at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Lilia M.J. Belem; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Gomes, Carlos A.; Carvalho, Zenildo L.; Gouveia, Vandir; Estrada, Julio; Ney, Cezar [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    In order to respond to a major radiological emergency at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, located in Angra do Reis, Rio de Janeiro, the Emergency Response Team of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD/CNEN) established a program of environmental monitoring. A monitoring trend to assess the off-site radiological conditions and give support to decision making for implementing protective measure in case of a radiological accident is presented. For the selection of the monitoring points, the program takes into account atmospheric diffusion, population conglomerates and their habits, water and land use; it includes the entire Emergency Planning Zone of 15 km radius. The program has been organized in the form of a handbook to facilitate handling by field teams 2 refs., 1 fig.; e-mail: lilia at ird.gov.br

  11. The examination of radiological monitoring on Okayama Prefectural Institute for Environmental Science and Public Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Seiko [Okayama Prefectural Inst. for Environmental Science and Public Health (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    We evaluated the environment around Ningyotoge in the northern part of Okayama Prefecture. Environmental gamma ray measurement results were evaluated by TLD at the time of confirming an investigation using a continuous gamma ray monitor. Doses during that time span for passing persons and individuals in the area were lower than 89 nGy/h. We observed Fading for TLD. The result was that the Fading revision coefficient for the Tenno district in Ningyotoge between October 10, 1997 to December 18, 1997 was 1.02. That for the premises of the Okayama Prefectural Institute for Environmental Science and Public Health was 1.05. The Tenno district in Ningyotoge during the period between June 29, 1998 to October 6, 1998 was 1.04. A relationship between the height from the ground and gamma ray dose was found. A straight line was shown by both logarithm graphs. We evaluated radioactive wastewater. When considering the processing of wastewater that flows into rivers, a discharge of zero release is desirable. We evaluated the BOD, COD, etc, as well as the radioactive materials that are processed by microbes such as Bacillus and Arthrobacter. (author)

  12. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  13. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program

  14. Clinical validation of a medical grade color monitor for chest radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J.; Zanca, F.; Verschakelen, J.; Marchal, G.; Bosmans, H.

    2009-02-01

    Until recently, the specifications of medical grade monochrome LCD monitors outperformed those of color LCD monitors. New generations of color LCD monitors, however, show specifications that are in many respects similar to those of monochrome monitors typically used in diagnostic workstations. The aim of present study was to evaluate the impact of different medical grade monitors in terms of detection of simulated lung nodules in chest x-ray images. Specifically, we wanted to compare a new medical grade color monitor (Barco Coronis 6MP color) to a medical grade grayscale monitor (Barco Coronis 3MP monochrome) and a consumer color monitor (Philips 200VW 1.7MP color) by means of an observer performance experiment. Using the free-response acquisition data paradigm, seven radiologists were asked to detect and locate lung nodules (170 in total), simulated in half of the 200 chest X-ray images used in the experiment. The jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis of the data showed a statistically significant difference between at least two monitors, F-value=3.77 and p-value =0.0481. The different Figure of Merit values were 0.727, 0.723 and 0.697 for the new color LCD monitor, the medical grade monitor and the consumer color monitor respectively. There was no difference between the needed reading times but there was a difference between the mean calculated Euclidian distances between the position marked by the observers and the center of the simulated nodule, indicating a better accuracy with both medical grade monitors. Present data suggests that the new generation of medical grade color monitors could be used as diagnostic workstations.

  15. An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting 238 U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected 241 Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area

  16. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  17. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  18. Fiber optic sensor system for entrance areas monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajkus, Marcel; Nedoma, Jan; Kepak, Stanislav; Cubik, Jakub; Jargus, Jan; Zboril, Ondřej; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    Authors of this article present the fiber-optic system based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) which are used to secure the entrance areas such as buildings, halls, warehouses, etc. The system uses the specially encapsulated sensory array of fiber Bragg gratings which are implemented into the floor or on the floor and allows for monitoring the area of 1 m2 up to 100 m2 depending on the number of FBG sensors. The sensory array is characterized by immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), passivity regarding electrical power supply, the possibility of remote evaluation (up to units of km) and high sensitivity. Proposed sensor system has detection capability greater than 99 % and furthermore, provides information about the weight load to an accuracy of +/- 5 kg. The concept has been tested in a real environment within the test polygon for several weeks. As the reference devices, we used the CCTV (Closed Circuit Television).

  19. Development of a software for predicting the effects of nuclear and radiological terrorism events in city areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Lijuan; Chen Bo; Zhuo Weihai; Lu Shuyu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To develop a new software system that can directly display the predicted results on an electronic map, in order to get a directly perceived understanding of the affected areas of nuclear and radiological terrorism events in city areas. Methods: Three scenarios of events including spreading radioactive materials, dirty bomb attack, and explosion or arson attacks on the radiation facilities were assumed. Gaussian diffusion model was employed to predict the spread and deposition of radioactive pollutants, and both the internal and external doses were estimated for the representative person by using the corresponding dose conversion factors. Through integration of the computing system and Mapinfo geographic information system (GIS), the predicted results were visually displayed on the electronic maps of a city. Results: The new software system could visually display the predicted results on the electronic map of a city, and the predicted results were consistent with those calculated by the similar software Hotspot®. The deviation between this system and Hotspot was less than 0.2 km for predicted isoplethic curves of dose rate downwind. Conclusions: The newly developed software system is of the practical value in predicting the effects of nuclear and radiological terrorism events in city areas. (authors)

  20. R-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the following locations in R Area: Well cluster P20 east of R Area (one well each in the water table and the McBean formation), the R-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (the four water-table wells of the RAC series), the R-Area Ash Basin/Coal Pile (one well of the RCP series in the Congaree formation and one in the water table), the R-Area Disassembly Basin (the three water-table wells of the RDB series), the R-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (the four water-table wells of the RRP series), and the R-Area Seepage Basins (numerous water-table wells in the RSA, RSB, RSC, RSD, RSE, and RSF series). Lead was the only constituent detected above its 50μg/L standard in any but the seepage basin wells; it exceeded that level in one B well and in 23 of the seepage basin wells. Cadmium exceeded its drinking water standard (DWS) in 30 of the seepage basin wells, as did mercury in 10. Nitrate-nitrite was above DWS once each in two seepage basin wells. Tritium was above DWS in six seepage basin wells, as was gross alpha activity in 22. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its screening standard in 29 wells. Extensive radionuclide analyses were requested during 1993 for the RCP series and most of the seepage basin wells. Strontium-90 in eight wells was the only specific radionuclide other than tritium detected above DWS; it appeared about one-half of the nonvolatile beta activity in those wells

  1. Neutron area monitoring at storage bunkers of density/moisture gauges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fuste, M.J. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions. Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), Edifici Cc, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Amgarou, K., E-mail: khalil.amgarou@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions. Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), Edifici Cc, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Orellana, J.; Domingo, C. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions. Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), Edifici Cc, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    Previous studies remarked the need of performing neutron personal dosimetry, together with gamma dosimetry, when using portable density/moisture gauges that are normally equipped with gamma and neutron sources. The convenience of our Poly-Allyl-Diglycol-Carbonate (PADC) based neutron dosimeter to perform long-term routine survey of all workers involved in the transport, maintenance and usage of these gauges was also corroborated in the past. This complete dosimetric control offers the possibility to quantify simultaneously individual neutron and gamma doses of workers operating such devices, especially in the most frequent cleaning and maintenance (shutter lubrication) operations of the gauges or in emergency situations that may lead to radiological risk of the persons involved. Another aspect to be considered, from the radioprotection point of view, is the optimization of the occupational and public exposure in the storage bunkers of the gauges. In this work, three storage bunkers, located at three different factories of the PAYMA Cotas S.A.U company, have been monitored for three months using several units of our PADC based neutron dosimeter. Special care has been taken to study also offices near the bunkers with high occupancy rates and passage zones, such as toilets and access areas. Results for all monitored points inside and around the three storage bunkers are presented. Neutron doses inside the bunkers could be relatively high depending on the specific conditions (geometry configuration, localization and shielding composition) of the considered bunker and the number of portable gauges stored.

  2. Neutron area monitoring at storage bunkers of density/moisture gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Amgarou, K.; Garcia-Orellana, J.; Domingo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies remarked the need of performing neutron personal dosimetry, together with gamma dosimetry, when using portable density/moisture gauges that are normally equipped with gamma and neutron sources. The convenience of our Poly-Allyl-Diglycol-Carbonate (PADC) based neutron dosimeter to perform long-term routine survey of all workers involved in the transport, maintenance and usage of these gauges was also corroborated in the past. This complete dosimetric control offers the possibility to quantify simultaneously individual neutron and gamma doses of workers operating such devices, especially in the most frequent cleaning and maintenance (shutter lubrication) operations of the gauges or in emergency situations that may lead to radiological risk of the persons involved. Another aspect to be considered, from the radioprotection point of view, is the optimization of the occupational and public exposure in the storage bunkers of the gauges. In this work, three storage bunkers, located at three different factories of the PAYMA Cotas S.A.U company, have been monitored for three months using several units of our PADC based neutron dosimeter. Special care has been taken to study also offices near the bunkers with high occupancy rates and passage zones, such as toilets and access areas. Results for all monitored points inside and around the three storage bunkers are presented. Neutron doses inside the bunkers could be relatively high depending on the specific conditions (geometry configuration, localization and shielding composition) of the considered bunker and the number of portable gauges stored.

  3. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Grossman, R.F.; Corkern, W.D.; Thome, D.J.; Patzer, R.G.; Hopper, J.L.

    1981-06-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas (EMSL-LV) continued its Offsite Radiological Safety Program for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other sites of past underground nuclear tests. For each test, the Laboratory provided airborne meteorological measurements, ground and airborne radiation monitoring teams, and special briefings to the Test Controller's Advisory Panel. Test-related radioactivity from the NTS was detected offsite following the Riola Test conducted on September 25, 1980. This consisted of xenon-133 (3.4 x 10 -11 μCi/m1) and xenon-135 (3.6 x 10 -10 μCi/m1) in a compressed air sample collected at Lathrop Wells, Nevada. The estimated dose equivalent to the whole body of a hypothetical receptor at Lathrop Wells from exposure to the radioxenon was 0.011 mrem, which is 0.006 percent of the radiation protection guide for a suitable sample of the general population. Whole-body counts of individuals residing in the environs of the NTS showed no manmade radionuclides attributable to the testing program. The only radioactivity from non-NTS sites of past underground nuclear tests was due to tritium in water samples collected from the Project Dribble Site near Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and the Project Long Shot Site on Amchitka Island, Alaska. The maximum concentrations measured at these locations were 1 and 0.1 percent of the Concentration Guide for drinking water, respectively. A small amount of airborne radioactivity originating from nuclear tests carried out by the People's Republic of China was detected during 1980 at some stations scattered throughout the Air Surveillance Network. The Laboratory's Animal Investigation Program sampled tissues from wildlife and domestic animals on and around the NTS. Data from analysis of these tissues are published separately in an annual report

  4. Potentials and limitations of remote fire monitoring in protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, João Flávio Costa; Romeiro, Joyce Machado Nunes; de Assis, José Batuíra; Torres, Fillipe Tamiozzo Pereira; Gleriani, José Marinaldo

    2018-03-01

    Protected areas (PAs) play an important role in maintaining the biodiversity and ecological processes of the site. One of the greatest challenges for the PA management in several biomes in the world is wildfires. The objective of this work was to evaluate the potentialities and limitations of the use of data obtained by orbital remote sensing in the monitoring fire occurrence in PAs. Fire Occurrence Records (FORs) were analyzed in Serra do Brigadeiro State Park, Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2015, using photo interpreted data from TM, ETM + and OLI sensors of the Landsat series and the Hot Spot Database (HSD) from the Brazilian Institute of Space Research - INPE. It was also observed the time of permanence of the scar left by fire on the landscape, through the multitemporal analysis of the behavior of NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and NBR (Normalized Burn Ratio) indexes, before and after the occurrence. The greatest limitation found for the orbital remote monitoring was the presence of clouds in the passage of the sensor in dates close to the occurrence of the fires. The burned area identified by photo interpretation was 54.9% less than the area contained in the FOR. Although the HSD reported fire occurrences in the buffer zone (up to 10km from the Park), no FORs were found at a distance greater than 1100m from the boundaries of the PA. As the main potential of remote sensing, the possibility of identifying burned areas throughout the park and surroundings is highlighted, with low costs and greater accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Aerial radiological survey of the Waterford Generating Station and surrounding area, Taft, Louisiana. Date of survey: March-April 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, R.J.; Feimster, E.L.

    1984-02-01

    An aerial survey of the Waterford Generating Station near Taft, Louisiana was conducted during the period March 24 through April 7, 1982. The area encompassed a 256-square-kilometer (100-square-mile) area centered on the reactor facilities. Inferred exposure rates were due primarily to naturally occurring gamma-emitting radionuclides and cosmic ray activity (estimated at 3.7 μR/h). The exposure rates varied from 7 to 60 μR/h. Throughout most of the residential/industrial areas, the inferred exposure rate range was 7 to 12 μR/h. Marsh and water-covered areas were less than 7 μR/h. Two areas were encountered which had activity elevated above the typical background: (1) an industrial waste pond located 2 kilometers southeast of the site, and (2) a small area located 5 kilometers southeast of the site on the south bank of the Mississippi River. (A river barge was docked at this location during the survey.) Maximum inferred exposure rates over these areas were 60 and 16 μR/h, respectively. Spectral analysis revealed gamma-emitting radionuclides of the uranium decay chain as the primary contributors to this elevated activity. Ground-based measurements made in several areas were consistent with the aerial data. This was the first aerial radiological survey conducted over this area. 3 references, 9 figures, 3 tables

  6. The structure of water quality monitoring in the disaster area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Described are monitoring systems of water environment at usual times and after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster, and measures taken by the Ministry of the Environment (ME) for radioactive substances in the water environment. At usual times, the monitoring of hazardous substance in water environment is conducted by local governments. At/after the Disaster, ME conducted the monitoring investigation concerning the environmental quality standards and toxicants like dioxins in the river, sea and groundwater from late May to late July, 2011 because undesirable effects on health and life of the residents had been feared due to possible leak of hazardous substances in public water area and underground water of victim prefectures, Aomori, Iwate, Miyagi, Fukushima and Ibaraki. As the results, no high contamination due to the Disaster was found, and a part of regions exhibited the slight chemical contamination, where continuous and additional monitoring was to be kept locally with guidance of drinking the concerned well water. ME measured radioactive iodine and cesium at 29 places of Fukushima rivers to find <65 and <30,000 Bq/kg, respectively, of 4 spots of river bed material alone (late May); then Cs 32 Bq/L in water at 1 spot and <26,000 Bq/kg in bed at all places after rain (early July). In groundwater, no radioactive nuclides above were detected in any of 111 places of Fukushima Prefecture (late June to early August). Cs was not found in sea water of 9 places of concerned prefectures, but was in the sea bottom soil, <1,380 Bq/kg (middle June). As well, local governments measured those two radioactive nuclides in water and ambient dose rate of 551 sea bathing beaches (late May to early Oct.) and found only one beach (Iwaki City, Fukushima) inappropriate for swimming play. Hereafter, ME is still to investigate the bed material of public water area and to continue to monitor the marine environment in cooperation with related authorities. (T.T.)

  7. MONITORING OF LARGE INSTABLE AREAS: system reliability and new tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, G.; Mucciarelli, M.; Pellicani, R.; Spilotro, G.

    2009-04-01

    The monitoring of unstable or potentially unstable areas is a necessary operation every time you can not remove the conditions of risk and apply to mitigation measures. In Italian Apennine regions there are many urban or extra-urban areas affected by instability, for which it is impracticable to remove hazard conditions, because of size and cost problems. The technological evolution exportable to the field of land instability monitoring is particularly lively and allows the use of warning systems unthinkable just few years ago. However, the monitoring of unstable or potentially unstable areas requires a very great knowledge of the specific problems, without which the reliability of the system may be dangerously overestimated. The movement may arise, indeed, in areas not covered by instrumentation, or covered with vegetation that prevents the acquisition of both reflected signals in the multi-beam laser techniques and radar signals. Environmental conditions (wind, concentrated sources of light, temperature changes, presence of animals) may also invalidate the accuracy of the measures, by introducing modulations or disturbance at a level well above the threshold of alarm signal, leading consequently to raise the values of the warning threshold. The Authors have gained long experience with the observation and monitoring of some large landslides in the Southern Apennine (Aliano, Buoninventre, Calciano, Carlantino, etc.) and unstable areas also at regional scale. One of the most important experiences is about the case of landslides of extensive areas, where unstable and stables zones coexist along transverse and longitudinal axis. In many of these cases you need the accurate control of the movement at selected points to evaluate the trend of displacement velocity, which can be achieved by means of a single-beam laser. The control of these movements, however, does not provide information on stress pattern into the stable areas. Among the sensitive precursors, acoustic

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site and surrounding area, Central Nevada. Date of survey: December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site was conducted in December 1993. An interim report described survey procedures and presented terrestrial exposure rate and wide-area-averaged plutonium isopleth plots. This letter report presents additional plutonium plots and some rule-of-thumb calculations which should help the reader to properly interpret the data presented. Attached to this report are three isopleth plots produced from the Double Track data. No one processing method provides all the answers regarding a particular surveyed area. Where peak vales are most important, a figure created from the original unsmoothed data is the presentation of choice. A figure from smoothed data is superior for the detection of areas of widespread low-level contamination. A figure , also smoothed data, satisfied a particular early mission goal but is not as useful for cleanup operations as the other two. This last figure is presented for historical completeness only

  9. An aerial radiological survey of the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station and surrounding area, Bay City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.M.

    1988-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS) near Bay City, Texas, during the period 25 March to 4 April 1988. The purpose of the 259-square-kilometer (100-square-mile) survey was to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the plant and surrounding area. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. Exposure rates were observed up to 10μR/h over land. No areas of enhanced exposure rates were observed. Ground-based exposure rate measurements and soil samples were obtained to support the aerial data. Oblique aerial photographs of the plant were also acquired during the survey. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. An aerial radiological survey of the EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies and surrounding area, Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, Ohio, during the period of June 9--24, 1989. The purpose of the 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) survey was to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the plant and surrounding area. In addition, ground-based exposure rate measurements and soil samples were obtained to support the aerial data. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level was.constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. Exposure rates measured in the area typically ranged from 9 to 11 microroentgens per hour (μR/h)

  11. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Moon Hoe.; Hwang, Sang Gyu [Chuncheon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2002 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of {sup 7}Be and {sup 137}Cs on airborne dust, and {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs etc. concentrations in the 19 foodstuffs(peanut, chestnut, walnut, pine nut acorn, oak mushroom, western mushroom, winter mushroom, oyster mushroom, coffee, green tea, ginseng tea, soils, cereals, vegetable, indicator plant) and 5 tap water sampled in Youngseo area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA values, except {sup 40}K nuclide. All the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs nuclides in the water are less than the MDA values.

  12. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Moon Hoe.; Hwang, Sang Gyu [Chuncheon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2003 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of {sup 7}Be and {sup 137} Cs on airborne dust, and {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs etc. concentrations in the 22 foodstuffs(peanut, chestnut, walnut, pine nut acorn, oak mushroom, western mushroom, winter mushroom, oyster mushroom, coffee, green tea, ginseng tea, soils, cereals, vegetable, indicator plant) and 10 tap water sampled in Youngseo area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA values, except {sup 40}K nuclide. All the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs nuclides in the water are less than the MDA values.

  13. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Ki.; Hwang, Sang Kyu [Chuncheon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2000 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of {sup 7}Be and {sup 137}Cs on airborne dust, and {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 226}Ra etc. concentrations in the 23 foodstuffs(potato, sweet potato, bean sprout, onion, pumpkin, spinach, welsh onion, radish leaves, red pepper, garlic, lettuce, apple, persimmon, orange, pear, grape, mackerel, Alaska pollack, hairtail, squid oyster, baby clam, mussed) and 5 tap water sampled in Youngsoe area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA value, except {sup 40}K nuclide. The concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 226}Ra nuclide in tap water are less(or is slightly higher in one sample) than the MDA value.

  14. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Ki.; Hwang, Sang Kyu [Chuncheon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2001 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of {sup 7}Be and {sup 137}Cs on airborne dust, and {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 226}Ra etc. concentrations in the 23 foodstuffs(potato, sweet potato, bean sprout, onion, pumpkin, spinach, welsh onion, radish leaves, red pepper, garlic, lettuce, apple, persimmon, orange, pear, grape, mackerel, Alaska pollack, hairtail, squid oyster, baby clam, mussel) and 5 tap water sampled in Youngseo area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA values, except {sup 40}K nuclide. All the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 226}Ra nuclides in the water are less than the MDA values.

  15. Unobstructive Body Area Networks (BAN) for efficient movement monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisberto, Filipe; Costa, Nuno; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Pereira, António

    2012-01-01

    The technological advances in medical sensors, low-power microelectronics and miniaturization, wireless communications and networks have enabled the appearance of a new generation of wireless sensor networks: the so-called wireless body area networks (WBAN). These networks can be used for continuous monitoring of vital parameters, movement, and the surrounding environment. The data gathered by these networks contributes to improve users' quality of life and allows the creation of a knowledge database by using learning techniques, useful to infer abnormal behaviour. In this paper we present a wireless body area network architecture to recognize human movement, identify human postures and detect harmful activities in order to prevent risk situations. The WBAN was created using tiny, cheap and low-power nodes with inertial and physiological sensors, strategically placed on the human body. Doing so, in an as ubiquitous as possible way, ensures that its impact on the users' daily actions is minimum. The information collected by these sensors is transmitted to a central server capable of analysing and processing their data. The proposed system creates movement profiles based on the data sent by the WBAN's nodes, and is able to detect in real time any abnormal movement and allows for a monitored rehabilitation of the user.

  16. A/M Area Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupar, J.; Jarosch, T.R.; Jackson, D.G. Jr.; Looney, B.B.; Jerome, K.M.; Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Van Pelt, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    Characterization and monitoring data from implementation and the first two and one half years of vadose zone remediation operations indicate that this activity has substantially improved the performance of the A/M Area Groundwater Corrective Action Program. During this period, vadose zone remediation removed approximately 225, 000 lbs (100,000 Kg) of chlorinated solvents (CVOCs) from the subsurface. Further, vadose zone remediation system operation increased the overall CVOC removal rate of the A/M Area Groundwater Corrective Action by 300% to 500% during this period versus the groundwater pump and treat system along. Various support activities have been performed to support operation and documentation of performance of the vadose zone remediation system. These activities address performance of existing systems (contaminant distributions, zone of influence, and process monitoring data), evaluation of suspect sources, evaluation of alternative/enhancement technologies, and initial development of remediation goals. In particular, the most recent A/M vadose zone remediation support activities (described in WSRC-RP-97-109) were completed and the results provide key documentation about system performance

  17. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Ki.; Hwang, Sang Kyu

    2001-12-01

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2001 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of 7 Be and 137 Cs on airborne dust, and 7 Be, 40 K and 137 Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The 7 Be, 40 K, 137 Cs and 226 Ra etc. concentrations in the 23 foodstuffs(potato, sweet potato, bean sprout, onion, pumpkin, spinach, welsh onion, radish leaves, red pepper, garlic, lettuce, apple, persimmon, orange, pear, grape, mackerel, Alaska pollack, hairtail, squid oyster, baby clam, mussel) and 5 tap water sampled in Youngseo area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of 7 Be, 40 K, and 137 Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA values, except 40 K nuclide. All the concentrations of 137 Cs and 226 Ra nuclides in the water are less than the MDA values

  18. Involvement of local stakeholders in the development of new information schemes for the displaying of environmental radiological monitoring results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollinger, Francoise; Lebeau, Audrey; Petitfrere, Michael; Eimer, Michel; Ganay, Claude de; Gadbois, Serge; Leprieur, Fabrice; Vaillant, Ludovic

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of radionuclides concentration in the environment and associated potential health impacts are key and legitimate questions for the population living around nuclear facilities. In spite of the efforts from authorities, public experts and operators to make this information available and understandable, mainly through Local Liaison Committees (LLC), the way it is usually formalized makes it difficult to meet non-expert expectations. In this context, the IRSN launched a pilot project in the Loire Valley to define new schemes for the displaying of this information. This project brings together representatives from LLCs - local elected people, trade unions and environmental NGOs -, experts from the IRSN - environment and radiation protection departments - and facilitators - CEPN and MUTADIS -. Its objectives are: 1-) To identify all nuclear facilities and producers of measurements in the environment within the Valley; 2-) To clearly define local population expectations regards environmental radiological survey; 3-) To select adequate measurements values and presentational schemes; 4-) To provide recommendations regarding the environment monitoring strategy. This project is also connected with the French national measurement network. Within this national network, the IRSN is in charge of developing a database that brings together all the results from environmental radiological monitoring, in order to provide all these data to the population, including elements about impacts on human health. This network will take advantage of the work achieved within the pilot project. The facilitation process mainly consisted in fostering relations of trust (notably with the preparation of detailed minutes of the project meetings), and supporting both local stakeholders and IRSN experts in the project management and the development of a common language at the crossroad between scientific and technical knowledge and local actors' understanding of their own environment. This

  19. Radiological safety system based on real-time tritium-in-air monitoring indoor and in effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidica, Nicolae; Sofalca, Nicolae; Balteanu, Ovidiu-Ioan; Stefan, Ioana-Iuliana

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe an improved real-time tritium monitoring system designed for Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant of National Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopes Separation, Rm. Valcea, Romania. The system consists of three fixed tritium-in-air monitors which measure continuously tritium-in-air concentration (in both species: vapour and gas) in working areas and gaseous effluents. Portable tritium monitors with ionization chamber, and tritium-in-air collector combined with liquid scintillation counter method are also used to supplement fixed instrument measurements. The main functions of tritium monitoring system are: to measure tritium-in air concentration in working areas and gaseous effluents; to alarm the personnel if tritium concentration thresholds are exceeded; to integrate tritium activity released to the environment during a week and to cut off normal ventilation when the activity threshold is exceeded and start the air cleaning system. Now, several especial functions have been added, so that by using appropriate conversion factors, the tritium monitoring system is able to estimate the effective dose rate before starting an activity into the monitored area, during this activity, or soon as the activity was finished. Another new function has been added by coupling tritium-in-air monitoring system with control access system. This is very useful for quick estimation of tritium doses. For routine dosimetric survey, one the internal dose for individuals by measuring tritium in urine is estimated. With all these features our tritium monitoring system is really a safety system for personnel and for environment. (authors)

  20. Landslide monitoring in the Atlantic Highlands area, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Pamela A.; Ashland, Francis X.; Fiore, Alex R.

    2017-08-25

    Shallow and deep-seated landslides have occurred episodically on the steep coastal bluffs of the Atlantic Highlands area (Boroughs of Atlantic Highlands and Highlands) in New Jersey. The oldest documented deep-seated landslide occurred in April 1782 and significantly changed the morphology of the bluff. However, recent landslides have been mostly shallow in nature and have occurred during large storms with exceptionally heavy rainfall. These shallow landslides have resulted in considerable damage to residential property and local infrastructure and threatened human safety.The recent shallow landslides in the area (locations modified from New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection) consist primarily of slumps and flows of earth and debris within areas of historical landslides or on slopes modified by human activities. Such landslides are typically triggered by increases in shallow soil moisture and pore-water pressure caused by sustained and intense rainfall associated with spring nor’easters and late summer–fall tropical cyclones. However, the critical relation between rainfall, soil-moisture conditions, and landslide movement has not been fully defined. The U.S. Geological Survey is currently monitoring hillslopes within the Atlantic Highlands area to better understand the hydrologic and meteorological conditions associated with shallow landslide initiation.

  1. Monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin; Suivi de l'impact radiologique environnemental des activites du site AREVA du Tricastin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercat, C.; Brun, F.; Florens, P.; Petit, J. [AREVA NC Pierrelatte, Direction surete environnement du site du Tricastin, 26 (France); Garnier, F. [EURODIF Production, Direction qualite securite surete environnement, 26 (France); Devin, P. [AREVA NC Pierrelatte, Direction surete, sante, securite, environnement, 26 (France)

    2010-06-15

    Set up at the beginning of the site's operations, in 1962, the monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin has evolved over time to meet more specifically the multiple objectives of environmental monitoring: to prove the respect of the commitments required by the authorities, to be able to detect a dysfunction in the observed levels, to enable the assessment of impacts of industrial activities, to ensure the balance between environmental quality and the use made by the local population and to inform the public of the radiological state of the environment. Thousands of data were acquired on the radioactivity of all environmental compartments as well as on the functioning of local ecosystems. Today, the Network of Environmental Monitoring of AREVA Tricastin goes beyond the requirements of routine monitoring to provide innovative solutions for monitoring the radioactivity (especially for uranium) in the environment. (author)

  2. Recognition difference and improvement direction of the radiological technologists and patient against medical service in department radiology - Inchon area in the object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Sung Min; Kim, Sung Chul

    2006-01-01

    Satisfaction of the patient against the medical service in department of radiology and it evaluated the different recognition of radiological technologist and patient, and investigates it's improvement direction. It sent the reply the above the which is a usual result in question result of the most that, the receipt process it was complicated in the portion which is insufficient. 'The receipt process is complication', 'waiting time is long' and ' don't radiation protection for patient and guardian'. Also these a facts was recognizing patients and radiological technologist all. And the effort of the radiological technologist is necessary with the method which reduces a recognition difference. The periodical medical service satisfaction investigates and must endeavor in reform measure preparation

  3. Demographic monitoring of wild muriqui populations: Criteria for defining priority areas and monitoring intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strier, Karen B; Possamai, Carla B; Tabacow, Fernanda P; Pissinatti, Alcides; Lanna, Andre M; Rodrigues de Melo, Fabiano; Moreira, Leandro; Talebi, Maurício; Breves, Paula; Mendes, Sérgio L; Jerusalinsky, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Demographic data are essential to assessments of the status of endangered species. However, establishing an integrated monitoring program to obtain useful data on contemporary and future population trends requires both the identification of priority areas and populations and realistic evaluations of the kinds of data that can be obtained under different monitoring regimes. We analyzed all known populations of a critically endangered primate, the muriqui (genus: Brachyteles) using population size, genetic uniqueness, geographic importance (including potential importance in corridor programs) and implementability scores to define monitoring priorities. Our analyses revealed nine priority populations for the northern muriqui (B. hypoxanthus) and nine for the southern muriqui (B. arachnoides). In addition, we employed knowledge of muriqui developmental and life history characteristics to define the minimum monitoring intensity needed to evaluate demographic trends along a continuum ranging from simple descriptive changes in population size to predictions of population changes derived from individual based life histories. Our study, stimulated by the Brazilian government's National Action Plan for the Conservation of Muriquis, is fundamental to meeting the conservation goals for this genus, and also provides a model for defining priorities and methods for the implementation of integrated demographic monitoring programs for other endangered and critically endangered species of primates.

  4. Demographic monitoring of wild muriqui populations: Criteria for defining priority areas and monitoring intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen B Strier

    Full Text Available Demographic data are essential to assessments of the status of endangered species. However, establishing an integrated monitoring program to obtain useful data on contemporary and future population trends requires both the identification of priority areas and populations and realistic evaluations of the kinds of data that can be obtained under different monitoring regimes. We analyzed all known populations of a critically endangered primate, the muriqui (genus: Brachyteles using population size, genetic uniqueness, geographic importance (including potential importance in corridor programs and implementability scores to define monitoring priorities. Our analyses revealed nine priority populations for the northern muriqui (B. hypoxanthus and nine for the southern muriqui (B. arachnoides. In addition, we employed knowledge of muriqui developmental and life history characteristics to define the minimum monitoring intensity needed to evaluate demographic trends along a continuum ranging from simple descriptive changes in population size to predictions of population changes derived from individual based life histories. Our study, stimulated by the Brazilian government's National Action Plan for the Conservation of Muriquis, is fundamental to meeting the conservation goals for this genus, and also provides a model for defining priorities and methods for the implementation of integrated demographic monitoring programs for other endangered and critically endangered species of primates.

  5. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, R.G.; Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Smith, D.D.

    1984-07-01

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends in environmental radiation, and to provide such information to the public. It summarizes these activities for calendar year 1983. No radioactivity attributable to NTS activities was detectable offsite by the monitoring networks. Using recorded wind data and Pasquill stability categories, atmospheric dispersion calculations based on reported radionuclide releases yield an estimated dose of 5 x 10 -5 man-rem to the population within 80 km of the Nevada Test Site during 1983. World-wide fallout of Kr-85, Sr-90, Cs-137, and Pu-239 detected by the monitoring networks would cause maximum exposure to an individual of less than 0.2 mrem per year. Plutonium and krypton in air were similar to 1982 levels while cesium and strontium in other samples were near the detection limits. An occasional net exposure to offsite residents has been detected by the TLD network. On investigation, the cause of such net exposures has been due to personal habits or occupational activities, not to NTS activities. 29 references, 35 figures, 30 tables

  6. The Monitoring Of Thunderstorm In Sao Paulo's Urban Areas, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, R. B.; Pereira, A.; Beneti, C.; Jusevicius, M.; Kawano, M.; Bianchi, R.; Bellodi, M.

    2005-12-01

    A monitoring of thunderstorm in urban areas occurred in the vicinity of Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo from November 2004 to March 2005. Eight thunderstorms were monitored by local electric field, video camera, Brazilian Lightning Location Network (RINDAT) and weather radar. The most of these thunderstorms were associated with the local convection and cold front. Some of these events presented floods in the vicinity of Sao Bernardo and in the Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo (MASP) being associated with local sea breeze circulation and the heat island effect. The convectives cells exceeding 100km x 100 km of area, actives between 2 and 3 hours. The local electric field identified the electrification stage of thunderstorms, high transients of lightning and total lightning rate of above 10 flashes per minute. About 29.5 thousands of cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were analyzed . From the total set of CG flashes analyzed, about 94 percent were negative strokes and presented average peak current of above 25kA, common for this region. Some lightning images were obtained by video camera and compared with transients of lightning and lightning detection network data. The most of these transients of lightning presented continuing current duration between 100ms and 200ms. A CG lightning occurred on 25th February was visually observed 3.5km from FEI campus, Sao Bernardo do Campo. This lightning presented negative polarity and estimed peak current of above 30kA. A spider was visually observed over FEI Campus at 17th March. No transients of lightning and recording by lightning location network were found.

  7. Energy technology monitoring - New areas and in-depth investigations; Technologie-Monitoring - Weitere Bereiche - Vertiefungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigassi, R; Eicher, H [Dr. Eicher und Pauli AG, Liestal (Switzerland); Steiner, P; Ott, W [Econcept AG, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project that examined long-term trends in the energy technology area in order to provide information that is to form the basis for political action and the distribution of energy research funding in Switzerland. Energy-technology areas examined include variable-speed electrical drives, ventilation systems for low-energy-consumption buildings, membrane technology and the use of plastics in lightweight automobiles. Examples are quoted and the current state of the appropriate technologies and market aspects are examined. Also, the potential and future developments in the areas listed are looked at. The consequences for energy policy and future developments in the technology-monitoring area are considered.

  8. HYSPLIT's Capability for Radiological Aerial Monitoring in Nuclear Emergencies: Model Validation and Assessment on the Chernobyl Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gunhyo; Kim, Juyoul; Shin, Hyeongki

    2007-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident took place on 25 April 1986 in Ukraine. Consequently large amount of radionuclides were released into the atmosphere. The release was a widespread distribution of radioactivity throughout the northern hemisphere, mainly across Europe. A total of 31 persons died as a consequence of the accident, and about 140 persons suffered various degrees of radiation sickness and health impairment in the acute health impact. The possible increase of cancer incidence has been a real and significant increase of carcinomas of the thyroid among the children living in the contaminated regions as the late health effects. Recently, a variety of atmospheric dispersion models have been developed and used around the world. Among them, HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model developed by NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)/ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) is being widely used. To verify the HYSPLIT model for radiological aerial monitoring in nuclear emergencies, a case study on the Chernobyl accident is performed

  9. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Summary of Socioeconomic Data Analysis Conducted in Support of the Radiological Monitoring Program, During FY 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L.K. Roe

    2001-01-01

    This report is a summary of socioeconomic data analyses conducted in support of the Radiological Monitoring Program during fiscal year 2001. Socioeconomic data contained in this report include estimates for the years 2000 and 2001 of the resident population in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. The estimates presented in this report are based on selected Census 2000 statistics, and housing and population data that were acquired and developed in accordance with LP-RS-00 1 Q-M and 0, Scientific Investigation of Economic, Demographic, and Agricultural Characteristics in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain. The study area from which data were collected is delineated by a radial grid, consisting of 160 grid cells, that is suitable for evaluating the pathways and potential impacts of a release of radioactive materials to the environment within a distance of 84 kilometers from Yucca Mountain. Data are presented in a tabular format by the county, state, area, and grid cell in which housing units, households, and resident population are located. Also included is a visual representation of the distribution of the 2000 residential populations within the study area, showing Census 2000 geography, county boundaries, and taxing district boundaries for selected communities

  10. Radiological performance assessment for the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.R.; Fowler, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-12-18

    This radiological performance assessment (RPA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was prepared in accordance with the requirements of Chapter III of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. The Order specifies that an RPA should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The performance objectives require that: (1) exposures of the general public to radioactivity in the waste or released from the waste will not result in an effective dose equivalent of 25 mrem per year; (2) releases to the atmosphere will meet the requirements of 40 CFR 61; (3) inadvertent intruders will not be committed to an excess of an effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem per year from chronic exposure, or 500 mrem from a single acute exposure; and (4) groundwater resources will be protected in accordance with Federal, State and local requirements.

  11. Radiological performance assessment for the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Fowler, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This radiological performance assessment (RPA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was prepared in accordance with the requirements of Chapter III of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. The Order specifies that an RPA should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The performance objectives require that: (1) exposures of the general public to radioactivity in the waste or released from the waste will not result in an effective dose equivalent of 25 mrem per year; (2) releases to the atmosphere will meet the requirements of 40 CFR 61; (3) inadvertent intruders will not be committed to an excess of an effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem per year from chronic exposure, or 500 mrem from a single acute exposure; and (4) groundwater resources will be protected in accordance with Federal, State and local requirements

  12. Natural radionuclide and radiological assessment of building materials in high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Moghaddam, Masoud Vahabi; Fathabadi, Nasrin

    2013-04-01

    Building materials, collected from different sites in Ramsar, a northern coastal city in Iran, were analyzed for their natural radionuclide contents. The measurements were carried out using a high resolution high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer system. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K content varied from below the minimum detection limit up to 86,400 Bqkg(-1), 187 Bqkg(-1), and 1350 Bqkg(-1), respectively. The radiological hazards incurred from the use of these building materials were estimated through various radiation hazard indices. The result of this survey shows that values obtained for some samples are more than the internationally accepted maximum limits and as such, the use of them as a building material pose significant radiation hazard to individuals.

  13. Impact of the application of criteria of internal monitoring in radiological protection programmes in nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, B.M.; Dantas, A.L.A.; Juliao, L.Q.C.; Lourenco, M.C.; Melo, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The manipulation of open sources in Nuclear Medicine services involves risks of external exposure and internal contamination. The radiological protection plan of facilities licensed by CNEN - Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - must include the evaluation of such risks and propose a programme of individual monitoring to control exposure and ensure the maintenance of conditions of radiation safety. The IAEA - International Atomic Energy Agency - recommendations presented in the Safety Guide RS-G-1.2 suggest that an internal worker monitoring program be implemented where there is a possibility of internal contamination lead to effective dose committed annual values equal to or greater than 1 mSv. This paper presents the application of such criteria to the radionuclides most frequently used in the field of Nuclear Medicine, taking into account the normal conditions of handling and the ranges of activity authorized by CNEN. It is concluded that iodine 131 manipulation for therapeutic purposes is the practice that presented the greatest risk of internal exposure of workers, requiring the adoption of a programme of internal monitoring of Nuclear Medicine services

  14. Results of whole body counting for JAEA staff members engaged in the emergency radiological monitoring for the Fukushima nuclear disaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Chie; Kurihara, Osamu; Kanai, Katsuta; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Tsujimura, Norio; Momose, Takumaro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    A massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, resulted in the release of an enormous amount of radioactive materials into the environment. On the day after the earthquake the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) began emergency radiological monitoring. Measurements with a whole body counter (WBC) for the staff members who had returned from Fukushima began at the end of March because a power blackout for several days and lingering increased ambient radiation levels had rendered the WBCs inoperable. The measured activity level for {sup 131}I due to inhalation for emergency staff varied from below detection limit to 7 kBq, which corresponds to an estimated initial intake range of <1 to 60 kBq when extrapolated back to the date the staff began the monitoring in Fukushima. The measured activity levels for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were both in the ranges from below detection limit to 3 kBq. When using the median values for each set of measurements, the ratio of the initial intake of {sup 131}I to {sup 137}Cs was 11. The maximum committed effective dose of 0.8 mSv was recorded for a member of the 4th monitoring team dispatched from March 15 to 20. (author)

  15. Environmental monitoring radiological programs for the nuclear centre and the low level radioactive waste facility in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero, E.; Cervantes, L.; Rojas, V.

    2006-01-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico (ININ) has its Laboratory of Environmental Radiological Monitoring, (LVRA), to assure the critical population and the environment they are not exposed to radiation doses greater than the limits established by the national and international legislation, this laboratory carries out environmental monitoring radiological programs the Nuclear Centre and its surroundings and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Facility (CADER) and its around. In order to carry out these programs the LVRA has rooms for evaporation, drying, grinding, ashing of environmental and food samples, and a laboratory for gamma ray spectrometry, liquid scintillation, alpha-beta gross counting and computer room. Since the year 2000 the (ININ) has tried to implant the quality system ISO 9001:2000 including a its (LVRA). This quality system includes: a Plan of Quality, Quality Manual, programs of technical and administrative document elaboration, technical and administrative procedures, technical and administrative qualification programmes for the laboratory staff, maintenance and calibration programs for measurement systems and finally participation in national and international exercises of intercomparison. The ININ counts with the management of quality assurance to verify these programs, in addition, our Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CNSNS) carries out periodic audits to authorize the of use and handling of radioactive and nuclear material licenses of these facilities. In this work we presented the advances and difficulties found in the implantation of the quality system, also we present the benefits obtained with uses of this system, the samples analyses results, and the calculation of the annual dose to the critical population for the last five years. In addition, we presented the calculation the radionuclides concentration tendencies in different sample types, according to our (CNSNS) requirements. In the same way the results of the calibrations

  16. The Ability of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center to Collect and Disseminate Environmental Measurements during Radiological Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marianno, Craig; Essex, James

    2007-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is the United States response organization for radiological emergencies. The FRMAC is structured as an operations center and employs the combined resources of several federal agencies to respond to any disaster resulting in the release of radioactivity. The mission of the FRMAC is to support state and local authorities in the gathering of environmental data using an array of survey equipment ranging from alpha probes, beta/gamma probes, and high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectroscopy to the gathering of physical samples. Once collected, the data are projected on maps to assist public officials make protective action decisions. In addition to the accumulation of data, it is the legal obligation of the FRMAC to keep archival records of all data points and their actions. During an event, it is conceivable that hundreds to thousands of sample points will be recorded over a relatively short time. It is in the interest of the federal government and public that the information collected be put to the best use as fast as possible. Toward this end, the Remote Sensing Laboratory, working under the direction of the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, is investigating the use of several technologies that will accelerate data flow from field teams to the FRMAC and, finally, distribution of data to decision makers and the public. Not only can finished data products be viewed through the internet, but the actual collection of data via 'real-time' telemetry can be viewed using this same method. Data from the field will be transferred directly to the FRMAC using the MCPD (multi-path communication device). This base station receives the survey information from the field teams via Bluetooth and instantly investigates the best communication pathway to transfer data to the FRMAC. Possible paths include standalone radio, commercial cellular networks (GPRS and CDMA) and satellite

  17. Monitoring of Soil Remediation Process in the Metal Mining Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Ko, Myoung-Soo; Han, Hyeop-jo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Na, So-Young

    2016-04-01

    Stabilization using proper additives is an effective soil remediation technique to reduce As mobility in soil. Several researches have reported that Fe-containing materials such as amorphous Fe-oxides, goethite and hematite were effective in As immobilization and therefore acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) may be potential material for As immobilization. The AMDS is the by-product from electrochemical treatment of acid mine drainage and mainly contains Fe-oxide. The Chungyang area in Korea is located in the vicinity of the huge abandoned Au-Ag Gubong mine which was closed in the 1970s. Large amounts of mine tailings have been remained without proper treatment and the mobilization of mine tailings can be manly occurred during the summer heavy rainfall season. Soil contamination from this mobilization may become an urgent issue because it can cause the contamination of groundwater and crop plants in sequence. In order to reduce the mobilization of the mine tailings, the pilot scale study of in-situ stabilization using AMDS was applied after the batch and column experiments in the lab. For the monitoring of stabilization process, we used to determine the As concentration in crop plants grown on the field site but it is not easily applicable because of time and cost. Therefore, we may need simple monitoring technique to measure the mobility or leachability which can be comparable with As concentration in crop plants. We compared several extraction methods to suggest the representative single extraction method for the monitoring of soil stabilization efficiency. Several selected extraction methods were examined and Mehlich 3 extraction method using the mixture of NH4F, EDTA, NH4NO3, CH3COOH and HNO3 was selected as the best predictor of the leachability or mobility of As in the soil remediation process.

  18. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gangneung area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Dong Wan; An, Mi Jeong [Gangnung Regional Radiation Monitoring Station, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    The objectives of the project are to get a systematic data for the distribution of environmental radioactivity levels in Gangnung provinces, and use them as a baseline data for the health of the peoples. To monitor the environmental radiation/radioactivity, gross beta activities and gamma exposure rate in the airborne-dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water were measured in Kangnung province during the period of January 1- December 31, 2001. Waters from drinking water reservoirs, agricultural and marine products were sampled and measured by the HPGe(High Purity Ge)detector for the analysis from some selected areas to make sure of the effect of the fallout due to the atmospheric weapons test. The radioactivity in Kangnung was all about the past data.

  19. Use of local area networks in radioisotopic monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheckel, C.A.; Huckins, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    In the spring of 1988, Canberra's Nuclear Data Systems Division introduced a device that performed the basic data acquisition functions of a multichannel analyzer (MCA) but was interfaced to an Institute of electrical and Electronics Engineers standard 802.2/802.3 Ethernet local area network 1,2 (LAN). The device, known as the 556 acquisition interface module (AIM), includes 64K channels of spectral memory and can handle two analog-to-digital converter (ADC) modules running an aggregate acquisition rate of up to 1 MHz. The AIM can transfer data and accept commands over the 10M bit/s LAN, making it suitable for real-time applications. Subsequent advancements in software and hardware display technology have expanded the capabilities of spectroscopy analysis systems by providing remote real-time spectral displays. The paper presents a system architecture review and discusses applicability for radiation monitoring

  20. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gangneung area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hwa; An, Mi Jung [Gangnung Regional Radiation Monitoring Station, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The objectives of the project are to get a systematic data for the distribution of environmental radioactivity levels in Gangnung provinces, and use them as a baseline data for the health of the peoples. To monitor the environmental radiation/radioactivity, gross beta activities and gamma exposure rate in the airborne-dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water were measured in Gangnung province during the period of January 1 - December 31, 2003. Waters from drinking water reservoirs, agricultural and marine products were sampled and measured by the HPGe(High Purity Ge)detector for the analysis from some selected areas to make sure of the effect of the fallout due to the atmospheric weapons test. The radioactivity in Kangnung was all about the past data.

  1. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gangneung area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hwa; An, Mi Jung [Gangnung Regional Radiation Monitoring Station, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The objectives of the project are to get a systematic data for the distribution of environmental radioactivity levels in Gangnung provinces, and use them as a baseline data for the health of the peoples. To monitor the environmental radiation/radioactivity, gross beta activities and gamma exposure rate in the airborne-dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water were measured in Kangnung province during the period of January 1- December 31, 2002. Waters from drinking water reservoirs, agricultural and marine products were sampled and measured by the HPGe(High Purity Ge)detector for the analysis from some selected areas to make sure of the effect of the fallout due to the atmospheric weapons test. The radioactivity in Kangnung was all about the past data.

  2. Aerial radiological survey of Areas 18 and 20 Nevada Test Site. Date of survey: October-November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1985-11-01

    Radiological surveys were conducted over Areas 18 and 20 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the period 10 October through 13 November 1980. Separate surveys of the two areas were conducted simultaneously using arrays of NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals mounted on Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm BO-105 and Hughes H-500 helicopters. Exposure rate contour maps due to total terrestrial gamma ray activity were produced for both areas. The most frequently occurring range of exposure rates was 17 to 25 μR/h for both Areas 18 and 20; the total range varied from 12 to 2000 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic contribution of 6 μR/h. An isocount rate contour map showing the distribution of count rates measured in the spectral window sensitive to cesium-137 was produced to show the extent of man-made contaminants in Area 18. In a similar manner, an isocount rate contour map showing the distribution of count rates measured in a spectral window sensitive to cobalt-60 was used to show the extent of man-made contaminants in Area 20. The extent of man-made contamination from the effluents of the various events in both areas shows patterns indicative of the prevailing winds during and after the events. Except for the presence of low levels of cesium-137 activity in the eastern half of Area 18, all contaminants can be correlated with the effluents of the various events. In Area 18, cesium-137 activity appears to be spread over about 30 to 40 percent of the eastern half; it does not appear to be directly associated with the events in this area. The distribution and level of background radiation in the two areas are consistent with those measured during previous surveys

  3. The Importance of Building and Enhancing Worldwide Industry Cooperation in the Areas of Radiological Protection, Waste Management and Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-01-01

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry ' s involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  4. The importance of building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in the areas of radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-01-01

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of Summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry's involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  5. Radiological air monitoring and sample analysis research and development progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Sponsored by a Department Of Energy (DOE) research and development grant, the State of Idaho INEL Oversight Program (OP) personnel designed an independent air monitoring system that provides detection of the presence of priority airborne contaminants potentially migrating beyond INEL boundaries. Initial locations for off-site ambient air monitoring stations were chosen in consultation with: DOE and NOAA reports; Mesodif modeling; review of the relevant literature; and communication with private contractors and experts in pertinent fields. Idaho State University (ISU) has initiated an Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP). The EMP provides an independent monitoring function as well as a training ground for students. Students learn research techniques dedicated to environmental studies and learn analytical skills and rules of compliance related to monitoring. ISU-EMP assisted OP in specific aspects of identifying optimum permanent monitoring station locations, and in selecting appropriate sample collection equipment for each station. The authorization to establish, prepare and install sampling devices on selected sites was obtained by OP personnel in conjunction with ISU-EMP personnel. All samples described in this program are collected by OP or ISU-EMP personnel and returned to the ISU for analysis. This report represents the summary of results of those samples collected and analyzed for radioactivity during the year of 1992

  6. Epidemiological investigation of radiological effects in high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Luxin; Zha, Yongru; Tao, Zufan; He, Weihui; Chen, Deqing; Yuan, Yongling

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to provide some information for providing whether any detrimental effects exist in a large population whose families have been continuously exposed to a low dose rate radiation. Two areas in Yangjiang Country, characterized by high background radiation (HBR) with environmental gamma exposure, large population size and long-term inhabitants, were selected for evaluation of late effects of HBR. The areas with normal radiation background close to the Yangjiang Country were selected as control areas. Up to 1986 approximately one million person-years in each area in both HBR and control areas have been observed. No increase of cancer mortality was found in the HBR areas; on the contrary, cancer mortality tended to be lower in the HBR areas than the control areas. The prevalence of hereditary diseases and congenital defects was similar in both HBR and control areas, but the frequency of Down's syndrome was higher in the HBR areas (through within the normal range) than the control areas. A possible explanation is the difference of age of maternity between the HBR and control areas, and the extremely low frequency in the control areas. Possible factors influencing the incidence of mutationbased diseases were comparable in the HBR and control groups. However, the cultural and educational levels were somewhat different, probably affecting health status and family planning. It is likely that there may be a dose threshold for cancer incidence, but this remains to be determined by further research. (N.K.)

  7. An aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River Site and surrounding area, Aiken, South Carolina, October--November 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1993-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period of October 14 to November 23, 1991, over an area surrounding the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The area is situated 15 kilometers south of Aiken, South Carolina. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the gamma ray environment of the SRS and surrounding areas. Contour maps showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level were constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on a United States Geological Survey map of the area. The exposure rates measured within the survey region are generally uniform and typical of natural background. The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution. Enhanced exposure rates not attributable to natural background were measured over several areas within the survey region. The manmade radionuclides detected in these areas, cesium-137, cobalt-60, and protactinium-234m, were produced by the reactor operations and material processing conducted at the SRS. The radiation levels produced by these nuclides are consistent with those levels measured during previous SRS aerial surveys. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries

  8. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vic [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally

  9. Radiological characterisation and radon equilibrium factor in the outdoor air of a post-industrial urban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozas, S.; Idoeta, R.; Alegría, N.; Herranz, M.

    2016-01-01

    of determining activity concentrations for each naturally occurring radionuclide and the equilibrium factor in the outdoor air. - Highlights: • A yearlong full radiological picture of a post-industrial area's air is shown. • The method considers isotopes collection, ingrowth and decay during sampling. • The method is based on early and delayed gamma measurements after sampling. • Past industries' committed impact on the air radiological quality is assessed. • Influence of environmental parameters on equilibrium factor is analysed.

  10. 1997 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    1998-04-01

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride. In November 1994, an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) was agreed to and signed by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health ampersand Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Interim Record of Decision requires the installation of a hybrid groundwater corrective action (HGCA) to stabilize the plume of groundwater contamination and remove CVOCs dissolved in the groundwater. The hybrid groundwater corrective action included a recovery well network, purge water management facility, air stripper, and an airlift recirculation well. The recirculation well was dropped pursuant to a test that indicated it to be ineffective at the TNX Area. Consequently, the groundwater corrective action was changed from a hybrid to a single action, pump-and-treat approach. The Interim Action (IA) T-1 air stripper system began operation on September 16, 1996. a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. As of December 31, 1997, the system has treated 32 million gallons of contaminated groundwater removed 32 pounds of TCE. The recovery well network created a 'capture zone' that stabilized the plume of contaminated groundwater

  11. 1997 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1998-04-01

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride. In November 1994, an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) was agreed to and signed by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health {ampersand} Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Interim Record of Decision requires the installation of a hybrid groundwater corrective action (HGCA) to stabilize the plume of groundwater contamination and remove CVOCs dissolved in the groundwater. The hybrid groundwater corrective action included a recovery well network, purge water management facility, air stripper, and an airlift recirculation well. The recirculation well was dropped pursuant to a test that indicated it to be ineffective at the TNX Area. Consequently, the groundwater corrective action was changed from a hybrid to a single action, pump-and-treat approach. The Interim Action (IA) T-1 air stripper system began operation on September 16, 1996. a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. As of December 31, 1997, the system has treated 32 million gallons of contaminated groundwater removed 32 pounds of TCE. The recovery well network created a `capture zone` that stabilized the plume of contaminated groundwater.

  12. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgland, A.W.; Charles, E.; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration and Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground

  13. Echelon approach to areas of concern in synoptic regional monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Wayne; Patil, Ganapati P.; Joly, Kyle

    1997-01-01

    Echelons provide an objective approach to prospecting for areas of potential concern in synoptic regional monitoring of a surface variable. Echelons can be regarded informally as stacked hill forms. The strategy is to identify regions of the surface which are elevated relative to surroundings (Relative ELEVATIONS or RELEVATIONS). These are areas which would continue to expand as islands with receding (virtual) floodwaters. Levels where islands would merge are critical elevations which delimit echelons in the vertical dimension. Families of echelons consist of surface sectors constituting separate islands for deeper waters that merge as water level declines. Pits which would hold water are disregarded in such a progression, but a complementary analysis of pits is obtained using the surface as a virtual mould to cast a counter-surface (bathymetric analysis). An echelon tree is a family tree of echelons with peaks as terminals and the lowest level as root. An echelon tree thus provides a dendrogram representation of surface topology which enables graph theoretic analysis and comparison of surface structures. Echelon top view maps show echelon cover sectors on the base plane. An echelon table summarizes characteristics of echelons as instances or cases of hill form surface structure. Determination of echelons requires only ordinal strength for the surface variable, and is thus appropriate for environmental indices as well as measurements. Since echelons are inherent in a surface rather than perceptual, they provide a basis for computer-intelligent understanding of surfaces. Echelons are given for broad-scale mammalian species richness in Pennsylvania.

  14. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report Supporting Radiological Air Surveillance Monitoring for the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Thomas Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report documents the Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site ambient air surveillance program. The development of the DQOs was based on the seven-step process recommended “for systematic planning to generate performance and acceptance criteria for collecting environmental data” (EPA 2006). The process helped to determine the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to meet current regulatory requirements and to follow U.S. Department of Energy guidance for environmental surveillance air monitoring design. It also considered the current air monitoring program that has existed at INL Site since the 1950s. The development of the DQOs involved the application of the atmospheric dispersion model CALPUFF to identify likely contamination dispersion patterns at and around the INL Site using site-specific meteorological data. Model simulations were used to quantitatively assess the probable frequency of detection of airborne radionuclides released by INL Site facilities using existing and proposed air monitors.

  15. Evaluation of radiological impacts for environmental radioactivity distribution in the Kartini reactor area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazid, M.; Suratman; Sutresna, G.; Aminjoyo, S.

    1996-01-01

    This evaluation covered of gross radioactivity. K-40 radioactivity in the water, soil and grass samples. The measurement of Cs-137 and Sr-9