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Sample records for radiologic procedures policies

  1. International Commission on Radiological Protection. History, policies, procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Bo; Dunster, H.J.; Valentin, Jack; )

    2000-01-01

    This report briefly reviews the history, mode of operation, concepts, and current policies of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It touches upon the objectives of the Commission's recommendations, the quantities used, the biological basis of the Commission's policy, the quantitative basis for its risk estimates, the structure of the system of protection, some problems of interpretation and application in that system, and the need for stability, consistency, and clarity in the Commission's recommendations. (author)

  2. Radiologic procedures, policies and protocols for pediatric emergency medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, George A.

    2008-01-01

    Protocol development between radiology and pediatric emergency medicine requires a multidisciplinary approach to manage straightforward as well as complex and time-sensitive needs for emergency department patients. Imaging evaluation requires coordination of radiologic technologists, radiologists, transporters, nurses and coordinators, among others, and might require accelerated routines or occur at sub-optimal times. Standardized protocol development enables providers to design a best practice in all of these situations and should be predicated on evidence, mission, and service expectations. As in any new process, constructive feedback channels are imperative for evaluation and modification. (orig.)

  3. Handbook of radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgcock, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is organized around radiologic procedures with each discussed from the points of view of: indications, contraindications, materials, method of procedures and complications. Covered in this book are: emergency radiology chest radiology, bone radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, GU radiology, pediatric radiology, computerized tomography, neuroradiology, visceral and peripheral angiography, cardiovascular radiology, nuclear medicine, lymphangiography, and mammography

  4. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.; Hare, W.S.C.; Thomson, K.; Tess, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book outlines the various procedures necessary for the successful practice of diagnostic radiology. Topics covered are: general principles, imaging of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, vascular radiology, arthrography, and miscellaneous diagnostic radiologic procedures

  5. Classification of radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A classification for departments in Danish hospitals which use radiological procedures. The classification codes consist of 4 digits, where the first 2 are the codes for the main groups. The first digit represents the procedure's topographical object and the second the techniques. The last 2 digits describe individual procedures. (CLS)

  6. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  7. Radiological Work Planning and Procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Kurtz, J E

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In add...

  8. Radiological Work Planning and Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD

  9. Glove Perforations During Interventional Radiological Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leena, R. V.; Shyamkumar, N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Intact surgical gloves are essential to avoid contact with blood and other body fluids. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of glove perforations during interventional radiological procedures. In this study, a total of 758 gloves used in 94 interventional radiological procedures were examined for perforations. Eleven perforations were encountered, only one of which was of occult type. No significant difference in the frequency of glove perforation was found between the categories with varying time duration.

  10. The future policy for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The international system of radiological protection is currently being revised with the aim of making it more coherent and concise. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published its draft reflections on the system's evolution, and has opened discussions with the radiological protection community in order to seek a broad range of stakeholder input. This open dialogue will help bring about a common level of understanding of the issues at stake and contribute to the evolution of new ICRP recommendations. These proceedings present a significant block of stakeholder input, comprising the views of policy makers, regulators, radiological protection professionals, industry and representatives of both non-governmental and intergovernmental organisations. (author)

  11. Occupational exposures from selected interventional radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.; Beal, A.; James, D.

    2001-01-01

    The number of radiology and cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased in recent years due to better diagnostic equipment resulting in an increase in radiation dose to the staff and patients. The assessment of staff doses was performed for cardiac catheterization and for three other non-cardiac procedures. The scattered radiation distribution resulting from the cardiac catheterization procedure was measured prior to the staff dose measurements. Staff dose measurements included those of the left shoulder, eye, thyroid and hand doses of the cardiologist. In non-cardiac procedures doses to the hands of the radiologist were measured for nephrostomy, fistulogram and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty procedures. Doses to the radiologist or cardiologist were found to be relatively high if correct protection was not observed. (author)

  12. Acquisition Policy and Procedures Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    This Instruction establishes policies, responsibilities, and procedures for the procurement of goods and services to include supplies, equipment, publications, furniture, and information technology...

  13. The future policy for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    At the end of the 1990's, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) launched a process for establishing new recommendations, which are expected to serve as guidelines for national systems of radiological protection. Currently the ICRP's proposed recommendations are being subjected to extensive stakeholder comment and modifications. The NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has been actively involved in this process. Part of the Committee's work has been to undertake collaborative efforts with the ICRP through, for example, the organisation of broad stakeholder fora. The first of these, held in Taormina, Italy in 2002, focused on the development of a policy basis for the radiological protection of the environment. The second forum, held in Lanzarote, Spain in April 2003, addressed the latest concepts and approaches in the ICRP proposed recommendations for a system of radiological protection. During this meeting, the ICRP listened to the views of various stakeholder groups, including radiological protection regulators, environmental protection ministries, the nuclear power industry and NGOs. As a result, the ICRP modified its proposals to better reflect stakeholder needs and wishes. This report presents the outcomes of the discussions, examining what the ICRP proposed and how its proposals have been affected and modified as a result of stakeholder input. (author)

  14. The Ethics for Justification of Radiological Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a steady and continuing interest in ethical issues in radiation protection for a number of years. The International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) has produced a Code of Ethics which was adopted at its last General assembly. Many RP Societies have similar Codes. However, the trend now is the application of ethics to more practical day to day matters. This paper will concentrate of the application of ethics in the field of Justification in Radiation Protection in Medicine. A description of basic ethical concepts will be given, together with some discussion of the application of ethics to the proposed new recommendations from the International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP). The paper will conclude with a more detailed discussion of the ethical process of requesting radiological procedures, particularly in line with European Commission Regulations (Directives) and how they can and should be applied locally. To assist participants, an extensive list of references is appended here

  15. General statement of policy and procedures for NRC enforcement actions: Enforcement policy. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This document includes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s or Commission`s) revised General Statement of Policy and Procedure for Enforcement Actions (Enforcement Policy) as it was published in the Federal Register on May 13, 1998 (63 ER 26630). The Enforcement Policy is a general statement of policy explaining the NRC`s policies and procedures in initiating enforcement actions, and of the presiding officers and the Commission in reviewing these actions. This policy statement is applicable to enforcement matters involving the radiological health and safety of the public, including employees` health and safety, the common defense and security, and the environment.

  16. General statement of policy and procedures for NRC enforcement actions: Enforcement policy. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This document includes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's or Commission's) revised General Statement of Policy and Procedure for Enforcement Actions (Enforcement Policy) as it was published in the Federal Register on May 13, 1998 (63 ER 26630). The Enforcement Policy is a general statement of policy explaining the NRC's policies and procedures in initiating enforcement actions, and of the presiding officers and the Commission in reviewing these actions. This policy statement is applicable to enforcement matters involving the radiological health and safety of the public, including employees' health and safety, the common defense and security, and the environment

  17. Outpatient invasive radiologic procedures - Diagnostic and therapeutic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublin, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a ''how-to'' book for radiologists who are planning to, or considering whether to establish outpatient practice in response to DRGs. It provides practical, expert advice on both the administrative and clinical sides of outpatient radiology. It focuses on the essentials of clinical practice in the outpatient setting - and how it differs from inpatient practice

  18. Radiology of orthopedic procedures, problems and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelman, M.I.; Saunders, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    This work is volume 24 in a series on clinical radiology. Eight sections cover fractures in general, thoracolumbar spine, upper extremities, hand and wrist, trauma to pelvis, hip and femur, knee and lower leg, and ankle and foot. These sections vary from 15 to 36 pages and contain adequate text, 18 to 54 x-ray films per section, and appropriate references (306 in sum). There are 275 radiographs, most of which are well printed, some with accompanying line sketches

  19. Evaluation of medical radiation exposure in pediatric interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Valeria Coelho Costa; Navarro, Marcus Vinicius Teixeira; Oliveira, Aline da Silva Pacheco, E-mail: vccnavarro@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Maia, Ana Figueiredo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Adriano Dias Dourado [Sociedade Brasileira de Hemodinamica e Cardiologia Intervencionista, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate pediatric radiation exposure in procedures of interventional radiology in two hospitals in the Bahia state, aiming at contributing to delineate the scenario at the state and national levels. The knowledge of exposure levels will allow an evaluation of the necessity of doses optimization, considering that peculiarities of radiology and pediatrics become even more significant in interventional radiology procedures which involve exposure to higher radiation doses. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 procedures were evaluated in four rooms of the two main hospitals performing pediatric interventional radiology procedures in the Bahia state. Air kerma rate and kerma-area product were evaluated in 27 interventional cardiac and 5 interventional brain procedures. Results: Maximum values for air kerma rate and kerma-area product and air kerma obtained in cardiac procedures were, respectively, 129.9 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 947.0 mGy; and, for brain procedures were 83.3 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 961.0 mGy. Conclusion: The present study results showed exposure values up to 14 times higher than those found in other foreign studies, and approximating those found for procedures in adults. Such results demonstrate excessive exposure to radiation, indicating the need for constant procedures optimization and evaluation of exposure rates. (author)

  20. Generic procedures for assessment and response during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. Radiological accident assessment must take account of all critical information available at any time and must be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at reviewing the response as more detailed and complete information becomes available. This manual provides the tools, generic procedures and data needed for an initial response to a non-reactor radiological accident. This manual is one out of a set of IAEA publications on emergency preparedness and response, including Method for the Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents (IAEA-TECDOC-953), Generic Assessment Procedures for Determining Protective Actions During a Reactor Accident (IAEA-TECDOC-955) and Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency (Safety Series No. 109)

  1. Deterministic effects of interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shope, Thomas B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe deterministic radiation injuries reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that resulted from therapeutic, interventional procedures performed under fluoroscopic guidance, and to investigate the procedure or equipment-related factors that may have contributed to the injury. Reports submitted to the FDA under both mandatory and voluntary reporting requirements which described radiation-induced skin injuries from fluoroscopy were investigated. Serious skin injuries, including moist desquamation and tissues necrosis, have occurred since 1992. These injuries have resulted from a variety of interventional procedures which have required extended periods of fluoroscopy compared to typical diagnostic procedures. Facilities conducting therapeutic interventional procedures need to be aware of the potential for patient radiation injury and take appropriate steps to limit the potential for injury. (author)

  2. A model to determine payments associated with radiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabotuwana, Thusitha; Hall, Christopher S; Thomas, Shiby; Wald, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Across the United States, there is a growing number of patients in Accountable Care Organizations and under risk contracts with commercial insurance. This is due to proliferation of new value-based payment models and care delivery reform efforts. In this context, the business model of radiology within a hospital or health system context is shifting from a primary profit-center to a cost-center with a goal of cost savings. Radiology departments need to increasingly understand how the transactional nature of the business relates to financial rewards. The main challenge with current reporting systems is that the information is presented only at an aggregated level, and often not broken down further, for instance, by type of exam. As such, the primary objective of this research is to provide better visibility into payments associated with individual radiology procedures in order to better calibrate expense/capital structure of the imaging enterprise to the actual revenue or value-add to the organization it belongs to. We propose a methodology that can be used to determine technical payments at a procedure level. We use a proportion based model to allocate payments to individual radiology procedures based on total charges (which also includes non-radiology related charges). Using a production dataset containing 424,250 radiology exams we calculated the overall average technical charge for Radiology to be $873.08 per procedure and the corresponding average payment to be $326.43 (range: $48.27 for XR and $2750.11 for PET/CT) resulting in an average payment percentage of 37.39% across all exams. We describe how charges associated with a procedure can be used to approximate technical payments at a more granular level with a focus on Radiology. The methodology is generalizable to approximate payment for other services as well. Understanding payments associated with each procedure can be useful during strategic practice planning. Charge-to-total charge ratio can be used to

  3. ICRP Publication 139: Occupational Radiological Protection in Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, P Ortiz; Dauer, L T; Loose, R; Martin, C J; Miller, D L; Vañó, E; Doruff, M; Padovani, R; Massera, G; Yoder, C

    2018-03-01

    In recent publications, such as Publications 117 and 120, the Commission provided practical advice for physicians and other healthcare personnel on measures to protect their patients and themselves during interventional procedures. These measures can only be effective if they are encompassed by a framework of radiological protection elements, and by the availability of professionals with responsibilities in radiological protection. This framework includes a radiological protection programme with a strategy for exposure monitoring, protective garments, education and training, and quality assurance of the programme implementation. Professionals with responsibilities in occupational radiological protection for interventional procedures include: medical physicists; radiological protection specialists; personnel working in dosimetry services; clinical applications support personnel from the suppliers and maintenance companies; staff engaged in training, standardisation of equipment, and procedures; staff responsible for occupational health; hospital administrators responsible for providing financial support; and professional bodies and regulators. This publication addresses these elements and these audiences, and provides advice on specific issues, such as assessment of effective dose from dosimeter readings when an apron is worn, estimation of exposure of the lens of the eye (with and without protective eyewear), extremity monitoring, selection and testing of protective garments, and auditing the interventional procedures when occupational doses are unusually high or low (the latter meaning that the dosimeter may not have been worn).

  4. Assessment of radiological properties of wastes from urban decontamination procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, D.N.G.; Guimarães, J.R.D.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Rochedo, P.R.R.; De Luca, C.

    2015-01-01

    One important activity associated to urban areas contaminated from accidental releases to the atmosphere of nuclear power plants is the management of radioactive wastes generated from decontamination procedures. This include the collection, conditioning, packing, transport and temporary/final disposition. The final destination is defined usually through a political decision. Thus, transport of packed radioactive wastes shall depend on decisions not just under the scope of radiological protection issues. However, the simulations performed to assess doses for the public and decontamination workers allows the estimate of radiological aspects related to the waste generated and these characteristics may be included in a multi-criteria decision tool aiming to support, under the radiological protection point of view, the decision-making process on post-emergency procedures. Important information to decision makers are the type, amount and activity concentration of wastes. This work describes the procedures to be included in the urban area model to account for the assessment of qualitative and quantitative description of wastes. The results will allow the classification of different procedures according to predefined criteria that shall then feed the multi-criteria assessment tool, currently under development, considering basic radiological protection aspects of wastes generated by the different available cleanup procedures on typical tropical urban environments. (authors)

  5. Patients exposure assessment for radiographic procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arandjic, D.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Stankovic, K.; Lazarevic, Dj.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.)

    2007-01-01

    In this work the results of dose assessment for the most frequent radiographic procedures in diagnostic radiology are shown. Entrance surface doses were assessed for 7 radiographic procedures. Three hospitals, six x-ray units in total, were enrolled in investigation. Patient doses were estimated based on results of x-ray tube output measurements. Finally, doses were compared with Diagnostic reference level. Higher dose values were observed for chest examinations. In comparison with results from other countries, doses from this procedure in Serbia are significantly higher. Estimated doses for other procedures were well below Diagnostic reference levels [sr

  6. Radiological interventional procedures for the acute abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trumm, C.; Hoffmann, R.T.; Reiser, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    In patients with acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, catheter-assisted thrombolytic therapy represents a procedure of increasing importance in addition to surgery and intensive care treatment. The thrombolytic drugs utilized for this purpose are urokinase, streptokinase and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA). Therapeutic embolization is predominantly used in the treatment of arterial bleeding from the gastro-intestinal tract, the liver, the intestines (due to an aneurysm or vascular malformation) and in bleeding from intestinal anastomoses. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, embospheres, gelfoam and microcoils can be utilized as embolic agents. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and stent implantation are applied in patients with biliary obstructions caused by inoperable tumors of the gall bladder or bile ducts, of the pancreatic head or duodenum and by metastases located in the liver parenchyma or hepatic hilum. Image-guided percutaneous drainage is a valuable option in the management of abscesses in the peritoneal cavity; less common indications are lymphoceles, biliomas, urinomas, hematomas, necrosis and pseudocysts. (orig.) [de

  7. Determining procedures for simulation-based training in radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Nielsen, Kristina Rue; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    , and basic abdominal ultrasound. CONCLUSION: A needs assessment identified and prioritized 13 technical procedures to include in a simulation-based curriculum. The list may be used as guide for development of training programs. KEY POINTS: • Simulation-based training can supplement training on patients......OBJECTIVES: New training modalities such as simulation are widely accepted in radiology; however, development of effective simulation-based training programs is challenging. They are often unstructured and based on convenience or coincidence. The study objective was to perform a nationwide needs...... assessment to identify and prioritize technical procedures that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum. METHODS: A needs assessment using the Delphi method was completed among 91 key leaders in radiology. Round 1 identified technical procedures that radiologists should learn. Round 2 explored...

  8. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use

  9. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use.

  10. Organ doses in interventional radiology procedures: Evaluation of software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tort, I.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Perez-Martinez, M.; Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Diez de los Rios, A.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) procedures require large fluoroscopy times and important number of radiological images, so the levels of radiation to patient are high, which leads us to calculate the organ doses. The objective of this work is to estimate and make a comparison of the results given by the different software that we have to do the calculation of organ doses in complex procedures of IR. To do this, 28 patients have been selected, distributed in the 3 procedures with highest doses. The determination of organ doses and effective doses has been made using the projections utilized and different software based on Monte Carlo Methods: Eff-dose, PCXMC and Diasoft. We have obtained very high dispersion in the average organ dose between the 3 programs. In many cases, it is higher than 25% and in some particular cases, it is greater than 100%. Dispersion obtained in effective doses is not so high, being under 20% in all cases. This shows that a better solution is needed to solve the problem of the organ doses calculation; a more accurate method is necessary that brings us to a trustworthy approach to reality, and, at the moment, that we do not dispose of it. (author)

  11. Policies and attitudes toward the pregnant radiology resident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheth, S.; Freedman, M.T.; Arak, G.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate attitudes and policies toward pregnant radiology residents, a questionnaire was sent to the chiefs of radiology residency programs across the country. A return rate of 76.4% and a response rate of 75.4% were achieved. A large majority of the respondents indicated that schedule changes would be made to avoid excessive exposure of a pregnant resident to radiation. The accommodations they suggest are reviewed, and suggestions are made that would help alleviate some of the stress and conflicts that invariably arise when a resident becomes pregnant

  12. Maternity leave policies in academic and private radiology practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirt, B.A.; Rauth, V.; Price, A.P.F.; Pagani, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987, the American Association of Women Radiologists surveyed both academic and private radiology departments regarding pregnancy and maternity leave policies. One hundred academic institutions (70% response), 30 radiotherapy departments (38% response), and 31 private practices responded. Details were obtained regarding maternity leave policy for residents and attending physicians; availability of paternity leave; policies regarding on-call time, fluoroscopy time and intracavitary/interstitial applications during pregnancy; and problems that occurred during resident or attending physician pregnancies. There was a wide range of responses regarding paid leave time, availability of additional time, and the use of vacation time during maternity leave

  13. Quality control procedures of dental diagnostic radiology systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Paula Serra Sasaki

    2007-01-01

    This work presents quality control reference procedures for dental diagnostic radiology systems, following the recommendations of the Publication 453 of the Brazilian Health Ministry (PF453), to be applied in dental clinics, in order to achieve an improvement in the radiological image qualities and the patient dose reduction. All tests were applied in an intraoral X rays system, following the methodology developed and the requirements of the PF 453. In order to verify the best quality of the image in relation to the smaller exposition time an object test was also developed in this work. The use of this object allowed the reduction of the exposition time of 0.5 seconds, the maximum value of the linear region of the characteristic curve, for 0.2 seconds. The tested X rays system showed a very good agreement with the applied procedures, detaching the reduction of the skin entrance dose using the film-holding devices. However, the size of the field increased and exceeded the maximum value of 6 cm recommended in the standard. The importance of the quality control in dental diagnostic radiology systems is essential due to the constant use of X radiation in dental clinics. The PF453 recommends the frequency of at least two years for the constancy tests. However, it is suggested that the professional, surgeon-dentist, should be responsible for the internal control of the image quality obtained from the X rays device. This can be done through monthly exposures of the object test developed in this work. (author)

  14. Open Access Journal Policies: A Systematic Analysis of Radiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Anand; Lobner, Katie; Fritz, Jan

    2018-02-01

    The open access movement has pushed for greater access to scientific knowledge by expanding access to scientific journal articles. There is limited information about the extent to which open access policies have been adopted by radiology journals. We performed a systematic analysis to ascertain the proportion of radiology journals with open access options. A search was performed with the assistance of a clinical informationist. Full and mixed English-language diagnostic and interventional radiology Web of Science journals (impact factors > 1.0) were included. Nuclear medicine, radiation oncology, physics, and solicitation-only journals were excluded. Primary outcome was open access option (yes or no) with additional outcomes including presence or absence of embargo, complete or partial copyright transfer, publication fees, and self-archiving policies. Secondary outcomes included journal citations, journal impact factors, immediacy, Eigenfactor, and article influence scores. Independent double readings were performed with differences resolved by consensus, supplemented by contacting editorial staff at each journal. In all, 125 journals were identified; review yielded 49 journals (39%, mean impact factor of 2.61). Thirty-six of the journals had open access options (73.4%), and four journals were exclusively open access (8.2%). Twelve-month embargoes were most commonly cited (90.6%) with 28.6% of journals stating that they did not require a complete transfer of copyright. Prices for open access options ranged from $750 to $4,000 (median $3,000). No statistically significant differences were found in journal impact measures comparing journals with open access options to journals without open access options. Diagnostic and interventional radiology journals have widely adopted open access options with a few radiology journals being exclusively open access. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiological procedures: Quality criteria and dose optimisation: French status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Ph.; Marshall-Depommier, E.; Bourguignon, M.; Beauvais-March, H.; Valero, M.; Lacronique, J.F.; Frijal, G.

    2001-01-01

    The Council Directive 97/43/Euratom of June 30 1997 on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure has come into force on May, 13 th 2000. French health directorate has entrusted the 'Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants (OPRI)' together with the 'Societe Francaise de Radiologie' (SFR) to implement article 6 related to radiological procedures, in order to bring into operation the principle of optimisation. The most frequent diagnostic radiology and interventional procedures (120 protocols) have been standardised in writing. Corresponding patient dosimetry has been determined from measurements on site, calculations and literature review. The criteria for optimisation have been highlighted for each protocols. With the help of the French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), measurements are being collected on a large scale in France. Then, knowing more precisely the patient dosimetry of each protocol, referral criteria will be reviewed and prioritised to implement the principle of justification. The authors will present and explain the chosen methodology (methodology of the Accreditation and Evaluation in Health Agency: ANAES) for completing this two years workload program, and will demonstrate clinical examples as well. (author)

  16. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; López-Rendón, X.; Rivera-Ordóñez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.

    2012-01-01

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 ×1 cm 2 of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15×15 cm 2 in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  17. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; Lopez-Rendon, X.; Rivera-Ordonez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia Manuel Velasco Suarez, 14269 DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2} of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15 Multiplication-Sign 15 cm{sup 2} in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  18. Implementation of procedures of radiological protection in the section of Radiology of the emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre-Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, F.; Rizzati, M.R. [Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre, HPS (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre (HPS) is one of the main reference centers for the population in the attendance of medical emergencies/urgencies. The Section of Radiology, which informs the patients clinical conditions based on radiological images, is the most demanded section of the hospital (81.43 % of the medical cases request radiological exams) in the aid of the diagnosis, in which excels for the search of the quality in the health branch. In this work are presented the procedures to have been implemented about radiological protection according to effective norm, methods, ways and conditions to satisfy the radiation workers and the internal and external patients. (Author)

  19. Implementation of procedures of radiological protection in the section of Radiology of the emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzini, F.; Rizzati, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    The Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre (HPS) is one of the main reference centers for the population in the attendance of medical emergencies/urgencies. The Section of Radiology, which informs the patients clinical conditions based on radiological images, is the most demanded section of the hospital (81.43 % of the medical cases request radiological exams) in the aid of the diagnosis, in which excels for the search of the quality in the health branch. In this work are presented the procedures to have been implemented about radiological protection according to effective norm, methods, ways and conditions to satisfy the radiation workers and the internal and external patients. (Author)

  20. Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately assess the need for protective actions. Protective action accident management must make use of the key relevant information available. Decision-making and accident assessment will be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at refining the initial evaluation as more detailed and complete information becomes available. Emergency monitoring is one of the main sources for obtaining needed information. This publication is in the scope of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Legal Series No. 14) under which the IAEA is authorized to assist a State Party or a Member State among other matters in developing appropriate radiation monitoring programmes, procedures and standards (Article 5). The scope of this manual is restricted to practical guidance for environmental and source monitoring during a nuclear or other radiological emergency. It does not address emergency response preparedness, nor does it cover the emergency management aspects of accident assessment. This manual is organised into sections relating to measurements in order of priority of a major reactor accident, namely: ambient gamma/beta dose rates from plume, ground deposition or source; radionuclide concentrations in air; deposition maps for 131 I and 137 Cs and other important radionuclides; radionuclide mix in deposition and radionuclide concentrations in food, drinking water and other samples. The introductory section provides an overview of the design of emergency monitoring and sampling programmes, monitoring teams and their qualifications and training, monitoring equipment and instrumentation, protective actions for emergency monitoring teams and quality assurance and quality control checks

  1. Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book is a Japanese version of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publication (Report No., IAEA-TECDOC-1092, published in Vienna, 1999) of the same title. The translation of the original English into Japanese was done by the Department of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Since the Department was organized in addition to the Emergency Medicine Dept. in the Center in 2003 to establish a system for rapid and accurate dose assessment at emergent radiation exposure, the translation is thus a result of the department works, and is published with permission by IAEA as one of a series of NIRS Report (NIRS-M--179) for use in the country. The book is essentially a manual for providing technical requirements and procedures for radiation monitoring, environmental sampling and laboratory analyses for a nuclear or other radiological emergency. The contents are: Introduction, Outline of monitoring, Monitoring of outdoor radiation and contamination, Outdoor sampling, Gross alpha/beta measurement, Gamma spectrometry, Activation analyses, Basic data assessment, Work-sheets, Check-list for measuring equipments, Appendices, References, and others. (S.I.)

  2. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services... radiology services and other diagnostic procedures. (a) Basis and purpose. (1) This section implements section 1833(n) of the Act and establishes the method for determining Medicare payments for radiology...

  3. University Policies and Procedures on Sexual Harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Jerilyn S.

    Sexual harassment complaints are challenges to the abuse of power in certain kinds of communicative relationships, and sexual harassment policies and procedures are ways of defining the responsible exercise of power and providing the means to address grievances that result from irresponsible and potentially harmful uses of power in those…

  4. A real-time haptic interface for interventional radiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moix, Thomas; Ilic, Dejan; Fracheboud, Blaise; Zoethout, Jurjen; Bleuler, Hannes

    2005-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a minimally-invasive surgery technique (MIS) where guidewires and catheters are steered in the vascular system under X-ray imaging. In order to perform these procedures, a radiologist has to be correctly trained to master hand-eye coordination, instrument manipulation and procedure protocols. This paper proposes a computer-assisted training environment dedicated to IR. The system is composed of a virtual reality (VR) simulation of the anatomy of the patient linked to a robotic interface providing haptic force feedback.The paper focuses on the requirements, design and prototyping of a specific part of the haptic interface dedicated to catheters. Translational tracking and force feedback on the catheter is provided by two cylinders forming a friction drive arrangement. The whole friction can be set in rotation with an additional motor providing torque feedback. A force and a torque sensor are integrated in the cylinders for direct measurement on the catheter enabling disturbance cancellation with a close-loop force control strategy.

  5. Windscale inquiry and policy-making procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Moltke, K

    1978-07-01

    Policy decisions on the development and installation of nuclear facilities often strain both the time and human resources of a country, some countries having taken steps to involve the national government in specific siting decisions and shifting the constitutional balance in response to popular dissent. Challenges to nuclear facilities could be met by limiting the scope of intervenors and the use of judicial review. The 100-day Windscale Inquiry in the United Kingdom represents the most costly review any country has had of a specific nuclear policy and has international implications. A chronology of the inquiry illustrates how the debate evolved into a vote on whether nuclear energy should be developed at all and effectively cut off other avenues of recourse. The traditional procedures for planning are shown to be inadequate for setting nuclear energy policy without the intervention of Parliament. 18 references.

  6. Work procedures and risk factors for high rdiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Young; Choi, Yeong Chull [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Jin; Cha, Eun Shil [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiologic technologists currently consist of 31.5% among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea. Among diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists receive the highest annual and collective doses in South Korea. Comprehensive assessment of the work practices and associated radiation doses from diagnostic radiology procedures should be undertaken for effective prevention for radiologic technologists. Using the national survey, this study aimed (1) to explore the distribution of the work procedures performed by gender, (2) to evaluate occupational radiation exposure by work characteristics and safety compliance, (3) to identify the primary factors influencing high radiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea. This study provided detailed information on work practices, number of procedures performed on weekly basis, and occupational radiation doses among radiologic technologists in South Korea. Average radiation dose for radiologic technologists is higher than other countries, and type of facility, work safety, and wearing lead apron explained quite a portion of increased risk in the association between radiology procedures and radiation exposure among radiologic technologists.

  7. Work procedures and risk factors for high rdiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Young; Choi, Yeong Chull; Lee, Won Jin; Cha, Eun Shil

    2016-01-01

    Radiologic technologists currently consist of 31.5% among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea. Among diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists receive the highest annual and collective doses in South Korea. Comprehensive assessment of the work practices and associated radiation doses from diagnostic radiology procedures should be undertaken for effective prevention for radiologic technologists. Using the national survey, this study aimed (1) to explore the distribution of the work procedures performed by gender, (2) to evaluate occupational radiation exposure by work characteristics and safety compliance, (3) to identify the primary factors influencing high radiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea. This study provided detailed information on work practices, number of procedures performed on weekly basis, and occupational radiation doses among radiologic technologists in South Korea. Average radiation dose for radiologic technologists is higher than other countries, and type of facility, work safety, and wearing lead apron explained quite a portion of increased risk in the association between radiology procedures and radiation exposure among radiologic technologists.

  8. A pilot study of radiation exposures arising from interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet, S.; Giczi, F.; Gaspardy, G.; Temesi, A.; Ballay, L.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the past 25 years, considerable number of new therapeutic procedures have been worked out and adopted in radiology. These interventional procedures are mainly based on angiographic methods. During these procedures the exposure of patients and staff are usually greater than of conventional radiography and fluoroscopy as a consequence of longer fluoroscopy times and great number of cine-radiography. In the latest years radiation-induced skin injuries occurred in some patients. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. In our days interventional procedures are widely used and more sophisticated procedures are worked out and adopted. Consequently, there is a need for the protection of the patient and the staff on a higher level. Radiation protection of intervention radiology deserves a distinguish attention. In Hungary interventional radiology were performed in 36 laboratories in 2003. According to statistical data the gross number of interventional radiological procedures were 19442. The most frequently performed procedures were the P.T.C.A., the coronary and ilio-femoral stent implantation and chemo-embolization. In 2004, the National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radio-hygiene and the National Patient Dose Evaluation Program started a pilot study of radiation exposures arising from interventional radiology procedures. During the study the patient exposure were measured by D.A.P.-meters. The patient skin dose and the staff dose were performed by thermoluminescent chips. In their presentation the authors present the most important results of the study. (authors)

  9. Assessment of LANL transportation policies and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danna, J.G.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S.

    1991-04-01

    In order to determine whether activities related to the transportation of waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were being conducted in accordance with DOE policy, requirements stated in applicable DOE Orders were reviewed and compared with LANL policies and procedures described in the Administrative Requirements and the On-Site Transportation Manual. The following DOE Orders were determined to pertain to waste transportation and thus reviewed to identify requirements for which LANL is responsible for satisfying: Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management; Order 1540.1 Materials Transportation and Traffic Management; and Order 5480.3 Safety Requirements for the Packaging and Transportation of Hazardous Materials, Hazardous Substances, and Hazardous Wastes. The LANL On-Site Transportation Manual and the Administrative Requirements contained in the LANL Environment, Safety, and Health Manual were reviewed to verify that each of the requirements identified through the review of the Orders and 10 CFR Part 71 were being satisfied. The following Administrative Requirements were considered in this task: Shipment of Radioactive Materials; Radioactive Liquid Waste; Low-Level Radioactive Solid Waste; Chemical, Hazardous, and Mixed Waste; Polychlorinated Biphenyls; and Transuranic (TRU) Solid Waste

  10. Radiological protection procedures for industrial applications of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de

    2009-03-01

    Due to its very particular characteristics, industrial radiography is responsible for roughly half of the relevant accidents in nuclear industry, in developed as well as in developing countries, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Thus, safety and radiological protection in industrial gamma radiography have been receiving especial treatment by regulatory authorities of most Member States. The main objective of the present work was to evaluate, from the radioprotection point of view, the main advantages of computed radiography (CR) for filmless industrial radiography. In order to accomplish this, both techniques, i.e. conventional and filmless computed radiography were evaluated and compared through practical studies. After the studies performed at the present work it was concluded that computed radiography significantly reduces the inherent doses, reflecting in smaller restricted areas and costs, with consequent improvement in radiological protection and safety. (author)

  11. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  12. 32 CFR 14.3 - Policies and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Policies and procedures. 14.3 Section 14.3... QUALIFICATION OF CIVILIAN DEFENSE COUNSEL § 14.3 Policies and procedures. (a) Application procedures. (1... the subject of any sanction or disciplinary action by any court, bar, or other competent governmental...

  13. An observation study of radiation exposure to nurses during interventional radiology procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Aoki, Atsuko

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively measure the level of radiation exposure among nursing staff during interventional radiology procedures. All interventional radiology procedures performed at our institution between April 20 and June 19, 2009 were included in this study. Radiation exposure was measured as the equivalent dose penetrating tissue to a depth of 10 mm using electronic personal dosimeters attached outside (Ha) and inside (Hb) lead aprons. Effective dose (HE) was estimated by calculating from Ha and Hb. In total, data from 68 procedures were included in this study. Four nurses performed 71 nursing cares. The mean Ha was 0.70±1.0 μSv, while the mean Hb was 0.06±0.2 μSv. The mean HE was 0.14±0.3 μSv. The present findings indicate that during interventional radiology procedures, nurses were exposed to very low levels of radiation. (author)

  14. Merrill's Atlas of radiographic positions and radiologic procedures. Volumes 1-3. Sixth edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Merrill's Atlas describes and explains the routine and specialized radiologic procedures for all body systems. This edition thoroughly reorganized, updated and expanded. Volumes one and two describe all routine and flouroscopic procedures; and volume three describes more specialized areas in the profession

  15. Software for the estimation of organ equivalent and effective doses from diagnostic radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Ernest K; Barnett, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic radiological imaging such as conventional radiography, fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) examinations will continue to provide tremendous benefits in modern healthcare. The benefit derived by the patient should far outweigh the risk associated with a properly conducted imaging examination. Nonetheless, it is very important to be able to quantify the risk associated with any radiological examination of patients, and effective dose has been considered a useful indicator of patient exposure. Quantification of the risks associated with radiological imaging is very important as such information will be helpful to physicians and their patients for comparing risks from various imaging examinations and for making informed decisions whenever there is a need for any radiological imaging. The determination of equivalent and effective doses in diagnostic radiology is of interest as a basis for estimates of risk from medical exposures. In this paper we describe a simple computer program OrgDose, which calculates the doses to 27 organs in the body and then calculates the organ equivalent and effective doses and the risk from various procedures in the radiology department including conventional radiography, fluoroscopy and computed tomography examinations. The program will be a useful tool for the medical and paramedical personnel who are involved with assessing organ and effective doses and risks from diagnostic radiology procedures.

  16. Radiology of non-spinal pain procedures. A guide for the interventionalist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Mubin I.; Shaikh, Azin

    2011-01-01

    Most interventionalists are not radiologists and most radiologists do not understand interventional pain procedures. Nevertheless, interventionalists order extensive diagnostic imaging in the workup prior to any intervention. Against this background, this handy, well-illustrated manual has been designed to meet the major need of interventional pain physicians to understand the radiologic imaging involved in the performance of non-spinal pain procedures. It provides information on such topics as radiologic anatomy, the radiologic manifestations of indications and contraindications to interventional procedures, and the radiologic appearance of complications that may arise from these procedures. In addition, it will be useful for the diagnostic radiologist, who may be unaware of many of the interventional pain procedures. The chosen format will ensure that the reader is quickly able to reference any given procedure. Sections are devoted to the head and neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. As this is a guidebook, it does not encompass every single pathologic entity that may be encountered; however, the commonly performed non-spinal pain procedures are included. This text will prove essential for any interventionalist who does not have easy access to a radiologist and vice versa. (orig.)

  17. Radiology of non-spinal pain procedures. A guide for the interventionalist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Mubin I. [Dayton Interventional Radiology, Dayton, OH (United States); Shaikh, Azin

    2011-07-01

    Most interventionalists are not radiologists and most radiologists do not understand interventional pain procedures. Nevertheless, interventionalists order extensive diagnostic imaging in the workup prior to any intervention. Against this background, this handy, well-illustrated manual has been designed to meet the major need of interventional pain physicians to understand the radiologic imaging involved in the performance of non-spinal pain procedures. It provides information on such topics as radiologic anatomy, the radiologic manifestations of indications and contraindications to interventional procedures, and the radiologic appearance of complications that may arise from these procedures. In addition, it will be useful for the diagnostic radiologist, who may be unaware of many of the interventional pain procedures. The chosen format will ensure that the reader is quickly able to reference any given procedure. Sections are devoted to the head and neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. As this is a guidebook, it does not encompass every single pathologic entity that may be encountered; however, the commonly performed non-spinal pain procedures are included. This text will prove essential for any interventionalist who does not have easy access to a radiologist and vice versa. (orig.)

  18. Information security policies and procedures a practitioner's reference

    CERN Document Server

    Peltier, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    INFORMATION SECURITY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Introduction Corporate Policies Organizationwide (Tier 1) Policies Organizationwide Policy Document Legal Requirements Duty of Loyalty Duty of Care Other Laws and Regulations Business Requirements Where to Begin? Summary Why Manage This Process as a Project? Introduction First Things First: Identify the Sponsor Defining the Scope of Work Time Management Cost Management Planning for Quality Managing Human Resources Creating a Communications Plan Summary Planning and Preparation Introduction Objectives of Policies, Stand

  19. Dosimetry in medical specialist in procedures of interventionist radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Vazquez V, J. A.; Rivera M, T.; Izeta G, A. C.; Azorin V, J. C.; Arreola, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this work are presented the experimental results of determining the dose in different body parts, measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters, to medical specialists of implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker. The medical personnel in ten intervention procedures were controlled according to the procedure type, pathological indication, fluoroscopy time and machine generating estimates of the patient doses. The doses to the extremities of the cardiologist were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The domains of first level in the hand are in the index finger of the left and the right hand. The medium doses of the skin in the eyes, a report of the dose received during each type of intervention procedure in the glandular thyroid and fingers of the cardiologists is made. The results represent the integrated dose to the cardiologist, received during the implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker in the same patient. By a half time of detection of 70 minutes for patient, the half dose of the skin, received for the right and left hand, ascended to 1,4 mSv, under the glove. In conclusion, the dose average for the dosimeters of the thyroid gland and forehead was varied from 0,41 up to 1,14 mSv for study. The exposure to the X-rays is a topic to consider, more important every time on the development of systematic procedures little invasive, including the angiography, catheter, worker and patient. (Author)

  20. Radiologically assisted percutaneous gastrostomy or enterostomy. A retrospective analysis of 90 procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildenberger, P.; Oberholzer, K.; Kauczor, H.U.; Dueber, C.; Kurz, S.; Schild, H.; Thelen, M.

    1996-01-01

    To analyse retrospectively the indications, technique and results of radiologically induced gastrostomies or enterostomies. Radiologically assisted gastrostomies or enterostomies were induced in 90 patients, mostly with high grade obstructions due to head and neck tumours or oesophageal tumours. 19/90 patients had had previous resection of the oesophagus or gastric operations. A catheter was successfully introduced in all patients. In 11/90 patients this was followed by a two-stage procedure. In 16/90 patients puncture was performed under CT control because of some anatomical peculiarity. Serious complication occurred in 9/90 patients but in only one was surgery necessary. There were no deaths resulting from the procedure but mortality after 30 days was 6.7%. Radiologically assisted gastrostomies or enterostomies are a reliable and effective form of treatment even amongst difficult patients. The results and complications are comparable to those from endoscopic procedures. (orig.) [de

  1. Patient dose in interventional radiology: a multicentre study of the most frequent procedures in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etard, Cecile; Bigand, Emeline; Salvat, Cecile; Vidal, Vincent; Beregi, Jean Paul; Hornbeck, Amaury; Greffier, Joel

    2017-01-01

    A national retrospective survey on patient doses was performed by the French Society of Medical physicists to assess reference levels (RLs) in interventional radiology as required by the European Directive 2013/59/Euratom. Fifteen interventional procedures in neuroradiology, vascular radiology and osteoarticular procedures were analysed. Kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT), reference air kerma and number of images were recorded for 10 to 30 patients per procedure. RLs were calculated as the 3rd quartiles of the distributions. Results on 4600 procedures from 36 departments confirmed the large variability in patient dose for the same procedure. RLs were proposed for the four dosimetric estimators and the 15 procedures. RLs in terms of KAP and FT were 90 Gm.cm 2 and 11 mins for cerebral angiography, 35 Gy.cm 2 and 16 mins for biliary drainage, 75 Gy.cm 2 and 6 mins for lower limbs arteriography and 70 Gy.cm 2 and 11 mins for vertebroplasty. For these four procedures, RLs were defined according to the complexity of the procedure. For all the procedures, the results were lower than most of those already published. This study reports RLs in interventional radiology based on a national survey. Continual evolution of practices and technologies requires regular updates of RLs. (orig.)

  2. Patient dose in interventional radiology: a multicentre study of the most frequent procedures in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etard, Cecile [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Bigand, Emeline [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); La Timone University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Marseille Cedex (France); Salvat, Cecile [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Lariboisiere Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Paris (France); Vidal, Vincent [La Timone University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Marseille Cedex (France); French Society of Radiology (SFR) - Interventional Radiology Federation (FRI), Paris (France); Beregi, Jean Paul [French Society of Radiology (SFR) - Interventional Radiology Federation (FRI), Paris (France); Nimes University Hospital, Medical Imaging Group Nimes, Department of Radiology, Nimes (France); Hornbeck, Amaury [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Trousseau University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Greffier, Joel [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Nimes University Hospital, Medical Imaging Group Nimes, Department of Radiology, Nimes (France)

    2017-10-15

    A national retrospective survey on patient doses was performed by the French Society of Medical physicists to assess reference levels (RLs) in interventional radiology as required by the European Directive 2013/59/Euratom. Fifteen interventional procedures in neuroradiology, vascular radiology and osteoarticular procedures were analysed. Kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT), reference air kerma and number of images were recorded for 10 to 30 patients per procedure. RLs were calculated as the 3rd quartiles of the distributions. Results on 4600 procedures from 36 departments confirmed the large variability in patient dose for the same procedure. RLs were proposed for the four dosimetric estimators and the 15 procedures. RLs in terms of KAP and FT were 90 Gm.cm{sup 2} and 11 mins for cerebral angiography, 35 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 16 mins for biliary drainage, 75 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 6 mins for lower limbs arteriography and 70 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 11 mins for vertebroplasty. For these four procedures, RLs were defined according to the complexity of the procedure. For all the procedures, the results were lower than most of those already published. This study reports RLs in interventional radiology based on a national survey. Continual evolution of practices and technologies requires regular updates of RLs. (orig.)

  3. Assessment of Patients Radiation Dose During Interventional Radiological Procedure in PPUKM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Husaini Salleh; Muhammad Jamal Muhammad Isa

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a relatively new subspecialty of radiology. It is subspecialty where minimally invasive procedures are performed under radiological guidance using X-ray. This procedure can deliver high radiation doses compared with other radiological method due to long screening time. Because of these it is important to determine radiation doses received by patients undergoing IR procedures. It is to ensure that the dose is within the range deemed to be saved. A total of 128 patients undergoing IR procedures in PPUKM between 2012 and 2013 were study retrospectively. Dose area product (DAP) meter were used to measure the integral dose for the whole procedures. Mean kerma-area products for abdomen, head, pelvis, and thorax were 243.1, 107.3, 39.05 and 45.7 Gycm 2 , respectively. This study may provide the useful information which can be use to establish baseline patient dose data for dose optimizing study and carried out a recommendation on effective method of patient dose reduction during IR procedures. A more detail results of this study are presented in this paper. (author)

  4. Determining procedures for simulation-based training in radiology: a nationwide needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Nielsen, Kristina Rue; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth; Bachmann Nielsen, Michael; Paltved, Charlotte; Lindorff-Larsen, Karen Gilboe; Nielsen, Bjørn Ulrik; Konge, Lars

    2018-01-09

    New training modalities such as simulation are widely accepted in radiology; however, development of effective simulation-based training programs is challenging. They are often unstructured and based on convenience or coincidence. The study objective was to perform a nationwide needs assessment to identify and prioritize technical procedures that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum. A needs assessment using the Delphi method was completed among 91 key leaders in radiology. Round 1 identified technical procedures that radiologists should learn. Round 2 explored frequency of procedure, number of radiologists performing the procedure, risk and/or discomfort for patients, and feasibility for simulation. Round 3 was elimination and prioritization of procedures. Response rates were 67 %, 70 % and 66 %, respectively. In Round 1, 22 technical procedures were included. Round 2 resulted in pre-prioritization of procedures. In round 3, 13 procedures were included in the final prioritized list. The three highly prioritized procedures were ultrasound-guided (US) histological biopsy and fine-needle aspiration, US-guided needle puncture and catheter drainage, and basic abdominal ultrasound. A needs assessment identified and prioritized 13 technical procedures to include in a simulation-based curriculum. The list may be used as guide for development of training programs. • Simulation-based training can supplement training on patients in radiology. • Development of simulation-based training should follow a structured approach. • The CAMES Needs Assessment Formula explores needs for simulation training. • A national Delphi study identified and prioritized procedures suitable for simulation training. • The prioritized list serves as guide for development of courses in radiology.

  5. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  6. Modern radiology in oncology and waiting lists for procedures: Breast cancer screening in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimiljan Kadivec

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good and modern radiology equipment is needed for successful treatment of the oncologic patients. New Department of Radiology of the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana is entirely digital and can compete with the similar radiologic departments all over the world. It si possible to perform all the new modern procedures that the oncologic patients need. Important diagnostic modality is PET CT that fulfill the selection of the diagnostic procedures for cancer patients. The problem of Slovenian radiology is lack of the radiologists. This problem could be solved with telemedicine and properly awarded work that was performed. Waiting lists for procedures like CT, MR, US are short for oncologic patients in comparison with the other radiologic units in Slovenia.Conclusions: At the beginning of the year 2008 we will start the Breast Cancer Screening Program in Slovenia. It is organized by Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (DORA program. Breast cancer screening program will be centralized, in accordance with of the European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis 2006 (fourth edition and supervision of reference breast screening center. The main goal of the breast cancer screening program in Slovenia is reduction of the breast cancer death for 25 % or more.

  7. Central venous catheterization: comparison between interventional radiological procedure and blind surgical reocedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Won Gyu; Jin, Gong Yong; Han, Young Min; Yu, He Chul

    2002-01-01

    To determine the usefulness and safety of radiological placement of a central venous catheter by prospectively comparing the results of interventional radiology and blind surgery. For placement of a central venous catheter, the blind surgical method was used in 78 cases (77 patients), and the interventional radiological method in 56 cases (54 patients). The male to female ratio was 66:68, and the patients' mean age was 48 (range, 18-80) years. A tunneled central venous catheter was used in 74 cases, and a chemoport in 60. We evaluated the success and duration of the procedures, the number of punctures required, and ensuing complications, comparing the results of the two methods. The success rates of the interventional radiological and the blind surgical procedure were 100% and 94.8%, respectively. The duration of central catheterization was 3-395 (mean, 120) day, that of chemoport was 160.9 days, and that of tunneled central venous catheter was 95.1 days. The mean number of punctures of the subclavian vein was 1.2 of interventional radiology, and 2.1 for blind surgery. The mean duration of the interventional radiology and the blind surgical procedure was, respectively, 30 and 40 minutes. The postprocedure complication rate was 27.6% (37 cases). Early complications occurred in nine cases (6.7%): where interventional radiology was used, there was one case of hematoma, and blind surgery gave rise to hematoma (n=2), pneumothorax (n=2), and early deviation of the catheter (n=4). Late complications occurred in 32 cases (23.9%). Interventional radiology involved infection (n=4), venous thrombosis (n=1), catheter displacement (n=2) and catheter obstruction (n=5), while the blind surgical procedure gave rise to infection (n=5), venous thrombosis (n=3), catheter displacement (n=4) and catheter obstruction (n=8). The success rate of interventional radiological placement of a central venous catheter was high and the complication rate was low. In comparison with the blind

  8. Education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures ICRP 113 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Alshoufi, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) is the primary body in protection against ionizing radiation. Among its latest publication is ICRP publication 113 e ducation and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures . This document introduces diagnostic and interventional medical procedures using ionizing radiations in deep details. The document is approved by the commission in October 2010 and translated into Arabic at December 2011. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translation include WHO handbook on indoor radon: a public health perspective, issued by world health organization 2009 and Radiation Protection in Medicine, ICRP Publication 105 2007 that translated into Arabic with support of Arab atomic energy authority at 2011.

  9. Manual of use and accounting of radioactive material and procedures of radiological protection for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, Miguel

    1997-03-01

    This manual of use and accounting of material radioactive and procedures of radiological safety tries to facilitate workings of protection of material radioactive in services of medicine nuclear, during diagnosis (examinations with x-rays, or those that are made in nuclear medicine), or during the processing of diseases, mainly of the carcinomas (x-ray)

  10. The DOE policy for protection against radiological and toxicological sabotage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassell, C. Jr.; Callahan, S.; Myers, D.

    1995-01-01

    In response to a Department of Energy Office of Security Evaluations study on radiological and toxicological sabotage, the Under Secretary of Energy has directed that all departmental elements initiate analyses to determine the extent of radiological and toxicological sabotage threats within the department. To accomplish this, a plan was adopted whereby radioactive and other hazardous materials at DOE sites would be assessed by an interdisciplinary team as to quantities, ranked according to their hazards, subjected to a vulnerability assessment, and appropriate upgrades selected and monitored. This paper is a discussion of those efforts

  11. Radiological procedures of the biliary tract and their complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, U.

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess the incidence and type of complications at PTC and transhepatic bile duct intubation three different patient populations were investigated retrospectively. Information form angiofraphy (n =83), CT (n =23), PTC examinations (n = 237) and medical records were analysed in order to detect complications caused by the transhepatic procedures. Complications were observed in 17-33 %, treatment was required in 4-6 % and procedure related mortality was 1-2 % in the different materials. A randomised prospective clinical investigation in 200 consecutive patients was performed to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of preoperative intravenous infusion cholangiography (PIC) with iotroxate as compared to that of operative cholangiography (OC) and to assess the incidence of complications. Bile duct calculus was underdiagnosed with PIC in 1/124 patients and overdiagnosed with OC in 3/124 patients examined with both methods. PIC was found to reduce operating time significantly. Only two minor (1 %) and no serve of fatal reactions to iotroxate were noted. An experimental model was set up to study the morphology of surgically created stenotic bile duct anastomoses in 13 pigs before and after transhepatic balloon catheter dilatation. In pigs not dilated by balloon catheter a fibrotic stenosis persisted during a follow-up period of 25 weeks. Transhepatic balloon catheter dilatation of the stenotic area caused a bile duct wall lesion which resulted in a fibrous healing that was almost complete after four weeks. An initial increase of the stricture diameter was followed by partial restenosis in the short-term follow-up. (author)

  12. Policies and Strategies for the Decommissioning of Nuclear and Radiological Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents the main elements of policies and strategies for decommissioning activities of nuclear and radiological facilities. It is intended to help in facilitating proper and systematic planning, and safe, timely and cost effective implementation of all decommissioning activities. The policy establishes the principles for decommissioning and the strategy contains the approaches for the implementation of the policy. The publication will be a useful guide for strategic planners, waste managers, operators of facilities under decommissioning, regulators and other stakeholders.

  13. Radiological protection of the environment: the path forward to a new policy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The international system of radiological protection is currently being revised with the aim of making it more coherent and concise. During the revision process, particular attention is being given to the development of an explicit system for the radiological protection of the environment in addition to that of human beings. In order to support the ongoing discussions of the international community of radiological protection experts, these proceedings try to answer the questions: Is there an international rationale behind the wish to protect the environment from radiation? Do we have enough scientific information to develop and define a broadly accepted policy? What are the socio-political dynamics, beyond science, that will influence policy on radiological protection of the environment? What are the characteristics of the process for developing a system of radiological protection of the environment? These proceedings comprise the views of a broad range of invited speakers, including policy makers, regulators, radiological protection and environmental protection professionals, industry, social scientists and representatives of both non-governmental and intergovernmental organisations. (author)

  14. Use of Low-Fidelity Simulation Laboratory Training for Teaching Radiology Residents CT-Guided Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Melissa; Nelson, Rachel; Roebel, John; Collins, Heather; Anderson, M Bret

    2016-11-01

    To determine the benefit of the addition of low-fidelity simulation-based training to the standard didactic-based training in teaching radiology residents common CT-guided procedures. This was a prospective study involving 24 radiology residents across all years in a university program. All residents underwent standard didactic lecture followed by low-fidelity simulation-based training on three common CT-guided procedures: random liver biopsy, lung nodule biopsy, and drain placement. Baseline knowledge, confidence, and performance assessments were obtained after the didactic session and before the simulation training session. Approximately 2 months later, all residents participated in a simulation-based training session covering all three of these procedures. Knowledge, confidence, and performance data were obtained afterward. These assessments covered topics related to preprocedure workup, intraprocedure steps, and postprocedure management. Knowledge data were collected based on a 15-question assessment. Confidence data were obtained based on a 5-point Likert-like scale. Performance data were obtained based on successful completion of predefined critical steps. There was significant improvement in knowledge (P = .005), confidence (P simulation-based training to the standard didactic curriculum for all procedures. This study suggests that the addition of low-fidelity simulation-based training to a standard didactic-based curriculum is beneficial in improving resident knowledge, confidence, and tested performance of common CT-guided procedures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Variability in the Use of Simulation for Procedural Training in Radiology Residency: Opportunities for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Chikarmane, Sona A; Yeh, Eren D; Smith, Stacy E; Mayo-Smith, William W; Giess, Catherine S

    2018-03-19

    Increased attention to quality and safety has led to a re-evaluation of the classic apprenticeship model for procedural training. Many have proposed simulation as a supplementary teaching tool. The purpose of this study was to assess radiology resident exposure to procedural training and procedural simulation. An IRB-exempt online survey was distributed to current radiology residents in the United States by e-mail. Survey results were summarized using frequency and percentages. Chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis where appropriate. A total of 353 current residents completed the survey. 37% (n = 129/353) of respondents had never used procedure simulation. Of the residents who had used simulation, most did not do so until after having already performed procedures on patients (59%, n = 132/223). The presence of a dedicated simulation center was reported by over half of residents (56%, n = 196/353) and was associated with prior simulation experience (P = 0.007). Residents who had not had procedural simulation were somewhat likely or highly likely (3 and 4 on a 4-point Likert-scale) to participate if it were available (81%, n = 104/129). Simulation training was associated with higher comfort levels in performing procedures (P simulation training is associated with higher comfort levels when performing procedures, there is variable use in radiology resident training and its use is not currently optimized. Given the increased emphasis on patient safety, these results suggest the need to increase procedural simulation use during residency, including an earlier introduction to simulation before patient exposure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Estimating effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing interventional radiology procedures using anthropomorphic phantoms and MOSFET dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, Nelson; Gordon, Christopher L; Thomas, Karen; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective doses received by pediatric patients during interventional radiology procedures and to present those doses in "look-up tables" standardized according to minute of fluoroscopy and frame of digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Organ doses were measured with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters inserted within three anthropomorphic phantoms, representing children at ages 1, 5, and 10 years, at locations corresponding to radiosensitive organs. The phantoms were exposed to mock interventional radiology procedures of the head, chest, and abdomen using posteroanterior and lateral geometries, varying magnification, and fluoroscopy or DSA exposures. Effective doses were calculated from organ doses recorded by the MOSFET dosimeters and are presented in look-up tables according to the different age groups. The largest effective dose burden for fluoroscopy was recorded for posteroanterior and lateral abdominal procedures (0.2-1.1 mSv/min of fluoroscopy), whereas procedures of the head resulted in the lowest effective doses (0.02-0.08 mSv/min of fluoroscopy). DSA exposures of the abdomen imparted higher doses (0.02-0.07 mSv/DSA frame) than did those involving the head and chest. Patient doses during interventional procedures vary significantly depending on the type of procedure. User-friendly look-up tables may provide a helpful tool for health care providers in estimating effective doses for an individual procedure.

  17. Evaluation of patient radiation doses using DAP meter in interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Byung Sam [Dept. of Radiological Technology. Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Su [Dept. of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu Univeristy, Kyushu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The author investigated interventional radiology patient doses in several other countries, assessed accuracy of DAP meters embedded in intervention equipment in domestic country, conducted measurement of patient doses for 13 major interventional procedures with use of Dose Area Product(DAP) meters from 23 hospitals in Korea, and referred to 8,415 cases of domestic data related to interventional procedures by radiation exposure after evaluation the actual effective of dose reduction variables through phantom test. Finally, dose reference level for major interventional procedures was suggested. In this study, guidelines for patient doses were 237.7 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TACE, 17.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in AVF, 114.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in LE PTA and STENT, 188.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TFCA, 383.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Aneurysm Coil, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PTBD, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Biliary Stent, 22.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCN, 4.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Hickman, 2.8 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Chemo-port, 4.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Perm-Cather, 17.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCD, and 357.9 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Vis, EMB. Dose reference level acquired in this study is considered to be able to use as minimal guidelines for reducing patient dose in the interventional radiology procedures. For the changes and advances of materials and development of equipment and procedures in the interventional radiology procedures, further studies and monitoring are needed on dose reference level Korean DAP dose conversion factor for the domestic procedures.

  18. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  19. Bureau of radiological health compliance testing procedures for cabinet S-ray systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.A.; Sprau, D.

    1976-01-01

    A manual has been developed by the Bureau of Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration to establish procedures for the routine field testing of cabinet x-ray systems to determine compliance with the Federal Performance Standard for Cabinet X-Ray Systems, 21 CFR 1020.40. The manual provides specific instructions for testing each model of cabinet x-ray system. Results from the inspection are recorded on a data from which is designed to permit automatic data processing

  20. Cost analysis of radiological interventional procedures and reimbursement within a clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strotzer, M.; Voelk, M.; Lenhart, M.; Fruend, R.; Feuerbach, S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of costs for vascular radiological interventions on a per patient basis and comparison with reimbursement based on GOAe(Gebuehrenordnung fuer Aerzte) and DKG-NT (Deutsche Krankenhausgesellschaft-Nebenkostentarif). Material and Methods: The ten procedures most frequently performed within 12 months were evaluated. Personnel costs were derived from precise costs per hour and estimated procedure time for each intervention. Costs for medical devices were included. Reimbursement based on GOAewas calculated using the official conversion factor of 0.114 DM for each specific relative value unit and a multiplication factor of 1.0. The corresponding conversion factor for DKG-NT, determined by the DKG, was 0.168 DM. Results: A total of 832 interventional procedures were included. Marked differences between calculated costs and reimbursement rates were found. Regarding the ten most frequently performed procedures, there was a deficit of 1.06 million DM according GOAedata (factor 1.0) and 0.787 million DM according DKG-NT. The percentage of reimbursement was only 34.2 (GOAe; factor 1.0) and 51.3 (DKG-NT), respectively. Conclusion: Reimbursement of radiological interventional procedures based on GOAeand DKG-NT data is of limited value for economic controlling purposes within a hospital. (orig.) [de

  1. Endoscopy versus radiology in post-procedural monitoring after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, Jan Friso; Berliner, Christoph; Rösch, Thomas; von Renteln, Daniel; Noder, Tania; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Ittrich, Harald; Kersten, Jan F; Adam, Gerhard; Werner, Yuki B

    2018-03-15

    The newly developed technique of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been shown to be effective in several short- and mid-term studies. Limited information is available about the adequacy of immediate post-POEM monitoring tests. POEM was performed under general anesthesia in 228 patients (59.6% male, mean age 45.6 ± 15.5 years). Post-procedural checks comprised clinical and laboratory examination, and, during post-procedure days 1-5, endoscopy and-in the first 114 cases-radiologic examination using water-soluble contrast (1st group); the remaining patients underwent post-procedure controls without radiology (2nd group). Main outcome was value of endoscopic compared to radiologic control for recognition of early adverse events. In the first group, routine fluoroscopic contrast swallow suggested minor leakages at the mucosal entry site in two cases which was confirmed endoscopically in only one. Endoscopy revealed two minor entry site leakages and, in six additional cases, dislocated clips without leakage (overall 5.3%). All eight patients underwent reclipping and healed without clinical sequelae. In the 2nd group, endoscopy showed 5 clip dislocations (all reclipped) and one ischemic cardiac perforation in a patient with clinical deterioration on post-POEM day 1 who had to undergo surgery after confirmation of leakage by CT. Radiologic monitoring (contrast swallow) after POEM is not useful and can be omitted. Even routine endoscopic monitoring for detection and closure of minor defects of the mucosal entry site yields limited information with regards to final outcome; major complications are very rare and probably associated with clinical deterioration. Clinical Trials Gov Registration number of the main study: NCT01405417.

  2. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, D. [Dept. of Biostatistics, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Mason, K.P. [Dept. of Anesthesiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  3. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L.; Zurakowski, D.; Mason, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  4. Proposed procedure and analysis of results to verify the indicator of the product dose-area in radiology equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Marcos, R.; Gallego Franco, P.; Sierra Diaz, F.; Gonzalez Ruiz, C.; Rodriguez Checa, M.; Brasa Estevez, M.; Gomez Calvar, R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to establish a procedure to verify the value of the product dose-area showing certain teams of Radiology, with an alternative to the use of external transmission cameras. (Author)

  5. [Interventional radiology procedures for malignancies of the liver treatment: Intraarterial procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina, V; Pracht, M; Lachenal, Y; Adib, S; Boubaker, A; Prior, J; Senys, A; Wagner, A D; Bize, P

    2014-05-21

    Intraarterial procedures such as chemoembolization and radioembolization aim for the palliative treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (stage BCLC B and C with tumoral portal thrombosis). The combination of hepatic intraarterial chemotherapy and systemic chemotherapy can increase the probability of curing colorectal cancer with hepatic metastases not immediately accessible to surgical treatment or percutaneous ablation.

  6. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  7. Determining and managing fetal radiation dose from diagnostic radiology procedures in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion

  8. Determining and managing fetal radiation dose from diagnostic radiology procedures in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa [Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2015-12-15

    We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion.

  9. Simple multicomponent batch distillation procedure with a variable reflux policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. García

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a shortcut procedure for batch distillation simulation with a variable reflux policy. The procedure starts from a shortcut method developed by Sundaram and Evans in 1993 and uses an iterative cycle to calculate the reflux ratio at each moment. The functional relationship between the concentrations at the bottom and the dome is evaluated using the Fenske equation and is complemented with the equations proposed by Underwood and Gilliland. The results of this procedure are consistent with those obtained using a fast method widely validated in the relevant literature.

  10. 32 CFR 168a.4 - Policy and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to pursue graduate degrees in science, engineering, or other fields of study that are designated, in... DEFENSE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.4 Policy and procedures. (a) Sponsoring... nationwide competition in which all appropriate actions have been taken to encourage applications from...

  11. 21 CFR 203.34 - Policies and procedures; administrative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distribution security and audit system, including conducting random and for-cause audits of sales... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policies and procedures; administrative systems...; administrative systems. Each manufacturer or authorized distributor of record that distributes drug samples shall...

  12. ODIN. Online Database Information Network: ODIN Policy & Procedure Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Charles T.; And Others

    Policies and procedures are outlined for the Online Database Information Network (ODIN), a cooperative of libraries in south-central Pennsylvania, which was organized to improve library services through technology. The first section covers organization and goals, members, and responsibilities of the administrative council and libraries. Patrons…

  13. 78 FR 69286 - Electric System Construction Policies and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service 7 CFR Part 1726 Electric System Construction Policies and Procedures CFR Correction In Title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1600 to 1759, revised as of January 1, 2013, on page 246, in Sec. 1726.14, the second definition of Minor modification...

  14. 12 CFR 609.930 - Policies and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Before engaging in E-commerce, you must weigh its business risks against its benefits. You must also....930 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.930 Policies and procedures. The FCA supports E-commerce and wants to...

  15. 31 CFR 206.3 - Billing policy and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Billing policy and procedures. 206.3 Section 206.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE MANAGEMENT OF FEDERAL AGENCY RECEIPTS...

  16. Patient-oriented presentation of results of radiological procedures using DICOM-compliant DVD media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Aberle, Denise R.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Lu, David S.; Dahlbom, Magdalena; McGill, D. Ric; McCoy, J. Michael

    2003-05-01

    Some institutions have adopted digital media such as CD ROMs to provide patients and referring physicians with results of radiological procedures. These systems require a computer to review the images and lack the supporting explanations and guidance for patients to properly understand the results. We developed a hybrid DVD encoding format that combines DICOM-compliant image storage format with video streams viewable on any consumer DVD players. The addition of the video material allows radiologists to provide explanations, disclaimers and guidance to the patients regarding the results of the study. The diagnostic report is also included on the DVD as a PDF file and as a set of video frames that can be viewed on a DVD player. The native high-resolution images are also included in DICOM format on the DVD and can be accessed by any workstation equipped with a DICOM viewer. The DVD that can be reviewed on any consumer DVD player overcomes the limitation of CD ROMS that require the use of a personal computer. The results of the radiological procedures become more accessible patients that could be reluctant or unable to use a computer. Also, live video clips add a more personalized note and allow radiologists to convey important messages to the patients. This is particularly useful for self-referred screening procedures where results should always be accompanied with education material and explanations of the findings.

  17. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical resource for planning the medical response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. Effective medical response is a necessary component of the overall response to nuclear or radiological (radiation) emergencies. In general, the medical response may represent a difficult challenge for the authorities due to the complexity of the situation, often requiring specialized expertise, and special organizational arrangements and materials. To be effective, adequate planning and preparedness are needed. This manual, if implemented, should help to contribute to coherent international response. The manual provides the practical tools and generic procedures for use by emergency medical personnel during an emergency situation. It also provides guidance to be used at the stage of preparedness for development of medical response capabilities. The manual also addresses mass casualty emergencies resulting from malicious acts involving radioactive material. This part was supported by the Nuclear Security Fund. The manual was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, it must be reviewed and revised as part of the planning process to match the potential accidents, threats, local conditions and other unique characteristics of the facility where it may be used

  18. Development of Policies, Institutions and Procedures for Water Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demouche, L.; Pfiefer, J.; Hanson, A.; Skaggs, R.

    2009-12-01

    In the arid, water scarce region of New Mexico and West Texas there is growing interest in the potential for water reuse to extend existing supplies and mitigate drought shortage impacts. There are no new sources of water in New Mexico, except reclaimed water. Communities and individuals are uncertain about and have many unanswered questions about polices, institutions involved (agencies), legal and regulatory requirements, and procedures governing water reuse. Issues to be addressed by this project include: the legal ability to reuse water, ownership of water rights, downstream or third party impacts, regulatory and procedural requirements, water quality concerns, state and local agency involvement, and cost effectiveness of water reuse compared to alternative sources. Presently, there is very little implementation or directives in New Mexico policy that addresses reuse, reclamation, or recycled water. The only regulations pertaining to reuse is New Mexico Environmental Department currently allows the use of reclaimed domestic wastewater for irrigation of golf courses and green spaces, which is listed in the Policy for the Above Ground Use of Reclaimed Domestic Wastewater (NMED, 2003). This document identifies the various reclaimed quality classifications that are required for specific applications and the permits required for application. This document does not identify or address policy applications on the distribution, ownership, or trading of reclaimed water. Even though reclaimed water reuse projects are currently being implemented in many cities in the U.S., mainly for commercial and municipal irrigation (golf courses and green space), its potential has not yet been exploited. A policy analysis matrix (PAM) is being designed to identify and examine the policy framework and consequences of non-policy implementation for decision makers and interest groups and assist them in understanding the consequences of policy actions and project outcomes if no laws or

  19. Radiation load of the extremities and eye lenses of the staff during selected interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, Denisa; Trosanova, Dominika

    2010-01-01

    The Slovak Medical University in Bratislava is involved in the ORAMED (Optimization of Radiation Protection for Medical Staff) research project, aimed at developing a unified methodology for a more accurate assessment of professional exposure of interventional radiology staff, with focus on extremity and eye lens dosimetry in selected procedures. Three cardiac procedures and 5 angiography examinations were selected: all technical parameters were monitored and the dose equivalent levels were measured by TL dosimetry at 9 anatomic sites of the body. Preliminary results were obtained for the radiation burden of the eyes and extremities during digital subtraction angiography of the lower limbs, collected from 7 hospital departments in partner EU states. Correlations between the evaluated data and the influence of some parameters are shown

  20. Estimation of absorbed dose and its biological effects in subjects undergoing neuro interventional radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Subramanian, Vinodhini; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Joseph, Santosh; Selvam, Paneer; Jose, M.T.; Annalakshmi, O.

    2016-01-01

    Radiological imaging has many applications due to its non-invasiveness, rapid diagnosis of life threatening diseases, and shorter hospital stay which benefit patients of all age groups. However, these procedures are complicated and time consuming, which use repeated imaging views and radiation, thereby increasing patient dose, and collective effective dose to the background at low doses. The effects of high dose radiation are well established. However, the effects of low dose exposure remain to be determined. Therefore, investigating the effect on medically exposed individuals is an alternative source to understand the low dose effects of radiation. The ESD (Entrance Surface Dose) was recorded using Lithium borate based TL dosimeters to measure the doses received by the head, neck and shoulder of the study subjects (n = 70) who underwent procedures like cerebral angiography, coiling, stenting and embolization

  1. Assessment of eye lens doses for workers during interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urboniene, A.; Sadzeviciene, E.; Ziliukas, J.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of eye lens doses for workers during interventional radiology (IR) procedures was performed using a new eye lens dosemeter. In parallel, the results of routine individual monitoring were analysed and compared with the results obtained from measurements with a new eye lens dosemeter. The eye lens doses were assessed using H p (3) measured at the level of the eyes and were compared with H p (10) measured with the whole-body dosemeter above the lead collar. The information about use of protective measures, the number of performed interventional procedures per month and their fluoroscopy time was also collected. The assessment of doses to the lens of the eye was done for 50 IR workers at 9 Lithuanian hospitals for the period of 2012-2013. If the use of lead glasses is not taken into account, the estimated maximum annual dose equivalent to the lens of the eye was 82 mSv. (authors)

  2. Risk of bleeding associated with interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. A comprehensive review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foremny, Gregory B.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Pretell-Mazzini, Juan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery-Division of Musculoskeletal Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This review compiles the current literature on the bleeding risks in common musculoskeletal interventional procedures and attempts to provide guidance for practicing radiologists in making decisions regarding the periprocedural management of patients on antithrombotic therapy. The practitioner must weigh the risk of bleeding if therapy is continued against the possibility a thromboembolic occurring if anticoagulation therapy is withheld or reversed. Unfortunately, there is little empirical data to guide evidence-based decisions for many musculoskeletal interventions. However, a review of the literature shows that for low-risk procedures, such as arthrograms/arthrocenteses or muscle/tendon sheath injections, bleeding risks are sufficiently small that anticoagulants and antiplatelet therapies need not be withheld. Additionally, relatively higher-risk procedures, such as needle biopsies of bone and soft tissue, may be safely performed without holding antithrombotic therapy, provided pre-procedural INR is within therapeutic range. Thus, while a patient's particular clinical circumstances should dictate optimal individualized management, anticoagulation alone is not a general contraindication to most interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. (orig.)

  3. Sensitivity of the diagnostic radiological index of protection to procedural factors in fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A. Kyle, E-mail: kyle.jones@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Pasciak, Alexander S. [Department of Radiology, The University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville, Knoxville, Tennessee 37922 (United States); Wagner, Louis K. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, The John P. and Katharine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of the diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP), used to quantify the protective value of radioprotective garments, to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams to be used in measuring the DRIP. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the shape of the scattered x-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios, including interventional radiology and interventional cardiology (IC). Two clinical simulations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size, while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial simulations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size, and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy (E{sub avg}) was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Results: Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affect the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effect on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in IC, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. Conclusions: The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle.

  4. Double dosimetry procedures for the determination of occupational effective dose in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervinen, H.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Miljanic, S.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Nikodemova, D.; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In interventional radiology, for an accurate determination of occupational effective dose, measurements with two dosemeters ('double dosimetry', DD) have been recommended, one dosemeter located above and one under the protective apron. In this paper, based on an extensive literature search, the most recent algorithms developed for the determination of effective dose from the dosimeter readings have been compared for a few practical interventional procedures. Recommendations on the practices and algorithms are given on the basis of the results. For the comparison of algorithms, dosemeter readings and the effective dose were obtained both experimentally and by calculation. Further, data from published Monte Carlo calculations have been applied. The literature review has indicated that very few regulations for DD exist and the DD practices have not been harmonized. There is no firm consensus on the most suitable calculation algorithms. Single dosemeter (SD) measurements are still mostly used for the calculation of effective dose. Most DD and SD algorithms overestimate effective dose significantly, sometimes by over ten times. However, SD algorithms can significantly underestimate effective dose in certain interventional radiology conditions. Due to the possibility of underestimating effective dose, DD is generally recommended. The results suggest that there might not be a single DD algorithm which would be optimum for all interventional radiology procedures. However, the selection of a precise DD algorithm for each individual condition is not practical and compromises must be made. For accurate personnel dosimetry, the accuracy of the algorithm selected should be tested for typical local interventional radiology condition. Personnel dosemeters should be used in the recommended positions. The dosemeter above the apron should be on a collar and its reading also used to assess the risk of lens injuries. The dosemeter under the apron can be on the chest or

  5. Patient dose assessment in various Interventional radiology and cardiology procedures in Algeria (IAEA regional project results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Merad, Ahmed; Toutaoui, A.E.K.; Bairi, Souad

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To evaluate patient doses in Interventional Radiology (IR) and Cardiology (IC) procedures in Algeria, within the framework of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regional project on radiation protection of patients and medical exposure control (RAF 9033). Materials and Methods: Three public hospitals (CHU Bab el Oued, CHU Parnet and CHU Mustapha) and one specialised Cardiology Service (Clinique Maouche) were chosen for the study. For Maximum Skin Dose (MSD) evaluation, gafchromic films XR type R were used, placed on patient's back before the procedure. The Dose Area Product (DAP) and MSD were measured in 57 IR and IC procedures, either diagnostic or therapeutic. Results: The results revealed large variations in MSD (0.06-3.3 Gy) and DAP (5.5-332 mGycm 2 ). Mean MSD was 0.227 Gy in cerebral angiography, 0.202 Gy in coronary angiography, 1.162 Gy in Percutaneus Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA) and 0.128 in abdominal angiography. The correlation of DAP and MSD was significant (r = 0.7). The correlation was DAP and fluoroscopy time was also significant (r = 0.8). Conclusion: The highest MSD values were found in PTCA which is a therapeutic procedure. Two PTCAs out of the 57 procedures measured in total had MSD over the threshold of 2 Gy for deterministic effects (MSD 1 = 3.0 Gy and MSD 2 3.3 Gy). The large variations in MSD reveal the need to continuously monitor patient doses in IR and IC procedures with special emphasis in PTCA procedure. (author)

  6. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  7. 2 CFR 3185.30 - What policies and procedures must I follow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION § 3185.30 What policies and procedures must I follow? The IMLS policies and procedures that you must follow are the policies and... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What policies and procedures must I follow...

  8. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards

  9. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H., E-mail: ngkh@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia and University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Jong, W. L. [Clinical Oncology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  10. Introduction of low-osmolar contrast agents in radiology: medical, economic, legal, and public policy issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, P.D.; Rosenquist, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    This case study of the public policy implications of introducing a new technology in radiology, namely, low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM), raises the issues of whether and how to place appropriate limits on new technologies. Although these contrast media represent small episodic costs, they may add up to an aggregate expenditure of nearly $1 billion per year if used for all contrast injections. As a result, this technology raises a number of important medical, economic, legal, and public policy questions. The cost-effectiveness analysis and an analysis of the medical evidence suggest that LOCM should be limited to high-risk patients. The authors discuss in this article how the legal system might respond to such limitations, and they consider various public policy options for adopting restrictions on use. They conclude that the medical profession should take the lead in developing protocols for appropriate assessment, reimbursement, and use of LOCM

  11. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Sanchez, R.M.; Fernandez, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 μSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm 2 , respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators ( protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 μSv Gy -1 cm -2 , respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y -1 and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. (authors)

  12. Preliminary study of using imaging plates to map skin dose of patients in interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchi, H.; Satoh, T.; Eguchi, Y.; Mori, K.

    2005-01-01

    A method using europium-doped BaFBr imaging plates (IPs) has been studied for mapping entrance skin doses during interventional radiology (IR); the mapping is useful for detecting overlap between irradiation fields and determining the most exposed skin areas. IPs, which are two-dimensional radiation sensors made of photostimulated luminescence materials, have a linear dose response up to ∼100 Gy, can accurately measure doses from 1 μGy to 10 Gy and can be used repeatedly. Because the energy dependence of IPs is rather high, the IPs were characterised in this study and a sensitivity variation of ∼13% was observed for effective energies of 32.7 to 44.7 keV, which are used in IR procedures. Simulation of actual interventional cardiology procedures showed that the variation of sensitivity was within 5%, meaning that IPs are practical for measuring skin doses during IR. Moreover, the patient data can be stored online and easily called up when IR procedures must be repeated, helping to prevent radiation injuries. (authors)

  13. Basic policy of JMTR refurbishment and regulatory procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Kenji

    2012-04-01

    The JMTR refurbishment started from FY2007 had been completed on the end of the FY2010. The refurbishment works carried out on about 60 items nuclear reactor systems, (about 40 of facilities and about 20 constructions) with no trouble. This report review the basic policy of JMTR refurbishment, such as a selection of facilities/equipments for the refurbishment and the determination method of specifications for repairs. The deliberation and discussion by the safety review committee of Oarai Research and Development Center in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and nuclear regulatory procedure are included in this report. (author)

  14. Thyroid Radiation Dose to Patients from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures over Eight Decades: 1930-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lienard A; Miller, Donald L; Lee, Choonsik; Melo, Dunstana R; Villoing, Daphnée; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Winters, Sarah J; Labrake, Michael; Myers, Charles F; Lim, Hyeyeun; Kitahara, Cari M; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2017-12-01

    This study summarizes and compares estimates of radiation absorbed dose to the thyroid gland for typical patients who underwent diagnostic radiology examinations in the years from 1930 to 2010. The authors estimated the thyroid dose for common examinations, including radiography, mammography, dental radiography, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and computed tomography (CT). For the most part, a clear downward trend in thyroid dose over time for each procedure was observed. Historically, the highest thyroid doses came from the nuclear medicine thyroid scans in the 1960s (630 mGy), full-mouth series dental radiography (390 mGy) in the early years of the use of x rays in dentistry (1930s), and the barium swallow (esophagram) fluoroscopic exam also in the 1930s (140 mGy). Thyroid uptake nuclear medicine examinations and pancreatic scans also gave relatively high doses to the thyroid (64 mGy and 21 mGy, respectively, in the 1960s). In the 21st century, the highest thyroid doses still result from nuclear medicine thyroid scans (130 mGy), but high thyroid doses are also associated with chest/abdomen/pelvis CT scans (18 and 19 mGy for males and females, respectively). Thyroid doses from CT scans did not exhibit the same downward trend as observed for other examinations. The largest thyroid doses from conventional radiography came from cervical spine and skull examinations. Thyroid doses from mammography (which began in the 1960s) were generally a fraction of 1 mGy. The highest average doses to the thyroid from mammography were about 0.42 mGy, with modestly larger doses associated with imaging of breasts with large compressed thicknesses. Thyroid doses from dental radiographic procedures have decreased markedly throughout the decades, from an average of 390 mGy for a full-mouth series in the 1930s to an average of 0.31 mGy today. Upper GI series fluoroscopy examinations resulted in up to two orders of magnitude lower thyroid doses than the barium swallow. There are

  15. Comparison of patient doses in interventional radiology procedures performed in two large hospitals in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papageorgiou, E.; Tsapaki, V.; Tsalafoutas, I. A.; Maurikou, E.; Kottou, S.; Orfanos, A.; Karidas, G.; Fidanis, T.; Zafiriadou, E.; Neofotistou, V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to determine patient doses in the most common interventional radiology (IR) procedures performed in two large Greek hospitals. A total of 164 patients who underwent 4 types of IR procedures were studied. Fluoroscopy time, total exposure time, number of frames, number of runs, radiation field size, and cumulative dose-area product (DAP) were recorded. The median DAP values for carotid arteriography and lower limb arteriography were 66 and 123 Gy cm 2 for hospital 'A' and 21 and 49 Gy cm 2 for hospital 'B'. For the cerebral arteriographies performed in hospital 'A', the median DAP was 116 Gy cm 2 while for the hepatic embolizations performed in hospital 'B', it was 104 Gy cm 2 . The DAP values observed in hospital 'A' for carotid arteriography and lower limb arteriography were almost three times than those of hospital 'B'. From the data analysis, it is evident that dose optimization in hospital 'A' should be pursued through revision of the techniques used. (authors)

  16. Procedures with deterministic risk in interventionist radiology; Procedimientos con riesgo deterministico en radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tort Ausina, Isabel; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Perez Martinez, Manuel; Carrera Magarino, Francisco; Diez de los Rios, Antonio [Universidad de Malaga (Spain). Facultad de Medicina. Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica]. E-mail: rrcmf@uma.es

    2001-07-01

    The determinist effects in interventionist radiology are been from the irradiation in skin. The objective of this work is the estimation of the deterministic risk of the organs exposed in IR procedures. There ware selected four procedures: coated stent in abdominal aorta; shunt carry-digs; embolization of varicocele; mesenteric arteriography with venous returns. They have present maximum values of dose-area product (PDA), and it has considered the doses in organs by means of computer programs (Eff-Dose, PCXMC and OSD). The PDA has been measured with flat ionization chamber (PTW Diamentor M2). Although still few cases exist, are a high value of dose in kidney and testicles, that suppose that recommendations must be applied to avoid high exhibitions, motivating the personnel to change the irradiation fields, to use the collimation and losses rates of dose of x-ray radioscopy. Dispersion between the values of dose of the different programs is observed, which causes that it considers which is indicated of them, although seems that the Eff-Dose could be recommended, based on the Report-262 of the NRPB.

  17. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures, and/or guidance for the systematic consideration and management of work zone impacts, to be...

  18. Study of the radiological procedures used in odontologic clinics of Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Jaberson Luiz Leitao

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiological procedures used at the odontologic clinics of Boa Vista, Roraima-Brazil. The following parameters were recorded: field diameter, half value layer, total filtration, discrepancy between the preset and the applied kilovoltage and exposure time. Dose to the patient's skin from radiography of the upper molar tooth was also estimated. The results showed that 78% of the inspected units had field diameters larger than 6,0 cm, which is outside the limits recommended by the Brazilian Health Ministry. The results also showed that 14% of the equipment presented a discrepancy of more than 10% between preset and applied kilovoltage. On the other hand, the discrepancy between preset and applied exposure time is higher than 10% in 70% of the tested units. The total filtration of 77% units is lower than 1,5 mm of Al, a value recommended by the Brazilian Health Ministry for equipment that operates in the range of 50 kV to 70 kV. The survey also indicates that for 35% of the units the entrance dose in high than 3,5 mGy that is the reference value established by the Brazilian Health Ministry for dental radiography with film type. It was observed that the majority of the clinics use neither aprons nor collars for patients and that films are processed manually, without controlling temperature or processing time. Based on the results obtained it is strongly recommended that a quality control program be implemented in dental radiological clinics in Boa Vista, Roraima. (author)

  19. The potential of radiologic procedures in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Dubrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is no "golden standard" of diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Each and every individual case requires a thorough analysis of clinical symptoms in their association with endoscopic, histological, radiological and laboratory data. This review paper analyzes both conventional and novel methods of radiological investigations. Some of them have changed their significance from the "golden standard" to rare and limited application and from promising, then frequent and currently sporadic use of small bowel enema. Traditional ileocolonoscopy maintains its diagnostic potential, especially as a tool for follow up of patients with colonic and ileac disorders. The state-of-the-art non-invasive (ultrasound examination and limitedly non-invasive (computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging procedures are considered to be the most accurate methods for assessment of inflammatory bowel disorders in patient with already confirmed diagnosis and those with suspected cases of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The paper describes preparation of patient for each method, assessment technique, advantages and limitations for use, diagnostic criteria for intestinal wall thickness, accuracy of methods and discusses the perspectives of their use. The main sign of inflammatory bowel disease is thickening of intestinal wall. Usually its mean thickness in Crohn's disease (11 to 13 mm is higher than that in ulcerative colitis (7 to 8 mm. This may provide a diagnostic key during differential diagnosis of an isolated colon disease. The amount of the contrast cumulated by the intestinal wall directly correlates with inflammation activity. Intensive contract cumulation in the intestinal wall after intravenous contrast enhancement is a symptom of active inflammatory process. However, despite progression in the technologies, initial signs of inflammatory bowel diseases are quite superficial and remain hardly visible, being below the resolution

  20. Radioactive lightning rods: radiologic evaluation and regulatory policy related to its use in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Forteza, Yamil; Quevedo Garcia, Jose R.; Diaz Guerra, Pedro I.; Cruz Dumenico, Gonzalez; Fuente Puch, Andres de la

    2001-01-01

    The radioactive lightning rod employment for the protection of facilities against atmospheric discharges reached its maximum splendor in the eighties. It was in fact at the end of this decade when the technical considerations related to the justification of this practice finally conclude that the production of such teams was abolished. For the regulatory authorities, however, it continues having validity the question related to the control of lightning rod still in use as well as the question related to the establishment of a coherent with the international practice national policy. The paper shows the results of the last 10 years of control of the radioactive lightning rod use in Cuba and the radiological evaluation carried out on the base of this experience. Lastly, it exposes the regulatory policy referred to the employment of the radioactive lightning rod in the country. (author)

  1. Radiological management of patients with urinary obstruction following urinary diversion procedures: technical factors, complications, long-term management and outcome. Experience with 378 procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, M M

    2012-02-03

    We aimed to assess management by interventional radiology techniques of patients with urinary diversion procedures (UD) complicated by urinary obstruction (UO). A 12-year electronic database of interventional cases was searched for urinary access in patients with UD. Patients\\' records were assessed for aetiology of obstruction, indication for procedure, types of interventional radiology, complications and outcome. Management issues included frequency of visits for catheter care, type of catheter placement and technical problems associated with catheter maintenance. Three hundred and seventy eight procedures were carried out in 25 patients (mean age 70 years; Male : Female ratio 13:12). Indications for UD were malignancy (n = 22) and neuropathic bladder (n = 3). UD included ileal conduits (n = 17), cutaneous ureterostomy (n = 3 (2 patients)) and sigmoid colon urinary conduit (n = 6). In most patients, catheters were placed antegradely through nephrostomy tract, but subsequent access was through the UD. Twenty of 25 patients had unilateral stents where as 5 had bilateral stents (8-10- Fr pigtail catheters (20-45 cm in length)). The mean number of procedures including catheter changes was 15 +\\/- 4 per patient and 331 of 378 procedures (87 %) were carried out as outpatients. Since catheter placement, 11 patients required hospital admission on 22 occasions for catheter-related complications. Ureteric strictures in patients with UD can be successfully managed by interventional radiology.

  2. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 µSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm(2), respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators (protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 µSv Gy(-1) cm(-2), respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y(-1) and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Data publication - policies and procedures from the PREPARDE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Sarah; Murphy, Fiona; Tedds, Jonathan; Kunze, John; Lawrence, Rebecca; Mayernik, , Matthew S.; Whyte, Angus; Roberts, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Data are widely acknowledged as a first class scientific output. Increases in researchers' abilities to create data need to be matched by corresponding infrastructures for them to manage and share their data. At the same time, the quality and persistence of the datasets need to be ensured, providing the dataset creators with the recognition they deserve for their efforts. Formal publication of data takes advantage of the processes and procedures already in place to publish academic articles about scientific results, enabling data to be reviewed and more broadly disseminated. Data are vastly more varied in format than papers, and so the policies required to manage and publish data must take into account the complexities associated with different data types, scientific fields, licensing rules etc. The Peer REview for Publication & Accreditation of Research Data in the Earth sciences (PREPARDE) project is JISC- and NERC-funded, and aims to investigate the policies and procedures required for the formal publication of research data. The project is investigating the whole workflow of data publication, from ingestion into a data repository, through to formal publication in a data journal. To limit the scope of the project, the focus is primarily on the policies required for the Royal Meteorological Society and Wiley's Geoscience Data Journal, though members of the project team include representatives from the life sciences (F1000Research), and will generalise the policies to other disciplines. PREPARDE addresses key issues arising in the data publication paradigm, such as: what criteria are needed for a repository to be considered objectively trustworthy; how does one peer-review a dataset; and how can datasets and journal publications be effectively cross-linked for the benefit of the wider research community and the completeness of the scientific record? To answer these questions, the project is hosting workshops addressing these issues, with interactions from key

  4. Monte Carlo calculations on extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff at interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Ferrari, P.; Koukorava, C.; Krim, S.; Struelens, L.

    2011-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence the extremity and eye lens doses of the medical staff during interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Numerical simulations can play an important role in evaluating extremity and eye lens doses in correlation with many different parameters. In the present study, the first results of the ORAMED (Optimisation of Radiation protection of Medical staff) simulation campaign are presented. The parameters investigated for their influence on eye lens, hand, wrist and leg doses are: tube voltage, filtration, beam projection, field size and irradiated part of the patient's body. The tube voltage ranged from 60 to 110 kVp, filtration from 3 to 6 mm Al and from 0 to 0.9 mm Cu. For all projections, the results showed that doses received by the operator decreased with increasing tube voltage and filtration. The magnitude of the influence of the tube voltage and the filtration on the doses depends on the beam projection and the irradiated part of the patient's body. Finally, the influence of the field size is significant in decreasing the doses. (authors)

  5. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stentshunt (TIPSS): A new nonoperative, transjugular percutaneous procedure. [Radiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, G M; Noeldge, G; Siegerstetter, V; Franke, M; Wenz, W; Palmaz, J C; Roessle, M

    1989-08-01

    In a 49-year-old male patient suffering from severe symptoms of end-stage portal hypertension and Child's stage C metabolic status, an intrahepatic stent-assisted portosystemic shunt was established for the first time exclusively by means of interventional radiology. Via transjugular access, a modified Brockenbrough needle was used to puncture the right branch of the portal vein via the right liver vein. As a target, a Dormia-basket was used that had previously been exposed in the right main portal branch. After successful puncture and balloon dilation of the artificial tract, two Palmaz stents were implanted to keep the tract permanently open. The portosystemic pressure gradient dropped from 38 to 18 mm Hg. The clinical status of the patient improved substantially during the following days. However, the patient died on day 11 after the procedure because of sudden onset of acute respiratory distress arising from acute nosocomial fungus and cytomegalovirus infection worsened by his primary immunoincompetence. Autopsy demonstrated a totally patent shunt without superficial thrombus. Microscopically, a thin endothelial layer on the inner shunt surface was found to be present. (orig.).

  6. Optimization of Radiological Protection in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Common Conventional Radiological Procedures: Effectiveness of Increasing the Film to Focus Distance (FFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Increasing the x-ray film to focus distance (FFD, has been recommended as a practical dose optimization tool for patients undergoing conventional radiological procedures. In the previous study, we demonstrated a 32% reduction in absorbed dose is achievable due to increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm during pediatric chest radiography. The aim of this study was to examine whether increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm is equally effective for other common radiological procedures and performing a literature review of published studies to address the feasibility and probable limitations against implementing this optimization tool in clinical practice. Materials and Methods Radiographic examination of the pelvis (AP view, abdomen (AP view, skull (AP and lateral view, and spine (AP and lateral view, were taken of pediatric patients. The radiation dose and image quality of a radiological procedure is measured in FFD of 100 cm (reference FFD and 130 cm (increased FFD. The thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD were used for radiation dose measurements and visual grading analysis (VGA for image quality assessments. Results: Statistically significant reduction in the ESD ranged from 21.91% for the lateral skull projection to 35.24% for the lateral spine projection was obtained, when the FFD was increased from 100 to 130 cm (P0.05. Conclusion Increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm has significantly reduced radiation exposure without affecting on image quality. Our findings are commensurate with the literatures and emphasized that radiographers should learn to use of an updated reference FFD of 130 cm in clinical practice.

  7. Contributions to the genetic and mean bone-marrow doses of the Australian population from radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.; Morris, N.D.

    1980-06-01

    The results of a national survey of radiological procedures used for diagnosis and therapy in medicine, dentistry and chiropracty are reviewed. Statistical data for the distribution and frequency of various procedures in Australian hospitals and practices are summarised, together with their associated radiation doses. Annual genetically significant and mean bone-marrow doses to the Australian population arising from these procedures are derived for the survey year of 1970. Values of 176 microgray and 651 microgray for the annual (per capita) genetic and mean bone-marrow doses respectively are reported. These compare closely with corresponding estimates in other countries with similar medical practices to those in Australia

  8. 42 CFR 50.403 - What is the policy basis for these procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the policy basis for these procedures? 50.403 Section 50.403 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Public Health Service Grant Appeals Procedure § 50.403 What is the policy...

  9. The economics of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    At a time when policy makers and regulators are scheming to reduce the costs and utilization of medical services, interventional radiology is poised for growth. Part of this potential for growth is based on wider acceptance of the procedures performed by interventional radiologists. A second factor in the growth potential is the relative value in cost of these procedures compared with alternative therapies. The author presents a discussion of the differences in the relative value of these procedures when performed by physicians of different specialties. This paper reviews the status of the economic climate in the health care delivery system and the role and potential growth of interventional radiology. This includes a review of current data on the utilization of interventional radiology procedures in the Medicare program. This overview includes a discussion of the initiatives of the federal government which directly impact interventional radiology

  10. Comparison between a digital scanning system and a conventional screen film system in the full spine radiological procedure in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, M. L.; Gomez, G.; Romero, A.; Minambres, A.; Albi, G.; Floriano, A.; Rodirguez, A.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2004-01-01

    To compare from both dosimetry and image quality standpoints, a digital scanning system with a conventional screen film system, in the full spine radiological procedure. The standard patient is considered to be 12 years old, and a sample of forty patients referred for full spine radiological procedure has been studied. Gonad shielding has been used in all the patients, and its efficiency has been evaluated. Dosimetric study includes Kerma-area product, and thorax and gonad entrance surface dose. Kerma area product has been measured using a transmission camera, and for entrance surface dose estimation both thermoluminescent dosemeter LiF: Mg, Cu, P and LiF: Mg, Ti have been utilized. Three radiologists have evaluated the image quality according to the degree of fulfilment of the image quality criteria. (Author) 22 refs

  11. Management and presentation of grouped procedures: has the IHE integration profile cracked the toughest radiology workflow nut?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisot, Charles R.; Channin, David S.; Avrin, David E.; Lindop, Christopher

    2001-08-01

    In a simple, typical radiology workflow process, an order generates a single procedure, which in turn generates a single data set, from which, one radiology report is generated. There are, however, occasions when a single order consists of more than one procedure each with a separate report, yet the procedures are accomplished by one physical acquisition of data. The prototypical example of this is the request for computed tomographic evaluation of the chest, abdomen and pelvis. The study is accomplished, with modern day scanners, by a single helical acquisition, yet there are typically three codable and billable procedures involved, and these may be reported independently either for administrative or academic reasons. This grouping of procedures remained up to now a challenge to automate across integrated modalities, PACS and RIS. This paper discusses a number of other practical cases where this situation occurs and reviews the capabilities of the Presentation of Grouped Procedures IHE Integration Profile in solving this problem. The DICOM services used are evaluated as well as the strengths and weaknesses of this IHE Integration Profile. The implementation experience gained on both a CT and an MR for the IHE Demonstration at RSNA 2000 and HIMSS 2001 is also reviewed. In conclusion, the resulting clinical and operational benefits are discussed.

  12. Influence of CT on the number of radiologic procedures and hospitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkhuysen, F.H.B.; Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The research concerns the influence of body CT on medical efficiency in radiology and hospitalization in The Netherlands. General hospitals with body CT are compared with hospitals without CT. In radiology the substitution effect is investigated with use of the number of radiological performances per clinical patient as a parameter. From 1977 to 1984 this parameter proves to decrease in hospitals with body CT (9%) in contrast to the rise in hospitals without CT (10%). Concerning the average hospital in patient stay, it appears that this parameter shows a faster decrease in hospitals with body CT compared with hospitals without CT (5%-8%)

  13. Arterial Injury Associated with Tension-Free Vaginal Tapes-SECUR Procedure Successfully Treated by Radiological Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seok Jung

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various postoperative complications have been reported after the use of tension-free vaginal tapes (TVT. The transobturator approach was introduced to minimize the potential complications. The next generation of recently introduced TVT-SECUR is intended to minimize the incidence of complications. Herein we report a case of internal pudendal artery injury sustained during this procedure that was successfully treated by radiological embolization. Angiography with vessel embolization, when available, should be considered when the arterial injury is suspected.

  14. Comparative analysis of dose levels to patients in radiological procedures guided by fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Pablo Luis; Fernandez, Manuel; Ramos, Julio A.; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Cons, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the comparative data of the dose indicators for patient in radiological processes with respect to the values published in the ICRP document. It is analyzed the need for different strategies to communicate to different specialists mechanisms to optimize the radiation beginning with practice by training of second degree level in radiological protection and then, working with them the basics of equipment management to reduce doses without detriment to the welfare purpose

  15. Philosophy, policies, and procedures - The three P's of flight-deck operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl L.

    1991-01-01

    Standard operating procedures are drafted and provided to flightcrews to dictate the manner in which tasks are carried out. Failure to conform to Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) is frequently listed as the cause of violations, incidents, and accidents. However, procedures are often designed piecemeal, rather than being based on a sound philosophy of operations and policies that follow from such a philosophy. A framework of philosophy, policies, and procedures is proposed.

  16. Work history and radioprotection practices in relation to cancer incidence and mortality in US radiologic technologists performing nuclear medicine procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Marie Odile; Doody, Michele M; Van Dyke, Miriam E; Villoing, Daphné; Alexander, Bruce H; Linet, Martha S; Kitahara, Cari M

    2018-05-02

    Technologists working in nuclear medicine (NM) are exposed to higher radiation doses than most other occupationally exposed populations. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of cancer in NM technologists in relation to work history, procedures performed and radioprotection practices. From the US Radiologic Technologists cohort study, 72 755 radiologic technologists who completed a 2003-2005 questionnaire were followed for cancer mortality through 31 December 2012 and for cancer incidence through completion of a questionnaire in 2012-2013. Multivariable-adjusted models were used to estimate HRs for total cancer incidence and mortality by history of ever performing NM procedures and frequency of performing specific diagnostic or therapeutic NM procedures and associated radiation protection measures by decade. During follow-up (mean=7.5 years), 960 incident cancers and 425 cancer deaths were reported among the 22 360 technologists who worked with NM procedures. We observed no increased risk of cancer incidence (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.04) or death (HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.19) among workers who ever performed NM procedures. HRs for cancer incidence but not mortality were higher for technologists who began performing therapeutic procedures in 1960 and later compared with the 1950s. Frequency of performing diagnostic or therapeutic NM procedures and use of radioprotection measures were not consistently associated with cancer risk. No clear associations were observed for specific cancers, but results were based on small numbers. Cancer incidence and mortality were not associated with NM work history practices, including greater frequency of procedures performed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Overview of double dosimetry procedures for the determination of the effective dose to the interventional radiology staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervinen, H.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Jansen, J.; Miljanic, S.; Nikodemova, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    In interventional radiology, for an accurate determination of effective dose to the staff, measurements with two dosemeters have been recommended, one located above and one under the protective apron. Such 'double dosimetry' practices and the algorithms used for the determination of effective dose were reviewed in this study by circulating a questionnaire and by an extensive literature search. The results indicated that regulations for double dosimetry almost do not exist and there is no firm consensus on the most suitable calculation algorithms. The calculation of effective dose is mainly based on the single dosemeter measurements, in which either personal dose equivalent, directly, (dosemeter below the apron) or a fraction of personal dose equivalent (dosemeter above the apron) is taken as an assessment of effective dose. The most recent studies suggest that there might not be just one double dosimetry algorithm that would be optimum for all interventional radiology procedures. Further investigations in several critical configurations of interventional radiology procedures are needed to assess the suitability of the proposed algorithms. (authors)

  18. Interim radiological safety standards and evaluation procedures for subseabed high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    The Seabed Disposal Project (SDP) was evaluating the technical feasibility of high-level nuclear waste disposal in deep ocean sediments. Working standards were needed for risk assessments, evaluation of alternative designs, sensitivity studies, and conceptual design guidelines. This report completes a three part program to develop radiological standards for the feasibility phase of the SDP. The characteristics of subseabed disposal and how they affect the selection of standards are discussed. General radiological protection standards are reviewed, along with some new methods, and a systematic approach to developing standards is presented. The selected interim radiological standards for the SDP and the reasons for their selection are given. These standards have no legal or regulatory status and will be replaced or modified by regulatory agencies if subseabed disposal is implemented. 56 refs., 29 figs., 15 tabs

  19. 15 CFR 291.6 - Additional requirements; Federal policies and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST... requirements; Federal policies and procedures. Recipients and subrecipients are subject to all Federal laws and Federal and Department of Commerce policies, regulations, and procedures applicable to Federal financial...

  20. Responding to Self-Harm: A Documentary Analysis of Agency Policy and Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sally; Hill, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a documentary analysis of policies and procedures relating to self-harm from a range of organisations working with young people in the UK. It identifies the extent to which policies and/or procedures relating to self-harm are available for service providers and offers a wider understanding of the concepts of…

  1. Generic Procedures for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency at Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The IAEA publishes the Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to fulfil that function. This publication is part of that series. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, contains the following requirement: 'To ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene...'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(53)/RES/10, continues to encourage Member States '...to enhance, where necessary, their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies, by improving capabilities to prevent accidents, to respond to emergencies and to mitigate any harmful consequences...'. This publication is intended to assist Member States meet the requirements of GS-R-2 and enhance their preparedness by providing guidance on the response by facility personnel to emergencies at research reactor facilities.

  2. Policies and Procedures for Foreign Exchange Agencies. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Donald D.

    The guide details the policy of the Jefferson County (Alabama) Board of Education policy concerning international exchange of students (travel both to and from United States) in elementary and secondary grades. The first section specifies the standards by which the county will evaluate all international exchange agencies concerning structure,…

  3. Evaluation and assessment methodology, standards, and procedures manual of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, K.C.; Burson, Z.G.; Smith, J.M.; Blanchard, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, the U.S. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan authorises the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to co-ordinate the Federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities, and is comprised of representatives from several Federal agencies and Department of Energy contractors who provide assistance to the state(s) and Lead Federal Agency. The Evaluation and Assessment (E and A) Division of the FRMAC is responsible for receiving, storing, and interpreting environmental surveillance data to estimate the potential health consequences to the population in the vicinity of the accident site. The E and A Division has commissioned the preparation of a methodology and procedures manual which will result in a consistent approach by Division members in carrying out their duties. The first edition of this manual is nearing completion. In this paper, a brief review of the structure of the FRMAC is presented, with emphasis on the E and A Division. The contents of the E and A manual are briefly described, as are future plans for its expansion. (author)

  4. 44 CFR 1.4 - Policy and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... economy, and other regulatory actions contemplated for the future. (b) It is the policy of FEMA to provide... include a statement with respect to the impact of the proposed rule on small entities; holding open...

  5. Policy, Procedures and Standards for Enterprise Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    This policy establishes a standard approach for managing information produced by, funded by, or received per regulated reporting and/or federal-wide requirements and subsequently held or cataloged in information management systems by EPA.

  6. Improving financial performance by modeling and analysis of radiology procedure scheduling at a large community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingbo; Li, Jingshan; Gisler, Paula

    2011-06-01

    Radiology tests, such as MRI, CT-scan, X-ray and ultrasound, are cost intensive and insurance pre-approvals are necessary to get reimbursement. In some cases, tests may be denied for payments by insurance companies due to lack of pre-approvals, inaccurate or missing necessary information. This can lead to substantial revenue losses for the hospital. In this paper, we present a simulation study of a centralized scheduling process for outpatient radiology tests at a large community hospital (Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky). Based on analysis of the central scheduling process, a simulation model of information flow in the process has been developed. Using such a model, the root causes of financial losses associated with errors and omissions in this process were identified and analyzed, and their impacts were quantified. In addition, "what-if" analysis was conducted to identify potential process improvement strategies in the form of recommendations to the hospital leadership. Such a model provides a quantitative tool for continuous improvement and process control in radiology outpatient test scheduling process to reduce financial losses associated with process error. This method of analysis is also applicable to other departments in the hospital.

  7. Academic medical libraries' policies and procedures for notifying library users of retracted scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, C

    1998-01-01

    Academic medical libraries have a responsibility to inform library users regarding retracted publications. Many have created policies and procedures that identify flawed journal articles. A questionnaire was sent to the 129 academic medical libraries in the United States and Canada to find out how many had policies and procedures for identifying retracted publications. Of the returned questionnaires, 59% had no policy and no practice for calling the attention of the library user to retracted publications. Forty-one percent of the libraries called attention to retractions with or without a formal policy for doing so. Several responding libraries included their policy statement with the survey. The increasing number of academic medical libraries that realize the importance of having policies and practices in place highlights the necessity for this procedure.

  8. 76 FR 213 - National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... due to, for example, a threatened violation of applicable environmental, safety, and health... legally enforceable rights, benefits, or responsibilities, substantive or procedural, not otherwise... failed in indoor tests. Whether the explosives or propellants were tested indoors or outdoors, the...

  9. Radiochromic film for dosimetric measurements in radiation shielding composites synthesized for applied in radiology procedures of high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontainha, C. C. P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Baptista N, A. T.; Faria, L. O., E-mail: crissia@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Medical radiology offers great benefit to patients. However, although specifics procedures of high dose, as fluoroscopy, Interventional Radiology, Computed Tomography (CT) make up a small percent of the imaging procedures, they contribute to significantly increase dose to population. The patients may suffer tissue damage. The probability of deterministic effects incidence depends on the type of procedure performed, exposure time, and the amount of applied dose at the irradiated area. Calibrated radiochromic films can identify size and distribution of the radiated fields and measure intensities of doses. Radiochromic films are sensitive for doses ranging from 0.1 to 20 c Gy and they have the same response for X-rays effective energies ranging from 20 to 100 keV. New radiation attenuators materials have been widely investigated resulting in dose reduction entrance skin dose. In this work, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}:8 % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were obtained by mixing them with P(VDF-Tr Fe) copolymers matrix from casting method and then characterized by Ftir. Dosimetric measurements were obtained with Xr-Q A2 Gafchromic radiochromic films. In this setup, one radiochromic film is directly exposed to the X-rays beam and another one measures the attenuated beam were exposed to an absorbed dose of 10 mGy of RQR5 beam quality (70 kV X-ray beam). Under the same conditions, irradiated Xr-Q A2 films were stored and scanned measurement in order to obtain a more reliable result. The attenuation factors, evaluated by Xr-Q A2 radiochromic films, indicate that both composites are good candidates for use as patient radiation shielding in high dose medical procedures. (Author)

  10. Determining the suitability of materials for disposal at sea under the London Convention 1972: A radiological assessment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    on conducting specific assessments to determine whether candidate materials for disposal at sea contained de minimis levels of radioactivity. This report contains guidance on performing specific assessments of candidate materials to determine whether the materials are de minimis in the meaning of the London Convention 1972. It follows the guidelines adopted by the Twenty-first Consultative Meeting of the London Convention 1972 that incorporate a Stepwise Evaluation Procedure for screening candidate material to determine if it can be treated as 'non-radioactive' (i.e. de minimis) under the Convention. Material that cannot be readily defined as de minimis on the basis of Steps 1 to 5 of the Stepwise Evaluation Procedure require a specific assessment at Step 6. Such an assessment is the subject of this report. The assessment process described in this report is based on an inherently conservative procedure consistent with the precautionary approach, provided for under the London Convention 1972. Its purpose is to ensure the use of conservative models and cautious assumptions that result in the overestimation of the doses due to candidate materials that might be disposed of at sea in near coastal waters under de minimis provisions. Accordingly, the radiological consequences of disposal at sea of de minimis materials in other areas of the continental shelf and deeper waters will result in much lower radiation exposures than those considered here. It must be stressed that any candidate materials designated as de minimis must comply with all other provisions of the Convention. Section 2 provides a summary of the Stepwise Evaluation Procedure as detailed in the guidelines and background information necessary to understand the context of this guidance. Section 3 describes in detail a procedure to conduct the specific radiological assessment of the disposal of a candidate material. It contains a schematic diagram illustrating the specific assessment process and components of

  11. Qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecker, A.; Gross-Fengels, W.; Haage, P.; Huppert, P.; Landwehr, P.; Loose, R.; Reimer, P.; Tacke, J.; Vorwerk, D.; Fischer, J.

    2012-01-01

    The topics covered in the qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins are the following: Practical qualification: aorta iliac vessels and vessels in the upper and lower extremities, kidney and visceral arteries, head and neck arteries, dialysis shunts, veins and pulmonary arteries, aorta aneurysms and peripheral artery aneurysms. Knowledge acquisition concerning radiation protection: legal fundamentals, education and training, knowledge actualization and quality control, definition of the user and the procedure, competence preservation.

  12. The value of various radiological procedures for the investigation of functional disturbances of renal transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgener, F.A.; Schabel, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    The value of various radiological examinations was analysed with reference to 75 renal transplants which had developed complications. If the renal poles are marked with metallic clips, the size of the transplant can be estimated by abdominal x-rays. Abnormal size was found exclusively in severe rejection reactions, but only about 50% of acture rejections showed such a change. Contrast examinations were found to be valuable in the diagnosis or exclusion of anatomically localised lesions such as obstructions or anastomotic leaks. They were unsatisfactory in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of diffuse parenchymatous abnormalities such as rejection or damage during storage. (orig.) [de

  13. 12 CFR 612.2165 - Policies and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., preserve the integrity and independence of the supervisory process, and prevent the improper use of... employees may purchase any real or personal property of a System institution acquired by such institution... demonstrating compliance with standards-of-conduct decisions and board policy; (12) Establish reporting...

  14. 33 CFR 236.5 - Policy and procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... manage when directly integrated with the implementation or management of the water resource development... created by a water resource development to be recommended for implementation by the Corps of Engineers. (3... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCE POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: CORPS OF ENGINEERS PARTICIPATION IN IMPROVEMENTS FOR...

  15. Foetal Radiation Dose and Risk from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures: A Multinational Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Ernest K.; Darko, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    In diagnostic radiology examinations there is a benefit that the patient derives from the resulting diagnosis. Given that so many examinations are performed each year, it is inevitable that there will be occasions when an examination(s) may be inadvertently performed on pregnant patients or occasionally it may become clinically necessary to perform an examination(s) on a pregnant patient. In all these circumstances it is necessary to request an estimation of the foetal dose and risk. We initiated a study to investigate fetal doses from different countries. Exposure techniques on 367 foetuses from 414 examinations were collected and investigated. The FetDoseV4 program was used for all dose and risk estimations. The radiation doses received by the 367 foetuses ranges: <0.001–21.9 mGy depending on examination and technique. The associated probability of induced hereditary effect ranges: <1 in 200000000 (5 × 10 −9 ) to 1 in 10000 (1 × 10 −4 ) and the risk of childhood cancer ranges <1 in 12500000 (8 × 10 −8 ) to 1 in 500 (2 × 10 −3 ). The data indicates that foetal doses from properly conducted diagnostic radiology examinations will not result in any deterministic effect and a negligible risk of causing radiation induced hereditary effect in the descendants of the unborn child

  16. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK... Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1...

  17. Right and Goods: Procedural Liberalism and Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James Scott

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, James Scott Johnston asks what sort of liberalism is best for the educational systems of early twenty-first century, late capitalistic democratic nations, looking at the procedural liberalism extant. Two major models are John Rawls's Justice as Fairness and Jurgen Habermas's Communicative Action. Both owe their foundational…

  18. Comparison of incident air kerma (ki) of common digital and analog radiology procedures in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafapour, Hassan; Salehi, Zaker

    2018-03-01

    Introduction: Although in many developed countries, Analog radiography (AR) is replaced with digital radiography (DR) but AR is still widely used in many countries included Iran. Therefore, dosimetrically assessment of delivered dose is very important to avoid unnecessary patient dose. Materials and Methods: In this study, all imaging centers in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad were selected. The initial information included the mean kVp and mAs used by the personnel to perform each radiological procedure were gathered through a questionnaire. Barracuda dosimeter was then used to measure Incident air kerma (ki). Data obtained from digital radiography (DR) and analogue radiography (AR) were then analyzed and compared to each other. Results: The mean incident air kerma (ki) for five radiological procedures (chest AP&Lat, Skull AP&Lat, Lumbar spine AP&Lat, Thoracic spine AP&Lat and Pelvis) in digital devices were 0.38&1.34, 2.1&1.94, 4.99&7.83, 4.18& 6.41 and 4.33 mGy and those for analogue devices were 0.7&1.28, 3.05&3.02, 7.25&9.9, 7.125&8.36 and 5.36 mGy, respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: The use of low kVp or high mAs is one of the reasons to increase the incident air kerma (ki) in analogue methods comparing to digital methods in all procedures except the chest (in Lateral view). Also the results, surprisingly, showed that in some of the analogue methods incident air kerma (ki) was less than digital methods which is most probably because of the auto-exposure conditions.

  19. Evolution of the radiological protection policy. Applications in developing countries. IPEN a case of study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, A.M.P.L.; Sordi, G.M.A. A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the radiological protection development in Brazil from the beginning, when President Joao Cafe Filho signed an agreement with the U.S.A. In this agreement, Brazil joined the 'Atoms for Peace' program established on August 3., 1955. Yet in 1955, Brazil participated as a foundation member in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). As a result, the Iea - 'Instituto de Energia Atomica'- was created on August 31., 1956 and a research reactor type swimming pool was installed to produce radioisotopes and prepare experts in the field of nuclear activities. This reactor is maintained in operation at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), former Iea. Having the Iea as a case of study, we analyze the radiological protection evolution during the fifty years of its life. We correlate this development with the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) Regulations. CNEN was also created in 1956. The first safety standard in Brazil was delivered in 1973. Therefore, this paper will focus the radiological protection development at national level. Both institutions followed the international radiological protection recommendations, under the difficulties imposed by the historical conditions of a developing country. In order to have an outline of the radiological protection development, we inform that it was started as a section of the Radiological Division at the Iea. At that time, the Iea had four divisions. The radiological protection was performed by four people, being two physicists and two technicians that accomplished all the duties. On that occasion, approximately 30 people operated the Iea. The work staff at IPEN increased, arriving to 1600 people in 1998, including 150 persons in the radiological protection activities. Nowadays, 1200 people, including 100 persons in the health physics duties operate the IPEN. (authors)

  20. Evolution of the radiological protection policy. Applications in developing countries. IPEN a case of study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A.M.P.L.; Sordi, G.M.A. A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    This paper aims to show the radiological protection development in Brazil from the beginning, when President Joao Cafe Filho signed an agreement with the U.S.A. In this agreement, Brazil joined the 'Atoms for Peace' program established on August 3., 1955. Yet in 1955, Brazil participated as a foundation member in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). As a result, the Iea - 'Instituto de Energia Atomica'- was created on August 31., 1956 and a research reactor type swimming pool was installed to produce radioisotopes and prepare experts in the field of nuclear activities. This reactor is maintained in operation at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), former Iea. Having the Iea as a case of study, we analyze the radiological protection evolution during the fifty years of its life. We correlate this development with the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) Regulations. CNEN was also created in 1956. The first safety standard in Brazil was delivered in 1973. Therefore, this paper will focus the radiological protection development at national level. Both institutions followed the international radiological protection recommendations, under the difficulties imposed by the historical conditions of a developing country. In order to have an outline of the radiological protection development, we inform that it was started as a section of the Radiological Division at the Iea. At that time, the Iea had four divisions. The radiological protection was performed by four people, being two physicists and two technicians that accomplished all the duties. On that occasion, approximately 30 people operated the Iea. The work staff at IPEN increased, arriving to 1600 people in 1998, including 150 persons in the radiological protection activities. Nowadays, 1200 people, including 100 persons in the health physics duties operate the IPEN. (authors)

  1. Radiological protection in coronary procedures. Is it sufficient with the practices optimizations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotelo, Elena D.

    2001-01-01

    The number of percutaneous transluminal coronary procedures (PTCA) per million inhabitants in Uruguay is similar to the one obtained in developed countries. Between 1995 and 1999, PTCA procedures increased by 86 %. Despite the 'Fondo Nacional de Recursos' finances the Interventional Cardiology (IC) procedures of 90 % inhabitants, the number of IC procedures on people of public hospital is lower than that on people from private hospitals. All the 6 IC facilities are in the capital of the country. The number of IC procedures increases while decrease s the distance between the hospital and the capital. This study also shows that no one facility performs quality control tests, the 50% of the X-ray equipment is more than 10 years and, the IC staff does not have Radiation Protection education. We conclude that it is necessary to establishing as soon as possible, Quality Assurance Programmes. Despite the objective of this work was to obtain information to optimize the IC procedures, results shows that it is necessary to include the Principle of Justification of the procedures in Radiation Protection education for the IC staff. (author)

  2. 12 CFR 616.6300 - Leasing policies, procedures, and underwriting standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... property and associated risks; (e) Property tax and sales tax reporting; (f) Title and ownership of leased... engaged in lease underwriting must adopt a written policy (or policies). Management, at the direction of the board, must develop procedures that reflect lease practices that control risk and comply with all...

  3. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  4. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo, E-mail: lfaggioni@sirm.org [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Paolicchi, Fabio [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Bastiani, Luca [Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Guido, Davide [Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 2, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Caramella, Davide [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  5. Transcrestal Sinus Lift Procedure Approaching Atrophic Maxillary Ridge: A 60-Month Clinical and Radiological Follow-Up Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lo Giudice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to assess the success and the survival rate of dental implants placed in augmented bone after sinus lifting procedures. Material and Methods. 31 patients were mainly enrolled for a residual upper jaw crest thickness of 3 mm. CBCT scans were performed before and after the augmentation technique and at the follow-up appointments, at 3, 6, 12, 24, and up to 60 months. The follow-up examination included cumulative survival rate of implants, peri-implant marginal bone loss, and the height of sinus floor augmentation. Results. This retrospective study on 31 patients and 45 implants later inserted in a less than 3 mm crest showed excellent survival rates (99.5%, one implant was lost before loading due to an acute infection after 24 days, and two implants did not osteointegrate and were removed after 3 months. The radiological evaluation showed an average bone loss of 0.25 mm (±0.78 mm at the first follow-up appointment (3 months up to 0.30 mm (±1.28 mm after 60-month follow-up. Conclusion. In this study it was reported how even in less than 3 mm thick crest a transcrestal technique can predictably be used with a long-term clinical and radiological outcome, giving patients excellent stability of the grafted material and healthy clinical results.

  6. 75 FR 70557 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Draft Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... comments by referencing a Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section number. iii. Explain why you... the record in accordance with section 554 of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA). (15 U.S.C. 2615(a... referencing by parties unfamiliar with the referenced regulation. C. When do these policies and procedures...

  7. 47 CFR 64.401 - Policies and procedures for provisioning and restoring certain telecommunications services in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Policies and procedures for provisioning and restoring certain telecommunications services in emergencies. 64.401 Section 64.401 Telecommunication... procedures for provisioning and restoring certain telecommunications services in emergencies. The...

  8. Role of the IAEA's ALMERA network in harmonization of analytical procedures applicable worldwide for radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitois, A.; Osvath, I.; Tarjan, S.; Groening, M.; Osborn, D.; )

    2016-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) coordinates and provides analytical support to the worldwide network of Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity (ALMERA), consisting at the end of 2015 of 154 laboratories in 85 countries. This network, established by the IAEA in 1995, has for aim to provide timely and reliable measurement results of environmental radioactivity in routine monitoring and emergency situations. The IAEA supports the ALMERA laboratories in their routine and emergency response environmental monitoring activities by organizing proficiency tests and inter-laboratory comparison exercises, developing validated analytical procedures for environmental radioactivity measurement, and organizing training courses and workshops. The network also acts as a forum for sharing knowledge and expertise. The aim of this paper is to describe the current status of ALMERA analytical method development activities for radiological emergencies and the plans for further development in the field

  9. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  10. A method to reduce patient's eye lens dose in neuro-interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safari, M.J.; Wong, J.H.D.; Kadir, K.A.A.; Sani, F.M.; Ng, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    Complex and prolonged neuro-interventional radiology procedures using the biplane angiography system increase the patient's risk of radiation-induced cataract. Physical collimation is the most effective way of reducing the radiation dose to the patient's eye lens, but in instances where collimation is not possible, an attenuator may be useful in protecting the eyes. In this study, an eye lens protector was designed and fabricated to reduce the radiation dose to the patients’ eye lens during neuro-interventional procedures. The eye protector was characterised before being tested on its effectiveness in a simulated aneurysm procedure on an anthropomorphic phantom. Effects on the automatic dose rate control (ADRC) and image quality are also evaluated. The eye protector reduced the radiation dose by up to 62.1% at the eye lens. The eye protector is faintly visible in the fluoroscopy images and increased the tube current by a maximum of 3.7%. It is completely invisible in the acquisition mode and does not interfere with the clinical procedure. The eye protector placed within the radiation field of view was able to reduce the radiation dose to the eye lens by direct radiation beam of the lateral x-ray tube with minimal effect on the ADRC system. - Highlights: • The eye protector can considerably reduce the patient's eye lens dose during neuro-interventional procedures. • This protector does not significantly perturb the fluoroscopy image and was completely invisible on the acquisition image due to image subtraction. • The eye protector does not significantly change the exposure parameters (kV and mAs).

  11. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; Pradiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (Pradiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (PRadiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological examinations. Both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching needs to be effectively implemented with radiation safety courses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Epidural steroid injection: A procedure ideally suited for performance in the radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khoury, G.Y.; Ehara, S.; Weinstein, J.N.; Montgomery, W.J.; Kathol, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    Epidural steroid injection, a procedure used for decades for the treatment of low back pain, is often performed blindly by anesthesiologists in the pain clinic setting. The authors believe the radiologist is best equipped to do this procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. With the patient prone, a 22-gauge spinal needle is advanced into the sacral epidural space through the sacral hiatus. The needle position is checked in posteroanterior and lateral projections and a limited epidurogram is obtained. This is followed by administration of 0.125% bupivacaine (16-20 ml) and betamethasone (12-24 mg). More than 200 such examinations have been performed, with a failure rate of less than 5% and with no serious complications

  13. Analysis of risk in computerized tomography and other diagnostic radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Medical practice entails continuous risks to the patient taken in good faith by the physician for the benefit of the patient. Risk of radiation induced cancer death approximates 10(-4) per cGy (rad). Assuming an average whole body dose of 0.1 cGy for many diagnostic X-ray procedures, the probability of radiation-induced cancer death is about 10(-5). The purpose of this paper is to compare the risks of common diagnostic X-ray procedures including computerized tomography (CT) with risks of smoking or automobile travel. Such comparisons should be constructive in putting radiation in perspective and facilitating explanation of risk/benefit to patients

  14. Coefficients calculations of conversion of cancer risk for occupational exposure using Monte Carlo simulations in cardiac procedures of interventionist radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, William S.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Maia, Ana F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac procedures are among the most common procedures in interventional radiology (IR), and can lead to high medical and occupational exposures, as in most cases are procedures complex and long lasting. In this work, conversion coefficients (CC) for the risk of cancer, normalized by kerma area product (KAP) to the patient, cardiologist and nurse were calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. The patient and the cardiologist were represented by anthropomorphic simulators MESH, and the nurse by anthropomorphic phantom FASH. Simulators were incorporated into the code of Monte Carlo MCNPX. Two scenarios were created: in the first (1), lead curtain and protective equipment suspended were not included, and in the second (2) these devices were inserted. The radiographic parameters employed in Monte Carlo simulations were: tube voltage of 60 kVp and 120 kVp; filtration of the beam and 3,5 mmAl beam area of 10 x 10 cm 2 . The average values of CCs to eight projections (in 10 -4 / Gy.cm 2 were 1,2 for the patient, 2,6E-03 (scenario 1) and 4,9E-04 (scenario 2) for cardiologist and 5,2E-04 (scenario 1) and 4,0E-04 (Scenario 2) to the nurse. The results show a significant reduction in CCs for professionals, when the lead curtain and protective equipment suspended are employed. The evaluation method used in this work can provide important information on the risk of cancer patient and professional, and thus improve the protection of workers in cardiac procedures of RI

  15. SU-D-209-05: Sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to Procedural Factors in Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pasciak, A [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wagner, L [UT Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams (SMPB) to be used in measuring the DRIP. Methods: A series of clinical and factorial Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine the shape of the scattered X-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios. Two clinical evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Results: Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affected the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effects on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in interventional cardiology, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. Conclusion: The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy, and therefore the DRIP, is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle. These results will help determine an appropriate set of SMPB to be used for measuring the DRIP.

  16. Optimizing Travel Time to Outpatient Interventional Radiology Procedures in a Multi-Site Hospital System Using a Google Maps Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob E; Morel-Ovalle, Louis; Boas, Franz E; Ziv, Etay; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Deipolyi, Amy; Mohabir, Heeralall R; Erinjeri, Joseph P

    2018-02-20

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a custom Google Maps application can optimize site selection when scheduling outpatient interventional radiology (IR) procedures within a multi-site hospital system. The Google Maps for Business Application Programming Interface (API) was used to develop an internal web application that uses real-time traffic data to determine estimated travel time (ETT; minutes) and estimated travel distance (ETD; miles) from a patient's home to each a nearby IR facility in our hospital system. Hypothetical patient home addresses based on the 33 cities comprising our institution's catchment area were used to determine the optimal IR site for hypothetical patients traveling from each city based on real-time traffic conditions. For 10/33 (30%) cities, there was discordance between the optimal IR site based on ETT and the optimal IR site based on ETD at non-rush hour time or rush hour time. By choosing to travel to an IR site based on ETT rather than ETD, patients from discordant cities were predicted to save an average of 7.29 min during non-rush hour (p = 0.03), and 28.80 min during rush hour (p travel time when more than one location providing IR procedures is available within the same hospital system.

  17. Generic Procedures for Medical Response During a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this manual is to provide the medical community with practical guidance for medical emergency preparedness and response, describing the tasks and actions of different members of the national, regional or local medical infrastructure in accordance with international standards. This document provides generic response procedures for medical personnel responding to different types of radiation emergencies and at the different stages of the emergency response (at the scene of the emergency, pre-hospital, hospital), and during the early post-emergency stage (about 1-2 months afterwards).

  18. MyHealthAtVanderbilt: policies and procedures governing patient portal functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, S Trent; Stenner, Shane P; Anders, Shilo; Muse, Sue; Johnson, Kevin B; Jirjis, Jim; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2011-01-01

    Explicit guidelines are needed to develop safe and effective patient portals. This paper proposes general principles, policies, and procedures for patient portal functionality based on MyHealthAtVanderbilt (MHAV), a robust portal for Vanderbilt University Medical Center. We describe policies and procedures designed to govern popular portal functions, address common user concerns, and support adoption. We present the results of our approach as overall and function-specific usage data. Five years after implementation, MHAV has over 129 800 users; 45% have used bi-directional messaging; 52% have viewed test results and 45% have viewed other medical record data; 30% have accessed health education materials; 39% have scheduled appointments; and 29% have managed a medical bill. Our policies and procedures have supported widespread adoption and use of MHAV. We believe other healthcare organizations could employ our general guidelines and lessons learned to facilitate portal implementation and usage. PMID:21807648

  19. Radiological protection in a patient during a total body irradiation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez O, J. O.; Hinojosa G, J.; Gomez M, E.; Balam de la Vega, J. A.; Deheza V, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    A technique used in the Service of Radiotherapy of the Cancer Center of the American British Cowdray Medical Center (ABC) for the bone marrow transplantation, is the total body irradiation. It is known that the dose calculation, for this irradiation type, is old, since the dosimetric calculation is carried out by hand and they exist infinity of techniques for the patients irradiation and different forms of protecting organs of risk, as well as a great uncertainty in the given dose. In the Cancer Center of the ABC Medical Center, was carried out an irradiation procedure to total body with the following methodology: Computerized tomography of the patient total body (two vacuum mattresses in the following positions: dorsal and lateral decubitus), where is combined the two treatment techniques anterior-posterior and bilateral, skin delineate and reference volumes, dose calculation with the planning system Xi O of CMS, dose determination using an ionization chamber and a lung phantom IMRT Thorax Phantom of the mark CIRS and dosimetry in vivo. In this work is presented the used treatment technique, the results, statistics and the actualization of the patient clinical state. (Author)

  20. The effectiveness of sexual harassment policies and procedures at higher education institutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Joubert

    2011-02-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the awareness levels of academic staff members at higher education institutions in South Africa of sexual harassment policies and procedures in their institutions. Motivation for the study: A number of high profile court cases emphasised the need for effective policies to reduce the incidence of sexual harassment complaints. Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional survey design was conducted amongst 161 academic staff members, representing 10 higher education institutions in South Africa. The measuring instrument that was used is the Sexual Harassment Questionnaire (SHQ that was developed specifically for this study. Main findings: The results showed that despite indications that sexual harassment policies do exist and that they are regarded as effective tools in addressing sexual harassment, the implementation of such policies is not effective and few academic staff members received training and/or guidance on the utilisation of the policy. Significant correlation coefficients were found between the elements of an effective policy and between population group and some of the elements. Practical/managerial implications: Employers across the board should regularly conduct an audit to determine the level of awareness of sexual harassment policies and procedures and plan interventions. Contribution: No other study in South Africa attempted to measure the awareness levels of academics and its impact on the management of sexual harassment.

  1. Radiological interventional procedures for the acute abdomen; Radiologisch-interventionelle Massnahmen beim akuten Abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumm, C.; Hoffmann, R.T.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    In patients with acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, catheter-assisted thrombolytic therapy represents a procedure of increasing importance in addition to surgery and intensive care treatment. The thrombolytic drugs utilized for this purpose are urokinase, streptokinase and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA). Therapeutic embolization is predominantly used in the treatment of arterial bleeding from the gastro-intestinal tract, the liver, the intestines (due to an aneurysm or vascular malformation) and in bleeding from intestinal anastomoses. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, embospheres, gelfoam and microcoils can be utilized as embolic agents. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and stent implantation are applied in patients with biliary obstructions caused by inoperable tumors of the gall bladder or bile ducts, of the pancreatic head or duodenum and by metastases located in the liver parenchyma or hepatic hilum. Image-guided percutaneous drainage is a valuable option in the management of abscesses in the peritoneal cavity; less common indications are lymphoceles, biliomas, urinomas, hematomas, necrosis and pseudocysts. (orig.) [German] Die kathetergestuetzte thrombolytische Therapie stellt im Kontext einer chirurgischen und intensivmedizinischen Versorgung von Patienten mit thrombembolisch bedingter mesenterialer Ischaemie ein unterstuetzendes Behandlungsverfahren von zunehmender Bedeutung dar. Als thrombolytische Agenzien werden Urokinase, Streptokinase und der rekombinante Gewebeplasminogenaktivator (rtPA) verwendet. Die therapeutische Embolisation kommt neben der endoskopischen und chirurgischen Blutungsstillung bei arteriellen Blutungen im Gastrointestinaltrakt, aus der Leber, im Darm (als Folge eines Aneurysmas oder einer vaskulaeren Malformation) sowie bei blutenden intestinalen Anastomosen zum Einsatz. Zur Embolisation koennen Polyvinylalkoholpartikel, Embosphaeren, Gelfoam oder Mikrocoils verwendet werden. Die

  2. Usefulness and Limitation of Manual Aspiration Immediately After Pneumothorax Complicating Interventional Radiological Procedures with the Transthoracic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Kato, Takeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of simple aspiration of air from the pleural space to prevent increased pneumothorax and avoid chest tube placement in cases of pneumothorax following interventional radiological procedures performed under computed tomography fluoroscopic guidance with the transthoracic percutaneous approach. While still on the scanner table, 102 cases underwent percutaneous manual aspiration of a moderate or large pneumothorax that had developed during mediastinal, lung, and transthoracic liver biopsies and ablations of lung and hepatic tumors (independent of symptoms). Air was aspirated from the pleural space by an 18- or 20-gauge intravenous catheter attached to a three-way stopcock and 20- or 50-mL syringe. We evaluated the management of each such case during and after manual aspiration. In 87 of the 102 patients (85.3%), the pneumothorax had resolved completely on follow-up chest radiographs without chest tube placement, but chest tube placement was required in 15 patients. Requirement of chest tube insertion significantly increased in parallel with the increased volume of aspirated air. When receiver-operating characteristic curves were applied retrospectively, the optimal cutoff level of aspirated air on which to base a decision to abandon manual aspiration alone and resort to chest tube placement was 670 mL. Percutaneous manual aspiration of the pneumothorax performed immediately after the procedure might prevent progressive pneumothorax and eliminate the need for chest tube placement. However, when the amount of aspirated air is large (such as more than 670 mL), chest tube placement should be considered

  3. Radiation dose to patients from the coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jun-Zheng; Bai, Mei; Liu, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To survey and assess radiation dose to patients from coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in Beijing Xuanwu Hospital of Capital University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The dose-area product (DAP) values to the patient and cumulative dose (CD) were recorded from 84 coronary angiographies and 51 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. A Monte-Carlo based program PCXMC was used to calculate the effective dose from DAP values for each patient. Organ doses were also measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) using a human-shaped phantom to compare the calculated organ dose from DAP. Results: The difference between the organ doses measured by TLDs and those from PCXMC software (P>0.05) were tolerable. The DAP value ranged from 7611∼60538 mGy·cm 2 for CA and 16423∼161973 mGy·cm 2 for PTCA. The effective dose for all procedures was determined to be in the range of 1.1∼6.9 mSv for CA and 2.3∼20.1 mSv for PTCA. CD ranged from 120.0 to 1016.0 mGy for CA and 287 to 2883 mGy for PTCA. Conversion factors between effective dose and DAP were 0.114∼0.139 mSv·Gy - 1·cm -2 for CA and 0.124∼0.142 mSv·Gy -1 ·cm -2 for PTCA; Conversion factors between organ dose and CD were derived for CA and PTCA, respectively. Conclusions: DAP and CD can be used as the dose indicator to calculate the organ dose and effective dose of patient based on Monte Carlo simulation. Using this method can provide important information of patient absorbed dose and enhance the radiation protection of patient in interventional radiology procedures. (author)

  4. Library and Archival Security: Policies and Procedures To Protect Holdings from Theft and Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkaus-Randall, Gregor

    1998-01-01

    Firm policies and procedures that address the environment, patron/staff behavior, general attitude, and care and handling of materials need to be at the core of the library/archival security program. Discussion includes evaluating a repository's security needs, collections security, security in non-public areas, security in the reading room,…

  5. A Review of Cash Management Policies, Procedures and Practices of Mississippi's Institutions of Higher Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Legislature, Jackson. Performance Evaluation and Expenditure Review Committee.

    This report to the Mississippi Legislature presents the findings of a review of the cash management policies, procedures, and practices of the State Board of Trustees of Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL). The methodology involved review of: applicable Mississippi statutes; standards promulgated by the National Association of College and…

  6. 2 CFR 801.30 - What policies and procedures must I follow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...? 801.30 Section 801.30 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION § 801.30 What policies and procedures... § 801.220 in this part (2 CFR 801.220). ...

  7. Automated procedure for selection of optimal refueling policies for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, B.I.; Zolotar, B.; Weisman, J.

    1979-01-01

    An automated procedure determining a minimum cost refueling policy has been developed for light water reactors. The procedure is an extension of the equilibrium core approach previously devised for pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Use of 1 1/2-group theory has improved the accuracy of the nuclear model and eliminated tedious fitting of albedos. A simple heuristic algorithm for locating a good starting policy has materially reduced PWR computing time. Inclusion of void effects and use of the Haling principle for axial flux calculations extended the nuclear model to boiling water reactors (BWRs). A good initial estimate of the refueling policy is obtained by recognizing that a nearly uniform distribution of reactivity provides low-power peaking. The initial estimate is improved upon by interchanging groups of four assemblies and is subsequently refined by interchanging individual assemblies. The method yields very favorable results, is simpler than previously proposed BWR fuel optimization schemes, and retains power cost as the objective function

  8. Radiological optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological optimization is one of the basic principles in each radiation-protection system and it is a basic requirement in the safety standards for radiation protection in the European Communities. The objectives of the research, performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, are: (1) to implement the ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for optimization techniques in decision-aiding; (3) to optimize radiological assessment models by validation and intercomparison; (4) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (5) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (6) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (7) to investigate existing software programmes in the domain of multi criteria analysis. The main achievements for 1997 are given

  9. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  10. Transposition of the 97/43 EURATOM directive. Mission on procedures and standard levels of medical examinations using ionizing radiations. The radiological procedures: quality criteria and doses optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this report concerns the optimization of radiological practices, to avoid delivering unuseful doses while ensuring an image quality necessary to the obtaining of the desired diagnosis information. (N.C.)

  11. Policies, Procedures, and Practices Regarding Sport-Related Concussion in Community College Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddack, Michael; DeWolf, Ryan; Covassin, Tracey; Kontos, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    College sport organizations and associations endorse concussion-management protocols and policies. To date, little information is available on concussion policies and practices at community college institutions. To assess and describe current practices and policies regarding the assessment, management, and return-to-play criteria for sport-related concussion (SRC) among member institutions of the California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA). Cross-sectional study. Web-based survey. A total of 55 head athletic trainers (ATs) at CCCAA institutions. Data about policies, procedures, and practices regarding SRC were collected over a 3-week period in March 2012 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Fisher exact test, and the Spearman test. Almost half (47%) of ATs stated they had a policy for SRC assessment, management, and return to play at their institution. They reported being in compliance with baseline testing guidelines (25%), management guidelines (34.5%), and return-to-play guidelines (30%). Nearly 31% of ATs described having an SRC policy in place for academic accommodations. Conference attendance was positively correlated with institutional use of academic accommodations after SRC (r = 0.44, P = .01). The number of meetings ATs attended and their use of baseline testing were also positively correlated (r = 0.38, P = .01). At the time of this study, nearly half of CCCAA institutions had concussion policies and 31% had academic-accommodation policies. However, only 18% of ATs at CCCAA institutions were in compliance with all of their concussion policies. Our findings demonstrate improvements in the management of SRCs by ATs at California community colleges compared with previous research but a need for better compliance with SRC policies.

  12. Development and evaluation of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for quality control tests and radiological protection activities in a Nuclear Medicine Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krempser, Alexandre R., E-mail: krempser@peb.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEB/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Biomedica; Soares, Alexandre B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Corbo, Rossana [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (FM/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2011-07-01

    The quality management in Nuclear Medicine Services is a requirement of national and international standards. The Brazilian regulatory agency in health surveillance, the Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria (ANVISA), in its Resolucao de Diretoria Colegiada (Collegiate Directory Resolution) no. 38, requires the elaboration of documents describing the technical and clinical routine activities. This study aimed to elaborate, implement and evaluate Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for quality control tests and radiological protection activities in the Nuclear Medicine Service of a university hospital. Eighteen SOPs were developed, involving tasks related to dose calibrator, gamma camera, Geiger-Muller detectors and radiological protection activities. The performance of its application was evaluated for a period of six months. It was observed a reduction in 75% of reported operational errors and 42% of the number of reported incidents with contamination by radioactive material. The SOPs were adequate and successful in its application. New procedures involving clinical activities will also be developed and evaluated. (author)

  13. Determining the Suitability of Materials for Disposal at Sea under the London Convention 1972 and London Protocol 1996: A Radiological Assessment Procedure. 2015 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidance on performing specific assessments of candidate materials for dumping at sea, to determine whether the materials are de minimis in the meaning of the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter 1972 (the London Convention 1972) and the related Protocol 1996 (the London Protocol 1996). It presents a detailed radiological procedure to assess doses to workers and members of the public and doses to marine flora and fauna related to the dumping of materials at sea. The procedures in this publication follow the requirements to protect the environment in the IAEA Safety Standards and in the recommendations by the International Commission of Radiological Protection. It is expected to be used by national regulatory authorities responsible for authorizing disposal at sea of candidate materials as well as by those companies and individuals applying to obtain permission to dispose these materials at sea

  14. A Case Study of Policies and Procedures to Address Cyberbullying at a Technology-Based Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Bettina Polite

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the policies and procedures used to effectively address cyberbullying at a technology-based middle school. The purpose of the study was to gain an in-depth understanding of policies and procedures used to address cyberbullying at a technology-based middle school in the southern United States. The study sought…

  15. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  16. Policies and procedures in the workplace: how health care organizations compare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, R

    1993-01-01

    Many organizations are implementing programs and services to manage the human and economic costs of stress. A mail survey was conducted of 500 randomly selected Canadian organizations having at least 500 employees. The survey tapped four major areas: organizational policies and procedures for managing stress; programs and services offered; perceived benefits and constraints for the organization; and projected future directions in this area. Analyses of returns from 210 organizations-43 health and 167 non-health-revealed various findings. For example, over half of health care organizations have policies and procedures as opposed to less than half of non-health care organizations. Also, health care organizations place greater emphasis on smoking cessation, weight control programs and on stress management training. Although some Canadian organizations are addressing stress, much more could and should be done, especially by organizations that do not yet recognize the impact of stress on employees and their work performance.

  17. Library Operations Policies and Procedures, Volume 2. Central Archive for Reusable Defense Software (CARDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    use and customize those policies and procedures applicable to the implementor’s situation. It is not the intent of this manual to restrict the library...improvements. Pare 10 ka•- V •DkI U Release Manager The Release Manager provides franchisees with media copies of existing libraries, as needed. Security...implementors, and potential library franchisees . Security Team The Security Team assists the Security Officer with security analysis. Team members are

  18. Report of the radiological protection procedures adapted in the Goiania General Hospital for assistance to the victims of the radiological accident with Cesium 137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    A caesium-137 capsule, illegal removed from a desactivated health center of the Instituto Goiano de Radioterapia, was disrupted causing a serious radiological accident. The dimensions of the accident were worsened due to some facts such as: the caesium-137 was in the chloride from, which is a very soluble compound the accident was notify to the competent authorities only several days after the capsule was removal and during this period of time some people handled the souce directly, without knowing its potential danger. This paper descibes the measures adopted in the Goiania General Hospital to restrict the exposure of workers and members of the public and to minimize the consequences of unavoidable exposures in such a way to assure that the annual dose limits were not exceeded. An efficiency evaluation of the methods adopted for the decontamination of the victims was made and its described in the report. (author) [pt

  19. Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

    1995-01-01

    This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

  20. Upgrade the intervention levels derived for water and foods, to be include in the PERE 607 procedure the external radiological emergency plan in the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llado Castillo, R.; Aguilar Pacheco, R.

    1998-01-01

    The work shows the results obtained in the upgrade the intervention levels derived for water and foods, to be include in the PERE 607 procedure the external radiological emergency plan in the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

  1. Postoperative radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenne, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of postoperative radiology. Most surgical procedures on the alimentary tract are successful, but postoperative complications remain a common occurrence. The radiologist must be familiar with a large variety of possible surgical complications, because it is this specialty that is most commonly called on to render a definitive diagnosis. The decision for reoperation, for instance, is usually based on results from radiologic imaging techniques. These now include ultrasonography, CT scanning, needle biopsy, and interventional techniques in addition to contrast studies and nuclear medicine investigation

  2. Competency-based (CanMEDS) residency training programme in radiology: systematic design procedure, curriculum and success factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jippes, Erik; Engelen, Jo M.L. van; Brand, Paul L.P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    Based on the CanMEDS framework and the European Training Charter for Clinical Radiology a new radiology curriculum was designed in the Netherlands. Both the development process and the resulting new curriculum are presented in this paper. The new curriculum was developed according to four systematic design principles: discursiveness, hierarchical decomposition, systematic variation and satisficing (satisficing is different from satisfying; in this context, satisficing means searching for an acceptable solution instead of searching for an optimal solution). The new curriculum is organ based with integration of radiological diagnostic techniques, comprises a uniform national common trunk followed by a 2-year subspecialisation, is competency outcome based with appropriate assessment tools and techniques, and is based on regional collaboration among radiology departments. The application of the systematic design principles proved successful in producing a new curriculum approved by all authorities. The principles led to a structured, yet flexible, development process in which creative solutions could be generated and adopters (programme directors, supervisors and residents) were highly involved. Further research is needed to empirically test the components of the new curriculum. (orig.)

  3. Policy analysis of authorisation procedures for wind energy deployment in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Guillermo; Rio, Pablo del; Dopico, Jesus Angel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the administrative procedures for the granting of authorisations for the siting of wind farms in Spain, currently the competency of regional authorities. The analysis reveals some commonalities and differences between the procedures across regions. Furthermore, some aspects regarding these procedures have raised the concern of different stakeholders, including the central government and wind energy investors. A conflict between the interests of the central and regional governments can be observed. Lack of coordination between the different administrative levels and the 'more is better mentality' of regional authorities have led to a significant growth of wind energy requests for the (national) feed-in tariff. In turn, investors have complained about the discretionarity and non-transparency of those procedures and the lack of homogeneity across regions. This is likely to result in delays, uncertainty for investors and higher transaction costs. Although there has been a trend to a model which involves the use of multicriteria bidding procedures with more explicit, objective and precise criteria regarding project selection, the aforementioned problems suggest the need to improve coordination between the different administrative levels. - Highlights: → A conflict between the interests of the central and regional governments in the granting of administrative procedures can be observed. → Lack of coordination between different administrative levels have led to a significant growth of wind energy requests for the (national) feed-in tariff. → The resulting increase in the total costs of wind energy promotion has been a major concern for national policy-makers. → In turn, investors have complained about the discretionarity and non-transparency of those procedures and the lack of homogeneity across regions. → Those problems suggest the need to improve coordination between the different administrative levels.

  4. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  5. Policy Implementation of Working Procedures of Information and Documentation Officer at Cimahi City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Intan Permatasari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since one year after the enactment of Public Information Disclosure Rights Number 14 of 2008 in April 2010, all government in Indonesia shall establish Information and Documentation Officer (PPID and all supporting instruments. Cimahi itself had made Cimahi Mayor Regulation No. 4 of 2011 on the Working Procedures and Documentation Information Management Officer at Cimahi in response to the main policy. However, despite being implemented for 3 years, implementation of this policy is not in accordance with UU KIP sought to assess and analyse the factors that cause these obstacles by using the theory of Charles O. Jones who focuses on organizational aspects, aspects of the interpretation and application of aspects of using qualitative research methods.

  6. The development of the IAEA policy on the radiological protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, G.

    2002-01-01

    Since its creation in 1957, and in accordance with its statute, the IAEA has established standards of safety for protection of health in the fields of nuclear installations safety, radiation protection, the transport of radioactive materials and radioactive waste management, including the control of radioactive releases to the environment. In this context, the IAEA has a long history of involvement in matters related not only to the protection of humans but also to the protection of other species from the effects of radioactivity in the environment. Concern about the environment has arisen for different reasons over the years, starting with questions about the potential effects on non-human species of fall-out from nuclear weapons testing and of radioactive discharges to atmosphere and the oceans. Later, the concern was focussed on the possible harm to non-human species caused by the dumping of solid waste at sea. The IAEA has responded to requests from other UN bodies and from international conventions to evaluate these potential hazards and to establish protection criteria. Social and political attitudes have gradually changed towards the environment mainly due to a growing realisation that the environment is vulnerable to the effects of human activities. This change has been reflected in the outcomes of major UN conferences on the environment in 1972 and 1992 and, accordingly, the emphasis of international and national policies towards the environment has increasingly shifted towards protective measures and strategies that include other species. Thus, the protection of the environment from the effects of ionising radiation has taken on a new importance. The IAEA, together with other relevant international organisations, is working to develop an agreed environmental protection strategy to counter the possible effects of ionising radiation, building on the work done over the last 30 years but taking due account of the new attitudes to the subject. The IAEA

  7. Notification: Audit of EPA's Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, August 28, 2017. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel to Oklahoma.

  8. Report: EPA Needs Policies and Procedures to Manage Public Pesticide Petitions in a Transparent and Efficient Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #16-P-0019, October 27, 2015. OPP’s lack of policies and procedures to manage public pesticide petitions in a transparent and efficient manner can result in unreasonable delay lawsuits costing the agency time and resources.

  9. Radiological protection procedures for industrial applications of computed radiography; Procedimentos de protecao radiologica em aplicacoes industriais da radiografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de

    2009-03-15

    Due to its very particular characteristics, industrial radiography is responsible for roughly half of the relevant accidents in nuclear industry, in developed as well as in developing countries, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Thus, safety and radiological protection in industrial gamma radiography have been receiving especial treatment by regulatory authorities of most Member States. The main objective of the present work was to evaluate, from the radioprotection point of view, the main advantages of computed radiography (CR) for filmless industrial radiography. In order to accomplish this, both techniques, i.e. conventional and filmless computed radiography were evaluated and compared through practical studies. After the studies performed at the present work it was concluded that computed radiography significantly reduces the inherent doses, reflecting in smaller restricted areas and costs, with consequent improvement in radiological protection and safety. (author)

  10. Radiologic intervention: patient anxiety, fear of pain, understanding of the procedure and satisfaction with the medication-a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    2006-01-01

    I wanted to prospectively assess patients' anxiety, their understanding of the procedure being performed, the perception of the pain level and the satisfaction with the administered medication for interventional procedures. I investigated 78 patients before and after they underwent 93 interventional procedures. The patients responded to a series of questions by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Two different procedures were performed on 15 patients at different times. Based on the patient's body weight, a combination of sedative and analgesic was intravenously administered. The mean anxiety VAS score for the interventional procedures was about 5.3. The mean anxiety score of the experienced patients was about 3.8 and that of the inexperienced patients was about 5.5 (ρ < .001). The mean score for the understanding of the procedure, which was recorded both before and after the procedure, was about 4.1 and 7.1, respectively. The mean scores for the understanding of the procedure were about 7.0 in the experienced patients and about 3.6 in the inexperienced patients (ρ < .001). The anticipated level of pain recorded before the procedure was about 5.2 and the level of pain during the procedure was 2.9, and the latter was recorded after the procedure (ρ < .001). The level of satisfaction with the medication provided during the procedure was about 8.0 on the VAS score. The patients had a moderate amount of anxiety about the interventional procedures. Most patients had a high level of satisfaction with the medication despite the amount of pain they experienced during the procedure. The patients who were experienced with a procedure tended to have less anxiety and anticipated pain, and they had a greater understanding of the procedure

  11. 21 CFR 1404.610 - What procedures does the Office of National Drug Control Policy use in suspension and debarment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What procedures does the Office of National Drug Control Policy use in suspension and debarment actions? 1404.610 Section 1404.610 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment...

  12. 75 FR 29996 - Review of MMS NEPA Policies, Practices, and Procedures for OCS Oil and Gas Exploration and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) policies, practices, and procedures for the Minerals Management Service (MMS... applies NEPA in its management of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas exploration and development and make recommendations for revisions. The scope of the review is intended to be holistic, i.e. from leasing decisions to...

  13. 76 FR 50813 - Major Capital Investment Projects; Guidance on News Starts/Small Starts Policies and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Major Capital Investment Projects; Guidance on News Starts/Small Starts Policies and Procedures AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA... Administration (FTA) to publish policy guidance on the New and Small Starts capital project review and evaluation...

  14. Post-procedural Care in Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know—Part I: Standard Post-procedural Instructions and Follow-Up Care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: Bedros.Taslakian@nyumc.org; Sridhar, Divya [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Section (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Interventional radiology (IR) has evolved into a full-fledged clinical specialty with attendant patient care responsibilities. Success in IR now requires development of a full clinical practice, including consultations, inpatient admitting privileges, and an outpatient clinic. In addition to technical excellence and innovation, maintaining a comprehensive practice is imperative for interventional radiologists to compete successfully for patients and referral bases. A structured approach to periprocedural care, including routine follow-up and early identification and management of complications, facilitates efficient and thorough management with an emphasis on quality and patient safety.

  15. Quality control procedures of dental diagnostic radiology systems; Elaboracao de um procedimento para controle de qualidade em sistemas de radiodiagnostico odontologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Paula Serra Sasaki

    2007-07-01

    This work presents quality control reference procedures for dental diagnostic radiology systems, following the recommendations of the Publication 453 of the Brazilian Health Ministry (PF453), to be applied in dental clinics, in order to achieve an improvement in the radiological image qualities and the patient dose reduction. All tests were applied in an intraoral X rays system, following the methodology developed and the requirements of the PF 453. In order to verify the best quality of the image in relation to the smaller exposition time an object test was also developed in this work. The use of this object allowed the reduction of the exposition time of 0.5 seconds, the maximum value of the linear region of the characteristic curve, for 0.2 seconds. The tested X rays system showed a very good agreement with the applied procedures, detaching the reduction of the skin entrance dose using the film-holding devices. However, the size of the field increased and exceeded the maximum value of 6 cm recommended in the standard. The importance of the quality control in dental diagnostic radiology systems is essential due to the constant use of X radiation in dental clinics. The PF453 recommends the frequency of at least two years for the constancy tests. However, it is suggested that the professional, surgeon-dentist, should be responsible for the internal control of the image quality obtained from the X rays device. This can be done through monthly exposures of the object test developed in this work. (author)

  16. 12 CFR 550.140 - Must I adopt and follow written policies and procedures in exercising fiduciary powers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures in exercising fiduciary powers? 550.140 Section 550.140 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FIDUCIARY POWERS OF SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS Exercising Fiduciary Powers § 550.140 Must I adopt and follow written policies and procedures in exercising fiduciary powers? You...

  17. DRG and OPS-301: effects on the performed procedure capture in radiology; DRG und OPS-301: Auswirkungen auf die Leistungserfassung in der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen-Meyer, S.; Wieser, B.; Huber, S.; Wirth, S.; Treitl, M.; Hartmannsgruber, A.; Witt, C.; Kaysser, A.M.; Kuettner, B.; Hoffmann, R.T.; Reiser, M. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie (Germany); Werner, M. [Siemens AG, Geschaeftsfeld Medizintechnik, Wien (Austria)

    2005-08-01

    Reimbursement for inpatient services rendered based on comparable daily care rates, case-based flat rates, and special fees as practiced until now has been replaced by the system of diagnosis-related groups. Up until 2004, operation and procedure system (OPS 301) codes could be processed completely automatically by appropriate adaptation of the radiology information system (RIS). Because of further differentiation of OPS codes in the 2005 version, it is no longer possible to unambiguously determine OPS codes automatically. Our goal was to fulfill these additional requirements with as little extra effort as possible. In 36 of 2138 procedures during an observation period of 12 days, i.e., 4/day, manual input on the part of the radiology technical assistant and quality assurance by the diagnosing physician were necessary. This is only needed in complicated procedures for which the minor added effort is negligible in comparison to the entire effort expended for the procedure. We were thus able to achieve the goal of near automation of ascertaining OPS codes. (orig.) [German] Die bisherige Erstattung stationaerer Krankenhausleistungen auf Basis tagesgleicher Pflegesaetze, Fallpauschalen und Sonderentgelte ist durch das Diagnosis-related-groups- (DRG-)System abgeloest worden. Operationen- und Prozeduren- (OPS-)Schluessel 301 konnten in der Radiologie bis 2004 mit entsprechender Anpassung des ''Radiologie-Informations-System'' (RIS) vollautomatisiert erfasst werden. Durch die immer feinere Differenzierung der OPS-Codes in der Version 2005 ist eine eindeutige Ermittlung der OPS-Codes jedoch nicht mehr vollautomatisch moeglich. Ziel ist es, diese zusaetzlichen Aufgaben mit so wenig Mehraufwand wie moeglich zu erbringen. Bei 36 von 2138 Verfahren waren in einem Beobachtungszeitraum von 12 Tagen, d. h. 4/Tag, manuelle Eingaben durch die MTRA sowie eine Qualitaetskontrolle durch den befundenden Arzt notwendig. Dies ist nur bei aufwaendigen Verfahren noetig

  18. Micro Declared Language Policy or Not?: Language-Policy-Like Statements in the Rules of Procedure of the Rwandan Parliament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafaranga, Joseph; Niyomugabo, Cyprien; Uwizeyimana, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    An invitation to integrate macro and micro level analyses has been extended to researchers as this integration is felt to be the way forward for language policy research (Ricento, Ideology, politics and language policies: Focus on english, John Benjamins, Amsterdam, 2000). In turn, the notion of 'micro' in language policy has been specified as…

  19. Policy and procedures for classification of Class III groundwater at UMTRA Project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed groundwater regulations for the US Department of Energy's )DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. These regulations allow the application of supplemental standards at UMTRA Project sites in specific situations. The designation of groundwater as Class III permits the application of supplemental standards. This document discusses a final UMTRA Project policy and procedures for identifying Class III groundwater, including identification of a review area, definition of water quality, quantification of aquifer yield, and identification of methods reasonably employed for public water supply systems. These items, either individually or collectively, need to be investigated in order to determine if groundwaters at UMTRA Project sites are Class III. This document provides a framework for the DOE to determine Class III groundwaters

  20. Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Picture yourself in L.A. Register now SIR Essentials Purchase/register Search SIR's entire catalog for educational ... Quality Improvement Clinical practice MACRA Matters Health Policy, Economics, Coding Toolkits Society of Interventional Radiology 3975 Fair ...

  1. Generic Procedures for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency at Triga Research Reactors. Attachment 1 (2011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The publication provides guidance for response to emergencies at TRIGA research reactors in Threat Category II and III. It contains information on the unique behaviour of TRIGA fuel during accident conditions; it describes design characteristics of TRIGA research reactors and provides specific symptom-based emergency classification for this type of research reactor. This publication covers the determination of the appropriate emergency class and protective actions for a nuclear or radiological emergency at TRIGA research reactors. It does not cover nuclear security at TRIGA research reactors. The term 'threat category' is used in this publication as described in Ref. [6] and for the purposes of emergency preparedness and response only; this usage does not imply that any threat, in the sense of an intention and capability to cause harm, has been made in relation to facilities, activities or sources. The threat category is determined by an analysis of potential nuclear and radiological emergencies and the associated radiation hazard that could arise as a consequence of those emergencies. STRUCTURE. The attachment consists of an introduction which defines the background, objective, scope and structure, two sections covering technical aspects and appendices. Section 2 describes the characteristics of TRIGA fuel in normal and accident conditions. Section 3 contains TRIGA research reactor specific emergency classification tables for Threat Category II and III. These tables should be used instead of the corresponding emergency classification tables presented in Ref. [1] while developing the emergency response arrangements at TRIGA research reactors. The appendices present some historical overview and typical general data for TRIGA research reactor projects and the list of TRIGA installations around the world. The terms used in this document are defined in the IAEA Safety Glossary and the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors.

  2. Dosimetry in medical specialist in procedures of interventionist radiology; Dosimetria en medico especialista en procedimientos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaona, E. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Xochimilco, Calz. del Hueso 1100, Col. Villa Quietud, 04960 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vazquez V, J. A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Izeta G, A. C. [Hospital Central Militar, Periferico y Av. Ejercito Nacional s/n, 11200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin V, J. C. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Instituto de Fisica, Loma del Bosque 103, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Arreola, M., E-mail: gaen1310@correo.xoc.uam.mx [Shands Hospital at University of Florida, Department of Radiology, PO Box 100374, Gainesville, FL 32610-0374 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    In this work are presented the experimental results of determining the dose in different body parts, measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters, to medical specialists of implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker. The medical personnel in ten intervention procedures were controlled according to the procedure type, pathological indication, fluoroscopy time and machine generating estimates of the patient doses. The doses to the extremities of the cardiologist were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The domains of first level in the hand are in the index finger of the left and the right hand. The medium doses of the skin in the eyes, a report of the dose received during each type of intervention procedure in the glandular thyroid and fingers of the cardiologists is made. The results represent the integrated dose to the cardiologist, received during the implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker in the same patient. By a half time of detection of 70 minutes for patient, the half dose of the skin, received for the right and left hand, ascended to 1,4 mSv, under the glove. In conclusion, the dose average for the dosimeters of the thyroid gland and forehead was varied from 0,41 up to 1,14 mSv for study. The exposure to the X-rays is a topic to consider, more important every time on the development of systematic procedures little invasive, including the angiography, catheter, worker and patient. (Author)

  3. Protection of the unborn child in diagnostic and interventional radiological procedures; Schutz des ungeborenen Lebens bei diagnostischen und interventionellen radiologischen Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, A.; Prosch, H.; Karanikas, G.; Trattnig, S. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Homolka, P. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Zentrum fuer medizinische Physik und biomedizinische Technik, Wien (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The radiation exposure of an unborn child should be principally avoided, whenever it is medically reasonably possible; therefore, the identification of pregnant patients is the first and the most important step in radiation protection of the unborn child. However, in cases of emergency saving the life of the patient has a higher priority than the radiation protection of the unborn child. In this review article, we present a longitudinal section through the national and international literature and guidelines as a basis for radiological management of a (possibly) pregnant patient. We also list some radiological procedures recommended in the literature for a series of maternal indications considering the contraindications of each method during pregnancy and radiation protection of the unborn child. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlenexposition eines ungeborenen Kindes ist prinzipiell, wann immer dieses medizinisch sinnvoll moeglich ist, zu vermeiden. Daher ist die Identifizierung der schwangeren Patientinnen der erste und wichtigste Schritt zum Strahlenschutz des ungeborenen Kindes. In einer Notfallsituation hat allerdings das Leben der Patientin hoechste Prioritaet. In dieser Uebersichtsarbeit praesentieren wir einen Laengsschnitt durch die nationale und internationale Literatur und Leitlinien, die als Grundlage fuer das radiologische Management einer (moeglicherweise) schwangeren Patientin angewendet werden kann. Wir stellen auch einige in der Literatur empfohlene radiologische Verfahren fuer eine Reihe von Indikationen in der Schwangerschaft vor. Dabei werden sowohl die Kontraindikationen der jeweiligen Methode waehrend der Schwangerschaft als auch der Strahlenschutz des ungeborenen Kindes beruecksichtigt. (orig.)

  4. Radiology today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, M.W.; Heuck, F.H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The book encompasses the proceedings of a postgraduate course held in Salzburg in June 1980. 230 radiologists from 17 countries discussed here the important and practical advances of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and ultrasound as they contribute to gastrointestinal, urologic, skeletal, cardiovascular, pediatric, and neuroradiology. The book contains 55 single contributions of different authors to the following main themes: Cardiovascular, Radiology, pulmonary radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, urinary tract radiology, skeletal radiology, mammography, lymphography, ultrasound, ENT radiology, and neuroradiology. (orig./MG)

  5. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  6. Handling of overexposed persons in radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this standard procedure of the criteria in case of radiological emergencies is to describe the standard procedures used to define an radiological accident in terms of the doses received, and to describe the medical procedures for diagnoses and treatment of health hazards caused by external and internal irradiation in radiological emergencies

  7. 41 CFR 301-70.600 - What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to threatened law enforcement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to threatened law enforcement/investigative employees? 301-70.600 Section 301-70.600 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY...

  8. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  9. Dosimetry in Interventional Radiology - Effective Dose Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Jarvinen, H.; Nikodemova, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    Interventional radiological procedures can lead to significant radiation doses to patients and to staff members. In order to evaluate the personal doses with respect to the regulatory dose limits, doses measured by dosimeters have to be converted to effective doses (E). Measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) using a single unshielded dosimeter above the lead apron can lead to significant overestimation of the effective dose, while the measurement with dosimeter under the apron can lead to underestimation. To improve the accuracy, measurements with two dosimeters, one above and the other under the apron have been suggested ( d ouble dosimetry ) . The ICRP has recommended that interventional radiology departments develop a policy that staff should wear two dosimeters. The aim of this study was to review the double dosimetry algorithms for the calculation of effective dose in high dose interventional radiology procedures. The results will be used to develop general guidelines for personal dosimetry in interventional radiology procedures. This work has been carried out by Working Group 9 (Radiation protection dosimetry of medical staff) of the CONRAD project, which is a Coordination Action supported by the European Commission within its 6th Framework Program.(author)

  10. Radiological and administrative criteria and procedures required by the Radiation Protection Ordinance for exemption from regulatory control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkholz, W.

    2000-01-01

    The system of required radioactivity measurements and limits as well as methods, based on the 10 μSv concept, constitutes the regulatory regime for exemption of radioactive waste materials from regulatory control according to atomic energy law. The methods and administrative procedures are suitable both for smaller amounts of materials, such as those resulting from the use of radioactive substances in scientific research and medical applications, and for the large waste volumes emanating from the dismantling of nuclear installations. The system provided for in the Radiation Protection Ordinance ensures harmonized administrative action of all public authorities involved. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Value of levels of complexity in the estimation of the risk in interventional radiology procedures; Valor de los indices de complejidad en la estimacion del riesgo en procedimientos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Cruces, R.; Vano, E.; Hernandez Armas, J.; Carrera Magarino, F.; Rosales, F.; Galan, P.; Solar, M. M.; Perez Martinez, M.; Sanchez Casanueva, R.; Moreno Saiz, C.; Caudepon, F.; Diaz, F.; Gallego Solar, J. J.; Martin-Palanca, A.; Ruiz Munoz-Canela, J. J.; Moreno Rodriguez, F.; Gonzalez de Garay, M.; Canis, M.; Lopez Medina, A.; Moreno Sachez, T.; Pastor Vega, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The interventional Radiology (IR) refers to guided procedures with X rays, to develop a diagnostic and/or therapeutic action both in vascular diseases as non-vascular. The progressive increase in the complexity and diversity of interventional procedures make it difficult to objectify the criteria about the dosage provided to patients who are these techniques. Control of radiation doses administered to patients to limit the risks associated with the use of x-rays is not more than one way of improving procedures. For this reason, already completed the ERRAPRI project, we have developed complexity rates to better assess the radiological risk associated with the procedures carried out in a sample of Spanish hospitals. (Author)

  12. Needle stick injury in a radiology department: a decade analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayani, R.; Rajani, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of needle stick injury in health care workers of radiology department. Study type, settings and duration: Cross sectional, observational study conducted at the Radiology department of Aga Khan University hospital from January 2000 to May 2010. Subject and Methods: All self-reported needle stick injuries data of Health care workers of radiology department was recorded. The personnel involved (Radiologist, resident, radiographer, nurses etc), area of working and the causes of injury were identified including the procedural or post procedural details. Patient's status of hepatitis or blood borne infection was also noted. Data was recorded and analyzed in Excel worksheet. Results: A total of 55 health workers reported needle stick injuries at all sections of radiology departments with maximum number needle stick injuries at general radiography, fluoroscopy and IVP section. Radiographers and radiology residents received the maximum number of injuries. Major cause of injury was cannulation however, many injuries occurred during disposing or handling of bin. In majority of cases the patients were not infected with any known blood borne infections. Conclusions: Doctors and nurses get needle-stick injuries while carrying out clinical procedures, while, ancillary staff get infected post procedure during disposal of garbage. Policy message: Good occupational health and safety practices must be promoted to all staff. Safer disposal of needles is an important area where practice and procedure needs to be carefully reviewed. It is necessary to undertake a risk assessment, to offer counseling and Post Exposure Prophylaxis and treatment where necessary. (author)

  13. Implementation of the procedure of high radiation of the forum about radiological protection in the health care environment; Implantacion del procedimiento de alta radiologica del foro sobre proteccion radiologica en el medio sanitario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro Novais, J.; Pardo Perez, E.; Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Maldonado Suarez, A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present the results of the implementation in our hospital the procedure of high radiological in patients treated with 131 I described in the document presented by the Forum on Radiation Protection in the Health Environment formed by the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear and the Spanish societies of Fisica Medica and Proteccion Radiologica. (Author)

  14. Study of the radiological procedures used in odontologic clinics of Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil; Estudo dos procedimentos radiologicos nos consultorios odontologicos de Boa Vista, Roraima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Jaberson Luiz Leitao

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiological procedures used at the odontologic clinics of Boa Vista, Roraima-Brazil. The following parameters were recorded: field diameter, half value layer, total filtration, discrepancy between the preset and the applied kilovoltage and exposure time. Dose to the patient's skin from radiography of the upper molar tooth was also estimated. The results showed that 78% of the inspected units had field diameters larger than 6,0 cm, which is outside the limits recommended by the Brazilian Health Ministry. The results also showed that 14% of the equipment presented a discrepancy of more than 10% between preset and applied kilovoltage. On the other hand, the discrepancy between preset and applied exposure time is higher than 10% in 70% of the tested units. The total filtration of 77% units is lower than 1,5 mm of Al, a value recommended by the Brazilian Health Ministry for equipment that operates in the range of 50 kV to 70 kV. The survey also indicates that for 35% of the units the entrance dose in high than 3,5 mGy that is the reference value established by the Brazilian Health Ministry for dental radiography with film type. It was observed that the majority of the clinics use neither aprons nor collars for patients and that films are processed manually, without controlling temperature or processing time. Based on the results obtained it is strongly recommended that a quality control program be implemented in dental radiological clinics in Boa Vista, Roraima. (author)

  15. Remediation strategies after nuclear or radiological accidents: part 2 - accident scenarios for assessing effectiveness of cleanup procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R.

    2009-01-01

    The selection of protective measures and remediation strategies after an accident needs to be based on previously established criteria, to minimize unnecessary stress and the exposures involved in cleanup operations that are not effective in reducing doses to the public. In a first stage, a database describing the countermeasures has been developed including their efficiency on removing contamination from surfaces. However, to assess the effectiveness of cleanup procedures in reducing doses to members of the public, it was necessary to derive specific scenarios in order to simulate the long term behavior of the material in the environment, since the contribution of different surfaces to doses changes with time after contamination. A basic release and exposure scenario was developed to assess the dose reduction due to the mostly used procedures. Exposure scenarios were selected to fit the surroundings of the Brazilian nuclear power plants in Angra dos Reis. Simulations were performed using SIEM, the integrated system for dose assessment after contamination events, developed at IRD. The contamination of urban environments was assessed for Cs-137, as this was found to be the most relevant long term radionuclide to contribute to doses to member of the public. The effects on reducing external exposures were assessed for periods up to 50 years after the contamination. For agricultural areas, the focus was on ingestion doses from contamination with I-131 for periods up to 1 year after contamination. Results will be complemented on the database in order to support multi-criteria decision making processes after accidents. (author)

  16. Remediation strategies after nuclear or radiological accidents: part 2 - accident scenarios for assessing effectiveness of cleanup procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Instalacoes Nucleares], e-mail: erochedo@cnen.gov.br; Silva, Diogo N.G.; Wasserman, Maria A.V.; Conti, Luiz F.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: dneves@ird.gov.br, e-mail: angelica@ird.gov.br, e-mail: lfcconti@ird.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The selection of protective measures and remediation strategies after an accident needs to be based on previously established criteria, to minimize unnecessary stress and the exposures involved in cleanup operations that are not effective in reducing doses to the public. In a first stage, a database describing the countermeasures has been developed including their efficiency on removing contamination from surfaces. However, to assess the effectiveness of cleanup procedures in reducing doses to members of the public, it was necessary to derive specific scenarios in order to simulate the long term behavior of the material in the environment, since the contribution of different surfaces to doses changes with time after contamination. A basic release and exposure scenario was developed to assess the dose reduction due to the mostly used procedures. Exposure scenarios were selected to fit the surroundings of the Brazilian nuclear power plants in Angra dos Reis. Simulations were performed using SIEM, the integrated system for dose assessment after contamination events, developed at IRD. The contamination of urban environments was assessed for Cs-137, as this was found to be the most relevant long term radionuclide to contribute to doses to member of the public. The effects on reducing external exposures were assessed for periods up to 50 years after the contamination. For agricultural areas, the focus was on ingestion doses from contamination with I-131 for periods up to 1 year after contamination. Results will be complemented on the database in order to support multi-criteria decision making processes after accidents. (author)

  17. The Devil Is in the Details: Development of Policy and Procedure in the Battle River Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleddie, Doug L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Guidelines from a variety of jurisdictions for the health-promoting schools (HPS) approach include healthy school policy as a critical element. Research also supports the importance of policy; however, there seems to be a lack of information on how to develop and implement policy. The article examines the processes involved in one…

  18. The development and application of an integrated radiological risk assessment procedure using time-dependent probabilistic risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurens, J.M.; Thompson, B.G.J.; Sumerling, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the past decade, the UKDoE has funded the development of an integrated assessment procedure centred around probabilistic risk analysis (p.r.a.) using Monte Carlo simulation techniques to account for the effects of parameter value uncertainty, including those associated with temporal changes in the environment over a postclosure period of about one million years. The influence of these changes can now be incorporated explicitly into the p.r.a. simulator VANDAL (Variability ANalysis of Disposal ALternatives) briefly described here. Although a full statistically converged time-dependent p.r.a. will not be demonstrated until the current Dry Run 3 trial is complete, illustrative examples are given showing the ability of VANDAL to represent spatially complex groundwater and repository systems evolving under the influence of climatic change. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  19. Parallel analysis of film and TLD application in personal dosimetry of medical staff during application of invasive radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misovic, M.; Boskovic, Z.; Spasic-Jokic, V.

    1997-01-01

    Although both types of dosimeters showed similar results for mentioned category of health care workers we wished to emphasize some advantages in use of TLD and film dosemeters in personal dosimetry. The main advantageous of film for dosimetric purposes are that it can provide visual representation of the radiation field and they are cheap, but there are lot of disadvantages. Advantages of TLD are based on: possibility for re-use, practically for whole users working life, small dimensions suitable for results, high precision and specially wide dose range. They are sensitive on low dose, practically for ten times more than film is. Disadvantages of TLD are based on their previous thermal and radiation history and on the fact that information about dose disappears after reading procedure. Considering advantages and disadvantages of both types of dosemeters we decided to propose TLD for routine hospital practice in personal dosimetry. (author)

  20. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  1. Applying 'Evidence-Based Medicine' Theory to Interventional Radiology.Part 2: A Spreadsheet for Swift Assessment of Procedural Benefit and Harm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacEneaney, Peter M.; Malone, Dermot E.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To design a spreadsheet program to analyse interventional radiology (IR) data rapidly produced in local research or reported in the literature using 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM) parameters of treatment benefit and harm. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Microsoft Excel TM was used. The spreadsheet consists of three worksheets. The first shows the 'Levels of Evidence and Grades of Recommendations' that can be assigned to therapeutic studies as defined by the Oxford Centre for EBM. The second and third worksheets facilitate the EBM assessment of therapeutic benefit and harm. Validity criteria are described. These include the assessment of the adequacy of sample size in the detection of possible procedural complications. A contingency (2 x 2) table for raw data on comparative outcomes in treated patients and controls has been incorporated. Formulae for EBM calculations are related to these numerators and denominators in the spreadsheet. The parameters calculated are benefit -- relative risk reduction, absolute risk reduction, number needed to treat (NNT). Harm -- relative risk, relative odds, number needed to harm (NNH). Ninety-five per cent confidence intervals are calculated for all these indices. The results change automatically when the data in the therapeutic outcome cells are changed. A final section allows the user to correct the NNT or NNH in their application to individual patients. RESULTS: This spreadsheet can be used on desktop and palmtop computers. The MS Excel TM version can be downloaded via the Internet from the URL ftp://radiography.com/pub/TxHarm00.xls. CONCLUSION: A spreadsheet is useful for the rapid analysis of the clinical benefit and harm from IR procedures. MacEneaney, P.M. and Malone, D.E

  2. Fiscal policy surveillance in the enlarged European Union: Procedural checks or simple arithmetic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, Nico; Batten, Jonathan A.; Kearney, Colm

    2006-01-01

    In its recommendation on the 2004 update of the Broad Economic Policy Guidelines (BEPGs), the European Commission (2004) issued country-specific recommendations for fiscal policy in the Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries that have recently joined the European Union (EU) (henceforth the

  3. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  4. Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Guidelines: Update of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Policies and Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Moyer, Virginia; Grossman, David; Ebell, Mark; Woo, Meghan; Miller, Therese; Brummer, Tana; Chowdhury, Joya; Kato, Elisabeth; Siu, Albert; Phillips, William; Davidson, Karina; Phipps, Maureen; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) provides independent, objective, and scientifically rigorous recommendations for clinical preventive services. A primary concern is to avoid even the appearance of members having special interests that might influence their ability to judge evidence and formulate unbiased recommendations. The conflicts of interest policy for the USPSTF is described, as is the formal process by which best practices were incorporated to update the policy. The USPSTF performed a literature review, conducted key informant interviews, and reviewed conflicts of interest policies of ten similar organizations. Important findings included transparency and public accessibility; full disclosure of financial relationships; disclosure of non-financial relationships (that create the potential for bias and compromise a member's objective judgment); disclosure of family members' conflicts of interests; and establishment of appropriate reporting periods. Controversies in best practices include the threshold of financial disclosures, ease of access to conflicts of interest policies and declarations, vague definition of non-financial biases, and request for family members' conflicts of interests (particularly those that are non-financial in nature). The USPSTF conflicts of interest policy includes disclosures for immediate family members, a clear non-financial conflicts of interest definition, long look-back period and application of the policy to prospective members. Conflicts of interest is solicited from all members every 4 months, formally reviewed, adjudicated, and made publicly available. The USPSTF conflicts of interest policy is publicly available as part of the USPSTF Procedure Manual. A continuous improvement process can be applied to conflicts of interest policies to enhance public trust in members of panels, such as the USPSTF, that produce clinical guidelines and recommendations. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine

  5. Radiation control standards and procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-12-14

    This manual contains the Radiation Control Standards'' and Radiation Control Procedures'' at Hanford Operations which have been established to provide the necessary control radiation exposures within Irradiation Processing Department. Provision is also made for including, in the form of Bulletins'', other radiological information of general interest to IPD personnel. The purpose of the standards is to establish firm radiological limits within which the Irradiation Processing Department will operate, and to outline our radiation control program in sufficient detail to insure uniform and consistent application throughout all IPD facilities. Radiation Control Procedures are intended to prescribe the best method of accomplishing an objective within the limitations of the Radiation Control Standards. A procedure may be changed at any time provided the suggested changes is generally agreeable to management involved, and is consistent with department policies and the Radiation Control Standards.

  6. Textbook of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, C.E.; Ravin, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book is presented in two volumes, standard textbook of imaging, conclusive and totally up-to-date. This provides information organized by major topics covering the state-of-the-art for all imaging procedures. The volume 1 presents radiologic physics and technology by discussing roentgenography, ultrasound, CT, nuclear medicine, MRI, and positron emission tomography. The volume 2 studies pulmonary radiology, imaging of the skeletal and central nervous systems, uroradiology, abdominal and cardiac imaging, and imaging of the pelvis

  7. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  8. 78 FR 47047 - Proposed Policy for Discontinuance of Certain Instrument Approach Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... the cancellation of certain Non-directional Beacon (NDB) and Very High Frequency (VHF) Omnidirectional... approach procedures. The FAA proposes specific criteria to guide the identification and selection of... selection of potential NDB and VOR procedures for cancellation. Once the criteria are established and the...

  9. Fair play in energy policy decisions: Procedural fairness, outcome fairness and acceptance of the decision to rebuild nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visschers, Vivianne H.M.; Siegrist, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To raise public acceptance of new energy policies, promoting the fairness of the outcomes and of the decision-making procedure has been suggested. Very few studies have examined the role of fairness in public acceptance of rebuilding nuclear power plants. Therefore, using a large mail survey, we investigated the public’s acceptance of the decision to rebuild nuclear power plants in Switzerland by 2020. The study examined the influence of procedural fairness and outcome fairness on the acceptance of this decision, as well as other factors such as risk perception and benefit perception. Additionally, we investigated the moderating influence of general attitudes towards nuclear power on the relation between fairness and decision acceptance. Results indicated that outcome fairness strongly increased decision acceptance, along with general attitudes towards nuclear power and perceived economic benefits. Procedural fairness had only a small impact on decision acceptance. The influence of fairness on decision acceptance did not seem to depend on general nuclear attitudes. Our findings imply that, in the case of rebuilding nuclear power plants, perceived benefits and outcome fairness are important determinants of acceptance of the decision, while procedural fairness only has a limited impact. - Highlights: ► We investigated the role of fairness in the acceptance of a nuclear policy decision. ► Outcome fairness strongly influenced decision acceptance regarding nuclear power plants. ► The role of procedural fairness was relatively small in this respect. ► Also, nuclear attitudes and perceived economic benefits affected decision acceptance. ► Outcome fairness seems more relevant for decision acceptance than procedural fairness.

  10. Radiological English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribes, R. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba (Spain). Servicio de Radiologia; Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Div. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  11. Radiological English

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribes, R.; Ros, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  12. 76 FR 66721 - New Policies and Procedural Requirements for the Electronic Submission of Discretionary Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... electronic submission of discretionary grant applications through the government-wide grants application site... Procedural Requirements for the Electronic Submission of Discretionary Grant Applications AGENCY: Division of... requirements for the electronic submission of discretionary grant applications. Overview Information: The...

  13. 77 FR 3102 - Procedures for Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ..., organizational changes, and procurement of routine goods and services. (ii) Issuance of procedural rules, manuals... routine data collection and analysis activities. (vi) Preparation and dissemination of information, including document mailings, publications, classroom materials, conferences, speaking engagements, Web sites...

  14. Radiological assessment and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.; Sohier, A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised

  15. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    The escalating number of radiodiagnostic investigations has, as a consequence, an increase in medical irradiation of patients and of cost of radiological services. Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme in this direction which has issued four technical reports which give practical recommendations on how to rationalize the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations

  16. Comparative analysis of dose levels to patients in radiological procedures guided by fluoroscopy; Analisis comparativo de los niveles de dosis a paciente en procedimientos radiologicos guiados por fluoroscopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Pablo Luis; Fernandez, Manuel; Ramos, Julio A.; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Cons, Nestor, E-mail: pablogll@eresmas.com [Hospital Universitario de Salamanca (Spain). Servicio de Radio fisica y Proteccion Radiologica

    2013-07-01

    This work presents the comparative data of the dose indicators for patient in radiological processes with respect to the values published in the ICRP document. It is analyzed the need for different strategies to communicate to different specialists mechanisms to optimize the radiation beginning with practice by training of second degree level in radiological protection and then, working with them the basics of equipment management to reduce doses without detriment to the welfare purpose.

  17. 78 FR 38989 - New Policies and Procedural Requirements for Electronic Submission of State Plans, and Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    .... Report (FFR). Child Abuse and Neglect State Grant Form SF-425: Federal Financial Part 1. Report (FFR... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families New Policies and..., for Mandatory Grant Programs AGENCY: Office of Administration (OA), Administration for Children and...

  18. 76 FR 18942 - Policies To Promote Rural Radio Service and To Streamline Allotment and Assignment Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... absence of other Tribal-owned or Tribal-oriented media of mass communications in the area, or a showing... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 73 and 74 [MB Docket No. 09-52; FCC 11-28] Policies... Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Commission adopted a number of...

  19. 77 FR 2916 - Policies To Promote Rural Radio Service and To Streamline Allotment and Assignment Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... bidding credit to Tribes with no interests in media of mass communications, for a total maximum bidding.... ADDRESSES: Peter Doyle or Thomas Nessinger, Federal Communications Commission, Media Bureau, Audio Division... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [MB Docket No. 09-52; FCC 11-190] Policies To...

  20. 34 CFR 668.134 - Institutional policies and procedures for requesting documentation and receiving secondary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Immigration-Status Confirmation § 668.134 Institutional policies and... immigration status of applicants for title IV, HEA student financial assistance who claim to meet the... eligible noncitizen until the institution has provided the student the opportunity to submit the...

  1. 78 FR 35909 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Final Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), ACC, BCS, and CLA and the Endocrine Policy Forum (EPF)) indicated... chemicals and drinking water contaminants. G. Other Topics 1. Cost sharing. ACC, CLA, EPF, and CPDA stated... should strictly disallow CBI claims. The ACC, CLA, and EPF commented that FFDCA authorized, and EPA...

  2. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  3. RSVP radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.; Chaffee, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a relative scale of value for pediatric radiology (RSVPR). Neither the HCFA/ACA Relative Value Scale nor the Workload Measurement System developed by Health and Welfare Canada specifically addressed pediatric radiologic examinations. Technical and professional charges for examinations at Children's Hospital Medical Center were reviewed and compared with time and cost analysis. A scale was developed with chest radiography (PA and lateral views) assigned a value of 1. After review by pediatric radiologic technologists, radiologic administrators, pediatric radiologists, and chairs of departments of children's hospitals, this proposed scale was modified to reflect more accurately relative value components of pediatric radiologic and imaging examinations

  4. Radiological Society of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSNA Permissions Librarian Guide Subscriptions & Licensing Free Samples & Online Trial Radiology Legacy Collection Services Promote Your Offerings Manage Your Account Contact Us Agency Guide Pricing Commision Rates Customer Service Contact Us Advertising Editorial Fellowships Policies FAQs ...

  5. Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The present guide endeavours to provide an outline of the type of quality assurance programme to be recommended for (1) routine implementation by those performing radiodiagnostic procedures (medical radiology technicians, medical physicists, and radiologists), (2) for application by the responsible national authorities, and (3) for use by international bodies such as the International Society of Radiology (ISR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  6. Interventional radiology and undesirable effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderitter, M.

    2009-01-01

    As some procedures of interventional radiology are complex and long, doses received by patients can be high and cause undesired effects, notably on the skin or in underlying tissues (particularly in the brain as far as interventional neuroradiology is concerned and in lungs in the case of interventional cardiology). The author briefly discusses some deterministic effects in interventional radiology (influence of dose level, delay of appearance of effects, number of accidents). He briefly comments the diagnosis and treatment of severe radiological burns

  7. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J. [Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reith, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Rummeny, Ernst J. (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2016-08-01

    This exceptional book covers all aspects of diagnostic and interventional radiology within one volume, at a level appropriate for the specialist. From the basics through diagnosis to intervention: the reader will find a complete overview of all areas of radiology. The clear, uniform structure, with chapters organized according to organ system, facilitates the rapid retrieval of information. Features include: Presentation of the normal radiological anatomy Classification of the different imaging procedures according to their diagnostic relevance Imaging diagnosis with many reference images Precise description of the interventional options The inclusion of many instructive aids will be of particular value to novices in decision making: Important take home messages and summaries of key radiological findings smooth the path through the jungle of facts Numerous tables on differential diagnosis and typical findings in the most common diseases offer a rapid overview and orientation Diagnostic flow charts outline the sequence of diagnostic evaluation All standard procedures within the field of interventional radiology are presented in a clinically relevant and readily understandable way, with an abundance of illustrations. This is a textbook, atlas, and reference in one: with more than 2500 images for comparison with the reader's own findings. This comprehensive and totally up-to-date book provides a superb overview of everything that the radiology specialist of today needs to know.

  8. Notification: Audit of EPA’s Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel (2nd notification)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, October 6, 2017 - The EPA OIG plans to expand the scope of preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel.

  9. DoD Program for Stability of Civilian Employment: Policies, Procedures, and Programs Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    history of treatment for mental or emotional problems) .......................................... 91 Severe distortion of limbs and/or spine (e.g., dwarfism ...Cancer-a history of cancer with complete recovery .................. 88 Cancer-undergoing surgical and/or medical treatment ............. 89 Mental...and therefore, the treatment each registrant must receive. e. Activities planning to fill positions through competitive procedures should

  10. 77 FR 72237 - Policies To Promote Rural Radio Service and To Streamline Allotment and Assignment Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ...) (section 307(b)) for new AM construction permits, as well as new FM allotments, in already well- served... petitioners argued that the new procedures ``ignore current marketplace realities,'' causing radio stations to..., whether ``potential services,'' such as vacant FM allotments or granted but unbuilt construction permits...

  11. Routine use of radiologic investigations WHO recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.

    1987-01-01

    The concern for unjustified radiological investigations started in the early fifties when medical irradiation was recognized to be the major source of population exposure to man-made ionizing radiations. This continues to be of major concern to many national and international bodies when analyzing the data on x-ray investigations and attempting to develop measures to limit their use. The Commission of European Communities (CEC) has also been motivated by the same approach - the decrease of the population dose commitment - in the studies made on radiological mass screening within the Member States of the European Community presented at a Technical Workshop held on 4-5 December 1985 in Luxembourg. Although such an approach seems to be appealing to a very large number of people sensitive to the potential hazards represented by ionizing radiations for exposed individuals and their offspring, a number of other factors, with more direct implications for the health authorities, have been recognized in the last 10-15 years as major reasons for limiting the use of radiologic procedures. As such factors are fully recognized and endorsed by WHO policy, and expressed in WHO Technical Reports Nos 689 and 723, this presentation will take into consideration these factors and not the problem of patient and population protection, which is directly implied when the radiologic investigations are limited only to those clinically justified

  12. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  13. Handbooks in radiology: Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    This series of handbooks covers the basic facts, major concepts and highlights in seven radiological subspecialties. ''Nuclear Medicine'' is a review of the principles, procedures and clinical applications that every radiology resident and practicing general radiologist should know about nuclear medicine. Presented in an outline format it covers all of the organ systems that are imaged by nuclear medicine

  14. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  15. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  16. Radiological safety by design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundaker, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Under the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1968, the Food and Drug Administration's Bureau of Radiological Health may prescribe performance standards for products that emit radiation. A description is given of the development of these standards and outlines the administrative procedures by which they are enforced. (author)

  17. 41 CFR 301-75.3 - What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.3 Section 301-75.3... ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL General Rules § 301-75.3 What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel? You must establish...

  18. When Procedural Legitimacy Equals Nothing: Civil Society and Foreign Trade Policy in Brazil and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Rodrigues Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-state actors contribute with inputs to the elaboration of the national interest in trade negotiations, thus enhancing its legitimacy. Nevertheless, does the participation of those actors necessarily equal influence on the part of all segments of civil society on policymaking? To answer the question, I argue that procedural legitimacy should be evaluated not only in relation to the inputs society provides to the State, but should also consider whether officials actually analyse societal contributions in decision-making. I demonstrate the empirical application of the model based upon Brazil's experience in multilateral trade negotiations during the 2000s, using Mexico as a shadow case. I conclude that foreign trade policymaking can only be democratised if, in procedural legitimacy, the State attributes equal weight to contributions from all types of societal actors, including civil society organisations and organised social movements, which tend to have less material resources and power than interest groups such as business associations and labour unions.

  19. FDH radiological design review guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millsap, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information

  20. FDH radiological design review guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millsap, W.J.

    1998-09-29

    These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information.

  1. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme which has issued four technical reports giving practical recommendations on how to rationalise the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations. (author)

  2. Health surveillance of radiological work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauw, H.; Vliet, J.V.D.; Zuidema, H.

    1988-01-01

    Shielding x-ray devices and issuing film badges to radiological workers in 1936 can be considered the start of radiological protection in the Philips enterprises in the Netherlands. Shielding and equipment were constantly improved based upon the dosimetry results of the filmbadges. The problem of radioactive waste led to the foundation of a central Philips committee for radiological protection in 1956, which in 1960 also issued an internal license system in order to regulate the proper precautions to be taken : workplace design and layout, technological provisions and working procedures. An evaluation of all radiological work in 1971 learnt that a stricter health surveillance program was needed to follow up the precautions issued by the license. On one hand a health surveillance program was established and on the other hand all types of radiological work were classified. In this way an obligatory and optimal health surveillance program was issued for each type of radiological work

  3. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    The book presents the radiological manifestations of the maxillodental region in a suitable manner for fast detection and correct diagnosing of diseases of the teeth, soft tissue, and jaws. Classification therefore is made according to the radiological manifestations of the diseases and not according to etiology. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Attention for pediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Cheng Yongde

    2005-01-01

    Radiological interventions possess wide utilization in the diagnosis and treatment for pediatric patients. Pediatric interventional radiology is an important branch of interventional radiology and also an important branch of pediatric radiology. Pediatric interventional radiology has grown substantially over the last 30 years, radiologists closely cooperation with surgeons and other physicians providing a new horizon in the management of pediatric diseases in western countries. It includes pediatric cardiac interventional radiology, pediatric neuro-interventional radiology, pediatric vascular interventional radiology, pediatric nonvascular interventional radiology, pediatric tumor interventional radiology and others. In the United States, every children hospital which owns two hundred beds has to have special trained interventional radiologists in radiologic department installing with advanced digital subtraction angiographic equipment. Interventional therapeutic procedures and diagnostic angiography have been proceeding more and more for the congenital and acquired diseases of children. The promising results give use uprising and interventional therapy as an alternative or a replacement or supplement to surgical operation. Pediatric interventional radiology is rather underdeveloped in China with a few special pediatric interventional radiologist, lack of digital subtraction angiography equipment. Pediatric radiologists have no enough field for interventional procedures such as pediatric neuro-interventional radiology and pediatric vascular interventional radiology. In the contrary adult interventional radiologists do have better interventional jobs in China and Pediatric cardiologists also share the same trend. They perform angiocardiography for congenital heart diseases and treat congenital heart disease with interventional procedures including balloon dilation of valves and vessels, coil embolization of collaterals, patent ducts and other arterial fistulae

  5. Qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins; Qualifizierungsleitlinie der Deutschen Roentgengesellschaft (DRG) und der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Interventionelle Radiologie und minimalinvasive Therapie (DeGIR) zur Durchfuehrung interventionell-radiologischer minimalinvasiver Verfahren an Arterien und Venen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecker, A. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Gross-Fengels, W. [Asklepiosklinik, Hamburg-Harburg (Germany); Haage, P. [Helios-Kliniken, Wuppertal (Germany); Huppert, P. [Klinikum Darmstadt (Germany); Landwehr, P. [Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Loose, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord (Germany); Reimer, P. [Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany); Tacke, J. [Klinikum Passau (Germany); Vorwerk, D. [Klinikum Ingolstadt (Germany); Fischer, J.

    2012-06-15

    The topics covered in the qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins are the following: Practical qualification: aorta iliac vessels and vessels in the upper and lower extremities, kidney and visceral arteries, head and neck arteries, dialysis shunts, veins and pulmonary arteries, aorta aneurysms and peripheral artery aneurysms. Knowledge acquisition concerning radiation protection: legal fundamentals, education and training, knowledge actualization and quality control, definition of the user and the procedure, competence preservation.

  6. Increasing Internal Stakeholder Consensus about a University Science Center's Outreach Policies and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Richard D.

    For decades the United States has tried to increase the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. Educators and policy makers continue to seek strategies to increase the number of students in the STEM education pipeline. Public institutions of higher education are involved in this effort through education and public outreach (EPO) initiatives. Arizona State University opened its largest research facility, the new Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV (ISTB4) in September, 2012. As the new home of the School of Earth & Space Exploration (SESE), ISTB4 was designed to serve the school's dedication to K-12 education and public outreach. This dissertation presents a menu of ideas for revamping the EPO program for SESE. Utilizing the Delphi method, I was able to clarify which ideas would be most supported, and those that would not, by a variety of important SESE stakeholders. The study revealed that consensus exists in areas related to staffing and expansion of free programming, whereas less consensus exist in the areas of fee-based programs. The following most promising ideas for improving the SESE's EPO effort were identified and will be presented to SESE's incoming director in July, 2013: (a) hire a full-time director, theater manager, and program coordinator; (b) establish a service-learning requirement obligating undergraduate SESE majors to serve as docent support for outreach programs; (c) obligate all EPO operations to advise, assist, and contribute to the development of curricula, activities, and exhibits; (d) perform a market and cost analysis of other informational education venues offering similar programming; (3) establish a schedule of fee-based planetarium and film offerings; and (f) create an ISTB4 centric, fee-based package of programs specifically correlated to K12 education standards that can be delivered as a fieldtrip experience.

  7. Transposition of the 97/43 EURATOM directive. Mission on procedures and standard levels of medical examinations using ionizing radiations. The radiological procedures: quality criteria and doses optimization; Transposition de la directive 97/43 Euratom. Mission sur les procedures et les niveaux de reference des examens medicaux utilisant les rayonnements ionisants. Les procedures radiologiques: criteres de qualite et optimisation des doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this report concerns the optimization of radiological practices, to avoid delivering unuseful doses while ensuring an image quality necessary to the obtaining of the desired diagnosis information. (N.C.)

  8. On the risk to low doses (<100 mSv) of ionizing radiation during medical imaging procedures - IOMP policy statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    The science committee of International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) developed a policy statement on the predictions of radiation-induced cancers and cancer deaths in patients exposed to low doses (<100 mSv) of ionizing radiation during medical imaging; this statement has been approved by the IOMP council. In order to attract the attention of medical physicists, an editorial (1) titled 'Risk of Medical Imaging' that includes the said statement has recently been published in Medical Physics journal of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). As stated, IOMP represents 80 national and 6 regional medical physics organizations and 18,000 medical physicists worldwide. The IOMP affiliated bodies/organizations in different countries (such as Association of Medical Physicists of India, AMPI) have been encouraged to reproduce the IOMP statement in their journals/newsletters for the benefit of larger community of medical physicists. The IOMP statement is reproduced below (readers may also go through the supportive literature listed in references). It is hoped that this policy statement will have some deterrent influence on the continued propagation of unproven risk related to medical imaging procedures conducted with small doses.

  9. Occupational exposure in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, H.J.; Lee, K.Y.; Cha, S.H.; Kang, Y.K.; Kim, H.J.; Oh, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to survey of radiation safety control and to measure occupational radiation exposure dose of staff in interventional radiology in Korea. Interventioanl radiology requires the operator and assisting personnel to remain close to the patient, and thus close to primary beams of radiation. Therefore exposure doses of these personnel are significant from a radiological protection point of view. We surveyed the status of radiation safety on interventional radiology of 72 hospitals. The result were that 119 radiation equipments are using in interventional radiology and 744 staffs are composed of 307 radiologists, 116 residents of radiology, 5 general physicians, 171 radiologic technologists and 145 nurses. 81.4% and 20.2 % of operating physicians are using neck collar protector and goggle respectively. The average radiation dose was measured 0.46±0.15 mSv/10 hours fluoroscopy inside examination room in radiation protection facilities. Occupational radiation exposure data on the staff were assessed in interventional radiology procedures from 8 interventional radiology equipments of 6 university hospitals. The dose measurements were made by placing a thermoluminesent dosimeter(TLD) on various body surface of operation and assistant staff during actual interventional radiology. The measured points were the corner of the eyes, neck(on the thyroid) , wrists, chest(outside and inside of the protector), and back. Average radiation equivalent dose of the corner of left eye and left wrist of operating physicians were 1.19 mSv(0.11∼4.13 mSv)/100 minutes fluoroscopy and 4.32 mSv(0.16∼11.0 mSv)/100 minutes fluoroscopy respectively. Average exposure dose may vary depending on the type of procedure, personal skills and the quality of equipment. These results will be contributed to prepare the guide line in interventional radiology in Korea

  10. Issues in radiology related to the new technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkin, M.

    1982-01-01

    A number of interrelated issues facing radiology have been highlighted by our new technologies. The issues discussed in this presentation are: subspecialization of radiology; the use of economic analyses (CEA/CBA) to judge the cost effectiveness of radiologic procedures, the alleged overuse of radiologic examinations; and the need for the diagnostic radiologist to become more actively involved in patient management

  11. 42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards for patients and... qualified full-time, part-time, or consulting radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and... osteopathy who is qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel designated as...

  12. Remote level radiation monitoring system for the brazilian IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor for routine radiation protection procedures and as a support tool in case of radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Jose P.N.; Romero Filho, Christovam R.; Madi Filho, Tufic

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear facilities must monitoring radiation levels to establish procedures for radiological protection staff involving workers and the public. The Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN has 5 important plants and in case of accident in one of them, the Institute keeps operational an Emergency Response Plan (ERP). This document (ERP) is designed to coordinate all procedures to assure safe and secure conditions for workers, environment and the public. One of this plants is the IEA-R1 reactor, it is the oldest nuclear research reactor (pool type) in Latin America, reached it first criticality in September of 1957. The reactor is used 60 hours/week with continuous operation and with nominal power of 3.5 MW, with technical conditions to operate at 5 MW thermal power. This reactor has a Radiological Emergency Plan that establishes the implementation of rules for workers and people living at the exclusion area in the case of an emergency situation. This paper aims to describe the implementation of a computational system developed for remote radiation monitoring, in a continuous schedule of IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor containment building. Results of this action can be used as a support mean in a radiological emergency. All necessary modules for radiation detection, signals conditioners and processing, data acquisition board, software development and computer specifications are described. The data acquisition system operating in the reactor shows readings concerned to radiation environment such as activity, doses and concentration in real time and displays a periodical data bank (Data Base) of this features allowing through the surveillance of the operation records anytime, leading to studies and analysis of radiation levels. Results of this data acquisition are shown by means of computer graphics screens developed for windows environment using Visual Basic software. (author)

  13. MEMO radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1989-01-01

    This radiology volume is a concise handbook of imaging techniques, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy, albeit that the main emphasis is on classic radiology. It offers, for instance, a survey of radiological findings for the most frequent pathological conditions, many overviews of differential diagnosis, a glossary of the technical bases of radiology and so forth. The contents are divided into the following chapters: Physical and biological bases; skeleton; thorax with the subdivisions lungs, heart, mediastinum, and pleura; gastrointestinal tract with the subsections esophagus, small and large intestine; liver; biliary tract; pancreas; retroperitoneal space; kidney; suprarenal glands; bladder; blood vessels, lymph nodes, spleen; mammary glands; female genitals; prostate and scrotum, epididymis and seminal vesicle. (orig./MG) With 23 figs [de

  14. The Future of Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Margulis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been my good fortune to live and practice radiology during a long period of momentous change – to see the transformation of the discipline from a supportive service into a mainstream, essential branch of clinical medicine. I remember wearing red goggles to adapt my vision before performing fluoroscopy; observing the horrible, now thankfully obsolete, practice of ventriculography, which was considered advanced neuroradiology; and performing other, now rarely prescribed procedures, such as double-contrast barium enemas and intravenous pyelography. Witnessing the beginnings of interventional radiology, I suggested its name in an editorial. I also had the good fortune to see the introduction of computed tomography (CT and a technology first known as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Together with fellow members of a committee of the American College of Radiology and editors of prestigious radiological journals, I took part in changing the name of the latter modality to MRI, freeing it from threatening implications. Looking back on these experiences, one lesson stands out above all: Innovation and transformation never cease. Looking forward, it is clear that radiology, along with the rest of medicine, is now undergoing further momentous changes that will affect the future of all those already practicing as well as those yet to start their careers.

  15. Radiological hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the (United Kingdom) National Radiological Protection Board is discussed. The following topics are mentioned: relative contributions to genetically significant doses of radiation from various sources; radon gas in non-coal mines and in dwelling houses; effects of radiation accidents; radioactive waste disposal; radiological protection of the patient in medicine; microwaves, infrared radiation and cataracts; guidance notes for use with forthcoming Ionising Radiations Regulations; training courses; personal dosimetry service; work related to European Communities. (U.K.)

  16. A New Role for Local Police in Radiological Security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    .... Local police agencies have previously not had a formal role in radiological security. This thesis explores policy initiatives, based on community policing principles conducted at the local police level, which will enhance security at locations where radiological materials are kept.

  17. Cardiovascular and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.I. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A symposium of eight short but complete papers giving an overview of interventional radiology is presented. Organized by Dr. William Casarella, this symposium is certainly the most current review of the subject available. This year's cardiovascular section is again heavily weighted toward interventional radiology. Abrams and Doubilet's article on the underutilization of angioplasty is important because it describes the cost effectiveness of this method. Most health planners, right or wrong, have complained about overutilization of diagnostic radiology procedures. In general, the opposite is true for interventional procedures - they are underutilized. If the authors draw the attention of their hospital administrators to these approaches and also produce the data on long-term follow-up for our medical colleagues, interventional radiology may realize its full potential. Articles on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are beginning to appear and this technique seems to have great potential. An important article, which is the first prospective study comparing lung scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, supports the increased use of pulmonary angiography. Finally, an article on complications of percutaneous biliary drainage provokes some discussion of its value for routine preoperative use

  18. Radiological problems in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Lukashenko, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Kazakhstan historical development and available mineral resources have pre-determined a scale of radiological problems in the state. Kazakhstan keeps leading positions in the world in explored uranium resources and hydrocarbon raw. More than five hundred nuclear explosions were performed in various regions of Kazakhstan. There is necessity to carry out remediation actions at the former test sites of Kazakhstan, especially at the Semipalatinsk test-site (STS). But because of the high cost of such actions it should be expedient to carry out them only in case of emergency and inclusion of the former test sites lands to the national economic activity, as in general, under conditions of competent policy of inhabitants, STS doesn't represent a hazard. At the same time, we ought not to lose an invaluable scientific material of test-sites. It is necessary to keep some areas of Semipalatinsk test-site as a rarities, reflected the important stages of the human evolution. Test-sites should be considered as world laboratory for studies of artificial radionuclides behaviour in natural medium. Illustrations of radiation-hazardous objects, of used technologies and procedures, under the Kazakhstan Republic instance, show that main power industries lead to the common increase of radioactivity materials in human environment. Mankind certainly will become aware of fact that industrial activities, under the current level of science and technologies development, will lead to the common increase of radioactivity materials in human environment. Solving of radioecological problems is possible only when people review their approach to a radioactivity, as a whole. Not only specialists involved in this field, but also all local population have to know rules of radiation safety and how reasonable manage with radioactive materials

  19. Radiological containment handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to be used as a reference text. It is meant to be used by the working personnel as a guide for using temporary radiological containments. The installing group and health physics group may vary among organizations but responsibilities and duties will not change. It covers installation and inspection containments; working and operating guidelines; operating requirement; emergency procedures; and removal of containments

  20. Enhanced radiological work planning; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DECKER, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System

  1. Corporate Policies and Procedures on Advertising & Promotion. Report of the Sub-Council on Advertising and Promotion of the National Business Council for Consumer Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Business Council for Consumer Affairs, Washington, DC.

    This report is the result of efforts to encourage thoughtful individual corporate action in maintaining up-to-date internal policies and procedures relating to the functions of advertising and promotion. Information for the report was gathered by sending letters to the chief executives of major national advertisers requesting a personal review of…

  2. Dry run 1: an initial examination of a procedure for the post-closure radiological risk assessment of an underground disposal facility for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, B.G.J.; Broyd, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    A probabilistic risk analysis is demonstrated for a single groundwater release scenario from a repository for intermediate level wastes at a depth of about 150 metres under Harwell. This is the first stage development of an overall methodology which will eventually treat combinations of risks due to multiple release scenarios with parameter values whose uncertainty varies with time. It is shown that upper bound estimates of risk are unlikely to be useful and that the approach to radiological risk assessment based upon 'best estimates' is difficult to justify. Consequently, a full probabilistic risk analysis is necessary although further development of statistical sampling and data acquisition techniques and also of methods for the generation and analysis of site evolution scenarios, is necessary. (author)

  3. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  4. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs [de

  5. Angiography and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The decrease in angiographic procedures as a result of less invasive imaging modalities has been counterbalanced by the rise in interventional radiological techniques. Because the interventional radiologist behaves somewhat like a surgeon, his legal responsibilities also approach those of his surgical colleagues. The basic concerns of negligent malpractice are amplified by the issues of informed consent and vicarious liability. Also, damages resulting from these procedures are costly because of the severity of the injuries. The angiographer must become versed in medicolegal issues of this rapidly evolving specialty

  6. Declining rates of sterilisation reversal procedures in western Australian women from 1990 to 2008: the relationship with age, hospital type and government policy changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama-Alol, Khadra A; Bremner, Alexandra P; Pereira, Gavin; Stewart, Louise M; Malacova, Eva; Moorin, Rachael; Preen, David B

    2017-11-25

    Female sterilisation is usually performed on an elective basis at perceived family completion, however, around 1-3% of women who have undergone sterilisation elect to undergo sterilisation reversal (SR) at a later stage. The trends in SR rates in Western Australia (WA), proportions of SR procedures between hospital types (public and private), and the effects of Federal Government policies on these trends are unknown. Using records from statutory state-wide data collections of hospital separations and births, we conducted a retrospective descriptive study of all women aged 15-49 years who underwent a SR procedure during the period 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2008 (n = 1868 procedures). From 1991 to 2007 the annual incidence rate of SR procedures per 10,000 women declined from 47.0 to 3.6. Logistic regression modelling showed that from 1997 to 2001 the odds of women undergoing SR in a private hospital as opposed to all other hospitals were 1.39 times higher (95% CI 1.07-1.81) and 7.51 times higher (95% CI 5.46-10.31) from 2002 to 2008. There were significant decreases in SR rates overall and among different age groups after the Federal Government interventions. Rates of SR procedures in WA have declined from 1990 to 2008, particularly following policy changes such as the introduction of private health insurance (PHI) policies. This suggests decisions to undergo SR may be influenced by Federal Government interventions.

  7. Plan for radiological security at a university health center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiaman Mendoza, G.M.; Sanchez Riojas, M.M.; Felix JImenez, D.

    1998-01-01

    This work shows a radiological security plan applied to a Basic Radiological Service at a university health center. Factors taken into account were installation designs, equipment operation parameters, work procedures, image system and responsibilities

  8. Stereoscopy in diagnostic radiology and procedure planning: does stereoscopic assessment of volume-rendered CT angiograms lead to more accurate characterisation of cerebral aneurysms compared with traditional monoscopic viewing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Nikolas; Lock, Gregory; Coucher, John; Hopcraft, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Stereoscopic vision is a critical part of the human visual system, conveying more information than two-dimensional, monoscopic observation alone. This study aimed to quantify the contribution of stereoscopy in assessment of radiographic data, using widely available three-dimensional (3D)-capable display monitors by assessing whether stereoscopic viewing improved the characterisation of cerebral aneurysms. Nine radiology registrars were shown 40 different volume-rendered (VR) models of cerebral computed tomography angiograms (CTAs), each in both monoscopic and stereoscopic format and then asked to record aneurysm characteristics on short multiple-choice answer sheets. The monitor used was a current model commercially available 3D television. Responses were marked against a gold standard of assessments made by a consultant radiologist, using the original CT planar images on a diagnostic radiology computer workstation. The participants' results were fairly homogenous, with most showing no difference in diagnosis using stereoscopic VR models. One participant performed better on the monoscopic VR models. On average, monoscopic VRs achieved a slightly better diagnosis by 2.0%. Stereoscopy has a long history, but it has only recently become technically feasible for stored cross-sectional data to be adequately reformatted and displayed in this format. Scant literature exists to quantify the technology's possible contribution to medical imaging - this study attempts to build on this limited knowledge base and promote discussion within the field. Stereoscopic viewing of images should be further investigated and may well eventually find a permanent place in procedural and diagnostic medical imaging.

  9. The radiological technologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologists rely upon the talents of the technologists with whom they work. Indeed, a good technologist will only enhance the radiologist's performance. Radiological technologists no longer solely take radiographs, but are involved in many more detailed areas of imaging, such as computered tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear radiology, ultrasound, angiography, and special procedures. They are also required to make decisions that affect the radiological examination. Besides the degree in radiological technology (RT), advanced degrees in nuclear medicine technology (NMT) and diagnostic medical sonography (RDMS) are attainable. The liability of the technologist is not the same as the radiologist involved, but the liability is potentially real and governed by a subdivision of jurisprudence known as agency law. Since plaintiffs and attorneys are constantly searching for new frontiers of medical liability, it is wise for the radiologist and technologist to be aware of the legalities governing their working relationship and to behave accordingly. The legal principles that apply to this working relationship are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of some relevant and interesting cases that have been litigated

  10. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Radiological Worker II Training, Course 20301 (Live), Course 12909 (Test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jimmy D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Radiological worker training is the basic building block for any additional radiological training you may receive. Upon completing radiological worker training, you will have the basic knowledge needed to work safely, using proper radiological practices, in areas where radiological hazards exist. You will also have a better understanding of the hazards and responsibilities associated with radiological work to help prevent the carelessness that can occur when working continually with or around radioactive material. This course does not qualify you for any specific radiological work. You may be required to take additional training at individual facilities to address facility- and job-specific hazards and procedures.

  12. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Ramon; Khong, Pek-Lan; Ringertz, Hans

    2013-01-01

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  13. Radiology education: a glimpse into the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsbrook, A.F. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andyscarsbrook1@aol.com; Graham, R.N.J. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Perriss, R.W. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The digital revolution in radiology continues to advance rapidly. There are a number of interesting developments within radiology informatics which may have a significant impact on education and training of radiologists in the near future. These include extended functionality of handheld computers, web-based skill and knowledge assessment, standardization of radiological procedural training using simulated or virtual patients, worldwide videoconferencing via high-quality health networks such as Internet2 and global collaboration of radiological educational resources via comprehensive, multi-national databases such as the medical imaging resource centre initiative of the Radiological Society of North America. This article will explore the role of e-learning in radiology, highlight a number of useful web-based applications in this area, and explain how the current and future technological advances might best be incorporated into radiological training.

  14. Radiology education: a glimpse into the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    The digital revolution in radiology continues to advance rapidly. There are a number of interesting developments within radiology informatics which may have a significant impact on education and training of radiologists in the near future. These include extended functionality of handheld computers, web-based skill and knowledge assessment, standardization of radiological procedural training using simulated or virtual patients, worldwide videoconferencing via high-quality health networks such as Internet2 and global collaboration of radiological educational resources via comprehensive, multi-national databases such as the medical imaging resource centre initiative of the Radiological Society of North America. This article will explore the role of e-learning in radiology, highlight a number of useful web-based applications in this area, and explain how the current and future technological advances might best be incorporated into radiological training

  15. The use of Straumann (R) Bone Ceramic in a maxillary sinus floor elevation procedure: a clinical, radiological, histological and histomorphometric evaluation with a 6-month healing period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenken, J.W.F.H.; Bouwman, W.F.; Bravenboer, N.; Zijderveld, S.A.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the quality and quantity of bone formation in maxillary sinus floor elevation procedure using a new fully synthetic biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) consisting of a mixture of 60% hydroxyapatite and 40% of β-tricalcium phosphate (Straumann® Bone Ceramic).

  16. The use of Straumann Bone Ceramic in a maxillary sinus floor elevation procedure: a clinical, radiological, histological and histomorphometric evaluation with a 6-month healing period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenken, J.W.F.H.; Bouwman, W.F.; Bravenboer, N.; Zijderveld, S.A.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; Bruggenkate, C.M. ten

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, we evaluated the quality and quantity of bone formation in maxillary sinus floor elevation procedure using a new fully synthetic biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) consisting of a mixture of 60% hydroxyapatite and 40% of beta-tricalcium phosphate (Straumann Bone Ceramic).

  17. Radiological diagnosis in traumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahm, R.

    2001-01-01

    This loose-leaf publication covers all radiological problems that may possibly occur in accident surgery. The focus is on conventional radiological diagnosis. The physical and technical fundamentals of diagnostic examination methods are discussed, followed by practical hints on radiation protection, technical equipment and quality assurance, as well as accurate information on the procedure of taking and interpreting standard X-ray pictures. The indications for standard X-raying, tomography, CT and MRT are presented in consideration of the radiation exposure incurred by the patient. The reader is also informed on the dynamics and varying morphology of bone fracture healing, potential disturbances of callus formation and reconstruction, as well as on possible complications. The main section of the book discusses injuries of the skull, spinal cord, pectoral girdle, upper arm, elbow and lower arm, wrist and hands, pelvis, hip joint, knee and upper and lower leg, ankle joint and foot, thorax and abdomen. (orig.)

  18. Paediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric interventional radiology (PIR) is a rapidly-growing subspecialty, which offers a wide range of procedures applicable to almost all areas of hospital paediatrics. There are many important differences between paediatric and adult practice in interventional radiology, including disease processes and treatment goals, anatomical considerations, periprocedural patient management, radiation exposure optimisation and legal aspects. The use of retrievable or absorbable interventional devices such as stents will probably become more widespread in PIR practice. Recent advances in the technology of imaging equipment have been accompanied by an increase in the complexity of the work done by the radiographer. These developments present challenges and opportunities related to training and maintenance of skills, staffing arrangements, and the potential for advanced practice. It is likely that specialisation in PIR will become a more common role for radiographers in the future

  19. Radiological control implementation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamley, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program

  20. Digital radiology and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.

    1991-01-01

    With the access to digital methods for handling and processing images in general, many medical imaging methods are becoming more effectively handled digitally. This applies in particular to basically digital techniques such as CT and MR but also now includes Nuclear Medicine (NM), Ultrasound (US) and a variety of radiological procedures such as Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) and Fluoroscopy (DF). The access to conventional projection images by stimulatable plates (CR) or by digitization of film makes all of radiology potentially accessible, and the management of such images by a network is the basic aim of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). However, it is suggested that in order for such systems to be of greater value, that way in which such images are treated needs to change, that is, digital images can be used to derive additional clinical value by appropriate processing

  1. Conventional radiology and genetic dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Vila, V.; Fernandez, A.; Rivera, F.; Martinez, M.; Gomez, A.; Luis, J.

    1992-01-01

    A research project was established in 1984 to evaluate the expected genetic abnormalities due to radiation received by the population attending the Outpatient Radiological Service due to medical radiological practices. The study was conducted in 1985 (12 weeks chosen by random). The equivalent gonadal dose was the chosen parameter, representing the social cost of the radiology. Samples of 2945 men and 2929 women were considered in the study. The number of genetic abnormalities, in relation to the mean age of reproduction (a generation every 30 years), was 2.13 cases per million in the first generation and 15.97 cases per million at equilibrium. The authors interpretation is that both the method and the expected genetic detriment are suitable procedures for the characterisation of the Radiological Service as a radiation source. (author)

  2. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  3. The development by means of trial assessments, of a procedure for radiological risk assessment of underground disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    Seven trials are outlined showing the development and testing of a procedure based upon pra using Monte Carlo simulators, to assess post closure risks from the underground disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The PRA method is found to be more justifiable than the use of 'best estimates'. Problems of accounting for long-term environmental changes and of future human intrusions are discussed. The importance of achieving statistical convergence within practical time scales and resources and of accounting for the influence of different sources of systematic bias is emphasised. (orig.)

  4. Declining rates of sterilization procedures in Western Australian women from 1990 to 2008: the relationship with age, hospital type, and government policy changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama-Alol, Khadra A; Bremner, Alexandra P; Stewart, Louise M; Kemp-Casey, Anna; Malacova, Eva; Moorin, Rachael; Shirangi, Adeleh; Preen, David B

    2016-09-01

    To describe trends in age-specific incidence rates of female sterilization (FS) procedures in Western Australia and to evaluate the effects of the introduction of government-subsidized contraceptive methods and the implementation of the Australian government's baby bonus policy on FS rates. Population-based retrospective descriptive study. Not applicable. All women ages 15-49 undergoing an FS procedure during the period January 1, 1990, to December 31, 2008 (n = 47,360 procedures). Records from statutory statewide data collections of hospitals separations and births were extracted and linked. Trends in FS procedures and the influence on these trends of the introduction of government policies: subsidization of long-acting reversible contraceptives (Implanon and Mirena) and the Australian baby bonus initiative. The annual incidence rate of FS procedures declined from 756.9 per 100,000 women in 1990 to 155.2 per 100,000 women in 2008. Compared with the period 1990-1994, women ages 30-39 years were 47% less likely (rate ratio [RR] = 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-0.72) to undergo sterilization during the period 2005-2008. Adjusting for overall trend, there were significant decreases in FS rates after government subsidization of Implanon (RR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82-0.97) and Mirena (RR = 0.81; 95% CI, 0.73-0.91) and the introduction of the baby bonus (RR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.61-0.81). Rates of female sterilization procedures in Western Australia have declined substantially across all age groups in the last two decades. Women's decisions to undergo sterilization procedures may be influenced by government interventions that increase access to long-term reversible contraceptives or encourage childbirth. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Orthopedic radiology in the postoperative patient (practical orthopedic radiology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, B.N.; Gelman, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    This course examines various aspects of the radiologic examination of postoperative orthopedic patients. The operative indications, pertinent aspects of surgical technique, expected postoperative radiographic appearances, and radiographic findings indicating postoperative complications are discussed. The evaluation of total joint replacement surgery, spinal surgery, lower extremity procedures, and failed orthopedic devices and appliances are covered

  6. Radiological assessement of Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, F.; Palladino, M.; Stella, P.; Barbi, E.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-eight consecutive cases of patients affected by Crohn's disease, with ileum (23/58), colon (10/58) and ileo-colic (25/58) involvement were studied. A good overall sensitivity was reached by the radiological procedures employed (barium meal, barium enema, enterclysis). Enterclysis is proposed as a second-step method for the study of ileum involvement, because it provides a quite precise assessement of disease stage and extent. Some criteria for a rational use of current radiological procedures in follow-up of both surgically and medically treated patients are proposed. Moreover it is suggested that better coordination of anatomo-radiological and clinical aspects could improve the therapeutic approach and prognostic judgement in such cases

  7. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  8. Recommended radiological controls for tritium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, G.

    1992-01-01

    This informal report presents recommendations for an adequate radiological protection program for tritium operations. Topics include hazards analysis, facility design, personnel protection equipment, training, operational procedures, radiation monitoring, to include surface and airborne tritium contamination, and program management

  9. Basic principles of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, Jorge Luiz Soares de; Fajardo, Patricia Wieland.

    1984-07-01

    The fundamentals of radiological protection are presented. The interaction of radiation with matter and with living systems as well as radioprotection procedures and units are described. 6 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs of radioactive wastes from nuclear medicine in Brazil are presented. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Gonad shielding in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The use of gonad shielding is an important radiation protection technique, intended to reduce unnecessary x-ray exposure of the gonads of patients from diagnostic x-ray procedures. This pamphlet will provide physicians and radiologic technologists with information which will aid their appropriate use of gonad shielding

  11. Cardiothoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    A wealth of cardiothoracic websites exist on the internet. What follows is a list of the higher quality resources currently available which should save you time searching them out for yourself. Many of the sites listed cater for undergraduates and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, nevertheless these may also be of interest to specialists in thoracic radiology, particularly for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (April 2005)

  12. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  13. Safety aspects in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D.C. da.

    1991-05-01

    The development of a program for the evaluation of the physical installations and operational procedures in diagnostic radiology with respect to radiation-safety is described. In addition, a proposal for the quality analysis of X-ray equipment and film-processing is presented. The purpose is both to ensure quality and safety of the radiology service, as well as to aid in the initial and in-service training of the staff. Interviews with patients, staff practicing radiology at a wide range of levels and the controlling authorities were carried out in the State of Rio de Janeiro in order to investigate the existence and the effective use of personal radioprotection equipment as well as user's and staff's concern for radiation safety. Additionally physical measurements were carried out in University Hospitals in Rio de Janeiro to assess the quality of equipment in day-to-day use. It was found that in the locations which did not have routine maintenance the equipment was generally in a poor state which lead to a high incidence of repetition of examinations and the consequent financial loss. (author)

  14. Early and long-term clinical and radiological follow-up results of expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Thijs, Maria; Wilms, Guy; Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris; Wilmer, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy and immediate and long-term safety of expanded-tetrafluoroethylene covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in patients with portal hypertension-related complications. A cohort of 56 patients suffering from severe portal hypertension-related complications underwent implantation of an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-graft. All patients suffered from severe liver cirrhosis graded Child-Pugh A (n=8; 16%), B (n=13; 21%) or C (n=35; 63%). In 44 patients, the stent-graft was placed during the initial TIPS procedure (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients, the stent-graft was placed to repermeabilize the previously placed bare stent (TIPS revision). Follow-up was performed with clinical assessment, duplex ultrasound and, if abnormal or inconclusive, with invasive venography and pressure measurements. Per- en immediate post-procedural complications occurred in four patients (4/56, 7%). None of them was lethal. During follow-up, stent occlusion appeared in one patient and stenosis in two; no recurrence of bleeding was noted in all patients treated for variceal bleeding (n=28), and 24 of the 28 patients (86%) suffering from refractory ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were free of regular paracenteses and/or drainage of pleural effusion after shunt creation. The 30-day and global mortality for the total study population (n=56) was, respectively, 7% (n=4) and 28.5% (n=16). In the patient subgroup with variceal bleeding (n=28), 30-day mortality was 3.5% (n=1) and global mortality 14.2% (n=4). In the ascites and/or hydrothorax subgroup (n=28), 8.1% (n=3) mortality at 30 days was found and global mortality was 32.4% (n=12). In 10 patients of the 56 studied patients (18%), isolated hepatic encephalopathy occurred, which was lethal in 4 (Child C) patients (7%). Three of these four patients died within the 1st month after TIPS placement. A very high primary patency rate

  15. Early and long-term clinical and radiological follow-up results of expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Thijs, Maria; Wilms, Guy [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Hepatology, Leuven (Belgium); Wilmer, Alexander [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Medical Intensive Care Unit, Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy and immediate and long-term safety of expanded-tetrafluoroethylene covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in patients with portal hypertension-related complications. A cohort of 56 patients suffering from severe portal hypertension-related complications underwent implantation of an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-graft. All patients suffered from severe liver cirrhosis graded Child-Pugh A (n=8; 16%), B (n=13; 21%) or C (n=35; 63%). In 44 patients, the stent-graft was placed during the initial TIPS procedure (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients, the stent-graft was placed to repermeabilize the previously placed bare stent (TIPS revision). Follow-up was performed with clinical assessment, duplex ultrasound and, if abnormal or inconclusive, with invasive venography and pressure measurements. Per- en immediate post-procedural complications occurred in four patients (4/56, 7%). None of them was lethal. During follow-up, stent occlusion appeared in one patient and stenosis in two; no recurrence of bleeding was noted in all patients treated for variceal bleeding (n=28), and 24 of the 28 patients (86%) suffering from refractory ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were free of regular paracenteses and/or drainage of pleural effusion after shunt creation. The 30-day and global mortality for the total study population (n=56) was, respectively, 7% (n=4) and 28.5% (n=16). In the patient subgroup with variceal bleeding (n=28), 30-day mortality was 3.5% (n=1) and global mortality 14.2% (n=4). In the ascites and/or hydrothorax subgroup (n=28), 8.1% (n=3) mortality at 30 days was found and global mortality was 32.4% (n=12). In 10 patients of the 56 studied patients (18%), isolated hepatic encephalopathy occurred, which was lethal in 4 (Child C) patients (7%). Three of these four patients died within the 1st month after TIPS placement. A very high primary patency rate

  16. Radiological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant has been shown the radiation dose to the public from plant operation to be quite small. Calculations from the reported release rates yield 0.2 mrem whole body dose and 0.6 mrem skin dose for the calendar quarter of maximum release. Radioactivity discharges to the Chesapeake Bay have resulted in detectable concentrations of /sup 110m/Ag, 58 Co, and 60 Co in sediments and shellfish. The area yielding samples with detectable concentrations of plant effluents extends for roughly six miles up and down the western shore, with maximum values found at the plant discharge area. The radiation dose to an individual eating 29 doz oysters and 15 doz crabs (5 kg of each) taken from the plant discharge area would be about 4/1000 mrem whole body dose and 0.2 mrem gastrointestinal tract dose (about 0.007% and 0.5% of the applicable guidelines, respectively.) Comparison of these power plant-induced doses with the fluctuations in natural radiation dose already experienced by the public indicates that the power plant effects are insignificant. The natural variations are tens of times greater than the maximum doses resulting from Calvert Cliffs Power Plant. Although operations to date provide an insufficient basis to predict radiological impact of the Calvert Cliffs Plant over its operational lifetime, available data indicate that the plant should continue to operate with insignificant radiological impact, well within all applicable guidelines

  17. Radiological malpractice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.

    1987-01-01

    As medico-legal statistics show, compared with other branches of medicine, cases of liability of the radiologist or his assistants are relatively rare. The duty to exercise due care as set out in Paragraph 6 of the Austrian penal code or Paragraph 276 of the German civil code, respectively, provide a basic rule of law also for radiology. Due to the risk inherent in the investigation method, incidents in angiography cannot be totally excluded. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that all steps be taken with regard to staff, equipment and drugs to be able to deal with any complications and incidents that may arise. The courts of law require the employer to produce strongest exonerating evidence to prove that the duty to exercise due care in the selection and supervision of the assistants has been duly fulfilled. For the practical execution of radiological investigations of the digestive tract, also the RTA is responsible; her liability when performing an irrigoscopy is particularly great, as perforation of the intestine is often lethal. The introduction of the rectal tube into the vagina by mistake, with resultant injury or death of the patient, will regularly lead to conviction under penal law. (orig.) [de

  18. Establishing diagnostic reference levels in digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bana, Remy Wilson

    2016-04-01

    Medical application of radiation has gained wider study since diagnostic radiology plays a very important role in modern medicine. The need of the service seems to increase since the invention of digital radiology as a new technology that promises greater accuracy while minimizing patient dose. However, it is not exempted in the harmonization of doses delivered to the patient undergoing same radiologic examination in different institutions either regional or nationwide. The objective of this project was to review the establishment of Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) in digital radiology at National level with the aim to reduce patient dose while maintaining appropriate image quality. A general discussion on digital radiology has been presented focusing on the optimization of patient dose as well as dosimetric quantities used for the establishment of DRLs. Recommendations have been provided for Rwanda to initiate steps to establish National Diagnostic Reference Levels for common procedures in digital radiology. (au)

  19. Radiology in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, P.L.; Seltzer, S.E.; Gore, J.C.; Heiiman, R.S.; Abrams, H.L.; Davis, K.A.; Henkelman, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    On the leading edge in ''high-tech'' medicine, radiology is experiencing several revolutions simultaneously that promise an exciting future. New imaging methods and digital technologies not only offer novel ways to view tissues but also provide opportunities for quantitative evaluation of function and even permit determination of metabolic status. New approaches to technology assessment are being explored that alter the ways in which equipment and procedures are introduced into clinical medicine. With the plethora of radiology services available, the radiologist must serve as a consultant in the triage of patients in radiology and the dissemination of information from radiology. For similar reasons, training in diagnostic radiology may eventually accommodate to the concept of specialization along organ-system lines. Without question, radiology is destined for an exciting period as it moves into the 21st century

  20. Radiological protection in a patient during a total body irradiation procedure; Proteccion radiologica en un paciente durante un procedimiento de TBI (irradiacion de cuerpo entero)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez O, J. O.; Hinojosa G, J.; Gomez M, E.; Balam de la Vega, J. A. [The American British Cowdray Medical Center, I. A. P., Sur 128 No. 143, Col. Americas, 01120 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Deheza V, J. C., E-mail: johernandezo@abchospital.co [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. Luis Enrique Erro s/n, Edificio No. 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    A technique used in the Service of Radiotherapy of the Cancer Center of the American British Cowdray Medical Center (ABC) for the bone marrow transplantation, is the total body irradiation. It is known that the dose calculation, for this irradiation type, is old, since the dosimetric calculation is carried out by hand and they exist infinity of techniques for the patients irradiation and different forms of protecting organs of risk, as well as a great uncertainty in the given dose. In the Cancer Center of the ABC Medical Center, was carried out an irradiation procedure to total body with the following methodology: Computerized tomography of the patient total body (two vacuum mattresses in the following positions: dorsal and lateral decubitus), where is combined the two treatment techniques anterior-posterior and bilateral, skin delineate and reference volumes, dose calculation with the planning system Xi O of CMS, dose determination using an ionization chamber and a lung phantom IMRT Thorax Phantom of the mark CIRS and dosimetry in vivo. In this work is presented the used treatment technique, the results, statistics and the actualization of the patient clinical state. (Author)

  1. Paediatric doses from diagnostic radiology in Victoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, T.J.; Cardillo, I.; Einsiedel, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    This study examines doses to paediatric patients from diagnostic radiology. Measurements were made at 29 hospitals and private radiology practices in the state of Victoria. Entrance skin doses in air were measured for the exposure factors used by hospital radiology departments and private radiology practices for a standard size 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old child, for the following procedures: chest AP/PA, lat; abdomen AP; pelvis AP; lumbar spine AP, lat; and skull AP, lat. There was a large range of doses for each particular procedure and age group. Factors contributing to the range of doses were identified. Guidance levels for paediatric radiology based on the third quartile value of the skin entrance doses have been recommended and are compared with guidance levels. Copyright (1998) Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine

  2. Ensuring due process in the IACUC and animal welfare setting: considerations in developing noncompliance policies and procedures for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Barbara C; Gografe, Sylvia; Pritt, Stacy; Jen, Kai-Lin Catherine; McWhirter, Camille A; Barman, Susan M; Comuzzie, Anthony; Greene, Molly; McNulty, Justin A; Michele, Daniel Eugene; Moaddab, Naz; Nelson, Randall J; Norris, Karen; Uray, Karen D; Banks, Ron; Westlund, Karin N; Yates, Bill J; Silverman, Jerald; Hansen, Kenneth D; Redman, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    Every institution that is involved in research with animals is expected to have in place policies and procedures for the management of allegations of noncompliance with the Animal Welfare Act and the U.S. Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. We present here a model set of recommendations for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials to ensure appropriate consideration of allegations of noncompliance with federal Animal Welfare Act regulations that carry a significant risk or specific threat to animal welfare. This guidance has 3 overarching aims: 1 ) protecting the welfare of research animals; 2 ) according fair treatment and due process to an individual accused of noncompliance; and 3 ) ensuring compliance with federal regulations. Through this guidance, the present work seeks to advance the cause of scientific integrity, animal welfare, and the public trust while recognizing and supporting the critical importance of animal research for the betterment of the health of both humans and animals.-Hansen, B. C., Gografe, S., Pritt, S., Jen, K.-L. C., McWhirter, C. A., Barman, S. M., Comuzzie, A., Greene, M., McNulty, J. A., Michele, D. E., Moaddab, N., Nelson, R. J., Norris, K., Uray, K. D., Banks, R., Westlund, K. N., Yates, B. J., Silverman, J., Hansen, K. D., Redman, B. Ensuring due process in the IACUC and animal welfare setting: considerations in developing noncompliance policies and procedures for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials. © FASEB.

  3. Digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is vital to the life-saving efforts of surgeons and other physicians, but precious time can be lost generating the images and transferring them to and from the operating room. Furthermore, hospitals are straining under the task of storing and managing the deluge of diagnostic films produced every year. A 300-bed hospital generates about 1 gigabyte (8 x 10 9 bits) of picture information every day and is legally bound to hold it for three to seven years--30 years in the case of silicosis or black lung disease, illnesses that may have relevance to future lawsuits. Consequently, hospital warehouses are filling with x-ray film and written reports that are important for analysis of patient histories, for comparison between patients, and for analyzing the progress of disease. Yet only a fraction of the information's potential is being used because access is so complicated. What is more, films are easily lost, erasing valuable medical histories

  4. Science and Values in Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Eggermont, G.; Britt-Marie, Drottz Sjoberg; Tirmarche, M.; Geard, Ch.R.; Atkinson, M.; Murith, Ch.; Grant, K.G.; Luccioni, C.; Mays, C.; Sisko, Salomaa; Kelly, N.G.; Oughton, D.; Shannoun, F.; Grant, K.G.; Cooper, J.; Mays, C.; Weiss, V.; Oughton, D.; Kazuo, Sakai; Carroll, S.

    2010-01-01

    protection professionals can better identify and respond to civil society concerns. Session 1: Setting the scene: Holistic presentations of science, values, regulation and public health policy, NGO viewpoints.. An informed view of 'where we stand' on each case topic following the Helsinki workshop. Presentations: Radon as a public health issue (Margot Tirmarche); The continuing story of CT scan risks (Charles R. Geard). Break-out sessions 1. part - Issues surrounding current approaches. This session deepens the discussion and widens the process begun at Helsinki, regarding the new data, phenomena and observations that stimulate us to ask whether current public health and regulatory approaches in each topical area are still adequate, or whether they may need revision. The focus of this session is thus on scientific aspects which may induce a need for paradigm change. Presentation: Radon as a public health issue (Christophe Murith). Evening session 1: Stakeholder platform opportunity (Ola Holmberg). One of the workshop objectives is to foster dialogue between radiological protection professionals, researchers, regulators, and other stakeholders from interested publics in order to deepen discussion on points of interest. In order to maximize stakeholders' benefit in attending the workshop, a platform for communicating and discussing relevant stakeholder views and concerns is offered in this evening context. The on-topic interventions are intended to cover relevant subjects that may not be directly addressed during the rest of the workshop (e.g., risk communication, etc.). This evening session focusses on aspects of dose regulations in radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic fields, ALARA in medicine and other issues related to medical exposures. Discussion is intended to be linked to introductory talk in Session 1 on Public Health Perspective in Radiological Protection in Challenging Topical Areas. Presentation: Paediatric CT examinations in nineteenth developing countries (Kazuko

  5. Radiological protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.

    2003-01-01

    The benefits of ionizing radiation in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, as well as other conditions such as cardiac ablation, are well established. However determination, monitoring, and evaluation of patient doses is not as easy task. Furthermore, radiation doses for individual patients may vary greatly from one radiological procedure to another. Attention is needed to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to patients from All types of radiation producing machines and equipment. The patient risk from radiation injury-stochastic and/or deterministic must be weighted against the benefits of a proper medical examination or treatment as well as the risk of depriving the patient from the necessary medical care. Arbitrary reduction of radiological patient doses without regard to final outcome is determined to proper medical care provided to the patient. Sacrificing image quality in order to reduce patient dose is potentially harmful to the patient as well. Furthermore, the role of radiation exposure incurred from screening procedures such as mammography, needs to be properly considered and differentiated from medically indicated procedures. A known radiation induced risk needs to be balanced against diagnostic efficacy of a screening procedure. In these cases, regulations on standards and guidelines for determination, monitoring, and evaluation of patient doses may be appropriate. In this paper, the technical data collected in the United States have been compared with the corresponding data in Canada. However, even here, it has been recognized that we can not assume that one dose limit fits all. It is advisable to consider individual patient specifics if it means the difference between detection and miss

  6. Beyond Synthesis: Augmenting Systematic Review Procedures with Practical Principles to Optimise Impact and Uptake in Educational Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Chris; Taylor, Celia; Buckley, Sharon; Hean, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Whilst systematic reviews, meta-analyses and other forms of synthesis are considered amongst the most valuable forms of research evidence, their limited impact on educational policy and practice has been criticised. In this article, we analyse why systematic reviews do not benefit users of evidence more consistently and suggest how review teams…

  7. 76 FR 800 - Policy and Procedural Change Regarding the Publication of Notices of Funding Opportunities in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... Web site, http://www.grants.gov , in accordance with the policy directive issued by the Office of... posted at http://www.grants.gov by following the universal resource locator (URL) link included in the synopsis, or by visiting ETA's Web site at http://www.doleta.gov . DATES: Effective Date: January 6, 2011...

  8. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Supporting analyses of human-system interfaces, procedures and practices, training and organizational practices and policies. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L.

    1995-07-01

    A human factors project on the use of nuclear by-product material to treat cancer using remotely operated afterloaders was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the project was to identify factors that contribute to human error in the system for remote afterloading brachytherapy (RAB). This report documents the findings from the second, third, fourth, and fifth phases of the project, which involved detailed analyses of four major aspects of the RAB system linked to human error: human-system interfaces; procedures and practices; training practices and policies; and organizational practices and policies, respectively. Findings based on these analyses provided factual and conceptual support for the final phase of this project, which identified factors leading to human error in RAB. The impact of those factors on RAB performance was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance, and alternative approaches for resolving safety significant problems were identified and evaluated

  9. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Supporting analyses of human-system interfaces, procedures and practices, training and organizational practices and policies. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science & Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    A human factors project on the use of nuclear by-product material to treat cancer using remotely operated afterloaders was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the project was to identify factors that contribute to human error in the system for remote afterloading brachytherapy (RAB). This report documents the findings from the second, third, fourth, and fifth phases of the project, which involved detailed analyses of four major aspects of the RAB system linked to human error: human-system interfaces; procedures and practices; training practices and policies; and organizational practices and policies, respectively. Findings based on these analyses provided factual and conceptual support for the final phase of this project, which identified factors leading to human error in RAB. The impact of those factors on RAB performance was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance, and alternative approaches for resolving safety significant problems were identified and evaluated.

  10. Radiologic image compression -- A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.; Huang, H.K.; Zaremba, L.; Gooden, D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of radiologic image compression is to reduce the data volume of and to achieve a lot bit rate in the digital representation of radiologic images without perceived loss of image quality. However, the demand for transmission bandwidth and storage space in the digital radiology environment, especially picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and teleradiology, and the proliferating use of various imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine, computed radiography, and digital subtraction angiography, continue to outstrip the capabilities of existing technologies. The availability of lossy coding techniques for clinical diagnoses further implicates many complex legal and regulatory issues. This paper reviews the recent progress of lossless and lossy radiologic image compression and presents the legal challenges of using lossy compression of medical records. To do so, the authors first describe the fundamental concepts of radiologic imaging and digitization. Then, the authors examine current compression technology in the field of medical imaging and discuss important regulatory policies and legal questions facing the use of compression in this field. The authors conclude with a summary of future challenges and research directions. 170 refs

  11. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.; Bermudez Jimenez, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  12. 41 CFR 301-71.108 - What internal policies and procedures must we establish for travel authorization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and procedures must we establish for travel authorization? 301-71.108 Section 301-71.108 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Authorization § 301-71.108...

  13. 41 CFR 301-71.309 - What internal policies and procedures must we establish governing travel advances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and procedures must we establish governing travel advances? 301-71.309 Section 301-71.309 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Accounting for Travel Advances § 301...

  14. 41 CFR 301-71.207 - What internal policies and procedures must we establish for travel reimbursement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Claims for Reimbursement... should submit a travel claim (including whether to use a standard form or an agency form and whether the... and procedures must we establish for travel reimbursement? 301-71.207 Section 301-71.207 Public...

  15. Mediation and Due Process Procedures in Special Education: An Analysis of State Policies. Final Report. Project FORUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Eileen M.

    This survey of 50 states and 3 of 10 non-state U.S. jurisdictions concerning state due process procedures focuses mainly on the use of mediation as a form of dispute resolution that offers an alternative to due process hearings in special education. A background section discusses the definition of mediation and the mediation process. Survey…

  16. 48 CFR Appendix I to Chapter 2 - Policy and Procedures for the DOD Pilot Mentor-Protege Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the DOD Pilot Mentor-Protege Program I Appendix I to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... and Procedures for the DOD Pilot Mentor-Protege Program I-100Purpose. (a) This Appendix I to 48 CFR Chapter 2 implements the Pilot Mentor-Protégé Program (hereafter referred to as the “Program”) established...

  17. 75 FR 71391 - Implementation of Conflicts of Interest Policies and Procedures by Swap Dealers and Major Swap...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... regulations establish conflicts of interest requirements for swap dealers (SDs) and major swap participants...-AC96 and SD-MSP Conflicts of Interest, by any of the following methods: Agency Web site, via its... mandates that the required conflicts of interest systems and procedures ``address such other issues as the...

  18. General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training: Program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) and Radiological Worker I and II (RW I and II) Training programs. It includes material development requirements, standards and policies, and program administration. This manual applies to General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training at all DOE contractor sites. The training materials of both GERT and RW I and II training reflect the requirements identified in the DOE Radiological Control Manual and DOE Order 5480.11. The training programs represent the minimum requirement for the standardized core materials. Each contractor shall implement the program in its entirety and may augment the standardized core materials to increase the general employee and radiological worker level of competency

  19. Radiological safety research for nuclear excavation projects - Interoceanic canal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klement, A.W. Jr.

    1969-01-01

    The general radiological problems encountered in nuclear cratering and nuclear excavation projects are discussed. Procedures for assessing radiological problems in such projects are outlined. Included in the discussions are source term, meteorology, fallout prediction and ecological factors. Continuing research requirements as well as pre- and post-excavation studies are important considerations. The procedures followed in the current interoceanic canal feasibility studies provide examples of radiological safety problems, current solutions and needed research. (author)

  20. Radiological safety research for nuclear excavation projects - Interoceanic canal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klement, Jr, A W [U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The general radiological problems encountered in nuclear cratering and nuclear excavation projects are discussed. Procedures for assessing radiological problems in such projects are outlined. Included in the discussions are source term, meteorology, fallout prediction and ecological factors. Continuing research requirements as well as pre- and post-excavation studies are important considerations. The procedures followed in the current interoceanic canal feasibility studies provide examples of radiological safety problems, current solutions and needed research. (author)

  1. Current radiology. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular

  2. Region 8 radiological assistance program team response manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance so that a request for radiological assistance is responded to in an effective and consistent manner. These procedures are specific to the trained and qualified members of the Region 8 Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team. Procedures provide steps for responding to the request, notification and activation of the team members, position descriptions, and checklists

  3. An advanced microcosting system for forecasting and managing radiology expenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenson, R.; Viale, R.; VanDerVoorde, F.

    1985-01-01

    The new prospective payment system encourages hospital cost containment and necessitates understanding actual cost for radiology procedures. The automated microcosting system described in this paper, utilizing data from the Radiology Information Management System, hospital expense reports, and payroll management reports, calculates an accurate unit cost for each procedure type. This data is very useful for cost control, enhancement of department efficiency, and planning

  4. The Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a radiological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, K. [Department of Orthopaedic Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)], E-mail: kausik.mukherjee@cardiffandvale.wales.nhs.uk; Pandit, H. [North Hampshire Hospital, Basingstoke (United Kingdom); Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Oxford, Headington (United Kingdom); Dodd, C.A.F.; Ostlere, S. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Headington (United Kingdom); Murray, D.W. [Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Oxford, Headington (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is increasingly being performed in both specialist centres as well as district hospitals. The radiologists should be aware of the required preoperative imaging, the normal appearance, and complications of this procedure. Unfortunately, very little is available in the radiology literature. This review aims to provide a radiological perspective to an already widely used procedure.

  5. Radiological Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valetin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This report

  6. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  7. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  8. Adapting a Markov Monte Carlo simulation model for forecasting the number of Coronary Artery Revascularisation Procedures in an era of rapidly changing technology and policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuiman Matthew

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatments for coronary heart disease (CHD have evolved rapidly over the last 15 years with considerable change in the number and effectiveness of both medical and surgical treatments. This period has seen the rapid development and uptake of statin drugs and coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs that include Coronary Artery Bypass Graft procedures (CABGs and Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (PCIs. It is difficult in an era of such rapid change to accurately forecast requirements for treatment services such as CARPs. In a previous paper we have described and outlined the use of a Markov Monte Carlo simulation model for analyzing and predicting the requirements for CARPs for the population of Western Australia (Mannan et al, 2007. In this paper, we expand on the use of this model for forecasting CARPs in Western Australia with a focus on the lack of adequate performance of the (standard model for forecasting CARPs in a period during the mid 1990s when there were considerable changes to CARP technology and implementation policy and an exploration and demonstration of how the standard model may be adapted to achieve better performance. Methods Selected key CARP event model probabilities are modified based on information relating to changes in the effectiveness of CARPs from clinical trial evidence and an awareness of trends in policy and practice of CARPs. These modified model probabilities and the ones obtained by standard methods are used as inputs in our Markov simulation model. Results The projected numbers of CARPs in the population of Western Australia over 1995–99 only improve marginally when modifications to model probabilities are made to incorporate an increase in effectiveness of PCI procedures. However, the projected numbers improve substantially when, in addition, further modifications are incorporated that relate to the increased probability of a PCI procedure and the reduced probability of a CABG

  9. Adapting a Markov Monte Carlo simulation model for forecasting the number of coronary artery revascularisation procedures in an era of rapidly changing technology and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Haider R; Knuiman, Matthew; Hobbs, Michael

    2008-06-25

    Treatments for coronary heart disease (CHD) have evolved rapidly over the last 15 years with considerable change in the number and effectiveness of both medical and surgical treatments. This period has seen the rapid development and uptake of statin drugs and coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs) that include Coronary Artery Bypass Graft procedures (CABGs) and Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (PCIs). It is difficult in an era of such rapid change to accurately forecast requirements for treatment services such as CARPs. In a previous paper we have described and outlined the use of a Markov Monte Carlo simulation model for analyzing and predicting the requirements for CARPs for the population of Western Australia (Mannan et al, 2007). In this paper, we expand on the use of this model for forecasting CARPs in Western Australia with a focus on the lack of adequate performance of the (standard) model for forecasting CARPs in a period during the mid 1990s when there were considerable changes to CARP technology and implementation policy and an exploration and demonstration of how the standard model may be adapted to achieve better performance. Selected key CARP event model probabilities are modified based on information relating to changes in the effectiveness of CARPs from clinical trial evidence and an awareness of trends in policy and practice of CARPs. These modified model probabilities and the ones obtained by standard methods are used as inputs in our Markov simulation model. The projected numbers of CARPs in the population of Western Australia over 1995-99 only improve marginally when modifications to model probabilities are made to incorporate an increase in effectiveness of PCI procedures. However, the projected numbers improve substantially when, in addition, further modifications are incorporated that relate to the increased probability of a PCI procedure and the reduced probability of a CABG procedure stemming from changed CARP preference

  10. Advanced radiological protection course 1993: 15 November - 3 December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This pamphlet describes an advanced radiological protection course organised by the NRPB and aimed at experienced health physicists and others who have worked in radiological protection for some years. A knowledge of basic radiological protection is assumed. The course concentrates on developing awareness of the policies and philosophy upon which radiological protection is based. Emphasis is given to managerial and professional responsibilities in radiological protection and to involvement with problems of industrial and public relations. The 1994 course is 3 - 21st October. (Author)

  11. Radiological Protection Science and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Augustin; ); Mossman, Ken; Morgan, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of radiation at the end of the 19. century, the health effects of exposure to radiation have been studied more than almost any other factor with potential effects on human health. The NEA has long been involved in discussions on the effects of radiation exposure, releasing two reports in 1994 and 2007 on radiological protection science. This report is the third in this state-of-the-art series, examining recent advances in the understanding of radiation risks and effects, particularly at low doses. It focuses on radiobiology and epidemiology, and also addresses the social science aspects of stakeholder involvement in radiological protection decision making. The report summarises the status of, and issues arising from, the application of the International System of Radiological Protection to different types of prevailing circumstances. Reports published by the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) in 1998 and 2007 provided an overview of the scientific knowledge available at that time, as well as the expected results from further research. They also discussed the policy implications that these results could have for the radiological protection system. The 2007 report highlighted challenges posed by developments in relation to medical exposure and by intentions to include the environment (i.e. non-human species), within the scope of the radiological protection system. It also addressed the need to be able to respond to a radiological terrorist attack. This report picks up on where the 1998 and 2007 reports left off, and addresses the state of the art in radiological prevention science and application today. It is divided into five chapters. Firstly, following broadly the structural topics from the 1998 and 2007 reports, the more purely scientific aspects of radiological protection are presented. These include cancer risk of low dose and dose rates, non-cancer effects and individual sensitivity. In view of the increasing

  12. Radiological protection and quality control for diagnostic radiology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baorong, Yue

    2008-01-01

    Full text: There are 43,000 diagnostic departments, nearly 70,000 X-ray diagnostic facilities, 7,000 CT, 250 million for the annual total numbers of X-ray examinations, 120,000 occupationally exposed workers in diagnostic radiology. 'Basic standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources' is promulgated on October, 2002. This basic standard follows the BSS. 'Rule on the administration of radio-diagnosis and radiotherapy', as a order of the Ministry of Health No. 46, is promulgated by Minister of Health on January 24, 2006. It includes general provisions, requirements and practice, establishment and approval of radio-diagnosis and radiotherapy services, safeguards and quality assurance, and so on. There are a series of radiological protection standards and quality control standards in diagnostic radiology, including 'radiological protection standard for the examination in X-ray diagnosis', 'radiological health protection standards for X-ray examination of child-bearing age women and pregnant women', 'radiological protection standards for the children in X-ray diagnosis', 'standards for radiological protection in medical X-ray diagnosis', 'specification for radiological protection monitoring in medical X-ray diagnosis', 'guide for reasonable application of medical X-ray diagnosis', 'general aspects for quality assurance in medical X-ray image of diagnosis', 'specification of image quality control test for the medical X-ray diagnostic equipment', 'specification of image quality assurance test for X-ray equipment for computed tomography', 'specification for testing of quality control in computed radiography (CR)' and 'specification for testing of quality control in X-ray mammography'. With the X-ray diagnostic equipment, there are acceptant tests, status tests and routing tests in large hospitals. It is poor for routing test in middle and smaller hospitals. CT is used widely in diagnostic radiology, however most workers in CT

  13. Radiological design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Andersen, B.V.; Carter, L.A.; Waite, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Many new nuclear facilities are unsatisfactory from a radiation protection point of view, particularly when striving to maintain occupational exposure as low as practicable 'ALAP'. Radiation protection is achieved through physical protective features supplemented by administrative controls. Adequate physical protective feature should be achieved during construction so that supplemental administrative controls may be kept simple and workable. Many nuclear facilities fall short of adequate physical protective features, thus, remedial and sometimes awkward administrative procedures are required to safely conduct work. In reviewing the various handbooks, reports and regulations which deal with radiation protection, it may be noted that there is minimal radiological design guidance for application to nuclear facilities. A set of criteria or codes covering functional areas rather than specific nuclear facility types is badly needed. The following are suggested as functional areas to be considered: characterization of the Facility; siting and access; design exposure limits; layout (people and materials flow); ventilation and effluent control; radiation protection facilities and systems. The application of such radiological design criteria early in the design process would provide some assurance that nuclear facilities will be safe, flexible, and efficient with a minimum of costly retrofitting or administrative restrictions. Criteria which we have found helpful in these functional areas is discussed together with justification for adoption of such criteria and identification of problems which still require solution

  14. Radiologic diagnostics of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, M.; Schoenberg, S.O.

    2003-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most common diseases in the elderly population and is getting more and more important with the ageing of the population. A radiologic structural examination with CT or MRI is meanwhile a standard procedure in the diagnostic work up of patients with dementia syndrome. Radiology enables an early diagnosis and a differential diagnosis between different causes of dementia. Because structural changes occur only late in the disease process, a more detailed structural analysis using volumetric techniques or the use of functional imaging techniques is mandatory. These days, structural imaging uses MRI which enables to detect early atrophic changes at the medial temporal lobe with focus on the amygdala hippocampal complex. These changes are also present in the normal ageing process. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, however, they are more rapid and more pronounced. The use of functional imaging methods such as perfusion MRI, diffusion MRI or fMRI allow new insights into the pathophysiologic changes of dementia. The article gives an overview of the current status of structural imaging and an outlook into the potential of functional imaging methods. Detailed results of structural and functional imaging are presented in other articles of this issue. (orig.) [de

  15. [Regulating radiological protection and the role of health authorities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, César F

    2006-01-01

    This article summarizes the development of protection against ionizing radiation and explains current thinking in the field. It also looks at the decisive role that regulatory agencies for radiological protection must play and the important contributions that can be made by health authorities. The latter should take an active part in at least three aspects: the formal education of health personnel regarding radiological protection; the medical care of individuals who are accidentally overexposed, and the radiological protection of patients undergoing radiological procedures. To this end, health professionals must possess sufficient knowledge about radiological protection, promote the use of proper equipment, and apply the necessary quality assurance procedures. Through their effective intervention, national health authorities can greatly contribute to reducing unnecessary doses of radiation during medical procedures involving radiation sources and decrease the chances that radiological accidents will take place.

  16. Role of Radiology in Forensic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Chandrasekhar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Forensic radiology is a specialized area of medical imaging utilizing radiological techniques to assist physicians and pathologists in matter pertaining to the law. Postmortem dental radiographs are the most consistent part of the antemortem records that can be transmitted during the forensic examination procedures. Pathologists regularly use radiographic images during the course of autopsy to assist them in identification of foreign bodies or determination of death. Forensic radiology can be used in suspicious death or murder, in analysis of adverse medical events, solving legal matters, to detect child abuse, drug trafficking, body identification and disease identification. Using the possibilities of radiology, special characteristics of the internal structures of the dentomaxillofacial region can be revealed. We can also detect endodontic treatments, healing extraction sockets, implants or even tooth colored restoration. Therefore, we can give answers to problems dealing with identification procedures, mass disaster and dental age estimation.

  17. Pediatric interventional radiology: vascular interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery. (author)

  18. IAEA Perspectives on Radiological Characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Patrick; Ljubenov, Vladan

    2012-01-01

    quantity and type of radionuclides, their distribution and their physical and chemical states - e.g. see IAEA report no. TRS-389, Radiological Characterization of Shut Down Nuclear Reactors for Decommissioning Purposes. The collection of detailed data on the physical, chemical and radiological conditions in a nuclear facility, including activity calculations, in situ measurements and/or sampling and analysis, facilitates a detailed estimation of risk, cost and waste generation during decommissioning, and supports the selection of the overall dismantling strategy - e.g. partial vs. full decontamination, requirements for shielding and for partial removal of equipment and services - and its detailed planning. It also supports the assessment of different dismantling options and their consequences, including decontamination and dismantling procedures and tools required, and arrangements to ensure the radiological protection of workers, general public and the environment. (authors)

  19. Radiologic diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunderquist, A.

    1989-01-01

    The radiologic work-up of a patient with a pancreatic endocrine tumor should follow a strict course. Ultrasonography as the first procedure should be followed by angiography, if possible. Negative ultrasonography should be followed by computed tomography (CT), which, whether positive or negative, is supplemented by angiography. Negative CT and angiography is followed by transhepatic venous sampling. In patients with suspected liver metastases from intestinal and pancreatic endocrine tumors, angiography may reveal more metastases than CT and ultrasonography. (orig.)

  20. Radiological diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, F.; Palladino, M.; Stella, P.

    1988-01-01

    Seven patients with clinically suspected Meckel's diverticulum were examined. The symptoms of Meckel's diverticulum are variable, ranging from mild recurrent or severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding to intestinal obstruction and acute peritonitis. The authors evaluate the diagnostic results and suggest guidelines to choose the most appropriate radiological procedures, according to the clinical pattern: barium meal, enteroclysis and scintigraphy ( 99m TC) in patients with mild bleeding; mesenteric angiography in case of severe bleeding. The possibility of false negatives and positives is then discussed

  1. Standards of diagnostic radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, A.; Ferreira, R.

    1996-01-01

    Brazil as well as many other countries are characterized for the access differentiated from the society to the products of the development. The lacking in specifications tolerance and mainly requirements of security and they of protection have induced to the inadequate utilization of the procedures technical and products in the area of radiology. We in this context are proposing a new mode of relationships between the diverse levels of intervention and responsibility

  2. Environmental procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The European Bank has pledged in its Agreement to place environmental management at the forefront of its operations to promote sustainable economic development in central and eastern Europe. The Bank's environmental policy is set out in the document titled, Environmental Management: The Bank's Policy Approach. This document, Environmental Procedures, presents the procedures which the European Bank has adopted to implement this policy approach with respect to its operations. The environmental procedures aim to: ensure that throughout the project approval process, those in positions of responsibility for approving projects are aware of the environmental implications of the project, and can take these into account when making decisions; avoid potential liabilities that could undermine the success of a project for its sponsors and the Bank; ensure that environmental costs are estimated along with other costs and liabilities; and identify opportunities for environmental enhancement associated with projects. The review of environmental aspects of projects is conducted by many Bank staff members throughout the project's life. This document defines the responsibilities of the people and groups involved in implementing the environmental procedures. Annexes contain Environmental Management: The Bank's Policy Approach, examples of environmental documentation for the project file and other ancillary information

  3. Case based dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

  4. Risks from dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Tamara Goularte

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the risks and consequences of exposure to dental X-ray. The methodology used was the survey of bibliographic literature on this matter. First, we tried to understand the operation and characteristics of dental X-rays. Afterwards, we tried to know about the risks that this procedure offers to workers and patients. And concluded with the consequences of such exposure. The results showed that dental x-rays only offer risks in prolonged exposure, can affect the worker or patient to pathologies such as cancer or a life-time decreased due to the stochastic effect. Therefore, radiological protection standards must be respected and practised. (author)

  5. Optimization of Patient Doses in Interventional Radiology and Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Boehm, K.

    2011-01-01

    Interventional radiology and cardiology belongs to the imaging modalities connected with significantly higher radiation exposure of patients and medical staff, compared to the exposure during other diagnostic procedures. The objective of this presentation is to promote typical technical parameters and parameters related to the radiation policy, used during the most frequent endovascular and cardiology procedures, as well as the monitoring of the exposure of patients. The presented study reports the results of collecting the data of monitoring doses received by 318 patients undergoing interventional examinations in 3 various departments of the Slovak National Institute of Cardiology and Vascular Diseases. There were 9 different endovascular and cardiology procedures reviewed. The reported patient's radiation exposures were established by using the KAP values, directly shown on the display of the X-ray equipment. From the measured KAP values the entrance surface doses were calculated. Equivalent doses have been measured on hands, legs and other parts of medical staff body, by using electronic dosimeters or thermoluminescent dosimeters. The presented results have covered a wide range of the measured fluoroscopy time values, different number of acquisitions used in various interventional procedures, various cumulated KAP values and also a wide range of the cumulated entrance surface doses. The occupational doses of the operators, followed during dose measurements on their left hands, covered the range from 0.1 μSv to 1513 μSv for one examination performed. The important contribution of the presented results to the radiation protection policy in the Slovak Republic is the mapping of the current situation of the radiation exposure of patients undergoing the chosen interventional examinations and the professional radiation exposure level of interventional operators, providing the most significant interventional procedures in the Slovak interventional hospitals. The

  6. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  7. Radiologic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoeni, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The radiographic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract has been changed drastically by the introduction of endoscopic procedures that are now widely available. However, the diagnostic approach to the small bowel remains largely unchanged. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are occasionally employed but are not primary imaging modalities for small bowel disease. Even though small bowel endoscopes are available, they are infrequently used, and no scientific paper on their employment has been published. Barium studies are still the mainstay for evaluating patients with suspected small bowel abnormalities. This paper discusses the anatomy and physiology of the small bowel and lists the various types of barium and pharmacologic aids used for examining it. The different radiographic methods for examining the small bowel with barium, including SBFT, dedicated SBFT, enteroclysis, peroral pneumocolon (PPC), and retrograde small bowel examination, are described and put into perspective. To some degree such an undertaking must be a personal opinion, but certain conclusions can be made based on the available literature and practical experience. This analysis is based on the assumption that all the various barium techniques are performed with equal expertise by the individual radiologist, thus excluding bias from unfamiliarity with certain aspects of a procedure, such as intubation or skilled compression during fluoroscopy. Also, the use of water-soluble contrast material, CT, and MRI for evaluating suspected small bowel abnormalities is outlined

  8. The management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godet, Jean-Luc; Mehl-Auget, Isabelle; Johanna Fite

    2008-01-01

    For several years, public authorities have defined an organisation for the management of emergency situations arising from an accident occurring at a nuclear installation. So far, the management of the risk arising from the post accident step was, in itself, not explored with the same care. Whatsoever, no formal policy on which the action of public authority could be based is today available. The French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), in relation with the other concerned departments, is now in charge to prepare and implement the necessary provisions to respond to a post accident situation. In June 2005, ASN established the steering committee for the management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations (CODIRPA). The definition of a national policy related to the management of the radiological risk during a post event situation has to integrate various organisation aspects such as: lifting of protection emergency provisions and rehabilitation of buildings, life in contaminated rural territories, agriculture and water, dose and radiological consequences, sanitary surveillance of victims and populations, indemnification, waste management of contaminated crops and soils, organisation of public Authorities. During the 2nd step of CODIRPA work (2008-2009), the first elements of policy will be consolidated and new scenarios will be studied (one worsened scenario and one scenario with alpha emitting radionuclide). In parallel, a procedure for local actor's consultation has just been launched. (author)

  9. Philosophy, policy and procedures of the World Organisation for Animal Health for the development of standards in animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, A; Wilson, D

    2005-08-01

    Animal welfare was identified as a priority for the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) in the 2001-2005 OIE Strategic Plan. Member Countries recognised that, as animal protection is a complex, multi-faceted public policy issue which includes important scientific, ethical, economic and political dimensions, the OIE needed to develop a detailed vision and strategy incorporating and balancing these dimensions. A permanent working group on animal welfare was established in order to provide guidance to the OIE in its work on the development of science-based standards and guidelines. The Working Group decided to give priority to the welfare of animals used in agriculture and aquaculture, and that, within those groups, the topics of transportation, slaughter for human consumption and killing for disease control purposes would be addressed first. Some guiding principles were approved by the International Committee of OIE Member Countries during the 72nd General Session in May 2004, and these have been followed by four specific guidelines on the priority topics listed above.

  10. An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Rachlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

    1980-01-01

    To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology

  11. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  12. Radiological discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodliffe, J.

    1990-01-01

    Current practice of North Sea States on the discharge and disposal of liquid radioactive wastes to the North Sea are based on the declaration issued at the Second International Conference on the Protection of the North Sea, known as the London Declaration. This has three main points the first of which emphasises the application of the Best Available Technology to protect the North Sea, the second provides a framework on which future controls on radioactive discharges should be based. The third identifies two parts of the framework; to take into account the recommendations of international organizations and that any repositories of radioactive waste which are built should not pollute the North Sea. This chapter looks at how the concensus based on the London Declaration is working, gauges the progress made in the implementation of the policy goal, identifies existing and future areas for concern and proposes ways of strengthening the control of radioactive discharges. The emphasis is on the United Kingdom practice and regulations for liquid wastes, most of which comes from the Sellafield Reprocessing Plant. (author)

  13. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Erlt-Wagner, B.

    2006-01-01

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  14. Radiological diagnostics in hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, U.; Kuhn, F.P.; Gruetzner, G.

    1991-01-01

    The most important radiologically detectable effects of the primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism of the skeletal system and the periarticular soft tissue structures are presented. In the following sensitivity and specificity of radiological imaging - sonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, arteriography and selective venous sampling - in the preoperative diagnostic of the parathyroid adenomas are discussed. Therefore, radiological imaging can be omitted before primary surgery. It was only in secondary surgery that radiological process proved useful and a guide during surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  15. Image Quality in Vascular Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Struelens, L.

    2005-01-01

    In vascular radiology, the radiologists use the radiological image to diagnose or treat a specific vascular structure. From literature, we know that related doses are high and that large dose variability exists between different hospitals. The application of the optimization principle is therefore necessary and is obliged by the new legislation. So far, very little fieldwork has been performed and no practical instructions are available to do the necessary work. It's indisputable that obtaining quantitative data is of great interest for optimization purposes. In order to gain insight into these doses and the possible measures for dose reduction, we performed a comparative study in 7 hospitals. Patient doses will be measured and calculated for specific procedures in vascular radiology and evaluated against their most influencing parameters. In view of optimization purposes, a protocol for dose audit will be set-up. From the results and conclusions in this study, experimentally based guidelines will be proposed, in order to improve clinical practice in vascular radiology

  16. A radiological control implementation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamley, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program. The manual is now in draft form and includes information that will be of use to line managers dealing with improving radiological performance and the practical aspects of radiological controls implementation. The manual is expected to be completed by the fall of 1993 and to be used in conjunction with a performance-based self-assessment training program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  17. Radiology systems architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibel, S R; Greenes, R A

    1996-05-01

    This article focuses on the software requirements for enterprise integration in radiology. The needs of a future radiology systems architecture are examined, both at a concrete functional level and at an abstract system-properties level. A component-based approach to software development is described and is validated in the context of each of the abstract system requirements for future radiology computing environments.

  18. Ethical values in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Issues like consent, equity, control and responsibility are important for an ethical evaluation of radiation risks. This paper discusses the incorporation of ethical values in radiological protection policy and compares how ICRP recommendations promote their use in practice and intervention cases. The paper contends that in cases of intervention, where the overall aim is dose reduction, social and ethical factors are often alluded to when evaluating costs of an action. However, possible ethical or social benefits of intervention measures are seldom raised. On the other hand, when assessing a practice, wherein the net effect is an increase in radiation dose, one is more likely to find an appeal to ethical factors on the benefits side of the equation than with the costs. The paper concludes that all decisions concerning radiological protection should consider both positive and negative ethical aspects. (author)

  19. Evidence-based radiology: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Hunink, Myriam G.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2010-01-01

    To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this principle in the European radiological community. Starting from Sackett's definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM's limitations. Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis on the need to shift from the demonstration of the increasing ability to see more and better, to the demonstration of a significant change in treatment planning or, at best, of a significant gain in patient outcome. The ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle is thought as a dimension of EBR while EBR is proposed as part of the core curriculum of radiology residency. Moreover, we describe the process of health technology assessment in radiology with reference to the six-level scale of hierarchy of studies on diagnostic tests, the main sources of bias in studies on diagnostic performance, and levels of evidence and degrees of recommendations according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (Oxford, UK) as well as the approach proposed by the GRADE working group. Problems and opportunities offered by evidence-based guidelines in radiology are considered. Finally, we suggest nine points to be actioned by the ESR in order to promote EBR. Radiology will benefit greatly from the improvement in practice that will result from adopting this more rigorous approach to all aspects of our work. (orig.)

  20. Interventional vascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yune, H.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The papers published during this past year in the area of interventional vascular radiology presented some useful modifications and further experiences both in the area of thromboembolic therapy and in dilation and thrombolysis, but no new techniques. As an introductory subject, an excellent monograph reviewing the current spectrum of pharmacoangiography was presented in Radiographics. Although the presented material is primarily in diagnostic application of various pharmacologic agents used today to facilitate demonstration of certain diagnostic criteria of various disease processes, both vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive reaction to these agents are widely used in various therapeutic vascular procedures. This monograph should be reviewed by every angiographer whether or not he or she performs interventional procedures, and it would be very convenient to have this table available in the angiography suite. In a related subject, Bookstein and co-workers have written an excellent review concerning pharmacologic manipulations of various blood coagulative parameters during angiography. Understanding the proper method of manipulation of the bloodclotting factors during angiography, and especially during interventional angiography, is extremely important. Particularly, the method of manipulating the coagulation with the use of heparin and protamine and modification of the platelet activity by using aspirin and dipyridamole are succinctly reviewed. The systemic and selective thrombolytic activities of streptokianse are also discussed

  1. The radiological accident in Yanango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The use of nuclear technologies has fostered new, more effective and efficient medical procedures and has substantially improved diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. However, in order that the benefits of the use of ionizing radiation outweigh the potential hazards posed by this medium, it is important that radiation protection and safety standards be established to govern every aspect of the application of ionizing radiation. Adherence to these standards needs to be maintained through effective regulatory control, safe operational procedures and a safety culture that is shared by all. Occasionally, established safety procedures are violated and serious radiological consequences ensue. The radiological accident described in this report, which took place in Lilo, Georgia, was a result of such an infraction. Sealed radiation sources had been abandoned by a previous owner at a site without following established regulatory safety procedures, for example by transferring the sources to the new owner or treating them as spent material and conditioning them as waste. As a consequence, 11 individuals at the site were exposed for a long period of time to high doses of radiation which resulted inter alia in severe radiation induced skin injuries. Although at the time of the accident Georgia was not an IAEA Member State and was not a signatory of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, the IAEA still provided assistance to the Government of Georgia in assessing the radiological situation, while the World Health Organization (WHO) assisted in alleviating the medical consequences of the accident. The two organizations co-operated closely from the beginning, following the request for assistance by the Georgian Government. The IAEA conducted the radiological assessment and was responsible for preparing the report. The WHO and its collaborating centres within the Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network

  2. Radiation safety concerns during interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor Raj, D.; Livingstone, Roshan Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiological procedures are on the increase by virtue of the fact that these procedures replace highly invasive surgical and other procedures. Radiation dose to patients and hospital workers are of significance since these procedures tend to impart large dose to them. Moreover, long term risk from radiation absorbed by patients is of concern since the life expectancy of major fraction of patients is long after undergoing the procedure. This study intends to measure radiation dose imparted to patients as well as personnel- radiologists, technologists, nurses, etc. and estimate the risk factor involved

  3. Hazardous radiological waste-dental and environmental perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Dental radiology is concerned with maxillo-facial radiological diagnostic procedure. It is meant for patient welfare and to generate diagnostically useful information, which can be utilized for patient welfare. If injudiciously used, it can become a source of harmful effluents and solid waste, which may pose risk to health and environment. Professionals of dental radiology should be aware about their responsibility to dispose such waste in the rightful manner to fulfil their medical pledge and ethics of doing no harm. (author)

  4. Radiology and fine art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stošić-Opinćal, Tatjana; Tomić, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    The radiologic aesthetics of some body parts and internal organs have inspired certain artists to create specific works of art. Our aim was to describe the link between radiology and fine art. We explored 13,625 artworks in the literature produced by 2049 artists and found several thousand photographs in an online image search. The examination revealed 271 radiologic artworks (1.99%) created by 59 artists (2.88%) who mainly applied radiography, sonography, CT, and MRI. Some authors produced radiologic artistic photographs, and others used radiologic images to create artful compositions, specific sculptures, or digital works. Many radiologic artworks have symbolic, metaphoric, or conceptual connotations. Radiology is clearly becoming an original and important field of modern art.

  5. Radiology and social media: are private practice radiology groups more social than academic radiology departments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, McKinley; Choy, Garry; Boland, Giles W; Saini, Sanjay; Prabhakar, Anand M

    2015-05-01

    This study assesses the prevalence of use of the most commonly used social media sites among private radiology groups (PRGs) and academic radiology departments (ARDs). The 50 largest PRGs and the 50 ARDs with the highest level of funding from the National Institutes of Health were assessed for presence of a radiology-specific social media account on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and LinkedIn. Measures of organizational activity and end-user activity were collected, including the number of posts and followers, as appropriate; between-group comparisons were performed. PRGs adopted Facebook 12 months earlier (P = .02) and Twitter 18 months earlier (P = .02) than did ARDs. A total of 76% of PRGs maintained ≥1 account on the social media sites included in the study, compared with 28% of ARDs (P Instagram, 2%. The prevalence of radiology-specific social media accounts for ARDs was: Facebook, 18%; LinkedIn, 0%; Twitter, 24%; YouTube, 6%; Pinterest, 0%; and Instagram, 0%. There was no significant difference between ARDs and PRGs in measures of end-user or organizational activity on Facebook or Twitter. Use of social media in health care is emerging as mainstream, with PRGs being early adopters of Facebook and Twitter in comparison with ARDs. Competitive environments and institutional policies may be strong factors that influence how social media is used by radiologists at the group and department levels. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient exposure evaluation in Romanian radiological departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girjoaba, O.; Cucu, A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A nation-wide evaluation of ionizing radiation exposure of the Romanian population due to the radiological examinations is performed in accordance with European Directive 97/43 EURATOM implemented in national regulations. Method: The study is applied to the collected data from radiological departments from Romanian hospitals during 2010. The radiological examinations were grouped in three categories: conventional diagnostic radiology, interventional radiology and computed tomography. The annual collective dose was determined from the reported data about the mean effective doses and the frequency for each type of radiological examination, in conformity with the national regulations. Regarding the frequency aspects, the results include the age and gender distributions. Major results: More then 6 million radiological examinations were performed in 2010, Romania having a population about of 20.3 million inhabitants. The collective effective dose for 2010 resulted from the study is 152 mSv per 1000 inhabitants. Conclusions: Medical practitioners must select the best medical imaging investigation for each clinical case taking into account the importance of keeping the patient dose as low as possible. Medical physicists should be strongly involved in the establishing of the dosimetry procedures. (author)

  7. Effective doses in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, Olga; Diaconescu, Cornelia; Roca, Antoaneta

    2001-01-01

    Because of their longer life expectancy, the risk of late manifestations of detrimental radiation effects is greater in children than in adults and, consequently, paediatric radiology gives ground for more concern regarding radiation protection than radiology of adults. The purpose of our study is to assess in terms of effective doses the magnitude of paediatric patient exposure during conventional X-ray examinations, selected for their high frequency or their relatively high doses to the patient. Effective doses have been derived from measurements of dose-area product (DAP) carried out on over 900 patients undergoing X-ray examinations, in five paediatric units. The conversion coefficients for estimating effective doses are those calculated by the NRPB using Monte-Carlo technique on a series of 5 mathematical phantoms representing 0, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old children. The annual frequency of X-ray examinations necessary for collective dose calculation are those reported in our last national study on medical exposure, conducted in 1995. The annual effective doses from all medical examinations for the average paediatric patient are as follows: 1.05 mSv for 0 year old, 0.98 mSv for 1 year old, 0.53 mSv for 5 year old, 0.65 mSv for 10 year old and 0.70 mSv for 15 year old. The resulting annual collective effective dose was evaluated at 625 man Sv with the largest contribution of pelvis and hip examinations (34%). The annual collective effective associated with paediatric radiology in Romania represent 5% of the annual value resulting from all diagnostic radiology. Examination of the chest is by far the most frequent procedure for children, accounting for about 60 per cent of all annually performed X-ray conventional examinations. Knowledge of real level of patient dose is an essential component of quality assurance programs in paediatric radiology. (authors)

  8. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  9. Report about the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrimer, H.P.; Gomes, C.A.; Recio, J.C.A.

    1997-01-01

    This work reports the activities developed by the technical groups who worked during the radiological accident in Goiania, held on September 1997. Several aspects of the accident are described. The final solution for the disposal of the radioactive wastes generated during the accident is presented, according to the Brazilian waste management policy. (author)

  10. Document: the radiological survey of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerno, Linden; Leprieur, F.; Janssens, A.

    2002-01-01

    The document presents the radiological survey of the environment in France today with a comparison of the situation in Switzerland, Germany and Belgium. The evolution of the policy in this activity is also concerned. The laboratories and their monitoring equipment, the regulation and the social impacts are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  11. Evidence-based radiology: a new approach to evaluate the clinical practice of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.; Felder-Puig, R.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last several years, the concept and methodology of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have received significant attention in the scientific community. However, compared to therapeutic medical disciplines, EBM-based radiological publications are still underrepresented. This article summarizes the principles of EBM and discusses the possibilities of their application in radiology. The presented topics include the critical appraisal of studies on the basis on EBM principles, the explanation of EBM-relevant statistical outcome parameters (e.g., ''likelihood ratio'' for diagnostic and ''number needed to treat'' for interventional procedures), as well as the problems facing evidence-based radiology. Evidence-based evaluation of radiological procedures does not only address aspects of cost-effectiveness, but is also particularly helpful in identifying patient-specific usefulness. Therefore it should become an integral part of radiologist training. (orig.)

  12. Fetal dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology examinations are frequently performed in all countries because of the benefit that the patient derives from the resultant diagnosis. Given that so many examinations are performed it is inevitable that there will be occasions when the planned exposure of a woman who is known to be pregnant is contemplated. In these circumstances, there must be rigorous justification of the examination and the procedure itself must be optimised as well. Radiation risks from fetal irradiation are well established. These risks fall into three categories: 1) a cancer induction risk (mainly leukaemia); 2) hereditary effects (as the fetus is a potential parent); 3) a risk of serious mental retardation (if the fetus is exposed in the critical 8-15 weeks period when the forebrain is being developed). Risk factors for these effects have been reviewed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Special rules apply to the radiology of women who are or who may be pregnant. These rules have been developed to avoid he unintended irradiation of the fetus. These rules have been variously referred to as the 10-day rule and the 28-day rules, in which radiology of potentially pregnant women is restricted to the first 10 or 28 days following menstruation. It is apparent that the advice provided by national bodies varies, as different rules apply internationally, due presumably to a lack of an international consensus on the subject. The advice from the National Radiological Protection Board, the College of Radiographers and the Royal College of Radiologists applies in the United Kingdom. In summary, the advice is that women of child bearing age are asked before a diagnostic radiology examination in which the pelvis is in, or near, the primary beam are asked if they are, or may be, pregnant. If pregnancy can be excluded then the examination can proceed. If it is likely that the patient is pregnant, then the proposed examination must undergo rigorous justification. If

  13. Occupational radiological protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: occupational expossure (the ALARA principle, dose-equivalent limit, ICRP justification); radiological protection planning (general aspects, barrier estimation) and determination of the occupational expossures (individual monitoring). (M.A.) [pt

  14. Facing the Guilt and Commemorating the Victims: German Radiology and Radiation Oncology During National Socialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Franziska; Weindling, Paul; Ley, Astrid; Lang, Hans-Joachim; Lang, Sascha; Moser, Gabriele

    2018-04-01

    Whereas the scientific community is aware of atrocities committed by medical doctors like Mengele, the specifics of radiology and radiation oncology during National Socialism remain largely unknown. Starting in 2010, the German Radiology Association and the German Association of Radiation Oncology coordinated a national project looking into original archival material. A national committee convened in 2013 to discuss the project's findings, which were also the subject of a symposium at the University of Tuebingen in 2016 on radiology under National Socialism. The project identified approximately 160 radiologists who were victimized because of their Jewish descent, among them Gustav Bucky (known for the Bucky factor in x-ray diagnostics). Radiologists throughout Germany took part in forced sterilizations. The "Schutzstaffel," commonly known as SS, had a special radiology unit that was established for tuberculosis screening. Radiation was also used for sterilization experiments in the Auschwitz concentration camp with subsequent surgical procedures to enable histological analysis of the irradiated tissue. Reflection on medicine during the Holocaust will be strengthened by specific facts related to the respective medical field. Radiologists were involved in atrocious medical experiments as well as in supporting Nazi policies in Germany. These facts provoke ethical considerations about marginalized patient groups and doctor-patient communication. They also raise questions about "evidence-based" medicine as sole justification for medical procedures. In summary, historical studies will be able to help in the professional identity formation of radiologists gaining awareness to ethical issues of today. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Practices and regulations of radiological mass screening in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The only radiological mass screening undertaken in the UK was the mass miniature radiography service for detection of tuberculosis by chest x-ray. Mass miniature radiographic (MMR) units were set up when tuberculosis was a common illness. However, by 1969 the detection rate of tuberculosis was so low that it was no longer cost-effective as a preventive health measure. In the last decade there has also been an increased awareness that people should only be exposed to radiation for medical purposes if it is judged to be clinically desirable. For some years, therefore, the Department's policy has been to discourage self-referral to these units and to advise people to consult their doctor should they be concerned about symptoms. Health authorities have been made aware of the need to continue to review the level of provision of MMR services and to integrate these facilities with hospital radiological departments as far as possible. To secure further information on the costs and benefits of radiological procedures, the Department is financially supporting research by the Royal College of Radiologists' Working Party on the Effective use of Diagnostic Radiology. Research is taking place in a number of areas and the work done on the use of preoperative chest x-ray in hospital is particularly germane

  16. Radiological chronometry of uranium metal samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, L.A.; Stalcup, A.M.; Glover, S.E.; Spitz, H.B.; LaMont, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological chronometry is an important tool in nuclear forensics that uses several methods to determine the length of time that has elapsed since a material was last purified. One of the chronometers used in determining the age of metallic uranium involves measuring the fractional ingrowth of 230 Th from its parent 234 U with the assumption that the uranium metal contained no impurities, especially thorium, when it was purified. The affects of different etching procedures were evaluated for the removal of surface oxidation with three different types of uranium metal samples to determine whether the etching procedure affects the radiological age. The sample treated with a rigorous etching procedure had exhibited the most reliable radiological age while less rigorous etching yields a radiological age from 15 years to hundreds of years older than the known age. Any excess thorium on the surface of a uranium metal sample presents a bias in age determination and the sample will appear older than the true age. Although this research demonstrates the need for rigorous surface etching, a bias in the radiological age could have arisen if the uranium in the metal was heterogeneously distributed. (author)

  17. Environmental aspects at radiological protection in ArcelorMittal Monlevade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Filho, Cleber Marques; Soares Filho, Mauricio; Franco, Jose Otavio Andrade; Leite, Roberto Paulo; Goncalves, Breno Cunha; Costa, Jose Gustavo de Souza

    2010-01-01

    ArcelorMittal Monlevade Environmental Management of Radiological Protection is based on radiological protection team training, start up of radioactivity materials detection equipment in several steps of industrial processes and internal procedures according to CNEN - Nuclear Energy National Commission guidelines. At this way ArcelorMittal Monlevade seeks to guarantee the safety of employees, community, customers, equipment and the environment and their business. (author)

  18. What constitutes a radiology radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, A.; Edmonds, K.; Hayton, A.; Tingey, D.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A review of the literature indicates a very small number of articles on radiology radiation accidents. This may be due to there being no agreed definition of the term 'accident' when applied to radiology incidents. As the intensity of X-ray beams and the functionality of various modalities increase there is a consequent development in procedures to which 'high dose' applications are required. We may therefore expect to see more incidents in future. How are we to manage them? Radiology radiation accidents are usually exemplified by deterministic skin burns which may take many weeks or months to become apparent and any procedure leading to a radiation induced fatality is difficult to prove. (author)

  19. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio; Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  20. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio, E-mail: vittorio.iaccarino@unina.it; Venetucci, Pietro [University of Naples ' Federico II' , Diagnostic Imaging Department-Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  1. Management of science policy, sociology of science policy and economics of science policy

    CERN Document Server

    Ruivo, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    'Management of science policy, sociology of science policy and economics of science policy' is a theoretical essay on the scientific foundation of science policy (formulation, implementation, instruments and procedures). It can be also used as a textbook.

  2. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board...... of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology....

  3. Socioeconomic trends in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. (orig.)

  4. [Marketing mix in a radiology department: challenges for future radiologists in management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claikens, B

    1998-08-01

    Radiology has gained an enviable position among medial specialities. Developments in new technology expand its horizons and the volume of radiologic imaging techniques and procedures increase far more than the overall growth in health care services. In this position radiology has become a prime target for restrictions, cutbacks, controlled financing in an area of managed care and new national health care policy based on partially fixed budgets. Future health care takers have to choose the best available diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Evidence based medicine, cost-utility analysis, diagnostic performance analysis, patient outcome analysis, technology assessment and guidelines for practice are means to guide us through our obligatory choice. Our major objective is to use the most performant available imaging technique or intervention to achieve the best possible outcome for our patient at lower possible costs. A strategic response from radiologists is required to meet the imperatives of this new management situation. They must do far more than interpret imaging procedures. They must work as efficient managers of imaging resources, organise their practices and define their marketing-strategies using the different, so-called, marketing-mix elements. The challenges will be great but the rewards are worth our best efforts. In this article we highlight the marketing responsibilities of future radiologists and their clinical practice in this new socio-economic environment and we present different useful marketing tools.

  5. RCT: Module 2.11, Radiological Work Coverage, Course 8777

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Kurt T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-20

    Radiological work is usually approved and controlled by radiation protection personnel by using administrative and procedural controls, such as radiological work permits (RWPs). In addition, some jobs will require working in, or will have the potential for creating, very high radiation, contamination, or airborne radioactivity areas. Radiological control technicians (RCTs) providing job coverage have an integral role in controlling radiological hazards. This course will prepare the student with the skills necessary for RCT qualification by passing quizzes, tests, and the RCT Comprehensive Phase 1, Unit 2 Examination (TEST 27566) and will provide in-the-field skills.

  6. SA Journal of Radiology: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... not approved for publication will not be returned to the submitting author in any format. ... provide new scientific knowledge where experiments, statistics and other ... that are presented in an appropriate manner and are supported by the data ...

  7. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  8. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  9. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  10. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  11. Machine learning and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment. (orig.) [de

  13. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment.

  14. Radiological protection in equine radiography and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoxall, A.T.

    1977-10-01

    The principles of radiological protection are summarised and consideration is then given to problems, which may confront the equine practitioner, in the fulfillment of these principles during diagnostic radiography of the limbs, head, and spine of the horse. The place of anaesthesia in such procedures is discussed and the special problems associated with therapeutic radiography of the horse are considered.

  15. Radiation protection in the intervenmtional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Benjamin V.; Lissek, Friedrich; Waldeck, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Interventional radiology and neuroradiology covers a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. A minimal invasive percutaneous access under imaging guidance is common for all these methods. The legal regulations for quality assurance are reviewed, technical possibilities for dose reduction and the importance of modern radiation protection procedures are discussed.

  16. Soft tissue Burkitt's lymphoma: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Barredo, R.; Fernandez Echevarria, M.A.; Riego, M. del; Canga, A.

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case is reported of a soft tissue mass in the lower extremity, without bone involvement, in an 85-year-old woman; the histopathological diagnosis was Burkitt's lymphoma. Pertinent clinical history, histological examination, and imaging procedures allowed early diagnosis. To our knowledge, the radiological findings in Burkitt's lymphoma with this unusual clinical presentation have not been described previously. (orig.)

  17. Interventional neuroradiology techniques in interventional radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Kieran; Robertson, Fergus; Watkinson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This book provides accessible technique-specific information on interventional radiology procedures, in a format suitable for reference in the IR treatment room or as a carry-around guide. Offers step-by-step points, key point summaries and illustrations.

  18. Ebola virus disease: radiology preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemke, David A; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2015-02-01

    At present, there is a major emphasis on Ebola virus disease (EVD) preparedness training at medical facilities throughout the United States. Failure to have proper EVD procedures in place was cited as a major reason for infection of medical personnel in the United States. Medical imaging does not provide diagnosis of EVD, but patient assessment in the emergency department and treatment isolation care unit is likely to require imaging services. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of relevant aspects of EVD disease and preparedness relevant to the radiologic community. © RSNA, 2014.

  19. Advanced radiology information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovou, L; Vatousi, M; Lymperopoulos, D; Koukias, M

    2005-01-01

    The innovative features of an advanced Radiology Information System (RIS) are presented in this paper. The interoperability of RIS with the other Intra-hospital Information Systems that interacts with, dealing with the compatibility and open architecture issues, are accomplished by two novel mechanisms [1]. The first one is the particular message handling system that is applied for the exchange of information, according to the Health Level Seven (HL7) protocol's specifications and serves the transfer of medical and administrative data among the RIS applications and data store unit. The same mechanism allows the secure and HL7-compatible interactions with the Hospital Information System (HIS) too. The second one implements the translation of information between the formats that HL7 and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) protocols specify, providing the communication between RIS and Picture and Archive Communication System (PACS). The whole structure ensures the automation of the every-day procedures that the ;medical protocol' specifies and provides its services through a friendly and easy to manage graphical user interface.

  20. Analgesics and sedatives in vascular interventionist radiologic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorio, M.A. de; Opta, J.M.; Pulido, J.M.; Encarnacion, C.E.; Arino, I., Fernandez, J.A.; Alfonso, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    Interventionist radiology routinely requires the use of different drugs (analgesics and sedatives) in the course of a procedure. Aside from their therapeutic action, these drugs can produce secondary or undesirable effects, making necessary an in-depth knowledge of them to assure their safe and efficient management. The aim of this work is to provide the vascular interventionist radiologist with additional information on the management of those drugs that contribute to minimizing patient discomfort and pain in interventionist procedures. Author

  1. Contrast media properties in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laerum, F.; Enge, I.

    1989-01-01

    Potential hazards of the use of contrast media (CM) in interventional radiology are analyzed by looking into each procedure regarding interactions of CM with pharmaceutical additives, with technical equipment possibly affecting CM stability, and special local or systemic demands related to the procedure. Also the impact of these factors upon the physiological mechanisms are taken into account. (H.W.). 32 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Report writing in skeletal radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, L.J.; Yochum, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation of reports in clinical practice is a standard method of documentation of a patient's history, examination findings, therapeutic regime, and prognosis, as well as other important features. In the practice of producing and interpreting diagnostic radiographs, report writing also serves a number of important roles, which include providing an accurate means of recording findings in instances of 1) medicolegal circumstances; 2) a standard for comparison with previous or later examinations; 3) a permanent record if the radiographs are lost or not immediately available for perusal; 4) communication with other practitioners and health professionals; and 5) expediating the treatment regime by providing a resume of important indications and contraindictions for therapy. In the radiological literature there is a distinct lack of material on report writing and very little as to what would be considered a standard style. Consequently, radiological reporting has increasingly become a subjective, personalized procedure, with each individual modifying the report according to previous training, experience, and needs. It is the purpose of this chapter to provide basic guidelines on the mechanisms of formulating adequate standardized reports in radiological examinations of the skeletal system

  3. History and Organizations for Radiological Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Keon Wook

    2016-02-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), an independent international organization established in 1925, develops, maintains, and elaborates radiological protection standards, legislation, and guidelines. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) provides scientific evidence. World Health Organization (WHO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilise the ICRP recommendations to implement radiation protection in practice. Finally, radiation protection agencies in each country adopt the policies, and adapt them to each situation. In Korea, Nuclear Safety and Security Commission is the governmental body for nuclear safety regulation and Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety is a public organization for technical support and R&D in nuclear safety and radiation protection.

  4. Evaluation of radiological protection aspects in radiodiagnostic rooms in Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar A, L.; Vizuet G, J.; Ruiz, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The preliminary results of an evaluation of radiological protection carried out in radiology services of different hospitals of Mexico are shown. The evaluated points were: relative aspects of the room, operation parameters of operation of the equipment, work procedures and training about radiological protection for the equipment operators. (authors). 2 refs., 1 fig

  5. Development of a national doctrine for the management of the post-accident phase of a radiological emergency situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.Ch.; Godet, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    For several years, public Authorities have defined an organization for the management of emergency situations arising from an accident occurring at a nuclear installation. So far, the management of the risk arising from the post accident phase was, in itself, not explored with the same care. What so ever, no format policy on which the action of public Authority could be based is today available. The nuclear safety Authority (ASN), in relation with the other concerned departments, is now in charge, according to the above mentioned directive, to prepare and implement the necessary provisions to respond to a post accident situation. In dune 2005, ASN established the steering committee for the management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations (CODIRPA). The definition of a national policy related to the management of the radiological risk during a post event situation having to integrate various organization aspects as: lifting of protection emergency provisions and rehabilitation of buildings, life in contaminated rural territories, agriculture and water, dose and radiological consequences, sanitary surveillance of victims and populations, indemnification, waste management of contaminated crops and soils, organization of public Authorities. During the 2. phase of CODIRPA work (2008-2009), the first elements of policy will be consolidated and new scenarios will be studied (one worsened scenario and one scenario with alpha emitting radionuclide). in parallel, a procedure for local actor's consultation should be elaborated. (authors)

  6. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  7. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  8. Physics of Radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Harold Elford

    1983-01-01

    Authority, comprehensivity and a consummate manner of presentation have been hallmarks of The Physics of Radiology since it first saw publication some three decades past. This Fourth Edition adheres to that tradition but again updates the context. It thoroughly integrates ideas recently advanced and practices lately effected. Students and professionals alike will continue to view it, in essence, as the bible of radiological physics.

  9. Gout. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Calvo Paramo, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the clinical and radiological aspects of gout, showing the most frequent radiological findings that can guide to the correct diagnosis of the disease. The cases that we presented here have been analyzed for many years in our rheumatology service, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Bogota

  10. Radiology Resident Supply and Demand: A Regional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Cory M

    2017-09-01

    Radiology was subject to crippling deficits in the number of jobs available to graduates of training programs from 2012 through 2015. As the specialty transitions to the assimilation of osteopathic training programs and the welcoming of direct competition from new integrated interventional radiology programs, the assessment of growth in radiology training positions over the 10 years preceding this pivotal time will serve to characterize the genesis of the crisis while inspiring stakeholders to avoid similar negative fluctuations in the future. The number of per capita radiology trainees in each region was derived from data published by the National Resident Matching Program, as were annual match statistics over the years 2012 through 2016. Data regarding new interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology enrollees were also obtained from the National Resident Matching Program. The seven states with the most per capita radiology residents were in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States in both 2006 and 2016, and three of these seven also showed the greatest per capita growth over the course of the 10 years studied. New radiology programs were accredited during the peak of the job shortage. Integrated interventional radiology training created 24 de novo radiology residents in the 2017 match. Fill rates are weakly positively correlated with program size. Unregulated radiology program growth persisted during the decade leading up to 2016. The region with the fewest jobs available since 2012 is also home to the greatest number of per capita radiology residents. Numerous published opinions during the crisis did not result in enforced policy change. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The combined application of radiology, nuclear medicine and fine needle aspiration biopsy cytology (FNAB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo, P.L.; Ruis, I.A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The combination of diagnostic cytology and diagnostic radiology, including intervention radiology, is a logical one. Radiology can visualize lesions which cannot be found otherwise and under its guidance cytology can obtain a direct and usually diagnostic proof of the true nature of the process with minimal inconvenience and risk for the patient. A survey of the combination of cytology and radiological procedures in the diagnosis work-up is outlined. (Auth.)

  12. Radiological diagnosis of the paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohnen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Although diseases of the paranasal sinuses have a relatively homogeneous clinical presentation, their causes can vary considerably. Radiological imaging only became relevant in paranasal sinus diagnostics following the introduction of cross-sectional imaging. In addition to technical details on imaging procedures and the individual criteria of the different modalities, anatomic details and congenital variations are presented. Particularly in acute inflammatory diseases as well as traumatic lesions, imaging is essential in preoperative planning and postoperative control. The article gives a detailed description of options in radiologic imaging of the paranasal sinuses. (orig.) [de

  13. A Lean Six Sigma journey in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Ronald V; Musitano, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The department of radiology at Akron Children's Hospital embarked on a Lean Six Sigma mission as part of a hospital wide initiative to show increased customer satisfaction, reduce employee dissatisfaction and frustration, and decrease costs. Three processes that were addressed were reducing the MRI scheduling back-log, reconciling discrepancies in billing radiology procedures, and implementing a daily management system. Keys to success is that managers provide opportunities to openly communicate between department sections to break down barriers. Executive leaders must be engaged in Lean Six Sigma for the company to be successful.

  14. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis: Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted State(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division (M ampersand A) is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC M ampersand A and the content and preparation of the manual

  15. Patient dosimetry in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mauro Wilson O. da; Canevaro, Lucia V.; Rodrigues, Barbara Beatriz D.

    2009-01-01

    Mapping skin doses in interventional radiology is useful to determine the probability of a possible injury, to detect areas of overlapping field and to obtain a permanent register of the most exposed skin areas. A method for the evaluation of patient doses in interventional radiology procedures is the slow film, Kodak EDR2 (Extended Dose Range). Kodak EDR 2 film was calibrated in the range of 50 kVp to 120 kVp beam qualities. Its dose-response curve was plotted up to the saturation point of 1000 mGy. Dose responses are a function of facility dependent factors including processing conditions the density sampling, and exposure monitoring equipment. The distribution and the form of all the irradiation fields have been registered in the Kodak EDR 2 films. The Dosimetric analysis was performed in a sample of 37 patients submitted the procedures coronariography and angioplasty. The film has a threshold of saturation around 1 Gy, the applied methodology is efficient to quantify the doses and to identify the distribution of the fields. (author)

  16. Health Risks of Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oraby, M.N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during diagnostic radiologic procedures carries small but real risks. Children, young adults and pregnant women are especially vulnerable. Exposure of patients to diagnostic energy levels of ionizing radiation should be kept to the minimum necessary to provide useful clinical information and allay patients concerns about radiation-related risks. Computerized Tomography (CT) accounts for two thirds of the cumulative patient dose from diagnostic radiological procedures and the cumulative dose from CT is rising as technological advances increase the number of indications and the capabilities of CT. Carcinogenesis and teratogenesis are the main concerns with ionizing radiation. The risk increases as the radiation dose increases. There is no minimum threshold and the risk is cumulative: a dose of 1 mSv once a year for 10 years is equivalent to a single dose of 10 mSv. Whenever practical, choose an imaging test that uses less radiation or no radiation and lengthen the periods between follow-up imaging tests. Some patients may avoid screening mammography because of fear of radiation-induced cancer, yet this test uses a very small radiation dose (0.6 mSv, much less than the annual dose from background radiation, 3.6 mSv). (author)

  17. Radiology residents' experience with intussusception reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateni, Cyrus; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Li, Chin-Shang

    2011-01-01

    Residents should be exposed to adequate procedural volume to act independently upon completion of training. Informal inquiry led us to question whether residents encounter enough intussusception reductions to become comfortable with the procedure. We sought to determine radiology residents' exposure to intussusception reductions, and whether their experiences vary by region or institution. U.S. radiology residency program directors were asked to encourage their residents to complete a 12-question online survey describing characteristics of their pediatric radiology department, experiences with intussusception reduction, and confidence in their own ability to perform the procedure. Six hundred sixty-four residents responded during the study period. Of those, 308 (46.4%) had not experienced an intussusception reduction, and 228 (34%) had experienced only one or two. Twenty-two percent of fourth-year residents had never experienced an intussusception reduction, and 21% had experienced only one. Among second- through fourth-year residents, only 99 (18.3%) felt confident that they could competently reduce an intussusception (P < 0.0001), and 336 (62.2%) thought they would benefit from a computer-assisted training model simulating intussusception reduction (P < 0.0001). Radiology residents have limited opportunity to learn intussusception reduction and therefore lack confidence. Most think they would benefit from additional training with a computer-simulation model. (orig.)

  18. Patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: X-ray examinations remain an essential and widely used diagnostic tool in medicine and hence the most significant source of exposure to man-made radiation for populations. Patterns of practice in diagnostic radiology continue to evolve, with overall growth in the numbers of procedures worldwide and, particularly in developed countries, increasing importance for complex procedures such as computed tomography (CT) and interventional techniques. In order to maximise the benefits from x-rays relative to the associated radiation risks, there is a need to ensure the prior justification of all examinations and the optimisation of patient protection such that doses are as low as reasonably practicable to meet specific clinical requirements. Accordingly, patient dosimetry is a fundamental requirement in diagnostic radiology. Detailed measurements for the assessment of risks or comparison of different types of procedure require the estimation of organ and effective doses. Such comprehensive dosimetry necessarily involves the simulation of clinical practice using anthropomorphic phantoms, with either measurements in a physical phantom or calculations utilising a mathematical phantom. Simpler measurements for the routine monitoring of dose in x-ray departments can be based on practical quantities such as entrance surface dose, dose-area product and, for CT, weighted CT dose index and dose-length product. Widescale surveys reveal significant variations between departments in the typical doses for a given type of procedure and potential scope for dose reductions. In order to promote improvements in practice, the results of periodic dose surveys in departments should be compared with appropriate standards, such as diagnostic reference levels for adult and paediatric patients, that are set nationally or locally for the purposes of promoting critical review of the equipment and techniques in use. Patient dosimetry should form an essential element of routine quality

  19. Safety of Conscious Sedation In Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arepally, Aravind; Oechsle, Denise; Kirkwood, Sharon; Savader, Scott J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To identify rates of adverse events associated with the use of conscious sedation in interventional radiology.Methods: In a 5-month period, prospective data were collected on patients undergoing conscious sedation for interventional radiology procedures (n = 594). Adverse events were categorized as respiratory, sedative, or major adverse events. Respiratory adverse events were those that required oral airway placement, ambu bag, or jaw thrust. Sedation adverse events were unresponsiveness, oxygen saturation less than 90%, use of flumazenil/naloxone, or agitation. Major adverse events were hypotension, intubation, CPR, or cardiac arrest. The frequency of adverse events for the five most common radiology procedures were determined.Results: The five most common procedures (total n = 541) were biliary tube placement/exchange (n = 182), tunneled catheter placement (n 135), diagnostic arteriography (n = 125), vascular interventions (n = 52), and other catheter insertions (n = 46). Rates for respiratory, sedation, and major adverse events were 4.7%, 4.2%, and 2.0%, respectively. The most frequent major adverse event was hypotension (2.0%). Biliary procedures had the highest rate of total adverse events (p < .05) and respiratory adverse events (p < .05).Conclusion: The frequency of adverse events is low with the use of conscious sedation during interventional procedures. The highest rates occurred during biliary interventions

  20. Ethnic and Gender Diversity in Radiology Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Derek L; Nguyen, HaiThuy

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess ethnic and gender diversity in US radiology fellowship programs from 2006 to 2013. Data for this study was obtained from Journal of the American Medical Association supplements publications from 2005 to 2006 to 2012-2013 (Gonzalez-Moreno, Innov Manag Policy Pract. 15(2):149, 2013; Nivet, Acad Med. 86(12):1487-9, 2011; Reede, Health Aff. 22(4):91-3, 2003; Chapman et al., Radiology 270(1):232-40, 2014; Getto, 2005; Rivo and Satcher, JAMA 270(9):1074-8, 1993; Schwartz et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 149(1):71-6, 2013; Simon, Clin Orthop Relat Res. 360:253-9, 1999) and the US census 2010. For each year, Fisher's exact test was used to compare the percentage of women and under-represented minorities in each Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-certified radiology fellowship to the percentage of women and under-represented minorities in (1) all ACGME-certified radiology fellowships combined, (2) radiology residents, (3) ACGME-certified fellows in all of medicine combined, (4) ACGME-certified residents in all of medicine combined, and (5) graduating medical students. Chi-Squared test was used to compare the percentage of women and under-represented minorities and the 2010 US census. p gender and ethnic disparities. Outreach efforts, pipeline programs, and mentoring may be helpful in addressing this issue.

  1. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  2. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Guidelines for radiological interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    The German Radiological Society, in cooperation with other German professional bodies, set up draft Guidelines for Radiological Interventions and submitted them to the professional community for discussion. The Guidelines are meant to assess the potential of radiological interventions as treatment alternatives to surgery or aggressive therapy such as chemotherapy. In fact, technical practicability on its own is insufficient to warrant intervention. The Guidelines are systematically compiled notions and recommendations whose aim it is to provide support to physicians and patients in choosing suitable medical care provisions (prevention, diagnosis, therapy, aftertreatment) in specific circumstances. A complete Czech translation of the Guidelines is given. (P.A.)

  4. Accreditation of professionals for radiological protection in medical and dental radiology at Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Teogenes A. da; Pereira, Elton G.; Alonso, Thessa C.; Guedes, Elton C.; Goncalves, Elaine C.; Nogueira, Maria Angela A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of the CDTN/CNEN as far as the radiological protection services in the medical and dental radiology has changed a lot due to the new Regulatory Directives. The CDTN/CNEN was recognized as the regional reference center for providing not only radiological survey services, but to coordinate an accreditation procedure for professional persons to be accepted by the State Regulatory Authorities to work at Minas Gerais. All the new activities were formalized in a Cooperation Agreement between the CDTN/CNEN and the Regulatory Authority. This paper describes the accreditation procedure for candidates, the adopted requirements, the intercomparison results among measuring instruments and the main achievements during the first year of the Agreement. (author)

  5. Radiologic examination of orthopaedics. Methods and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafner, E.; Meuli, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    This volume describes in detail radiological examinations of the skeleton modern procedures in orthopaedic surgery. Special emphasis is given to functional examination techniques based upon the authors' extensive work on standardized radiological examinations best suited to the needs of orthopaedic surgeons. These techniques were developed at the Radiodiagnostic Department of the Central Radiological Clinic, Bern University, in cooperation with the University Clinic of Orthopaedics and Surgery of the Locomotor System. Exposure techniques are explained concisely, yet with extraordinary precision and attention to detail. They have proved highly successful in teaching programs for X-ray technicians and as standard examination techniques for many hospitals, X-ray departments, orthopaedic units, and private clinics. Recommended for orthopaedic surgeons, radiologists, general surgeons, and X-ray technicians, this definitive treatise, with its superb X-ray reproductions and complementary line drawings, explains how to achieve improved diagnoses and standardized control with the least possible radiation exposure to the patient

  6. Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology for Paediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the radiation dose to children from diagnostic radiology examinations has recently been popularly expressed, particularly as related to computed tomography (CT) procedures. This involves the observation that children can receive doses far in excess of those delivered to adults, in part due to the digital nature of the image receptors that may give no warning to the operator of the dose to the patient. Concern for CT examinations should be extended to the broad range of paediatric diagnostic radiological procedures responsible for radiation doses in children, especially as factors, such as increased radiosensitivity and the longer life expectancy of children, increase the associated radiation risk. In all cases, owing to the added paediatric radiological examination factor of patient size and its associated impact on equipment selection, clinical examination protocol and dosimetric audit, the determination of paediatric dose requires a distinct approach from adult dosimetry associated with diagnostic radiological examinations. In response to this, there is a need to inform health professionals about standardized methodologies used to determine paediatric dose for all major modalities such as general radiography, fluoroscopy and CT. Methodologies for standardizing the conduct of dose audits and their use for the derivation and application of diagnostic reference levels for patient populations, that vary in size, are also required. In addition, a review is needed of the current knowledge on risks specific to non-adults from radiation, and also an analysis of the management of factors contributing to dose from paediatric radiological examinations. In 2007, the IAEA published a code of practice, Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology: An International Code of Practice, as Technical Reports Series No. 457 (TRS 457). TRS 457 recommends procedures for dosimetric measurement and calibration for the attainment of standardized dosimetry, and addresses requirements

  7. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  8. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meetings of Interest Online Education Job Board CME Policies CBN Fellowship Certificate Research Grant Program Resources All Resources Approved Procedures Patient Safety Vignettes Dr. Mason Historical Library Governing Documents Guidelines Access and Insurance Position and ...

  9. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi......Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP...... and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...

  10. Diagnostic radiology: I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter describes the historic development of diagnostic equipment for radiology. The problems associated with fluoroscope design are detailed and the current uses of updated technology, particularly digitization, are considered. Numerous historical photographs are included. 13 refs

  11. Ergonomics in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, N. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.uk; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations.

  12. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Ergonomics in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, N.; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V.

    2009-01-01

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations

  15. Radiology Architecture Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Hogan, Laurie; Teshima, Satoshi; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-19

    The rapid pace of technologic advancement and increasing expectations for patient- and family-friendly environments make it common for radiology leaders to be involved in imaging remodel and construction projects. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in architectural and construction processes but are expected to play significant and often leading roles in all phases of an imaging construction project. Avoidable mistakes can result in significant increased costs and scheduling delays; knowledgeable participation and communication can result in a final product that enhances staff workflow and morale and improves patient care and experience. This article presents practical guidelines for preparing for and leading a new imaging architectural and construction project. We share principles derived from the radiology and nonradiology literature and our own experience over the past decade completely remodeling a large pediatric radiology department and building a full-service outpatient imaging center. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiology and the law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Law of Medical Malpractice: An Overview; The Radiologist as Defendant; The Radiologist as an Expert Witness; The Missed Diagnosis; Legalities of the Radiograph; and Angiography and Interventional Radiology

  17. Discussion on the method of environmental radiological impact assessment for the highway construction project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Guohua

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristics and environmental radiological impact of the highway construction project, the basic procedure of environmental radiological impact assessment for the highway construction project is put forward, including analysis and determination of contamination sources, selection of evaluation factors, determination of assessment range and dose limit, environmental investigation, environmental impact prediction and assessment. The working method of each procedure is analyzed. (authors)

  18. Occupational exposure of diagnostic radiology staff in Israel during 1994-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biran, T.; Malchi, S.; Shamai, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Personnel who perform interventional radiological procedures which involve long fluoroscopy times and with a high workload, may receive radiation doses comparable to one of the dose limits suggested by the International Commission on Radiological protection. It is therefore important to monitor accurately the radiation dose to every staff member. who is involved in fluoroscopy procedures. (authors)

  19. Radiological clerkships as a critical curriculum component in radiology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore the perceived value of clinical clerkships in the radiology curriculum as well as the impact of radiology clerkship on students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole and as a career. Methods: This study is a sequel to a previous survey in which student perceptions about radiology curriculum components were investigated. The present study focuses on a further analysis of a subsection in this study, based on 14 statements about radiology clerkship and two statements about radiology as a career. Results: Perceived usefulness of the aspects of radiology clerkship as 'radiology examination', 'skills development' and 'diagnosis focus' were awarded the highest scores. The predict value of the subscale 'radiology examination' on the level of performance was very high (adjusted R 2 = 0.19, p < .001). Conclusion: Students expressed highly favorable evaluation of clerkship as a learning environment to learn to order and to interpret imaging studies as well as an unique possibility to attend various radiological examinations and to access to specific radiology software systems, as well as to get a better view on radiology and to improve image interpretation skills. This positive attitude towards clerkship is closely tied to students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole. These aspects of dedicated radiology clerkship are crucial for effective and high-quality education as well as for the choice of radiology as a career.

  20. Evaluation of the conditions and practices of radiological protection technicians in radiology, according to Ordinance 453

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Rogerio Ferreira da

    2013-01-01

    Professionals in radiology suffer whole body exposure to low doses for long periods . The system of radiological protection should keep exposures below recommended thresholds, thus avoiding the stochastic effects that can be triggered with any dose level value, and there is not a threshold for induction of the same. Therefore it is important to use personal dosimeter for monitoring doses and protective equipment. The increase in procedures using ionizing radiation in recent years has been noted with concern, since many companies are not complying with the standards of protection. This is because some procedures may be performed without the need of surgery, which presents a greater risk to the patient. Furthermore, Brazilians are being exposed to radiation without necessity. The reasons range from radiological equipment miscalibrated to poorly trained staff. Thus we evaluate the conditions and practices of radiation protection technicians in radiology according to Ordinance 453 in Goiania, GO, Brazil. Through a descriptive survey with a quantitative approach, we used the technique of gathering information based on a questionnaire. From this survey, we identified the procedures used by radiation protection professionals and concluded that there are failures in the procedures for protecting patients and accompanying and in the training of the professionals. (author)

  1. Radiologic science for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of physics, biology and protection for the radiologic technology student. It presents a significant portion of all of the science required of radiologic technology students under one cover. Chapter content reflects a readable and practical organization with outlines listed on the first page of each chapter and sample problems at the end. New to this edition are: new and expanded sections on radiation techniques, digital imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound

  2. Hygiene in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp-Schwoerer, A.; Daschner, F.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the hygienic management in radiological departments with special regard to the handling of injections and infusions. It includes prevention of bacterial as well as viral infections. In radiological departments disinfection of X-ray tables is necessary only in exceptional cases. A special proposal for disinfection is added. A safe method of sterilisation of flexible catheders is included, which proved to prevent bacterial infection. (orig.) [de

  3. Radiological protection act, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and dissolves An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh (the Board), transferring its assets and liabilities to the Institute. It sets out a range of radiation protection measures to be taken by various Ministers in the event of a radiological emergency and gives effect at national level to the Assistance Convention, the Early Notification Convention and the Physical Protection Convention. The Institute is the competent Irish authority for the three Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  4. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...... is cyclic: exacerbations relieved by asymptomatic periods. New imaging modalities, including the combination of MR imaging and multiplanar 3-D CT scans, have broadened our awareness of possible pain-generating degenerative processes of the lumbar spine other than disc degeneration....

  5. Emergency procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed - Emergency Procedures: emergency equipment, emergency procedures; emergency procedure involving X-Ray equipment; emergency procedure involving radioactive sources

  6. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University, Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic.

  7. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic

  8. Policy and Strategies for Environmental Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In the environmental remediation of a given site, concerned and interested parties have diverse and often conflicting interests with regard to remediation goals, the time frames involved, reuse of the site, the efforts necessary and cost allocation. An environmental remediation policy is essential for establishing the core values on which remediation is to be based. It incorporates a set of principles to ensure the safe and efficient management of remediation situations. Policy is mainly established by the national government and may become codified in the national legislative system. An environmental remediation strategy sets out the means for satisfying the principles and requirements of the national policy. It is normally established by the relevant remediation implementer or by the government in the case of legacy sites. Thus, the national policy may be elaborated in several different strategies. To ensure the safe, technically optimal and cost effective management of remediation situations, countries are advised to formulate an appropriate policy and strategies. Situations involving remediation include remediation of legacy sites (sites where past activities were not stringently regulated or adequately supervised), remediation after emergencies (nuclear and radiological) and remediation after planned ongoing operation and decommissioning. The environmental policy involves the principles of justification, optimization of protection, protection of future generations and the environment, efficiency in the use of resources, and transparent interaction with stakeholders. A typical policy will also take into account the national legal framework and institutional structure and applicable international conventions while providing for the allocation of responsibilities and resources, in addition to safety and security objectives and public information and participation in the decision making process. The strategy reflects and elaborates the goals and requirements set

  9. New nuclear build and evolving radiological protection challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2010-01-01

    Many trends and indicators suggest that the use of nuclear power for generating electricity will increase, perhaps significantly, in the coming 10 to 20 years and beyond. Any such expansion will not take place in a static scientific or social context, but rather in the midst of ongoing changes in many relevant fields, radiological protection, radioactive waste management and nuclear safety to name a few. Regarding radiological protection, this evolution can be characterised in many different ways, but can conveniently be described as having scientific and socially driven aspects. These may well pose challenges to radiological protection (RP) policy, regulation and application in the future

  10. ICRP PUBLICATION 121: Radiological Protection in Paediatric Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P-L.; Ringertz, H.; Donoghue, V.; Frush, D.; Rehani, M.; Appelgate, K.; Sanchez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric patients have a higher average risk of developing cancer compared with adults receiving the same dose. The longer life expectancy in children allows more time for any harmful effects of radiation to manifest, and developing organs and tissues are more sensitive to the effects of radiation. This publication aims to provide guiding principles of radiological protection for referring clinicians and clinical staff performing diagnostic imaging and interventional procedures for paediatric patients. It begins with a brief description of the basic concepts of radiological protection, followed by the general aspects of radiological protection, including principles of justification and optimisation. Guidelines and suggestions for radiological protection in specific modalities – radiography and fluoroscopy, interventional radiology, and computed tomography – are subsequently covered in depth. The report concludes with a summary and recommendations. The importance of rigorous justification of radiological procedures is emphasised for every procedure involving ionising radiation, and the use of imaging modalities that are non-ionising should always be considered. The basic aim of optimisation of radiological protection is to adjust imaging parameters and institute protective measures such that the required image is obtained with the lowest possible dose of radiation, and that net benefit is maximised to maintain sufficient quality for diagnostic interpretation. Special consideration should be given to the availability of dose reduction measures when purchasing new imaging equipment for paediatric use. One of the unique aspects of paediatric imaging is with regards to the wide range in patient size (and weight), therefore requiring special attention to optimisation and modification of equipment, technique, and imaging parameters. Examples of good radiographic and fluoroscopic technique include attention to patient positioning, field size and adequate collimation

  11. A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetser, Inge C. J.; Vries, Eefje N. de; Delden, Otto M. van; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-01-01

    To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

  12. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook

  13. Radiation Protection in Paediatric Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, special issues have arisen regarding the protection of children undergoing radiological examinations. These issues have come to the consciousness of a gradually widening group of concerned professionals and the public, largely because of the natural instinct to protect children from unnecessary harm. Some tissues in children are more sensitive to radiation and children have a long life expectancy, during which significant pathology can emerge. The instinct to protect children has received further impetus from the level of professional and public concern articulated in the wake of media responses to certain publications in the professional literature. Many institutions have highlighted the need to pay particular attention to the special problems of protecting paediatric patients. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has noted it and the IAEA's General Safety Requirements publication, Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards (BSS), requires it. This need has been endorsed implicitly in the advisory material on paediatric computed tomography scanning issued by bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Cancer Institute in the United States of America, as well as by many initiatives taken by other national and regional radiological societies and professional bodies. A major part of patient exposure, in general, and paediatric exposure, in particular, now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that this innovation has been driven both by the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind industrial and clinical innovations. This Safety Report is designed to consolidate and provide timely advice on

  14. Strengthening the scientific basis of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The overarching objective of the radiological protection system is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection against the harmful effects of radiation exposure, without unjustifiably limiting the desired results from the human activity causing exposure. Such a balance is achieved by understanding as best as possible the scientific characteristics of radiation exposure and the related health effects, and by taking this knowledge into consideration when judging which protection decisions will ensure the best balance between social and economic aspects and risks. In general, the existing radiological protection system, on which national regulations are built in virtually every country in the world, works well and does not underestimate protection needs for either individuals or exposed populations as a whole. The latest International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations, which define this protection system, were formed after a long and open dialogue with the public, where expert views were actively collected and discussed at national, regional and international levels. Although the radiological protection system is very effective, and there is no current need for a prompt revision, it is important nonetheless to keep a watchful eye on the latest scientific results, and to work to ensure that the entire radiological protection community is kept up to date on evolving and emerging scientific issues. In this way, potential or actual scientific changes can be appropriately identified and in turn can stimulate reflection on changes that might be needed in the protection system, in policy, in regulation and in practice. Such reflection should benefit from the input of other scientific disciplines and interested stakeholders. To contribute to this process, the NEA Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has periodically reviewed and released reports on the state of the art in radiological protection science (see NEA

  15. Technical support and preparations for the response to radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas H, J.; Ramos V, E.O.; Fernandez G, I.M.; Capote F, E.; Zerquera J, T.; Garcia L, O.; Lopez B, G.; Molina P, D.; Lamdrid B, A.I.; Benitez N, J.C.; Salgado M, M.; Lopez F, Y.; Jerez V, P.

    2006-01-01

    The work picks up the efforts directed to elevate the technical capacity of the answer in front of the radiological emergencies. Expressing them by means of the actions carried out as for teaching, research and development and intervention before accidental radiological events. The same one reflects the leading role of the participant institutions in those marks of the answer system to radiological emergencies that for its technical level it satisfies the national and international demands in the matter. In execution of the mentioned goals research projects guided to endow to the national system of methodologies and procedures for the administration of radiological emergencies have been executed that favor the improvement of its technical and organizational capacities. As well as the postulates of the National Plan of Measures for Case of Catastrophes in the corresponding to radiological accidents. (Author)

  16. Determination of action zone in the nuclear / radiology handling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade Awalludin

    2013-01-01

    Assessment has been conducted on determination of action zone in nuclear or radiological emergency. The assessment is taken into account radiological risk level in nuclear or radiological emergency management process outside nuclear installation. Managing of nuclear emergency is same as that one of other emergency by adding the principles of radiation protection. This study aims to provide guidance in making of safety and security perimeter outside the nuclear installation for first responders during nuclear/radiological emergency based on dose rate, contamination level or distance from the scene. Separation of working zone is important for first responder safety that works in radiological environment in the event of nuclear or radiation emergency without violating their standard operating procedure. Value limit of safety and security perimeter has been made according to the conditions in Indonesia and considering the applicability in practical. (author)

  17. Room design in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achalli, Sonika

    2013-01-01

    Radiography and radiographic examination of the patient form most valuable diagnostic tool in providing comprehensive dental care. The safe and effective use of the X-ray equipment is important for the protection of the patient, other members of the public and all members of the dental team. For patients, the risk that is associated with exposure to X-rays must always be weighed against the clinical benefit of an accurate diagnosis. The risks associated with the exposure to the X-rays during the radiographic examination of the patient must be minimised by meticulously adhering to good practice and thus carefully managing the use of dental radiological procedures. The dentist or the personnel who is the license holder for the X-ray equipment is ultimately responsible for the radiation safety at the workplace. One important method in limiting the possible risk of radiation exposure at workplace is the correct design of an X-ray room. This paper is aimed at discussing the guidelines and recommendations on X-ray room designs in dental radiology in order to facilitate radiation control and safe working conditions for radiation workers as well as the public. (author)

  18. Radiological imaging of the kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaia, Emilio (ed.) [Trieste Univ. Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy). Ist. Radiologia

    2011-07-01

    This book provides a unique and comprehensive analysis of the normal anatomy and pathology of the kidney and upper urinary tract from the modern diagnostic imaging point of view. The first part is dedicated to the embryology and normal radiological anatomy of the kidney and anatomic variants. The second part presents in detail all of the imaging modalities which can be employed to assess the kidney and the upper urinary tract, including ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. Patient preparation and investigation protocols are accurately described, and the principal fields of application of each imaging modality are clearly highlighted. The entire spectrum of kidney pathologies is then presented in a series of detailed chapters. Each pathology is illustrated by high-quality images obtained with state of the art equipment and the most advanced imaging modalities, as well as by figures showing macroscopic and microscopic specimens. The latest innovations in interventional radiology, biopsy procedures, and parametric and molecular imaging are also described, as is the relationship between contrast media and kidney function. This book will be of great interest to all radiologists, oncologists, and urologists who are involved in the management of kidney pathologies in their daily clinical practice. (orig.)

  19. Radiological imaging of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaia, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a unique and comprehensive analysis of the normal anatomy and pathology of the kidney and upper urinary tract from the modern diagnostic imaging point of view. The first part is dedicated to the embryology and normal radiological anatomy of the kidney and anatomic variants. The second part presents in detail all of the imaging modalities which can be employed to assess the kidney and the upper urinary tract, including ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. Patient preparation and investigation protocols are accurately described, and the principal fields of application of each imaging modality are clearly highlighted. The entire spectrum of kidney pathologies is then presented in a series of detailed chapters. Each pathology is illustrated by high-quality images obtained with state of the art equipment and the most advanced imaging modalities, as well as by figures showing macroscopic and microscopic specimens. The latest innovations in interventional radiology, biopsy procedures, and parametric and molecular imaging are also described, as is the relationship between contrast media and kidney function. This book will be of great interest to all radiologists, oncologists, and urologists who are involved in the management of kidney pathologies in their daily clinical practice. (orig.)

  20. Radiological diagnosis of skeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numberger, J.

    1982-01-01

    The general X-ray-symptoms follow one another or appear at the same time: Swelling of soft tissues by fungus; toxic perifocal and sometimes parafocal osteoporosis; osteolysis by specific granulation tissues; destruction of adjacent discs and articulation cartilages; formation of sequesters; cold abscess and formation of fistulas because of perforation of the corticalis by liquified tuberculous tissue; bone compression and deformation; amorphous calcifications; perifocal osteosclerosis as a repairing process. The spondylitis tuberculosis is the most frequent form with about 50%; usually narrowing of the discspace is the earliest X-ray-finding. On the second and third place follow the tuberculosis of the hip- and the knee-joint, the rest shows up at other locations of red bone marrow. Very often the perifocal osteoporosis is the earliest X-ray-symptom of joint tuberculosis. All X-ray-findings, even the earliest, in reality are late symptoms, because at that time the disease exists at least some months. Radiologically only the differential diagnosis can be made, final diagnosis is established by histologic examination only. Because the course of untreated skeletal tuberculosis usually is chronic and destructive and, on the other hand early antituberculous chemotherapy as well as surgical treatment show excellent results early radiological suggestion of tuberculosis is of great importance for initiating other diagnostic procedures to establish the diagnosis. (orig./MG) [de