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Sample records for radioiodine i-131 therapy

  1. Three cases of respiratory failure after I-131 radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Masayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    We report three cases of respiratory failure after I-131 radioiodine therapy. All cases involved relapsed cervical lesions, and two showed edema of the larynx. Emergency tracheostomy was performed to treat the respiratory failure in one case while the others were treated conservatively. All patients showed improvements without after-effects. Patients who undergo I-131 radioiodine therapy, especially those with cervical lesions, should be carefully monitored for this rare complication after treatment. (author)

  2. Radioiodine (I-131) therapy and the influence of antithyroid medication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duldulao, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine therapy began to play a major role in the management of hyperthyroidism as early as 1941. It later evolved to become what it is today, the treatment of choice for majority of patients who are suffering from Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter. It is generally considered safe, inexpensive, effective, and devoid of major side effects. Despite the extensive experience with radioactive therapy, the adjunctive role of antithyroid medication remains controversial. Some authors claim that it has a positive influence on the outcome of radioiodine therapy while others insist otherwise. The reasons behind the adjunctive use of antithyroid medication include a more rapid attainment of euthyroid state and a decrease in the rise of developing thyroid crisis. However, a higher treatment failure rate is observed compared to radioiodine alone. This is due to the reputed radioprotective effect of the antithyroid medication. As a result, higher doses of I-131 are needed in order to obtain the desired effect but, unfortunately, that would also increase the radiation exposure to the rest of the body. The majority of clinicians would require discontinuation of the medication a few days before therapy to overcome these undesirable effects but the question is, is this safe? The issue of when antithyroid medication is warranted is a big question to the clinician. For optimal use of radioiodine therapy, appropriate selection criteria and good clinical judgment concerning pretreatment with antithyroid medication are required. Otherwise, we may put some patients into unnecessary increased risk and added cost. (author)

  3. Radioiodine (I-131) therapy in thyroid cancer differentiated type (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Carcinoma thyroid is not an uncommon malignancy in Pakistan because of its location in iodine deficient terrain. Painless palpable (solitary) thyroid nodule is the common presentation in majority (>90%) of the patients and > 25% cold nodules in females turned malignant on biopsy whereas in males >75% of cold nodules turned malignant on historical examination. The disease is more common in females as compared to males (3:1) and in females pure papillary carcinoma is more common whereas in males mostly follicular or mixed tumors are seen. Radical surgery (thyroidectomy) is not a routine surgical treatment in our country. In teaching hospitals the routine surgical procedure is lobectomy and Isthmectomy, whereas in DHQ Hospitals less surgical procedures, e.g. tumorectomy or partial labectomy etc. are done. Therefore, in view of limited/partial surgical ablation, I-131 ablation is mandatory for better and longer survival. We have treated 118 patients of thyroid carcinoma (Differential type) at our centre (AEMC) with therapeutic dose of Radioactive iodine (I-131) during the last 13 years with encouraging results (Disease free survival). (author)

  4. Efficiency of radioiodine therapy with a fix dose of I-131 in toxic thyroid adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovski, Z

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate the results obtained using a fix dose of I-131 in the treatment of the solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. Material and Methods: We have performed radioiodine therapy m 64 patients, 49 female (50+ 1 7 yrs) and 15 male (43+-15 yrs) with solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. 45 patients received fix dose I-131 of 850 MBq, while 19 patients were treated with calculated (MBq/gr) dose 555-1100 MBq Previously 39(64%) patients were clinically hyperthyreotic and received thyreostatic meditication which were interruptecf one week before the administration of I-131. Those patients who were euthyreotic, TSH was suppressed(<0.25 MU/m1). 61(95.3%) patients received a single dose, while 3(4, 7%) patients needed two doses. Resulting thyroid matabolism and volume of nodules were evaluated 6-48 months after treatment. Results: From 45 radioiodine treated patients with fix dose 6(9, 8%) became hypothyroidism, 36(85, 3%) euthyroidism and 3(4, 9%) recurrent hyperthyroidism, in comparison with 19 treated patients with calculated I-131 dose: 2(10, 5%) hypothyroidism, 16(84, 3%) euthyroidism and 1(5, 2%) recurrent hyperthyroidism. The size of the nodules became unpalpable m 17(26, 2%), decreased evidently in 33(52, 5%) and remained unchanged in 14(21, 3%) of the treated patients. Conclusion: A fix dose of I-131 is simple, safe and efficient in the treatment of solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. There was not significant different in incidence of late follow-up results of hypothyroidism and recurrent hyperthyroidism between fix dose and calculated MBq/gr dose. (authors)

  5. Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy for Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy Radioiodine therapy is a nuclear ... thyroid cancer. When a small dose of radioactive iodine I-131 (an isotope of iodine that emits ...

  6. Exhalation of I-131 after radioiodine therapy: time dependence and chemical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomaecker, K.; Fischer, T.; Eschner, W.; Gaidouk, M.I.; Schicha, H.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: The change of both amount and chemical forms of radioiodine exhaled in the air of rooms with patients on the therapy ward should be investigated depending on radioactivity applied, time after application, and kind of thyroid disease. Methods: The air of ward-rooms of 62 patients with thyroid carcinoma, Graves' Disease, and autonomy which received different therapy doses, was investigated with an portable constant air flow sampler. Different chemical iodine species (organic, elemental, aerosol bound) were collected during 8 hr in various filters until 3 days after application of the radioiodine capsule, according to their chemical form. The radioactivity in the filters was measured with a well counter on defined time points after application. Results: The radioactivity exhaled was between 0,008 and 0,03% related to activity of radioiodine applied. The percentage of radioiodine exhaled related to the activity applied, differed significantly depending on disease and changed as follows: Grave's disease > autonomy > carcinoma. The exhalation of radioiodine became stronger with increasing applied activities and showed an exponential decrease with time. The most part of radioiodine was present in organic bound form. This organic portion decreased with time in favour of the other iodine species. Conclusion: The degree of accumulation of radioiodine orally applied within thyroid seems to be in direct proportion to the extend of its exhalation. Further measurements directly in the breathing air of RIT-patients are necessary, in order to clarify the relationship between degree of thyroid uptake and quantity as well as chemical form of radioiodine exhaled. (orig.) [de

  7. Radioiodine (I-131) treatment for uncomplicated hyperthyroidism: An assessment of optimal dose and cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.K.; Rahman, H.A.; Jahan, N.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Radioiodine (I-131) is increasingly being considered for the treatment of hyperthyroidism but there is no general agreement for the initial dose. To determine the cost-effectiveness and optimal dose of I-131 to cure disease, we prospectively studied the outcome of radioiodine therapy of 423 patients. Material and Methods: Any of the fixed doses of 6, 8, 10, 12 or 15 mCi of I-131 was administered to the patients relating to thyroid gland size. The individual was excluded from this study who had multinodular goitre and autonomous toxic nodule. Patients were classified as cured if the clinical and biochemical status was either euthyroid or hypothyroid at one year without further treatment by antithyroid drugs or radioiodine. The costs were assessed by analyzing the total cost of care including office visit, laboratory testing, radioiodine treatment, average conveyance and income loss of patient and attendant and thyroxine replacement for a period of 2 years from the day of I-131 administration. Results: The results showed a progressive increase of cure rate from the doses of 6, 8 and 10 mCi by 67%, 76.5% and 85.7% respectively but the cure rate for the doses of 12 and 15 mCi was 87.9% and 88.8% respectively. Cure was directly related to the dose between 6 and 10 mCi but at higher doses the cure rate was increased marginally at the expense of increased total body radiation. There was little variation in total costs, but was higher for low dose-therapy and the cost proportion between the 6 mCi regimen and 10 mCi regimen was 1.04:1. Conclusion: We could conclude that an initial 10 mCi of I-131 may be the optimal dose for curing hyperthyroidism and will also limit the total costs

  8. Financial impact of outpatient clinic radioiodine therapy with sodium iodide I-131 for the treatment of patients with differentiated low-risk thyroid carcinoma in relation to hospital doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenguer, P.F.; Chang, T.M.C.; Silva, R.A.M.; Neto, A.H.D.; Belo, I.B.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2017-01-01

    Differential thyroid carcinoma (CDT) is the most prevalent endocrine malignancy in the world, with an excellent prognosis and a 10-year survival rate of over 95%. By 2013, the lowest activity of I-131 authorized by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) in the therapy of patients with low-risk CDT was 3,700 MBq, requiring hospitalization. Recent studies have shown similar effectiveness between low and high doses of I-131 in the treatment of low-risk CDT. In 2014, the Ministry of Health included in the list of SUS procedures the use of lower activities (1,110 MBq and 1,850 MBq) for this purpose. The Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) also authorized the outpatient use of activity up to 1,850 MBq of I-131. Objective: To evaluate the financial impact of the adoption of ambulatory radioiodine therapy in patients with CDT of low-risk when compared to the hospital dose. Methods: Analysis of patients with CDT low-risk who were treated with an outpatient dose of I-131 from August / 2014 to January / 2017 at a nuclear medicine service in Recife, PE, Brazil. The cost of outpatient versus hospital doses was calculated. Results: A total of 289 patients underwent low doses of iodine therapy were evaluated, resulting in a savings of R$227,793.80. Conclusion: Outpatient radioiodine therapy in the treatment of patients with CDT of low-risk resulted in a 61.10% reduction in SUS expense, in addition to enabling faster care

  9. Thyroid remnant ablation using 1,110 MBq of I-131 after total thyroidectomy. Regulatory considerations on release of patients after unsealed radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Ito, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to measure the radiation exposure level of caregivers following outpatient NaI (I-131) 1,110 MBq therapy for remnant thyroid ablation after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, and to evaluate the influence of activities of daily living on radiation exposure level, with the goal of proposing an optimum method of I-131 therapy. The study included 37 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, who had undergone total thyroidectomy and received outpatient based remnant thyroid ablation using NaI (I-131) 1,110 MBq, who were satisfying the following requirements: patients who have no evidence of distant metastases, whose living environments were appropriate for outpatient I-131 (1,110 MBq) therapy, and patients who gave written informed consent. The dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the body surface of the patient at the moment of release was measured using survey meters of the GM type or ionization chamber type. The dose level for the caregiver was measured with a personal dosimeter in all cases. The dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the patient's body surface 1 h after I-131 administration was in the range of 29-115 μSv/h (mean 63.8 μSv/h). The 7-day cumulative effective dose of caregivers was 0.11±0.08 mSv, on an average, in 34 dosimeters. In 31 of 34 dosimeters, cumulative effective dose of caregivers was below 0.2 mSv. Dose levels exceeding 0.2 mSv were recorded in 3 cases (0.21, 0.35 and 0.43 mSv in one case each). These results suggest that the exposure level of family members (caregiver and others) was minimal and is lower than the radiation levels affecting human environments. Outpatient-based remnant thyroid ablation with I-131 (1,110 MBq) performed after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is safe if applied in accordance with the appropriate supervision and guidance by experts with certain qualifications. (author)

  10. Autonomous Functioning Thyroid Nodule in a 4-year-old Male Child Treated with Radioiodine (I-131)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Abhishek; Bhutani, Puneet; Chauhan, Suneel

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous functioning thyroid nodules that cause toxic manifestations (toxic adenomas) are benign monoclonal tumors characterized by their capacity to grow and produce thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) autonomously, i.e. in the absence of thyrotropin thyroid stimulating hormone. Toxic adenomas are a rare presentation of hyperthyroidism in the pediatric population. Radioiodine (I-131) has been widely used for therapy of patients with toxic adenomas and is now accepted as a safe and effective treatment even in the pediatric age group. The authors here present a case of a 4-year-old boy with a solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule, who was successfully treated with radioiodine (I-131) and is presently on follow-up

  11. Financial impact of outpatient clinic radioiodine therapy with sodium iodide I-131 for the treatment of patients with differentiated low-risk thyroid carcinoma in relation to hospital doses; Impacto financeiro da radioiodoterapia ambulatorial com iodeto de sódio I-131 para tratamento de pacientes com carcinoma diferenciado da tireóide de baixo risco em relação às doses hospitalares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenguer, P.F.; Chang, T.M.C.; Silva, R.A.M.; Neto, A.H.D.; Belo, I.B., E-mail: pricilaberenguer@gmail.com [Instituto de Medicina Integral Professor Fernando Figueira, Recife, PE (Brazil). Serviço de Medicina Nuclear; Santos, M.A.P. [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife (Brazil). Coordenação de Radioproteção

    2017-07-01

    Differential thyroid carcinoma (CDT) is the most prevalent endocrine malignancy in the world, with an excellent prognosis and a 10-year survival rate of over 95%. By 2013, the lowest activity of I-131 authorized by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) in the therapy of patients with low-risk CDT was 3,700 MBq, requiring hospitalization. Recent studies have shown similar effectiveness between low and high doses of I-131 in the treatment of low-risk CDT. In 2014, the Ministry of Health included in the list of SUS procedures the use of lower activities (1,110 MBq and 1,850 MBq) for this purpose. The Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) also authorized the outpatient use of activity up to 1,850 MBq of I-131. Objective: To evaluate the financial impact of the adoption of ambulatory radioiodine therapy in patients with CDT of low-risk when compared to the hospital dose. Methods: Analysis of patients with CDT low-risk who were treated with an outpatient dose of I-131 from August / 2014 to January / 2017 at a nuclear medicine service in Recife, PE, Brazil. The cost of outpatient versus hospital doses was calculated. Results: A total of 289 patients underwent low doses of iodine therapy were evaluated, resulting in a savings of R$227,793.80. Conclusion: Outpatient radioiodine therapy in the treatment of patients with CDT of low-risk resulted in a 61.10% reduction in SUS expense, in addition to enabling faster care.

  12. The present status of I-131 therapy for Graves' hyperthyroidism in Japan. Survey by questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikekubo, Katsuji; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Kanaya, Shinichi; Nakada, Kunihiro; Mori, Yutaka

    2003-01-01

    A survey on the I-131 therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism was undertaken by questionnaire in 1,246 hospitals of Japan. One thousand and ninety seven of them (88.0%) responded to the questionnaire. In this paper, we report the results and analysis of the replies to the questionnaire. In the 121 hospitals (11.03%) of the respondents, I-131 therapy is being performed for Graves' hyperthyroidism. A gradual increase was observed in the annual number of I-131 treated Graves' disease patients during the period of 1998-2001, from 1,740 to 2,484. I-131 treatment was selected mainly for the cases with side effects from antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy, followed by the cases with complication of heart or hepatic diseases, recurrences of hyperthyroidism after surgery, radioiodine treatment, and long-term ATD treatment. The 41% of respondents used I-131 in order to restore euthyroidism, 34% aimed for hyperthyroidism and 41% used the dose properly between the two according to the patients. Administration dosage of I-131 was estimated mainly on the basis of thyroid uptake and volume in 93% of the respondents and 48% calculated the radiation dose by also determining the effective half-life in the thyroid gland. Thyroid size was estimated by scintigram (51%), ultrasonography (US) (33%), CT (22%) and palpation (12%). ATD treatment was used before I-131 administration by 70% of the respondents and 34% after radioiodine therapy. A low-iodine diet was given to the patients for a week (46%) or two weeks (47%) before I-131 administration. However, after treatment only 46% of the respondents continued low-iodine diet for a week. (author)

  13. Determination of Therapeutic Dose of I-131 for First High Dose Radioiodine Therapy in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Comparison of Usefulness between Pathological Staging, Serum Thyroglobulin Level and Finding of I-123 Whole Body Scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Youn, Hyun Jo; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of patients needed total thyroidectomy and high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RAI) get increased more. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether pathological staging (PS) and serum thyroglobulin (sTG) level could replace the diagnostic I-123 scan for the determination of therapeutic dose of HD-RAI in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Fifty eight patients (M:F=13;45, age 44.5±11.5 yrs) who underwent total thyroidectomy and central or regional lymph node dissection due to differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. Diagnostic scan of I-123 and sTG assay were also performed on off state of thyroid hormone. The therapeutic doses of I-131 (TD) were determined by the extent of uptakes on diagnostic I-123 scan as a gold standard. PS was graded by the criteria recommended in 6th edition of AJCC cancer staging manual except consideration of age. For comparison of the determination of therapeutic doses, PS and sTG were compared with the results of I-123 scan. All patients were underwent HD-RAI. Among them, five patients (8.6%) were treated with 100 mCi of I-131, forty three (74.1%) with 150 mCi, six (10.3%) with 180 mCi, three (5.2%) with 200 mCi, and one (1.7%) with 250 mCi, respectively. On the assessment of PS, average TDs were 154±25 mCi in stage I (n=9), 175±50 mCi in stage II (n=4), 149±21 mCi in stage III (n=38), and 161±20 mCi in stage IV (n=7). The statistical significance was not shown between PS and TD (p=0.169). Among fifty two patients who had available sTG, 25 patients (48.1%) having below 2 ng/mL of sTG were treated with 149±26 mCi of I-131, 9 patients (17.3%) having 2≤ sTG <5 ng/mL with 156±17 mCi, 5 patients (9.6%) having 5≤ sTG <10 ng/mL with 156±13 mCi, 7 patients (13.5%) having 10≤ sTG <50 ng/mL with 147±24 mCi, and 6 patients (11.5%) having above 50 ng/mL with 175±42 mCi. The statistical significance between sTG level and TD (p=0.252) was not shown. In conclusion, PS and sTG could not replace the

  14. Radioiodine (I-131) application in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanayakkara, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) remains one of the curable of all cancers. All literature reviews and clinical experiences regarding I 131 use in DTC conclude the beneficial effects, better prognosis, longer survival time and an assurance for cure. The Overall prognosis of patients with DTC is excellent if treat scientifically, adequately and timely. The management of thyroid cancer depends on the resources available in different institutions. Nuclear Medicine unit (NMU), Faculty of Medicine Peradeniya, Sri Lanka is in the process of uplifting the services for thyroid cancer management. Clinical audit was carried out in NMU on patients who utilized the Nuclear Medicine facilities in the management of DTC. It is important to identify deficiencies in current practice to improve our services. During January 2004 to March 2005, 126 DTC patients were referred for radioiodine Whole body scan (WBS) and therapy. Their age, sex, histology, extent of surgery, adequacy of thyroxine suppression treatment, monitoring with serum thyroglobulin levels (Tg), WBS results and radioiodine therapy were analyzed. There were 104(82.5%) females and 22(17.5%) males giving sex ratio of 4.7: 1. The Mean age was 35.5 years (range 9-58 years). The commonest histological types were papillary carcinoma 55.5% (n=70), follicular carcinoma 35% (n=44) and follicular variant of papillary carcinoma 9.5% (n=12). Seventy five percent (n=95) had total thyroidectomy (TT), 17 %(n=21) had near total thyroidectomy (NTT) and 8%(n=10) had subtotal thyroidectomy (STT). Sixty-nine patients (54.8%) were on thyroid suppression therapy. Thirty-six patients (28.6%) were referred to the WBS soon after surgery without initiation of thyroxine treatment. Another twenty-one patients (16.6%) were not on thyroxine therapy since surgery. Serum thyroglobulin was assessed on 20.6% (n=26). WBS done using 3-4 mCi liquid radioiodine showed residual functioning thyroid tissues in 41% (n=52). Lymph nodes or bone

  15. Radiation exposure in I-131 iodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, W.

    1985-01-01

    In the past five years, the applied I-131 radioactivity quantity has doubled with a constant number of beds. In 1984, it was 925 GBq (25 Ci). Despite this development, no changes in the professional radiation exposure were made out. The evaluation shows a dose smaller than 0.04 man Sv/TBq (0.16 man rem/Ci) of I-131 applied. This value is below the traceability limit of the film badges. The incorporation load of the personnel (27 members) was determined by monthly body counter measurements. Only in one measurement thyroid gland activity of 5 kBq (140 nCi) was detected. Most measurements did not show any incorporation; and the few positive results were below 0.74 kBq (20 nCi). The environmental load due to unfiltered release from patients' rooms was determined at the fence of the nuclear research plant. The maximum was 0.24 mSv/a thyroid gland dose of a small child in 1982 taking into account the measured 90% partion of organic compound iodine. The waste water is decayed following chemical treatment in storage tanks. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  17. Radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Jr, J F; Deliso, H B

    1993-12-31

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ({sup 131}I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  18. Teenage hyperthyroidism and radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.A.; Nisa, L.; Hoque, M.; Jehan, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To assess the efficacy of radioiodine therapy in teenage patients with hyperthyroidism. Method: The medical records of 28 patients (age range 16 -18 years) were purposely selected from a pool of 3637 hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine during the period January 1982 to December 2006. Data for analysis included the age, sex, clinical symptoms, type of hyperthyroidism, antithyroid medications received, doses of radioiodine therapy given and the outcome of the therapy after one and five years. Results: The mean age of the patients treated for hyperthyroidism was 17.60 ± 0.73 years and 82 % were females. The most common type of hyperthyroidism was Graves' disease (75%). All patients were pre-treated with antithyroid drugs for variable duration periods (6 months to 2 years). The mean administered dose of radioiodine was 10.69 ± 2.77 mCi. The dose of I-131 was calculated on the basis of gland size and morphology (assessment by palpation and scintigraphy) and percentage of radioactive iodine uptake. Effective control of hyperthyroidism after radioiodine treatment occurred in 60.72% patients with a single dose, 35.71% required a second dose and 3.57% required more than two doses. Frequency of early hypothyroidism within one year was 38.09 % in Graves' disease and 33.33% in toxic multinodular goiter. Most patients (66.66%) in the toxic nodule group remained euthyroid up to one year after I-131 therapy. Overall incidence rates of hypothyroidism after 1 year and 5 years of radioiodine therapy were 32.14% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperthyroidism in the teen group of patients was effectively controlled with radioiodine. There were no early side effects. The only long-term effect was hypothyroidism. Appearance of early/late hypothyroidism showed a direct relationship with the type of hyperthyroidism and the dose of radioiodine administered. In general, patients with Graves' disease showed a greater tendency in the evolution of early

  19. Initial radioiodine remnant ablation success rates compared by diagnostic scan methods: I123 versus I131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W.; Choi, E.; Yoo, I.; Kim, S.; Han, E.; Lee, S.; Lee, W.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objective: to see if diagnostic whole body scan (DxWBS) performed with I-131 prior diminishes the success rate of initial radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) compared to I-123 DxWBS in differentiated thyroid cancer patients. Material and methods: consecutive thyroid cancer patients who received total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and then high dose RRA (either 100 mCi or 150 mCi) within 6 months were included. DxWBSs were performed with I-123 or with I-131. Prior to the DxWBSs, all patients followed strict low iodine diet for 2 weeks and withdrew hormone to stimulate TSH above 30 mIU/l. Patients with extra-thyroidal extension of tumor, lymph node metastasis, or distant metastasis were excluded. The initial RRA was defined as successful if the next DxWBS done 6 months to 1 year later was negative and stimulated thyroglobulin level was below 2 ng/ml. Results: of 71 patients who had I-123 DxWBSs, 31 patients went on to receive RRA with 100 mCi and 40 patients received 150 mCi. Of 73 patients who had I-131 DxWBSs, 66 received 100 mCi and 7 patients received 150 mCi. The overall success rate was 79% for patients who had I-123 DxWBS prior to RRA (68% for 100 mCi and 86% for 150 mCi), and 68% for patient who had I-131 DxWBSs (68% for 100 mCi and 71% for 150 mCi). Conclusion: for patients who received 100 mCi, the RRA success rate was the same for I-123 DxWBS and I-131 DxWBS. For patients treated with 150 mCi, the success rate may be lower in patients who receive RRA following DxWBS with I-131 compared to DxWBS with I-123. (authors)

  20. The Relative Frequency of Persistent Hyperthyroidism After I131Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-EID, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    517 patients with different types of hyperthyroidism who had treated by I 131 therapy were studied. The study demonstrated that diffuse toxic goiter was the most common type of hyperthyroidism. The relative frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism in all types after the first dose of I 131 utilizing our empirical regimen in estimation of therapy doses was low (9.5%). While high frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism among diffuse toxic goiter patients (14%), probably was due to many factors discussed in this paper. Some of these factors are impossible to be estimated precisely and therefore, can not be avoided. But careful dose estimation for each case with diffuse toxic goiter may reduce the rate of retreatment by I 131 . Antithyroid medication prior to I 131 therapy might be another factor resulted in increasing of retreatment of retreatment rate diffuse toxic goiter cases. Longer time interval (more than 5 days) of ceasing antithyroid medication prior therapy is suggested to avoid the effects of these drugs. Patients with other types of hyperthyroidism were not frequently required more than one dose and the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism was almost negligible

  1. Recurrence rates following I-131 therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: results of meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaldo, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of I-131 therapy in decreasing recurrence rates after surgery for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, a research tool called meta-analysis was used. Data were pooled from five published studies which evaluated recurrences following at least sub-total thyroidectomy with or without I-131 ablation of remnants. Of 1332 patients managed surgically only 202 (15%) developed recurrences compared to 36 of 339 (11%) treated with radioiodine. This difference was statistically significant at p<.05. When a separate analysis of only those studies which directly compared the two modes of management was conducted, recurrence rates for patients treated by surgery alone was higher at 18% (185 of 1034) compared with those who had subsequent I-131 therapy with a rate of 9% (27 of 297). This difference was again significant at p <.001. This meta-analysis strongly suggests that the use of I-131 for ablation of post-surgical thyroid remnants significantly reduces recurrence rates in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. (Auth.). 34 refs., 1 tab.; 1 fig

  2. Radioiodine Therapy for Graves’ Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhdomi, B.K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of grave diseases include Antithyroid medications, Iodine-131 therapy and Surgery. First patient treated with radioiodine (Iodine-130) in 1941, while Iodine-131 therapy was introduced in 1946. Factors affecting treatment include Iodine uptake; Size of goitre; Length of time I-131 is retained in the gland; Homogeneity of distribution within the gland; Radiosensitivity of thyroid cells and Drug interactions. Some side effects include Transient sore throat or mild dysphagia; Exacerbation of ophthalmopathy; Radiation thyroiditis and no increase in incidence of thyroid cancer and Leukemia or other malignancies. There no harmful effect upon Health of progeny; Fertility and Reproductive history

  3. Dosimetry prior to I-131-therapy of benign thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenscheid, Heribert; Lassmann, Michael; Reiners, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The activity to be administered in I-131 therapy of benign thyroid disease is determined by the radiation absorbed dose necessary to cure the disease, the target mass, and the residence time of the I-131 in the target volume. Data from 73 patients with complete sets of uptake measurements 2, 6, 24, 48, and 96 (n = 53) or 120 (n = 20) hours after oral administration of 1 MBq I-131 were used to deduce residence times from subsets of 3, 2, or only 1 measurement for each individual. The values were compared to those obtained with the reference method, i.e. a fit of an uptake function based on a 2-compartment model to all 5 measurements, to quantify the errors introduced by the less demanding assessments. Deviations are less than 10% if the 2- compartment uptake function is fitted to only 3 values measured after 6, 24, and 96-120 h. Use of 2, 24, and 96-120 h data results in errors > 20% in individual patients. The effective half-lives as determined from 2 measurements after 24 and 96-120 h correlate well with those deduced from the reference method with larger deviations in individuals with slow iodine kinetics and late maximal uptake. Residence times determined from the 24 h uptake, assuming linear increase during the first day, and the effective half-life limited to maximum 8 days underestimate the actual values systematically in patients with long and short half-lives. These errors can be eliminated by a modification of the calculation method resulting in deviations less than 14% in all but one individual for this procedure. The accuracy of methods based on only one retention value increases with the time of measurement after the administration of I-131. While systematic errors up to a factor of two occur if the 24 h uptake is used for the estimate, deviations are less than 18% for measurements after 120 h. The results suggest that only one late uptake assessment warrants residence time estimates with an acceptable error. Given the high inherent uncertainties in the

  4. Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine technologists from administering I-131 therapy dosages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudakshetrin, P.; Pusuwan, P.; Sritongkul, N.; Tuntawiroon, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Therapeutic doses of I-131 for treatment of thyroid cancer are administered orally in liquid or capsule form. During the last few years, a total number of patients loaded in our isolation ward increased from 4 to 10 patients per week. When considering radiation safety precautions for attending technologists, it is preferable to use the dose in capsules. The purpose of this study is to compare radiation exposure to nuclear medicine technologists from administering I-131 therapy dosages in capsules and in liquid form in a closed system. Materials and Methods: Three year radiation exposure to technologists during I-131 administration was analyzed. From January 2004 to June 2005 dose administration was in liquid form (n=263) and from July 2005 to February 2007 in capsules (n=541). Radiation dose assessment was performed with an electronic personal dosimeter (PDM 112). The dose rate in μSv and time spent per patient were recorded. Results: Dose received per patient when I-131 was given in a liquid was 3.50 ± 1.67 μSv and 1.17 ± 0.66 μSv when given in capsules. Compared with the use of a liquid, capsules significantly reduced radiation dose to technologists by 66% (P < 0.001). These doses received depended not only on the administered activity but also on the time, distance and shielding. Time spent per patient, including a brief visit before the time of dosing to explain the procedure and answer questions was reduced slightly from 4.4 ± 2.2 to 3.7 ± 1.8 minutes (P < 0.01). These correspond to a reduction in a yearly dose to 1 technologist by 40%, from 0.63 mSv to 0.38 mSv from dosing to 175 and 325 patients respectively. Conclusions: The measured doses clearly showed that handling of I-131 therapy dosages either in a liquid form or capsules are not the major contributors to the technologist's radiation exposure in routine clinical practice. However, one has to be cautious and follow good work practice to avoid risk of radiation exposure and radioiodine

  5. Reduction in relapse rate of radioiodine therapy in patients of toxic multinodular goiter: A quality improvement project

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Sujata; Muthu, Sonai G

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Radioiodine (I-131) therapy is the definitive treatment of toxic multinodular goiter (TMNG). Treatment failure may result in relapse after I-131 therapy. The present study was undertaken to reduce treatment failure rate of I-131 therapy in TMNG patients. Materials and Methods: Multiple causes may have lead to treatment failure of I-131 in TMNG patients making it difficult to establish a direct cause?effect relationship and take corrective action. Therefore, the JURAN methodology...

  6. Comparison of four different protocols of I-131 therapy for toxic single thyroid nodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakavi, S.R.; Mousavi, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Aim: Radio-iodine therapy is the preferred method of treatment of toxic thyroid nodule, however there is no consensus on the dose of I-131 administered. The aim of this study was to compare 4 different dose protocols for treatment of these patients. Methods and patients: All patients with hyperthyroidism and single hot thyroid nodule were referred for I-131 therapy after thyroid physical examination, ultrasonography and measurements of 24 hours thyroid iodine uptake. They were randomly entered in one of 4 groups: fixed low dose (FLD), fixed high dose (FHD), calculated low dose (CLD) and calculated high dose (CHD). In fixed dose protocol, 13mCi of I-131 was administered for patients in FLD group and 22.5mCi was administered for patients in FHD group. Quimby formula was used for calculation of radio-iodine dose in calculated groups with 90-100uCi and 180-200uCi per gram of thyroid weight in CLD and CHD groups respectively. Patients were followed up for a mean of 2, 5, 10 , 22 and 50 months later and physical exam and measurements of thyroid values were done in each follow up. Results: One hundred and sixteen patients were studied. One 72 year old patient was decreased 2 months after treatment due to coronary artery disease and 18 other patients did not complete follow up. From 97 patients who completed follow- up 8 patients were male and 89 patients were female. Mean age of patients were 43.3 years (SD=13.4) and mean thyroid nodule weight was 51 grams (SD=19.2).Mean 24 hours thyroid uptake was 48.07% (SD=14.07). Follow up was done up to 85 months with a median follow up of 14 months. Twenty two patients were in CHD group, 23 patients in CLD, 25 patients in FLD and 27 patients in FHD group. No significant difference was noted in 4 groups regarding age, sex, thyroid uptake and thyroid weight. The mean administered dose was 10.5mCi (SD=3.2) and 18.7mCi (SD=5.3) in CLD and CHD groups respectively (P<0.001). In CHD group, hyperthyroidism was decreased from 33

  7. Comparison of thallium-201, Tc-99m MIBI and I-131 scan in the follow-up assessment after I-131 ablative therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jae Sung; Lee, Sung Keun; Kim, Doe Min; Park, Sae Jong; Jang, Kyong Sun; Kim, Eun Sil; Kim, Chong Soon

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a comparative study to evaluate the diagnostic values of Tl-201, Tc-99m MIBI and I-131 scans in the follow-up assessment after ablative I-131 therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer. The study population consisted of 20 patients who underwent surgical removal of thyroid cancer and ablative radioactive iodine therapy, and followed by one or more times of I-131 retreatment (33 cases). In all patients, Tl-201, Tc-99m MIBI, diagnostic and therapeutic I-131 scans were performed and the results were analyzed retrospectively. Also serum thyroglobulin levels were measured in all patients. The final diagnosis of recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer was determined by clinical, biochemical, radiologic and/or biopsy findings. Positive rates (PR) of Tc-99m MIBI, Tl-201, diagnostic and therapeutic I-131 scans in detecting malignant thyroid tissue lesions were 70% (19/27), 54% (15/28), 35% (17/48) and 63% (30/48), respectively. The PR in the group of 20 cases (28 lesions) who underwent concomitant Tl-201 and I-131 scans were in the order of therapeutic 131 scan 71%, Tl-201 scan 54% and diagnostic I-131 scan 36%. There was no statistically significant difference between Tl-201 and diagnostic I-131 scans (p>0.05). In the group of 20 cases (27 lesions) who underwent concomitant Tc-99m MIBI and I-131 scans, the PR were in the order of Tc-99m MIBI scan 70%, I-131 therapeutic scan 52% and I-131 diagnostic scan 33%. The PR of Tc-99m MIBI was significantly higher than that of diagnostic I-131 scan (p<0.05). Tc-99m MIBI scan is superior to diagnostic I-131 scan in detecting recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer following ablation therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Tl-201 scan did not showed significantly higher positive rate than diagnostic I-131 scan. Instead of diagnostic I-131 scan before the I-131 retreatment, Tc-99m MIBI scan without discontinuing thyroid hormone replacement would be a prudent and effective approach in the management of these

  8. Calculated activity incorporated in the therapy with I131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chica, L.G.; Puerta, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    By means of the product S(T→ S).A s (T e ), the absorbed dose to thyroid delivered by I 131 incorporated is calculated. Where S(T→ S) is the absorbed dose in the thyroid per nuclear transformation (tn.) of I 131 localized in the thyroid and as a potential function of the mass is expressed. A s (T e ) is the number of tn. of I 131 in the thyroid since the moment of the incorporation until the time T e (the effective middle time); to find A s (T e ) to normal as different pathological conditions, the metabolic model of the iodo proposed by the ICRP is used. Of the expressions of the doses, the incorporated activity, l o , is obtained

  9. Thyroid emergencies following radioiodine therapy - Two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasmine, Sufia; Haque, Fatema Sultana; Karim, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    Thyrotoxicosis and well differentiated thyroid carcinomas are the two most common pathological conditions where radioiodine is used. Patients with well differentiated thyroid carcinomas are the candidates for post operative radio iodine therapy. It is currently the most popular and frequently used method of treatment. Its use is safe and cost effective. The results are usually eventless but in some exceptional cases emergencies that occurred after administration of I-131. One emergency occurred after I-131 administration for Graves' disease and the second case happened after therapeutic application of I-131 for treatment of local recurrences of thyroid cancer.(author)

  10. THE MANAGEMENT OF THYROID CARCINOMA--THE ROLE OF RADIO-IODINE (I-131)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workman, James B.

    1963-06-15

    Experience from the management of 156 patients with proven thyroid cancer, followed from 1 to 11 years, is reported. Although no sweeping conclusions can be drawn, it appears that radioiodine continues to have a place in the overall management of most cases of this malignant disease. (auth)

  11. Present state of the I-131-MIBG therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of malignant pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma stage III and IV is unsatisfactory. Locally invasive tumors may be cured by radical extirpation. The role of irradiation and/or chemotherapy in malignant pheochromocytoma is disappointing, in neuroblastoma in many cases debatable. From 1981 to the present we studied more than 250 patients by MIBG scintigraphy. 5 patients with malignant pheochromocytoma, one female patient with an intra-adrenal, probably benign pheochromocytoma and 3 children with neuroblastoma stage IV were treated with I-131-MIBG

  12. Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131) in the thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Rivero, Levi; Turcios Trista, Silvia Elena; Velasco Mirabal, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of scintigraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses the tissular remains and the metastatic lesions that can be detected during the gammagraphic follow-up. Radioiodine 131 depends on the fulfillment of safety regulations against radioactivity

  13. Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131) in the thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Rivero Levi; Turcios Trista, Silvia Elena; Velasco Mirabal, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of gammagraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses the tissular remains and the metastatic lesions that can be detected during the gammagraphic follow-up. Radioiodine 131 depends on the fulfillment of safety regulations against radioactivity

  14. Long-term follow-up study of I-131 therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Nakano, Keiko; Maki, Masako

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the follow-up of thyroid function in the patients with late-onset hypothyroidism and euthyroidism after I-131 therapy of hyperthyroidism. Thirty three patients who did not need the thyroid treatment until ten years after I-131 therapy were classified as euthyroid group. And eleven patients who needed the thyroid supplement of thyroid hormone for late-onset hypothyroidism were classified as hypothyroid group. Patients in both groups who required only a single dose of I-131 for successful treatment of hyperthyroidism had similar age, gland size, 24 hour I-131 uptake, pretreatment serum T 3 uptake level and T 4 concentration, and I-131 treatment dose. Subclinical hypothyroidism occurred in 28.6% of euthyroid group and 66.7% of hypothyroid group four months after I-131 therapy. The levels of T 3 were recovered to higher than normal range at 6 months in euthyroid group, while the levels of T 3 were kept within the normal range in the seventy percent of hypothyroid group. Patients who were still lower in the level of T 3 uptake than normal range at 6 months had a higher incidence of late-onset hypothyroidism. Our observation showed no significant difference in the course of follow-up studies after I-131 therapy between the patients with late-onset hypothyroidism and euthyroidism. (author)

  15. Reducing radiation exposure during oral I-131 therapy administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trujillo, J.; Krinsky, S.; Wilson, B.; Teague, E.

    1982-01-01

    A new, closed-system method to reduce air-, direct-, and incidental-contamination during therapeutic administration of oral I-131 was experimentally evaluated on twelve patients. We studied a standard control population using the routine practice of drinking the solution through a straw and compared results with our new technique. Various measurements were performed throughout all phases of dose administration to assess the relative difference of the two approaches. Using the closed system method before and during iodine administration revealed between 100 and 1000 times less activity per millimeter of air sample; whereas, the direct radiation exposure values were higher for the control population. Both the experimental and control methods had similar levels of incidental contamination

  16. Radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrenechea, E.C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The introduction of I-131 in 1946 for the treatment of hyperthyroidism marked a historic event. It ushered in the era of radionuclides in medicine and led to the birth of nuclear medicine. Today I-131 has become one of the most commonly used agents for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Ninety percent (90%) of its effect is due to beta radiation and 10% is due to gamma radiation. The mechanism of action is production of radiation thyroiditis (3-10 days) and chronic gland atrophy (over a period of 3 years). To achieve the necessary dosage levels, four considerations are needed: maximum amount of I-131 taken by the thyroid gland, size of tissue to be irradiated, effective half life of the isotope in the thyroid and relative sensitivity of the thyroid to I-131. There are two kinds of dosing - the preferred dose where 160 μCi/gram of tissue of given (15-20μCi) or the usual dose 80 μCi/gram - (2 to 15 mCi). In giving these dosages, four basic approaches are utilized and two major principles are applied. However, precision in the calculation of I-131 dose makes very little difference in the outcome in any individual patients. The inherent sensitivity of the thyroid to radiation seems to vary widely for unknown reasons. The success in treatment is high with incidence of cure as follows: 70-86% in single dose; 10-20% using 2 doses and less than 5% required 3 doses or more. Adjunctive therapy in the forms of antithyroid drugs, beta blocker and steroids may be needed. There are short and long term complications where hypothyroidism is the most important complication. Long term follow-up is advocated by FT4 and TSH determinations. There is an unknown risk of malignancy and genetic damage. Finally, I-131 has been a choice of treatment for hyperthyroidism with some considerations in the U.S.A., Europe, and Asia. It is rapidly effective, predictable and inexpensive. Several studies on the experience will be discussed. (author)

  17. Clinical experience of 2-hour I-131 thyroid uptake significance in considering the radioiodine Graves' disease treatment dose: A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shammeri, I.; Al-Deen Mahmood, S.; Al-Mohannadi, S.; Ballani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It has been noticed that Graves' disease patients with high turnover are likely to experience under dosage when calculating the radioiodine therapeutic dose. We aim to demonstrate our clinical experience of 2-h I-131 uptake% value in estimating the radioiodine dose for Graves' disease patients with rapid washout. Material and methods: We reviewed the medical records for 2080 Graves' disease patients who received radioiodine treatment(s). Patients were distinguished by 2-h I-131 thyroid uptake%: 249 patients (group I) exhibited a rapid washout (>25%), and 250 patients (group II control group) demonstrated normal uptake (6–15%); the age and sex were balanced for both groups. These cases were reviewed for the time taken to control the condition clinically (ideally 3 months is the time needed), the time taken to achieve hypothyroidism (average time is 6 months), and the number of repeated treatments for recurrent thyrotoxicosis or failure of treatment. Results: In 152/249 (61%) patients, the condition was not controlled in the 3 month period post treatment and subsequently they needed more frequent and closer follow up, as opposed to 47/250 patients (19%) in the control group-II. At 6 months, 119/249 (48%) patients in group-I had not achieved hypothyroidism, as opposed to 28/250 patients (11%) in group-II. Seventy-seven patients in group-I (31%) needed a second or third therapeutic dose, as opposed to 10/250 patients (4%) in group-II. Conclusion: We believe that a higher radioiodine dose with significant rapid washout in the thyroid gland of Graves' disease patients would give a greater treatment success rate. - Highlights: • We present our clinical experience of 2-h I-131 uptake% value in Graves' disease. • We reviewed records of hyperthyroid patients who received radioiodine treatment. • Two patients' groups were distinguished by normal and high 2-h I-131 uptake%. • The two groups showed different radioiodine treatment

  18. Diet low in iodine as well as goitrogens (LILGD) enhanced radioiodine (I-131) uptake in treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaro, Erik; Gebre-Medhin, Mehari; Lindahl, Sten-AAke

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Low iodine diet (LID) is accepted as an adjuvant to post-thyroidectomy radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer since it is held to enhance radioiodine uptake in thyroid remnants and thyroid cancer tissue. However, in the few clinical investigations performed only an indirect and weak evidence of a positive effect of the LID has been demonstrated. Also we had discouraging experience in the application of a strict LID using the same design as in the present study. We therefore decided to investigate the effect of a diet low in iodine as well as in goitrogens (LILGD). Methods: Six patients with differentiated thyroid cancer entered the study and they were their own control. After thyroid hormone withdrawal (TSH > 30 m U/L) and on regular diet a diagnostic whole body scan was performed 24 h after administration of 50 MBq (1,4 mCi) 123 I. The day following diagnostic scan the patients were put on LILGD for 4 days prior and two days after radioiodine therapy. In LILGD beverages, fruits and vegetables containing flavonoids, glucosinolates, cyanides and thiocyanates were avoided and spices and smoking prohibited. Therapeutic radioiodine was administered one week after diagnostic procedures and in the morning after over-night fasting with an activity range of 3,7-5,4 GBq (100 -150 mCi) 131 I. A 24-h therapeutic whole body scan and calculations of percentage uptake U(24) were performed. Diagnostic (basal) D U(24)% and subsequent therapeutic T U(24)% uptake were compared and expressed as therapeutic/diagnostic uptake ratios T/D U(24). Results: A significant increase in therapeutic versus diagnostic uptake T/D U(24) was observed (mean 2,53, median 2,30, range 1,40 - 4,46, p 131 I uptake in radio-ablation of normal and thyroid cancer tissue. (author)

  19. Aplicaciones clínicas del radioyodo 131 (I131 en las enfermedades del tiroides Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131 in the thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi González Rivero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El radioyodo 131 es un isótopo radioactivo que se emplea exitosamente en el diagnóstico y tratamiento de las enfermedades benignas y malignas del tiroides. Su propiedad de integrarse selectivamente al metabolismo del tiroides y emitir una señal, le permite describir el funcionamiento glandular mediante estudios de captación, y delimitar la morfología y localización de los tejidos que capten yodo, a través de la gammagrafía. Es además una radioterapia sencilla, segura y coste-efectiva, usada como primera línea terapéutica en el control del hipertiroidismo, cuya dosis y momento de aplicación debería individualizarse según la etiología y la clínica de cada paciente. El radioyodo 131 ofrece una alternativa eficaz para reducir el tamaño del bocio no tóxico; además, respalda el tratamiento quirúrgico del carcinoma diferenciado del tiroides, y destruye a dosis ablativa los restos tisulares y las lesiones metastásicas que puede identificar durante el seguimiento gammagráfico. El empleo de radioyodo 131 está sujeto al cumplimiento de regulaciones de protección contra la radioactividad.Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of gammagraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses

  20. Adjuvant thyroid remnant ablation in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma confined to the thyroid. A comparison of ablation success with different activities of radioiodine (I-131)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prpic, M.; Dabelic, N.; Stanicic, J.; Jukic, T.; Kusic, Z.; Milosevic, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess efficiency of various I-131 activities on thyroid remnant ablation in thyroid cancer patients. The significance of patients' characteristics, pathologic features and levels of Tg were analyzed. This study included 259 consecutive differentiated thyroid cancer patients, with disease confined to the thyroid, treated with I-131 after total thyroidectomy. Patients were divided into the three groups: 80 patients receiving low [1110-1850 MBq (30-50 mCi)], 121 intermediate [2775 MBq (75 mCi)] and 58 high [3700 MBq (100 mCi)] postoperative I-131 activities. Six to eight months after the application of radioiodine, measurements of TSH, Tg, anti-Tg antibodies (in hypothyroid state) together with ultrasound exam and whole-body scintigraphy were performed. The ablation was significantly more effective (after the first application) in patients receiving 100 mCi of I-131-89.7% than in patients receiving lower activities (P=0.016). There was no significant difference in ablation rate between the 30-50 mCi (77.5%) and 75 mCi (70.2%) groups. In the group receiving 30-50 mCi, patients with solitary tumors had significantly higher ablation rate (P=0.038). In patients receiving 75 mCi ablation rates were higher among older patients (P=0.005), with infiltration of the single lobe (P=0.005), and with solitary tumor (P=0.012). The rates of successful ablation after the second application of I-131 (after 12-16 months) amounted to 96, 97 and 96% in the 30-50, 75 and 100 mCi groups, respectively. The activity of I-131 and age were independent factors for thyroid ablation failure after the first application of I-131 (model of binary logistic regression). The results of remnant ablation were satisfactory with all activities applied. Although after the first application of I-131 the activity of 100 mCi is significantly more effective in thyroid ablation than the administration of 30-50 mCi and 75 mCi, the ablation rates between all the three groups are

  1. I-131 and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Aase Krogh; Nygaard, Birte; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2000-07-01

    Objective: Radioiodine (I-131) used to obtain euthyroidism in thyrotoxic patients is suspected of having a worsening or provoking effect on thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), an autoimmune disease closely related to Graves' disease. Design: This review summarises the existing literature and describes risk factors influencing the course of TAO including thyroid function, cigarette smoking and treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism especially I-131 therapy. Conclusion: It is recommended that patients who may be at a greater risk of worsening ophthalmopathy are considered when choosing the modality of therapy of hyperthyroidism and also in deciding whether prophylactic systemic glucocorticoid treatment is indicated.

  2. I-131 therapy for thyroid diseases: Doses, new regulations and patient advice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, H.; Michaud, P.

    2001-01-01

    I-131 therapy has been widely used in the past 50 years. Its main applications are hyperthyroidism and functioning thyroid cancer. The indications, doses, regulations, precautions and guidelines differ in various centers. The following are recommended: 1. I-131 should be indicated in agreement of the endocrinologist and the nuclear physician with the patient consent; 2. Pre-treatment I-131 thyroid uptake must be performed; 3. The only contraindication for treatment is pregnancy, in children it might be used with caution; 4. For thyrotoxicosis both a calculated or an ablative dose (555 MBq) criteria are acceptable In this case secondary hypothyroidism must be considered an objective rather than a complication; 5. In uninodular toxic goiter a 1110 MBq dose is recommended; 6. Iodine free diet is indicated only for cancer patients; 7. Propylthiouracil (PTU) must be discontinued 5 days before treatment, it should be reinitiated 5 days later; 8. Prophylactic use of corticoid in Graves' disease still require more clinical data to support its use; 9. In treatment failure, wait six months for a new dose; 10. In intrathyroid cancer disease an ablative dose of 3700 MBq should be administered 4 weeks post-thyroidectomy or with a TSH level above 30 μUI/mL; 11. A whole body scan should be done one week later; 12. Follow-up whole body scan should be used only if there is clinical suspicion of metastasis. Thyroid hormone replacement must be discontinued for 30 days or with TSH value above 30 I/mL. For follow-up scan 185 MBq of I-131 are recommended to ovoid thyroid tissue stunning; 13. For metastases, 5700 to 7400 MBq dose is recommended if there are cervical lymphatic nodes or distant metastases. We recommended to adopt the criteria proposed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published as 10 CFR 35.75 and the Regulatory Guide 8.39 for patients release after I-131 administration. (author)

  3. Radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres-Barrenechea, E.C.

    2001-01-01

    A ten year study (1988-98) was done at the Veterans Memorial Medical Center on radioiodine (RAI) therapy for hyperthyroidism. A total of 162 patients received 131-I after careful selection hence was included in this study. A predominantly female population was seen (81%) compared to only (19%) males. The most frequent age group were in the third and fourth decades of life. Those included had clinical manifestations of thyrotoxicosis aside from the abnormal thyroid function tests and elevated RAI uptake. Almost all were given antithyroid drugs and beta-blockers prior to RAI ablation. Doses ranged from 7 to 12 mCi depending on gland size and degree of toxicity. Success rate of treatment was 92% which meant that the symptoms were abated and there was shrinkage of the thyroid gland after a single dose of iodine. The most common short term complications were sialitis and local neck tenderness while hypothyroidism was the commonest long term complication. (author)

  4. The prevalence of thyroid tissue along the thyroglossal tract on SPECT/CT following I131 ablation therapy after total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, T.W.; Cherk, M.H.; Yap, K.S.K.; Kalff, V.; Topliss, D.J.; Serpell, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: the aims of this study are first to determine the prevalence of thyroid tissue along the thyroglossal tract on SPECT/CT and secondly to assess the contribution of this tissue to total neck I-131 activity in patients treated with I-131 ablation therapy after total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer. Materials and methods: a total of 63 consecutive patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer treated with total thyroidectomy underwent whole body planar imaging and SPECT/CT of the neck 48 hours following ablative I-131 therapy. On SPECT/CT, thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue was defined as radioiodine activity in the anterior neck, superior to the thyroid bed in close proximity to the midline without evidence of localisation to lymph nodes. On planar imaging, thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue was defined as linear radioiodine activity in the midline of the neck superior to the thyroid bed. SPECT/CT and planar images were classified by two independent reviewers as positive, negative or equivocal with interobserver agreement quantified using a Kappa score. Disagreement was resolved using a third reviewer. Quantitation of thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue and total neck I-131 activity was performed using region of interest analysis on planar imaging following localisation on SPECT/CT. Results: thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue was present in 31/63 (49%; 95% CI: 37-61%) patients on SPECT/CT. In these 31 patients, thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue contributed to an average of 49% of total neck activity. Interobserver agreement was substantial on SPECT/CT (Kappa = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.61-0.91) and fair on planar imaging (Kappa = 0.31; 95% CI: 0.15-0.47). Conclusion: thyroid tissue along the thyroglossal tract was present in one half of patients in our study population and can contribute to a significant amount of total neck I-131 activity. Given the high prevalence of thyroglossal tract thyroid tissue, our results suggest that total neck

  5. Apoptosis: its pathophysiology and monitoring. The role of apoptosis in the radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopotyk, J.; Rogowski, F.; Parfienczyk, A.

    2004-01-01

    The review aims to give an up to date understanding of the mechanisms of apoptosis (programmed cell death), the methods of detecting apoptosis, in particular with regard to imaging such changes non-invasively. Radioiodine (I-131) is a gamma and beta emitting radionuclide and is commonplace in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. I-131 therapy relies on the destruction of thyroid tissue by beta radiation, and such destruction is proposed to be partly as a result of apoptosis. The review undertakes to explore and provoke research into the mechanisms of thyroid cell destruction by I-131, and whether such changes are able to be detected or monitored. Current knowledge concerning apoptosis in the thyroid gland in diseased states (including cancer) are described. The clinical significance of monitoring and modifying apoptosis are emphasized. Furthermore, overt and late destruction of thyroid tissue following I-131 therapy requires elaboration, and the relevance of detecting and modifying thyroid cell apoptosis following I-131 are questioned.(author)

  6. The influence of I-131 therapy on FDG uptake in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung Guanguei; Lee Kwowhei; Liao Peiyung; Yang Liheng; Yang Kwangtao

    2008-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) [or PET/computed tomography (CT)] is more likely to show false-negative results when it is performed shortly after chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy because of ''metabolic stunning''. The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of I-131 therapy on FDG uptake and the detection of recurrence or metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). We retrospectively enrolled 16 consecutive FDG-PET/CT studies which had been performed in patients with DTC with elevated thyroglobulin (TG) but negative I-131 whole-body scan. All studies were performed under L-thyroxine suppression. The patients were divided into groups A and B for PET/CT performed within 4 months of I-131 therapy or no such therapy, respectively. Each lesion identified on PET/CT was characterized using a 5-point scale by visual analysis: 0=definitely benign, 1=probably benign, 2=equivocal, 3=probably malignant, and 4=definitely malignant. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) in each lesion was also measured for semiquantitative analysis. We compared the visual grading and SUV max of the lesion of highest FDG uptake between groups A and B. For visual analysis, group B had significantly more patients with an uptake score of 3 or 4 than group A (80% vs. 17%, P=0.01). In addition, there were significantly more equivocal results from group A than from group B (67% vs. 10%, P=0.02). If the patients with the highest uptake scores of 2, 3, and 4 were considered to be positive for local recurrence or metastasis, there would be no significant difference between the positive rates of groups A and B (83% vs. 90%, P=0.7). However, the mean SUV max of positive results was significantly lower for group A than for group B (3.1±0.9 and 6.6±3.5 respectively, P=0.02). The preliminary results suggested that FDG uptake in DTC may be negatively influenced by I-131 therapy within 4 months, resulting in lower FDG uptake and more equivocal results

  7. Thyroid-hormone concentrations after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamagna, E.I.; Levine, G.A.; Hershman, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen hyperthyroid patients (11 men, three women), ages 28 to 66, were followed with serial measurements of serum thyroid hormone levels for 1 mo after therapy with I-131. Twelve patients had diffuse toxic goiters (25 to 70 g in size); two patients had multinodular glands (40 to 100 g). The patients were taking no antithyroid medications; ten patients were treated with propranolol. All patients received the equivalent of 5000 rad, except the two with multinodular glands, who received larger doses. There was no consistent pattern of serum T 4 and T 3 levels after the I-131 therapy. For the entire group, there was no significant increase of the mean serum hormone concentration. One group (three patients) had a mean T 4 increase of 28% and a T 3 increase of 91% above baseline at Days 10--11. Seven patients had minimal increases of hormone levels at Days 2--3, and a third group (four paients) had no increase of thyroid hormones after I-131 therapy. The patients with no rise in hormone concentrations had smaller goiters than the other groups. There was no correlation of the dose of radioactive iodine, or of the initial hormone concentration, with the rises or declines of T 4 and T 3 levels after I-131 therapy. Radioiodine therapy caused no significant increase of serum T 4 and T 3 concentrations in the majority of patients

  8. Effects of changed working methods on personnel doses at a I-131 and afterloading therapy ward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, D.; Wolf, G.; Georgi, P.; Bauer, M.

    1985-01-01

    The external load of the personnel from I-131 therapy can be kept small (almost 'neglectable') by appropriate behaviour without keeping patients 'under-lock and key'. The marked decrease in personnel doses is due to improved radiation protection for afterloading therapy (gynecological Ra-therapy, Cs-137-therapy) by technical equipment. This therapy is now possible but with the door of the application room closed; when the door is opened, the instruments automatically go back to their original position. From 1975 through 1982, there were remote control errors forcing the personnel to withdraw the instruments to the safe manually. Despite working regulations the personnel was able to go into the room without prior instrument withdrawal. The personnel doses so received were within the tolerance limits, however markedly above the inevitable values. Because of regular thyroid gland examination of the personnel there is proof for the fact that the radiation load of this organ from I-131 is probably smaller than 2% (6 mSv/a=600 mrem/a) of the annual limit value of 0.3 Sv (30 rem) which corresponds to 6 times the value of normal load. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Maximal safe dose therapy of I-131 after failure of standard fixed dose therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Seok, Ju Won; Uh, Jae Sun

    2005-01-01

    In patients with recurrent or metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma, residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy presents an awkward situation in terms of treatment decision making. Maximal safe dose (MSD) administration base on bone marrow radiation allows the delivery of a large amount I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue within the safety margin. We investigated the efficacy of MSD in differentiated thyroid cancers, which had persisted after conventional fixed dose therapy. Forty-six patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma who had non-responsible residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy were enrolled in this study. The postoperative pathology consisted of 43 papillary carcinomas and 3 follicular carcinomas. MSD was calculated according the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center protocol using blood samples. MSDs were administered at intervals of at least 6 months. Treatment responses were evaluated using I-131 whole body scan (WBS) and serum thyroglobulin measurements. Mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq. Of the 46 patients, 6 (13.0%) showed complete remission, 15 (32.6%) partial response, 19 (41.3%) stable disease, and 6 (13.0%) disease progression. Thus, about a half of the patients showed complete or partial remission, and of these patients, 14 (67%) showed response after a single MSD administration and 6 (29%) showed response after the second dose of MSD administrations. Twenty-nine patients (63%) experienced transient cytopenia after therapy, and recovered spontaneously with the exception of one. MSD administration is an effective method even in the patients who failed to be treated by conventional fixed dose therapy. MSD therapy of I-131 can be considered in the patients who failed by fixed dose therapy

  10. Radiation exposure from liquid discharges from I-131 therapy rooms into the piping system of a hospital building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuntawiroon, M.; Sritongkul, N.; Pusuwan, P.; Chaudakshetrin, P.

    2008-01-01

    Over 80% of the activity from patients undergoing radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer is eliminated during the first three days. In our I-131 therapy unit, the number of hospitalized patients has increased from less than 200 in 2004 to more than 300 in 2006. The total amount of radio activity used is about 1,800 GBq per year, and the estimated amount excreted is calculated to be about 1,500 GBq. This results in significant volume of contaminated liquid discharges into the piping system. In this study, we monitored external dose rates in non-radiation use areas adjacent to pipeline connections in the building to ensure that the dose to non-occupational workers who reside in offices below the unit does not exceed 1 mSv per year. Exposure rates in areas adjacent to the pipeline junction connections were measured periodically from April 2006 to February 2007 five floors below the therapy unit. The measurements were made inside the wall at contact with the junction, outside the wall and in hallways at 1 meter from the wall, using a GM detector or an ionization chamber. The results were recorded in μSv/h and the dose received was estimated for members of the public. Significant increases in dose rates were detected in three floors below the unit. They were 20--30, 10--30 and 5--15 μSv/h at contact with the pipeline connections, 9--15, 10--15 and 3--5 μSv/h outside the wall, and 3--6, 4--6 and 2--5 μSv/h in hallways on floors 1, 2 and 3 respectively. After appropriate wall shielding has been provided, dose rate outside the wall was reduced to 1.4 μSv/h, and to 0.5.3 μSv/h in hallways. By using an occupancy factor 1/4 for hallways, the calculated dose now meets the public dose limits of 1 mSv per year. Therapeutic application of I-131 for the treatment of thyroid cancer generates a significant amount of contaminated liquid waste into the sewers. These wastes originate mainly from toilets, showers, wash basins and floor drains. Although waste discharges can be

  11. Single dose planning for radioiodine-131 therapy of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Tamotsu; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Taki, Junichi; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2004-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied one year after radioiodine-131 therapy to assess the relationship between the effectiveness of the therapy and the radioiodine doses used. Patients were classified into three groups according to thyroid function as hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism and hypothyroidism at one year after I-131 therapy. In these groups we compared the mean values of dose, dose per thyroid weight calculated with I-123 uptake before the therapy (pre D/W), dose per thyroid weight calculated with therapeutic I-131 uptake (post D/W), and absorbed dose. No significant differences were found between the three groups in terms of dose or pre D/W. The mean values of post D/W and absorbed dose in the non-hyperthyroid (euthyroid and hypothyroid) group were significantly greater than those in the hyperthyroid group. Post D/W of 6.3 MBq/g was a threshold separating the non-hyperthyroid group from the hyperthyroid group. There was no correlation between pre D/W and post D/W; however, the mean post D/W was significantly greater than the mean pre D/W. All patients with pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g showed non-hyperthyroidism at one year after the radioiodine treatment. No indicators before the radioiodine therapy had significant relationships with the effectiveness of the therapy at one year after the treatment. However, the single therapy planned for setting the pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g will certainly make the patients non-hyperthyroid. As this proposal of dose planning is based on a small number of patients, further study is needed. (author)

  12. Lung uptake on I-131 therapy and short-term outcome in patients with lung metastasis from differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Shozo; Shiga, Tohru; Uchiyama, Yuko; Manabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Tamaki, Nagara

    2014-01-01

    It is sometimes difficult to assess I-131 lung uptake at the initial I-131 therapy because of strong artifacts from I-131 uptake in the thyroid bed. The aim of this study was to analyze the lung uptake at the second I-131 therapy for lung metastasis in patients who did not have lung uptake at the initial therapy from differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Then, we also analyzed the relationship between the initial lung uptake and short-term outcome after I-131 therapies. This study included 62 DTC patients with lung metastasis. The patients were classified into 2 groups according to the lung uptake at the initial I-131 therapy such as patients with lung uptake (positive uptake group n=31) and those without lung uptake (negative uptake group n=31). The lung uptake was analyzed at the second therapy in both groups. The short-term outcome was also analyzed based on the CT findings of lung metastasis size and serum thyroglobulin level between the two groups. The positive uptake group showed positive lung uptake at the second therapy in 23 patients (74%), whereas none of negative uptake group showed any lung uptake at the second therapy (P < 0.01). The positive uptake group significantly decreased in the size of lung metastasis from the initial therapy to the second therapy (20.0 ± 11.7 to 16.6 ± 9.6 mm, P < 0.01) with further decrease after the second therapy (P < 0.05). The serum thyroglobulin level was also significantly decreased from the initial therapy to the second therapy (4348 ± 7011 to 2931 ± 4484 ng/ml, P < 0.05). In contrast, the negative uptake group significantly increased in the size of lung metastasis from the initial therapy to the second therapy (17.3 ± 12.2 to 19.9 ± 14.3 mm, P < 0.01) with further increase after the second therapy (P < 0.01). No patients without lung uptake at the initial I-131 therapy showed lung uptake at the second therapy, or showed treatment effect. Therefore, second I-131 therapy for these patients with initially

  13. Evaluation for Preparation of I-131-MIBG for Diagnosis and Therapy Neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laksmi Andri A; Purwoko; Sri Setyowati; Maskur; Cahya Nova Ardianto; Adang Hardi G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation for preparation of 131 I-MIBG have been carried out. Production/preparation of 131 I-MIBG was carried out by labeling MIBG with I-131, the radiochemical purity of 131 I-MIBG was analysed using TLC/paper chromatography. The stability in the human body by using fresh human plasma, at room temperature and at 8°C was carried out. The chemical purity of synthesized MIBG was found to be > 95%, the labeled MIBG with I-131 was analysed using TLC/paper chromatography. The radiochemical purity of 131 I-MIBG was obtained at higher than 95 %. The stability of labeled MIBG in fresh human plasma and at 8°C was stable up to 141 hours, while at room temperature was stable up to 120 hours. The results of labeling of 131 I-MIBG from 2010-2012 showed that these products were colorless clear solution with pH between 5.5.0-7.0, sterile and pyrogen-free, radiochemical purity > 95%. The quality control results were found to be met with the requirements of 131 I-MIBG injection solution used for diagnosis and therapy of neuroblastoma in Hospital. (author)

  14. Endocrine ophthalmopathy and radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, F. Anders

    2006-01-01

    Endocrine ophthalmopathy is to some degree present in most patients with Graves' disease. In few cases, a severe form of the condition develops and in the majority of these cases, the course of the eye problems has been influenced by the treatment for thyrotoxicosis. In this regard, radioiodine therapy has been increasingly recognized as carrying a special risk. Here, the current understanding of endocrine ophthalmopathy and the risks associated with the development of severe eye disease are discussed. The results of a retrospective investigation of patients with severe eye disease in our hospital, and the experience with corticosteroid administration following radioiodine in order to reduce the risk of ophthalmopathy, are also presented

  15. Model of iodine metabolism in a T3-thyrotoxic patient undergoing I-131 therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahuja, S.; Price, R.; Brill, A.B.; Dobyns, B.M.; Berman, M.

    Data on radioactivity in the thyroid, urine, serum, butanol-extractable iodine (BEI) and chromatographic fractionations of BEI, obtained during four I-131 therapeutic treatments of a T 3 -thyrotoxic patient, have been analyzed and simulated with the help of a 7-compartment model. Good fits to most of the data can be obtained with both the dose-independent and dose-dependent models. A model with 3 or 4 compartments, which provides adequate fits to iodine kinetic data in most euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients is not satisfactory in the case of this patient. Thus, to represent iodine metabolism during T 3 -thyrotoxicosis therapy, we find that it is necessary to provide for separate biochemical pathways for the BEI components as well as the butanol-insoluble compounds released by the thyroid gland

  16. Radioiodine therapy and subsequent pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores G.; Miranda, Angelica E.; Corres, Nilson Duarte; Sieiro Neto, Lino; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate abortion and fetal congenital anomaly rates in women previously submitted to radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Study design: A case-control study of 108 pregnant women, 48 cases whose pregnancies were evaluated after they had undergone radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, and the control group consisted of 60 healthy pregnant women. Results: Of a total of 66 pregnancies, 14 conceived within the first year, 51 one or more years after the last administration of 131 I, the medical record of one patient was not available. The interval between the last radioiodine therapy administration and conception ranged from 1 month to 10 years. There were a total of 4 miscarriages, 2 of them for unknown reasons. There was one case of congenital anomaly and two preterms birth. Nine women presented the following pregnancy events: placental insufficiency, hypertensive crisis, placental detachment, risk of miscarriage, preterm labour and four miscarriages. No statistical difference was observed between the studied and control groups. Conclusion: Radioiodine was followed by no significant increase in untoward effects in neither the pregnancy nor the offspring. (author)

  17. I-131 Therapy in patients with hyperthyroidism 11- year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeva, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine therapy is a well-established method for the treatment of patients with various forms of hyperthyroidism and is preferred in many countries as the first line therapy. Traditionally, it has been applied in Bulgaria in low doses, mainly in elderly patients with contraindications for surgery or after long-term antithyroid drug therapy. No systematic follow up of these patients has ever been done in the country. Materials and Methods: 571 subjects aged 34 to 79 years (mean 64, 7), 108 males with mean age of 68.61 years (54 to 76 yrs) and 463 females with mean age of 68.89 years (34 to 84 yrs). Mean disease duration was 73±5 months. The study included 296 patients with toxic nodular goiter, 220 patients with Graves- Basedow disease and Hashitoxicosis and 55 patients with adenoma toxicum. 256 females and 40 males with toxic nodular goiter, 158 females and 62 males with Graves- Basedow disease and Hashitoxicosis, 49 females and 6 males with adenoma toxicum. The disease duration is 48.19 months in females and 22.5 months in males. Methods: 131-iodine scan and uptake before the treatment and on follow-up visits at months 6,12,18 and 24 with a dose of 1.48 MBq 131-I for the both tests, given orally as a water solution. Uptake was measured at hours 2, 4 and 24; thyroid scan -at hour 24, thyroid ultrasound, FNB cytology if suspicious of malignancy, thyroid hormones -TSH (normal range 0.3-4.0 mU/l), FT4 (normal range 8-17 pmol/l) Results: 131-iodine therapy was administered to subjects with 131-I uptake over 25% at hour 24. Doses between 148- 370MBq were given depending on diagnosis and thyroid volume. A single radioiodine dose, mean value 189.07 MBq is applied in 246 (87, 85%) patients, second dose, mean value 183, 5 MBq is required in 30 (10, 72%) and third dose, mean value 148 MBq received 4 (1, 43%) patients. Effect of 131-iodine therapy-the change in radioiodine uptake is a marker for complex assessment of the result of the 131-iodine therapy. In

  18. Status of thyroidal radioiodine (I-131) uptake and urinary iodine in Bangladesh population: A re-look following implementation of universal iodination of salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, F.; Sultana Haque, F.; Karim, M.A.; Faruque, O.; Ali, L.; Azad Khan, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Iodide plays a central role in thyroid physiology and in the production of thyroid hormones, which are essential for normal vertebrate growth and development. Radioiodine uptake test is one of the oldest radionuclide investigations for evaluation of thyroid function. On the other hand useful information about the nutritional status of a population can be obtained by measuring the prevalence of deficiency in a population. The main aim of this study was to find out the present status of urinary iodine and thyroid uptake status of people living in and around Dhaka City (Bangladesh). The present study was carried out over a period of three years from 1999 to 2002 involving 300 subjects inclusive of 216 females and 84 males. Efforts were made to randomly include people from a broad spectrum of social and economic strata, starting from people belonging to the lowest to the highest income groups; as well as people representing the urban, rural and suburban populations. Urinary iodine levels and 24 hour percentage radioiodine uptake by the thyroid were estimated in all subjects included in this study. Subsequently patients were grouped into four categories based on the values of their percentage 24-hour radioiodine uptake; e.g., Group-A (N-99) with lowest uptake (0-5%), Group-B (N=100) with uptake ranging between 5-10%, Group-C (N=73) with uptake ranging between 10-30% and Group D (N=28) with uptake above 30%. The median 24 hours RAIU values in groups A, B, C and D were 3, 7, 23 and 34% respectively. The corresponding mean urinary iodine levels in the four groups were 43.31, 33.95, 12.97 and 9.35μgm/dl respectively. The results have shown that 1.04, 3.48, 16.72 and 78.74% people studied had levels of urinary iodine indicating severe, moderate, mild or no iodine deficiency respectively as per the WHO Criteria (Severe: <2 μgm /dl, Moderate: 2-4.9 μgm /dl, mild: 5.0-9.9μgm /dl, normal: ≥ 10 μgm /dl). It may be noted that the normal values of Thyroidal I-131 uptake were

  19. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo; Monte, Osmar; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e; Duprat, Andre; Marone, Marilia; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  20. Effect of radioiodine therapy on thyroid nodule size in patients with toxic adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovaca, Z.; Mijatovic, J.; Skrobis, M.; Kovacevic, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Autonomously functioning toxic adenomas are a common cause of hyperthyroidism. Surgery, radioiodine and percutaneous ethanol injection into the nodule are effective therapies. Radioiodine therapy is increasingly used as first line therapy especially in elderly patients. Radioactive iodine I-131 seems to be a good therapeutic option with low incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The important therapeutic effect has also been the regression in nodule size. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radioiodine therapy on the size of toxic adenomas. Forty-six patients with age range of 37-76 years (Mean age=60.9 years) were followed up for a period of 12 months after I-131 therapy for toxic adenomas. Thyroid hormone levels (T3, T4 and TSH) were determined. Each patient was subjected to ultrasound and radionuclide scanning of thyroid gland at 3,6 and 12 months following I-131 therapy. Successful treatment was defined as control of hyperthyroidism and reappearance of extra-glandular thyroid tissue on Thyroid scan, which were suppressed by the hyperactive nodule prior to therapy. The volumes of the thyroid pre and post-therapy were estimated by US using the formula of ellipsoid model (δ/2π6 x length x width x depth). The therapeutic dose of I-131 was calculated for each patient by the following formula: 12 mCi x 100/24 hrs RAIU. Patients received a single dose of I-131 and the range of administered I-131 dose was 825 1221 MBq. Results revealed that 42 patients (91%) became euthyroid in three months after I-131. All patients became euthyroid in 6 months. The adenomas were reduced in size from a mean of 18.23+11.21 ml to 7.38+3.48 ml during the 12 months follow up. This was highly significant (p<0.05, t=3.408). The extra-nodular thyroid volume did not change following therapy (12.2+7.4 ml pre-therapy vs. 11.8+7.1 ml post therapy at 12 months). The results of our study showed that I-131 can successfully treat not only the functional state of

  1. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid autonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Peter [Clinic and Policlinic for Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Over half a century, treatment of thyroid autonomy with an oral dose of iodine-131 has proven to be effective. The optimum management strategy for the patient is, however, still a matter of debate. The article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of functional autonomy and its clinical relevance. According to the guidelines on both sides of the Atlantic, radioiodine treatment is considered the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the toxic nodular goitre. Some differences in the preparation procedures in the guidelines of the American and the German Society of Nuclear Medicine are discussed with respect to therapy results and the subtypes of thyroid autonomy. The results of studies are summarised concerning changes in thyroid function and thyroid volume after a course of radioiodine treatment. Therapy-related risks, such as immunogenic hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer, are discussed. {sup 131}I treatment of functional autonomy and hyperthyroidism is considered an effective and safe procedure. (orig.)

  2. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Over half a century, treatment of thyroid autonomy with an oral dose of iodine-131 has proven to be effective. The optimum management strategy for the patient is, however, still a matter of debate. The article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of functional autonomy and its clinical relevance. According to the guidelines on both sides of the Atlantic, radioiodine treatment is considered the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the toxic nodular goitre. Some differences in the preparation procedures in the guidelines of the American and the German Society of Nuclear Medicine are discussed with respect to therapy results and the subtypes of thyroid autonomy. The results of studies are summarised concerning changes in thyroid function and thyroid volume after a course of radioiodine treatment. Therapy-related risks, such as immunogenic hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer, are discussed. 131 I treatment of functional autonomy and hyperthyroidism is considered an effective and safe procedure. (orig.)

  3. Radioiodine therapy and thyrostatic drugs and iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmannstrasse 9, 50924 Koeln (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Radioiodine therapy is now the most common definite treatment for persistent hyperthyroidism. The outcome of radioiodine therapy depends mainly on the absorbed energy dose in the diseased thyroid tissue. The administered activity and the resulting target dose in the thyroid depend on both the biokinetics of radioiodine and the actual therapeutic effect of radioiodine in the thyroid. Thyrostatic drugs have a major influence on the kinetics of radioiodine in the thyroid and may additionally have a radioprotective effect. Pre-treatment with thyrostatic medication lowers the effective half-life and uptake of radioiodine. This can reduce the target dose in the thyroid and have a negative influence on the outcome of the therapy. Discontinuation of medication shortly before radioiodine administration can increase the absorbed energy dose in the thyroid without increasing the whole-body exposure to radiation as much as would a higher or second radioiodine administration. Furthermore, administration of non-radioactive iodine-127 2-3 days after radioiodine administration can also increase the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid. Thus, improving the biokinetics of radioiodine will allow lower activities to be administered with lower effective doses to the rest of the body, while achieving an equally effective target dose in the thyroid. (orig.)

  4. Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism at 25 years experience in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa; Phan Sy An; Phan Van Duyet; Tran Dinh Ha

    2004-01-01

    prevalence of hypothyroidism according to the doses of I-131 received (p > 0.05). No occurring thyroid nodules was detected on thyroid scintigrams and echosonograms of all patients. Before and after (3 months - 3 years) I-131 therapy the mean thyroid volume reduction was 66.1%. TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) are recognized as cause of organ-specific autoimmune disorder in Graves' disease. So the long-term effects of 131 I treatment for Graves' disease on TRAb have been studied in Vietnam. The TRAb values decreased over a period of more than 2 years after 131I therapy for Graves' disease, and the TRAb values (negative or positive) before treatment may influence the long- term outcome of 1311 therapy. The overall success rate of therapy, recognized as the permanent resolution of hyperthyroidism was 98.7 % with 94.4% achieving resolution in not more than 2 dose.The main problem with radioiodine treatment is hypothyroidism and this is easily managed with L-thyroxine. In summary, radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism is safe, inexpensive and efficacious in Vietnam. (authors)

  5. Risk from ionizing radiation to the clinical staff and incidental public in the course of therapy with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chas, J.; Janiak, M.K.; Kowalczyk, A.; Siekierzynski, M.; Dziuk, E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the risk to the personnel and neighbouring patients exposed to ionizing radiation during their stay at the Isotopic Therapy Clinic in Warsaw where therapeutic applications of I-131 are routinely performed. To this end, thermoluminescent dosimeters were deposited in various places throughout the Clinical ward and the absorbed doses were read after 125 days of the exposition. Additionally, exposure dose rates were determined at the skin surface over the thyroid gland at 0.5 and 1.0 m away from 71 patients treated with I-131 for hyperthyroidism or thyroid cancer (as a supplementary therapy after thyroidectomy) and the potential dose equivalents were calculated. From these values ''restriction times'', i.e., the amounts of time needed for the potential dose equivalents to decline below the limit recommended for occupational or public exposures to ionizing radiation were derived. The results indicate that - a) the probability to exceed the recommended annual dose limit by the personnel (50 mSv y -1 ) and neighbouring patients not subjected to radiotherapy (1 mSv y -1 ) during their exposition at the Isotopic Therapy Clinic to the I-131 treated patients is practically equal to zero; b) no restrictions in terms of limiting the duration of contact with the I-131-treated patients are necessary during the occupational exposures of the personnel of the Clinic; and c) the treated patients may incur some risk to the general public only when injected with high doses of I-131 and/or only within about 3 days upon the application of the radionuclide. (author)

  6. Calculation of the activity incorporated in the therapy with I 131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chica, L.G.; Puerta, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    By means of the product S(T--S). A-s-(T-e-). the absorbed dose to thyroid delivered by I-131 incorporated is calculated. Where S(T--S) is the absorbed dose in the thyroid per nuclear transformations (tn.) of I-131 localized in the thyroid and as a potential function of the mass is expressed. A-s-(T-e-) is the number of tn. of I-131 in the thyroid since the moment of the incorporation until the time T-e- (the effective middle time); to find A-s-(T-e-) to normal as different pathological conditions, the metabolic model of the iodo proposed by the ICRP is used. Of the expression of the doses, the incorporated activity, I-o- is obtained

  7. Maximal safe dose of I-131 after failure of standard fixed dose therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong-Jin; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kang, Won-Jun; Park, Do-Joon; Lee, Dong-Soo; Cho, Bo-Youn; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2008-01-01

    The maximal safe dose (MSD) on the basis of bone marrow irradiation levels allows the delivery of a large amount of I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue. The efficacy of MSD therapy in differentiated metastatic thyroid cancers that persisted after conventional fixed dose therapy is investigated. Forty-seven differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients with non-responsive residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy were enrolled in this study. Their postoperative pathologies were 43 papillary carcinomas and 4 follicular carcinomas. The MSD was calculated with the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center protocol using serial blood samples. The MSDs were administered at intervals of 6 months. Treatment responses were evaluated using I-131 whole-body scans and serum thyroglobulin measurements. The mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq (339.6±57.5 mCi). Of the 46 patients, 7 (14.9%) showed complete remission, 15 (31.9%) partial remission, 19 (40.4%) stable disease, and 6 (12.8%) disease progression. Of the patients who showed complete or partial remission, 15 (65%) showed response after the first MSD session and 6 (26%) showed response after the second session. Twenty-nine patients (62%) experienced transient cytopenia after therapy, but three did not recover to the baseline level. The maximal safe dose provides an effective means of treatment in patients who failed to respond adequately to conventional fixed dose therapy. I-131 MSD therapy can be considered in patients who fail fixed dose therapy. (author)

  8. Current status of radioiodine (131I) treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Radioiodine appears to be increasingly selected as the primary form of therapy for most hyperthyroid adults. Some controversy exists concerning the use of I-131 in children and adolescents as well as in some patients with toxic nodular goiter. The technical aspects of radioiodine administration reviewed in this chapter include the biologic basis of I-131 use, dose strategies, measurement and evaluation of radioiodine parameters, and I-125 treatment of hyperthyroidism. The management of patients before and after I-131 treatment is discussed as well as posttreatment hypothyroidism and complications of radioiodine treatment

  9. Analysis of influence of dosimetric factors on the outcome of I-131 therapy in patients with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapska-Kucharska, M.; Oszukowska, L.; Makarewicz, J.; Lewinski, A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of dosimetric factors on the outcome of 131 I therapy has been examined in hyperthyroid patients submitted to 131 I treatment. The following factors - which could have influence on the effects of therapy with radioiodine - were analysed: the goitre volume, the thyroid radioiodine uptake after 24 h, and the effective half-life time of 131 I (EHL). Five hundred (500) randomly selected patients with hyperthyroidism, treated with 131 I, were studied. They were divided into three groups (based on clinical examination, hormonal and immunological tests, thyroid scintigraphy and ultrasound imaging). The study shows that the effectiveness of 131 I therapy depends on the thyroid volume and absorbed dose in all the groups of patients and on the thyroid radioiodine uptake and EHL in patients with a single autonomously functioning thyroid nodule. We have failed to determine the borderline D, distinguishing between effective and ineffective therapy. The treatment outcome can be predicted with approximately 70% accuracy, based on minimal absorbed dose

  10. No hypothyroidism after I-131 therapy in pts with toxic nodular goiter, treated under combined thyreostatic, thyreomimetic medication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubbini, R.; Panarotto, M.B.; Paghera, B.; Pagliaini, R.; Pajoro, U.; Pizzocaro, C.; Rossini, P.L.; Terzi, A.; Maira, G.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Treatment of toxic nodular goiter with 131-I is generally satisfactory and will cause a reversion of hyperthyroidism. To avoid the risk of thyrotoxic storm I-131 therapy is usually performed after pre-treatment with antithyroid drugs, which causes a TSH increase and functional recruitment of previously inhibited normal thyroid tissue. In this functional state both autonomous nodule(s) and normal tissue are irradiated after I-131 administration. This may be the reason of late hypothyroidism occurring in 15-25% of Pts. Aim of the study was the evaluation of a different pre-treatment modality with combined methimazole (10-20 mg) and Triiodo-thyronine (T3 - 60 μg) in order to treat pts in euthyroid state with suppressed TSH. Study protocol. After diagnosis of hyperthyroidism with autonomous functioning tissue the pts were put under thyreostatic medication. Two months later TSH was checked and if >0.5% U.I the T3 treatment was associated. After two more months, the TSH level was checked again and, if suppressed, the pt received I-131 therapy. Study population. 93 pts (74f, 19m - age 75±10) were consecutively enrolled. 24 pts had a toxic nodular goiter and 69 a multi nodular one, respectively; they were evaluated at diagnosis, at pre-treatment, two months after therapy and at late follow-up (3.1 ± 3.5 yrs). Methods: 557±225 MBq of I-131 (according to uptake determinations and gland weight) were administered. Methymazole was discontinued 3 days before treatment whereas T3 was maintained during I-131 therapy. Results: Euthyroidism was achieved after the first treatment in 71% of pts. At late follow-up TSH values over the normal range were observed in only 4 pts (4.3% - however all 4 pts had TSH level below 6 I.U.). Summaries of FT3 and FT4 values are presented. Conclusions: The treatment of toxic nodular goiter under combined thyreostatic-thyreomimetic treatment is a safe, well tolerated and effective procedure allowing a 71% success at the first treatment

  11. Characterization of radioiodine therapy failures in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Schreckenberger, M.; Reinartz, P.; Nowak, B.; Ostwald, E.; Schaefer, W.; Block, S.; Setani, K.; Buell, U.

    2001-01-01

    Aim of this study was a characterization of radioiodine therapy (RIT) failures in Graves' disease without simultaneous carbimazole. Method: 226 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease received 686.8 ± 376.4 MBq of iodine-131 orally for thyroid ablation. Target dose was 250 Gy. All patients were followed up for 6 months. Therapy failures were compared with successes regarding possible influencing variables initial thyroid volume, thyroid function, immune activity (TRAb), I-131 uptake, effective half-life, absorbed energy dose, age and gender. Results: 212 of 226 patients (93.8%) were treated successfully, 14 (6.2%) showed a hyperthyroidism relapse within 6 months which required a second radioiodine therapy. A success rate of 92.5% (62/67) could also be achieved with 67 patients who were hyperthyroid at the time of RIT. Compared to the therapy successes, the 14 failures achieved significantly lower absorbed doses (223.8 ± 76.6 Gy vs. 285.2 ± 82.1 Gy, p 0.2). Of the 14 failures, n = 8 reached an absorbed dose 250 Gy. Stepwise logistic regression revealed only absorbed energy dose as a variable significantly influencing therapy success (p 0.2) or gender (p = 0.13). Two-tailed Fisher's exact test showed no significant influence of gender on success rates (failures/successes: male 1/36, female 13/176, p = 0.48). Conclusions: Except for the absorbed energy dose, no other significant variable influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease without simultaneous carbimazole could be found. It should be noted, though, that 5 therapy failures (2.2%) reached an absorbed energy dose of >250 Gy. (orig.) [de

  12. Iodine capsules in thyroid therapy: An individually controlled study of I-131 uptake kinetics as compared to liquid administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Schulthess, G.K.; Seelentag, W.W.; Pfeiffer, G.; Blauenstein, P.; Bekier, A.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the additional radiation dose sustained by parts of the patients gastric mucosa when given I-131 therapy in capsular rather than liquid form, and thus to establish the safety of this procedure. 16 patients with benign thyroid disease were studied by measuring serum radioactivity at 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 min. after administration of the capsule (120-200 MBq I131). These serum uptake values were compared to the uptake after administration of a liquid diagnostic dose of I-131 (2 MBq). From the resulting uptake curves the delay due to capsular dissolution was determined. The average dissolution time was found to be 12 min. with a large standard deviation of 7 min. Also, a theoretical curve was computed to indicate the dose rate as a function of the distance from the surface of the capsule. Based on this information the maximum dose to the gastric mucosa is of the order of 250 cGy for a therapeutic activity of 185 MBq, which is the maximum dose which may be given as single application to outpatients in Switzerland. By having the patient swallow some liquid during the first ten minutes, the capsule can be made to move around, and hence, the local radiation dose can be reduced substantially. The authors conclude, that I-131 in capsular form is a safe galenic form for therapeutic use in patients with thyroid disease. When large doses are given, administration of the dose in several capsules may be advisable

  13. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease - A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, B.R.; Bhattacharya, A.; Dutta, P.; Bhansali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine is a safe form of treatment for all patients with primary hyperthyroidism. The thyroid's unique capacity to store iodine (thus also radioiodine) makes it a natural target for radioiodine therapy. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of radioiodine therapy in a cohort of 151 patients of primary hyperthyroidism treated on an outpatient basis in our institute from January 2001 to November 2006. Of these 151 patients, 113 (38 male, 75 female; age range: 17- 65 years) were of Graves' disease. The median duration of symptoms in these patients was 4 years. (Range: 3 months to 20 years). Diagnosis was established on basis of clinical, biochemical and scintigraphic features. All the patients were treated medically with Neomercazole (Carbimazole) for varying durations (median 3.5 years). The dose range varied from 5 to 80 mg per day (median 20 mg per day). Clinical assessment of thyroid size revealed 39 patients with grade 0, 14 with grade 1, 30 with grade 2, and 30 with grade 3 goiters. Pre-therapy radioactive iodine uptake was done in 28 patients, which showed median values of 50 % at 4 hrs, 57.45 % at 24 hrs, and 56.2 % at 48 hrs respectively. These patients were treated empirically with I-131 in a dose range of 5 to 15 mCi, depending upon the clinical presentation and the RAIU values. Remission of symptoms with a single dose therapy was noticed in 68 patients. Of the 83 patients, 15 became hypothyroid within 3 months. These patients were on Neomercazole for a varying period of 2 to 20 years, at a dose range of 10 to 80 mg per day. 14 patients achieved remission after 2 doses with a cumulative RAI dose in the range of 10 to 19 mCi, at a median period of 7 to 24 months. Eight patients still showed hyperthyroid activity even after a second dose and are on follow-up. Seven patients achieved remission with a cumulative dose range of 17 to 35 mCi at a median duration of 10 months. One patient of Graves' disease who took Neomercazole for 10 years, at

  14. Analysis of influence of dosimetric factors on the outcome of I-131 therapy in patients with hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapska-Kucharska, M.; Oszukowska, L.; Makarewicz, J. [Department of Nuclear Medecine and Oncological Endocrinology, Province Hospital, Zgierz (Poland); Lewinski, A. [Chair and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Medical University, Lodz (Poland)

    2012-07-01

    The influence of dosimetric factors on the outcome of {sup 131}I therapy has been examined in hyperthyroid patients submitted to {sup 131}I treatment. The following factors - which could have influence on the effects of therapy with radioiodine - were analysed: the goitre volume, the thyroid radioiodine uptake after 24 h, and the effective half-life time of {sup 131}I (EHL). Five hundred (500) randomly selected patients with hyperthyroidism, treated with {sup 131}I, were studied. They were divided into three groups (based on clinical examination, hormonal and immunological tests, thyroid scintigraphy and ultrasound imaging). The study shows that the effectiveness of {sup 131}I therapy depends on the thyroid volume and absorbed dose in all the groups of patients and on the thyroid radioiodine uptake and EHL in patients with a single autonomously functioning thyroid nodule. We have failed to determine the borderline D, distinguishing between effective and ineffective therapy. The treatment outcome can be predicted with approximately 70% accuracy, based on minimal absorbed dose

  15. Functional impairment of the salivary gland after high dose radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, W.; Reiners, C.; Boerner, W.

    1986-06-01

    Radiation induced impairements of salivation, which are rather related to the more radio-sensitive parotides than to the submandibular glands according to our experience, occur in about 1/3 of the patients treated with 7,4-11,1 GBq (200-300 mCi) of I-131. Based on our results and experiences after percutaneous radiation therapy of the head and neck region, a total xerostomy (Sicca's syndrome) must already be expected at a focal dose of 40 Gy to the salivary gland parenchyma. Experience has shown that this cumulative radiation dose is reached at about 18,5 GBq (500 mCi) of I-131. The acute sialadenitis occuring a few days after therapeutic administration of radioiodine is mostly associated with minor complaints and therefore often escapes the patient's notice. During the onset of xerostomy, which is associated with a moderate reduction of salivation, the patients are surprisingly indolent. However, specific examinations including patient's history, palpation and functional scintigraphy enable early detection of radiation induced functional depression of the salivary glands, which should be accounted for in the assessment of indication for further radioiodine therapy. To prevent the severe consequences of xerostomy such as ageusia, dysphagia, epithelial lesion of the oral mucosa and loss of teeth, the patients under radioiodine therapy should be urged to see to sufficient fluid supply and to steadily stimulate salivation e.g. by sour drops, chewing gum or Emser pastilles.

  16. I-131 therapy for hyperthyroidism in carbimazole induced acute aplastic anaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, B.A.; Van Every, B.; Kelly, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: We present a case of a 39 year old previously well woman who developed carbimazole-induced acute aplastic anaemia. Following 6 weeks of carbimazole for Grave's disease she presented with fever, sore throat and lethargy and was found to be pancytopaenic. Haemoglobin fell to 79g/l (normal>120g/l), neutrophils to an undetectable level and platelets to 4,000/ml (normal>150,000/ml). From the MIRD schema it was estimated that a therapeutic dose of 444 MBq (12mCi) to treat her hyperthyroidism would deliver a red marrow radiation dose of about 30 mSv, at least an order of magnitude below any expected demonstrable deleterious effect on the marrow. Subsequently a dose of 444 MBq of I-131 was given and within 2 weeks the marrow had begun to recover, eventually to normal. This case would support the use of 1-131 for hyperthyroidism in carbimazole-induced marrow aplasia, even in profoundly depressed marrow

  17. I-131 therapy for hyperthyroidism in carbimazole induced acute aplastic anaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkin, B.A.; Van Every, B.; Kelly, M.J. [Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC (Australia). Nuclear Medicine Department

    1998-06-01

    Full text: We present a case of a 39 year old previously well woman who developed carbimazole-induced acute aplastic anaemia. Following 6 weeks of carbimazole for Grave`s disease she presented with fever, sore throat and lethargy and was found to be pancytopaenic. Haemoglobin fell to 79g/l (normal>120g/l), neutrophils to an undetectable level and platelets to 4,000/ml (normal>150,000/ml). From the MIRD schema it was estimated that a therapeutic dose of 444 MBq (12mCi) to treat her hyperthyroidism would deliver a red marrow radiation dose of about 30 mSv, at least an order of magnitude below any expected demonstrable deleterious effect on the marrow. Subsequently a dose of 444 MBq of I-131 was given and within 2 weeks the marrow had begun to recover, eventually to normal. This case would support the use of 1-131 for hyperthyroidism in carbimazole-induced marrow aplasia, even in profoundly depressed marrow

  18. Efficiency of radioiodine therapy in Graves disease and adenoma toxicum and incidence of hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovski, Z.P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the this study was to evaluate different states in hyperthyroid patients and incidence of hypothyroidism after I-131 therapy.We observed a total of 184 hyperthyroid pts, from which 108(58,7%)pts with Graves' disease,65(35,3%)pts with single toxicum nodule and 11(6%)pts with toxicum multinodular goitre,treated with radioiodine therapy during the period 1986-2001.Dose of I-131 orally administered ranged 150-1100MBq and was calculated according to the 'MBq/gram' method.The radioiodine-131 therapy was performed once in 69,5%(128/184)pts,twice in 21,2%(39/184)pts and in 9,3%(17/184)pts more than two doses. Completely cured of hyperthyroidism occurred in 61%(66/108)pts with Graves' disease,81,8%(9/11)pts with toxic multinodular goiter and 90,7%(59/65)pts with single toxic nodule. The patients in our study were evaluated 6 months to 15 years after received J-131 therapy. Incidence of early hypothyroidism within one year was 23,1%(25/108) in Graves' disease,9%(1/11) in toxic multinodular goiter and 4,6%(3/65) with single toxicum nodule.Overall incidence of hypothyroidism within one year was 17,6% and had cumulative increase of Graves' disease every following year approximately for 3%,while for adenoma toxicum there was no any significant changes. We concluded that radioiodine therapy is simple,comfortable radical method for medical treatment of hyperthyroidism and indicate higher incidence of hypothyroidism in patients treated with I-131 for Graves' disease than that of patients treated for toxicum multinodular goiters and single toxic nodule

  19. Radiation Dose to Family Member of Hospitalized Patient Receiving I-131 Therapy for Thyroid Cancer: Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuntawiroon, M; Chaudakshetrin, P; Sritongkul N; Thongprapal, T

    2009-07-01

    Full text: During high-dose I-131 therapy, hospitalized patient who is unable to walk to the bathroom is at risk of radiation burden to comforter from excreted urine. Foley catheter is usually placed in the patient before I-131 administration. The urine was collected and housed in lead shielding, emptied every 4 to 6 hours on the first day, and every 8 to 10 hours on subsequent days. After specific instructions with regard to radiation safety, family member designed as the caregiver of patient was provided an electronic personal dosimeter to directly measure radiation dose for three days in isolated hospitalization and two more weeks at home. The caregiver recorded time spent in contact with the patient and activities performed during these times. Total accumulative dose for 16 days was 650 μSv of which 44% (288 μSv) was from the first 24 hours and more than 70% (462 μSv) during the first 72 hours, and about 25% (162 μSv) from emptying urine bags. Most of the dose received (488 μSv) was from attending time spent in the vicinity of the patients. However, this was not exceeding the constraints of 1 mSv/y and well below the limit of 5 mSv in any one year for exposed caregiver and comforter

  20. Cost-effectiveness-analysis: radioiodine or antithyroid drugs as first-line therapy of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Dederichs, B.; Schicha, H.; Hunsche, E.; Lauterbach, K.W.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: As first-line therapy of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease antithyroid drugs are favoured in Europe, while radioiodine therapy is favoured in the USA. Radioiodine therapy has become more economic in Germany since the new recommendations by the Federal German Radiation Protection Committee (SSK) for patient discharge guidelines. Method: Sensitivity analyses took into account the long-term relapse rate of conservative or radioiodine therapy, use of diagnostic tests, level of health insurance, drops in productivity and a discount factor. Costing models included the costs of follow-up care over 30 years. The costs of the hospitalisation for radioiodine therapy were calculated for 300 patients, discharged with 250 MBq I-131 residual activity. Result: Antithyroid drugs were considered cost-effective when they achieved relapse rate of 50% or less, a cut in the number of tests needed and reduced working hours. Failure to meet any one of these conditions makes primary radioiodine therapy more cost-effective in 1593 of 1944 calculated costing models. Repeated conservative therapies will increase clearly the overall costs. Conclusion: Radioiodine is a cost-effective, first-line therapy in patients with a special risk of relapse after primary conservative therapy (goitre, younger patient, persistent elevated TSH-receptor-antibodies or Tc-uptake). (orig.) [de

  1. Results of radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, A.

    1980-01-01

    Between 1971 and 1977, 102 hyperthyroidism patients were treated with 131 I. The average age of the patients was 64 years. In 78 patients, hyperthyroidism was due to decompensated autonomous adenoma, 24 patients presented with diffuse hyperthyroidism. The patients were observed for 14 to 24 months. Until early 1976, diagnosis and therapy success assessment were based on thyroid scintiscanning, radioiodine two-phase tests, PBI 131 , T 4 tests, and T 3 tests. Since 1976, the radioiodine two-phase test has been replaced by the TRH test, the TRH-RIA, and the T 4 -RIA. The patients were given 3 to 25 mCi 131 I. In 88 cases, euthyroidism was reached after a single therapy; in 8 cases, after two therapies; in 1 case, after three therapies; in 4 cases, after 4 therapies; in 1 case, after 5 therapies. Euthyroidism was thus reached in 96% of all cases after 131 I therapy of hyperthyroidism. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Model of iodine metabolism in a T3-thyrotoxic patient undergoing I-131 therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, S.; Price, R.; Brill, A. B.; Dobyns, B. M.; Berman, M.

    1975-06-01

    Data on radioactivity in the thyroid, urine, serum, butanol-extractable iodine (BEI) and chromatographic fractionations of BEI, obtained during four I-131 therapeutic treatments of a T3-thyrotoxic patient, have been analyzed and simulated with the help of a 7-compartment model. Good fits to most of the data can be obtained with both the dose-independent and dose-dependent models. A model with 3 or 4 compartments, which provides adequate fits to iodine kinetic data in most euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients is not satisfactory in the case of this patient. Thus, to represent iodine metabolism during T3-thyrotoxicosis therapy, we find that it is necessary to provide for separate biochemical pathways for the BEI components as well as the butanol-insoluble compounds released by the thyroid gland. (auth)

  3. Changes in the thyroid hormone level and blood profile after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbac, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Exacerbation of hyperthyroidism has been reported to occur as early as 3 days after administration of radioiodine (I-131) therapy. The hematological effects of radioiodine also have been reported but mainly confined in thyroid cancer cases wherein high doses are administered. This study was undertaken to determine the possible acute changes in the thyroid hormone concentration and blood picture of patients one week after therapy. Twelve hyperthyroid patients (8 females, 4 males), with ages ranging from 27-56 years, were followed with measurements of serum thyroid hormone levels and blood profile a week after I-131 therapy. All patients were pretreated with antithyroid medications. Radioiodine doses given ranged from 8 mCi up to 16 mCi, all based from the computed dose of 160 uCi/g. Only two out of twelve (2/12) exhibited an increase in FT3 level. Two patients showed a decrease while the remaining 8 patients showed no significant difference. Six out of 12 (50%) exhibited an increase in FT4 level. Five patients showed a decrease while only one had no significant difference. Hematologically, there were 5/12, 1/12, 3/12, 5/12 and 1/12 patients who showed a decrease in hemoglobin, hematocrit, RBC, WBC and platelet counts, respectively. Four out of 12, 2/12, and 1/12 patients, however, showed an increase in hemoglobin, RBC and platelet, respectively. The rest exhibited no significant change. FT4 level was observed to be more affected than FT3 levels but there was no consistent pattern established. A significant decrease in WBC count was observed. Although a high percentage of decreased hemoglobin was noted, no pattern was established. Radioiodine therapy caused no significant increase of serum FT3 and FT4 concentrations in the majority of patients after one week of therapy. In the followup of patients, determination of complete blood count of patients is also important. (author)

  4. The history of radioiodine therapy beginnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Olegovich Rumiantsev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This report contains historical review of radioiodine therapy invention and clinical implementation for the treatment of patients with diffuse toxic goiter and differentiated thyroid cancer. In 1923 Henry Plummer has strongly recommended to prescribe stable iodine in patients with Grave’s diseases after surgery in order to prevent thyrotoxic storm. Radioactive isotopes of iodine for the first time were obtained by Enrico Fermi in 1934 in laboratory. Clinical implementation of radioiodine was started in 40th years of past century. In 1940 experimentally have been shown that thyroid gland with Grave’s disease accumulated as much as 80% of radioiodine administered activity. Saul Hertz was the first physician who used radioactive iodine in January, 1941 with purpose to treat diffuse toxic goiter patients. Samuel Seidlin was first who used radioiodine in March, 1943 to treat patient with functioned differentiated thyroid cancer metastases. In Russia radioiodine treatment of patients started since 1982 in Medical Radiological Research Centre (former Institute of Medical Radiology, Obninsk.

  5. Preparation of a radioactive boron compound (B-I-131-lipiodol) for neutron capture therapy of hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, F.I.; Chung, H.P.; Chung, R.J.; Wen, H.W.; Wei, Y.Y.; Kai, J.J.; Lui, W.Y.; Chi, C.W.

    2000-01-01

    In our research, a radioactive boron compound, B-I-131-lipiodol, that can be selectively retained in hepatoma cells was prepared. Combining the effect of α particles produced by boron neutron capture reaction with the β particles released by radionuclides in the radioactive boron compounds will produce a synergistic killing effect on cancer cells. Human hepatoma HepG2 cell cultures were used to examine the stability and the intracellular distribution of the radioactive boron drug. Microscopes were used to examine the interaction and retention of B-I-131-lipiodol globules in the individual hepatoma cell. Moreover, ICP-AES and NaI scintillation counter were performed to determine boron concentrations and I-131 radioactivity, respectively. Results showed that B-I-131-lipiodol with a boron concentration and a specific radioactivity ranged from 500-2000 ppm and 0.05-10 mCi/mL respectively was stably retained in serum. The radiochemical purity of B-I-131-lipiodol was 98%. After supplement with a medium containing B-I-131-lipiodol, the HepG2 cells had intracellular B-I-131-lipiodol globules in the cytoplasm as seen by inverted light microscope, the I-131 and boron can be stably retained in HepG2 cells. (author)

  6. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP); Monte, Osmar [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Physiology Department; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Speech Therapy School; Duprat, Andre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department; Marone, Marilia [Nuclimagem - Irmanity of the Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department. Endocrinology and Metabology Unit

    2008-07-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  7. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomies: Experience at a single university referral hospital centre in Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of I-131 therapy in patients suffering from various types of functional autonomies of the thyroid gland. The efficacy and adverse effects of radioiodine therapy are presented. Seven hundred ninety-nine patients (age range= 33 to 86 years; average age= 58.7 years; Male: Female = 7.4:1) with unifocal, multifocal and disseminated functional autonomies of thyroid gland were treated with at least one therapeutic dose of I-131. Baseline Tc-99m pertechnetate thyroid scans, radioactive iodine uptake studies and ultrasonography were performed in all cases prior to radio iodine therapy. Baseline serum total and free thyroxine (T-T4 and F-T4), total triiodothyronine (T-T3) and TSH levels were estimated in all cases. Effective half life of radio iodine in the thyroids was also determined in all patients prior to therapy and a few patients were subjected to TRH stimulation tests. Following treatment all patients were evaluated after a period of 4-6 months. Further follow up evaluations were done at one year in 545 patients and at two years in 254 patients. Complete elimination of functional autonomy was achieved in 733 (91.74%) patients with a single therapeutic dose of I-131, while 62 (7.76%) patients required two doses of I-131 and only 4 (0.5%) patients required three therapeutic doses of I-131. Following I-131 therapy, the suppression of TSH levels in serum disappeared in 607 (76%) of treated patients. An average volume reduction of 38% was noted in the thyroid gland following I-131. Side effects were minimal and only a few patients complained of transient neck pressure, pain and neck swelling. Postradiation hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 36 patients (4.5%). We conclude that radio iodine treatment is the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the thyroid functional autonomies. The results of our approach show that the radioiodine therapy of the thyroid functional autonomies is safe, with low incidence of adverse effects

  8. Clinical Significance of Diffuse Intrathoracic Uptake on Post-Therapy I-131 Scans in Thyroid Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyun Su; Kim, Sung Hoon; Park, Sonya Youngju; Park, Hye Lim; Seo, Ye Young; Choi, Woo Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and possible cause of diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy I-131 scans in thyroid cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed 781 post-therapy scans of 755 thyroid cancer patients who underwent total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine therapy between January and December 2010. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was examined, and clinical patient characteristics including sex, age, regimen for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation (thyroid hormone withdrawal or recombinant human TSH injection), TSH, thyroglobulin (Tg) and anti-thyroglobulin antibody (anti-Tg Ab) levels, therapeutic dose of radioactive iodine therapy and prior history of radioactive iodine therapy were recorded.Scan findings were correlated with chest CT, chest radiographs, laboratory tests and/or clinical status. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake without evidence of pathologic condition was categorized as indeterminate. The association between clinical characteristics and intrathoracic uptake were analyzed for negative intrathoracic uptake and indeterminate uptake groups. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was demonstrated in 39 out of 755 (5.2 %) patients, among which 3 were confirmed as lung metastasis. The 14 patients that showed high Tg or anti-Tg Ab levels were considered to be at risk of having undetected micrometastasis on other imaging modalities. The remaining 22 were indeterminate (2.9 %). Upon comparison of negative intrathoracic uptake and indeterminate uptake groups, TSH stimulation by thyroid hormone withdrawal was shown to be significantly correlated with diffuse intrathoracic uptake (p <0.05). The frequency of diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was 5.2 % and could be seen in thyroid cancer patients with underlying lung metastasis as well as those without definite pathologic condition. In the latter, there was a higher frequency for diffusely increased intrathoracic

  9. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Moser, E.; Reiners, C.; Schneider, P.; Schober, O.

    2007-01-01

    Version 4 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases includes an interdisciplinary consensus ondecision making for antithyroid drugs, surgical treatment and radioiodine therapy. The quantitative description of a specific goiter volume for radioiodine therapy or operation was cancelled. For patients with nodular goiter with or without autonomy, manifold circumstances are in favor of surgery (suspicion on malignancy, large cystic nodules, mediastinal goiter, severe compression of the trachea) or in favor of radioiodine therapy (treatment of autonomy, age of patient, co-morbidity, history of prior subtotal thyroidectomy, profession like teacher, speaker or singer). For patients with Graves' disease, radioiodine therapy or surgery are recommended in the constellation of high risk of relapse (first-line therapy), persistence of hyperthyroidism or relapse of hyperthyroidism. After counseling, the patient gives informed consent to the preferred therapy. The period after radioiodine therapy of benign disorders until conception of at least four months was adapted to the European recommendation. (orig.)

  10. Internal dosimetry for the radiological protection of the patient in the therapy with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deluca, G.M.; Rojo, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (CADIT) subjected to therapy with radiopharmaceuticals should be considered the possible risk of sharp depression of the bone marrow like consequence of the intolerance to the quantity of administered activity. The manifestation of the myelotoxicity can limit in a substantial way the future treatments and to deteriorate the predict of resolution of the illness. In this work it shows the physical-mathematical mark of a methodology for the estimated absorbed dose in bone marrow based in the MIRD scheme whose objective is to protect the one patient of the noxious and undesirable effects of the internal radiotherapy in organs that are not target of the same one. The formalism incorporates specific information of the patient and also peculiar characteristics of the internal therapy in patient with CADIT. The considerations are the following ones: (1) the main organ to protect is the bone marrow: (2) the accumulated activity, in bone marrow, it is obtained starting from measurements in blood: (3) the used isotope almost exclusively in this type of therapies is the 131 I; (4) it is used as radiopharmaceutical at the 131 INa that it is characterized to be a simple, inorganic and small molecule: (5) the statistical incidence of the CADIT is bigger in women than in men. It is explained for that it was selected the formalism that is presented, the principles on which it is sustained which are their reaches and their limitations. They are also presented future innovations that can be implemented to effects of improving the estimates. The work is framed inside the thematic of the medical applications of open radioactive sources and it constitutes a contribution to the invigoration of the internal therapy with radiopharmaceuticals. This is due to that the methodology of dose estimation presented supplements with a theoretical biophysics base the protocols of empiric prescription broadly used in this practice. For these reasons

  11. Technical solution for radioactive waste management resulting from the I-131 therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerez V, P.; Lopez F, Y.; Quevedo G, J.; Betancourt H, L.

    1996-01-01

    The paper discusses a system designed for the collection and storage of biological wastes arising from the therapy with l-131. This system is based on the use of either retention or septic tanks, in which the waste is stored or delayed until the activity decays to acceptable levels, in order to comply with authorized limits established by the Regulatory Authority for discharge to environment. A method for estimating waste activity concentration as a function of the number of patients, the activity delivered to each one of them, as well as other parameter related to the system design are discussed. The general requirements to be met by the system are also included. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs

  12. Fixed dose of I-131 therapy for the treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Lee, K.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate short-term (6 month) efficacy of fixed-dose (555 MBq, 15 mCi) approach in the treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism and analyze the relationship between clinical outcome (hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and euthyroidism) and variances (patient age, thyroid weight, absorbed activity per gram of thyroid tissue, and radioactive iodine uptake value). Methods: 38 patients of Graves' hyperthyroidism were treated with 555MBq of radioactive iodine (in the form of capsule). Follow-up was done 3 and 6 months post therapy and the following clinical outcome was monitored: persistent hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and euthyroidism. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software (version 11.5). P<0.05 was taken as indicating a statistically significant effect. Results: Of the 38 subjects, 14 (36.8%) were identified as euthyroidism, 18 (47.4%) hypothyroidism, and 6 (15.8%) hyperthyroidism. Cure rate (euthyroidism+hypothyroidism) was 84.2%. Statistical analysis revealed that there is a statistically significant difference of absorbed activity per gram of thyroid tissue and thyroid weight (F=17.639, P=0.000; F=28.453, P=0.000), but there is no statistically significant difference in terms of patient age and RAIU (F=1.375, P-0.266; F=2.453, P=0.101) among euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism patients. Conclusion: We concluded that fixed-dose approach is very effective in the quickly restoration of thyroid function. There is a statistically significant difference of absorbed activity per gram of thyroid tissue and thyroid weight, but there is no statistically significant difference in terms of patient age and RAIU among euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism patients. (authors)

  13. Radiation Dose-rate Reduction Pattern in Well-differentiated Thyroid Cancer Treated with I-131.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahbaz Ahmad; Khan, Muhammad Saqib; Arif, Muhammad; Durr-e-Sabih; Rahim, Muhammad Kashif; Ahmad, Israr

    2015-07-01

    To determine the patterns of dose rate reduction in single and multiple radioiodine (I-131) therapies in cases of well differentiated thyroid cancer patients. Analytical series. Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Physics, Multan Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy (MINAR), Multan, Pakistan, from December 2006 to December 2013. Ninety three patients (167 therapies) with well differentiated thyroid cancer treated with different doses of I-131 as an in-patient were inducted. Fifty four patients were given only single I-131 therapy dose ranging from 70 mCi (2590 MBq) to 150 mCi (5550 MBq). Thirty nine patients were treated with multiple I-131 radioisotope therapy doses ranging from 80 mCi (2960 MBq) to 250 mCi (9250 MBq). T-test was applied on the sample data showed statistically significant difference between the two groups with p-value (p < 0.01) less than 0.05 taken as significant. There were 68 females and 25 males with an age range of 15 to 80 years. Mean age of the patients were 36 years. Among the 93 cases of first time Radio Active Iodine (RAI) therapy, 59 cases (63%) were discharged after 48 hours. Among 39 patients who received RAI therapy second time or more, most were discharged earlier after achieving acceptable discharge dose rate i.e 25 µSv/hour; 2 out of 39 (5%) were discharged after 48 hours. In 58% patients, given single I-131 therapy dose, majority of these were discharged after 48 hours without any major complications. For well differentiated thyroid cancer patients, rapid dose rate reduction is seen in patients receiving second or subsequent radioiodine (RAI) therapy, as compared to first time receiving RAI therapy.

  14. Testicular impact of the treatment with I-131 in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chebel, G.; Gutierrez, S.; Fadel, A.; Suarez, S.; Levalle, O.

    2007-01-01

    Young patients carriers differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) are treated with high doses of I-131 for much of his life with very good prognosis and projects with paternity. However, there is scarce information on the effect of radioiodine on the male gonad and their future fertility. This therapy may compromise on a temporary and / or definitively the role of the germinal cells. The testicular irradiation depends on the blood flow, the dose of I-131 administered and of the presence or absence of metastasis pelvic near to the gonads. A single dose of 100 mCi of I-131 throws an absorbed dose at gonadal level of 50-150 cGy. It has been reported that absorbed doses of 50 cGy can produce transitory decrease spermatogenesis and higher doses can also affect the function of the Leydig cells [es

  15. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Balawi, Ibrahim A.; Meir, Hadir M.; Yousef, Mohammad K.; Nayel, Hala A.; Al-Mobarak, Mohammad F.

    2001-01-01

    The current work was conducted to study the disease status and treatment results of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioactive iodine therapy. Retrospective review of 78 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioiodine therapy in the Nuclear Medicine Unit, King Abdulaziz Hospital and Oncology Center, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Analysis of the clinicopathologic characteristics, age correlation to different risk factors, treatment protocol and results were performed. Seventy seven percent were female and the female to male ratio was 3.5:1. The age of patients ranged between 13-63 years with a median age of 36 years. Cervical lymph node involvement was detected in 22 patients (25%). Papillary carcinoma was encountered in 78 patients (90%) and follicular carcinoma in 9 patients (10%). Analysis of the clinicopathologic characteristics showed no statistically significant difference between patients in the different age groups except for extrathyroid extension and lymph node involvement. Patients older than 45 years had a statistically significant lower incidence of nodal involvement and higher incidence of extra thyroid extension (P<0.02). In the current study we used a high dose method (Radioiodine-131 dose 75-100mCi) for thyroid remnant ablation after thyroidectomy (total or near total) in 67 patients. An Iodine 131 dose of 150 mCi was used in 12 patients with radioiodine-avid cervical lymph nodes and in 3 patients with gross residual tumor. In 4 patients with distant metastases an Iodine 131 dose of 200 mCi was used. For the whole study group the 5 year overall survival and disease-free survival was 96% and 88%. The current study, as with many other retrospective studies, concluded that despite the fact that differentiated thyroid carcinoma is among the most curable cancers, some patients are still at high risk for recurrent disease and associated mortality. (author)

  16. Radiation protection principles for radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Lassmann, M.

    1999-01-01

    In Germany, approximately 30,000 treatments with radioiodine are performed yearly on patients with benign or malignant thyroid diseases. These are carried out generally in specialized therapy wards which are equipped with radiation protection facilities. Ambulant (fractionated) radioiodine treatment is not permitted in Germany. More recently, the situation has been that the discharge of patients is permitted, when they have spent a stay of at least 48 hours in the ward without the dose rate exceeding 3.5 μSv/hour at 2 meters distance from them, corresponding to 1 mSv/year (this correlates to a residual activity in the body of the patient of 250 MBq). The radiation exposure of personnel in the therapy ward due to both external and internal exposure lies within a range of a few mSv per year. According to recent studies, the exposure to family members and close friends via external exposure, inhalation or incorporation does not exceed the effective dose of 1 mSv/year. This value has been laid down in a recommendation by the European Union as the dose constraint for children; for adults younger than 60 years of age, 3 mSv are recommended, for older persons 15 mSv. (orig.) [de

  17. Thyrotoxicosis and radioiodine therapy: Does the dose matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Collier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 3 treatment options for thyrotoxicosis: Antithyroid drugs, Surgery and radioiodine. The choice of treatment varies geographically. Radioiodine therapy is preferred in the United States. The aim of radioiodine is to destroy sufficient thyroid tissue to cure the hyperthyroidism. There is a lack of consensus towards what dose of radioiodine should be used. Several methods are used to determine the dose. In our practice we administer 400 MBq to patients with Graves and in patients with large multinodular goiter, we would administer 800 MBq.

  18. Radiation exposure from liquid discharges from I-131 therapy rooms into a piping system in the building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuntawiroon, M.; Sritongkul, N.; Pusuwan, P.; Chaudakshetrin, P.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Over 80% of the activity from patients undergoing radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer is eliminated during the first three days. In our iodine therapy unit, numbers of hospitalized patients have increased from less than 200 in 2004 to more than 300 patients in 2006. The total amount of activity used is about 1,900 MBq, and the estimated amount excreted would then be about 1,800 MBq. This results in significant volume of liquid discharges into the piping system. In this study, we monitored external dose rates in non-radiation areas adjacent to pipeline connections in the building to ensure that the dose to any individual in these areas does not exceed 1 mSv per year. Materials and Methods: Exposure rates in areas adjacent to the pipeline junction connections were measured periodically from April 2006 to February 2007, five floors below the therapy unit. The measurements were made inside the wall in contact with the junction, behind the wall and in hallways 1 meter from the wall, using a GM detector or an ionization chamber. The results were recorded in μSv/h and the dose received was estimated for members of the public. Results: Significant increases in dose rates were detected in three floors below the unit. They were 2030, 1025 and 515 Sv/h at contact with the pipeline connections, 915, 1015 and 35 μSv/h behind the wall, and 36, 56 and 25 μSv/h in hallways on floors 1, 2 and 3 respectively. After appropriate wall shielding had been provided, dose rate behind the wall reduced to 23 μSv/h, and to 0.52 μSv/h in hallways. By using an occupancy factor 1/4 for hallways, the calculated dose meets the public dose limits of 1 mSv per year. Conclusions: Therapeutic application of 131 I for the treatment of thyroid cancer generates a significant amount of liquid waste into the sewers. These low activity wastes originate mainly from toilets, showers, wash basins and floor drains. Although waste discharges can be handled without exceeding the permissible

  19. Radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Rajashekharrao, B.

    1999-01-01

    Radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy has been in use for the treatment of thyroid diseases. Although the use of 131 I has been in vogue for a long time, its use in therapy for well-differentiated thyroid cancer is still controversial. This is because, thyroid cancers (TC) are generally slow growing tumors, with low mortality and normal spans of survival. To record recurrence and mortality, long-term follow-up studies over a period of two to three decades are needed to establish definite conclusions on the acceptable modes of treatment. The most reliable conclusions regarding 131 I treatment are obtained from studies reported on a large series of patients followed over a period of 3 decades or more from a single institute with a more or less unchanged protocol of management

  20. Does an individual estimation of halflife improve the results of radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P.; Koerber, C.; Koerber-Hafner, N.; Haenscheid, H.; Reiners, Chr.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The impact of our dosimetry concept on radioiodine therapy success in Graves' disease (GD) was analysed. Three questions arised: Did individual estimation of pretherapeutic halflife improve therapeutic success? Did individual dosimetry result in accurate dose calculation? Did antithyroid medication have a measurable influence on therapeutic success under the prevailing conditions? Methods: 126 consecutive patients were treated with 200 Gy I-131 in our therapy ward for GD and followed-up six to nine months after therapy. Success quote was assessed using a standardized protocol and treatment was classified as successful when the patients was eu- or hypothyroid, or unsuccessful when he or she presented with a suppressed TSH-level or in hyperthyroid condition after antithyroid medication withdrawal. Antithyroid medication, activity I-131, dose, concentration of fT 3 and fT 4 , specific delivered dose and halflife were put into a multiple regression model to assess their influence on therapeutic success. In order to assess possible factors disturbing the therapeutic outcome, relevant parameters were analyzed using Logit transformation. Results: Out of 126 patients 84 were classified as successfully treated and 42 (33,3%) as failures. A significant influence on the outcome only was found for thyroid mass. However, therapeutic success appeared to be more distinctly determined by the specific delivered dose using an estimated halflife of 5.5 days (Odds: 10.0, p [de

  1. The outcome of I-131 ablation therapy for intermediate and high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer using a strict definition of successful ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the outcome of radioactive iodine ablation therapy for thyroid cancer in nigh-risk patients and investigates background factors influencing ablation failure. We included 91 patients in this retrospective analysis and evaluated the ablation success rate. Successful ablation was defined as the absence of visible iodine-131 (I-131) accumulation in the thyroid bed after whole-body scans and thyroglobulin levels <2 ng/ml in a TSH-stimulated state after ablation. We extracted data on patients' age, sex, I-131 dose, pathology, resection stump findings, tumor T category and thyroglobulin levels, which could affect ablation outcome. Successful ablation was achieved in only 14 patients (15.4%). Pre-ablation serum thyroglobulin levels were significantly higher in the ablation failure group than in the success group (P < 0.001), while no significant differences were found for other factors between the groups. Furthermore, thyroglobulin levels >10 ng/ml were significantly related to ablation failure after multivariate analysis (odds ratio 27.2; 95% confidence interval 2.469-299.7; P = 0.007). The ablation success rate was very low because of high thyroglobulin levels, even with high-dose I-131. High-risk patients, especially those with high thyroglobulin levels (>10 ng/ml), are unlikely to reach levels low enough to meet successful ablation criteria. (author)

  2. The outcome of I-131 ablation therapy for intermediate and high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer using a strict definition of successful ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2017-09-01

    This article examines the outcome of radioactive iodine ablation therapy for thyroid cancer in high-risk patients and investigates background factors influencing ablation failure. We included 91 patients in this retrospective analysis and evaluated the ablation success rate. Successful ablation was defined as the absence of visible iodine-131 (I-131) accumulation in the thyroid bed after whole-body scans and thyroglobulin levels sex, I-131 dose, pathology, resection stump findings, tumor T category and thyroglobulin levels, which could affect ablation outcome. Successful ablation was achieved in only 14 patients (15.4%). Pre-ablation serum thyroglobulin levels were significantly higher in the ablation failure group than in the success group (P 10 ng/ml were significantly related to ablation failure after multivariate analysis (odds ratio 27.2; 95% confidence interval 2.469-299.7; P = 0.007). The ablation success rate was very low because of high thyroglobulin levels, even with high-dose I-131. High-risk patients, especially those with high thyroglobulin levels (>10 ng/ml), are unlikely to reach levels low enough to meet successful ablation criteria.

  3. Measuring the actual I-131 thyroid uptake curve with a collar detector system: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinks, Peter; Van Gils, Koen; Dickerscheid, Dennis B.M.; Habraken, Jan B.A. [Department of Medical Physics, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kranenborg, Ellen; Lavalaye, Jules [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    Radionuclide therapy using I-131 is commonly used for the treatment of benign thyroid diseases. The therapeutic dose to be administered is calculated based on the type of disease, the volume of the thyroid, and the measured uptake percentage. This methodology assumes a similar biological half-life of iodine, whereas in reality a large variation in biological half-life is observed. More knowledge about the actual biological half-life of iodine for individual patients will improve the quantification of the delivered radiation dose during radioiodine therapy and could aid the evaluation of the success of the therapy. In this feasibility study we used a novel measurement device [Collar Therapy Indicator (CoTI)] to measure the uptake curve of patients undergoing I-131 radioiodine therapy. The CoTI device is a light-weight wearable device that contains two independent gamma radiation detectors that are placed in a collar. By comparing results of thyroid uptake measurements with results obtained with a gamma camera, the precision of the system is demonstrated. Additionally, for three patients the uptake curve is measured during 48 h of admission in the hospital. The presented results demonstrate the feasibility of the new measurement device to measure the uptake curve during radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of detectors for blood bioanalysis in Lu-177 and I-131 therapies for bone marrow dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degenhardt, Amilie Louize

    2016-01-01

    The measures traceability is mandatory for minimizing uncertainties in internal dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals clinical studies and ensures the quality of the standard. Equipment should have resolution and efficiency compatible with radionuclides energies and, additionally, be able to quantify variations in human bodies' activities samples since the initial administration near the minimum residual activities. For testing three equipment (ionization chamber Capintec 25R, sodium iodine scintillator LTI Genesys Gamma-1 and high hyperpure germanium detector Canberra), they were prepared Lu-177 and I-131 radiation sources simulating patient's blood samples activities by adopting the following hypothesis: (1) initial activities according the Brazilian protocols; (2) blood volume in the whole body (5.3 L for adult men and 1.4 L for 5 years-old children); (3) effective half-lives (1.61 h and 42.9 h for Lu-177 bi-exponential adjustment and 15.7 h for I-131 mono-exponential adjustment); (4) sampling between 30 min and 168 h; (v) blood density adjustments. The standard sources were measured in the secondary standard ionization chamber Centronics IG11 at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes. The Capintec ionization chamber efficiencies ranged, respectively for I-131 and Lu-177, between (111.58±0.02)% and (102.27±0.01)% and HPGe semiconductor detector efficiencies ranged, respectively, between (89.40±0.03)% and (87.80±0.04)%. For the NaI detector, when the Lu-177 sources were positioned inside the detector the efficiencies ranged between (12.66±0.01)% and (11.54± 0.07)% and when the sources were positioned at 5 cm and 10 cm from the detector the efficiencies decreased to less than 5%. For I-131 sources positioned inside the detector, the efficiencies ranged between (29.76±0.21)% and (30.20±0.04)% and they decreased to less than 5% when they were positioned at 5 cm and 10 cm from the detector (deviation greater than 95

  5. Gastrointestinal Side Effects of the Radioiodine Therapy for the Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma Two Days after Prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashnehsaz, Mehran; Takavar, Abbas; Izadyar, Sina; Zakariaee, Seyed Salman; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Paydar, Reza; Geramifar, Parham

    2016-01-01

    Iodine-131 (I-131) therapy is one of the conventional approaches in the treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). The radioiodine agents also accumulate in the other organs that cause pain and damage to the patients. Radioiodine therapy is associated with various gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. In this study, GI side effects of the radioiodine therapy were investigated. GI toxicities of the radioiodine therapy were studied in 137 patients with histologically proven DTC in Jun-Nov 2014. All the patients were treated by radioiodine agents in the research institute of Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran. The patients were examined 48 h after prescription (before discharge) and their GI side effects were registered. Correlation of the age, gender, administered dose, administered dose per body weight as the independent factors, and GI side effects were analyzed using the Pearson correlation test with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Regression coefficients and linearity of the variable were investigated by MATLAB software. Line fitting was performed using MATLAB curve-fitting toolbox. From the subjects, 38 patients had GI complaints (30.4%). Significant factors influencing GI side effects were dose per body weight and administered doses. There was no significant correlation between age and gender as the independent parameters and GI complaints. The most prevalent GI side effect was nausea that occurs in 26.4% of the patients. From the results, it could be concluded that the GI side effects could be prevented by administering a safe radioiodine dose value less than 5,550 MBq

  6. Follow up of Graves' Opthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.S.R.; Paul, A. K.; Rahman, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy may first appear or worsen during or after treatment for hyperthyroidism. We followed up 158 Graves' hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine of which 49 had Grave's' ophthalmopathy during presentation in Nuclear Medicine Centre, Khulna during the period from 1995 to 2000. The aim of our study is to see the effect of radioiodine in Graves' ophthalmopathy. All the patients received radioiodine at fixed dose regime ranged from 7 mCi to 12 mCi. The duration of follow up was at least 12 months Graves' ophthalmopathy patients, 4 (4/49 i.e., 8.2%) showed exaggeration of ophthalmopathy and the rest (45/49 i.e., 91.8%) remained unchanged. None of ophthalmopathy developed among any of Graves' hyperthyroid or disappeared after radioiodine treatment during follow up period. From the study we concluded that eye changes in Graves' hyperthyroidism remain unchanged or exaggerated after radioiodine therapy and needs ophthalmologist care.(author)

  7. Clinical experience with outpatient radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csenkey-Sinko, I.; Roka, R.; Sera, T.; Csernay, L.; Pavics, L.; Valkusz, Z.; Julesz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1993, outpatient radioiodine therapy has been available in Hungary. The reported study evaluated the efficacy of outpatient radioiodine treatment in subjects with hyperthyroidism. The data on 238 patients with Graves' disease and 123 patients with thyroid autonomy were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated within the period 1994 - 1999. The activities of radioiodine were calculated individually. The dose applied in Graves' disease was 150 Gy, and that in thyroid autonomy was 300 Gy. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated 3,6 and 12 months after radioiodine therapy. In patients with persistent hyperthyroidism, repeated therapy was performed. Overall,the radioiodine therapy was successful in 84% of the Graves' disease patients. In thyroid autonomy, treatment with 300 Gy was successful in 79% of the patients. The efficacy of radioiodine treatment was similar to the results of one-dose application. It was concluded that radioidine therapy with an absorbed dose of 150 Gy in Graves' disease and with an absorbed dose of 300 Gy in thyroid autonomy proved successful by the method applied. (author)

  8. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M.

    2002-01-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  9. Reduction of thyroid volume following radioiodine therapy for functional autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luster, M.; Jacob, M.; Thelen, M.H.; Michalowski, U.; Deutsch, U.; Reiners, C.

    1995-01-01

    In a retrospective study we evaluated the data of 112 patients who underwent radioiodine treatment for functional autonomy of the thyroid at Essen University Hospital from 1988 to 1993. Therapeutic activities of radioiodine were administered after individual determination of activity for intended radiation doses (150-300 Gy) taking into consideration autonomously functioning volume, maximum uptake, and effective half-life. The achieved dose was calculated by means of measurement of the radioiodine kinetics during therapy. Depending on the type of autonomous function of the thyroid (solitary autonomously functioning nodule, multiple autonomously functioning nodules, autonomously functioning thyroid tissue) volume reductions between 39 and 46% were found approximately 6 months after treatment. (orig.) [de

  10. Our experience of high dose I-131 therapy in 75 patients with well differentiated carcinoma thyroid followed up over 5 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougall, P.; Kumar, A.; Ashok, P.; Chinwan, B.P.; Khan, B.; Pandey, D.; Joshi, N.D.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. The epidemiology of thyroid cancer is variable, depending on the geographic location of the patient population. Well differentiated thyroid cancer (WTC), is responsive to high dose I-131 treatment, and is the most accepted form of therapy, even though the dose administered for ablation of residual thyroid tissue maybe controversial. At our centre, 75 patients of WTC, mean age 42.4 years, 22 males and 53 females (M:F 1:2.4), were treated with high dose oral I-131 therapy with a Total Mean Dose (TMD) of 263.6 mCi, 4 - 6 weeks post thyroidectomy. They were followed up over a period of 6 years. Twenty ( 26.7%) patients had follicular cancer (FC), 47 (62.7%) papillary cancer (PC) and 8 (10.7%) were mixed (MC), on histopathology, at presentation. 38 (50.7%) patients had only residual thyroid tissue (RTT) on I-131 whole body bone scan (WBS) and 37 (49.3%) presented with metastatic disease (MD) at the time of therapy. Of the 37 patients with MD, 21 (56.8%) had metastases to the lymph nodes, 6 (16.2%) to the lungs, 4 (10.8%) to bone, 3 (8.1%) to bone and lung, and 4 (10.8%) to lung plus lymph nodes. Twenty-three patients (7 FC , 13 - PC and 3 MC; 6 RTT, 17 - MD) , received more than one dose of I-131 with a TMD of 422.7 mCi (Range 88 1590 mCi ). 52 patients (13 FC, 34 PC, 5 MC; 20 MD and 32 RTT) received a single TMD of 104.4 (Range 39.5 219 mCi). On follow-up, 3 patients of FC with MD (2 lung metastasis and 1 with extensive lymph node metastasis), died within 3 months 2 years of therapy. 3 patients of MD (2 FC, 1-MC; 2 bone metastasis and 1 bone with lung metastasis) died after 5 .5 years, Of the 6 patients who died, 5 were FC and only 1 was MC. 2 patients with MD to lungs and bone had received a single dose and were lost to follow up. All patients with PC and FC with only RTT, were surviving at the end of 5 years. None of the patients with MD to lymph nodes died at the end of 5 years, either receiving single or

  11. Distribution and Bioaccumulation of I-131 Within The Water-Fish System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darussalam, M; Wijaya, DGO; Sutrisno

    1996-01-01

    Distribution and Bioaccumulation of I-131 Within The Water-Fish System. As one of fission products, radioiodine I-131 potentially become a pollutant either resulted froma fallout or radioactive waste. Therefore, special interest has been given to handle I-131 starting from its production implementation and its waste management. The observations in this research have been focussed on distribution and bio accumulation of I-131 within the water-fish systems. Some number of Tilapia fish were put in aquaria containing I-131 contamined water with certain radioactivity concentration. Within time interval of 0, 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours after treatment the radioactivities of water media. fish and their organs have been measured. The results show that the radioactivity percentage different water media containing different I-131 concentration tend to have similar patterns. Meanwhile, the I-131 concentrations of fish and their organs were varied with similar patterns for different I-131 content in water media

  12. Evaluation of detectors for blood bioanalysis in Lu-177 and I-131 therapies for bone marrow dosimetry; Avaliacao de detectores para bioanalise de sangue em terapias com Lu-177 and I-131 para dosimetria de medula ossea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenhardt, Amilie Louize

    2016-10-01

    The measures traceability is mandatory for minimizing uncertainties in internal dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals clinical studies and ensures the quality of the standard. Equipment should have resolution and efficiency compatible with radionuclides energies and, additionally, be able to quantify variations in human bodies' activities samples since the initial administration near the minimum residual activities. For testing three equipment (ionization chamber Capintec 25R, sodium iodine scintillator LTI Genesys Gamma-1 and high hyperpure germanium detector Canberra), they were prepared Lu-177 and I-131 radiation sources simulating patient's blood samples activities by adopting the following hypothesis: (1) initial activities according the Brazilian protocols; (2) blood volume in the whole body (5.3 L for adult men and 1.4 L for 5 years-old children); (3) effective half-lives (1.61 h and 42.9 h for Lu-177 bi-exponential adjustment and 15.7 h for I-131 mono-exponential adjustment); (4) sampling between 30 min and 168 h; (v) blood density adjustments. The standard sources were measured in the secondary standard ionization chamber Centronics IG11 at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes. The Capintec ionization chamber efficiencies ranged, respectively for I-131 and Lu-177, between (111.58±0.02)% and (102.27±0.01)% and HPGe semiconductor detector efficiencies ranged, respectively, between (89.40±0.03)% and (87.80±0.04)%. For the NaI detector, when the Lu-177 sources were positioned inside the detector the efficiencies ranged between (12.66±0.01)% and (11.54± 0.07)% and when the sources were positioned at 5 cm and 10 cm from the detector the efficiencies decreased to less than 5%. For I-131 sources positioned inside the detector, the efficiencies ranged between (29.76±0.21)% and (30.20±0.04)% and they decreased to less than 5% when they were positioned at 5 cm and 10 cm from the detector (deviation greater than 95

  13. In-vivo isotope diagnosis and radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spesshardt, K.

    1980-01-01

    In-vivo diagnoses of thyroid diseases can be carried out using 123 I, 131 I, and 99 sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate. For the thyroid scintiscan, 99 sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate or 123 I are used. Some functional parameters can be determined using 99 sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate, but iodine is more accurate, so that thyroid clearance examinations with 123 I are rapidly gaining importance. However, the iodine turnover in the thyroid can only be determined by a several-days' test using 131 I. The available techniques of diagnosis are employed in several steps. Most thyroid diseases can already be diagnosed on the basis of the hormone parameters and a thyroid scan; otherwise, a TRH test and suppression and functional studies will be necessary. Treatment of enthyroid struma is limited to inoperable cases with functional blockage or compression of the trachea. In the treatment of diffuse hyperthyroidism, doses should be exact enough to counteract the hyperthyroid metabolism without inducing hypothyroidism. With exact doses, a second radioiodine therapy will only be necessary in about 40% of all cases. High doses should not be applied in the treatment of hyperthyroidism unless it is a case of excessive clinical hyperthyroid somatics as the risk of hypothyroidism is high. The diagnostic problem of autonomous adenoma is the highly varying hormone activity. The intention of radioiodine therapy here is a functional elimination of the autonomous adenoma. Radioiodine resection is indicated in cases where there are several small autonomous adenomas or where the operability of the patient is limited. (orig./MG) [de

  14. The optimal time of discontinuing methimazole before radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosavi, Z.; Zakavi, R.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a common disease and one of the best methods for its treatment is radioiodine therapy with Treatment with antithyroid drugs brings patients to euthyroidism before radioiodine therapy. Antithyroid drugs should be discontinued before radioiodine therapy to increase thyroid uptake. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal time of methimazole discontinuation. One hundred eighty four patients, who were referred for radioiodine therapy were classified in 3 groups according to the duration of methimazole discontinuation before thyroid uptake (RAIU) measurement. Group 1,2 and 3 were patients who discontinued methimazole (48-72 h rs), (72-120 h rs) and more than 120 h rs before RAIU measurement, respectively. Mean thyroid uptake in group 1, 2 and 3 was (64±151.1%), (60.1±14.1%) and (59.3±12.8), respectively. No significant difference was noted in thyroid uptake between these groups (F= 1.83, P<0.16). This study shows that 48-72 h rs of methimazole discontinuation before radioiodine therapy is enough and longer term abstention is not associated with higher uptake

  15. Influence of radioiodine therapy on urinary iodine excretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, B.; Lauer, I.; Baehre, M.; Richter, E.

    1998-01-01

    In 214 patients with benign thyroid diseases the time-course of urinary iodine excretion (UIE) was investigated in order to identify changes after radioiodine therapy (RITh). Method: UIE was measured photometrically (cerium-arsenite method) and related to urinary creatinine on the first and last day of the radioiodine test and the three days, seven days, four weeks, and six months after 131 I administration. Results: As compared with the level found immediately before radioiodine therapy, median UIE had almost doubled four weeks after therapy and was still significantly elevated six months after therapy. This increase correlated significantly with the target volume as measured by scintigraphy and sonography. Conclusions: The persistent elevation of UIE for months after RITh is a measure of treatment-induced damage to thyrocytes. Therefore, in view of the unfavourable kinetics of iodine that follow it, RITh should if possible be given via a single-dose regime. (orig.) [de

  16. Influence of oral rinsing on the exposure of salivary glands during radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetzen, U.; Silvia, P.; Zhao, Y.; Marx, M.; Winkler, C.; Zuhayra, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: the salivary glands (SG) constitute a risk organ during a radioiodine therapy of thyroid. A possible side effect is xerostomia. This study investigates whether repeated rinsing of the mouth with water during radioiodine therapy significantly extracts I-131 from the circuit between saliva and the gastrointestinal tract, and thus whether radiation exposure of the patient's SG is reduced. Methods: the control group consisted of 45 patients, ages 32 to 81 years, (mean 62 years, 8 male, 37 female), and received radioiodine therapy without rinsing their mouths. An intervention group of 42 patients, ages 36 to 88 years, (mean 61 years, 8 male, 34 female), with a benign or malignant thyroid disease, were asked 15-17 hours after capsule administration to rinse their mouths hourly with water for the next two days. The intervention group (n = 42) was divided into three groups. A low-risk group (n = 22) received between 0.4 and 1.0 GBq I-131 (mean 0.746), a medium risk group (n = 15) between 1.2 and 2.0 GBq (mean 1.783), and the high-risk group (n = 5) between 3.0 and 6.0 GBq (mean 3.600) respectively. To assess the function of the SG, scintigrams were performed prior to and 3 months after the radioiodine therapy. The estimation of the activity in the gastrointestinal tract was performed using whole-body scintigraphy on the day of release. Both, the SG and the whole body (WB) scintigraphies were evaluated using the region-of-interest technique. Furthermore, the activity of the collected saliva was quantified using a calibrated well-type detector. Results: the mean values of the activity extracted into the water-saliva mixture were 0.72% ± 0.3% and 0.14% ± 0.05% of the applied dose on the first and second day after capsule administration respectively. The analysis of the SG scintigrams of the low and medium risk groups showed no significant decrease in salivary gland function. Only in the high-risk group a significant loss of

  17. On the genetic risk after high dose radioiodine therapy with regard to the gonadal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenheim, C.; Hauswirth, C.; Fitschen, J.; Martin, E.; Oetting, G.; Hundeshagen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: The genetic risk for the offspring of patients treated with high doses of radioiodine was to be assessed with special regard to the gonadal dose caused by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Methods: 41 young females (aged between 19 and 39 years) and four young males (aged 26 to 36 years) treated with radioiodine because of a thyroid carcinoma were interviewed by use of a questionnaire. The course of pregnancy and birth history could be documented as well as the congenital and developmental conditions of 56 children. Results: The amount of radioactivity applied for therapy and whole body scans ranged over 4,144 and 35,15 GBq I-131; the individual gonadal dose was calculated based on the MIRD model and ranged over 0,2 and 2,2 Sv (0,51 Sv at a mean). The period of time between the last radioiodine application and confinement was at least 9 months, not exceeding 14 years. As to the course of pregnancy and birth two early abortions, one extrauterine gravidity and one premature birth due to an insufficiency of the placenta were stated. In one case a chromosomal translocation 7/14 occured as a genetic defect which lead to an interruption. The children's development was unconspicuous except of two cases of neurodermatitis as well as multiple allergies and an early closure of the anterior fontanelle in one child each. Conclusion: Although the genetic risk is supposed to increase with the gonadal dose achieved (doubling dose 1 Sv) and the increased risk of any congenital anomaly was calculated as about 13% at a mean in our patients, the rate of genetic determined diseases was not elevated (1,8% or 1/57). Thus, no increase of genetic defects or congenital malformations was reported in a total of 408 children described in the literature and in our group. (orig.) [de

  18. Radioiodine therapy effect on lacrimal gland function in patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fard-Esfahani, A.; Mirshekarpour, H.; Fallahi, B.; Eftekhari, M.; Takavar, A.; Beiki, D.; Ansari-Gilani, K.; Saghari, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: There is a limited number of case reports published in the past decade confirming the radioiodine presence in the tear. These observations as well as reported cases of salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction after radioiodine therapy stimulated investigators to clarify whether lacrimal gland function can be affected postradioiodine therapy. Hence we planned a historical cohort study. Methods: We studied 100 eyes of 50 patients who had received high doses (accumulative dose: 100-450mCi) of I-131 (exposed group) for treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with their latest admission at least 3 months ago. Dry eye symptoms (obtained via a standard questionnaire) and Schirmer I test results (mm/5 min) of this exposed group were compared with those of an unexposed group (100 eyes of 50 individuals) matched by sex and age. Cases with any other known cause(s) of dry eye were not included in either group. Results: The study demonstrated a significantly lower wetting amount of the Schirmer paper in exposed group compared to unexposed one. In the group of patients who have undergone radio-iodine therapy, results were 0-4 mm in 21%, 5-9 mm in 20% and 10 mm or more in 59%. These results were seen in the unexposed group in 6%, 17% and 77% respectively. In evaluating the symptoms, 51% of the exposed eyes and 50% of the unexposed ones revealed at least one of the mentioned dry eye symptoms in the questionnaire. Data analysis showed no significant difference between the number of symptoms of the two groups, but 2 symptoms (burning, unrelated to light and erythema) were significantly higher in the exposed eyes. From 9 exposed eyes complaining of erythema, Schirmer test result was abnormal only in 2 (one patient). Also among the 10 eyes with burning symptom (unrelated to light) one patient (2 eyes) revealed abnormal Schirmer test result. Conclusion: Long-term reduction in the tear secretion from major and/or minor lacrimal glands is seen after high

  19. Our experience with radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, Otakar

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this paper the author presents his experience with radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomies. The objectives of this study were to establish the efficacy and determine the adverse effects of radioiodine therapy of patients with thyroid functional autonomies. The main pathologic attribute of thyroid functional autonomies is the loss of regulation in the axis of hypothalamus-hypophysis-thyroid. The main cause of functional autonomy of the thyroid is iodine deficiency. Over a period of 30 years (1974-2004) 799 patients (age from 33 to 86 years; average age 58.7 years; the female: male ration was 7.4:1) with unifocal functional autonomy (UFA), multifocal functional autonomy (MFA) and disseminated functional autonomy (DFA) received at least one treatment of radioiodine. For diagnostics and the evaluation of radioiodine therapeutic effect of functional autonomies a thyroid scintigraphy is the basic and necessary procedure. In some patients a common scintigraphy with special imaging modulation, in some patients a scintigraphy after suppression or stimulation by means of thyroid hormones or TSH were done. We have also performed a thyroid ultrasonography, an assessment of a serum level of a total and free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine, TSH, radioiodine accumulation test, estimation of radioiodine effective half-life, in some patients TRH-TSH test. The follow-up examinations were done in all patients after 4-6 months, another examination after one year in 545 patients and after two years in 254 patients. One therapeutic dose received 733 patients (91.74%) and it was sufficient for an elimination of functional autonomies. Some patients were retreated if there was the evidence of small or no treatment effect and no elimination of functional autonomies. Two radioiodine treatments received 62 patients (7.76%) and three treatments 4 patients (0.5%). We advocate individual pre-therapeutic dosimetry to determine the activity necessary to achieve a

  20. Results of radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronath, A.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this work is the quantification of therapy results of a radioiodine therapy with Iodine 131 on 367 patients with the following benign thyroid diseases: euthyroidal struma, hyperthyroidism, hyperthyroidal struma and autonomous adenoma. 1. Euthyroidal struma - subjective improvement and objective diminution of the struma by 63%, subjective or objective improvement by 21% of the patients. Including the probable successful therapies the success rate was all together 90.1%. 2. Hyperthyroidism - after one-time/more-time (18.6%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 71.5/85.7% including latent (8.6/10.0%) and manifest (7.1/8.5%) hypothroidism. 3. Hyperthyroidal struma - after one-time/more-time (16.9%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 74.7/90.1% including latent (-/5.7%) and manifest (1.4/2.8%) hypothyroidism. 4. Autonomous adenoma - after one-time/two-time (5.2%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 80.5/84.6% including 15.5% latent hypothyroidism. The results will be discussed in comparison to published data and to operation and thyrostatic treatment. (TRV) [de

  1. Experience and outcome of radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, S.H.; Paul, A.K.; Rahman, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine is being increasingly used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. The primary reasons for choosing radioiodine therapy are its effectiveness, ease of administration, relatively low cost and paucity of side effects. Here we presented our experiences and outcome of radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism in a divisional referral centre.We retrospectively analyzed 203 patients receiving radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism in Centre for Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Khulna during the period from July 1994 to June 2004. All the patients had clinical signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as elevated triiodothyronine (T 3 ), thyroxine (T 4 ) and suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). T 3 , T 4 and TSH were done in all cases. Radionuclide scan and ultrasound of thyroid gland, radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU), thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb) and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) was done in selected cases. We assessed all patients prior to radioiodine therapy. Elderly patients and all those with cardiac complications and severe hyperthyroidism were pretreated with a short course of antithyroid drug in full dosages until they were clinically and biochemically euthyroid. Ninety five patients were on antithyroid medication (Neomercazole) prior to radioiodine therapy. Antithyroid medication were stopped 3 days before radioiodine therapy and restarted 3 days later and continued for 1 to 2 months depending on patient's symptoms. The rest of the patients received either no treatment or beta-blocker prior to radioiodine therapy. Menstrual history was taken in female patients and pregnancy was excluded by ultrasonography in doubtful cases before administering radioiodine. The likely consequences of the treatment were fully explained to the patients and attendants, the usual precautions for radiation protection of the public and the necessity of the follow-up were discussed and verbal consent was taken before administering radioiodine

  2. The secondary hypothyroidism after radioiodine therapy and the replacement treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ying; Xu Xiaohui

    2004-01-01

    The secondary hypothyroidism is the most important intercurrent disease after radioiodine therapy. The early hypothyroidism and the late hypothyroidism are incompletely different in pathogenesis. It needs researching further. there has not yet been an affirmable answer to choose the distillates from animal hypothyroid extract or complex preparation of levo-thyroxine in replacement treatment. (authors)

  3. Outcome of Radioiodine Therapy in a West African Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onimode, Yetunde A; Ankrah, Alfred; Adedapo, Kayode S

    Hyperthyroidism continues to be a pressing public health concern in West Africa. Its prevalence in Africa has been quoted as 1.2%-9.9%, with Graves' disease as its most common cause. Radioiodine-131 (RAI) therapy of hyperthyroidism recently commenced in two government hospitals in Ghana and Nigeria.

  4. Chronic myeloid leukaemia following radioiodine therapy for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundi, R S; Scott, J S; Halnan, K E [Institute of Radiotherapeutics, Glasgow (UK)

    1977-01-01

    The majority of cases reported in the literature of leukemia following treatment of thyroid disease (thyrotoxicosis and carcinoma) are of acute variety. A description is given of the development of chronic myeloid leukemia in a case of carcinoma of the thyroid treated with radioiodine and megavoltage X-ray therapy. The case history contains details of radioiodine and X-ray doses administered over the years 1961 to 1972 to a male patient, on whom a right hemithyroidectomy was carried out in 1960. The results of blood counts are also recorded for the period up to 1973. The patient died, at 57, in 1974. A total of 860 mCi of /sup 131/I was administered and the first abnormal blood count was noted two months after the last therapeutic dose. Estimates have been made of blood and thyroid doses from /sup 131/I. There has been only one other report in the literature of the development of chronic myeloid leukemia following radioiodine therapy for carcinoma of the thyroid, and although the leukemogenic hazard of /sup 131/I cannot be ruled out for this patient, it is possible that the development of leukemia was coincidental rather than due to the radioiodine therapy.

  5. Radioiodine therapy and subsequent pregnancy; Gravidez apos radioiodoterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores G.; Miranda, Angelica E.; Corres, Nilson Duarte; Sieiro Neto, Lino; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine; Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital dos Servidores do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); E-mail: loloi@zaz.com.br

    2007-06-15

    Objectives: To evaluate abortion and fetal congenital anomaly rates in women previously submitted to radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Study design: A case-control study of 108 pregnant women, 48 cases whose pregnancies were evaluated after they had undergone radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, and the control group consisted of 60 healthy pregnant women. Results: Of a total of 66 pregnancies, 14 conceived within the first year, 51 one or more years after the last administration of {sup 131}I, the medical record of one patient was not available. The interval between the last radioiodine therapy administration and conception ranged from 1 month to 10 years. There were a total of 4 miscarriages, 2 of them for unknown reasons. There was one case of congenital anomaly and two preterms birth. Nine women presented the following pregnancy events: placental insufficiency, hypertensive crisis, placental detachment, risk of miscarriage, preterm labour and four miscarriages. No statistical difference was observed between the studied and control groups. Conclusion: Radioiodine was followed by no significant increase in untoward effects in neither the pregnancy nor the offspring. (author)

  6. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Dressler, J.; Gruenwald, F.; Leisner, B.; Moser, E.; Reiners, C.; Schneider, P.; Schober, O.

    2004-01-01

    The version 3 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases presents first of all a revision of the version 2. The chapter indication for radioiodine therapy, surgical treatment or antithyroid drugs bases on an interdisciplinary consensus. The manifold criteria for decision making consider the entity of thyroid disease (autonomy, Graves' disease, goitre, goitre recurrence), the thyroid volume, suspicion of malignancy, cystic nodules, risk of surgery and co-morbidity, history of subtotal thyroidectomy, persistent or recurrent thyrotoxicosis caused by Graves' disease including known risk factors for relapse, compression of the trachea caused by goitre, requirement of direct therapeutic effect as well as the patient's preference. Because often some of these criteria are relevant, the guideline offers the necessary flexibility for individual decisions. Further topics are patients' preparation, counseling, dosage concepts, procedural details, results, side effects and follow-up care. The prophylactic use of glucocorticoids during radioiodine therapy in patients without preexisting ophthalmopathy as well as dosage and duration of glucocorticoid medication in patients with preexisting ophthalmopathy need to be clarified in further studies. The pragmatic recommendations for the combined use of radioiodine and glucocorticoids remained unchanged in the 3 rd version. (orig.) [de

  7. Radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaduban, M.

    1978-01-01

    The physical, chemical radiochemical and radiometric properties of radioiodine significant for the radiochemical analysis are summarized. The occurrence of iodine, especially in the biosphere organic part, the calculation of the amount of iodine radioisotopes formed under different conditions, the spectrometric and integral methods of measuring the radioactivity of the most important iodine radioisotopes, the methods of separating iodine and its respective chemical forms are described. (M.K.)

  8. Thyroid carcinoma after radioiodide therapy for hyperthyroidism. Analysis based on age, latency, and administered dose of I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, R.P.; Chapman, C.N.; Rao, H.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five reports in the medical literature of thyroid carcinomas which were detected after radioiodide therapy for hyperthyroidism were reviewed. These cases did not show a usual characteristic of radiation-associated tumors, namely a long latency period. That is, in 8/25 the latency period was under five years, and the mean latency was only 7.3 years. Further, there was no relationship between latency and age at treatment, or between latency and the dose of radioiodide employed. In 15/25 of the cases, there were known thyroid nodules. Three of the patients had thyroiditis (which itself has a correlation with thyroid carcinoma), and one individual had prior head and neck external radiation. There was no substantiating evidence that radioiodide treatment for hyperthyroidism was the cause of these thyroid carcinomas

  9. The radio-iodine therapy of the functional autonomy. Indications, findings, risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.

    1990-01-01

    The functional autonomy of the thyroid is a disorder, which appears in connection with iodine deficit and befalls the complete organ. An absolute indication for a radio-iodine-therapy is given in case of hyperthyreoidism (these are 25 % of all at the functional autonomy). Contrary to the operation method the advantage of the I-131-therapy is, that all of the functional autonome-cells can be reached. The risk at the I-131-therapy is low. (Botek)

  10. Radio-iodine therapy and Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholamrezanezhad, A.; Mirpour, S.; Saghari, M.; Abdollahzadeh, J.; Pourmoslemi, A.; Yarmand, S.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most important cause of gastritis and related morbidities. Following consumption, radioactive iodine accumulates considerably in the stomach. On the basis of this observation, we decided to determine whether the high radiation induced by radio-iodine in the stomach is effective in the eradication of this infection. All consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, who were referred for radio-iodine therapy [dose 117.1±24.4 mCi (4.3±0.9 GBq), range 100-200 mCi (3.7-7.4 GBq)], were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urease breath test (UBT) was performed 1-2 h before radio-iodine consumption and the test was repeated 2 months later. Of 88 patients, 71 had pre-treatment positive UBT. Of these, 23 patients had negative post-treatment result, which means a significant reduction (26.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 16.8-35.5%) in the number of positive UBT results in our treated population (32.4% of UBT-positive cases became UBT-negative). Considering the high prevalence of reinfection in developing countries, the therapeutic benefit would have been more considerable if the second UBT had been done with a lag time of less than 2 months. Although radio-iodine therapy is not a logical method for the treatment of patients suffering from H. pylori, our finding provides indirect evidence about the radiosensitivity of bacteria, the future clinical applications of which need to be further evaluated. Also this finding can be useful for the food industry, where radiation is used widely to sterilize food. Regarding the possibility of H. pylori suppression, we recommend not using UBT for screening for the infection for at least within 2 months following radio-iodine therapy. (author)

  11. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Xie, Jiawei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Suyun

    2016-02-18

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Both antithyroid medications and radioiodine are commonly used treatments but their frequency of use varies between regions and countries. Despite the commonness of the diagnosis, any possible differences between the two treatments with respect to long-term outcomes remain unknown. To assess the effects of radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease. We performed a systematic literature search in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and EMBASE and the trials registers ICTRP Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. The date of the last search was September 2015 for all databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease with at least two years follow-up. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance. One author carried out screening for inclusion, data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessment and a second author checked this. We presented data not suitable for meta-analysis as descriptive data. We analysed the overall quality of evidence utilising the GRADE instrument. We included two RCTs involving 425 adult participants with Graves' disease in this review. Altogether 204 participants were randomised to radioiodine therapy and 221 to methimazole therapy. A single dose of radioiodine was administered. The duration of methimazole medication was 18 months. The period of follow-up was at least two years, depending on the outcome measured. For most outcome measures risk of bias was low; for the outcomes health-related quality of life as well as development and worsening of Graves' ophthalmopathy risks of performance bias and detection bias were high in at least one of the two RCTs.Health-related quality of life appeared to be similar in the radioiodine and methimazole treatment groups, however no quantitative data were reported (425 participants; 2 trials; low quality evidence

  12. Radiation dosimetry and first therapy results with a 124I/131I-labeled small molecule (MIP-1095) targeting PSMA for prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zechmann, Christian M.; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Mier, Walter; Armor, Tom; Joyal, John; Stubbs, James B.; Hadaschik, Boris; Kopka, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Babich, John W.; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Since the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is frequently over-expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) several PSMA-targeting molecules are under development to detect and treat metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We investigated the tissue kinetics of a small molecule inhibitor of PSMA ((S)-2-(3-((S)-1-carboxy-5-(3-(4-[ 124 I]iodophenyl)ureido)pentyl)ureido) pentan edioicacid; MIP-1095) using PET/CT to estimate radiation dosimetry for the potential therapeutic use of 131 I-MIP-1095 in men with mCRPC. We also report preliminary safety and efficacy of the first 28 consecutive patients treated under a compassionate-use protocol with a single cycle of 131 I-MIP-1095. Sixteen patients with known prostate cancer underwent PET/CT imaging after i.v. administration of 124 I-MIP-1095 (mean activity: 67.4 MBq). Each patient was scanned using PET/CT up to five times at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h post injection. Volumes of interest were defined for tumor lesions and normal organs at each time point followed by dose calculations using the OLINDA/EXM software. Twenty-eight men with mCRPC were treated with a single cycle of 131 I-MIP-1095 (mean activity: 4.8 GBq, range 2 to 7.2 GBq) and followed for safety and efficacy. Baseline and follow up examinations included a complete blood count, liver and kidney function tests, and measurement of serum PSA. I-124-MIP-1095 PET/CT images showed excellent tumor uptake and moderate uptake in liver, proximal intestine and within a few hours post-injection also in the kidneys. High uptake values were observed only in salivary and lacrimal glands. Dosimetry estimates for I-131-MIP-1095 revealed that the highest absorbed doses were delivered to the salivary glands (3.8 mSv/MBq), liver (1.7 mSv/MBq) and kidneys (1.4 mSv/MBq). The absorbed dose calculated for the red marrow was 0.37 mSv/MBq. PSA values decreased by >50 % in 60.7 % of the men treated. Of men with bone pain, 84.6 % showed complete or moderate reduction in pain

  13. Radioiodine therapy within the German DRG-system 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.; Dressler, J.

    2005-01-01

    With introduction of a diagnosis-related groups system (DRG-system) in Germany the previous duration of stay based refunding is also replaced for the radioiodine therapies by a performance oriented reimbursement system. Since the at first optional start of the DRG-system in 2003 the adaptations which take place every year should lead, up to the planned end of the convergence phase in 2009, to a transparent, fair and economical financing system of the stationary hospital service. The physician is responsible for the right and complete coding of the diagnoses and procedures, which serve as essential parameters for the determination of the diagnosis related group (DRG) of a hospital case. In the actual version of the year 2005 the DRG-system still supplies for radioiodine therapy of thyroid carcinoma some unclarity in the coding of the diagnosis, as well as clear inadequacy with the fair mapping of the therapy costs. (orig.)

  14. Normalization of lymphocyte count after high ablative dose of I-131 in a patient with chronic lymphoid leukemia and secondary papillary carcinoma of the thyroid: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thom, Anneliese Rosmarie Gertrud Fischer; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Osawa, Akemi; Santos, Fabio Pires de Souza; Pasqualin, Denise da Cunha; Wagner, Jairo; Yamaga, Lilian Yuri Itaya; Cunha, Marcelo Livorsi da; Campos Neto, Guilherme de Carvalho; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao; Teles, Veronica Goes

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with chronic lymphoid leukemia who presented subsequently a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid with metastases to regional lymph nodes. The patient was treated with surgical thyroidectomy with regional and cervical lymph node excision and radioiodine therapy (I-131). The protocolar control scintigraphy 4 days after the radioactive dose showed I-131 uptake in both axillae and even in the inguinal regions. PET/CT showed faint FDG-F-18 uptake in one lymph node of the left axilla. An ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy of this lymph node identified by I-131 SPECT/CT and FDG-F-18 PET/CT revealed lymphoma cells and was negative for thyroid tissue and thyroglobulin content. The sequential blood counts done routinely after radiation treatment showed a marked fall until return to normal values of leucocytes and lymphocytes (absolute and relative), which were still normal in the last control 19 months after the radioiodine administration. Chest computed tomography showed a decrease in size of axillary and paraaortic lymph nodes. By immunohistochemistry, cells of the lymphoid B lineage decreased from 52% before radioiodine therapy to 5% after the procedure. The authors speculate about a possible sodium iodide symporter expression by the cells of this lymphoma, similar to some other non-thyroid tumors, such as breast cancer cells. (author)

  15. Radioiodine therapy in Graves` disease; Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ., Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    Analogous to subtotal struma resection, stable long-term results are attained with radioiodine therapy of immunohyperthyreosis only with an ablative therapy concept. Hypothyreosis is thus no longer an undesired or unavoidable side effect of radioiodine therapy, but constitutes part of the treatment principle. In addition to the negligible theoretical low late risk of radiation effect, an increase in immunostimulation is induced in the majority of patients by means of increased antigen presentation. In a minority of patients, this has detrimental effects on the treatment results and leads to a requirement for relatively high focal doses (200-300 Gy) to achieve a generally satisfactory therapeutic result. In individual cases, endocrine orbitopathy may be exacerbated or elicited. It is therefore recommended that radioiodine therapy of immunohyperthyreosis should be undertaken with cortisone protection as a matter of principle. (orig.) [Deutsch] In Analogie zur subtotalen Strumaresektion werden auch mit der Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose nur mit einem ablativen Therapiekonzept stabile Langzeitergebnisse erzielt. Die Hypothyreose ist somit nicht laenger unerwuenschte oder unvermeidliche Nebenwirkung der Radioiodtherapie, sondern Bestandteil des Behandlungsprinzips. Neben dem vernachlaessigbar geringen theoretischen Spaetrisiko durch Strahleneinwirkung wird bei einem Grossteil der Patienten durch eine vermehrte Antigenpraesentation eine Zunahme der Immunstimulation induziert, die bei einem kleineren Teil der Patienten das Behandlungsergebnis beeintraechtigt und dazu fuehrt, dass relativ hohe Herddosen (200-300 Gy) fuer ein insgesamt zufriedenstellendes Behandlungsergebnis erforderlich werden. In Einzelfaellen kann hierdurch auch eine endokrine Orbitopathie verschlechtert oder neu ausgeloest werden. Es wird daher empfohlen, die Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose grundsaetzlich unter Kortisonschutz vorzunehmen. (orig.)

  16. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders: functional thyroid autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the last 15 years, several concepts have been developed to further improve the outcome of radioiodine therapy in functional thyroid autonomy. Results of radioiodine therapy in functional autonomy are considerably better than in Graves' disease. All of the currently-applied concepts offer healing rates of 75-100%, but they differ considerably in the hypothyreosis rates attained. The target volume can be precisely determined by sonography only in unifocal autonomy. In the case of multifocal and disseminated autonomy, the entire thyroid is taken as the target volume and the focal dose is reduced ('dosimetric compromise'). TcTUs-based dose concepts calculate the functionally autonomous volume from the TcTUs and replace the target volume by sonography, in the TcTUs-adapted dose concepts, sonographic target volume is left and the focal dose varied in dependence of the suppression uptake. The objective is to attain a high rate of success with a low rate of hypothyreosis. (orig.)

  17. Beyond radioiodine: novel therapies in advanced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugen, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Thyroid cancer is a relatively common endocrine malignancy. Fortunately, many patients do well with standard therapy including surgery and radioiodine. A minority of patients have poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma that is unresponsive to radioiodine therapy. Redifferentiation agents that 'reprogram ' these tumors to concentrate radioiodine would be of great value in treating patients with advanced thyroid cancer. The retinoid isotretinoin is the most extensively studied of these agents. It appears that 20-40% of patients respond to isotretinoin treatment by concentration of radioiodine in metastatic tumors, but the clinical utility of this redifferentiation is still unclear. In vitro studies suggest that the retinoid receptors RARβ and RXRγ are required for this effect. Abnormal DNA methylation may be an early event in thyroid tumorigenesis and methylation of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) may play a role in loss of iodine concentration in these tumors. Inhibitors of methylation (5-azacytidine, phenylacetate and sodium butyrate) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in cell culture models, but published trials in humans are not yet available. Histone acetylation is required for efficient transcription of genes necessary for differentiated function. Proteins that cause histone deacetylation inhibit gene transcription and differentiated function. Inhibitors of histone deacetylation (depsipeptide, trichostatin A) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated cell lines. Finally, commonly used agents such as thiazolidine diones (diabetes) and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (hypercholesterolemia) have shown promise in preliminary in vitro studies in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Our own work has focused on receptor-selective retinoids and thiazolidine diones as potential therapy in patients with advanced thyroid cancer based on nuclear hormone receptor

  18. Internal dosimetry for the radiological protection of the patient in the therapy with I-131; Dosimetria interna para la proteccion radiologica del paciente en la terapia con I-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deluca, G.M.; Rojo, A.M. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250 (C1429BNP), Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: gdeluca@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    In the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (CADIT) subjected to therapy with radiopharmaceuticals should be considered the possible risk of sharp depression of the bone marrow like consequence of the intolerance to the quantity of administered activity. The manifestation of the myelotoxicity can limit in a substantial way the future treatments and to deteriorate the predict of resolution of the illness. In this work it shows the physical-mathematical mark of a methodology for the estimated absorbed dose in bone marrow based in the MIRD scheme whose objective is to protect the one patient of the noxious and undesirable effects of the internal radiotherapy in organs that are not target of the same one. The formalism incorporates specific information of the patient and also peculiar characteristics of the internal therapy in patient with CADIT. The considerations are the following ones: (1) the main organ to protect is the bone marrow: (2) the accumulated activity, in bone marrow, it is obtained starting from measurements in blood: (3) the used isotope almost exclusively in this type of therapies is the {sup 131}I; (4) it is used as radiopharmaceutical at the {sup 131}INa that it is characterized to be a simple, inorganic and small molecule: (5) the statistical incidence of the CADIT is bigger in women than in men. It is explained for that it was selected the formalism that is presented, the principles on which it is sustained which are their reaches and their limitations. They are also presented future innovations that can be implemented to effects of improving the estimates. The work is framed inside the thematic of the medical applications of open radioactive sources and it constitutes a contribution to the invigoration of the internal therapy with radiopharmaceuticals. This is due to that the methodology of dose estimation presented supplements with a theoretical biophysics base the protocols of empiric prescription broadly used in this practice. For these

  19. Whether antithyroid drugs influence on the outcome of radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuyevich, Viktar V.; Danilova, Larisa I.; Kaiser, Klaus P.; Ostwald-Lenz, Elisabeth; Wieler, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of research was an estimation of the influence of antithyroid medication on efficiency of radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with thyroid functional autonomy (FA). 100 patients with various clinical variants of FA were included in research and received treatment with radioiodine. From them uni-focal autonomy (UFA) was diagnosed in 65 person, multifocal (MFA) in 14 and disseminated (DA) in 21. Among the patients included in research 8 had relapse of hyperthyroidism after initial operative treatment and 1 after RIT. The data in work are submitted as a median (1-st and 3-rd quartiles). The age of surveyed was 65.5 (54; 72.5), from them 63 persons were a female, 37 were a male. From surveyed 2 groups of patients were formed. The first group consisted from 50 person, initially accepting during 4 months (2.5; 6) antithyroid drugs (ATD) which cancellation had been made as a rule 2 day prior to RIT, and the second one included 50 person, not accepting ATD neither up to nor after RIT. 9 elderly and multi morbid patients from the first group continued to accept ATD within several months after RIT. Carbimazole (n=45) or methimazole (n=5) in a dose of 10 mg (5; 10) were used as ATD. Therapeutic activity of 131 I was calculated by means of Marinelli's formula. The target dose for UFA has made 400 Gy, for MFA and DA - 150 Gy. For calculation of thyroid uptake 24-hour radioiodine test was carried 2-3 day prior to RIT. Used activity of I-131 have made from 4.08 up to 58.89 mCi. Duration of inpatient stay has made 3 days (2; 5). In 4 months (4; 5) after RIT the successful result (euthyroidism or hypothyroidism) has been achieved in 48 (96 %) patients accepting ATD, and in 47 (94 %) patients who were not accepting last. Conclusion: The conclusion that antithyroid medication does not influence on the efficiency of RIT of FA was made. It was revealed that frequency of hypothyroidism after RIT in patients of the first group was higher (36 %) than in patients

  20. Primary hyperthyroidism--diagnosis and treatment. Indications and contraindications for radioiodine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgul, Edyta; Sowinski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    Isotope therapy is one of the methods used in primary hyperthyroidism. The therapy is based on short-range beta radiation emitted from radioactive iodine. Radioiodine administration must always be preceded by pharmacological normalization of thyroid function. Otherwise, post-radiation thyrocyte destruction and thyroid hormones release may lead to hyperthyroidism exacerbation. Indications for radioiodine therapy in Graves-Basedow disease include recurrent hyperthyroidism after thyrostatic treatment or thyroidectomy and side-effects observed during thyrostatic treatment. In toxic nodule, isotope therapy is the first choice therapy. Radioiodine is absorbed only in autonomous nodule. Therefore, it destroys only this area and does not damage the remaining thyroid tissue. In toxic goitre, radioiodine is used mostly in recurrent nodules. Absolute contraindications for radioiodine treatment are pregnancy and lactation. Relative contraindications are thyroid nodules suspected of malignancy and age under 15 years. In patients with thyroid nodules suspected of malignancy, radioiodine treatment may be applied as a preparation for surgery, if thyrostatic drugs are ineffective or contraindicated. In children, radioiodine therapy should be considered in recurrent toxic goitre and when thyrostatic drugs are ineffective. In patients with Graves-Basedow disease and thyroid-associated orbitopathy, radioiodine treatment may increase the inflammatory process and exacerbate the ophthalmological symptoms. However, thyroid-associated orbitopathy cannot be considered as a contraindication for isotope therapy. The potential carcinogenic properties of radioiodine, especially associated with tissues with high iodine uptake (thyroid, salivary glands, stomach, intestine, urinary tract, breast), have not been confirmed.

  1. Normalization of lymphocyte count after high ablative dose of I-131 in a patient with chronic lymphoid leukemia and secondary papillary carcinoma of the thyroid: case report; Normalizacao da contagem de linfocitos apos dose ablativa de I-131 em um paciente com leucemia linfoide cronica e carcinoma papilifero da tireoide: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thom, Anneliese Rosmarie Gertrud Fischer; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Osawa, Akemi; Santos, Fabio Pires de Souza; Pasqualin, Denise da Cunha; Wagner, Jairo; Yamaga, Lilian Yuri Itaya; Cunha, Marcelo Livorsi da; Campos Neto, Guilherme de Carvalho; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao, E-mail: afthom@einstein.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Teles, Veronica Goes [Sociedade Brasileira de Diabetes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with chronic lymphoid leukemia who presented subsequently a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid with metastases to regional lymph nodes. The patient was treated with surgical thyroidectomy with regional and cervical lymph node excision and radioiodine therapy (I-131). The protocolar control scintigraphy 4 days after the radioactive dose showed I-131 uptake in both axillae and even in the inguinal regions. PET/CT showed faint FDG-F-18 uptake in one lymph node of the left axilla. An ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy of this lymph node identified by I-131 SPECT/CT and FDG-F-18 PET/CT revealed lymphoma cells and was negative for thyroid tissue and thyroglobulin content. The sequential blood counts done routinely after radiation treatment showed a marked fall until return to normal values of leucocytes and lymphocytes (absolute and relative), which were still normal in the last control 19 months after the radioiodine administration. Chest computed tomography showed a decrease in size of axillary and paraaortic lymph nodes. By immunohistochemistry, cells of the lymphoid B lineage decreased from 52% before radioiodine therapy to 5% after the procedure. The authors speculate about a possible sodium iodide symporter expression by the cells of this lymphoma, similar to some other non-thyroid tumors, such as breast cancer cells. (author)

  2. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease and the effects of prior carbimazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyampudi, Arun; Hamide, Abdoul; Halanaik, Dhanapathi; Sahoo, Jaya Prakash; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2014-09-01

    The use of radioiodine as the first line of treatment in Graves' disease is restricted in India because of its limited availability and an unrealistic risk perception associated with it. Additionally, the effectiveness of radioiodine ablation in Graves' disease is influenced by many factors. Prior medical antithyroid therapy is one such important factor. To analyze the efficacy of low dose radioiodine therapy (5 mCi) in treatment of naive patients of Graves' disease in comparison to that in which it was already primed with an antithyroid drug, carbimazole. A non-randomized, interventional study conducted in the Department of Medicine and Endocrinology of a tertiary care institute in South India. The study had two groups; Group A (36 treatment naive, uncomplicated Graves' disease patients) and B (34 Graves' disease patients on carbimazole prior to radioiodine therapy). Both groups had baseline clinical, biochemical evaluation and were reassessed at 3 and 6 months for evaluating the clinical status for possible documentation of cure. The cure rate was 61.1% in drug naive group and 58.8% in pretreated group at 6 months following radioiodine (P = 0.845). Higher baseline 999m technicium (99m Tc) uptake, male gender, BMI and higher baseline free thyroxine (fT4) level predicted treatment failure following radioiodine therapy. Administration of carbimazole prior to low dose radioiodine therapy does not alter the efficacy of radioiodine. Low fixed dose (5 mCi) of radioactive iodine may be a safe and effective primary therapeutic option in Graves' disease patients pretreated with antithyroid drugs.

  3. Vocal cord paralysis following I-131 ablation of a postthyroidectomy remnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.C.; Harbert, J.C.; Dejter, S.W.; Mariner, D.R.; VanDam, J.

    1985-01-01

    Vocal cord paralysis has been reported following I-131 therapy of thyrotoxicosis and following ablation of the whole thryoid. However, this rare complication has not previously been described following I-131 ablation of a postthyroidectomy remnant. The authors report a patient who required tracheostomy for bilateral vocal cord paralysis following I-131 ablation after near-total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma

  4. Metastatic Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Secreting Thyroid Hormone and Radioiodine Avid without Stimulation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A. Abid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This is an extremely rare case of a patient with metastatic follicular thyroid cancer who continued to produce thyroid hormone and was iodine scan positive without stimulation after thyroidectomy and radioiodine (I-131 therapy. Patient Findings. A 76-year-old Caucasian male was diagnosed with metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma on lung nodule biopsy. Total thyroidectomy was performed and he was ablated with 160 mCi of I-131 after recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH stimulation. Whole body scan (WBS after treatment showed uptake in bilateral lungs, right sacrum, and pelvis. The thyroglobulin decreased from 2,063 to 965 four months after treatment but rapidly increased to 2,506 eleven months after I-131. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH remained suppressed and free T4 remained elevated after I-131 therapy without thyroid hormone supplementation. He was treated with an additional 209 mCi with WBS findings positive in lung and pelvis. Despite I-131, new metastatic lesions were noted in the left thyroid bed and large destructive lesion to the first cervical vertebrae four months after the second I-131 dose. Conclusions. This case is exceptional because of its rarity and also due to the dissociation between tumor differentiation and aggressiveness. The metastatic lesions continued to secrete thyroid hormone and remained radioiodine avid with rapid progression after I-131 therapy.

  5. Thyroid uptake of I-131 during anti-thyroid drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoque, M.; Alam, F.; Haque, F.S.; Karim, M.A.; Fariduddin, M.

    2004-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a global ailment and its treatment is very promising either by ant-thyroid drug or by radioiodine. Iodine-131 uptake test is very important for evaluation of hyperthyroid in respect to its therapy and to exclude thyroiditis. This study was performed to observe the thyroid uptake pattern during intake of anti-thyroid medicine and workout the possibility to start I-131 therapy just after withdraw of antithyroid drug without waiting few days. In this study total 252 patient's I-131 uptake test is performed. Among the patient 135 (53.57%) were female, 117 (64.43%) were male. All this patients were hyperthyroid both clinically and biochemically. Thyroid uptake was taken to all patients at 24 hours after oral administration of 5 to 10 micro-curie of I -131. Uptake was taken by an uptake system and recorded as percentage uptake. These patients are grouped into three categories. Group-A-newly diagnosed cases, who have not taken antithyroid drug or I-131 therapy, there were 82 patients in this group, and their mean uptake was 37.12 ±18.5%. Group B - this group of patients were studied during intake of antithyroid medicine, there were 130 patients in this group and their mean uptake was 34.34±16.0%. Group-B patients were further divided in two sub-groups, patients having antithyroid drug for 1 to 3 weeks (group-B 1), group B1 have mean uptake 37±21% and those were taking antithyroid for 3 weeks to 2 years (group-B2), group B2 have uptake 34.34±20%. Group C- these patients are taken from those patients who had withdrawn antithyroid drug for 3 days to 3 months, there were 40 such patients. Group C further divided into two sub-group, group-C1 (stopped for 3-10 days) and group C2 (stopped for 11 days to 3 months). Group C1 had mean uptake 38±16% and group C2 had mean uptake 35±19%. From this study it is observed that Iodine-131 uptake percentage of untreated hyperthyroid; during antithyroid drug treatment and after withdraw of antithyroid drug almost

  6. Radiation absorbed dose and expected risk in head and neck tissues after thyroid radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamed, A [National Center for Nuclear and Radiation Control, AEA., Cairo (Egypt); Farag, H I [National Cancer instiute, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Saleh, A [Al-hussien Hospital, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Measurement of absorbed dose in head and neck phantom after applying I-131 therapeutic dose for the treatment of thyroid malignancies was conducted. The measurement were carried out at several sites of phantom using TL dosimeters. The absorbed doses were also measured on the skin of four patients during their administration of I-131 therapeutic doses 1.332 GBq (36 mci) I-131. The measurements were taken over 69 hours exposure at different sites of phantom. The same measurements were carried out on the four patients. At five sites of the patients head and neck, the absorbed dose were measured and compared with that measured on the phantom. The values measured are discussed in the light of the published individual absorbed doses in the organs by ICRP tables. High absorbed doses were absorbed in the different sites of the head and neck during the I-131 therapy (0.14-9.68 mGy/mCi). 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Ablative therapy with radioiodine in the postoperative management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, a retrospective observational study of the justified indication of the therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Herrera, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the indication of treatment with I131 as part of the management of differentiated thyroid cancer, was analyzed in patients older than 16 years attended in Hospital San Juan de Dios and Hospital Mexico, who received this therapy, during the years 2006-2009. The medical records of the selected patients were reviewed and registered in the SPSS statistical program. The following variables were obtained: name, file number, age, gender, type of cancer, maximum diameter of the tumor, presence of one of 2 or more tumor foci in the surgical piece, hospital of origin, value of T, N and M according to the TNM staging, MACIS scale score and staging according to the MACIS score. The most common differentiated carcinoma in the studied population was papillary carcinoma. A little less than half of the patients, had the criteria to receive radioiodine therapy according to that established by the ATA, same result when said population was subjected to European criteria Criteria to receive radioiodine dictated by the American school as the European one were fulfilled in the majority of patients with stage 2. Compliance with indication or non-indication of treatment was maintained without significant difference between papillary and follicular carcinomas [es

  8. Radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    inevitable in Graves' disease, whereas this risk is much lower when treating toxic nodular goiter. The side effect causing most concern is the potential induction of ophthalmopathy in predisposed individuals. The response to (131)I therapy is to some extent related to the radiation dose. However, calculation......, and they may even interact mutually and counteract each other. Numerous studies have evaluated the effect of (131)I therapy, but results have been conflicting due to differences in design, sample size, patient selection, and dose calculation. It seems clear that no single factor reliably predicts the outcome...

  9. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Leisner, B. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin des Allg. Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    The version 3 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases presents first of all a revision of the version 2. The chapter indication for radioiodine therapy, surgical treatment or antithyroid drugs bases on an interdisciplinary consensus. The manifold criteria for decision making consider the entity of thyroid disease (autonomy, Graves' disease, goitre, goitre recurrence), the thyroid volume, suspicion of malignancy, cystic nodules, risk of surgery and co-morbidity, history of subtotal thyroidectomy, persistent or recurrent thyrotoxicosis caused by Graves' disease including known risk factors for relapse, compression of the trachea caused by goitre, requirement of direct therapeutic effect as well as the patient's preference. Because often some of these criteria are relevant, the guideline offers the necessary flexibility for individual decisions. Further topics are patients' preparation, counseling, dosage concepts, procedural details, results, side effects and follow-up care. The prophylactic use of glucocorticoids during radioiodine therapy in patients without preexisting ophthalmopathy as well as dosage and duration of glucocorticoid medication in patients with preexisting ophthalmopathy need to be clarified in further studies. The pragmatic recommendations for the combined use of radioiodine and glucocorticoids remained unchanged in the 3{sup rd} version. (orig.) [German] Die Version 3 der Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen stellt im Wesentlichen eine redaktionelle Ueberarbeitung der Version 2 dar. Im Kapitel Indikation und Empfehlungen fuer eine Radioiodtherapie, eine Operation oder eine thyreostatische Therapie bei gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen basiert die Leitlinie auf einem interdisziplinaer abgestimmten Konzept. Die Entscheidungskriterien sind multifaktoriell und beruecksichtigen die Art der Schilddruesenerkrankung (Autonomie, Morbus Basedow, Struma, Rezidivstruma

  10. Transient hypothyroidism following radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, J.M.C.; McCruden, D.C.; Alexander, W.D.; Hilditch, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    A prospective study of thyroid function including serial tracer radioisotope uptake measurements in 55 patients treated with 131 I therapy is described. Five patients had an episode of transient hypothyroidism within eight months of treatment: in three of these patients this was due to impaired organification of iodide, with normal iodide trapping by the thyroid (as measured by a twenty minute 123 I uptake) being preserved. In contrast, in all patients who developed permanent hypothyroidism, iodide trapping was markedly diminished and did not recover. It is suggested that hypothyroidism due to organification failure following 131 I therapy is potentially short-lived; where hypothyroidism is associated with gross impairment of iodide trapping, recovery is unlikely. Early iodine uptake measurements may be of value in selecting those patients whose hypothyroidism is transient and who do not require permanent thyroid hormone replacement. (author)

  11. Anti-thyrotropin receptor antibody levels after radioiodine therapy in patients of childbearing age with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Mizuho; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Tajima, Naoko; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Ito, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Following radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease, transient elevation of anti-thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) is observed. Elevation of TRAb causes neonatal hyperthyroidism. Serum TRAb levels before radioiodine therapy, 2 months to 1 year, 1 to 2 years, 2 to 3 years, and 3 to 4 years after radioiodine therapy were retrospectively analyzed in 25 women of childbearing age with Graves' disease. The normal range for TRAb is ≤15%. The one patient with serum TRAb levels <10% before radioiodine therapy did not have TRAb levels ≥50% after radioiodine therapy. However, in patients with serum TRAb levels of 10% to 30% before radioiodine therapy (n=8), TRAb were ≥50% in 75.0% 2 months to 1 year after radioiodine therapy, in 25.0% 1 to 2 years after, and in 37.5% 2 to 4 years after. In patients with serum TRAb levels of 30% to 50% before radioiodine therapy (n=3), TRAb levels were ≥50% in 33.3% 2 months to 1 year after radioiodine therapy and in 0.0% 1 to 4 years after. In patients with serum TRAb levels of 50% to 70% before radioiodine therapy (n=6), TRAb were ≥50% in 83.3% 2 months to 1 year after radioiodine therapy, in 66.6% 1 to 2 years after, and in 33.3% 2 to 4 years after. In patients with serum TRAb levels ≥70% before radioiodine therapy (n=7), TRAb levels were ≥50% in 100% 2 months to 1 year after radioiodine therapy, in 85.7% 1 to 2 years after, in 71.4% 2 to 3 years after, and in 57.1% 3 to 4 years after. Serum TRAb levels are more likely to be ≥50% after radioiodine therapy in patients with high serum TRAb levels before radioiodine therapy. (author)

  12. Comparative evaluation of the two fixed dose methods of radioiodine therapy (185 MBq and 370 MBq) for the treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahani, A.F.; Fallahi, B.; Kakhki, V.R.D.; Eftekhari, M.; Beiki, D.; Saghari, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine therapy is the safest, simplest, least expensive and most effective method for treatment of Graves' disease. But optimal method for determining iodine-131 treatment doses for Graves' hyperthyroidism is unknown, and techniques have varied from a fixed dose to more elaborate calculations based upon gland size, iodine uptake, and iodine turnover. Due to difficulties in previous methods for dose determination, fixed dose method of I-131 is now considered the best practical method for I-131 therapy in Graves' disease, but there is no consensus on the dose. We compared two routinely recommended fixed doses of 185 and 370 MBq for this purpose. Methods and Materials: Patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism (n = 59) who had not been previously treated with radioactive iodine were randomized in two groups of 185 MBq (5 Ci) and 370 MBq (10 mCi). l patients were followed for two years, with 6-month intervals for following clinical outcomes: hyperthyroid requiring further radioiodine, and hypothyroid requiring life-long replacement therapy. Euthyroid and hypothyroid states were considered successful therapy (cure) and hyperthyroid state was considered failure (no response or relapse). Results: Totally, among 59 patients treated with I-131, 20 (33.9%) patients became euthyroid and 19(32.2%) became hypothyroid, while failed therapy was noticed in 20 patients (33.9%). In the group treated by 185 MBq (33 patients), 10(30.3%) were euthyroid, 6(18.2%) were hypothyroid (overall cure rate of 48.5%), while 17(51.5%) remained hyperthyroid by the end of the follow-up period. From the 26 patients treated with 370 MBq, the euthyroid and hypothyroid states were observed in 10(38.5%) and 13(50%) patients, respectively (overall cure rate of 88.5%), and hyperthyroid state in 3(11.5%). No relationship was noted between the outcome and age, sex, size of the thyroid gland and thyroid uptake, but the relationship between the disease outcome and the amount of administered

  13. Efeitos agudos laringológicos e vocais da radioiodoterapia em pacientes com hipertireoidismo por doença de Basedow Graves Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of Basedow-Graves patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Werlang Isolan-Cury

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A Doença de Graves constitui a forma mais comum de hipertireoidismo e três abordagens terapêuticas são atualmente utilizadas: uso de medicamentos antitireoideanos, cirurgia e iodo radioativo (I 131. Os efeitos do o I 131 e a indução precoce de hipotireoidismo são conseqüências da destruição induzida do I131 sobre o parênquima tireoideano. São poucos relatos encontrados na literatura acerca dos efeitos da radioioterapia sobre a laringe e conseqüentemente na produção vocal. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos agudos sobre a voz da radioiodoterapia em pacientes com hipertireoidismo por Doença de Basedow Graves. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo de corte contemporâneo longitudinal, prospectivo. Procedimentos: Investigação vocal, mensuração do tempo máximo fonatório de /a/ e relação s/z, análise freqüência fundamental (Software Praat, laringoscopia e análise perceptivo-auditiva em três momentos: pré-dose, 4 dias e 20 dias pós dose. Momentos baseados no perfil inflamatório do tecido tireoideano. RESULTADOS: Não houve mudanças estatisticamente significantes nos aspectos vocais e laringológicos nos três momentos avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: A radioiodoterapia não afeta a qualidade vocal.Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131. There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim and the AIM: os this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/ and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software, laringoscopy and (perceptive-auditory analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and

  14. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy in functional thyroid autonomy and mild immunothyropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Rudolph, F.; Prillwitz, A.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: To examine all cases with Graves' disease after radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid tissue (AFFT) in order to find the cause. Methods: We retrospectively studied 1428 pts who were treated between 11/93 and 3/97 with radioiodine for AFTT and who underwent at least one control examination. Results: 15 (1.1%) of all pts developed Graves' disease 8.4 (4-13) months after radioiodine therapy. There was no direct suggestion of Graves' disease (TRAK negative, no endocrine ophthalmopathy) in any pt at the time of radioiodine therapy. More detailed analysis of anamnestic data, however, revealed evidence that immunothyropathy predated radioiodine therapy in 11 of the 15 pts. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy manifested as an increase in immunothyropathy 14 pts, a deterioration in metabolism in 11 pts and a first occurrence of endocrine ophthalmopathy in 5 pts. Conclusion: Exacerbation of preexisting, functional primarily insignificant immunothyropathia is held responsible in most cases for the observed paradoxical effects after radioiodine therapy, resulting in radiation-induced manifest Graves' disease; however no therapeutical consequences are recommended. (orig.) [de

  15. Unfavourable effect of prolonged treatment with antithyroid drugs on radioiodine therapy outcome in Graves' hyperthyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Rajić, Milena; Vlajković, Marina; Ilić, Slobodan; Stević, Miloš; Sekulić, Vladan; Zečević, Mila

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) of Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) is usually recommended after failure of primary therapy with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), which are commonly prescribed for up to 18-24 months. However, in our region, the prolonged ATDs treatment of the disease is very common. Thus, we assessed the efficacy of RIT after prolonged continual pretreatment with ATDs in Graves' hyperthyroidism. Therapy outcome using a single dose of radioiodine was evaluated after one year in 91 patients (f/m...

  16. Radioiodine therapy in non toxic multi nodular goitre, preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiti, A.; Travaini, L.L.; Tadayyon, S.; Vannucchi, G.; Fugazzola, L.; Beck-Peccoz, P.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of 131 I therapy in patients (pts) affected by non toxic multinodular goitre (NTMG). NTMG is a thyroid disease with a high prevalence, especially in low-iodine intake regions. Treatment of NTMG often requires surgery. However, thyroidectomy may be risky in some patients and radioiodine therapy could be an alternative treatment to reduce thyroid volume. We also evaluated if lithium administration can improve the efficacy of radioiodine treatment in this pts. Material and Methods: We enrolled 39 pts (8 males, 31 females; mean age 59 y, range 40-79 y) affected by NTMG. Mean thyroid volume (TV) at ultrasound was of 46.8 ml (range 18.5-87.3). Pts were randomised in 2 groups. Group 1: iodine therapy + lithium therapy 900 mg/die for 6 days; Group 2: iodine therapy alone. We also define 3 clusters of pts by TV. A:15-30 ml; B:31-40 ml; C: > 40 ml. The 131 I activity (MBq) was calculated as follows: [4.44 (MBq) x 100/24 hours uptake (%)] x TV. All patients are evaluated for thyroid function and TV at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after treatment, since we postulate that major reduction in thyroid volume will occur 1 year after 131 I therapy. Results: Up to now 16 pts were treated with 131 I (mean activity: 512 MBq) and no side effects from 131 I and lithium therapy were reported. Four out of 5 pts evaluated at 3 months (2 of group 1 and 3 of group 2) had a reduction in TV (mean value: 8.8 ml). Five out of 10 pts had sub-clinical hyperthyroidism at 1 week, likely as a consequence of thyroid tissue destruction. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest the safety and effectiveness of 131 I treatment in NTMG. We expect to clarify the role of lithium administration in improving 131 I efficacy. This therapy could have a future role in patients with NTMG that can't be submitted to surgery

  17. Comparative evaluation of the two methods of fixed dose radioiodine therapy (5 mCi and 10 mCi) for the treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fard Esfehani, A.; Dabbagh Kakhki, V.R.; Eftekhari, M.; Zarpak, B.; Fallahi Seyjani, B.; Saghari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy is the safest, simplest, least expensive and most effective method for treatment in most patients with Graves' disease. Due to complexity of methods for dose determination, the tendency is toward using fixed doses of I-131 for this purpose. As there is conflict for the best fixed dose, regarding it's efficiency and complication of hypothyroidism, standardized dose selection is of particular importance in treatment of Grave' disease. 59 patients with grave' disease, referred to the nuclear medicine center of Shariati Hospital from 78.5.25 were studied. In this clinical trial, the patients were randomized into two groups, one were treated with 5 mCi of 1-131 and the other received 10 mCi of the same agent. All patients were followed for two years, with 6-month intervals. Among 65 patients treated with I-131, 20 (33 9%) patients became euthyroid and 19(32.2%) became hypothyroid while relapse was noticed in 20 patients (33.9%) In The group treated by 5 mCi I-131 (33 patients), 10(30%) were euthyroid, 6(18.2%) were hypothyroid (overall cure of 48.5% while 17(51.5%) remained hyperthyroid by the end of the follow -up period(two years). From the 26 patients who were treated with 10 mCi, the euthyroid, hypothyroid and hypothyroid states were observed in 10(38.5%), 13(50%), 13(50%) and 3(11.5%) patients respectively (with an overall cure rate of 88.5%). No relationship was noted between the outcome and age, sex, size of the thyroid gland and thyroid uptake, but the relationship between the disease outcome and the amount of administered radioiodine was statistically significant (P=0.003). For most of the patients, age, sex, iodine uptake and even thyroid size play minor roles in dose selection. Although the incidence-rate of early hypothyroidism (by the end of 2 years) in the cases related with 5 mCi is less than those treated with 10 mCi, the incidence of relapse is greatly higher in the former group. In addition, it was found that long

  18. The clinical value of immunosuppression in Graves' ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yue; Qiu Ling; Zhang Chunying; Long Shuiqing; Gan Xilun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The chief clinical characteristics of Graves disease are hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy. To assess the values of using immunosuppression in Graves ophthalmopathy. Method: 415 patients with Graves hyperthyroidism were studied. They were randomly assigned to receive radioiodine, methimazole from 1.5 to 2 years, radioiodine followed by a 3-month course of prednisone. The changes in thyroid function and progression of ophthalmopathy were evaluated. Results: Among the 138 patients treated with radioiodine, 19 patients had new or worsening ophthalmopathy; 117 had no changes in their eyes; 2 patients had improvement in their eye disease. Among the 138 patients treated with methimazole, 3 patients had new or worsening ophthalmopathy; 133 had no changes in their eyes; 2 patients had improvement in their eye disease. Among the 139 patients treated with radioiodine and prednisone, no patient had new or worsening ophthalmopathy; 107 had no changes in their eyes; 32 patients had improvement in their eye disease. The frequency of improvement of ophthalmopathy was significantly higher in the radioiodine-prednisone group than in either the radioiodine group or the methimazole group (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The administration of prednisone after radioiodine therapy was associated with improvement of ophthalmopathy. Worsening of ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy is often transient and can be prevented by the administration of prednisone

  19. Interest of a multidisciplinary and two-step consultation in radioiodine therapy to improve patient's support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumon, C.; Eberle, M.; Deshayes, E.; Savry, B.; Vinson, B.; Kotzki, P.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: the surgery of differentiated thyroid cancer may be followed by radioiodine therapy (I 131 ). This therapy requires a 3-day hospital stay in an isolation room without family visits, but also many precautions before, during and after the hospital stay. This clinical environment can give rise to increased anxiety for a number of patients. This is why we have set up a dedicated consultation, aimed at improving preparation of the hospital stay. The aim of our work was to assess the efficiency of such consultation for patient's understanding of their disease, related apprehensions, and coordination between the nuclear medicine (NM) unit and inpatient ward. Material and methods: we followed the recommendations of the first French Cancer Plan regarding the diagnosis or treatment announcement and the project was reviewed in the frame of Professional Practices Evaluation. Consultations were carried out according to a 2-step procedure in the NM unit. First, patients were informed by the NM physician about disease and treatment. Then, a technologist evaluated social and psychological conditions, and checked proper understanding of disease and treatment. He/she paid a special attention to radiation protection measures, especially for the discharge period. Patients received a guidance manual document, and when necessary were oriented towards the supportive care staff. A dedicated computerized form was used to share patient information between the NM unit and inpatient ward. These consultations ran every day (2 per day). To evaluate procedure efficiency, patients were asked to fulfill a satisfaction questionnaire. Inpatient ward nurses were also surveyed for patient's understanding of their disease, level of anxiety, and quality of care. Results: at Montpellier Cancer Institute, a total of 30 thyroid cancer patients and 15 nurses were surveyed about their perceptions about the consultation before radioiodine therapy from April to

  20. Myopathy Associated with Acute Hypothyroidism following Radioiodine Therapy for Graves Disease in an Adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivkees ScottA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe acute myopathy following I-131 treatment for hyperthyroidism due to Graves Disease (GD in an adolescent. A 15 year-old diagnosed with GD required treatment with radioactive iodine (I-131 therapy. Six weeks post I-131, he developed generalized muscle cramps. The CK was 19.800 U/L, the total thyroxine was 2.3 mcg/dL (29.6 nmol/L SI and the estimated free thyroxine (EFT was 0.5 ng/dL (6.4 pmol/L SI. The ALT was 112 U/L and AST was 364 U/L (normal

  1. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 4); Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen (Version 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany). Abteilung fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung des allgemeinen Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Schober, O. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    Version 4 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases includes an interdisciplinary consensus ondecision making for antithyroid drugs, surgical treatment and radioiodine therapy. The quantitative description of a specific goiter volume for radioiodine therapy or operation was cancelled. For patients with nodular goiter with or without autonomy, manifold circumstances are in favor of surgery (suspicion on malignancy, large cystic nodules, mediastinal goiter, severe compression of the trachea) or in favor of radioiodine therapy (treatment of autonomy, age of patient, co-morbidity, history of prior subtotal thyroidectomy, profession like teacher, speaker or singer). For patients with Graves' disease, radioiodine therapy or surgery are recommended in the constellation of high risk of relapse (first-line therapy), persistence of hyperthyroidism or relapse of hyperthyroidism. After counseling, the patient gives informed consent to the preferred therapy. The period after radioiodine therapy of benign disorders until conception of at least four months was adapted to the European recommendation. (orig.)

  2. Recurrent thyrotoxicosis after I-131 induced hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Borowski, G.D.; Shtasel, P.; Rose, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    The first clinically and biochemically documented case of recurrent thyrotoxicosis after I-131 induced hypothyroidism in a patient with Graves' disease is reported. Two months after the administration of 9.2 mCi of I-131, the subject developed hypothyroidism. One month later, the patient became euthyroid. Then, nine months following ablation, the patient again developed thyrotoxicosis. A second dose of I-131 of 12.5 mCi was required to finally produce permanent hypothyroidism. This case illustrates the recurrence of hypothyroidism after what had seemed to have been adequate I-131 radiation

  3. Body weight gain after radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidhauer, K.; Odatzidu, L.; Schicha, H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Analysis and follow up of body weight after radioiodine therapy (RITh) of hyperthyroidism, since excessive weight gain is a common complaint among these patients. Methods: Therapy and body weight related data of 100 consecutive RITh-patients were retrospectively analysed from the time before up to three years after RITh. All patients suffered from hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease or autonomy), but were adjusted to euthyroid levels after RITh. Patients' data were compared to a control group of 48 euthyroid patients out of the same ambulance and during the same time scale. Results: All patients (RITh and controls) gained weight over the time. There was no statistically significant difference in BMI development over three years between RITh-patients and controls (5.5% resp. 4.9% increase). In the first year after RITh, weight gain of the RITh patients was higher indeed, but lower in the follow up, resulting in the same range of weight gain after three years as the controls. Besides that women showed a slightly higher increase of BMI than men, and so did younger patients compared to elder as well as patients with overweight already before RITh. Conclusions: An initially distinct increase of body weight after RITh of hyperthyroidism is mainly a compensation of pretherapeutic weight loss due to hyperthyroidism. Presupposing adequate euthyroid adjustment of thyroid metabolism after therapy, RITh is not responsible for later weight gain and adipositas. (orig.) [de

  4. [Body weight gain after radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidhauer, K; Odatzidu, L; Kiencke, P; Schicha, H

    2002-02-01

    Analysis and follow up of body weight after radioiodine therapy (RITh) of hyperthyroidism, since excessive weight gain is a common complaint among these patients. Therapy and body weight related data of 100 consecutive RITh-patients were retrospectively analysed from the time before up to three years after RITh. All patients suffered from hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease or autonomy), but were adjusted to euthyroid levels after RITh. Patients' data were compared to a control group of 48 euthyroid patients out of the same ambulance and during the same time scale. All patients (RITh and controls) gained weight over the time. There was no statistically significant difference in BMI development over three years between RITh-patients and controls (5.5% resp. 4.9% increase). In the first year after RITh, weight gain of the RITh patients was higher indeed, but lower in the follow up, resulting in the same range of weight gain after three years as the controls. Besides that women showed a slightly higher increase of BMI than men, and so did younger patients compared to elder as well as patients with overweight already before RITh. An initially distinct increase of body weight after RITh of hyperthyroidism is mainly a compensation of pretherapeutic weight loss due to hyperthyroidism. Presupposing adequate euthyroid adjustment of thyroid metabolism after therapy, RITh is not responsible for later weight gain and adipositas.

  5. Amifostine is a potent radioprotector of salivary glands in radioiodine therapy. Structural and ultrastructural findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutta, H.; Kampen, U.; Sagowski, C.; Brenner, W.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Paulsen, F.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: salivary gland impairment following high-dose radioiodine treatment is well recognized. Since differentiated thyroid cancer has a good prognosis, reduction of long-term side effects is important. This study investigates the radioprotective effects of amifostine in salivary glands of rabbits receiving high-dose radioiodine therapy so as to obtain deeper insight in changes on the cellular and ultrastructural level. Material and methods: a total of 20 rabbits were investigated. High-dose radioiodine therapy applying 1 GBq 131 I was performed in 16 animals. Eight of these 16 animals received 200 mg/m 2 body surface amifostine prior to high-dose radioiodine therapy. Four additional rabbits served as controls, two receiving amifostine, the other two no treatment at all. Subsequently, salivary glands (submandibular and parotid glands, respectively) of all animals were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Results: parenchymal damage of both parotid and submandibular glands, specially acinar structures comprising cell organelles and nuclei, of animals pretreated with amifostine was much less pronounced than in animals without amifostine pretreatment. Conclusion: the results indicate that parenchymal damage in salivary glands induced by high-dose radioiodine therapy can significantly be reduced by amifostine. Therefore, amifostine therapy may increase quality of life in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  6. Benign thyroid disorders, radioiodine therapy and diagnosis related groups (DRGs): aspects of cost/benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of goiter and thyroid nodules in older patients is accompanied by an increasing frequency of treatment and cost. Cost-effectiveness is given for programs of prophylaxis (primary prevention, e.g. alimentary iodine supplementation), for programs of screening (secondary prevention. e.g. TSH-screening), and for therapeutic strategies to avoid complications of thyroid dysfunction (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and to minimize iatrogenic complications (tertiary prevention). Examples of tertiary prevention are radioiodine-therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have an increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioiodine therapy of ouvert or subclinical hyperthyroidism, and radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant co-morbidity. A cost-effectiveness-analysis for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease has been published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a first line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds 60%. Cost-minimization-analysis, comparing resection of goiter and radioiodine, has shown lower cost of radioiodine therapy for toxic multinodular goiter up to 100 ml and for Graves' disease up to 60 ml goiter volume. Medical aspects (volume of goiter, uptake of nodules, regressive goiter, suspicion on malignancy, patients' age, co-morbidity, patients' decision) remain decisive for the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  7. Stunning in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease. Quantification and therapeutic relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, T.; Meyer, P.T.; Knollmann, D.; Nowak, B.; Schaefer, W.M.; Ocklenburg, C.

    2008-01-01

    In radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease, a reduction of radioiodine uptake is known for consecutive administrations of 131I, which needs to be considered in therapy planning. Aim: Analysis of uptake reduction with regard on the time interval between radioiodine administration and the delivered dose to the thyroid tissue. Patients, methods: 200 patients were enrolled in the study and distributed into two groups (matched for diagnoses), each containing 32 patients with Graves' disease (target dose 250 Gy), 24 with focal (400 Gy), 44 with disseminated thyroid autonomy (150 Gy). In one group, a second fraction of radioiodine was given after 48 h (2d) due to an unexpected low radioiodine uptake or effective half-life, whereas in the other group the second fraction was given after 96 h (4d). Results: There was no significant difference between delivered doses due to the first fraction after four days: 2d: 86 ± 48 Gy (extrapolated) vs. 4d: 87 ± 41 Gy, p > 0.05. In 2d, delivered dose at time of second administration was significantly lower (51 μ 29 Gy) than in 4d (p < 0.01). The radioiodine uptake of the second fraction relative to the initial uptake was significantly lower in the 4d (4d: 63 ± 25% vs. 2d: 82 ± 24%, p < 0.01). In addition, a correlation between uptake reduction and delivered dose and an influence of the time interval between radioiodine administrations could be shown. Conclusions: Relative uptake of subsequent radioiodine fractions decreases with time after first administration and with increasing delivered dose to the thyroid. If a second fraction of 131I is given at an earlier time, the same therapeutic effect can be reached using lower amounts of activity, minimising radiation exposure and increasing efficiency of radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  8. [Efficacy of treatment with I(131) in paediatric Graves disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enes Romero, P; Martín-Frías, M; de Jesús, M; Caballero Loscos, C; Alonso Blanco, M; Barrio Castellanos, R

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important therapeutic option in young patients with Grave's disease (GD). In the United States it is a widespread therapy, but in Europe its use in paediatrics is still controversial. To report our experience in radioiodine therapy of paediatric GD patients and analyse its effectiveness and safety. We retrospectively studied our paediatric population (de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. [Radioiodine 131I therapy of hyperthyroidism on an outpatient basis - safe, effective and economic option].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, J; Kubinyi, J; Telička, Z

    2012-02-01

    Radioiodine 131I therapy of hyperthyroidism on an outpatient basis is widely accepted over the world. In Czech Republic, however, radioiodine therapy is still not enough used, and has been realized on an inpatient basis to date. Our work is the first analysis of the experiences with radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism on an outpatient basis in Czech Republic. Capsule with 550 MBq of 131I was administered orally in 39 hyperthyroid patients (32 women and 8 men, 21 with autoimmune Graves hyperthyroidism and 18 with toxic thyroid nodules, mean age 66.8 years). In 32 of them we evaluated effectiveness and complications of therapy after 12-42 months. We also compared financial costs of the radioiodine treatment on an outpatient basis with the treatment in hospitalization and with surgery. After the treatment, 9/32 (28 %) patients were euthyroid without thyrostatic/thyroxine treatment, 18/32 (60 %) patients were hypothyroid with thyroxine therapy, 2/32 (6 %) patients significantly decreased doses of thyrostatic drugs. In 2/32 (6 %) patients the treatment was ineffective. The effect of the treatment did not depend on the etiology and severity of hyperthyroidism, but decreased with thyroid volume. Patients with ineffective or only partially effective treatment had median of thyroid volume more than 40 ml. In 1 patient thyroid associated ophthalmopathy was moderately worsened. Other complications were not observed. If we compared financial costs in model with 1 patient, we found that the costs of radioiodine therapy on an outpatient basis (118.7 €) comprise only 16 % of the costs of radioiodine therapy in hospitalization (728 €) and only 25 % of the costs of surgery (475.6 €). Radioiodine 131I is effective and safe in the treatment of hyperthyroidism and the therapy on an outpatient basis is much cheaper choice. The therapy with 131I on an outpatient basis is not suitable in patients with thyroid volume more than 40 ml.

  10. A case report of hyperfunctioning metastatic thyroid cancer and rare I-131 avid liver metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunawudhi, Anchisa; Promteangtrong, Chetsadaporn; Chotipanich, Chanisa

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is usually, relatively hypofunctional; most patients with thyroid cancer are clinically euthyroid. The combination of thyroid cancer and thyrotoxicosis is not common. We herein, report a case of follicular thyroid cancer with hyperfunctioning metastasis in a 43-year-old woman who presented with thyrotoxicosis, a cold right thyroid nodule, and low I-131 uptake at the thyroid bed. An additional total body scan with I-131 revealed a large radioiodine avid osteolytic bone metastasis with soft tissue masses and liver metastasis. The patient received treatment with total thyroidectomy, methimazole, and I-131 at a cumulative dose of 600 mCi along with recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone before the first I-131 treatment and palliative radiation. The patient had normal liver function test and experienced a mild degree of bone marrow suppression after I-131. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was still alive with the progression of bone metastases but was doing well with less severe thyrotoxicosis, good ambulation, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. Clinicians should be aware of the unusual concurrent presentation of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid cancer, a differential diagnosis in patients with thyrotoxicosis and low or normal radioiodine uptake over the neck and also potential pitfalls during radionuclide treatment

  11. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This meta-analysis was performed to compare radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in terms of clinical outcomes, including development or worsening of ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroid cure rate, hypothyroidism, relapse rate and adverse events. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed and National Knowledge Infrastructure, China, were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in patients with Graves' disease. Results were expressed as risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and weighted mean differences with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: 17 RCTs involving 4024 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included. Results showed that radioiodine treatment has increased risk in new ophthalmopathy, development or worsening of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Whereas, compared with antithyroid drugs, radioiodine treatment seems to have a higher hyperthyroid cure rate, lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is associated with a higher hyperthyroid cure rate and lower relapse rate compared with antithyroid drugs. However, it also increases the risk of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Advances in knowledge: Considering that antithyroid drug treatment can be associated with unsatisfactory control of hyperthyroidism, we would recommend radioiodine therapy as the treatment of choice for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27266544

  12. Experimental radioimmunotherapy with I-131-antibody against a differentiation antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, C.C.; Krohn, K.A.; Bernstein, I.D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that I-131-labeled antibodies (Ab) against the Thyl.l antigen can care AKR/Cu (Thyl.2+) mice bearing the AKR/J (Thy 1l.1+) SL2 T-cell lymphoma. The authors have now extended these studies to therapy with I-131-anti-Thyl.1 of SL2 lymphoma in AKR/J mice where Ab reacts with both tumor and normal cells. A 25 μg bolus was rapidly cleared from serum by binding to spleen cells (75% with Tl/2 <60 min.) and only low concentrations of Ab(<2% ID/gm) were present in tumor after infusion. Therapy of AKR/J mice bearing established s.c. lymphoma nodules with 1500 μCi I-131-anti-Thyl.1 resulted in complete regression of the nodule in 6/6 animals although tumor eventually regrew and all animals died of metastatic lymphoma. In contrast, I-131-irrelevant Ab given to produce the same amount of whole body radiation (750 μCi) did not affect tumor growth. These studies suggest that radiolabeled-AB against differentiation antigens may be useful for therapy in spite of binding to normal cell populations

  13. Clinical outcome during the peri-operative (thyroidectomy) period of severely hyperthyroid patients with normalized pre-operative free-T4 levels: Importance of I-131 therapy as a part of pre-operative preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siguan-Crisaldo, M.A.L.; Mercado-Asis, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroidectomy is performed for hyperthyroidism on patients who do not respond to or are not compliant with medical therapy and in patients with very large goiters causing compressive symptoms. All thyrotoxic patients undergoing thyroidectomy usually are first treated with anti-thyroid drugs to normalize free thyroid hormone levels and render them euthyroid before surgery in order to prevent complications particularly thyroid storm and circulatory collapse. In this case series, we describe the clinical outcome during the perioperative (thyroidectomy) period of three severely hyperthyroid patients, two females and one male, with ages ranging from 13 to 38 years. All patients had grade III goiter, and only one had exophthalmos. The mean duration of goiter was 3.6 years. All of them were given preoperative treatment consisting of propylthiouracil (PTU) at 450-600 mg/day; iodone, 3 tablets daily and propranolol at 30-120 mg/day for one month. All of them had normalized preoperative thyroid function tests. In addition to the preoperative medications mentioned above, all three patients received radioactive iodine therapy before surgery. The first two patients received relatively low doses of 8.0 and 7.5 mCi of I-131 respectively. Unfortunately the first patient had supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), post skin cutting and the other one went into thyroid storm. The third patient who received a cumulative dose of 23.5 mCi of I-131 before surgery had an uneventful postoperative course. It is concluded that normalization of thyroid hormone parameters, especially free T4 is not sufficient for an uneventful and uncomplicated peri-thyroidectomy period in severely hyperthyroid patients with large goiters. Effective radioactive iodine therapy might prove to be helpful in inducing thyroid tissue fibrosis, thus leading to true clinical euthyroidism and excellent clinical course postoperatively. (author)

  14. Measurement of the Dose to the Family Members Taking Care of Thyroid Cancer Patients Undergoing I-131 Therapy in Nuclear Medicine Using TLD-100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehtabian, M; Dehghan, N; Danaei Ghazanfarkhani, M; Haghighatafshar, M; Sina, S

    2017-05-01

    The family members or friends of the patients undergoing treatment using radioiodine in nuclear medicine are inevitably exposed to ionization radiation. The purpose of this study is measurement of the dose received by the people taking care of the thyroid cancer patients treated by 131I. For this purpose, the dose amounts received by 29 people accompanying patients were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters. A badge containing three TLD-100 chips was given to each caregiver. The people were asked to wear the badges for 24 days, when they are taking care of the patients. Finally the dose to each person was estimated by averaging the readings of the three TLDs. The measured dose amounts to the people were compared with the recommendations of international commitions. According to the results obtained in this study, the amounts of dose received by the caregivers were between 0.03 and 0.38 mSv, with the average of 0.12 mSv. By comparison of the results of this study with the recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), it can be observed that the dose to family members of the patients is less than the dose constraints. However, it is recommended that the caregivers be aware of the radiation protection principles in order to reduce their dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Measurement of the dose to the family members taking care of thyroid cancer patients undergoing I-131 therapy in nuclear medicine using TLD-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabian, M.; Dehghan, N.; Danaei Ghazanfarkhani, M.; Haghighatafshar, M.; Sina, S.

    2017-01-01

    The family members or friends of the patients undergoing treatment using radioiodine in nuclear medicine are inevitably exposed to ionization radiation. The purpose of this study is measurement of the dose received by the people taking care of the thyroid cancer patients treated by "1"3"1I. For this purpose, the dose amounts received by 29 people accompanying patients were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters. A badge containing three TLD-100 chips was given to each caregiver. The people were asked to wear the badges for 24 days, when they are taking care of the patients. Finally the dose to each person was estimated by averaging the readings of the three TLDs. The measured dose amounts to the people were compared with the recommendations of international commissions. According to the results obtained in this study, the amounts of dose received by the caregivers were between 0.03 and 0.38 mSv, with the average of 0.12 mSv. By comparison of the results of this study with the recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), it can be observed that the dose to family members of the patients is less than the dose constraints. However, it is recommended that the caregivers be aware of the radiation protection principles in order to reduce their dose. (authors)

  16. Tc-99m imaging in thyroidectomized differentiated thyroid cancer patients immediately before I-131 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Jung; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Shen, Daniel Hueng-Yuan; Kuo, Shou Jen; Wang, Lien-Yen; Lee, Chiang-Hsuan; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chang, Ming-Che; Huang, Wen-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical role of technetium-99m pertechnetate (Tc-99m) imaging in thyroidectomized differentiated thyroid cancer patients immediately before radioiodine-131 (I-131) treatment (Tx). Eighty-six consecutive post-total-thyroidectomy patients (15 men, 71 women; mean age: 46.8 years) with pathologically diagnosed differentiated thyroid cancer were retrospectively studied. Tc-99m imaging immediately before I-131 Tx using both patient-based and lesion-based measurements were analyzed and were further compared with those of post-Tx I-131 whole-body scans. For patients with unequivocally positive Tc-99m uptake, the sensitivity was 77% (patient-based) and 59% (site-based). The positive predictive value (PPV) was 100% for both patient-based and site-based measurements. If equivocal Tc-99m uptake was counted as positive, the sensitivity was 83 and 67%, and the PPV was 100 and 99% for patient-based and site-based measurements, respectively. (a) To increase sensitivity yet maintaining high PPV, equivocal Tc-99m uptake should be considered a positive finding. (b) The nearly 100% PPV of Tc-99m imaging immediately before I-131 Tx for remnant detection suggests that Tc-99m imaging not only serves as an alternative to low-dose I-131 scanning in the low-risk post-thyroidectomy patients but also provides a clue for the subsequent I-131 therapeutic dosage and even for the outcome prediction.

  17. Post-laryngectomy localization of I-131 at tracheostomy site on a total body scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, G.A.; Schulz, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    A post-thyroidectomy, post-I-131-therapy patient had a laryngectomy and neck dissection for recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma. A subsequent I-131 total body scan revealed persistent anterior neck activity, which disappeared upon removal of the tracheostomy tube and dressings

  18. Lithium as an adjunct to radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease for prolonging the intrathyroidal effective half-life of radioiodine. Useful or not?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Kuenstner, H.; Nabavi, E.; Eberlein, U.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentrum fuer Radiologie

    2006-07-01

    Aim: Evaluation of intrathyroidal kinetics of radioiodine with and without lithium as adjunct with respect to the increase in radiation dose delivered to the thyroid. Patients, methods: 267 patients in three groups were included in the study. Group I with 227 patients served as control group, Group II with 21 patients and Group III with 19 patients were distinguished by an intrathyroidal half-life of radioiodine below 3.5 days in the diagnostic test. Patients in Group III received 885 mg lithium carbonate a day for 2 weeks as adjunct to radioiodine therapy. Both diagnostic and therapeutic radioiodine kinetics were followed up by at least 10 uptake measurements within a minimum of 48 h. Kinetics of radioiodine were defined mathematically as balance of the thyroidal iodine intake and excretion by a two-compartment model. Results: Under therapy the maximum uptake of radioiodine was reduced by nearly 10% in all groups, in Group I, the effective half-life as well as the product of maximum uptake x effective half-life as an equivalent of radiation dose independent of thyroid volume was lowered in the same magnitude. In Group II, the energy-dose equivalent remained constant under therapy. With adjunct lithium in Group III, the effective half-life was prolonged significantly by factor 1.61{+-}0.49 and the volume-independent energy-dose equivalent by factor 1.39{+-}0.37. No severe side effects of lithium were observed. Conclusion: Using lithium as adjunct to radio-iodine therapy increases the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid by 39% on average and nearly 30% of radioiodine activity can be saved in these patients. Lithium is recommended in patients with very short effective half-life in the diagnostic test in order to reduce the activity required and whole-body radiation dose. (orig.)

  19. I131-meta-iodobenzylguanidine in the diagnosis and treatment of neural crest tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Hartog Jager, F.C.A. den; Taal, B.G.; Engelsman, E.; Kraker, J. de; Voute, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Iodine-131-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (I-131-MIBG) was used for scintigraphic detection and therapy of neural crest tumours. The methodology of both techniques is described. Based upon experience with I-131-MIBG-scintigraphy in 170 patients with neural crest tumours, of whom 46 received multiple therapeutic doses of I-131-MIBG, and upon the cumulative reports in the literature, the role of I-131-MIBG in diagnosis and treatment of each of these diseases is indicated. I-131-MIBG-scintigraphy is one of the most sensitive and specific techniques for the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of phaeochromocytoma and neuroblastoma and I-131-MIBG-therapy may induce remission in a number of these patients. In carcinoid and medullary thyroid carcinoma the diagnostic sensitivity is less; however, once the diagnosis has been made, it is useful to establish that the tumour concentrates I-131-MIBG, to see if the patients at some point in time may be amenable to I-131-MIBG-therapy

  20. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy; Morbus Basedow und Autonomie - Radioiodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2002-04-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [German] In dem vorliegenden Beitrag wird ueber die Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen referiert. Dies betrifft gesetzliche Regelungen in Deutschland, grundlegende Ueberlegungen zur Therapie benigner Schilddruesenerkrankungen, die Diskussion konservative versus definitive Therapieindikation der Hyperthyreose und schliesslich die Themenkomplexe Vorbereitung, Durchfuehrung, Ergebnisse, Nebenwirkungen und Komplikationen, Kosten sowie Nachsorge der Radioiodtherapie. Im Vordergrund steht die Abgrenzung der konservativen Therapieindikation gegenueber der primaeren Radioiodtherapie des Morbus Basedow in Deutschland. Waehrend in den USA 70-90% der Morbus-Basedow-Faelle primaer mit Radioiodtherapie behandelt werden, wird in Deutschland bei 90% zunaechst ein

  1. Influence of preceding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendl, J.; Boerner, W.

    1991-01-01

    Before and until 3 weeks after application of nonionic CA iodine and the 20-min-technetium-thyroid-uptake was measured in serum and urine in 23 euthyroid patients, which were given intravenously nonionic CA during heart catheterization. Concerning the possible influence of iodine contamination on a subsequent radioiodine therapy the following aspects result from the study: the time interval between application of CA and therapy has to be at least 4-6 weeks to avoid dilution of the radioiodine by iodine being released from the contrast agents. The thyroid-uptake of Technetium or Iodine after administration of CA is not constant over time but reaches its original value only in a gradual way (60% of the initial value 3 weeks after the CA were given); that means, the iodine-uptake during, radioiodine therapy can be higher than it was at the time the dose was calculated. Concerning the possible influence of preceding therapeutic procedures on the therapy with radioiodine the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs plays the most important role. Antithyroid drugs of the thiourylene group have been shown by many study groups to have a radioprotective effect. Other large studies however could not demonstrate any effect of antithyroid medication on the results of radioiodine therapy. All studies so far existing have in common that they are not strongly randomized with regard to the patient groups, because generally only in severe cases of hyperthyroidism additional antithyroid drug treatment has been employed, therefore it might be the case that the radioprotective effect of antithyroid drugs may be caused only by selection artifacts. The contradictory results of the different studies justify the practical way in so far as there are no reasonable objections against the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs to restore euthyroidism before starting the therapy with radioiodine. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Cost-effectiveness-analysis: radioiodine or antithyroid drugs as first-line therapy of hyperthyroidism due to Graves` disease; Kosten-Effektivitaets-Analyse: Radioiod oder thyreostatische Medikation bei der Primaerbehandlung der Immunhyperthyreose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Dederichs, B.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Hunsche, E.; Lauterbach, K.W. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Gesundheitsoekonomie, Medizin und Gesellschaft

    1999-06-01

    Aim: As first-line therapy of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves` disease antithyroid drugs are favoured in Europe, while radioiodine therapy is favoured in the USA. Radioiodine therapy has become more economic in Germany since the new recommendations by the Federal German Radiation Protection Committee (SSK) for patient discharge guidelines. Method: Sensitivity analyses took into account the long-term relapse rate of conservative or radioiodine therapy, use of diagnostic tests, level of health insurance, drops in productivity and a discount factor. Costing models included the costs of follow-up care over 30 years. The costs of the hospitalisation for radioiodine therapy were calculated for 300 patients, discharged with 250 MBq I-131 residual activity. Result: Antithyroid drugs were considered cost-effective when they achieved relapse rate of 50% or less, a cut in the number of tests needed and reduced working hours. Failure to meet any one of these conditions makes primary radioiodine therapy more cost-effective in 1593 of 1944 calculated costing models. Repeated conservative therapies will increase clearly the overall costs. Conclusion: Radioiodine is a cost-effective, first-line therapy in patients with a special risk of relapse after primary conservative therapy (goitre, younger patient, persistent elevated TSH-receptor-antibodies or Tc-uptake). (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Die Erstmanifestation einer Immunhyperthyreose wird in Europa ueberwiegend thyreostatisch, in den USA mehrheitlich mit Radioiod definitiv behandelt. Diese beiden Alternativen wurden auf dem Hintergrund neuer nationaler Entlassungsrichtwerte nach einer Radioiodtherapie (RITh) verglichen. Methode: Aus Sicht der Gesellschaft entscheiden einerseits die langfristigen Rezidivraten, andererseits die Menge medizinischer Leistungen, der Versicherungsstatus und der Produktivitaetsausfall des Patienten (Fehlzeiten, Einkommen) sowie die zeitliche Verteilung der Kosten (Diskontierung) ueber die Kosten

  3. Strategies of radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET Center Klagenfurt, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-08-01

    Several therapeutic options are available for the treatment of Graves' disease (GD), including long-term antithyroid drug medication (ATD), near-total resection (NTR) and radioiodine therapy (RIT). These treatments are used with different frequencies depending on geographical location, size of the goitre, age of the patient and experience of the physician. It should be noted that RIT is still being applied more frequently in the United States than in Europe. Despite the fact that RIT was introduced as long ago as 1941, several questions are still the subject of debate: Should a fixed dose or a calculated dose be used. If the dose is calculated, how many Grays (Gy) should be delivered to the thyroid? What is the goal of RIT in GD? Which factors, including ATD, influence the outcome of RIT? Is RIT appropriate in GD with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO)? Although not all these questions have been answered yet, conclusions can be derived regarding a general strategy for use of RIT in GD. As with surgery, the goal of RIT in GD is euthyroidism with or without L-thyroxine medication. There is a clear advantage of dose calculation over use of a fixed dose because the only factor influencing the outcome is the dose delivered to a certain thyroid volume. To minimise recurrent hyperthyroidism, an ablative approach using a delivered dose of 250 Gy is widely accepted. Beside pretherapeutic T{sub 3} levels, thyroid volume and 24-h thyroid uptake, ATD may influence the outcome of RIT. Today it is accepted by most thyroidologists that, if ATD medication is necessary in overt hyperthyroidism, it should be withdrawn at least 2 days before RIT. In patients with GD and GO, RIT may worsen GO. If RIT is performed in GO it should be done under a 3-month steroid medication regimen. In conclusion, RIT can be considered an appropriate and cost-effective therapy in GD, although the decision regarding treatment should be taken on an individual basis, paying due respect to the course and

  4. Radioiodine therapy in toxic multinodular goiter- the influence of carbimazole therapy and dietary iodine on relapse rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Muthu, G.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The relapse rate of radioiodine therapy in toxic multinodular goiter (TMNG) is reported to be around 34% at one year. The effect of antithyroid drugs on the response rate is controversial with studies reporting a higher relapse rate in patients pretreated with antithyroid drugs. Other studies report no influence of pretreatment with antithyroid drugs. The thyroid clinic at Tata Main Hospital is a referral center for thyroid disorders in Jamshedpur. 63 patients of TMNG (Group A) were treated with Radioiodine between 1995-2003. The demographic profile of these patients was as follows: M/F- 38%: 62%, 76% of patients were above 40 years, 85% had been on anti-thyroid drugs for more than 18 months. Fixed dose radioiodine in an oral dose varying from 5-10 mCi was given in all patients of Group A. 32.4 % of patients continued to be toxic or relapsed after a period of euthyroid status within 1 year of Radioiodine therapy. A change in protocol for radioiodine therapy was introduced in 2003. This included withdrawal of antithyroid drugs for one month before radioiodine therapy and the use of noniodized salt and abstinence from seafood in diet during this period. 33 TMN Goiter patients (Group B) followed this protocol before receiving Radioiodine. The dose of Radioiodine remained 5-10 mCi. The age and sex profile of Group A and B were comparable. However, Group B patients had been on antithyroid drugs for a shorter period (p< 0.001). The dose of Radioiodine in 94% of Group B patients was between 7-10mCi, whereas this was 63.4% in Group A. The rest of the patients had received a dose between 5-7 mCi. The relapse rate in Group B was 9.1% compared to 32.4% in Group A. Improvement in response rates with increase in Radioiodine dose remains controversial.P PThe better response rate in Group B patients may be attributed to the withdrawal of antithyroid drugs for one month before therapy and the reduction in dietary intake of Iodine for a month before therapy. However, a

  5. The role of multikinase inhibitors target therapy in radioiodine-resistant differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P O Rumyantsev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available About 5-15% of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC primary or within follow-up have had distant metastases or inoperable tumor mass that are resistant to radioiodine therapy as well as dramatically deteriorate survival prognosis. Other treatment modalities (radiotherapy, chemotherapy etc. also ineffective. Certain expectances are associated with target therapy with multikinase inhibitors with are selectively blocking onco-kinase molecular pathways. This review is devoted to analysis of those multikinase inhibitors which have been implemented in patients with radioiodine DTC. Comparative analysis of two most perspective multikinase inhibitors (sorafenib and lenvatinib with evaluation of efficacy and adverse effects was conducted. Both of them successfully underwent 3 rd phase of clinical trial and were recommended as treatment of choice in progressive radioiodine-resistant DTC patients.

  6. Radioiodine therapy in non-toxic multinodular goitre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, S.R.; Rahman, H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The effect of radioiodine in the treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre has not been adequately evaluated. The aim of the study was to see the effect of radioiodine on thyroid size and function in patients with non-toxic multinodular goitre. We prospectively studied 55 non-toxic multinodular goitre patients treated with radioiodine of which 15 were males and 40 were females with age ranged from 25 years to 60 years (mean ± SD 40.45 ± 10.70 years) for a minimum of 12 months. Patients who were selected were those with local compression symptoms or for cosmetic reasons and the treatment was chosen because of a high operative risk or refusal to be operated on. Thyroid volume and T3, T4, TSH of all patients were determined before treatment and 6 months interval after treatment. Radioiodine was given in the dose ranged from 333 MBq (9 mCi) to 555 MBq (15 mCi) (mean ± SD 11.45 ± 2.04 mCi). The mean thyroid volume was reduced from 44.75 ± 37.44 ml to 28.76 ± 27.25 ml at 12 months (p < 0.001) i.e., reduced by 35.73%. Thyroid volume reduction at 6 months was 21.07%. Hypothyroidism occurred in 9.1% of the patients at 12 months. Side effects were few. Three cases developed radiation thyroiditis and two cases developed hyperthyroidism that was managed conservatively. It has been concluded that radioiodine is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre and may be the treatment of choice in elderly patients, in patients in whom surgery is contraindicated and in patients who are unwilling to undergo surgery. (author)

  7. Radioiodine treatment for complicated hyperthyroidism using a fixed dose regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.K.; Rahman, S.H.; Ansari, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Hyperthyroidism in the elderly and all those with cardiovascular and psychiatric problem has increased mortality and morbidity rate. These patients need special care to cure the disease promptly and permanently for avoidance of complications. Radioactive I-131 is one of the accepted forms of treatment for hyperthyroidism and increasingly being considered for the patients in whom rapid and permanent control of disease is desirable. To evaluate the success of I-131 to cure disease in-patients with complicated hyperthyroidism, we prospectively studied the outcome of radioiodine therapy using a fixed dose regime. Ninety-three patients with toxic diffuse goitre (65 female, 28 male) age ranging from 29-67 years (mean ? SD 41.35 ? 11.02 years) were evaluated. The subjects included 71 cases with cardiovascular problem, 13 elderly patients, 5 with poor drug compliance and 4 with associated psychiatric disease. The individual was excluded from the study who had autonomous toxic nodule. Every patient was pre-treated with antithyroid drugs for 4 weeks and the drug was discontinued for 3 days before administering I-131. No patients had post-treatment antithyroid drugs. All the patients were treated with a fixed oral dose of 15 mCi I-131 sodium iodide. Post-treatment follow-up examinations were done at 6 weeks without biochemical tests, at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 1 year and then annually with biochemical tests. Patients were classified as cured if the biochemical status was either euthyroid or hypothyroid at one year without further treatment by antithyroid drugs or radioiodine. Of the 93 cases, 82 patients became euthyroid or hypothyroid requiring no further treatment for hyperthyroidism with an overall cure of 88.17%. Hypothyroidism was developed in 49 (52.69%) patients at one year of whom 39 became hypothyroid within 6 months and another 10 patients within 1 year. 4 patients were subclinical hyperthyroid at 6 months and still hyperthyroid at 9 months. 7

  8. The results of the radioiodine-therapy of benign thyroid diseases respecting the applied radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, C.

    1994-09-01

    452 patients with benign thyroid diseases had been explored after 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, 5 years and 10 years after undergone radioiodine treatment retrospectively with regard to the applied radiation dose. A relevant relation between the radiation dose and the rate of hypothyroidism could only be proved as a tendency. Treating hyperthyroidism with radioiodine, the rates of hypothyroidism after therapy were not caused by significantly higher radiation doses. Therefore suggestions to change the used radiation-doses basically cannot be made. The applied doses of radiation are sufficient to achieve a rather satisfactory effect in healing hyperthyroidism. Cases of malignancy after radioiodine therapy could not be found in this population. The effective half-life determination before therapy can be neglected, because there was found a significant difference between the pre-therapeutically estimated half-life and the post-therapeutically measured effective half-life of radioiodine. Instead, fixed values of effective half-life should be used for each group of benign thyroid diseases. The radiation therapy still seems to be an efficient treatment to cure benign thyroid diseases with rare side effects. It also can be applied to patients below the age of 40. Generally it is an alternative to drug-therapy or surgery, always considering the individual relation between gain and risk. In this respect good results can be obtained and a relapse of hyperthyroidism is hardly to expect. (author)

  9. Current opinions on the radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy using I-131 for hyperthyroidism has been used for more than 50 years, and generally considered safe and devoid of major side effects. Appropriate patient selection criteria and clinical judgement concerning patient preparation should be employed for its optimal use. It has not been possible to resolve the trade-off between efficient definite cure of hyperthyroidism and the high incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The dose of the I-131 needed to maintain euthyroid state remains an area of uncertainty and debate. Early side effects are uncommon and readily manageable. Other than the need for long-term monitoring and, in most cases, lifelong thyroid hormone treatment for late adverse consequences of this treatment remains only conjectural. We have reviewed general principles and recent advances in radioiodine treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism, specially regarding to several controversies

  10. Low Dose I-131 MIBG therapy as an adjunct for bone pain palliation in pediatric patients with end-stage neuroblastoma: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual, Thomas; Herbert, Anthony; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Objective: This study describes the initial experience in the use of low-dose 1-131 MIBG in patients with metastaticl refractory Neuroblastoma given at 18.5 Mbql Kg (0.5 mCi/Kg )to (1) achieve disease palliation (i.e., pain I symptom control) and improvement in the quality of life, through subjective response from patient/carers and (2) allow day-admission to minimize hospital stay providing more quality time between the patients and carers. Methods: Patients with refractory and metastatic Neuroblastoma whose primary treatment goal at that particular stage is pain palliation were given low-dose 1-131 M IBG at a dose of 18.5 Mbql Kg ( 0.5 mCil Kg)l. Assessment of subjective pain relief following 1-131 MIBG was done through interviews from hospital visits of the patient and home visits by the team. Results: Four patients underwent Low-Dose 1-131 MIBG Therapy for pain palliation between May 2007- March 2008. Median age was 5.75 years old and median total dose given was 539 Mbql patient (14.5 mCil patient). All patients at a cenain time had relief from disease pain allowing them to communicate with family and participate in physical activities not priyiledged before. Observations gathered from carersl parents revealed that the overall quality-of-life improved after the 1-131 MIBG therapy with concurrent pain medication protocol. Conclusion: This initial I pilot study described achievement of disease palliation (i.e., pain and symptom control) and improvement in the quality of life of Stage IV Neuroblastoma patients and allows day-admissions providing more quality time between the patient and the family and reduces patient anxiety.

  11. Treatment of Graves' disease with I131: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Povis, J.E.; Sandoval Okuma, J.C.; Contreras Carreno, S.E.; Cabello Morales, E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the response and complications in children and teenagers suffering Graves' disease who received radioactive iodine therapy. Material and Methods: The clinical records of the patients attended at Paediatric Endocrinology Unit of Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia who received therapy with I 131 were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, thyroid weight, radioactive iodine uptake, I 131 dose and clinical and thyroid function evolution were registered. Results: We include thirteen patients: 1 male and 12 females. The mean thyroid weight obtained was 47.56 ± 10.70 gr. Initial calculated dose was 3.92 ± 0.95 mCi, with a total dose of 4.47 ± 1.66 mCi, and mean following period of 2.76 years. Ten patients received only one dose, 2 patients received two doses and one patient received three doses; all cases remitted. Patients who received only 1 dose showed disease remission at 13.13 weeks and mean remission period of the population was 24.62 weeks. Hypothyroidism prevalence up to six months from initiating treatment was 66.66%, and up to 257 weeks 83.33%. Conclusions: We conclude that I 131 was 100% effective in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering Graves' disease in this small series. (author)

  12. Risk factors for persistent atrial fibrillation following successful hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Hu; Ma, Long-Le; Wang, Le-Xin

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the predicting factors for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism. Standard 12-lead ECG and 24-h Holter monitoring were performed in 94 patients (38 males, mean age 46.1±8.2 years) with persistent AF following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism. Left ventricular (LV) function was assessed with two-dimensional echocardiography. Euthyroidism or hypothyroidism was achieved in 81% and 19% of the patients, respectively, after radioiodine therapy. At the end of follow-up (1.6±1.3 years), LV ejection fraction in the 52 patients with LV dysfunction was increased from 39.3±3.3% to 59.0±5.5% (ptreatment paroxysmal AF, no AF was documented during the follow-up. In the 45 patients with pre-treatment persistent AF, AF was found in 27 (60%) during the follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that more than 55 years old in age (RR 2.76, 95% CI: 1.16-8.79, phyperthyroidism (RR 3.08, 95% CI: 1.22-11.41, ptreatment atrial fibrillation (RR 2.96, 95% CI: 1.31-7.68, phyperthyroidism and pre-treatment duration of AF are risk factors for persistent AF following radioiodine therapy.

  13. A randomized trial evaluating a block-replacement regimen during radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2010 ABSTRACT: Background  Lack of consensus regarding the antithyroid drug regimen in relation to radioiodine ((131) I) therapy of hyperthyroidism prompted this randomized trial comparing two strategies. Design  Patients with Graves' disease (GD, n = 51) or toxic nodular goitre...

  14. Acute changes of peripheral thyroid hormone concentrations and serum thyroglobulin during radio-iodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, K.R.; Steinbaecher, M.; Heilig, B.

    1986-01-01

    TT3, FT3 and FT4 concentrations were measured in 28 patients with hyperthyroidism before and during therapy with radioiodine. In addition, in some patients serum thyroglobulin was evaluated, too. Only in the patients with immunogenic hyperthyroidism FT3, FT4 and serum TG were elevated significantly within the first two days after radioiodine application. In the residual patients with diffuse autonomy, autonomous adenoma, and multifocal autonomy during the whole time of investigation there was no significant increase of the respective values. From these data it can be deducted that hyperthyroid storm is more likely to be provoked in patients with immunogenic hyperthyroidism compared to thyroidal autonomy. (orig.) [de

  15. Improvement of dosimetry for I-131 therapy of lung metastases with special regard to children with thyroid cancer from Belarus following the Chernobyl accident. Final report 1997-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, M.; Reiners, C.; Allen, S.

    2000-01-01

    The main problem in treating disseminated pulmonary metastases in children with papillary thyroid cancer is to find a balance between an insufficient dose for the ablation of metastatic tissue and unnecessary high radiation exposure to the lungs and the bone marrow. This can hardly be achieved without quantitative dosimetry for the more or less inhomogeneously distributed 1-131 in high dosed radioiodine therapy. The major goal of this project is to improve the concept for treating patients with lung metastases induced by thyroid carcinoma. Almost all of the patients with lung metastases are treated in more than one therapy course. After each course the knowledge of the doses to the tumor tissue, the lung, and the bone marrow is of crucial importance for a well funded decision about further treatment. In the cases of either the tumor doses being inefficient for ablation or substantial impairment of residuing pulmonary metastases or the cumulated doses to lung and bone marrow exceeds empirically defined ''critical'' limits the fractionated radioiodine treatment has to be stopped to avoid side effects such as lung fibrosis or leukemia in patients with papillary thyroid cancer. The decision which has to be taken must consider that prognosis with respect to mortality and quality of life even in the case of persisting lung metastases may be better than after the induction of progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Up to now, patients are treated more or less empirically until complete remission is achieved and no tumor uptake is visible in post-therapeutic scans with a gamma camera or the cumulative activity of 1-131 taken up by the lungs exceeds 3 GBq (80 mCi) according to recommendations given by Benua and Leaper in 1962. This project combines empirical approaches with theoretical research at cellular level to optimize the dose to the tumor cells with protection of healthy lung tissue. (orig.)

  16. Outcome of radioiodine therapy without, on or 3 days off carbimazole: a prospective interventional three-group comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Martin A.; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Mueller, Beat; Schindler, Christian; Mueller-Brand, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Carbimazole ameliorates hyperthyroidism but reduces radioiodine uptake and adversely affects the outcome of simultaneous radioiodine therapy. We explored whether withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days can restore the outcome of radioiodine treatment without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. By generating three groups with comparable radioiodine uptake, we also investigated whether the effect of carbimazole depends on the radioiodine uptake. Stratified by a radioiodine uptake >30%, 227 consecutive adult patients were prospectively assigned to radioiodine therapy (target dose 200 Gy) without, on or 3 days off carbimazole. Patients were clinically (Crooks-Wayne score) and biochemically (T 3 , fT 4 , TSH) followed up after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint was outcome 12 months after radioiodine therapy. A total of 207 patients completed follow-up (toxic nodular goitre, n=117; Graves' disease, n=90). The overall success rate was 71.5%. Patients without and 3 days off carbimazole had similar biochemical (81.4% and 83.3%, respectively; p=0.82) and clinical outcomes [median (range) Crooks-Wayne score 0 (0-16) and 1 (0-10), respectively; p=0.73], which were both higher than in patients on carbimazole [42.6%, p 4 , T 3 and TSH. (orig.)

  17. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemsen, U.F.; Knesewitsch, P.; Kreisig, T.; Pickardt, C.R.; Kirsch, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  18. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemsen, U.F. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Knesewitsch, P. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Kreisig, T. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Pickardt, C.R. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Muenchen Univ. (Germany)); Kirsch, C.M. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  19. Outcome of radioiodine therapy without, on or 3 days off carbimazole: a prospective interventional three-group comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Martin A. [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); University Hospital Basel, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Mueller, Beat [University Hospital Basel, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Basel (Switzerland); Schindler, Christian [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland)

    2006-06-15

    Carbimazole ameliorates hyperthyroidism but reduces radioiodine uptake and adversely affects the outcome of simultaneous radioiodine therapy. We explored whether withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days can restore the outcome of radioiodine treatment without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. By generating three groups with comparable radioiodine uptake, we also investigated whether the effect of carbimazole depends on the radioiodine uptake. Stratified by a radioiodine uptake >30%, 227 consecutive adult patients were prospectively assigned to radioiodine therapy (target dose 200 Gy) without, on or 3 days off carbimazole. Patients were clinically (Crooks-Wayne score) and biochemically (T{sub 3}, fT{sub 4}, TSH) followed up after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint was outcome 12 months after radioiodine therapy. A total of 207 patients completed follow-up (toxic nodular goitre, n=117; Graves' disease, n=90). The overall success rate was 71.5%. Patients without and 3 days off carbimazole had similar biochemical (81.4% and 83.3%, respectively; p=0.82) and clinical outcomes [median (range) Crooks-Wayne score 0 (0-16) and 1 (0-10), respectively; p=0.73], which were both higher than in patients on carbimazole [42.6%, p<0.001; Crooks-Wayne score 3 (0-30), p<0.03]. Time to achieve cure was delayed on carbimazole. No changes in thyroid hormone levels occurred after 3 days' discontinuation of carbimazole. Logistic regression revealed that all observed cure rates were independent of entity, sex, age, thyroid volume, radioiodine uptake, radioiodine half-life, fT{sub 4}, T{sub 3} and TSH. (orig.)

  20. Use of corticosteroids to prevent progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Bogazzi, F.; Panicucci, M.; Lepri, A.; Pinchera, A. (Univ. of Pisa (Italy))

    1989-11-16

    We studied the effects of radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease on Graves' ophthalmopathy and the possible protective role of corticosteroids. Between June 1985 and June 1988, 26 patients were randomly assigned to treatment with radioiodine alone (group 1) and 26 to treatment with this agent and concomitant administration of systemic prednisone for four months (group 2). The initial dose of prednisone was 0.4 to 0.5 mg per kilogram of body weight for one month; the drug was gradually withdrawn over the next three months. All patients were evaluated at 3-month intervals for 18 months after they underwent radioiodine therapy. Ocular changes were assessed with the ophthalmopathy index; patients with moderate-to-severe changes (scores greater than or equal to 4) were excluded from the study. Before treatment, 10 patients in group 1 and 5 in group 2 had no evidence of ophthalmopathy: in none of them did ocular symptoms appear after radioiodine therapy. Among the patients in group 1 with an initial ophthalmopathy index greater than or equal to 1, ocular disease worsened in 56 percent (mostly involving soft-tissue changes and extraocular-muscle function) and did not change in 44 percent. In contrast, ophthalmopathy improved in 52 percent and did not change in 48 percent of group 2. The mean ophthalmopathy index increased from 1.5 to 3.0 in group 1 (P less than 0.005) and decreased from 2.2 to 1.3 in group 2 (P less than 0.05). We conclude that systemic corticosteroid treatment prevents the exacerbations of Graves' ophthalmopathy that occur after radioiodine therapy in a substantial proportion of patients with hyperthyroidism who have some degree of ocular involvement before treatment.

  1. Use of corticosteroids to prevent progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Bogazzi, F.; Panicucci, M.; Lepri, A.; Pinchera, A.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the effects of radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease on Graves' ophthalmopathy and the possible protective role of corticosteroids. Between June 1985 and June 1988, 26 patients were randomly assigned to treatment with radioiodine alone (group 1) and 26 to treatment with this agent and concomitant administration of systemic prednisone for four months (group 2). The initial dose of prednisone was 0.4 to 0.5 mg per kilogram of body weight for one month; the drug was gradually withdrawn over the next three months. All patients were evaluated at 3-month intervals for 18 months after they underwent radioiodine therapy. Ocular changes were assessed with the ophthalmopathy index; patients with moderate-to-severe changes (scores greater than or equal to 4) were excluded from the study. Before treatment, 10 patients in group 1 and 5 in group 2 had no evidence of ophthalmopathy: in none of them did ocular symptoms appear after radioiodine therapy. Among the patients in group 1 with an initial ophthalmopathy index greater than or equal to 1, ocular disease worsened in 56 percent (mostly involving soft-tissue changes and extraocular-muscle function) and did not change in 44 percent. In contrast, ophthalmopathy improved in 52 percent and did not change in 48 percent of group 2. The mean ophthalmopathy index increased from 1.5 to 3.0 in group 1 (P less than 0.005) and decreased from 2.2 to 1.3 in group 2 (P less than 0.05). We conclude that systemic corticosteroid treatment prevents the exacerbations of Graves' ophthalmopathy that occur after radioiodine therapy in a substantial proportion of patients with hyperthyroidism who have some degree of ocular involvement before treatment

  2. Radioiodine therapy within the German DRG-system 2005; Die Radioiodtherapie im DRG-System 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany); Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    With introduction of a diagnosis-related groups system (DRG-system) in Germany the previous duration of stay based refunding is also replaced for the radioiodine therapies by a performance oriented reimbursement system. Since the at first optional start of the DRG-system in 2003 the adaptations which take place every year should lead, up to the planned end of the convergence phase in 2009, to a transparent, fair and economical financing system of the stationary hospital service. The physician is responsible for the right and complete coding of the diagnoses and procedures, which serve as essential parameters for the determination of the diagnosis related group (DRG) of a hospital case. In the actual version of the year 2005 the DRG-system still supplies for radioiodine therapy of thyroid carcinoma some unclarity in the coding of the diagnosis, as well as clear inadequacy with the fair mapping of the therapy costs. (orig.)

  3. Radioiodine Therapy Does Not Change the Atherosclerotic Burden of the Carotid Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2016-01-01

    of cerebrovascular events has been reported after radioiodine therapy. This study aimed to examine whether atherosclerosis develops early or late after radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease. METHOD: Patients treated for benign thyroid disorders (nontoxic goiter, adenoma, and hyperthyroidism) were examined...... effects, there was no difference in CIMT (p = 0.25) or presence of plaques (p = 0.70) between those treated with radioactive iodine and those treated with surgery (9.8 and 5.6 years since treatment, respectively). Furthermore, the level of thyrotropin (TSH) did not influence these atherosclerosis markers....... CONCLUSION: No early changes in CIMT were detected in patients treated with radioactive iodine for benign thyroid disease. No signs of late effects of radioactive iodine on CIMT or plaque presence were found after 10 years of follow-up. The radiation to the carotid arteries by radioactive iodine therapy...

  4. Influence of low- and high-dose radioiodine therapy on oxidative modification of fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweeger-Exeli, I.J.

    2001-10-01

    Fibrinogen plays a central role in the course of thrombosis and hemostasis. It is soluble in blood and tissue extracts and transformed into the insoluble fibrin network structure in the presence of thrombin. Fibrinogen in circulating blood consists of a population of slightly different molecules with a half-life of 3.5-4.5 days. Various environmental conditions may cause different types of modifications of the molecule leading to a different functional behavior. Introduction of carbonyl groups in amino acid side chains is known as a marker for protein oxidation. Radioiodine therapy, applied in patients suffering from hyperthyroidism or differentiated thyroid carcinoma, may cause an oxidative modification of fibrinogen by formation of free radicals in blood exposed to the radioactive agent 131I. The topic of my thesis was i. to develop a simple and not time consuming method for isolation of fibrinogen from small volumes of human plasma (∼ 6ml), ii. to assess, whether radioiodine therapy causes detectable introduction of carbonyl groups into the fibrinogen molecule, and iii. to analyze an association between thyroid hormone function, fibrinogen levels and protein oxidation by means of carbonyl content. Purification of fibrinogen from human plasma was possible by three different methods (ammonium sulphate/ethanol; glycine/ethanol; glycine). Plasma levels of fibrinogen (Clauss method) and protein carbonyl group content (2,4-DNPH - assay) were determined before and after radioiodine therapy. The results demonstrate a significant increase (p = 0.05) in carbonyl content of human fibrinogen in cancer patients treated with 131I. However, in patients with diagnosed hyperthyroidism values were not significantly altered. In carcinoma patients, baseline fT4 levels and the relative increase in carbonyl content of fibrinogen after radioiodine therapy were correlated (r = 0.83; p 0.005), whereas no such correlation was found in patients with hyperthyroidism. Plasma fibrinogen

  5. Effect of radioiodine therapy on pulmonary metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yongli; Jin Changqing; Chen Libo; Lu Hankui; Zhu Ruisen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate effect of radioiodine therapy on pulmonary metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods: Fifty-eight cases of pulmonary metastases were studied utilizing chest X-ray, pulmonary function test and 99 Tc m -DTPA aerosol clearance examination. Results: The data of pulmonary function test were of no difference between groups of various radiation doses cumulation (P > 0.05). The differences of vital capacity (VC), fast vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ) were not remarkable between the two groups of male or female patients (P > 0.05), but the difference of maximal volume ventilation (MVV) was P 99 Tc m -DTPA aerosol clearance rates between various groups were of no difference (P > 0.05). Only for one female, 43 years old who had received an accumulative dose of 51.8 GBq radioiodine over an 8-yr period, her pulmonary function test showed evidence of restrictive lung disease, chest X-ray showed haziness and DTPA half-time clearance was 26.4 min, which is suggestive of interstitial fibrosis. Conclusion: The cumulative dose of radioiodine and gender of the patients had not statistically significant effects on the pulmonary function. Interstitial fibrosis must be carefully watched when the cumulative radioiodine dose is over 37 GBq

  6. The Effect of High Dose Radioiodine Therapy on Formation of Radiation Retinopathy During Thyroid Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kaçar Güvel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-thyroidal complication of high-dose radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma might cause salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, which may be transient or permanent in a dose-dependent manner. However, radiation retinopathy complicating 131I therapy, has not been previously well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of retinal damage among patients who had received high doses of radioiodine treatment. Methods: Forty eyes of 20 patients (3 male, 17 female who received 250-1000 mCi during 131I therapy and on ophthalmological follow up for a year after the last treatment were included in the study. Mean age of the study group was 50 years (range 25-70 years. In ophthalmologic examination, visual acuity was measured in order to determine visual loss. Intraocular pressure was measured in all the patients. Then lens examination was carried out with slit lamp biomicroscopy in order to investigate cataract or partial lens opacities. Fundus observation was carried out through the dilated pupil with slit lamp biomicroscopy using 90 D noncontact lens. Result: The best corrected visual aquity with Snellen chart was found as 1.0 in 36 eyes (90% and between 0.6 and 0.9 (10% in 4 eyes (10%. At the biomicroscopic fundus examination, retinal hemorrhage consistent with radiation retinopathy, microaneurysm, microinfarction, edema or exudation, vitreus hemorrhage, partial or total optical disc pallor indicating papillopathy in the optic disc were not observed in any of the eyes. Conclusion: This result indicates that there is not any significant correlation between repeated high-dose radioiodine therapy and radiation retinopathy in differentiated thyroid carcinomas. Even though there is not a significant restriction in use of higher doses of radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma, more extensive studies are needed in order to obtain more accurate data on possible occurrence of retinopathy.

  7. Combination of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation and radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid disease. A 3-month follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkusuz, H.; Happel, C.; Koch, D.A.; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2016-01-15

    Pilot studies of combined therapies treating benign nodular goiters reported promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of combined microwave ablation (MWA) and radioiodine therapy (RIT) with a special focus on thyroid function at the 3-month follow-up. 15 patients (median age: 55 years) with a large goiter and benign thyroid nodules or Graves' disease were treated with the combined therapy. Serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), thyroglobuline (Tg) and, additionally, antibody levels against thyroglobulin (TgAb), thyrotropin receptors (TRAb) and thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) were measured at enrollment, post MWA and at the 3-month follow-up (3MFU). Furthermore, the goiter volume, I-131 dose and hospitalization time were analyzed to evaluate effectiveness. MWA was operated under local anesthesia with a system working in a wavelength field of 902 to 928 MHz. TSH, T4, T3 and Tg did not change at 3MFU, except for in two patients in whom the initial TSH levels improved to normal thyroid functioning levels at follow-up. One of the patients developed a high TRAb-level that receded back into the normal range. At 3MFU, the combined therapy showed a mean thyroid volume reduction of 26.4 ml ± 7.9 ml (30.5 % ± 4.6 % (p < 0.05)). By utilizing the combined therapy, administered activity could be reduced by 26.6 % ± 4.8 % (p < 0.05) and hospitalization time by 30.9 % ± 19.9 % (p < 0.05). The data confirmed the effectiveness of the combination of MWA with RIT. The combined therapy is an innovative and conservative approach and could become a safe alternative to surgery for the treatment of very large benign nodular goiters. Due to the short follow-up and the limited number of patients, further studies will be necessary.

  8. Radioiodine (1-131) Dose for the Treatment of Hyperthyroidism in Rajavithi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuanrakcharoen, Pichit

    2016-02-01

    The main cause of hyperthyroidism is diffuse toxic goiter (Graves' disease), and the treatment of choice after medical therapy failure is radioiodine (I-131). There are two common methods of determining the optimal I-131 dose: calculated dose or fixed dose. The calculated dose method is based on the following formula: 75-200 microcuri/gram of thyroid gland divided by the percentage of radioiodine uptake at 24 hours (24-hour RAIU). As this is quite complex, some centers use fixed doses, such as 5, 10 or 15 mCi because it is simpler. At Rajavithi Hospital, the applied dose of I-131 is determined based on the thyroid gland weight assessed by palpation and other clinical factors. To study the mean I-131 dose for the initial treatment of hyperthyroidism in Rajavithi Hospital, to find the clinical factors that correlate with I-131 treatment dose, and to devise a formula to predict the optimal I-131 treatment dose. This was a retrospective study of 510 patients with a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism who received initial I-131 treatment at the Department of Nuclear Medicine in Rajavithi Hospital between January 2014 and June 2015. Baseline characteristics including age, sex, age at diagnosis, duration of antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy, gland weight (g), 3-hour RAIU and I-131 treatment dose were reviewed from medical records. The mean age ± SD was 41.93 ± 14.11 years (range 14-81 years), and the male to female ratio was 4.1:1. The mean duration of ATD therapy was 3.54 ± 4.02 years (min-max, 0.8-40.6 years). The mean gland weight was 54.35 ± 32.95 grams, and the mean 3-hour RAIU was 55.5 ± 23.69%. The mean I-131 treatment dose was 14.84 ± 5.71 mCi (min-max, 7-30 mCi). There was no significant correlation between dose and age, age at diagnosis, duration of A TD therapy or 3-hour RAIU. The study showed a significant correlation between I-131 dose and gland size, r = 0.938 (p treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism after medical therapy failure, and there are various

  9. Radioiodine therapy in veterinary medicine: treatment of hyperthyroidism in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinartz, P.; Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U.

    1999-01-01

    A nine-year-old cat with symptoms of a distinct hyperthyroidism was presented at the University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen. The clinical symptoms as well as the diagnostic procedures performed at the hospital confirmed the diagnosis. After five weeks of thyreostatic medication a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland was established, followed by a radioiodine therapy with 70.3 MBq 131-iodine. Subsequently, the cat was hospitalized for two days before it could be released in good condition. Six weeks after treatment the former drastically reduced weight of the cat recovered to near normal. Even though the chemical analysis detected a discrete hyperthyroidism, clinical symptoms were no longer prominent. Three months after treatment, the final examination showed a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland without a specific thyroidal medication. The presented case illustrates that radioiodine therapy is a safe and efficient treatment of thyroidal dysfunctions in veterinary medicine. (orig.) [de

  10. Close contact dose: a radioiodine therapy case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchyna, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: External radiation dose rates were measured immediately post administration and periodically thereafter at 0.3 and 1.0 m from a patient who received a 555 MBq therapeutic dose of I-131. The dose received by the partner during the close contact period of sleep was measured with an anthropomorphic RANDO phantom representing a standard man with ICRP60 organs critical for dosimetry. RANDO occupied the same bed as the patient at a skin to skin distance of 30 cm with up to 30 TLD rods (1 x 1 x 6mm, LiF:Mg) inserted at critical organ positions within the phantom. The measurements were compared with empirical estimates provided by the Close Contact Dose Spreadsheet (Cormack and Shearer, 1998). The measured external dose rate of 19.3microSv/hr obtained immediately post administration rose slightly, to 26.3microSv/hr during the first 12 hours, however subsequently demonstrated a slow decrease. The TLDs embed- ded in RANDO recorded a dose of 0.24mSv during the hours of sleep. The total dose received by the partner over the two days was 0.29mSv, which compared favourably with a figure of 0.31mSv obtained by the Close Contact Dose Spreadsheet. The doses received demonstrate the validity of restricting patient partner contact during the hours of sleep within the first few days post administration. Monitoring of the bedroom, bed linen, bathroom, toilet and personal effects showed slight levels of contamination ranging from background to 20 cps. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  11. Thyroid volume reduction following radioiodine therapy in patients with autonomous goitre and Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, B.; Otte, R.; Klink, J.E.; Schicha, H.

    1996-01-01

    Aim: It is well known that radioiodine therapy (RITh) leads to a significant thyroid volume reduction (TVR). But until now only little data has been presented due to the course of time and the extent of TVR. Method: Therefore the data of 33 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 36 patients with multifocal (MAG) and 31 with solitary (SAG) autonomous goitre were analyzed retrospectively. Results: All the patients showed a highly significant (p [de

  12. Use of recombinant, human TSH radioiodine therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma; Radioiodtherapie des differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinoms nach Vorbehandlung mit rekombinantem, humanem TSH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-12-01

    We describe the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) in conjunction with ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in 11 patients (16 total treatments) with advanced and/or recurrent DTC (5 papillary, 6 follicular) for whom withdrawal of thyroid hormone suppressive therapy (THST) to increase serum TSH was not an option. Indications for rhTSH use in these patients included inability to tolerate withdrawal of thyroid hormones due to poor physical condition or inability to achieve sufficient serum TSH levels after THST withdrawal. All patients had undergone thyroidectomy and most (9/11) had received prior radioablative therapy after THST withdrawal. In 7 cases (5 patients), post-therapy Tg levels assessed at a mean of 4.3 months (range 2-10 months) after I-131 therapy were decreased by at least 30% compared to pre-therapy levels. In an additional 3 patients, whole body scans performed at follow-up indicated decreased or stabilized tumor burden compared to pre-therapy scans or marked clinical improvement was found. Three patients died of progressive disease within 2 months of therapy before follow-up assessments occurred. No adverse events were reported among the 8 surviving patients. The results suggest that rhTSH offers a promising alternative to THST withdrawal to allow radioablative therapy under maximal TSH stimulation in patients with advanced recurrent DTC who would not otherwise be able to receive this treatment. This therapeutic indication extends the clinical potential of the new agent, already demonstrated to be effective for use with I-131 for diagnostic purposes. However in some patients suffering from highly aggressive tumors the poor prognosis will not be improved. (orig.) [German] An unserer Klinik liegen bislang Erfahrungen mit 16 Radioiodtherapien (RIT) (z.T. mehrfache Anwendung) unter rhTSH vor. Die ueberwiegende Mehrzahl der Patienten wurde wegen einer fortgeschrittenen Tumorerkrankung mit dem Risiko einer lebensbedrohlichen Verschlechterung in

  13. The Effect of Radioiodine on the Intima Media Thickness of the Carotid Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Sürücü

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The radiation can induce vessel injury. The result of this injury can be severe and life-threatening. There are a few studies demonstrating an increase in intima-media thickness (IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA after radiotherapy, especially in head and neck cancers. We evaluated the effect of I-131 to the IMT of the CCA in the patients who were treated for hyperthyroidism. Methods: 38 patients (25M, 13W referred to our department for radioiodine treatment with the diagnosis of nodular goitre (25 patients and diffuse hyperplasia (Graves disease (GD, 13 patients were included to the prospective study. An USG was performed for all the patients before therapy, 3, 6 and 12 months after radioiodine therapy in order to measure IMT of CCA and the femoral artery (FA. The IMT was measured at the level of proximal part of bulbus anteriorly on the left and right side. The IMT of FA was measured just before the bifurcation. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in IMT of both CCA and FA bilaterally in nodular hyperthyroid patients. However, in the patients with Graves disease, there was only statistically significant increase in the left IMT of CCA at 0-3rd, 0-6th month measurements and in the right IMT of FA at 0-3rd month measurements. Conclusion: Though the limitation of the study is the interobserver and intraobserver variability, it was seen that I-131 therapy might affect the IMT of CCA in the patients with NG. I-131 effect on the IMT of CCA in patients with nodular goitre was higher than the IMT of CCA in patients with GD. I-131 effect on the IMT of CCA might be due to administered dose and adjacency. The interesting point of our study was the increased thickness of IMT in FA. We think that the increase in IMT is due to the systemic effect of radioactivity circulating in the blood vessel. I-131 effect on the IMT of FA in patients with nodular goitre was higher than the IMT of FA in the patients with GD due to I-131 uptake

  14. Recent advances in radioiodine use for the management of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: It has been well accepted that radioiodine is useful in the management of patients with recurrent or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer. Although radioiodine has been used for more than 60 years in diagnosis and treatment, some improvements still appear continuously. Serum Thyroglobulin (Tg) and radioiodine whole body scans (WBS) are used to detect recurrent thyroid caner. Tg has been known to be more sensitive than WBS, and false negative WBS with elevated Tg are frequently found. However, the clinical importance of Tg negative cases with positive WBS has not been clarified. We found that 34 among 960 patients who showed negative Tg with positive post-therapy I-131 WBS had functioning metastases to extrathyroidal organs. Complementary use of radioiodine WBS is recommended to exclude Tg false negative cases. The retinoic acid (RA) is well known to induce the cellular re-differentiation and increase the expression of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) in de-differentiated tumor cell. We performed RA treatment with I-131 in 40 patients with elevated serum Tg level but no focal iodine uptake in WBS. In 14 patients (35%), improved I-131 uptake was seen. Focal iodine uptakes were seen in 4 patients, and diffuse hepatic visualization without localized lesions were found in 10 patients. Maximal safe dose (MSD) administration based on bone marrow radiation allows the delivery of a large amount of I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue within the safety margin. We performed MSD therapy in 46 patients with differentiated thyroid cancers, which had persisted even after conventional fixed dose therapy. MSD was calculated according to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center protocol using blood samples. Mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq (337.3±37.5 mCi). Of the 46 patients, 6 (13.0%) showed complete remission, 15 (32.6%) partial response, 19 stable disease, and 6 disease progression. Twenty-nine patients (63%) had a transient cytopenia after therapy. MSD therapy of

  15. [Results of radioiodine therapy in different forms of hyperthyroidism in relation to the planned dosage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, E

    1992-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of radioiodine therapy (131J) in a large group (n = 925) of hyperthyroid patients treated at two major departments of nuclear medicine (Freiburg, abbr. FR, and Munich, abbr. M). 761 patients suffered from non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism (Plummer's disease) and the remaining 164 patients from immunogenic hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). In these cases, radioiodine therapy using doses between 60 and 80 Gy proved ineffective, FR (80 Gy) recording 28% success and M (60 Gy) 54%. A dose of 150 Gy, however, is successful in more than 80% of the cases: FR 81%, M86%. However, the incidence rate of hypothyroidism increases consecutively with 150 Gy: FR 49%, M 62%. In patients suffering from Plummer's disease, the solitary autonomous nodule can be eliminated by radioiodine therapy (400 Gy) with a high rate of success (95%); the same applies to multinodular autonomous adenomas. The therapeutic concept applying a dose of 400 Gy to the total functional autonomous tissue (delineated by ultrasound) yields slightly better results (95%) than 150 Gy applied to thyroid gland (M88%, FR82%). This dosimetric compromise is a practicable alternative which is tolerably successful. In patients suffering from disseminated non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism, a dose of 150 Gy applied to the entire organ succeeds in 85% of the cases. The rate of hypothyroidism resulting from these dose recommendations is the lesser evil compared to residual or recurrent hyperthyroidism, since hypothyroid patients can be treated without any problem with thyroid hormones.

  16. Effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in treatment of hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M N; Chakrabarty, R K; Akhter, M; Nahar, N; Swapan, M K; Alam, M M; Nahar, R; Sultana, N; Hallaz, M M; Alam, M M; Uddin, M M; Hossain, M A; Yasmin, S; Islam, M R

    2013-10-01

    The present non randomized clinical trial was conducted in the Center for Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Mymensingh, Bangladesh for duration of one year. Total 30 patients with hyperthyroidism diagnosed by clinical and biochemical profile were included in the study. All patients received radioiodine treatment and regular follow up at 1st month, 3rd month, 6th month & 9th month were done to evaluate clinical and biochemical status and complications. Data were analyzed by computer with SPSS programme using 't' test and chi-square test. In the present study, out of 30 respondents more than three fourth of the respondents (76.6%) were in the age group of 31-50 years followed by less than 30 years are group (16.7%) and rest of respondents were in the age group of more than 50 years (06.7%). Mean±SD and range of age of the respondents were 39.80±10.02 years and 17-65 years respectively. Among the 30 respondents 11(36.7%) were male and 19(63.3%) were female. Male to female ratio was 1:1.73. Out of 30 patients 26(86.7%) presented with goiter and among them 21(80.8%) has diffused goiter and five (19.2%) had nodular goiter. Baseline mean±SD, median, range of serum T₃ level were 5.24±3.62, 4.34, 1.48-14.65nmol/L respectively. Base line mean±SD, median range of serum T₄ level were 192.25±99.17, 201.77, 1.75-336.25nmol/L respectively. Baseline mean±SD, median range of serum TSH level were 6.33±23.93, 0.15-0.07, 130.46nmol/L respectively. In the present study serum T₃, T₄ level among the respondents sharply decrease from baseline to 2nd follow up then gradually decrease from 2nd to 4th follow up. Serum TSH level gradually increases from baseline to 3rd follow up and then gradually decreases from 3rd to 4th follow up. The result showed radioiodine is an effective option for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis.

  17. Dosimetry in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. Background and practice; Dosimetrie bei Radioiodtherapie benigner Schilddruesenerkrankungen. Hintergrund und Durchfuehrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockisch, A.; Sonnenschein, W.; Jentzen, W.; Hartung, V.; Goerges, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2008-09-15

    Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases (focal = [toxic adenoma], multifocal, disseminated autonomy, Grave's disease or clinical relevant goitre) needs to be and can be performed individually for each patient. Most frequently a radioiodine test is performed applying a small activity of iodine-131 ({sup 131}I). The paper discusses some protocols for pre- or posttherapeutic dosimetry and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. All are based on the volumetry of the target tissue as well as the radioiodine kinetics in the target volume what may be represented by maximum uptake and half life of iodine retention in the thyroid. Possible disturbances and measuring uncertainties of these parameters are presented and discussed. In spite of the discussed uncertainties in dosimetry, due to its high therapeutic width radioiodine therapy is a very successful procedure to cure hyperthyroidism or to reduce goitre volume with only little side effects. (orig.)

  18. Investigation of early DNA damage after radioiodine therapy in patients with thyroid cancer using the gamma-H2AX focus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlein, U.; Lassmann, M.; Bluemel, C.; Buck, A.K.; Nowak, C.; Meineke, V.; Scherthan, H.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objectives: the Aim of the study is to investigate the DNA damage formation in blood lymphocytes and the correlation to the absorbed dose to the blood in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) after their first radionuclide therapy with I-131 as measured by the induction, persistence and decay behaviour of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 DNA damage-induced foci. Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) cause in their vicinity the formation of microscopically visible foci of the phospho-histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) and the 53BP1 protein that binds to and signals damaged chromatin at the DSB site. Nuclear foci containing both markers thus represent radiation-induced DSBs. Methods: we investigated 19 patients with DTC during the first treatment with 3.5±0.3 GBq I-131. Between 7 and 10 sequential peripheral blood samples (at least four within the first 5 hours) were taken before and between 0.5 h and 144 h post administration. The physical dosimetry procedures were performed according to the EANM DTC SOP. White blood cells were recovered by density centrifugation in CPT tubes (BD Biosciences) and subjected to two-colour immunofluorescence staining. The average frequencies of the radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci/nucleus that co localized with 53BP1 foci were derived from immuno-stained mononuclear peripheral blood lymphocyte samples. The number of foci was counted manually using a red/green double band pass filter (Chroma) in a Zeiss microscope by an experienced observer. Results: The mean I-131 absorbed dose to the blood was (0.04±0.01) Gy at t=2 h, (0.07±0.02) Gy at t=4 h, and (0.21±0.05) Gy at t=24 h, respectively. The mean value of the total absorbed dose to the blood was (0.36±0.08) Gy. The highest number of radiation-induced foci per nucleus (RIF) and per absorbed dose (median: 8.8 RIF/Gy, range 3.1-10.9 RIF/Gy) was observed in the first three hours post administration. Four hours after radioiodine administration the number

  19. Long-term impairment of the lacrimal glands after radioiodine therapy: a cross-sectional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zettinig, Georg; Fueger, Barbara J.; Pirich, Christian; Dudczak, Robert; Hanselmayer, Georg; Nepp, Johannes; Hofmann, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Impairment of the lacrimal glands after external radiation has been well documented, but there are only a few reports on the effects of radioiodine therapy on the lacrimal glands. Long-term effects of high-dose radioiodine therapy on tear secretion have not previously been studied. We investigated 175 eyes of 88 patients with a history of radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma (68 females, 20 males; mean age 55±16 years, range 17-81 years) and compared them with a sex- and age-matched control group (n=39). All patients had been given at least 2.96 GBq iodine-131 (maximal administered activity 22.3 GBq 131 I). An ophthalmological investigation was performed 64±71 months (range 3-317 months) after initial radioiodine therapy by a single ophthalmologist. Lacrimal gland function was evaluated with three different function tests. External eye morphology was considered, and detailed ophthalmological history-taking was performed. Patients with factors known to affect lacrimal gland function (contact lenses, autoimmune disorders, history of additional radiation exposure) were excluded from the study. A total of 81 patients (92%) had at least one abnormal function test indicating impaired lacrimal gland function. Schirmer's tear test was decreased (<10 mm/5 min) in 47 of the 88 patients and definitely abnormal (<5 mm/5 min) in 35 patients. A tear film break-up time of <10 s was found in 78 patients, and 62 patients had a definitely abnormal break-up time of <5 s. The lacrimal lipid layer was impaired in 43 patients. The function tests were all significantly altered in the study group as compared with the controls (P<0.005, P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively). Both subjective symptoms of dry eye (P<0.01) and changes in the external eye morphology (P<0.001) were significantly more prevalent in the study group. Our findings suggest that in the majority of patients, lacrimal gland function may be permanently impaired after high-dose radioiodine therapy. All three layers of the

  20. A mathematical model of optimized radioiodine-131 therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Suhail AR; Loutfi, Issa; Al-Shoumer, Kamal AS

    2001-01-01

    The current status of radioiodine-131 (RaI) dosimetry for Graves' hyperthyroidism is not clear. Recurrent hyperthyroidism and iatrogenic hypothyroidism are two problems which interact such that trying to solve one leads to exacerbation of the other. Optimized RaI therapy has therefore begun to be defined just in terms of early hypothyroidism (ablative therapy) as physicians have given up on reducing hypothyroidism. Optimized therapy is evaluated both in terms of the greatest separation of cure rate from hypothyroidism rate (non-ablative therapy) or in terms of early hypothyroidism (ablative therapy) by mathematical modeling of outcome after radioiodine and critically discussing the three common methods of RaI dosing for Graves' disease. Cure follows a logarithmic relationship to activity administered or absorbed dose, while hypothyroidism follows a linear relationship. The effect of including or omitting factors in the calculation of the administered I–131 activity such as the measured thyroid uptake and effective half-life of RaI or giving extra compensation for gland size is discussed. Very little benefit can be gained by employing complicated methods of RaI dose selection for non-ablative therapy since the standard activity model shows the best potential for cure and prolonged euthyroidism. For ablative therapy, a standard MBq/g dosing provides the best outcome in terms of cure and early hypothyroidism

  1. New Molecular Targeted Therapy and Redifferentiation Therapy for Radioiodine-Refractory Advanced Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Pun Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of papillary thyroid carcinoma could be successfully managed by complete surgical resection alone or resection followed by radioiodine ablation, a small proportion of patients may develop radioiodine-refractory progressive disease which is not amenable to surgery, local ablative treatment or other treatment modalities. The use of FDG-PET/CT scan for persistent/recurrent disease has improved the accuracy of restaging as well as cancer prognostication. Given that patients with RAI-refractory disease tend to do significantly worse than those with radioiodine-avid or non-progressive disease, an increasing number of phase I and II studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of new molecular targeted drugs such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and redifferentiation drugs. The overall response rate of these drugs ranged between 0–53%, depending on whether the patients had been previously treated with these drugs, performance status and extent of disease. However, drug toxicity remains a major concern in administration of target therapies. Nevertheless, there are also ongoing phase III studies evaluating the efficacy of these new drugs. The aim of the review was to summarize and discuss the results of these targeted drugs and redifferentiation agents for patients with progressive, radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  2. Antithyroid drugs as a factor influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease and toxic nodular goitre?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerber, C.; Schneider, P.; Koerber-Hafner, N.; Haenscheid, H.; Reiners, C.

    2001-01-01

    There is controversy over the factors that may influence the outcome of radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases. Antithyroid medication has been claimed to negatively influence the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease. In a longitudinal study, we assessed the influence of sex, age, antithyroid drugs, target radiation dose, target mass, applied activity, delivered dose, interval between last meal and application, and TSH, FT 3 and FT 4 levels on the outcome of radioiodine therapy. One hundred and forty-four patients (111 female, 33 male) suffering from Graves' disease (GD) and 563 patients (434 female, 129 male) with toxic nodular goitre (TNG) were entered in the study and followed up until 8 months after therapy. Treatment was defined as successful when the TSH level was found to be normal or elevated. Ninety-eight GD patients and 418 TNG patients were successfully treated. Forward stepwise multiple regression analysis models retained only the target mass in GD and the applied activity in TNG as significantly associated with the outcome of therapy. The predictive value of all variables involved was extremely low in both disease groups. Whereas concomitant antithyroid medication had no influence in GD, it adversely influenced radioiodine therapy of TNG. This effect may be attributed to a radioiodine ''steal phenomenon'' induced by TSH-stimulated normal thyroid tissue, which causes overestimation of the uptake in toxic nodules. (orig.)

  3. Antithyroid drugs as a factor influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease and toxic nodular goitre?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerber, C.; Schneider, P.; Koerber-Hafner, N.; Haenscheid, H.; Reiners, C. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-09-01

    There is controversy over the factors that may influence the outcome of radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases. Antithyroid medication has been claimed to negatively influence the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease. In a longitudinal study, we assessed the influence of sex, age, antithyroid drugs, target radiation dose, target mass, applied activity, delivered dose, interval between last meal and application, and TSH, FT{sub 3} and FT{sub 4} levels on the outcome of radioiodine therapy. One hundred and forty-four patients (111 female, 33 male) suffering from Graves' disease (GD) and 563 patients (434 female, 129 male) with toxic nodular goitre (TNG) were entered in the study and followed up until 8 months after therapy. Treatment was defined as successful when the TSH level was found to be normal or elevated. Ninety-eight GD patients and 418 TNG patients were successfully treated. Forward stepwise multiple regression analysis models retained only the target mass in GD and the applied activity in TNG as significantly associated with the outcome of therapy. The predictive value of all variables involved was extremely low in both disease groups. Whereas concomitant antithyroid medication had no influence in GD, it adversely influenced radioiodine therapy of TNG. This effect may be attributed to a radioiodine ''steal phenomenon'' induced by TSH-stimulated normal thyroid tissue, which causes overestimation of the uptake in toxic nodules. (orig.)

  4. Pretreatment with betamethasone of patients with Graves' disease given radioiodine therapy: thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamstedt, A.; Karlsson, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of betamethasone on thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of radioiodine therapy were determined over a period of 1 yr in a prospective randomized study of 40 patients with Graves' disease. Twenty patients were given placebo tablets, and 20 patients were treated with betamethasone from 3 weeks before until 4 weeks after 131 I therapy. At the time of inclusion in the study, the mean serum concentrations of TSH receptor antibodies, thyroid peroxidase antibodies, and thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) were increased in both groups. Three weeks of treatment with betamethasone reduced the thyroid peroxidase antibody and TgAb titers as well as the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. A decrease in the TSH receptor antibody level was not statistically significant. After radioiodine therapy, transient increases in thyroid autoantibody levels were observed. The titers of the different antibodies generally changed in parallel. In some patients a detectable level of a given antibody was found only after the radioiodine treatment, and in two cases, TgAb did not appear at all, although the two other antibodies increased temporarily. Betamethasone delayed, but did not abolish, the 131 I-induced antibody peaks. Betamethasone also caused a reduction in the total serum immunoglobulin G, a reduction which persisted throughout the study period. When the study ended, 17 patients given placebo and 9 patients given betamethasone were receiving replacement therapy due to the development of hypothyroidism. These patients at this point in time had lower antibody levels than those not requiring T4. The results of this study demonstrate that betamethasone reduces and modifies the thyroid autoantibody responses as well as the outcome of radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease

  5. Three-year follow-up of 500 patients with Graves' disease after radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghui; Jin Xiaona; Luo Yaping; Li Fang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of early hypothyroidism and factors affecting the treatment effect of radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease (GD) at 3 years after treatment. Methods: Five hundred cases of GD were retrospectively studied. The mean age was (39.3±12.6) y, with a female to male ratio of 5 : 1. Data including symptoms, signs, blood tests, radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU), effective half-life, radioiodine doses, remission rates and hypothyroidism incidences were collected. Early hypothyroidism was also recorded. Student's t-test, χ 2 test and logistic regression were performed. Results: Three months after radioiodine therapy, the remission rate of GD was 63.8% (319/500). The hypothyroidism incidence was 36.6% (183/500). Six months after radioiodine therapy, the remission rate was 67.8% (339/500). The hypothyroidism incidence was 43.4% (217/500). Nine months after radioiodine therapy, the remission rate was 70.0% (350/500). The hypothyroidism incidence was 39.4% (197/500). One year after radioiodine therapy, the remission rate was 72.6% (363/500). The hypothyroidism incidence was 38.2% (191/500). Two years after radioiodine therapy, the remission rate was 79.6% (398/500). The hypothyroidism incidence was 40.8% (204/500). Three years after radioiodine therapy, the remission rate was 90.8% (454/500). The hypothyroidism incidence was 46.0% (230/500). Eighty-four cases were retreated (16.8%) due to treatment failure. Early hypothyroidism occurred in 260 cases. Among them, seventy cases were rendered euthyroid (26.9%). One hundred and seventy-eight cases still persisted in hypothyroidism while twelve cases relapsed during the second and third year. One hundred and ninety-two cases achieved euthyroidism and two hundred cases became hypothyroid three years after treatment. They were classified as a success group. The retreated eighty-four cases were classified as a failure group. ATD therapy (χ 2 =16.758, P<0.01), TRAb (t=-2.074, P=0

  6. Synthetic prevention and treatment for hypothyroidism after radioiodine therapy hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shiyun

    2004-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is main complication after 131 I therapy for hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease. The hypothyroidism restricts its popular application that 131 I treatment for Graves' disease. In clinic practice, different factors of every patient, involved case selection, sensitivity estimation, unite using medicine before 131 I therapy are analysed, and synthetic measures for posttreatment examination, transient hypothyroidism and permanent hypothyroidism after 131 I therapy are discussed

  7. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the choice of thyreostatic medication?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe, C.; Weber, I.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: this study was performed to analyse the impact of the choice of antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the outcome of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease. Patients, material, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months after RIT between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were the confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of ATD two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose of 250 Gy was calculated from the results of the radioiodine test and the therapeutically achieved dose was measured by serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months offer RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The pretreatment ATD was retrospectively correlated with the results achieved. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients. 472 patients were treated with carbimazole or methimazole (CMI) and 61 with propylthiouracil (PTU). 38 patients had no thyrostatic drugs (ND) prior to RIT. The success rate was equal in all groups (CMI 451/472; PTU 61/61; ND 37/38; p = 0.22). Conclusion: thyrostatic treatment with PTU achieves excellent results in ablative RIT, using an accurate dosimetric approach with an achieved post-therapeutic dose of more than 200 Gy. (orig.)

  8. Radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism - changing pattern of management over three decades at INMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi Shankar, L.; Prakash, R.; Sharma, S.K.; Khanna, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Iodine-131 therapy is a relatively simple effective and economical method of treating hyperthyroidism. Even fifty years after the introduction of radioactive iodine, there is no concensus on the approach for selection of the dose for treatment of hyperthyroidism. Since the last three decades, the approach for radioiodine therapy at this Institute has been to treat with low, fractionated doses to produce partial destruction of the thyroid gland leaving the patient sufficient functioning gland for normal hormone production. New in vitro diagnostic techniques including free T 3 , T 4 and sensitive TSH assay have been introduced over the past decade for the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism. Changes in the thyroid radioactive iodine uptake in the population due to introduction of iodized salt, and the high incidence of persistent hyperthyroidism after low dose radioiodine therapy have prompted to go for a proportionate increase in the 131 I original dose schedules based on goitre grades. This has led to a nominal increase in the incidence of post therapy hypothyroidism. However the basic principle of low, fractionated dose therapy is still being followed at this Institute, which appears suitable for social and economic conditions in India. (author). 19 refs., 2 tabs

  9. Radiopharmaceutical potential of I-131 labelled diazepam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurt, F.; Unek, P.; Asikoglu, M.; Baggi, S.; Erener, G.; Ozkilic, H.; Uluc, F.; Tuglular, I.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, diazepam is a derivative of the 1.4 benzodiazepine family that the most widely used drug as anticonvulsant agent has been labeled with I-131, as a new radiopharmaceutical and its radiopharmaceutical potential has been determined. Labeling of diazepam has been performed by iodogen method and optimum labeling conditions have been determined. Optimum reaction conditions are 1 mg for iodogen amount; 1-5 mg for diazepam amount, 15-20 minutes for reaction time and room temperature for reaction temperature. Specific activity of labeled compound was 0,15 Ci/mmol level. N-octanol/water ratio was found 1.9 for 131 IDZ ( 131 I labeled diazepam). In vivo experiments have been carried out to determine radiopharmaceutical potentials of labeled compound. Biodistribution studies on rats showed that 131 IDZ have accumulated in kidneys, liver, lungs and brain tissues. Scintigraphic results taken with gamma camera on rabbits agree with biodistribution results of rats. (author)

  10. Influencing factors of radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiehua; Zhang Zikang; Cheng Muhua; Wu Chunxing; Wang Ping; Shan Hong

    2007-01-01

    The study was to evaluate factors affecting outcome of 131 I therapy in hyperthyroidism for optimizing the method. Data from 213 patients who received 131 I treatment from July 2003 to July 2005 in our department were retrospectively analyzed. Factors possibly contributing to the outcome of the 1311 therapy were analyzed, including gender, age, history of antithyroid drag, thyroid volume, duration of disease and radioactive iodine uptake rate. Multivariate analysis was done. The rates of euthyroidism and hypothyroidism were 69% and 8.5%, respectively, after one time 131 I therapy. Multivariate analysis of the patients showed no statistically significant factors affecting the outcome of 131 I therapy. The study showed that 131 I dose can be directly calculated, and this simplifies the dose-determined method and individualizes the therapy. (authors)

  11. A 30-year perspective on radioiodine therapy of benign nontoxic multinodular goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    rate of permanent hypothyroidism, whereas other side-effects are very modest when using a rhTSH dose of 0.1 mg or below. SUMMARY: RhTSH-stimulated radioiodine therapy of benign nontoxic multinodular goiter is still an off-label use but several trials have shown that this treatment is significantly more......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is no consensus on the ideal treatment of patients with a benign nontoxic multinodular goiter. In some European countries, (131)I therapy has replaced surgery as the treatment of choice in these patients. Recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) is a very potent stimulator...... of the thyroid gland and this review focuses on rhTSH-stimulated (131)I therapy. RECENT FINDINGS: The concept of rhTSH-stimulated (131)I therapy has been tested in several trials during the last 8 years. With this treatment, the goiter reduction is improved by 35-55%, compared with (131)I therapy without rh...

  12. Current opinions on the radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy using I-131 for hyperthyroidism has been used for more than 50 years, and generally considered safe and devoid of major side effects. Appropriate patient selection criteria and clinical judgement concerning patient preparation should be employed for its optimal use. It has not been possible to resolve the trade-off between efficient definite cure of hyperthyroidism and the high incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The dose of the I-131 needed to maintain euthyroid state remains an area of uncertainty and debate. Early side effects are uncommon and readily manageable. Other than the need for long-term monitoring and, in most cases, lifelong thyroid hormone treatment for late adverse consequences of this treatment remains only conjectural. We have reviewed general principles and recent advances in radioiodine treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism, specially regarding to several controversies.

  13. The role of radioiodine therapy in benign nodular goitre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Fast, Søren; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    For treatment of benign nodular goitre the choice usually stands between surgery and (131)I therapy. (131)I therapy, used for 30 years for this condition, leads to a goitre volume reduction of 35-50% within 1-2 years. However, this treatment has limited efficacy if the thyroid (131)I uptake is low...... for additional therapy due to insufficient goitre reduction, but the price is a higher rate of hypothyroidism. Another approach with rhTSH-stimulation is to reduce the administered (131)I activity by a factor that equals the increase in the thyroid (131)I uptake. Using this approach, radiation exposure...

  14. Radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer: AIIMS experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.; Nair, P.G.G.; ); Bal, C.S.; Pant, G.S.; Basu, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    After a slow start in late sixties, the procedure of 131 I therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC) has gained increasing popularity with every passing year at All India Institute of Medical Sciences. This has become an integral part of TC management at AIIMS like at most other centres all over the world. There is a general consensus that near total thyroidectomy along with 131 I therapy and suppressive doses of thyroid hormones provide the best mode of treatment for DTC

  15. Guide-line of the radio-iodine (131I) therapy in Graves' disease and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yutaka; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    2005-01-01

    Radio-iodine ( 131 I) therapy has been using in Graves' disease and well differentiated thyroid cancer. The rules of control in the discharge from radio-isotope hospital were notified in 1999 in Japan. Guideline of the 131 I therapy in Graves' disease and thyroid cancer were prepared by sub-group of Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  16. Post-Irradiation Behaviour of I131 in TeO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaćimović, Lj.; Stevović, J.; Veljković, S.R.

    1965-01-01

    The system I 131 in TeO 2 is interesting because little is known about thermal chemical changes in this target. Radioiodine was produced by neutron irradiation of TeO 2 in the reactor. Irradiated TeO 2 was dissolved in diluted NaOH. The analysis of the iodine valency forms was made by ion exchange techniques. The thermal and radiation stability of TeO 2 was studied by using the spectrophotometric method for the determination of tellurium. Post-irradiation annealing of I 131 in TeO 2 was studied in dependence on the time and temperature of the heating. The main tendency of annealing was the reduction of radioiodine. The time dependence of this process indicates a fast change at high temperatures. The curves are more complex at lower temperatures. The annealing may appear complex because of the variety of thermal reactions of iodine intermediary. It may react with products of the following processes: tellurium recoil and corresponding hot zone, beta transition of Te 131 and TeO 2 itself. The kinetics of these changes was considered and an estimation of the processes during annealing was made. The influence of the neutron flux on the kinetics of annealing was also studied. (author) [fr

  17. Radioiodine therapy induces dose-dependent in-vivo oxidation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinzinger, H.; Resch, U.; Tatzber, F.; Weiss, K.

    2002-01-01

    Until now, radiation hazards as a consequence of radioiodine therapy are not examined in detail. Oxidation of lipoproteins may favour vasculopathy. We studied the influence of a single radioiodine therapy with 5 (n=8; 46-71a), 10 (n=6; 54-75a), 20 (n=11; 45-73a), 80 (n=6; 37-75a) or 200 (n=6; 43-67a) mCi on in-vivo oxidation injury in blood (plasma [P], serum [Se]), urine (U) and saliva (Sa) in patients suffering from hyperthyroidism opr thyroid cancer, respectively. The isoprostane 8-epi-prostaglandin (PG) F 2α as a marker of in-vivo oxidation injury (Sa, Se, P, U), oxidation of lipoproteins (LDL, HDL), thromboxane B2 (Sa, Se, P, U), PGE 2 , PGF 2α and circulating endothelial cells (CEC) were examined before therapy, daily for 7 days and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks. Blood was also analyzed for thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), relative electrophoretic mobility (REM), baseline dienes (BD), endogenous peroxides (POX) and formation of conjugated dienes in copper-mediated oxidation (CD) expressed in lag-time and rate of propagation. There is a dose-dependent increase in 8-epi-PGF 2α being most pronounced in saliva (p 2 and HDL 3 subfractions 24 h after application, but 48 h and 72 h after application there was a significant increase in TBARS, REM, BD, POX and rate of propagation and a decrease in lag-time in HDL-subfractions independently from applied dose. Also HDL 2 showed more TBARS, REM, BD, POX and shorter lag-time than HDL 3 48 h after application, but this effect was reversed 72 h after application. HDL is the lipoprotein most prone to oxidation by radioiodine treatment. Apparently, when LDL becomes oxidized, it shifts metabolically its oxidation products to HDL. These findings show a significant temporary and dose-dependent endothelial desquamation, oxidation of lipoproteins and long-lasting in-vivo oxidation injury (saliva > urine > blood) as side effect of radioiodine therapy, altogether being potentially proatherogenic

  18. Testicular effects of 131radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccarelli, Claudia; Canale, Domenico; Carolina, Caglieresi; Moschini, Cecilia; Grasso, Lucia; Pinchera, Aldo; Vitti, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Little data is available on possible untoward effects of 131 I therapy for hyperthyroidism on gonad male function. FSH, LH, Total Testosterone(T), Inhibin B and spermiogram were evaluated in 15 hyperthyroid males (mean age 38.5+/-6.7 years, m +/- SD) before, and at day 45, month 3, 6 and 12 after 131 I therapy. Mean basal FSH was 5.6 +/- 3.8 mU/ml. After 131 I, FSH remained unchanged in 13 patients. In two, one of whom with basal FSH in the upper normal limits (16.4 mU/ml), a mild increase was observed after therapy. Basal LH and T were in normal range and did not vary significantly after 131 I, but T/LH ratio significantly decreased at month 3 and 6 (basal: 1.34 +/- 0.6; month 3: 0.85 +/- 0.3, p=0.02, month 6: 0.8 +/- 0.1, p= 0.06). Basal Inhibin B values did not vary significantly after 131 I. Basal mean sperm concentration did not differ from that found in a control group of 20 normal men (51.0 +/- 6.9 x 106 E/ml, vs. 57.6 +/- 7.5 x 106 E/ml) and did not vary significantly after 131 I therapy. Sperm progressive motility (SPM) was 39.1+/-4.7 % in hyperthyroid patients and 54.4 +/- 1.8 % in the controls (p=0.02). Ten patients (67%) were asthenospermic (SPM 131 I treatment of hyperthyroidism may account for a marginal and transient damage of Leydig cells, as highlighted by T/LH ratio. The lower SPM and increased theratospermia observed in patients before treatment could be due to hyperthyroidism per se, as suggested by the normalization of SPM in 5/10 patients after therapy. (author)

  19. Treatment with antithyroid drugs or iodine following radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeto, Glaucia; Leal, B.M.B.; Souza, L.S.; Griva, B.L.; Moriguchi, S.M.; Moreira, C.C.; Lemos, A.C.; Kiy, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The effect of radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy in Graves' disease is gradual and the patients continue to be hyperthyroid for much time after this therapy. In a retrospective study, we compared the evolution of 196 patients in this situation treated with some therapeutic regimens. They received propylthiouracil or methimazole (ATD), one of them and potassium iodide (KI), KI only, or no drugs after 131 I therapy. ATD was started usually one day and KI two months after the radioiodine. The groups had similar age, pretreatment serum T 4 concentrations and 131 I treatment dose. Cure of the hyperthyroidism occurred in 83,9%, 75,5%, 75,0% and 70,6% in no-drugs, KI, ATD and KI-ATD groups, respectively. Hyperthyroidism was longer in KI and KI-ATD groups. Definitive hypothyroidism occurred in 39,2%, 47,2%, 52,9% and 66,1% in KI-ATD, KI, ATD and no-drugs groups, respectively. This condition appeared more quickly in no-drugs and ATD groups. Conclusion: We conclude that KI and ATD groups had similar evolutions as to cure of hyperthyroidism and occurrence of hypothyroidism. (author)

  20. Radiation safety procedures in radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajashekharrao, B.; Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    During any administration of radioactive materials, it is imperative to always be conversant with any forbidden radiation health safety practices. This need is amplified when dealing with therapeutic amount of radionuclides. Among all the procedures dealing with the use of radiopharmaceuticals, it is easiest to think of 131 I, since this is the most widely used unsealed source of a radiopharmaceutical for treatment of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism and carries with it most of the problems associated with therapy applications

  1. Patient management in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, J.

    1997-01-01

    Benign thyroid disease ranks by far as the most frequent therapy in nuclear medicine. In Germany approximately 25 000 cases of hyperthyreosis are being treated in association with autonomy or Graves' disease, but also for the reduction of goiters or the correction of latent functional disturbances. In such indications radiotherapy is virtually free of risk as opposed to surgery and ranks more favorable in regard to costs and curative effects versus pharmacological long term treatment. Still regional varying therapeutical concepts and intentions are being pursued and trials of improvements described. There is consent in therapy that quality of treatment is closely linked to a specialized out-door platient preparation, individual hospital activity dosage and lifelong follow up including continued evaluation of therapeutical results. In this paper minimal requirements of outpatient measures before and after therapy are summarized which in Germany is only permitted on an inhospital patient basis. Considering basics of radioactive preventive law, scientific evidence of available results of therapeutical studies and a survey of German therapeutic centers, suggestions for a quality maintaining management in view of the most effective utilization for the limited available number of beds is presented for discussion. (orig.) [de

  2. Radioiodine uptake following iodine-131 therapy for Graves' disease: an early indicator of need for retreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, W.R.; Gilliland, P.F.; Piziak, V.K.; Petty, F.C.; McConnell, B.G.; Verdonk, C.A.; Ibarra, J.D.; Thompson, J.Q.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-five patients with Graves' disease were studied prospectively to determine if 24-hour I-131 uptake measurements alone or in combination with serum thyroid hormone levels at six weeks would determine the necessity for retreatment of the thyrotoxicosis. All patients with an I-131 uptake greater than 30% at six weeks required retreatment. No patient with an I-131 uptake of less than 15% required retreatment. Patients with uptakes between 15% and 30% were variable. An elevated free thyroxin index at 6 weeks is not helpful to determine which patients will remain thyrotoxic. Patients with a free thyroxin index within the normal range at six weeks can be predicted to be euthyroid by 12 weeks if their 24-hour I-131 uptake is between 15% and 30% and to be hypothyroid if their 24-hour I-131 uptake is below 15%. There was no difference between patient groups treated initially with antithyroid medication and those who were not

  3. Radioiodine therapy in management of thyroid carcinoma - A review of 138 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, A.S.; Hossain, S.; Hafiz, N.; Taslima, D.A.; Rashid, H.

    2001-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas are being treated by using a widely accepted protocol of surgery and radioiodine therapy followed by supplementation of thyroid hormones in the Nuclear Medicine Centre (NMC), Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) since 1990. In the present study 138 patients(Male-54, Female-84) with differentiated thyroid cancers received radioiodine therapy for ablation of residual thyroid tissue with a dose of 2.77-3.7 GBq (75-100 mCi), for lymph node metastases 5.55-6.5 GBq(150-175mCi), for lung metastases 5.55 GBq(150 mCi) and for bony metastases 7.4 GBq (200 mCi). Among 138 patients papillary carcinoma was observed in 94 cases (68%; Male-42, Female-52), follicular type was found in 30 cases (22%; Male-8, Female-22) and mixed type in 14 patients (10%, Male-4, Female-10). Single dose of 2.77-3.7 GBq(75-100 mCi) of radioiodine was received by all 138 patients. Among the unablated patients 62 received double doses totalling 9.25 GBq (250 mCi), 44 received three doses 12.95 GBq (350 mCi) and one patient received 8 doses 33.3 GBq (900 mCi). Out of 138 patients single dose ablated 76 cases and 62 remain unablated. Multiple doses ablated 28 patients and 34 still remain unablated and is under follow up. The success and failure in management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer over 8 years period have been discussed here revealing a satisfactory outcome. (author)

  4. In-vivo isotope diagnosis and radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spesshardt, K. (Sankt-Vincentius-Krankenhaeuser, Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.). Radiologische Abt. mit Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin)

    1980-10-15

    In-vivo diagnoses of thyroid diseases can be carried out using /sup 123/I, /sup 131/I, and /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate. For the thyroid scintiscan, /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate or /sup 123/I are used. Some functional parameters can be determined using /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate, but iodine is more accurate, so that thyroid clearance examinations with /sup 123/I are rapidly gaining importance. However, the iodine turnover in the thyroid can only be determined by a several-days' test using /sup 131/I. The available techniques of diagnosis are employed in several steps. Most thyroid diseases can already be diagnosed on the basis of the hormone parameters and a thyroid scan; otherwise, a TRH test and suppression and functional studies will be necessary. Treatment of enthyroid struma is limited to inoperable cases with functional blockage or compression of the trachea. In the treatment of diffuse hyperthyroidism, doses should be exact enough to counteract the hyperthyroid metabolism without inducing hypothyroidism. With exact doses, a second radioiodine therapy will only be necessary in about 40% of all cases. High doses should not be applied in the treatment of hyperthyroidism unless it is a case of excessive clinical hyperthyroid somatics as the risk of hypothyroidism is high. The diagnostic problem of autonomous adenoma is the highly varying hormone activity. The intention of radioiodine therapy here is a functional elimination of the autonomous adenoma. Radioiodine resection is indicated in cases where there are several small autonomous adenomas or where the operability of the patient is limited.

  5. Administration of additional inactive iodide during radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. Who might benefit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Reinholz, U.; Schmidt, M.; Schomaecker, K.; Schicha, H.; Wellner, U.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Graves' hyperthyroidism and antithyroid drugs empty the intrathyroid stores of hormones and iodine. The consequence is rapid 131 I turnover and impending failure of radioiodine therapy. Can administration of additional inactive iodide improve 131I kinetics? Patients, methods: Fifteen consecutive patients, in whom the 48 h post-therapeutically calculated thyroid dose was between 150 and 249 Gy due to an unexpectedly short half-life, received 3 x 200 μg inactive potassium-iodide ( 127 I) daily for 3 days (Group A), while 17 consecutive patients with a thyroid dose of = 250 Gy (Group B) served as the non-iodide group. 48 hours after 131 I administration (M1) and 4 or 5 days later (M2) the following parameters were compared: effective 131 I half-life, thyroid dose, total T3, total T4, 131 I-activity in the T3- and T4-RIAs. Results: In Group A, the effective 131 I half-life M1 before iodine (3.81 ± 0.93 days) was significantly (p 131 I half-life M2 (4.65 ± 0.79 days). Effective 131 I half-life M1 correlated with the benefit from inactive 127 I (r = -0.79): Administration of 127 I was beneficial in patients with an effective 131 I half-life M1 of 131 I activity of T3 and T4 showed lower specific 131 I activity after addition of inactive iodine compared with patients from the same group with a lower initial specific 131 I activity of T3 and T4 and compared with the patient group B who was given no additional inactive iodide. This correlation was mathematically described and reflected in the flatter gradient in Group A (y = 0.5195x + 0.8727 for 131 I T3 and y = 1.0827x - 0.4444 for 131 I T4) and steeper gradient for Group B (y = 0.6998x + 0.5417 for 131 I T3 and y = 1.3191x - 0.2901 for 131 I T4). Radioiodine therapy was successful in all 15 patients from Group A. Conclusion: The administration of 600 μg inactive iodide for three days during radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism and an unexpectedly short half-life of <3 or 4 days was a safe

  6. Diagnostic I-131 scintigraphy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. No additional value of higher scan dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, T.T.H.; Tol, K.M. van; Links, T.P.; Piers, D.A.; Vries, E.G.E. de; Dullaart, R.P.F.; Jager, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    After initial treatment with total thyroidectomy and radio iodine ablation, most follow-up protocols for patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma contain cyclic diagnostic I-131 imaging and serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurements. The applied diagnostic I-131 doses vary between 37 and 370 MBq. The aim of this study was to determine the yield of a diagnostic scan with 370 MBq I-131 in patients with a negative diagnostic scan with 74 MBq I-131. Retrospective evaluation of 158 patients who received a high-dose diagnostic scan with 370 MBq I-131 because of a negative low-dose diagnostic scan with 74 MBq I-131. Special attention was paid to the patients with positive high-dose diagnostic scanning and undetectable serum Tg levels after thyroid hormone withdrawal. In 127 (80%) of patients the 370 MBq I-131 scan was negative, just like the preceding low-dose scan. In 31 (20%) of patients abnormal uptake was present on the 370 MBq diagnostic scan. In 19 of these 31 patients serum Tg was undetectable. In 15/19 the high-dose diagnostic scan proved either false positive or demonstrated clinically irrelevant minor ablation rests. In only four patients (2.5%) did the high-dose diagnostic scans reveal possibly relevant uptake caused by residual differentiated thyroid cancer. In 98% of patients a 370 MBq dose of I-131 for diagnostic whole-body scintigraphy (WBS) had no additional value. The combination of a low-dose diagnostic I-131 scan using only 74 MBq combined with a serum Tg level measurement proved sufficient for correct clinical decision making regarding whether the patient requires additional I-131 therapy. (authors)

  7. Radioiodine therapy of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules: usefulness of an implemented dose calculation algorithm allowing reduction of radioiodine amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, M; Bagnara, M C; Pomposelli, E; Altrinetti, V; Calamia, I; Camerieri, L; Giusti, M; Pesce, G; Reitano, C; Bagnasco, M; Caputo, M

    2013-09-01

    Radioiodine is a common option for treatment of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. Due to the expected selective radioiodine uptake by adenoma, relatively high "fixed" activities are often used. Alternatively, the activity is individually calculated upon the prescription of a fixed value of target absorbed dose. We evaluated the use of an algorithm for personalized radioiodine activity calculation, which allows as a rule the administration of lower radioiodine activities. Seventy-five patients with single hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule eligible for 131I treatment were studied. The activities of 131I to be administered were estimated by the method described by Traino et al. and developed for Graves'disease, assuming selective and homogeneous 131I uptake by adenoma. The method takes into account 131I uptake and its effective half-life, target (adenoma) volume and its expected volume reduction during treatment. A comparison with the activities calculated by other dosimetric protocols, and the "fixed" activity method was performed. 131I uptake was measured by external counting, thyroid nodule volume by ultrasonography, thyroid hormones and TSH by ELISA. Remission of hyperthyroidism was observed in all but one patient; volume reduction of adenoma was closely similar to that assumed by our model. Effective half-life was highly variable in different patients, and critically affected dose calculation. The administered activities were clearly lower with respect to "fixed" activities and other protocols' prescription. The proposed algorithm proved to be effective also for single hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule treatment and allowed a significant reduction of administered 131I activities, without loss of clinical efficacy.

  8. High-dose radioiodine therapy of Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodky, V.; Fomin, D.; Pestritskaya, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objectives: to estimate the effectiveness and safety of the disease treatment under different modes of applying RIT. Materials and methods: 67 patients with the thyrotoxicosis condition associated with Graves disease were researched. The patients were divided into 2 groups: a control group with 25 people (18 women and 7 men), who underwent a low-dose therapy of 150-500 MBq; and a main group of 42 people (32 women and 10 men), who underwent a high-dose therapy of 550 and 800 MBq. The volume of thyroid prior to the treatment made up 23.8 ± 20 ml in the main group and 30.2 ± 23 ml in the control one. The average age in the high-dose group was 44.6 ±23 years old and in the low-dose -47.2 ± 24 years old. In terms of the hormone level before the RIT, 52% of the main group patients experienced euthyroidism, while 48% - thyrotoxicosis. The corresponding indices in the control group were 42% and 58% respectively. The cessation of the thyreostatic therapy came on 5. to 21. day prior to the treatment, with the average of 14 ±7 days in both groups. The diagnosis of the disease was based on ultrasonography, planar scintigraphy, the hormone level and antibody titer. The performance was assessed through the attainment of hypo-thyrosis and the transition to a substitutive hormonal therapy with L-thyroxine in 6 months or more. The attainment of euthyroidism was seen as a partial effect due to a possibility of relapse. Results: in 6 months a positive result in the form of hypo-thyrosis was achieved for 39 patients in the main group, which accounted for 93%, and 3 patients (7%) experienced euthyroidism. No symptomatic thyrotoxicosis relapses were revealed. In the control group, hypo-thyrosis was achieved by 18 patients, which accounted for 72%; euthyroidism came up to 12%; 4 patients needed a refresher course of RIT, which made up 16% of the group. 93% of the main group patients tolerated the treatment favourably. 3 patients complained of the

  9. Influence of thyroid metabolism on radioiodine therapy in Graves` disease; Einfluss der Stoffwechsellage auf die Radioiodtherapie beim Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A.R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin; Weckesser, M.; Boy, C.; Schmidt, D.; Langen, K.J.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik]|[Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin

    1997-12-01

    Radioiodine therapy is one of two definitive methods of treatment in Graves` disease beside near-total thyreoidectomy. Simple strategies like optimization of thyroid metabolism help to improve efficacy in radioiodine therapy thus lowering applied radioiodine doses, radiation exposure to the patient and to the environment and avoiding multiple vain therapeutic efforts. These strategies are likely to reduce costs at the same time. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Radioiodtherapie ist eine der beiden definitiven Therapiemethoden bei Morbus Basedow neben der nahezu totalen Thyreoidektomie. Ziel ist es, mit einfachen Methoden wie der optimalen Einstellung der Stoffwechsellage die Effizienz der Radioiodtherapie zu optimieren im Hinblick auf eine Reduktion der einzusetzenden Aktivitaet, der Gesamtstrahlenexposition fuer Patient und Umwelt und durch Vermeidung mehrfacher, vergeblicher therapeutischer Ansaetze. Diese Optimierung traegt auch zur Reduktion der Gesamtkrankheitskosten bei. (orig.)

  10. Graves Disease Induced by Radioiodine Therapy for Toxic Nodular Goiter: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Yürekli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Graves’ disease (GD may be observed as an infrequent adverse effect after radioiodine therapy (RAIT for toxic thyroid adenoma (TA and toxic multi nodular goiter (MNG. We present a case of a 55-year-old male with a toxic nodule who was treated with RAI. After therapy, the patient’s serum free triiodothyronine (fT3 and free thyroxine (fT4 levels gradually increased. Antithyroid peroxidase (TPOAb, antithyroglobulin (TgAb and TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAb were also positive. Thyroid scintigraphy revealed diffuse intense uptake after four months of RAIT. Radiation-induced GD should be considered in patients with aggravated hyperthyroidism 3-4 months after therapy.

  11. A prospective study of the effects of radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism in patients with minimally active graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Petros; Kendall-Taylor, Pat; Neoh, Chris; Frewin, Sarah; Dickinson, Jane

    2005-09-01

    Radioiodine is an effective and safe treatment for hyperthyroidism but has been implicated as a risk factor for deterioration or new presentation of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). Prophylactic glucocorticoids appear to prevent this effect. The objective of this study was to document the course of GO after radioiodine therapy. This was a prospective observational study. Patients were assessed at baseline and 2, 4, 6, and 12 months after radioiodine therapy. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral center. Seventy-two GO patients with minimally active eye disease participated in the study. A fixed dose of radioiodine was administered. T(4) was commenced 2 wk later to prevent hypothyroidism. Change in activity and severity of GO were analyzed. Exophthalmometer readings, the width of the palpebral aperture, diplopia scores, and the clinical activity score improved significantly. By clinically significant criteria, the eye disease improved in four patients (transiently in three of the four cases), most likely attributable to the natural course of the disease. No patient's eyes deteriorated. Radioiodine is not associated with deterioration of GO in patients with minimally active eye disease when postradioiodine hypothyroidism is prevented.

  12. Experimental peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in radioiodine negative somatostatin receptor positive thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilica, B.; Kroiss, A.; Putzer, D.; Uprimmy, C.; Warwitz, B.; Kendler, D.; Waitz, D.; Virgolini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Purpose: This retrospective analysis evaluated the time to progression (TTP), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with radioiodine negative thyroid cancer who had undergone peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE, 177 Lu-DOTA-LAN, 90 Y-DOTA-TOC or 90 Y-DOTA-LAN after tumor progression. Methods: Data derived from twenty patients with either differentiated (n=15), anaplastic (n=1) or medullary (n=4) somatostatin receptor positive thyroid cancer who had received treatment with PRRT after tumor progression. TTP, PFS and OS were defined according to the clinical trial endpoints suggested by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Progressive disease was defined by sonography, FDG-PET, Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET, or CT (RECIST Criteria). Results: In 17 patients the median overall survival time after the first PRRT was 17.3 (range: 0.1 - 109.7) months. Three patients still alive are actually showing stable disease. The median of PFS in 20 Patients (6 with more than one PRRT-cycle or PRRT-substance) has been 10.9 (range: 0.1 - 44.0) months. The median TTP was 15.6 (range 4.4 to 29.2) months. Conclusion: PRRT appears to be useful in patients with somatostatin receptor positive but radioiodine negative thyroid cancer as a complementary palliative cytotoxic therapy. (authors)

  13. Radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease - a dosimetric comparison of different strategies concerning antithyroid drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbannek, V.; Voth, E.; Moka, D.; Schicha, H.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Premedication with antithyroid drugs (ATD) compared to patients not pretreated with ATD causes a higher failure rate of radioiodine therapy (RITh) or demands higher therapeutical dosage of radioiodine (RI). For clinical reasons and because of accelerated iodine metabolism in hyperthyreosis a compensated thyroid metabolism is desirable. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ATD on the biokinetics of RI in case of Graves' disease in order to improve RITh of patients pre-treated with ATD. Methods: 385 consecutive patients who underwent RITh because of Graves' disease for the first time were included: Group A (n = 74): RITh under continuous medication with ATD; Group B (n = 111): Application of RI under continuous medication with ATD, in case of insufficient RI-uptake or shortened effective RI-half-life ATD were stopped 1-5 days after RITh; Group C (n = 200): ATD were stopped 2 days prior to RITh in all patients. We examined the influence of ATD on RI-uptake and effective RI-half-life as well as the absorbed dose achieved on the thyroid in dependence of thyroid volume and applied RI-dosage [TEQ - therapy efficiency quotient, (2)]. Results: In the RI-pretest (all patients under ATD) the RI-uptake was comparable in all three groups. During RITh-RI-uptake, effective RI-half-life and therefore the TEQ were significantly higher in Group C as compared to Groups A and B (p [de

  14. Evaluation of systematic I-131 thyroid measurements for nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puscalau, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In Nuclear Medicine, I-131 is used intensively for the diagnosis and for the treatment of the different severities maladies of the thyroid. This radionuclide generates an important internal contamination to the patients, because of its oral administration, and, also, through inhalation, to the workers involved in the radiopharmaceuticals production , to the nursing staff and to the physicians that care and treat the patients in the hospitals. The paper presents the data obtained by systematically thyroid monitoring of the physicians and nurses from the Endocrinology Hospital, that are contaminated by I-131 inhalation because of their permanent relation with the patients treated with 3.7 MBq I-131 for investigation and with activities in the range 1100 MBq - 4000 MBq for therapy. The measurements were carried out with our Body Counter equipped with a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, 50 mm thickness and 40mm diameter. Values of the estimated committed equivalent doses are, also, reported

  15. The early development of transient and permanent hypothyroidism following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peden, N.R.; Hart, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The outcome in 110 patients first treated with radioiodine (mean dose 6.56 mCi) for hyperthyroid Graves' disease in 1980 was reviewed. In 23 percent of the patients the disease had not been controlled by the initial dose after 3 months, and 17 percent were given one or two more doses. Within 2 years 65 percent of the patients required replacement thyroxine therapy. Although about half of the patients were biochemically hypothyroid 3 months after the last dose of iodine 131, this condition was transient in a third of them; five of these patients even became hyperthyroid again. Patients with transient, as opposed to permanent, hypothyroidism at 3 months tended to be clinically euthyroid but to have residual palpable thyroid tissue and only a modest reduction in the serum thyroxine level. It is therefore recommended that patients not overtly hypothyroid 3 months after treatment with 131 I be observed still longer before thyroxine replacement therapy is instituted

  16. The influence of radioiodine therapy in 1470 patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrazek, S.; Szumowski, P.; Mysliwiec, J.; Mojsak, M.; Kraszynska, A.; Amelian-Filonowicz, A.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy on the achievement of euthyroidism, prevention of adverse effects on the cardiovascular and prevent evolvement to overt hyperthyroidism. Material and methods: we treated 1470 patients sent to our department during the last 7 years, aged 24-76 years; 88% of them were female and 12% male; 490 patients with multi-nodular goitre (MNG), and 980 patients with autonomous nodule (ATN). Some of the patients were treated with antithyroid drugs for 1 to 3 months before 131 I therapy (140 patients). Malignant changes were excluded in all nodules by fine needle aspiration biopsy. All the patients had serum TSH levels <0.1 mU/l and effective T-half was more than 3 days at the time of treatment. The activity dose was calculated by the use of Marinelli's formula and ranged between 200 and 800 MBq. The absorbed dose (Gy) ranged between 180 and 300, and was proportional to thyroid volume. Follow up control was done every 6 weeks. Results: euthyroidism achieved in 99% of patient with ATN and 94% of MNG; 1% of patients with ATN and 5% of patients with MNG develop hypothyroidism. 1% of patients with MNG were in subclinical hyperthyroidism and received second dose of radioiodine therapy. In all of the patients, the symptoms and signs of subclinical hyperthyroidism disappeared (palpitation, tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, exercise tolerance improved, the blood pressure normalised and the quality of life improved). Conclusions: our result is good and is in the range of the existing literature. The achievement of euthyroidism and the remission of the symptoms and signs of subclinical hyperthyroidism, were due to good diagnosis, well preparation of the patients; accurate measurement of administered activity, effective half-life, and well-organised follow up. We recommend early treatment of subclinical hyperthyroidism, and long period of follow up visits in our department

  17. Fetus dose estimation in thyroid cancer post-surgical radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mianji, Fereidoun A.; Karimi Diba, Jila; Babakhani, Asad

    2015-01-01

    Unrecognised pregnancy during radioisotope therapy of thyroid cancer results in hardly definable embryo/fetus exposures, particularly when the thyroid gland is already removed. Sources of such difficulty include uncertainty in data like pregnancy commencing time, amount and distribution of metastasized thyroid cells in body, effect of the thyroidectomy on the fetus dose coefficient etc. Despite all these uncertainties, estimation of the order of the fetus dose in most cases is enough for medical and legal decision-making purposes. A model for adapting the dose coefficients recommended by the well-known methods to the problem of fetus dose assessment in athyrotic patients is proposed. The model defines a correction factor for the problem and ensures that the fetus dose in athyrotic pregnant patients is less than the normal patients. A case of pregnant patient undergone post-surgical therapy by I-131 is then studied for quantitative comparison of the methods. The results draw a range for the fetus dose in athyrotic patients using the derived factor. This reduces the concerns on under- or over-estimation of the embryo/fetus dose and is helpful for personal and/or legal decision-making on abortion. (authors)

  18. The risk for cancer and genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.

    1997-01-01

    According to recent studies, the risk for thyroid cancer is not increased after radioiodine treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. Only the risk of cancer of the stomach seems to be increased slightly in patents treated with I-131 because of functional autonomy. However, the risk for gastric cancer is not increased after higher activities of I-131 because of thyroid cancer. There is no increased risk for genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  19. Long-Term Results of Fixed High-Dose I-131 Treatment for Toxic Nodular Goiter: Higher Euthyroidism Rates in Geriatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Ege Aktaş

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Geriatric patient population has special importance due to particular challenges. In addition to the increase in incidence of toxic nodular goiter (TNG with age, it has a high incidence in the regions of low-medium iodine intake such as in our country. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall outcome of high fixed dose radioiodine (RAI therapy, and investigate the particular differences in the geriatric patient population. Methods: One hundred and three TNG patients treated with high dose I-131 (370-740 MBq were retrospectively reviewed. The baseline characteristics; age, gender, scintigraphic patterns and thyroid function tests before and after treatment, as well as follow-up, duration of antithyroid drug (ATD medication and achievement of euthyroid or hypothyroid state were evaluated. The patient population was divided into two groups as those=>65 years and those who were younger, in order to assess the effect of age. Results: Treatment success was 90% with single dose RAI therapy. Hyperthyroidism was treated in 7±7, 2 months after RAI administration. At the end of the first year, overall hypothyroidism rate was 30% and euthyroid state was achieved in 70% of patients. Age was found to be the only statistically significant variable effecting outcome. A higher ratio of euthyroidism was achieved in the geriatric patient population. Conclusion: High fixed dose I-131 treatment should be preferred in geriatric TNG patients in order to treat persistent hyperthyroidism rapidly. The result of this study suggests that high fixed dose RAI therapy is a successful modality in treating TNG, and high rates of euthyroidism can be achieved in geriatric patients.

  20. Graves' disease radioiodine-therapy: Choosing target absorbed doses for therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willegaignon, J., E-mail: j.willegaignon@gmail.com; Sapienza, M. T.; Coura-Filho, G. B.; Buchpiguel, C. A. [Cancer Institute of São Paulo State (ICESP), Clinical Hospital, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Watanabe, T. [Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Traino, A. C. [Unit of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa 56126 (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The precise determination of organ mass (m{sub th}) and total number of disintegrations within the thyroid gland (A{sup ~}) are essential for thyroid absorbed-dose calculations for radioiodine therapy. Nevertheless, these parameters may vary according to the method employed for their estimation, thus introducing uncertainty in the estimated thyroid absorbed dose and in any dose–response relationship derived using such estimates. In consideration of these points, thyroid absorbed doses for Graves’ disease (GD) treatment planning were calculated using different approaches to estimating the m{sub th} and the A{sup ~}. Methods: Fifty patients were included in the study. Thyroid{sup 131}I uptake measurements were performed at 2, 6, 24, 48, 96, and 220 h postadministration of a tracer activity in order to estimate the effective half-time (T{sub eff}) of {sup 131}I in the thyroid; the thyroid cumulated activity was then estimated using the T{sub eff} thus determined or, alternatively, calculated by numeric integration of the measured time-activity data. Thyroid mass was estimated by ultrasonography (USG) and scintigraphy (SCTG). Absorbed doses were calculated with the OLINDA/EXM software. The relationships between thyroid absorbed dose and therapy response were evaluated at 3 months and 1 year after therapy. Results: The average ratio (±1 standard deviation) betweenm{sub th} estimated by SCTG and USG was 1.74 (±0.64) and that between A{sup ~} obtained by T{sub eff} and the integration of measured activity in the gland was 1.71 (±0.14). These differences affect the calculated absorbed dose. Overall, therapeutic success, corresponding to induction of durable hypothyroidism or euthyroidism, was achieved in 72% of all patients at 3 months and in 90% at 1 year. A therapeutic success rate of at least 95% was found in the group of patients receiving doses of 200 Gy (p = 0.0483) and 330 Gy (p = 0.0131) when m{sub th} was measured by either USG or SCTG and A

  1. Radioiodine therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FF ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:644-645. Kaplan EL, Angelos P, James ... Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 96. Lai SY, Mandel SJ, ...

  2. Migration of radionuclide I-131 through a clayey porous matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlat, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and physical behavior of the radiotracer I-131 through a porous matrix are described. The study was evaluated using the laboratory column, which contains porous soils. The collected activities have been measured by gamma counting with a NaI(Tl) detector. The indicators were observed and analyzed by using the one dimension mass transport equation. The solution was utilized to interpret the obtaining experimental data. The experimental values of I-131 are in agreement with those calculated by the model. However, the utilization of (I-131) in the punctual hydrogeological studies is proved. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid nodules and of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guhlmann, C.A.; Rendl, J.; Boerner, W.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effects of radioiodine therapy (RIT) for autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTNs) and Graves' disease on thyroid function and size up to one year after RIT. In 230 patients with AFTNs, a dose of 300 Gy was effective in about 90% of the cases 6 months after RIT. Out of 65 patients suffering from Graves' disease, 5 patients (8%) had persisting hyperthyroidism 6 months after RIT with a dose of 150 Gy. This group consisted exclusively of patients with manifest hyperthyroidism at the time of RIT. As determined by ultrasonography 6 months after RIT, a reduction of thyroid size by about 40% and 60% was observed in patients with AFTNs and Graves' disease, respectively. (orig.) [de

  4. Dose concepts and dosimetry for radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockisch, A.; Brandt-Mainz, K.; Goerges, R.

    1997-01-01

    Dose planning prior to radioiodine therapy of benign thyroidal disease is usually based on macrodosimetry. The paper shows that this assumption is acceptable. The common concepts for dose planning are given. The following target doses are nowadays widely accepted: 150 Gy for euthyroid goiter, 400 Gy for toxic adenoma, 150 Gy for disserminated autonomy, 200 Gy for hyperthyroid Grave's disease if posttherapeutic euthyroidism is intended, and 250 (to 300) Gy if the risk of recurrency is to be minimized ('ablative' concept). Finally, a surveyfis given concerning the precision in which the parameters relevant for the dose calcultion can be determined. For realistic favourable conditions, the dose can be determined with an accuracy of better than ±25%. (orig.) [de

  5. Effects of Radioiodine Therapy on the Natural History of Graves' Ophtalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dreval

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available 21 patients with Graves’ disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO received radioiodine treatment (RIT. Before 131-I therapy in all patients GO were non-active and no severe. Six patients not received any treatment before RIT; four patients received orbital radiotherapy and 11 patients received intravenous glucocorticoids. Thyreotoxicosis compensation were achieved by antithyroid medication before RIT. Antithyroid medication was stopped 10 days before RIT. Worsening of GO was seen on 47.7% patients 3 months after RIT, but only 9.5% of patients needed additional treatment GO. GO exacerbation take place in 90% of hypothyroid patients and its compensation reduced the symptoms of activity of GO for 3 months. 42.8% was without any symptoms of activity of GO by 9—12 months after RIT. Treatment of GO before RIT were improved the course of GO after RIT.

  6. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioiodine: adjunctive therapy with antithyroid drugs reconsidered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velkeniers, B.; Vanhaelst, L.; Cytryn, R.; Jonckheer, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the value of antithyroid drugs as an adjunct to radioactive iodine for the treatment of hyperthyroidism the incidence of relapse or hypothyroidism after a mean follow-up of 51/2 years (range 2-7 years) was reviewed retrospectively for 206 patients, some treated with and others without antithyroid drugs after radioiodine therapy. Allocation to treatment group had been random, and both groups were similar in all respects except for the adjunctive treatment with antithyroid drugs. All doses of 131 I had been calculated by one physician. Compared with those who received 131 I alone, those starting on antithyroid drugs within 8 days after 131 I had a lower incidence of hypothyroidism but a higher incidence of early post-treatment recurrence or persistence of hyperthyroidism, and considerably lower incidence of remission. (author)

  7. Radiation exposure for 'caregivers' during high-dose outpatient radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriott, C. J.; Webber, C. E.; Gulenchyn, K. Y.

    2007-01-01

    On 27 occasions, radiation doses were measured for a family member designated as the 'caregiver' for a patient receiving high-dose radioiodine outpatient therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. For 25 of the administrations, patients received 3.7 GBq of 131 I. Radiation doses for the designated caregivers were monitored on an hourly basis for 1 week using electronic personal dosemeters. The average penetrating dose was 98±64 μSv. The maximum penetrating dose was 283 μSv. Measured dose rate profiles showed that, on average, one-third of the caregiver dose was received during the journey home from hospital. The mean dose rate profile showed rapid clearance of 131 I with three distinct phases. The corresponding clearance half-times were 131 I contaminating the home. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of radioiodinated vesamicol analogs for sigma receptor imaging in tumor and radionuclide receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Akhter, Nasima; Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Washiyama, Kohshin; Kinuya, Seigo; Kawai, Keiichi; Mori, Hirofumi

    2009-11-01

    It has been reported that sigma receptors are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. In this study, we selected (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino] cyclohexanol [(+)-pIV] as a sigma receptor ligand and evaluated the potential of radioiodinated (+)-pIV for tumor imaging and therapy. (+)-[(125/131)I]pIV was prepared by an iododestannylation reaction under no-carrier-added conditions with radiochemical purity over 99% after HPLC purification. Biodistribution experiments were performed by the intravenous injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV into mice bearing human prostate tumors (DU-145). Blocking studies were performed by intravenous injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV mixed with an excess amount of unlabeled sigma ligand into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. For therapeutic study, (+)-[(131)I]pIV was injected at a dose of 7.4 MBq followed by measurement of the tumor size. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[(125)I]pIV showed high uptake and long residence in the tumor. High tumor to blood and muscle ratios were achieved because the radioactivity levels of blood and muscle were low. However, the accumulations of radioactivity in non-target tissues, such as liver and kidney, were high. The radioactivity in the non-target tissues slowly decreased over time. Co-injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV with an excess amount of unlabeled sigma ligand resulted in a significant decrease in the tumor/blood ratio, indicating sigma receptor-mediated tumor uptake. In therapeutic study, tumor growth in mice treated with (+)-[(131)I]pIV was significantly inhibited compared to that of an untreated group. These results indicate that radioiodinated (+)-pIV has a high potential for sigma receptor imaging in tumor and radionuclide receptor therapy.

  9. The relationship between 24 h/4 h radioiodine-131 uptake ratio and outcome after radioiodine therapy in 1402 patients with solitary autonomously functioning thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filesi, M.; Travascio, L.; Montesano, T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of 24 h/4 h uptake ratio (UR) in response to radioiodine-131 ( 131 I) therapy in patients with autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTN). A total of 1402 consecutive hyperthyroid patients were treated with 131 I, between 1958 and 2005. Therapeutic doses (D) were calculated according to the formula: D=weight of nodule x dose per gram of nodular tissue (q)/24 h 131 I uptake. The ratios of the 24 and 4 h uptake were retrospectively calculated and the patients were grouped according to outcome and q into three groups of UR (≤1.25; 1.26-1.68; ≥1.69) by means of terziles. Of the 1402 patients, 95 did not respond to 131 I treatment while 93/1307 developed hypothyroidism. Most non-responders (55.8%) had UR ≤1.25, while many hypothyroid patients (66.7%) had UR ≥1.69 (χ 2 : P 131 I treatment, increasing to 13.9% at 5 years and 26.2% at 10 years. The 131 I UR can predict the outcome of 131 I treatment in AFTN and may have utility in modifying treatment in some patients to limit post-radioiodine induced hypothyroidism and treatment failures in order to achieve euthyroidism. (author)

  10. Is it safe to treat hyperthyroid patients with I-131 without fear of thyroid storm?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, V.; Nusynowitz, M.L.; Ali, S.

    2006-01-01

    Thyroid storm is extremely rare. However, hyperthyroid patients with severe thyrotoxicosis are frequently not treated immediately with I-131 for fear of thyroid storm but are placed on thiouracil drugs for varying periods of time. We demonstrate herein that it is safe to treat these patients with I-131, without pretreatment with thiouracil drugs, provided they do not have complicating intercurrent disease. Our definition of severe hyperthyroidism includes marked signs and symptoms of thyrotoxicosis, suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), markedly elevated free T4 and/or free T3 and elevated radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) (>30%) at 4 or 24 hours. Our diagnostic criteria for thyroid storm include two or more findings of fever (>38 deg C, 100 deg F), severe tachycardia, high pulse pressure, agitation with tremors, flushing, sweating, heart failure, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, jaundice associated with high free T4 and/or free T3. Patients were selected retrospectively for the period between August 2003 and December 2004. One hundred and twenty-two patient visits were identified. These patients were treated with 370-740 MBq (10-20 mCi) of I-131 and were evaluated for any evidence of thyroid storm. Most of the patients were placed on beta blocker drugs at the time of initial I-131 therapy; these were continued for at least two months, when the first follow-up visit occurred. At the time of I-131 therapy, it is our policy to educate the patients to seek immediate medical attention for exacerbation of symptoms of thyrotoxicosis. Not one of these patients developed thyroid storm. A subset of 25% of these cases with higher potential for thyroid storm (RAIU more than 65%, very marked signs and symptoms, and very markedly elevated free T4 and/or free T3) also tolerated the I-131 therapy well with marked clinical improvement and no exacerbation of the thyrotoxic state. It is safe to administer I-131 to patients who are severely hyperthyroid without fear of thyroid

  11. Dosimetry study of [I-131] and [I-125]- meta-iodobenz guanidine in a simulating model for neuroblastoma metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, W H; Yaremko, B; McEwan, A; Amanie, J; Yee, D; Cho, J; McQuarrie, S; Riauka, T; Sloboda, R; Wiebe, L; Loebenberg, R; Janicki, C

    2013-02-01

    The physical properties of I-131 may be suboptimal for the delivery of therapeutic radiation to bone marrow metastases, which are common in the natural history of neuroblastoma. In vitro and preliminary clinical studies have implied improved efficacy of I-125 relative to I-131 in certain clinical situations, although areas of uncertainty remain regarding intratumoral dosimetry. This prompted our study using human neuroblastoma multicellular spheroids as a model of metastasis. 3D dose calculations were made using voxel-based Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) and dose-point-kernel (DPK) techniques. Dose distributions for I-131 and I-125 labeled mIBG were calculated for spheroids (metastases) of various sizes from 0.01 cm to 3 cm diameter, and the relative dose delivered to the tumors was compared for the same limiting dose to the bone marrow. Based on the same data, arguments were advanced based upon the principles of tumor control probability (TCP) to emphasize the potential theoretical utility of I-125 over I-131 in specific clinical situations. I-125-mIBG can deliver a higher and more uniform dose to tumors compared to I-131 mIBG without increasing the dose to the bone marrow. Depending on the tumor size and biological half-life, the relative dose to tumors of less than 1 mm diameter can increase several-fold. TCP calculations indicate that tumor control increases with increasing administered activity, and that I-125 is more effective than I-131 for tumor diameters of 0.01 cm or less. This study suggests that I-125-mIBG is dosimetrically superior to I-131-mIBG therapy for small bone marrow metastases from neuroblastoma. It is logical to consider adding I-125-mIBG to I-131-mIBG in multi-modality therapy as these two isotopes could be complementary in terms of their cumulative dosimetry.

  12. Administration of additional inactive iodide during radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. Who might benefit?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Reinholz, U.; Schmidt, M.; Schomaecker, K.; Schicha, H.; Wellner, U. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2007-07-01

    Aim: Graves' hyperthyroidism and antithyroid drugs empty the intrathyroid stores of hormones and iodine. The consequence is rapid {sup 131}I turnover and impending failure of radioiodine therapy. Can administration of additional inactive iodide improve 131I kinetics? Patients, methods: Fifteen consecutive patients, in whom the 48 h post-therapeutically calculated thyroid dose was between 150 and 249 Gy due to an unexpectedly short half-life, received 3 x 200 {mu}g inactive potassium-iodide ({sup 127}I) daily for 3 days (Group A), while 17 consecutive patients with a thyroid dose of = 250 Gy (Group B) served as the non-iodide group. 48 hours after {sup 131}I administration (M1) and 4 or 5 days later (M2) the following parameters were compared: effective {sup 131}I half-life, thyroid dose, total T3, total T4, {sup 131}I-activity in the T3- and T4-RIAs. Results: In Group A, the effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 before iodine (3.81 {+-} 0.93 days) was significantly (p <0.01) shorter than the effective {sup 131}I half-life M2 (4.65 {+-} 0.79 days). Effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 correlated with the benefit from inactive {sup 127}I (r = -0.79): Administration of {sup 127}I was beneficial in patients with an effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 of <3 or 4 days. Patients from Group A with high initial specific {sup 131}I activity of T3 and T4 showed lower specific {sup 131}I activity after addition of inactive iodine compared with patients from the same group with a lower initial specific {sup 131}I activity of T3 and T4 and compared with the patient group B who was given no additional inactive iodide. This correlation was mathematically described and reflected in the flatter gradient in Group A (y = 0.5195x + 0.8727 for {sup 131}I T3 and y = 1.0827x - 0.4444 for {sup 131}I T4) and steeper gradient for Group B (y = 0.6998x + 0.5417 for {sup 131}I T3 and y = 1.3191x - 0.2901 for {sup 131}I T4). Radioiodine therapy was successful in all 15 patients from Group A

  13. Get the Facts About Exposure to I-131 Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... affected by I-131 fallout from nuclear testing. Medical signs —A lump or nodule that an individual ...

  14. Results of a risk adapted and functional radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Neumann, V.; Staub, U.; Groth, P.; Kuenstner, H.; Schuemichen, C. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Univ. Rostock (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Aim of this study was to find out, if results of a functional orientated radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease could be optimized using a risk adopted dose concept. Patients, method: 351 patients with Graves' disease were treated for the first time between 11/97 and 8/01. The basic dose was 125 Gy, which was increased up to 250 Gy in a cumulative manner depending on clinical parameters (initial thyroid metabolism, thyroid volume, immunoreactivity). Two different methods of dosimetry were used. Occasional thyreostasis was withdrawn two days before the radioiodine test was started. Follow up was done on overage 8 {+-} 2,4 (4-17,2) months. TSH {>=}0,27 {mu}IU/mL confirmed as a measure of the success. Results: With improved pretherapeutic dosimetry and a mean target dose of 178 {+-} 31 Gy (n = 72) therapeutic success occurred in 66,7%, in 51,4% euthyreosis was restalled and in 15,3% of patients hypothyroidism was seen (TSH >4,20 {mu}IU/mL). With simplified pretherapeutic dosimetry and a mean target dose of 172 {+-} 29 Gy (n = 279) results were moderately impaired (63,8%, 40,1% and 23,7%). With increasing target dose therapeutic failure increased, as unsufficiently adopted risk factors for therapeutic failure turned out the initial thyroid metabolism, the TcTU(s) as the (h)TRAb titer. Conclusion: Functional orientated RIT can be optimized by including illness specific characteristics, principal limitations are a high initial thyroid metabolism, a large thyroid volume and a high (h)TRAb-titer. (orig.)

  15. Radioiodinated free fatty acids; can we measure myocardial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, F.C.; Eenige, M.J. van; Duwel, C.M.B.; Roos, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of radioiodinated free fatty acids for ''metabolic imaging'', the kinetics and distribution pattern of metabolites of heptadecanoic acid I 131 (HDA I 131) were studied in canine myocardium throughout metabolic interventions. In control dogs and in dogs during glucose/insulin and sodium lactate infusion, biopsy specimens were taken during a go-min period after HDA I 131 administration and analyzed. Clearly distinct patterns of distribution and elimination were seen during the metabolic interventions, indicating the usefulness of iodinated fatty acids for metabolic studies. (orig.)

  16. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases: Graves' disease - current aspects; Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen: Morbus Basedow - aktuelle Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, M.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Radioiodine therapy is a reliable and cost-effective alternative to medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Current recommendations favour a risk-adapted therapeutic procedure. Medical treatment is preferred in patients with a low risk of relapse which are characterised by the combination of female gender, age of onset above 40 years, thyroid volume below 40 ml and TSH-receptor antibodies below 10 U/l. Because of the poor remission rate with medical treatment in patients at less than 40 years of age, male gender, thyroid volume above 40 ml and TSH receptor antibodies above 10 U/l, it is suggested that definitive treatment with radioiodine or surgery should be considered soon after disease presentation. Analysis of cost-effectiveness clearly favour ablative radioiodine treatment. Ablative treatment is even more favourable in terms of early resumption of a normal life style of the hyperthyroid patient. Recent publications suggest further an adaptation of the tissue-absorbed dose to the pre-treatment thyroid volume using Marinelli's formula to achieve thyroid ablation with a single radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  17. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Eschner, W.; Luster, M.; Reiners, C.; Schober, O.; Muenster Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3) is the counterpart to the procedure guideline for 131 I whole-body scintigraphy (version 3) and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Recommendation for ablative 131 I therapy is given for all differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) >1 cm. Regarding DTC ≤1 cm 131 I ablation may be helpful in an individual constellation. Preparation for 131 I ablation requires low iodine diet for two weeks and TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroid hormone medication or by use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The advantages of rhTSH (no symptoms of hypothyroidism, lowerblood activity) and the advantages of endogenous TSH stimulation (necessary for 131 I-therapy in patients with metastases, higher sensitivity of 131 I whole-body scan) are discussed. In most centers standard activities are used for 131 I ablation. If pretherapeutic dosimetry is planned, the diagnostic administration of 131 I should not exceed 1-10MBq, alternative tracers are 123 I or 124 I. The recommendations for contraception and family planning are harmonized with the recommendation of ATA and ETA. Regarding the best possible protection of salivary glands the evidence is insufficient to recommend a specific setting. To minimize the risk of dental caries due to xerostomia patients should use preventive strategies for dental hygiene. (orig.)

  18. Radioimmunotherapy in refractory b-cell nonhodgkins lymphoma with I-131-labeled chimeric anti cd-20 c2b8 (I-131 rituximab): preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Park, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sung Eun and others

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the native chimeric human-mouse anti CD-20 antibody IDEC-C2B8 (Rituximab) has been widely applied in NHL. This ongoing phase study was to evaluate whether radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with I-131 rituximab is effective in refractory B-cell NHL. Inclusion criteria were as follows: B-cell NHL with relapsed or refractory to primary standard therapy, measurable disease, adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function, informed consent. The rituximab (Mabthera, Roach) was radiolabeled with iodine-131(I-131) using a modified chloramine T method with high radiochemical purity (95%) and preservation of immuno-reactivity. All patients received loading doses of unlabeled rituximab (median, 40 mg: range, 20∼70 mg) immediately prior to administration of therapeutic dose (51.4∼152.2 MBq/kg), and then underwent gamma camera scan. 11 patients were enrolled (4 low-grade B-cell NHL, 7 DLBCL, median age 63 years). Patients had received a median of three prior chemotherapy regimens. The objective response rate was 36.4% (1 CR, 3 PRs). These all responses were observed in low-grade B-cell NHL, except one with DLBCL. Adverse events were primarily hematologic toxicities; the incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was 27.3%, 45.5%, and 18.2%, respectively. The treatment-related mortality was observed in one patient, who had been previously treated with high-dose chemotherapy plus TBI with autologous stem cell transplantation. RIT with I-131 rituximab seems to be effective tolerable in refractory low-grade B-cell NHL, although modest activity in refractory DLBCL. Further studies to define the efficacy of I-131 rituximab in DLBCL are warranted

  19. Radioimmunotherapy in refractory b-cell nonhodgkins lymphoma with I-131-labeled chimeric anti cd-20 c2b8 (I-131 rituximab): preliminary result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Park, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sung Eun and others [Korea University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Recently, the native chimeric human-mouse anti CD-20 antibody IDEC-C2B8 (Rituximab) has been widely applied in NHL. This ongoing phase study was to evaluate whether radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with I-131 rituximab is effective in refractory B-cell NHL. Inclusion criteria were as follows: B-cell NHL with relapsed or refractory to primary standard therapy, measurable disease, adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function, informed consent. The rituximab (Mabthera, Roach) was radiolabeled with iodine-131(I-131) using a modified chloramine T method with high radiochemical purity (95%) and preservation of immuno-reactivity. All patients received loading doses of unlabeled rituximab (median, 40 mg: range, 20{approx}70 mg) immediately prior to administration of therapeutic dose (51.4{approx}152.2 MBq/kg), and then underwent gamma camera scan. 11 patients were enrolled (4 low-grade B-cell NHL, 7 DLBCL, median age 63 years). Patients had received a median of three prior chemotherapy regimens. The objective response rate was 36.4% (1 CR, 3 PRs). These all responses were observed in low-grade B-cell NHL, except one with DLBCL. Adverse events were primarily hematologic toxicities; the incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was 27.3%, 45.5%, and 18.2%, respectively. The treatment-related mortality was observed in one patient, who had been previously treated with high-dose chemotherapy plus TBI with autologous stem cell transplantation. RIT with I-131 rituximab seems to be effective tolerable in refractory low-grade B-cell NHL, although modest activity in refractory DLBCL. Further studies to define the efficacy of I-131 rituximab in DLBCL are warranted.

  20. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease; Radioiodoterapia em pacientes com doenca de Basedow-Graves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Margarida Maria Galvao; Blum, Bernardo; Pellegrini, Paulo Martins [Instituto Brasileiro de Medicina Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Corbo, Rossana [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Rebello, Ana Maria de Oliveira [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2000-04-01

    We studied retrospectively 104 patients with Graves' disease who underwent radioiodine therapy between 1983 and 1993. The administered dose varied from 2.0 to 9.0 mCi (74 to 333 MBq). In 1994 and 1998 the patients were asked to answer a questionnaire and were considered to have hypothyroidism when receiving T4 therapy. The importance of radioiodine therapy, its indications and the different methods of calculating the administered activity were studied. The results were compared with the literature. At the end of the evaluation, 62,4% of the patients presented hypothyroidism and 37,6% euthyroidism. There was no significant difference regarding the development of hypothyroidism when sex, number of doses, total activity (mCi), effective radiation ({mu}Ci per gram of tissue) and use of antithyroid drugs were considered. In conclusion, the period of time of post-radioiodine therapy is the most important factor in the analysis of the results, which may interfere with the development of hypothyroidism. (author)

  1. Increasing incidence of hypothyroidism within one year after radioiodine therapy for toxic diffuse goiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Hofe, S.E.; Dorfman, S.G.; Carrette, R.F.; Young, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Patients treated with 10 mCi of I-131 for toxic diffuse goiter in the period January 1974--June 1976 were evaluated for development of hypothyroidism. Fifty percent were hypothyroid within 3 months and 69 percent within 1 year of treatment. Our data suggest that there is a higher incidence of hypothyroidism after standard doses of I-131 in the 1970s as contrasted with treatment groups in the 1950s and 1960s. The pathophysiology of this increased incidence is not known with certainty; however, infrequent use of thionamide medication, together with recent increases in dietary iodine, may render the gland more radiosensitive

  2. Benign thyroid disorders, radioiodine therapy and diagnosis related groups (DRGs): aspects of cost/benefit; Benigne Schilddruesenerkrankungen, Radioiodtherapie und Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs): Kosten-Nutzen-Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of goiter and thyroid nodules in older patients is accompanied by an increasing frequency of treatment and cost. Cost-effectiveness is given for programs of prophylaxis (primary prevention, e.g. alimentary iodine supplementation), for programs of screening (secondary prevention. e.g. TSH-screening), and for therapeutic strategies to avoid complications of thyroid dysfunction (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and to minimize iatrogenic complications (tertiary prevention). Examples of tertiary prevention are radioiodine-therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have an increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioiodine therapy of ouvert or subclinical hyperthyroidism, and radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant co-morbidity. A cost-effectiveness-analysis for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease has been published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a first line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds 60%. Cost-minimization-analysis, comparing resection of goiter and radioiodine, has shown lower cost of radioiodine therapy for toxic multinodular goiter up to 100 ml and for Graves' disease up to 60 ml goiter volume. Medical aspects (volume of goiter, uptake of nodules, regressive goiter, suspicion on malignancy, patients' age, co-morbidity, patients' decision) remain decisive for the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  3. Radioiodine 131 therapy in hyperthyroidism evaluation of French nuclear medicine practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, D.; Boin, C.; Desruet, M.; Roux, J.; Wolf, M.; Fagret, D.; Allenet, B.; Foroni, L.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim Radioiodine 131 I (RAI) is currently used routinely in the treatment of hyperthyroidism including Graves disease (GD), toxic multi-nodular goitre (TMNG) and toxic solitary nodule (TSN). It has proved to be safe, efficient and relatively inexpensive therapy. But after more than 60 years, many protocols are coexisting and no consensus exists on the most appropriate way to prescribe RAI dose: fixed dose regime or calculated doses based on gland size or turnover of RAI. This is the first nationwide French survey assessing the current practices about radioiodine treatment in thyrotoxicosis. Methods: we sent a questionnaire to French nuclear medicine hospital units and cancer treatment centres (n=69) about their practices in 2012. Questions were asked about RAI treatment: objectives, way to prescribe the therapeutic dose and its factors, radioisotope use to explore thyroid function and method of gland size measurement. Results: we received 40 responses. Euthyroidism was a successful treatment outcome for 33% of French respondents whereas hypothyroidism was the aim for 26%. Antithyroid drugs were stopped 7 days on average (range 3-21 days) before therapy. 68% of physicians used ultrasound for thyroid volume measurement. Calculated doses were used by 40% of clinicians (Marinelli's formula: 80%). Factors influencing prescription were thyroid uptake (100%) based on radiotracer iodine-131 (33%) or iodine-123 (67%), thyroid volume (93%) and disease (80%). Fixed activities represented 60% of the prescribed doses (72,5% for TMNG and TSN). The administered dose was chosen between 1 to 3 levels of standard doses, according to the patient characteristics. Factors influencing this choice were disease, with respectively a median of 370 MBq (range:185-740), 555 MBq (185-740), 555 MBq (296-925) for GD, TSN and TMNG, thyroid volume (59%) and thyroid uptake (52%) with the radiotracer iodine-123 (30%) or technetium-99m (70%). Even physicians

  4. Recombinant human thyrotropin-stimulated radioiodine therapy of nodular goiter allows major reduction of the radiation burden with retained efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Søren; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Grupe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Context and Objective: Stimulation with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) before radioiodine ((131)I) therapy augments goiter volume reduction (GVR). Observations indicate that rhTSH has a preconditioning effect beyond increasing thyroid (131)I uptake. We test the hypothesis that an equivalent GVR mi....... This approach is attractive in terms of minimizing posttherapeutic restrictions and in reducing the potential risk of radiation-induced malignancy....

  5. Clinical Utility of SPECT/CT Imaging Post-Radioiodine Therapy: Does It Enhance Patient Management in Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Fahim U; Mohan, Hosahalli K

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate post-therapy iodine-131 single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography ((131)I-SPECT/CT) imaging in comparison to conventional planar (131)I whole-body imaging, and to assess its clinical impact on the management of patients. We retrospectively reviewed planar (131)I whole-body and (131)I-SPECT/CT imaging findings in 67 patients who underwent (131)I therapy for thyroid cancer. Two nuclear medicine physicians reviewed the scans independently. The foci of increased tracer uptake were identified in the neck, thorax and elsewhere. Within the neck, the foci of (131)I-increased uptake were graded qualitatively as probable or definite uptake in thyroid remnants and probable or definite uptake in the lymph nodes. Serum thyroglobulin level, histopathology and other imaging findings served as the reference standard. Of the 67 patients, 57 (85%) had radioiodine avid disease and 10 (15%) demonstrated non-radioiodine avid disease. Overall, post-therapy (131)I-SPECT/CT downstaged lymph node staging in 10 patients and upstaged it in 4 patients. This translated into a change of management for 9/57 (16%) patients with radioiodine avid disease. A change of management was observed in 5/10 patients with non-radioiodine avid disease confirmed in the post-(131)I-SPECT/CT study. Additionally, clinically significant findings such as incidental lung cancer, symptomatic pleural effusion and consolidation were also diagnosed in both groups of patients. In patients with thyroid cancer, (131)I-SPECT/CT is a valuable addition to standard post-therapy planar imaging. SPECT/CT also improved diagnostic confidence and provided crucial clinical information leading to change of management for a significant number of these patients.

  6. Guidelines on radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Impact on clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, M.; Pixberg, M.K.; Schober, O.; Doerr, U.; Dietlein, M.; Schlemmer, H.; Grimm, J.; Zajic, T.; Nestle, U.; Ladner, S.; Sepehr-Rezai, S.; Rosenbaum, S.; Puskas, C.; Fostitsch, P.; Heinecke, A.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Schmid, K.W.; Dralle, H.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: For the examination of the impact on clinical practice of the guidelines for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), treatment data from the ongoing multicenter study differentiated thyroid carcinoma (MSDS) were analyzed. Patients, methods: patients were randomized to adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (RTx) or no RTx in addition to standard therapy in TNM stages pT4 pNO/1/x MO/x (UICC, 5 th ed. 1997). All patients were to receive the same treatment regimen consisting of thyroidectomy, ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT), and a diagnostic 131 I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS) 3-4 months after RIT. Results: Of 339 eligible patients enrolled between January 2000 and March 2004, 273 could be analyzed. Guideline recommendations by the German Society for Nuclear Medicine from 1999 and 1992 were complied with within 28% and 82% with regard to the interval between surgery and RIT (4 vs. 4-6 weeks), in 33% and 84% with regard to 131 I activity for RIT (1-3 vs. 1-4 GBq; ±10%), and in 16% and 60% with regard to 131 I activity for WBS (100-300 vs. 100-400 MBq; ±10%). Conclusions: the 1999 guideline revision appears to have had little impact on clinical practice. Further follow-up will reveal if guideline compliance had an effect on outcomes. (orig.)

  7. Preliminary study of attitude and knowledge of thyroid cancer patients to radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongpraparn, Thonnapong; Pusuwan, Pawana; Tocharoenchai, Chiraporn; Siriphitukyotin, Oratai; Wongsawat, Wanwimon; Chaudakshetrin, Pachee; Putrasreni, Nucharee

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study is to survey the attitude and knowledge of radiation and radioiodine treatment in thyroid cancer patients. Fifty-two thyroid cancer patients who were prepared for radioactive iodine treatment at Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital were requested to fill the questionaires before and after receiving the information about radioiodine treatment. The questionaires consisted of 12 questions of which the first five were about the attitude to radiation and radioiodine treatment. The rest was about an information on radioiodine treatment. For data analysis, firstly the percentage of correct answer of each question was calculated and compared between pre- and post-test. Secondly all patients were categorized into 2 groups according to their education: upto high school, and undergraduate or higher. The attitude and the understanding about radioiodine treatment were analyzed in each group. The results show that post-test gives higher percentages of correct answers for all questions with an average of 29% improvement. For upto high school group, the attitude improves from 69.4% to 97.2% and the understanding about radioiodine treatment improves from 88.9% to 100%. Similarly, for the undergraduate or higher group,the attitude improves from 93.3% to 100% and the understanding about radioiodine treatment improves from 73.3% to 100%. It may be concluded that our education intervention is informative and the well-educated patients have better attitude to radiation

  8. Results of a TcTUs-optimized radioiodine therapy of multifocal and disseminated functional thyroid autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Endlicher, D.; Prillwitz, A.; Rudolph, F.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: The presented study prospectively evaluates the efficacy of optimized radioiodine therapy in patients (pts) with multifocal (MFA) and disseminated (DISA) autonomy. The target dose was related to the total thyroid volume and was increased in moderate and nonlinear increments for 150 to 300 Gy dependent on the pretherapeutic Tc-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression (TcTUs). Patients with focal autonomy were treated with a target dose independent of TcTUs and were used as control group. Methods: The data of 641 pts (518 women, 123 men) were evaluated, 466 pts with MFA or DISA and 175 pts with focal autonomy. In pts with MFA and DISA the target dose was increased in four steps: TcTUs 3-6%: 200 Gy, >6-12%: 250 Gy and >12%: 300 Gy. In pts with focal autonomy a fixed target dose of 300 or 400 Gy was applied. The radioactivity to be administered was calculated using a modified Marinelli formula. The follow-up examination was performed at the earliest after four, on average after eight months. Normalization of TSH was the only criterion for successful therapy. Results: The success rate in pts with latent or manifest hyperthyroidism in focal autonomy was 91.5%, thereby was not successful in 5.1% and hypothyroidism occurred in 3.4%. The average success rate in pts with MFA and DISA was 91.5%, therapy failed in 7.5% and a very low rate of 1% with hypothyroidism was seen. Conclusion: The presented optimized therapy concept with calculated, nonlinear increase of the target dose according to the TcTUs-level guaranteed even in MFA and DISA a high success rate comparable to that in focal autonomy along with a very low rate of hypothyroidism. (orig.) [de

  9. Indication of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity by impairment of pIPPA I 131 utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenzhofer, R.; Dudczak, R.

    1986-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate if doxorubicin (D) can impair myocardial fatty acid utilization. To this end we studied the myocardial utilization of pIPPA I 131 in untreated (Co, n=6) and D (20 mg/kg intraperitoneal) treated rats. D was given 24 h (24 D, n=6) and 48 hours (48 D, n=6) before tracer administration. One min after i.v. pIPPA I 131 (50 μCi) injection, the hearts were rapidly removed, frozen in liquid nitrogen, weighed, and counted. Following lipid extraction of homogenized heart extracts 131 I radioactivity distribution was analyzed by thin-layer chromatographity (TLC). In additional rat experiments, high energy phosphates (12 rats/group) and carnitine (20 rats/group) were determined enzymatically in heart extracts. The mean pIPPA uptake in rat heart (%dose/g) was 2.49 in Co, 1.74 in 24 D, and 2.36 in 48 D rats. Usually five peaks were separated by TLC, that with a mean Rf value of 0.92 corresponding to pIPPA I 131, the remaining four representing catabolites of pIPPA metabolism. The mean relative amount of unmetabolized pIPPA I 131 as compared to the sum of pIPPA I 131 catabolites was less in Co than in 24 D or 48 D rats (P<0.05) (anti x: 46.5% vs 72.4% vs 59.4%, respectively). The mean carnitine content of H extracts was higher in Co (0.55 μM/g) than in D treated rats (24 D, 0.42 μM/g; 48 D, 0.46 μM/g) (P<0.05). The total amount of higher energy phosphates was not different between the groups. However the mean ATP/AMP ratio was higher in Co (35.9) than in 24 D (22.3) or 48 D (27.1) rats (P<0.05). We conclude that D therapy is accompanied by a partial reversible impairment in myocardial pIPPA utilization, possibly mediated by carnitine deficiency. Thus, pIPPA I 131 might be useful in patients on D therapy to evaluate eventual D-induced effects on myocardial fatty acid utilization. (orig.)

  10. Is administered radioiodine activity appropriate? The effects of pre- treatment antithyroid drugs on the therapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanayakkara, D.; Udugama, C.; Perera, K.; Herath, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Although radioiodine (RAI) therapy has been used in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, there are both wide variations in current practice and deficiencies in outcome. There is concern as to decide the optimum activity to achieve better therapeutic outcome and uncertainty over the effects of pretreatment antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the post therapy outcome. Use of ATD (carbimazole) to control the severity of the disease prior to RAI therapy is a common accepted practice. The Royal college of Physicians (RCP) guideline on radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis has recommended activity of 400mBq for Graves' disease (GD) and 15mCi for toxic multi nodular disease (TMND) to achieve euthyroidism with an incidence of hypothyroidism around 15-20% at 2 years. However, in the clinical setting, many patients have become hypothyroid very early than the expected time period. This study was carried out to see the fixed dose RAI therapy outcome of both GD and TMND. Another objective is to assess the effects of pre therapy ATD on the RAI therapy for both GD and TMND at 1 year. Post RAI therapy outcome was analyzed in thyrotoxic patients who received RAI at our institute from 2001-2005. Diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis was made on the basis of biochemical thyroid function tests and thyroid uptake scans. Both GD and TMND patients were selected. Patients who were treated with ATD were advised to stop drugs for at least 4 weeks before administration of RAI therapeutic dose. GD patients received 400mBq and TMND received 550mBq of RAI irrespective of the size of the thyroid gland. Both GD and TMND were further categorized into two groups on the basis of whether they have given ATD prior to RAI therapy. Patients with solitary toxic nodular disease were excluded from the study. Post therapy thyroid functions (free thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone) were done at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months intervals. Therapy outcome over time was defined on the basis of thyroid function and

  11. Radiation exposure estimation from patient treated by I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahfi, Y.; Anjak, O.

    2012-09-01

    Radioactive iodine is the main radiopharmaceutical substance in the nuclear medicine field which used in diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from thyroid cancer; thus it can be considered as the main source of the public and patient relative exposure. In this study, 192 patients were selected randomly and their radiation dose rate was measured at different levels of the patient's body (thyroid, knee, bladder) after one, twenty four and forty eight hours from availing the prescript quantity of the I-131. The collected data may serve in estimating the worker and public exposure related to the patient treated by I-131. (authors)

  12. Long-term carbimazole pretreatment reduces the efficacy of radioiodine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Shivaprasad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Data from several studies suggest that pretreatment with antithyroid drugs (ATD before 131 I increases the risk of treatment failure. This effect has been demonstrated more consistently with propylthiouracil than with carbimazole (CMZ or methimazole (MMI. Men with Graves′ disease (GD have a lower rate of remission with 131 I compared to women and the impact of long-term ATD pretreatment on the success of 131 I is unknown. The objective of our study was to compare the efficacy of fixed doses of radioiodine between patients with and without long-term CMZ pretreatment. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective study on 335 male patients with GD treated with 131 I from 1998 to 2008. 148 patients had been pretreated with CMZ, and the remaining 187 patients received 131 I without pretreatment. We compared the success rate of a single dose of 131 I, between patients with and without long-term CMZ pretreatment. Results: The success rate of a single dose of 131 I was significantly higher in patients without pretreatment than in patients who were pretreated with CMZ (91.4% vs. 82.3%, P = 0.01. The rate of hypothyroidism in the first 6 months after 131 I therapy was significantly higher in patients without pretreatment (55.1% vs. 44.6%, P = 0.05. There was also a trend for higher cumulative rate of hypothyroidism at last follow-up in nonpretreated patients (78.1% vs. 69.7%. Conclusion: Male patients with Graves′ hyperthyroidism pretreated with CMZ have lower efficacy with 131I therapy compared to nonpretreated patients. CMZ pretreatment given for a prolonged period reduces the efficacy of 131 I therapy.

  13. Cytogenetic biodosimetry and dose-rate effect after radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostunov, Igor K. [Russian Ministry of Health Care, A.F. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Saenko, Vladimir A.; Yamashita, Shunichi [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Krylov, Valeri; Rodichev, Andrei [Russian Ministry of Health Care, A.F. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    This study set out to investigate chromosomal damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of thyroid cancer patients receiving {sup 131}I for thyroid remnant ablation or treatment of metastatic disease. The observed chromosomal damage was further converted to the estimates of whole-body dose to project the adverse side effects. Chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in 24 patients treated for the first time or after multiple courses. Blood samples were collected before treatment and 3 or 4 days after administration of 2-4 GBq of {sup 131}I. Both conventional cytogenetic and chromosome 2, 4 and 12 painting assays were used. To account for dose-rate effect, a dose-protraction factor was applied to calculate the whole-body dose. The mean dose was 0.62 Gy (95% CI: 0.44-0.77 Gy) in the subgroup of patients treated one time and 0.67 Gy (95% CI: 0.03-1.00 Gy) in re-treated patients. These dose estimates are about 1.7-fold higher than those disregarding the effect of exposure duration. In re-treated patients, the neglected dose-rate effect can result in underestimation of the cumulative whole-body dose by the factor ranging from 2.6 to 6.8. Elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations observed in re-treated patients before radioiodine therapy allows estimation of a cumulative dose received from all previous treatments. (orig.)

  14. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease: Comparison of outcome between Freiburg and Munich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, E.; Dagres, E.; Blattmann, H.; Kreisig, T.; Mann, K.

    1990-01-01

    The aim on this paper was to compare the results of radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease treated at two different nuclear medicine departments, Freiburg (FR); Munich (M). A low dose concept applying 60-80 Gy provides only a moderate rate of success: FR (80 Gy): 80%; M (60 Gy): 54%. A dose of 150 Gy, however, succeeds in 81% of the FR-cases and in 86% of the M-cases. As a consequence, this 150 Gy approach has a higher incidence of post-treatment hypothyroidism: FR: 49%; M: 62%. As the rate of post-treatment hypothyroidism seems to be independent of the dose concept these early post-treatment numbers will increase by about 4% per year in all patients. Nevertheless, the high dose concept is recommended, because the aim of RIT is to remove hyperthyroidism reliably, as the surgeons have told us. A hypothyroidism after RIT of Graves' disease, however, is the lesser evil compared to remaining or recurrent hyperthyroidism since these patients can be treated with thyroid hormones without problems. (orig.) [de

  15. Radioprotective action of carbimazole in radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis - influence of the drug on iodine kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, J.M.C.; Alexander, W.D.; Glasgow Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment with carbimazole of patients given radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy for thyrotoxicosis reduces the incidence of early hypothyroidism. The possibility that this radioprotective effect might be a consequence of drug induced alteration in thyroidal iodide turnover, leading to a reduction in thyroid irradiation, was investigated in a prospective study of 24 thyrotoxic patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive 131 I alone or to be treated with carbimazole for a minimum of three months before 131 I. Thyroxine supplements were given in the latter group to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The effective half-life of therapeutic 131 I in the thyroid was measured using a gamma camera/computer system after oral administration of the dose, allowing the biological half life of the anion and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid to be derived. Effective half life of 131 I, biological half life of 131 I and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid were similar in the two groups of subjects. It is concluded that the radioprotective action of carbimazole is not a consequence of altered thyroidal iodide kinetics. (orig.)

  16. Cytogenetic effects of radioiodine therapy: a 20-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, Gordon K. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Khvostunov, Igor K. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Gregoire, Eric [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, PRP-HOM/SRBE/LDB, BP 17, Fontenay aux roses Cedex (France); Barquinero, Joan-Francesc [Universtitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Facultat de Biociencies, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Shi, Lin; Tashiro, Satoshi [Hiroshima University, Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare cytogenetic data in a patient before and after treatment with radioiodine to evaluate the assays in the context of biological dosimetry. We studied a 34-year-old male patient who underwent a total thyroidectomy followed by ablation therapy with {sup 131}I (19.28 GBq) for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient provided blood samples before treatment and then serial samples at monthly intervals during the first year period and quarterly intervals for 5 years and finally 20 years after treatment. A micronucleus assay, dicentric assay, FISH method and G-banding were used to detect and measure DNA damage in circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of the patient. The results showed that radiation-induced cytogenetic effects persisted for many years after treatment as shown by elevated micronuclei and chromosome aberrations as a result of exposure to {sup 131}I. At 5 years after treatment, the micronucleus count was tenfold higher than the pre-exposure frequency. Shortly after the treatment, micronucleus counts produced a dose estimate of 0.47 ± 0.09 Gy. The dose to the patient evaluated retrospectively using FISH-measured translocations was 0.70 ± 0.16 Gy. Overall, our results show that the micronucleus assay is a retrospective biomarker of low-dose radiation exposure. However, this method is not able to determine local dose to the target tissue which in this case was any residual thyroid cells plus metastases of thyroidal origin. (orig.)

  17. Radioprotective action of carbimazole in radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis - influence of the drug on iodine kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, J.M.C.; Hilditch, T.E.; Robertson, J.; Alexander, W.D.

    1987-10-01

    Pretreatment with carbimazole of patients given radioiodine (/sup 131/I) therapy for thyrotoxicosis reduces the incidence of early hypothyroidism. The possibility that this radioprotective effect might be a consequence of drug induced alteration in thyroidal iodide turnover, leading to a reduction in thyroid irradiation, was investigated in a prospective study of 24 thyrotoxic patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive /sup 131/I alone or to be treated with carbimazole for a minimum of three months before /sup 131/I. Thyroxine supplements were given in the latter group to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The effective half-life of therapeutic /sup 131/I in the thyroid was measured using a gamma camera/computer system after oral administration of the dose, allowing the biological half life of the anion and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid to be derived. Effective half life of /sup 131/I, biological half life of /sup 131/I and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid were similar in the two groups of subjects. It is concluded that the radioprotective action of carbimazole is not a consequence of altered thyroidal iodide kinetics.

  18. The influence of antithyroid drugs on the results of radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuevich, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the given research was the estimation of the influence of antithyroid medication on efficiency of radioiodine therapy (RIT) of nonimmune hyperthyroidism in patients with thyroid functional autonomy (FA). 100 patients with various clinical variants of thyroid FA were included in research and received treatment with radioactive iodine. From surveyed 2 groups of patients were formed. The first group consisted from 50 persons initially accepting during 4 months (2.5; 6) antithyroid drugs (ATD) which cancellation had been made, as a rule, 2 day prior to RIT, and the second included 50 persons not accepting ATD neither up to nor after RIT. 9 elderly and multimorbid patients from the first group continued to accept ATD within several months after RIT. Carbimazole (n=45) or methimazole (n=5) in a doze of 10 mg (5; 10) were used as antithyroid drugs. In 4 months (4; 5) after RIT the successful result (euthyrosis or hypothyroidism) was achieved in 48 (96%) patients accepting ATD, and in 47 (94%) patients who were not accepting last. The conclusion that antithyroid medication does not influence on efficiency of RIT of thyroid FA is made. It is revealed that frequency of hypothyroidism after RIT in patients of the first group was higher (36%), than in patients of the second group (20%). (authors)

  19. Does an individual estimation of halflife improve the results of radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease?; Verbessert die individuelle Bestimmung der effektiven Halbwertszeit die Ergebnisse der Radioiodtherapie des Morbus Basedow?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, P.; Koerber, C.; Koerber-Hafner, N.; Haenscheid, H.; Reiners, Chr. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Aim: The impact of our dosimetry concept on radioiodine therapy success in Graves' disease (GD) was analysed. Three questions arised: Did individual estimation of pretherapeutic halflife improve therapeutic success? Did individual dosimetry result in accurate dose calculation? Did antithyroid medication have a measurable influence on therapeutic success under the prevailing conditions? Methods: 126 consecutive patients were treated with 200 Gy I-131 in our therapy ward for GD and followed-up six to nine months after therapy. Success quote was assessed using a standardized protocol and treatment was classified as successful when the patients was eu- or hypothyroid, or unsuccessful when he or she presented with a suppressed TSH-level or in hyperthyroid condition after antithyroid medication withdrawal. Antithyroid medication, activity I-131, dose, concentration of fT{sub 3} and fT{sub 4}, specific delivered dose and halflife were put into a multiple regression model to assess their influence on therapeutic success. In order to assess possible factors disturbing the therapeutic outcome, relevant parameters were analyzed using Logit transformation. Results: Out of 126 patients 84 were classified as successfully treated and 42 (33,3%) as failures. A significant influence on the outcome only was found for thyroid mass. However, therapeutic success appeared to be more distinctly determined by the specific delivered dose using an estimated halflife of 5.5 days (Odds: 10.0, p <0.001). Accurate intratherapeutic dosimetry did not play a significant role to enhance therapeutic success. Neither did antihyroid medication during radioiodine therapy exert any significant impact. Conclusions: Measurement of individual intratherapeutic halflife as opposed to an estimate using a standard halflife did not provide improved results concerning the target dose. Retrospectively, the therapeutic outcome on the basis of a measured halflife as compared to a standard halflife did not

  20. Development of gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid system for simultaneous imaging of I-131 radionuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kato, Katsuhiko [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogata, Yoshimune [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    Although iodine 131 (I-131) is used for radionuclide therapy, high resolution images are difficult to obtain with conventional gamma cameras because of the high energy of I-131 gamma photons (364 keV). Cerenkov-light imaging is a possible method for beta emitting radionuclides, and I-131 (606 MeV maximum beta energy) is a candidate to obtain high resolution images. We developed a high energy gamma camera system for I-131 radionuclide and combined it with a Cerenkov-light imaging system to form a gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system to compare the simultaneously measured images of these two modalities. The high energy gamma imaging detector used 0.85-mm×0.85-mm×10-mm thick GAGG scintillator pixels arranged in a 44×44 matrix with a 0.1-mm thick reflector and optical coupled to a Hamamatsu 2 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT: H12700 MOD). The gamma imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator was mounted on its top to form a gamma camera system. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was made of a high sensitivity cooled CCD camera. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was combined with the gamma camera using optical mirrors to image the same area of the subject. With this configuration, we simultaneously imaged the gamma photons and the Cerenkov-light from I-131 in the subjects. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the gamma camera system for I-131 were respectively ~3 mm FWHM and ~10 cps/MBq for the high sensitivity collimator at 10 cm from the collimator surface. The spatial resolution of the Cerenkov-light imaging system was 0.64 mm FWHM at 10 cm from the system surface. Thyroid phantom and rat images were successfully obtained with the developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, allowing direct comparison of these two modalities. Our developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system will be useful to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two

  1. What is the best pre-therapeutic dosimetry for successful radioiodine therapy of multifocal autonomy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthardt, M. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Rubner, C. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Bauhofer, A. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (DE). Inst. of Theoretical Surgery] (and others)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of multifocal autonomies (MFA) is a problem as therapeutic outcome may be worse than in other kinds of autonomies. We compared different dosimetric concepts in our patients. Patients, methods: Data from 187 patients who had undergone RIT for MFA (Marinelli algorithm, volumetric compromise) were included in the study. For calculation, either a standard or a measured half-life had been used and the dosimetric compromise (150 Gy, total thyroid volume). Therapeutic activities were calculated by 2 alternative concepts and compared to therapeutic success achieved (concept of TcTUs-based calculation of autonomous volume with 300 Gy and TcTUs-based adaptation of target dose on total thyroid volume). Results: If a standard half-life is used, therapeutic success was achieved in 90.2% (hypothyroidism 23,1%, n=143). If a measured half-life was used the success rate was 93.1% (13,6% hypothyroidism, n=44). These differences were statistically not significant, neither for all patients together nor for subgroups eu-, hypo-, or hyperthyroid after therapy (ANOVA, all p>0.05). The alternative dosimetric concepts would have resulted either in significantly lower organ doses (TcTUs-based calculation of autonomous volume; 80.76{+-}80.6 Gy versus 125.6{+-}46.3 Gy; p<0.0001) or in systematic over-treatment with significantly higher doses (TcTUs-adapted concept; 164.2{+-}101.7 Gy versus 125.6{+-}46.3 Gy; p=0.0097). Conclusions: TcTUs-based determination of the autonomous volume should not be performed, the TcTUs-based adaptation of the target dose will only increase the rate of hypothyroidism. A standard half-life may be used in pre-therapeutic dosimetry for RIT of MFA. If so, individual therapeutic activities may be calculated based on thyroid size corrected to the 24h ITUs without using Marinelli's algorithm. (orig.)

  2. Results of radioiodine therapy of manifest hyperthyroidism and autonomous euthyroid goiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berding, G.; Schicha, H.

    1990-01-01

    In 200 patients follow-up examinations were performed up to one year after radioiodine therapy (RITh) with individual dose calculation. The mean applied dose was significantly lower in patients with immunogenic hyperhyroidism (Graves' disease) as compared to patients with non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism (disseminated/multifocal autonomy, HYDA). In Graves' disease the rate of recurrent hyperthyroidism was significantly higher and that of posttreatment hypothyroidism lower. Considering the high recurrence rate in Graves' disease a higher dose, e.g. 150 Gy, seems to be appropriate. In patients with HYDA who received antithyroid drugs during RITh, recurrence of hyperthyroidism appeared slightly more, and posttreatment hypothyroidism slightly less, frequent. The efficiency of RITh was not significantly reduced by additional treatment with antithyroid drugs. Posttreatment hypothyroidism in patients with euthyroid goiter and disseminated/multifocal autonomy (EUDA) occurred significnatly more frequent if the basal TSH level was ≥ 0.5 μIE/ml before therapy. The goiter size was reduced independent of the basal TSH level. In HYDA patients after thyroid surgery recurrence appeared less, and in those with EUDA posttreatment hypothyroidism significantly more, frequent. A lower dose seems to be suitable in patients who underwent thyroid surgery before. In patients with focal autonomy after RITh no recurrence of hyperthyroidism was observed. In 9% a suppressed basal TSH level indicating persistent autonomy was seen. Posttreatment hypothyroidism in focal autonomy appeared only in patients without manifest hyperthyroidism before RITh and was significantly more frequent in this group. In patients with focal autonomy who developed hypothyroidism the dose calculation was based on a significantly higher volume of the adenoma. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Radioiodine therapy for Plummer's disease based on the thyroid uptake of technetium-99m pertechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, J.; Wisheu, S.; Behe, M.; Gratz, S.; Becker, W.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was the evaluation of a TcTUs (global technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression)-based approach in 370 patients with thyroid autonomy (Plummer's disease) treated by radioiodine therapy (RIT) under standardised conditions. The analysis included 370 patients (309 females, 61 males; mean age 64±11.6 years) treated for thyroid autonomy [unifocal (UFA), 36.8%; multifocal (MFA), 55.7%; disseminated (DISA), 7.6%]. During RIT all patients were under thyroid suppression (TSH 0.5 μU/l and/or TcTUs 4 μU/ml). A dose of 350-450 Gy to the autonomous tissue resulted in a success rate of 97% in the UFA group and 81% in the MFA/DISA group. Decrease in total thyroid volume and TcTUs did not differ significantly between successfully treated patients and patients with persistent autonomy. Multivariate analysis of all 370 patients identified four independent factors that negatively influenced the therapeutic success: high pretherapeutic thyroid volume (P=0.0001; odds ratio: 1.017), high pretherapeutic TcTUs values (P=0.0001; odds ratio: 1.378), multifocal/disseminated autonomy (P=0.0056; odds ratio: 3.245) and low target dose (P=0.017; odds ratio: 0.997). It is concluded that the high success rate in the treatment of UFA indicates the concept of TcTUs-based RIT to be valid, but that in the therapy of MFA/DISA the target se has to be corrected if the total thyroid volume exceeds a critical threshold. (orig.)

  4. Influence of antithyroid medication on effective half-life and uptake of 131 I following radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moka, D.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: A radioiodine therapy (RIT) in thyrotoxic patients receiving antithyroid drugs (ATD) leads in comparison to nonpretreated patients either to higher therapeutic doses or to higher treatment failure rates. Aim of this study was to optimize the effect of RIT in patients pretreated with ATD. Methods: Therefore, the influence of ATD was assessed in 109 patients with shortened effective half-life of 131 I. RIT was performed under stationary conditions. Radioiodine activity of the thyroid gland was stopped three days after RIT. The patients antithyroid medication was stopped three days after RIT. The progress of the first RIT and of a second radioiodine application, which still was necessary in 29 patients, was compared to 32 patients receiving ATD, continuously. Results: Values of effective half-life for 131 I rose significantly from 3.2±0.2 to 5.7±0.2 days (Graves' disease: 3.4 to 5.7 days; toxic goiters' disease: Multifocal autonomy 3.2 to 6.2 days; unifocal autonomy 2.5 auf 5.0 days) 2-3 days after stopping ATD. There was an increase of the 131 I-uptake of a second RIT decreased significantly in patients receiving ATD, continuously. Conclusion: Effective half-life and uptake of 131 I was affected significantly by ATD. The stop taking of ATD after RIT is useful to improve an apparent insufficient RIT in thyrotoxic patients receiving ATD. (orig.) [de

  5. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the choice of thyreostatic medication?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobe, C.; Weber, I.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to analyse the impact of the choice of antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the outcome of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease. Patients, material, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months after RIT between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were the confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of ATD two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose of 250 Gy was calculated from the results of the radioiodine test and the therapeutically achieved dose was measured by serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months offer RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The pretreatment ATD was retrospectively correlated with the results achieved. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients. 472 patients were treated with carbimazole or methimazole (CMI) and 61 with propylthiouracil (PTU). 38 patients had no thyrostatic drugs (ND) prior to RIT. The success rate was equal in all groups (CMI 451/472; PTU 61/61; ND 37/38; p = 0.22). Conclusion: thyrostatic treatment with PTU achieves excellent results in ablative RIT, using an accurate dosimetric approach with an achieved post-therapeutic dose of more than 200 Gy. (orig.)

  6. Body weight gain after radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism; Koerpergewichtsentwicklung nach Radioiodtherapie einer Hyperthyreose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidhauer, K.; Odatzidu, L.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Kiencke, P. [Koeln Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik, Informatik und Epidemiologie (IMSIE)

    2002-02-01

    Aim: Analysis and follow up of body weight after radioiodine therapy (RITh) of hyperthyroidism, since excessive weight gain is a common complaint among these patients. Methods: Therapy and body weight related data of 100 consecutive RITh-patients were retrospectively analysed from the time before up to three years after RITh. All patients suffered from hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease or autonomy), but were adjusted to euthyroid levels after RITh. Patients' data were compared to a control group of 48 euthyroid patients out of the same ambulance and during the same time scale. Results: All patients (RITh and controls) gained weight over the time. There was no statistically significant difference in BMI development over three years between RITh-patients and controls (5.5% resp. 4.9% increase). In the first year after RITh, weight gain of the RITh patients was higher indeed, but lower in the follow up, resulting in the same range of weight gain after three years as the controls. Besides that women showed a slightly higher increase of BMI than men, and so did younger patients compared to elder as well as patients with overweight already before RITh. Conclusions: An initially distinct increase of body weight after RITh of hyperthyroidism is mainly a compensation of pretherapeutic weight loss due to hyperthyroidism. Presupposing adequate euthyroid adjustment of thyroid metabolism after therapy, RITh is not responsible for later weight gain and adipositas. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Untersuchung der Entwicklung des Koerpergewichtes nach {sup 131}I-Therapie einer Hyperthyreose, da der Radioiodtherapie (RITh) haeufig eine exzessive posttherapeutische Gewichtszunahme angelastet wird. Methoden: Retrospektiv wurden therapie- und koerpergewichtsbezogene Daten von 100 konsekutiven Patienten vor und bis drei Jahre nach RITh einer Hyperthyreose (Morbus Basedow oder funktionelle Autonomie) erfasst und mit denen einer euthyreoten Kontrollgruppe (n = 48) verglichen. Die

  7. The superiority and benefits of whole body imaging after radioiodine -131 therapy over radioiodine 131 diagnostic imaging in management of thyroid carcinomas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleid, M A [Al-Mostansyria university, college of medicine P.O.Box 14132, Baghdad, (Iraq)

    1995-10-01

    A comparison between diagnostic and post therapeutic radioiodine imaging methods utilized in detection of thyroid metastases in 34 patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer was performed. The study revealed that the differences in detection on neck activity only between the two methods for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer were 35% and 27% respectively. While the overall detection percentages in both papillary and follicular thyroid cancers cases were 23% in diagnostic and 76% in post therapy scintigrams and the detection difference between the methods was 53% when all lesions throughout the body were seen on scintigram for only follicular thyroid cancer cases were counted, the detection percentage was increased up to 109%. It is clear that post therapeutic scans visualize an additional site activity not shown in diagnostic scans. There fore, post therapeutic imaging method is far superior to diagnostic imaging method and highly sensitive in visualization of thyroid metastases. On the other hand, this research also achieves many scientific and financial benefits. Therefore. This method should be adopted in management and follow up of well differentiated malignancies. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The superiority and benefits of whole body imaging after radioiodine -131 therapy over radioiodine 131 diagnostic imaging in management of thyroid carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleid, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    A comparison between diagnostic and post therapeutic radioiodine imaging methods utilized in detection of thyroid metastases in 34 patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer was performed. The study revealed that the differences in detection on neck activity only between the two methods for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer were 35% and 27% respectively. While the overall detection percentages in both papillary and follicular thyroid cancers cases were 23% in diagnostic and 76% in post therapy scintigrams and the detection difference between the methods was 53% when all lesions throughout the body were seen on scintigram for only follicular thyroid cancer cases were counted, the detection percentage was increased up to 109%. It is clear that post therapeutic scans visualize an additional site activity not shown in diagnostic scans. There fore, post therapeutic imaging method is far superior to diagnostic imaging method and highly sensitive in visualization of thyroid metastases. On the other hand, this research also achieves many scientific and financial benefits. Therefore. This method should be adopted in management and follow up of well differentiated malignancies. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Chemical Process for Treatment of Tellurium and Chromium Liquid Waste from I-131 Radioisotope Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainus-Salimin; Gunandjar; Dedy-Harsono; Hendro; Sugeng-Purnomo; Mohammad-Faruq; Zulfakhri

    2000-01-01

    The I-131 radioisotope is used in nuclear medicine for diagnosis and therapy. The I-131 radioisotope is produced by wet distillation at Bandung Nuclear Research Center and generated about 4,875 Itr of liquid waste containing 2,532.8 ppm of tellurium and 1,451.8 ppm chromium at pH 1. Considering its negative impact to the environment caused by toxic behaviour of tellurium and chromium, it is necessary to treat chemically that's liquid waste. The research of chemical treatment of tellurium and chromium liquid waste from I-131 radioisotope production has been done. The steps of process are involved of neutralisation with NaOH, coagulation-flocculation process for step I using Ca(OH) 2 coagulant for precipitation of sulphate, sulphite, oxalic, chrome Cr 3+ , and coagulation-flocculation process for step II using BaCI 2 coagulant for precipitation of chrome Cr 6+ and tellurium from the supernatant of coagulation in step I. The best result of experiment was achieved at 0.0161 ppm of chromium concentration on the supernatant from coagulation-flocculation of step I using 3.5 g Ca(OH) 2 for 100 ml of liquid waste, and 0.95 ppm of tellurium concentration on the final supernatant from coagulation-flocculation by of step II using 0.7 g BaCI 2 for supernatant from coagulation of step I. (author)

  10. Pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma using 124-iodine. Predicted blood doses correlate with changes in blood cell counts after radioiodine therapy and depend on modes of TSH stimulation and number of preceding radioiodine therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung-Knemeyer, V.; Nagarajah, J.; Jentzen, W.; Ruhlmann, M.; Freudenberg, L.S.; Stahl, A.R.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry prior to a high-dose radioiodine therapy (RAIT) is recommended and a blood dose of 2 Gy is considered to be safe. In this study, changes in the blood cell count after radioiodine therapy of high risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) were analyzed and compared with the results of the pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry using 124 I. Moreover, the influence of different modes of TSH stimulation and the number of preceding radioiodine therapies on the blood dose were assessed. 198 patients with locally advanced or metastasized DTC received a pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry using 124 I. To analyze the influence of the modes of TSH stimulation and the number of preceding RAITs on blood dose subgroups were built as follows: patients with endogenous TSH stimulation versus patients with exogenous TSH stimulation and patients with no preceding RAIT versus patients with at least one preceding RAIT. In 124/198 patients subsequent RAIT was performed. In 73/124 patients, hemograms were performed from day 2 to 12 month after RAIT. There was no high-grade bone marrow toxicity (id est (i.e.) ≥grade 3) in patients receiving less than 2 Gy blood dose-independent of the therapeutic history. Within the first month after radioiodine therapy, there was an overall decrease in the white blood cell and platelet counts. The erythrocyte count was essentially stable. There was a correlation between cell count decrease and predicted blood doses (Spearman's correlation coefficient >-0.6 each) for the white cell line and the platelets. With regard to the subgroups, the blood dose per administered 131 I activity (BDpA) was significantly higher in patients with endogenous TSH stimulation (median 0.08 Gy/GBq) than in patients with exogenous TSH stimulation (0.06 Gy/GBq) and in patients with no previous RAIT (0.08 Gy/GBq) compared to patients who had previously undergone at least one RAIT (0.07 Gy/GBq). The range of BDpA among DTC patients is rather wide. Our

  11. Control system of liquid effluents generated in treatment with I-131; Sistema de control de efluentes liquidos generados en el tratamiento con I-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia M, T.; Ruiz C, M. A.; Angeles C, A.; Ramirez S, R., E-mail: teodoro.garcia@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    In recent years, nuclear medicine has developed greatly in our country and around the world. Techniques for both medical diagnosis and therapy have increased the use of radiopharmaceuticals, notably the I-131. In Mexico there are around 150 nuclear medicine establishments authorized by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias. Most of these establishments do not have an appropriate facility for the treatment of radioactive liquid effluents, to ensure compliance with the concentration limits established in the regulations. The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) developed and implemented successfully, a control system of radioactive effluents (named SACEL) from a nuclear medicine facility. This system ensures an effective compliance with regulations and also better management and control of these radioactive effluents. Calculations and design of SACEL were made with respect to I-131, because is one of the most commonly used in radiotherapy and medical diagnostics, besides its half-life is greater in relation to other radionuclides. SACEL is comprised of four storage tanks and decay and a fifth tank for measuring the concentration of I-131 and later discharge to the drain; these tanks are connected to an automated system that controls the effluents passage. The calculation to determine the volume of the tanks was carried out according to the demand that has the hospital, to the maximum activity being poured in effluents and time required to decay. In this paper the design and installation of SACEL system, in addition to functioning as a facility that enables the Hospital meet the required standards is presented. Dose calculations performed with MCNPX and the methodology used in the calibration of the detection system is also presented. (Author)

  12. Use of I-131 labeled, murine Fab against a high molecular weight antigen of human melanoma: Preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; McGuffin, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    High molecular-weight antigen (HMWA) is tumor-associated proteoglycan of human malignant melanoma. I-131 labeled Fab fragments of these specific antibodies were used for preliminary feasibility studies for radioimmunodetection and therapy of human subjects who had inoperable metastatic melanoma. Ten patients received tracer doses of I-131 (anti-HMWA) Fab. All patients (8/8) who had melanoma lesions greater than 1 cm by correlative diagnosis methods had one or more lesions that had localization to tumor of the radiolabelled Fab. In all, 17 of 23 (74%) documented metastases were seen. Two patients who had avid uptake received potentially radiotherapeutic doses. For both of these patients, whole imaging studies showed that the localization of the high dose I-131 Fab was predominantly in tumor. On whole body images, the anti-Fab HMWA appears to be more tumor selective than Fab preparations that target the p97 antigen for melanoma, and there is less uptake in liver

  13. Effective Half-life of I-131 in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Treated by Radioactive I-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seok Gun [Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Effective half life of I-131 (T{sub eff}) in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated by I-131 is must-know value for dose calculation and determination of release time from isolation room. There has been no report about T{sub eff} in Koreans. Thus, author tried to measure dose rate without radiation exposure to faculty members and calculated T{sub eff}. Probe of radiation survey meter was fixed at the wall of isolation room, and body of survey meter was placed outside the room. With this simple arrangement, author could measure radiation frequently without radiation exposure to faculty members in 68 patient (F=55, M=13, age=47{+-}13.7) treated by I-131 (3.7{approx}7.4 GBq) for differentiated thyroid cancer from Jan 2006 to Dec 2006. From this data, T{sub eff}, 48 hr retention rate, and the time necessary to whole body retention of I-131 become less than 1.1 GBq were calculated. Serum creatinine levels were measured before and after thyroid hormone withdrawal. T{sub eff} was 15.4{+-}4.3 hr (9.4{approx}32.5 hr). There was a loose correlation between T{sub eff} and serum creatinine concentration (r=0.45). 48hr retention was 4.9{+-}4.2% (1{approx}23%). Time necessary to whole body retention of I-131 become less than 1.1 GBq was calculated as 47.1{+-}13.2 hr for 9.25 GBq, 42.1{+-}11.9 hr for 7.4 GBq, 35.7{+-}10.0 hr for 5.55 GBq, and 26.7{+-}7.5 hr for 3.7 GBq dose of I-131. Author successfully measured radiation dose rates in isolated patients treated by high dose of I-131 without radiation exposure to the faculty members with simple arrangement of survey meter probe. Using those data, T{sub eff} and some other indices were calculated.

  14. Radioiodine Therapy of Hyperthyroidism. Simplified patient-specific absorbed dose planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Helene

    2003-10-01

    Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism is the most frequently performed radiopharmaceutical therapy. To calculate the activity of {sup 131}I to be administered for giving a certain absorbed dose to the thyroid, the mass of the thyroid and the individual biokinetic data, normally in the form of uptake and biologic half-time, have to be determined. The biologic half-time is estimated from several uptake measurements and the first one is usually made 24 hours after the intake of the test activity. However, many hospitals consider it time-consuming since at least three visits of the patient to the hospital are required (administration of test activity, first uptake measurement, second uptake measurement plus treatment). Instead, many hospitals use a fixed effective half-time or even a fixed administered activity, only requiring two visits. However, none of these methods considers the absorbed dose to the thyroid of the individual patient. In this work a simplified patient-specific method for treating hyperthyroidism is proposed, based on one single uptake measurement, thus requiring only two visits to the hospital. The calculation is as accurate as using the individual biokinetic data. The simplified method is as patient-convenient and time effective as using a fixed effective half-time or a fixed administered activity. The simplified method is based upon a linear relation between the late uptake measurement 4-7 days after intake of the test activity and the product of the extrapolated initial uptake and the effective half-time. Treatments not considering individual biokinetics in the thyroid result in a distribution of administered absorbed dose to the thyroid, with a range of -50 % to +160 % compared to a protocol calculating the absorbed dose to the thyroid of the individual patient. Treatments with a fixed administered activity of 370 MBq will in general administer 250 % higher activity to the patient, with a range of -30 % to +770 %. The absorbed dose to other

  15. Predictors of treatment failure, incipient hypothyroidism, and weight gain following radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, F W; Zammitt, N N; Beckett, G J; Strachan, M W J

    2013-10-01

    Following radioiodine ((131)I) therapy, both late recognition of hypothyroidism and treatment failure may result in adverse outcomes. We sought to assess indicators of both incipient hypothyroidism and treatment failure following (131)I and determine factors predictive of weight gain. Retrospective study of 288 patients receiving (131)I for treatment of Graves' thyrotoxicosis. Primary outcome measures were thyroid status and weight change at 1 yr following (131)I. The treatment failure rate at 1 yr was 13.5%. Hypothyroidism developed in 80.9%, with 58.5% of patients having levels of free T4 (fT4) treatment failure (23.3%) than those with no thionamide exposure (6.3%, p=0.003), but also had more active Graves' disease. Following (131)I, development of a detectable TSH or low-normal fT4 levels was not associated with recurrent thyrotoxicosis. Median weight gain was 5.3 kg, although patients with nadir fT4 levels 6 pmol/l (p=0.05). The main predictor of weight gain was fT4 level immediately prior to treatment; those in the lowest tertile gained a median 3.1 kg whilst those in the highest tertile gained 7.4 kg (median difference 4.3 kg; 95% confidence interval: 2.5-6.2). Marked hypothyroidism following (131)I is common and often occurs early. Simple biochemical parameters may help identify incipient hypothyroidism and potentially limit excess weight gain. Treatment failure is common in patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and in such cases larger doses of (131)I may be warranted.

  16. Radioiodine therapy increases the risk of cerebrovascular events in hyperthyroid and euthyroid patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Jensen, Lars Thorbjoern; Vej-Hansen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    to radiation and is capable of inducing atherosclerosis. The objective of the study was to elucidate whether ionizing radiation from radioiodine might contribute to cerebrovascular morbidity. METHODS: In a retrospective register cohort study, 4000 hyperthyroid and 1022 euthyroid goitre patients treated...... with radioiodine between 1975 and 2008 were matched 1:4 on age and sex with random controls. The cohort was followed from the date of treatment until hospitalization due to cerebrovascular event, death, 20 years of follow-up or March 2013. Data were analyzed in competing risk models adjusting for age, sex...

  17. Influence of preceding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. Einfluss vorangegangener diagnostischer und therapeutischer Massnahmen auf die Radiojodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendl, J.; Boerner, W. (Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-02-01

    Before and until 3 weeks after application of nonionic CA iodine and the 20-min-technetium-thyroid-uptake was measured in serum and urine in 23 euthyroid patients, which were given intravenously nonionic CA during heart catheterization. Concerning the possible influence of iodine contamination on a subsequent radioiodine therapy the following aspects result from the study: the time interval between application of CA and therapy has to be at least 4-6 weeks to avoid dilution of the radioiodine by iodine being released from the contrast agents. The thyroid-uptake of Technetium or Iodine after administration of CA is not constant over time but reaches its original value only in a gradual way (60% of the initial value 3 weeks after the CA were given); that means, the iodine-uptake during, radioiodine therapy can be higher than it was at the time the dose was calculated. Concerning the possible influence of preceding therapeutic procedures on the therapy with radioiodine the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs plays the most important role. Antithyroid drugs of the thiourylene group have been shown by many study groups to have a radioprotective effect. Other large studies however could not demonstrate any effect of antithyroid medication on the results of radioiodine therapy. All studies so far existing have in common that they are not strongly randomized with regard to the patient groups, because generally only in severe cases of hyperthyroidism additional antithyroid drug treatment has been employed, therefore it might be the case that the radioprotective effect of antithyroid drugs may be caused only by selection artifacts. The contradictory results of the different studies justify the practical way in so far as there are no reasonable objections against the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs to restore euthyroidism before starting the therapy with radioiodine. (orig./MG).

  18. Effect of a Low Iodine Diet vs. Restricted Iodine Diet on Postsurgical Preparation for Radioiodine Ablation Therapy in Thyroid Carcinoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chi Young; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Mi-Jin; Chang, Hang Seok; Park, Cheong Soo; Chung, Woong Youn

    2015-07-01

    The radioiodine ablation therapy is required for patients who underwent a total thyroidectomy. Through a comparative review of a low iodine diet (LID) and a restricted iodine diet (RID), the study aims to suggest guidelines that are suitable for the conditions of Korea. The study was conducted with 101 patients. With 24-hour urine samples from the patients after a 2-week restricted diet and after a 4-week restricted diet, the amount of iodine in the urine was estimated. The consumed radioiodine amounts for 2 hours and 24 hours were calculated. This study was conducted with 47 LID patients and 54 RID patients. The amounts of iodine in urine, the 2-week case and 4-week case for each group showed no significant differences. The amounts of iodine in urine between the two groups were both included in the range of the criteria for radioiodine ablation therapy. Also, 2 hours and 24 hours radioiodine consumption measured after 4-week restrictive diet did not show statistical differences between two groups. A 2-week RID can be considered as a type of radioiodine ablation therapy after patients undergo a total thyroidectomy.

  19. Microwave assistance of labeling hippuric acid by I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Wu, Kou-Hung; Ko, Pi-Wen; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Pao, Kuan-Chuan; Chou, Shih-Ching; Shieh, Fa-Kuen; Sureshbabu, Radhakrishnan; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach for labeling hippuric acid with I-131 using microwaves. It utilizes copper(II) acetate as a catalyst of the labeling. The process involves the use of this catalytic copper(II) acetate at low dilutions that were nevertheless sufficient to produce labeled hippuric acid with high radiochemical purity in a short time. Therefore, the novel technique overcomes the limitations of previously reported conventional methods that involve heating. - Highlights: • We report the microwave assisted radiochemical labeling of hippuric acid by I-131. • Cu(OAc) 2 can be used as catalyst to get labeled product in lower dilution condition. • Advantages of our method are lesser time scale and high radiochemical purity.

  20. Radioiodine uptake following iodine-131 therapy for Graves' disease: an early indicator of need for retreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, W.R.; Gilliland, P.F.; Piziak, V.K.; Petty, F.C.; McConnell, B.G.; Verdonk, C.A.; Ibarra, J.D.; Thompson, J.Q.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-five patients with Graves' disease were studied prospectively to determine if 24-hour I-131 uptake measurements alone or in combination with serum thyroid hormone levels at six weeks would determine the necessity for retreatment of the thyrotoxicosis. All patients with an I-131 uptake greater than 30% at six weeks required retreatment. No patient with an I-131 uptake of less than 15% required retreatment. Patients with uptakes between 15% and 30% were variable. An elevated free thyroxin index at 6 weeks is not helpful to determine which patients will remain thyrotoxic. Patients with a free thyroxin index within the normal range at six weeks can be predicted to be euthyroid by 12 weeks if their 24-hour I-131 uptake is between 15% and 30% and to be hypothyroid if their 24-hour I-131 uptake is below 15%. There was no difference between patient groups treated initially with antithyroid medication and those who were not.

  1. What is the best pre-therapeutic dosimetry for successful radioiodine therapy of multifocal autonomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotthardt, M.; Philipps Univ., Marburg; Rubner, C.; Bauhofer, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of multifocal autonomies (MFA) is a problem as therapeutic outcome may be worse than in other kinds of autonomies. We compared different dosimetric concepts in our patients. Patients, methods: Data from 187 patients who had undergone RIT for MFA (Marinelli algorithm, volumetric compromise) were included in the study. For calculation, either a standard or a measured half-life had been used and the dosimetric compromise (150 Gy, total thyroid volume). Therapeutic activities were calculated by 2 alternative concepts and compared to therapeutic success achieved (concept of TcTUs-based calculation of autonomous volume with 300 Gy and TcTUs-based adaptation of target dose on total thyroid volume). Results: If a standard half-life is used, therapeutic success was achieved in 90.2% (hypothyroidism 23,1%, n=143). If a measured half-life was used the success rate was 93.1% (13,6% hypothyroidism, n=44). These differences were statistically not significant, neither for all patients together nor for subgroups eu-, hypo-, or hyperthyroid after therapy (ANOVA, all p>0.05). The alternative dosimetric concepts would have resulted either in significantly lower organ doses (TcTUs-based calculation of autonomous volume; 80.76±80.6 Gy versus 125.6±46.3 Gy; p<0.0001) or in systematic over-treatment with significantly higher doses (TcTUs-adapted concept; 164.2±101.7 Gy versus 125.6±46.3 Gy; p=0.0097). Conclusions: TcTUs-based determination of the autonomous volume should not be performed, the TcTUs-based adaptation of the target dose will only increase the rate of hypothyroidism. A standard half-life may be used in pre-therapeutic dosimetry for RIT of MFA. If so, individual therapeutic activities may be calculated based on thyroid size corrected to the 24h ITUs without using Marinelli's algorithm. (orig.)

  2. Study of the therapeutic dose and the clinical effect on Graves' disease with I-131 treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Y.

    2005-01-01

    -life were the most important factors to influence on the dose calculation. The therapeutic effects demonstrated that it was significantly different between 1961-1973 and 1978-1988. The incidence of hypothyroidism in 1961-1973 was obviously higher (58.58%) than in 1978-1988(19.01%). The non-condition logistic regression of the factors which lead to the hypothyroidism were analysed, which showed that the individual sensitivity and the higher administered doses were the main causes of hypothyroidism. The data also showed that the results were highly satisfactory when the administered doses were within 111-222MBq or 2.59-4.07MBq/g. The coefficients of variation (CV) of the mean value of the two peak I-131 uptake values determined within one week in 100 patients was 12.78. The biggest CV was 61.42%. There were 41% patients with CV=10%. The absolute difference mean value of the two peak I-131 uptake rate and calculating dose was 11.08% 44.03 MBq. The biggest different value was 44.26% and 446.59 MBq, respectively. To sum up, the dose and the therapeutic effect had a significant difference in the different period of the years although the therapeutic method and the calculating formula was the same. Therefore, the scientific and feasible function of the 'Quimby' formula should be considered deeply. Moreover, the uptake rate of I-131 was changed significantly in a short period. In order to solve these problems, on the basis of our experience, according to the individual sensitivity and the exceeding dose were the main causes of the incidence of the hypothyroidism, we put forward to simplify the therapeutic method. We suggested to choose the thyroid weight as the only factor-thyroid weight times a fixed coefficient, to take into consideration the patient's clinical condition and to choose the dose within the range of 111-222 MBq or 2.59-4.07MBq/g as a suitable optimal dose for therapy. (author)

  3. The management of metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer requires an integrated approach including both directed and systemic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Shamil D; Topliss, Duncan J

    2017-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) presented with left thigh and right flank numbness. He had known progressive and widespread bony metastases, for which he received palliative radiotherapy, and multiple bilateral asymptomatic pulmonary metastases. CT scan and MRI of the spine revealed metastases at right T10-L1 vertebrae with extension into the central canal and epidural disease at T10 and T11 causing cord displacement and canal stenosis but retention of spinal cord signal. Spinal surgery was followed by palliative radiotherapy resulting in symptom resolution. Two months later, sorafenib received approval for use in Australia and was commenced and up-titrated with symptomatic management of mild adverse effects. Follow-up CT scan three months after commencement of sorafenib revealed regression of pulmonary metastases but no evident change in most bone metastases except for an advancing lesion eroding into the right acetabulum. The patient underwent a right total hip replacement, intra-lesional curettage and cementing. After six months of sorafenib therapy, CT scanning showed enlarging liver lesions with marked elevation of serum thyroglobulin. Lenvatinib was commenced and sorafenib was ceased. He now has stable disease with a falling thyroglobulin more than 5 years after metastatic radioiodine-refractory DTC was diagnosed. In DTC, 5% of distant metastases become radioiodine-refractory, resulting in a median overall survival of 2.5-3.5 years. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has recently been demonstrated to increase progression-free survival in these patients but poses some unique management issues and is best used as part of an integrated approach with directed therapy. Directed therapies may have greater potential to control localised disease and related symptoms when compared to systemic therapies.Consider TKI therapy in progressive disease where benefits outweigh risks.Active surveillance and

  4. Influence of smoking associated with stress on the outcome of radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekulic, V.; Rajic, M.; Vlajkovic, M.; Ilic, S.; Stevic, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Introduction: Graves' disease (GD) is characterized by activation of the immune system as a result of interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental factors such as iodine intake, stressful events or smoking. Currently, there are no sufficient data on influence of nicotine and other components of tobacco smoking on outcome of radioiodine therapy in GD. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible influence of cigarette smoking associated with stress on the outcome of radioiodine therapy (RIT) in the patients with Graves' disease. Patients and methods: the study included 29 patients (23 female) aged from 22 to 73 years, who were subjects of a follow-up within 12 months after RIT. The stressful events were presented in all patients prior to diagnosing the GD. Patients were divided into two groups: 1. smokers - 15 patients who smoked cigarettes before, at the moment and after RIT, and 2. non-smokers - 14 patients who were always non-smokers. Patients were treated using a sliding scale of fixed activity of radioiodine according to the goiter size. Antithyroid drugs were discontinued 7 days before radioiodine therapy. Therapy outcome was assessed by serum TSH and thyroid hormones levels, and clinical evaluation. A successful response (SR) to RIT was defined as euthyroidism and subclinical or clinical hypothyroidism, and unsuccessful response (UR) as persistent hyperthyroidism. Results: comparison of age (48.0±9.39 vs. 49.6±14.3 years, P=0.715), values of TRAb (2.25±0.91 vs. 2.75±1.32 U/l, P=0.560), administered activity of 131 I-NaI (365±75.8 vs. 360±44.4 MBq, P=0.832), and duration of ATDs therapy before RIT (3.34±3.41 vs. 5.06±5.81 years, P=0.397) between smokers and non-smokers showed no significant difference. There was no significant influence of smoking on UR at 3., 6., 9. and 12. month compared with UR in patients who did not smoke (P=0.597, P=0.837, P=0.876, P=0.812, χ 2 test). The cumulative

  5. Evaluation of radioiodine therapy with fixed doses of 10 and 15 mCi in patients with Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadas, Viviane; Vilar, Lucio; Moura, Eliane; Brito, Ana; Castellar, Enio

    2007-01-01

    The treatment options for the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease are antithyroid drugs, surgery and radioiodine, none of which is considered ideal, as they do not act directly on the etiopathogenesis of the disease. Radioiodine has been increasingly used as the treatment of choice because it is a safe and definitive therapy whose administration is very easy. Some authors prefer to administer higher doses in order to deliberately induce hypothyroidism, while others recommend lower doses that result in a lower incidence of hypothyroidism and a greater incidence of euthyroidism. There is no consensus for the optimal regimen of fixed doses to be used and this is the main focus of the present study, where doses of 10 and 15 mCi of 131 I were compared. Among the 164 patients analyzed, 61 (37.2%) were submitted to 10 mCi and 103 (62.8%) to 15 mCi. In the longitudinal analysis it was observed that remission of the hyperthyroidism was statistically different in the sixth month (p 131 I brought about a similar remission of the hyperthyroidism after 12 months of treatment. Moreover, the remission rate of the hyperthyroidism had no association with age, sex or previous therapy with antithyroid drugs. (author)

  6. [Incorporation monitoring of employees of a radioiodine therapy ward. Is incorporation monitoring required for routine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, C; Kratzel, U; Selkinski, I; Bockisch, B; Etzel, M; Korkusuz, H; Sauter, B; Staudt, J; von Müller, F; Grünwald, F; Kranert, W T

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study was to determine the annual incorporation of staff on a radioiodine therapy ward and the resulting annual effective dose (aed). Following the German incorporation guideline (gig), incorporation monitoring is not necessary for potential aed below 0.5 mSv/a. For aed > 0.5 mSv/a adherence to the 1 mSv dose limit must be verified. For doses > 1 mSv/a incorporation has to be monitored by the authority. Furthermore, the (131)I incorporation factor from the gig should be verified. To determine the actual work related incorporation, the (131)I activity concentration in urine samples (collection over 24 h) of 14 employees of different professions were examined over a period of 27 months. Measured activity concentrations were related to the individual time of exposure. A constant activity supply for at least three days was assumed. The mean annual effective doses were 2.4 · 10⁻¹ mSv/a (nursing staff; n = 3), 5.6 · 10⁻² mSv/a (cleaning staff; n = 2), 2.8 · 10⁻³ mSv/a (technical staff; n = 2) and 5.2 · 10⁻³ mSv/a (physicians; n = 7). All aed were below the dose limits of the gig. The calculated mean incorporation factors ranged from 3.0 · 10⁻⁸ for the nursing staff to 3.6 · 10⁻¹⁰ for the technical staff (cleaning staff: 7 · 10⁻⁹; physicians: 6.5 · 10⁻¹⁰) and were therefore well below the (131)I incorporation factor defined by the gig. To estimate the aed caused by incorporation of (131)I it has to be subdivided for the different requirements in the diverse fields of activity of the employees. Regarding those who spend most of their time nearby the patient an incorporation monitoring by the authority might be required. The (131)I incorporation factor from the guideline (10⁻⁶) can be reduced by a factor of 10. For (99m)Tc and (18)F an incorporation factor of 10⁻⁷ is accepted.

  7. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7{+-}12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1{+-}25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive ({>=}50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62{+-}66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3{+-}157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection.

  8. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7±12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1±25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive (≥50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62±66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3±157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection

  9. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the achieved dose above 200 Gy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobe, C.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Weber, I.; Marx, K.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to determine the results of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) when the achieved dose in the thyroid was above 200 Gy and to characterize predictive factors for treatment outcome. Patients, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were a confirmed diagnosis Groves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of antithyroid drugs two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose was 250 Gy and the therapeutically achieved dose was calculated from serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months after RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The relation between success rate and the achieved dose, thyroid volume, age and sex of patients, TSH- and TRAb-values and presence of ophthalmopathy was analysed. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients who received more than 200 Gy, even for thyroid volumes >40 ml. The success of ablative RIT was not influenced by age or sex of patients, or by TSH- or TRAb values or concomitant ophthalmopathy. The mean achieved dose in the thyroid was 298 Gy with a standard deviation of 74.6 Gy. Conclusion: to achieve a dose of over 200 Gy with the above standard deviation, we recommend calculating on intended dose of 250 Gy and using a dosimetric approach with early and late uptake values in the radioiodine test, to allow early therapeutic intervention should the posttherapeutic thyroid dose fall unexpectedly below 200 Gy. (orig.)

  10. Potential of radioiodinated anti cancer compounds of natural origin for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, U.; Bapat, K.; Samuel, G.; Venkatesh, M.; Sarma, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    Plumbagin and Quercetin are naturally occurring compounds which exhibit anti-cancerous activity. To evaluate the effect of radioiodination on cytotoxicity, both Plumbagin and Quercetin were radioiodinated with 125 I. 125 I-Plumbagin and 125 I-Quercetin could be prepared in moderate yields and good radiochemical purity and were characterized using reverse phase HPLC. In Swiss mice bearing fibrosarcoma, 125 I-Plumbagin showed a tumor uptake of ∼2.5%ID/g at 3 h p.i. and ∼0.5%ID/g at 24 h p.i on i.v. injection. When injected intratumorally, greater tumor uptake and retention was observed (∼20%ID/g at 3 h p.i. and ∼14%ID/g at 24 h p.i. respectively). (author)

  11. Supporting Treatment Decisions in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (DTC) under Radioiodine-131 Therapy: Role of Biological Dosimetry Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, A.M.; Chebel, G.M.; Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Taja, M.R.; Radl, A.; Bubniak, R.V.; Oneto, A.

    2010-01-01

    Radioiodine-131 therapy is applied in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), within the therapeutic scheme following thyroidectomy, for the ablation of thyroid remnants and treatment of metastatic disease. Several approaches for the selection of a therapeutic dose were applied. The aim of this therapy is to achieve a lethal dose in the tumor tissue, without exceeding the dose of tolerance in healthy tissues (doses greater than 2 Gy in bone marrow could lead to myelotoxicity). In this work, the treatment protocol used incorporates the assessment by biological dosimetry (BD) for estimating doses to whole body and bone marrow, to tailor patient's treatment. Biological Dosimetry prospective studies conducted on samples from patients with cumulative activities, before and after each therapeutic administration, allows to evaluate DNA damage and repair capacity in peripheral blood lymphocytes. (authors)

  12. Comparison of radiolabeling efficiency of peptides containing the RGD domain using the Tc-99M and I-131 radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobral, Danielle V.; Cabral, Francisco Romero; Malavolta, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Radiolabeled peptides have become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in recent years mainly because they represent the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and radiopharmaceutical therapy with high specificity and affinity for over expressed receptors in tumors (Thno 2(5):481-501, 2012 / Drug Discov. Today. 7:1224-1232, 2012). In this context, peptides containing the RGD domain which possess high affinity for the αvβ3 integrin receptor have become an important tool in a wide variety tumor, including glioblastoma (Exp. Opin. Drug Deliv. 8:1041- 1056, 2011). Objective: The goal of this work was to compare the radiolabeling efficiency of the GRGDYV and GRGDHV peptides when radiolabeled with the 131 I and 99m Tc radioisotopes, respectively, as well as, to evaluate the features of synthesized complexes. Methods: The GRGDYV and GRGDHV fragments were manually synthesized by peptide synthesis in solid phase accordingly to the Fmoc protocol and purified by preparative HPLC. The GRGDYV and GRGDHV peptides were radiolabeled with the I-131 and Tc-99m radioisotopes respectively, through of the direct method of radiolabeling. The radioiodination was evaluated and optimized using the methodology of Chloramine-T and for the peptide containing the histidine aminoacid the tricarbonyl method was used. Radiochemical yield analyses of [ 131 I]-GRGDYV and [ 99m Tc]-GRGDHV peptides were performed by thin layer chromatography on silica gel TLC-SG (Al) in ACN 95%. The radiolabeled peptides were purified by using solid phase extraction (Sep-Pak C18 filter). The stability studies were realized at 2, 24, 48 and 72 hours in room temperature and refrigerate (4 deg C) for [ 131 I]-GRGDYV and up to 6 hours for the fragment [ 99m Tc]-GRGDHV. Partition coefficient was determinate for both radiopeptides. Results: The peptides [ 131 I]-GRGDYV and [ 99m Tc]-GRGDHV were efficiently synthesized, radiolabeled and showed radiochemical yield of 91.02% ± 1.68 (n=5

  13. Comparison of radiolabeling efficiency of peptides containing the RGD domain using the Tc-99M and I-131 radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobral, Danielle V.; Cabral, Francisco Romero; Malavolta, Luciana [Santa Casa de São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciências Médicas; Durante, Ana C. Ranucci; Miranda, Ana C. Camargo; Barbosa, Marycel R. F.Figols de [Instituto Israelita de Ensino e Pesquisa Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Radiolabeled peptides have become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in recent years mainly because they represent the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and radiopharmaceutical therapy with high specificity and affinity for over expressed receptors in tumors (Thno 2(5):481-501, 2012 / Drug Discov. Today. 7:1224-1232, 2012). In this context, peptides containing the RGD domain which possess high affinity for the αvβ3 integrin receptor have become an important tool in a wide variety tumor, including glioblastoma (Exp. Opin. Drug Deliv. 8:1041- 1056, 2011). Objective: The goal of this work was to compare the radiolabeling efficiency of the GRGDYV and GRGDHV peptides when radiolabeled with the {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes, respectively, as well as, to evaluate the features of synthesized complexes. Methods: The GRGDYV and GRGDHV fragments were manually synthesized by peptide synthesis in solid phase accordingly to the Fmoc protocol and purified by preparative HPLC. The GRGDYV and GRGDHV peptides were radiolabeled with the I-131 and Tc-99m radioisotopes respectively, through of the direct method of radiolabeling. The radioiodination was evaluated and optimized using the methodology of Chloramine-T and for the peptide containing the histidine aminoacid the tricarbonyl method was used. Radiochemical yield analyses of [{sup 131}I]-GRGDYV and [{sup 99m}Tc]-GRGDHV peptides were performed by thin layer chromatography on silica gel TLC-SG (Al) in ACN 95%. The radiolabeled peptides were purified by using solid phase extraction (Sep-Pak C18 filter). The stability studies were realized at 2, 24, 48 and 72 hours in room temperature and refrigerate (4 deg C) for [{sup 131}I]-GRGDYV and up to 6 hours for the fragment [{sup 99m}Tc]-GRGDHV. Partition coefficient was determinate for both radiopeptides. Results: The peptides [{sup 131}I]-GRGDYV and [{sup 99m}Tc]-GRGDHV were efficiently synthesized, radiolabeled and showed

  14. Radioiodine therapy effects on offspring of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma; Efeitos da radioiodoterapia nas geracoes futuras de mulheres com carcinoma diferenciado de tireoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores Goncalves [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia]. E-mail: loloi@zaz.com.br; Antonucci, Jane [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Correa, Nilson Duarte [Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2004-02-01

    Radioiodine therapy has attained a significant role in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The literature addressing possible secondary effects of {sup 131} I is limited, although there has been increasingly interest in this field. A more comprehensive understanding of the mutagenic effects of radiation on the offspring of women exposed to {sup 131} I is mandatory in view of the possibility of occurrence of miscarriages, congenital abnormalities and malignancies in these children. In this review, we found that many reports on safety of this type of treatment in female patients in reproductive age recommend that pregnancy should be avoided for at least one year after therapeutic administration of radioiodine. (author)

  15. Radioiodine therapy for combined disseminated and nodular thyroid autonomy. Results after using a correction term for the disseminated part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Otto, I.; Sciuk, J.; Wengenmair, H.; Kopp, J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: in combined focal and disseminated thyroid autonomy a variety of concepts in the treatment with radioiodine are used. The difference lies mainly in the calculation of the autonomous volume. This retrospective study shows a new method of calculating the autonomous volume. Patients and methods: in 398 patients with combined thyroid autonomy and good correlation of scintigraphically hot nodules and lesions defined by ultrasound the volume of the nodules is ascertained from scintigraphic and ultrasound parameters and the volume of the disseminated autonomous tissue is assessed with a weighting factor (VF). This factor is the ratio of impulse density in a ROI over the disseminated volume divided by the corresponding impulse density over the nodular volume of the thyroid scintigraphy. The sum of nodular volume and weighted perinodular volume gives the total autonomous volume. A standard radioiodine test gives the maximum iodine-131-uptake and effective half-life to calculate the activity to obtain a treatment dose of 400 Gy. Results: the rate of success with and without thyrostatic medication was 97% with an 18.6% rate of hypothyroidism observed from 4 months post therapy onwards. Conclusion: the use of the weighting factor VF in the treatment of combined autonomy leads to an excellent rate of success in patients with good correlation of functional imaging and ultrasound findings. (orig.)

  16. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy in functional thyroid autonomy and mild immunothyropathy; Paradoxe Effekte der Radiojodtherapie bei funktioneller Schilddruesenautonomie und milder Immunthyreopathie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Rudolph, F.; Prillwitz, A.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1998-01-01

    Aim: To examine all cases with Graves` disease after radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid tissue (AFFT) in order to find the cause. Methods: We retrospectively studied 1428 pts who were treated between 11/93 and 3/97 with radioiodine for AFTT and who underwent at least one control examination. Results: 15 (1.1%) of all pts developed Graves` disease 8.4 (4-13) months after radioiodine therapy. There was no direct suggestion of Graves` disease (TRAK negative, no endocrine ophthalmopathy) in any pt at the time of radioiodine therapy. More detailed analysis of anamnestic data, however, revealed evidence that immunothyropathy predated radioiodine therapy in 11 of the 15 pts. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy manifested as an increase in immunothyropathy 14 pts, a deterioration in metabolism in 11 pts and a first occurrence of endocrine ophthalmopathy in 5 pts. Conclusion: Exacerbation of preexisting, functional primarily insignificant immunothyropathia is held responsible in most cases for the observed paradoxical effects after radioiodine therapy, resulting in radiation-induced manifest Graves` disease; however no therapeutical consequences are recommended. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Erfassung von Pat. mit einer nach Radiojodtherapie wegen einer funktionellen Autonomie aufgetretenen Immunhyperthyreose sowie deren Ursachen. Methoden: Wir untersuchten in einer retrospektiven Studie 1428 Pat., die im Zeitraum 11/93 bis 3/97 wegen einer funktionellen Autonomie mit Radiojod behandelt wurden und die sich mindestens einer Kontrolluntersuchung unterzogen hatten. Ergebnisse: 15 (1,1%) der Pat. entwickelten 8,4 (4-13) Monate nach Radiojodtherapie eine postradiogene Immunhyperthyreose. Bei allen 15 Pat. lag zum Zeitpunkt der Radiojodtherapie kein direkter Hinweis auf eine Immunhyperthyreose vor (TRAK neg., keine endokrine Orbitopathie). Bei einer genauen Analyse anamnestischer Daten fanden sich jedoch bei 11 der 15 Pat. erste Hinweise auf das Vorliegen

  17. Control system of liquid effluents generated in treatment with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia M, T.; Ruiz C, M. A.; Angeles C, A.; Ramirez S, R.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, nuclear medicine has developed greatly in our country and around the world. Techniques for both medical diagnosis and therapy have increased the use of radiopharmaceuticals, notably the I-131. In Mexico there are around 150 nuclear medicine establishments authorized by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias. Most of these establishments do not have an appropriate facility for the treatment of radioactive liquid effluents, to ensure compliance with the concentration limits established in the regulations. The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) developed and implemented successfully, a control system of radioactive effluents (named SACEL) from a nuclear medicine facility. This system ensures an effective compliance with regulations and also better management and control of these radioactive effluents. Calculations and design of SACEL were made with respect to I-131, because is one of the most commonly used in radiotherapy and medical diagnostics, besides its half-life is greater in relation to other radionuclides. SACEL is comprised of four storage tanks and decay and a fifth tank for measuring the concentration of I-131 and later discharge to the drain; these tanks are connected to an automated system that controls the effluents passage. The calculation to determine the volume of the tanks was carried out according to the demand that has the hospital, to the maximum activity being poured in effluents and time required to decay. In this paper the design and installation of SACEL system, in addition to functioning as a facility that enables the Hospital meet the required standards is presented. Dose calculations performed with MCNPX and the methodology used in the calibration of the detection system is also presented. (Author)

  18. Radioiodinated bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, S.E.; Liu, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Radioiodinated bleomycin is a useful imaging agent for body tissues. Its production by iodination of bleomycin with radioactive iodide ions in the presence of an oxidizing agent is described. 7 claims, no drawings

  19. Radioiodine dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J R [Biomedical Research Branch, Health Sciences Div., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Lab.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of individual doses for radiation protection and for risk assessment purposes from a radioiodine intake requires a knowledge of the distribution and retention of the radioiodine (primarily in the thyroid), and a knowledge of the average energy deposited in each organ of interest per radioactive decay (S-factors). This paper reviews a model for distribution and retention used previously for adults, and extends the model to include all ages. The extended model also includes the effects of stable iodine intakes on radioiodine uptakes explicitly. Included in the paper is a tabulation of existing adult S-factors for selected radioiodines and the extension of S-factors for the thyroid to all age groups. Finally, doses per unit intake are calculated and tabulated. A discussion and some calculations of the effects of stable iodine intake on committed doses are given.

  20. Radioiodine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of individual doses for radiation protection and for risk assessment purposes from a radioiodine intake requires a knowledge of the distribution and retention of the radioiodine (primarily in the thyroid), and a knowledge of the average energy deposited in each organ of interest per radioactive decay (S-factors). This paper reviews a model for distribution and retention used previously for adults, and extends the model to include all ages. The extended model also includes the effects of stable iodine intakes on radioiodine uptakes explicitly. Included in the paper is a tabulation of existing adult S-factors for selected radioiodines and the extension of S-factors for the thyroid to all age groups. Finally, doses per unit intake are calculated and tabulated. A discussion and some calculations of the effects of stable iodine intake on committed doses are given. (author)

  1. The initial investigation of radiation dose rate at X-ray department and patients treating thyroid by I-131 at nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Kinh; Vo Thanh Cuong

    2000-01-01

    Survey meter NSM 150 Fuji with detector Geiger Muller has been used to assess for average annual exposure dose which affect radiographer ≤ 2 mSv per year, the staff involved with Fluoroscopy ≤ 19 mSv per year. Dose rate in waiting area of patient is a range from 0.2 to 0.8 μSv/h. Patients who have been treated by radioiodine, may be only discharged when the remaining activity is 400.2 ±368.8 MBq. Radioactivity of I-131 and Tc-99m in the sewage system of hospital is 0.4x10 -11 Ci/l. (author)

  2. Calibration of filters for detection of airborne I-131 in the environment of nuclear power plant; Kalibracija filtrov za detekcijo I-131 v zraku okolja jedrske elektrarne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zupan, M; Miklavzic, U; Pucelj, B [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1982-07-01

    A simple and clean method for efficiency calibration of filters for collection of airborne I and corresponding Ge(Li) spectrometer is described. As the calibrated source of gaseous I-131 the radiopharmaceutical water solution of NaI is used. As calibration example the absolute activity distribution of I-131 measured in a charcoal filter is shown. (author)

  3. Time to reconsider nonsurgical therapy of benign nontoxic multinodular goitre. Focus on recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) augmented radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Søren; Nielsen, Viveque; Bonnema, Steen

    2009-01-01

    alternatives are needed. Until recently, levothyroxine therapy was the preferred non-surgical alternative, but due to low efficacy and potential side-effects, it is not recommended for routine use in recent international guidelines. Conventional radioiodine (131I)-therapy has been used for two decades......, which makes 131I-therapy less feasible. Another challenge is the negative correlation between initial goitre size and goitre volume reduction (GVR). With its ability to more than double the thyroid 131I-uptake, recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) increases the absorbed radiation dose and thus enhances the GVR...... efficacy. Thus, although in its infancy, and still experimental, rhTSH-augmented 131I-therapy may profoundly alter the nonsurgical treatment of benign non-toxic MNG....

  4. Results of radioiodine therapy using different radiation doses in patients suffering from immunogenic and non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, E.

    1992-01-01

    During the past few years high rates of recidivation have increasingly been reported following drug treatment for hyperthyroidism. In view of these unsatisfactory results it is only natural that the use of surgery and ratioiodine treatment is now more often considered in order to achieve complete elimination of the metabolic disorders caused by hyperactivity of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to investigate into the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in a large cohort of patients (n = 925). Particular attention was given to the influence of the dose applied to the thyroid tissue on the rates of success achieved in immunogenic hyperthyroidism (IH) and autonomous disorders (non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism = NIH). (orig./GDG) [de

  5. The effects of radioiodine therapy on peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with Graves' disease. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turowska, M.D.; Rogowski, F.; Turowski, D.; Wysocka, J.

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of Graves' disease patients with radioactive iodide ( 131 I) is becoming the standard therapy in an increasing group of cases but can induce alterations in immune response, like increasing levels of thyroid autoantibodies, and, in part, exacerbation of ophthalmopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in peripheral blood (PB) lymphocyte subpopulations after 131 I treatment of patients with Graves' disease. The study was carried out in a group of 30 patients with Graves' disease (23 f; 7 m) 49.5±10.0 years of age, 26 with different subjective ocular signs like gritty sensation, increased lacrimation, orbital pain, and exophthalmos. PB lymphocyte subsets were analysed by cytofluorometry, serum concentration of TSH and fT4 were evaluated before and 6 weeks after radioiodine treatment. After 131 I treatment a significant increase in CD3+, CD4+, CD3+HLA-DR+ and a decrease in CD19+ percentages of lymphocyte subsets were found in comparison with the initial evaluation. No significant changes in percentage of CD8+ and NK (CD3-CD16+ CD56+) cells were observed during this study. A significant increase in TSH and a slight decrease in fT4 concentration concentration took place in the 6th week after 131 I application. The patients without subjective improvement of ocular signs during the therapy initially had a percentage of CD3+, CD8+ lymphocytes which was significantly lower compared with those with regression of ocular signs observed after 131 I treatment. The changes in PB lymphocyte subsets caused by 131 I treatment of Graves' disease confirm the involvement of acquired cellular immunity after radiation damage of the thyroid gland. The decreased initial percentage of CD8+ and CD3+ lymphocytes could help make a prediction of ocular symptoms persisting after radioiodine treatment in some patients with ophthalmopathy. (author)

  6. I-131 rose bengal excretion test is not dead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antico, V.F.; Denhartog, P.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L.; Houle, S.

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and thirty I-131 Rose Bengal Excretion Studies (RBI) were performed on 84 patients over nine years. In 90% (56/60) of cases with biliary atresia, the 72-hour RBI was less than or equal to 7%. In only 12.5% (3/24) of cases with neonatal hepatitis was the 72-hour RBI less than or equal to 7%. The accuracy of the test was 91% with a specificity of 88%. Thirty patients later were studied following a Kasai procedure. The RBI test reliably predicted the patency of the anastomosis. The authors conclude that the 72-hour RBI is a reliable test in the diagnosis of biliary atresia and in the documentation of biliary patency following surgery, provided adequate care is taken in stool collection and measurement

  7. False Positive Findings on I-131 WBS and SPECT/CT in Patients with History of Thyroid Cancer: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeina C. Hannoush

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although whole body scan (WBS with I-131 is a highly sensitive tool for detecting normal thyroid tissue and metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC, it is not specific. Additional information, provided by single photon emission computed tomography combined with X-ray computed tomography (SPECT/CT and by the serum thyroglobulin level, is extremely useful for the interpretation of findings. Case Presentation. We report four cases of false positive WBS in patients with DTC: ovarian uptake corresponding to an endometrioma, scrotal uptake due to a spermatocele, rib-cage uptake due to an old fracture, and hepatic and renal uptake secondary to a granuloma and simple cyst, respectively. Conclusions. Trapping, organification, and storage of iodine are more prominent in thyroid tissue but not specific. Physiologic sodium-iodine symporter expression in other tissues explains some, but not all, of the WBS false positive cases. Other proposed etiologies are accumulation of radioiodine in inflamed organs, metabolism of radiodinated thyroid hormone, presence of radioiodine in body fluids, and contamination. In our cases nonthyroidal pathologies were suspected since the imaging findings were not corroborated by an elevated thyroglobulin level, which is considered a reliable tumor marker for most well-differentiated thyroid cancers. Clinicians should be aware of the potential pitfalls of WBS in DTC to avoid incorrect management.

  8. Radioiodine Treatment of Well-Differentiated thyroid cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrenechea, E.

    2007-01-01

    responsiveness are evidence enough that these group of patients benefit with significant survival rate from radioiodine therapy. The belief that thyroid cancer in children is usually associated with low mortality and it being considered, as a benign disease, should be corrected because the course of the disease may not be so benign after all. Conclusion: WDTCA in children is rare but the biological behaviour differs from that of adults. Their course is sometimes aggressive and they may be recurrent. Total/near total thyroidectomy with I-131 ablation of remnant thyroid tissues and nodal or distal metastases if present, reduces mortality making RAI necessary. (author)

  9. Correlation of stress with outcome of radioiodine therapy for Graves disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, T.; Rochon, J.; Lenfestey, R.; Wise, P.

    1985-06-01

    Between November 1965 and December 1983, 293 patients were treated for Graves disease using /sup 131/I. All patients were asked to identify a stressful event antedating the onset of overt clinical symptoms. Eighty-one patients were able to do this (27.6%). Two hundred forty-four patients received a single treatment, 49 required two or more treatments. Patients with stress initiating the symptoms of Graves disease became hypothyroid earlier, 50% at 12 mo compared with 36 mo for the nonstress group. At 10 yr 5% of the stress group remained euthyroid compared with 17% nonstress. The authors conclude that stress in the 12 mo or less before the onset of clinical symptoms potentiates the development of hypothyroidism induced by a standard dose of radioiodine.

  10. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3); Verfahrensanweisung zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) beim differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinom (Version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Nuklearmedizinsiche Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Eschner, W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Lassmann, M. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Luster, M.; Reiners, C. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Moser, E. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3) is the counterpart to the procedure guideline for {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy (version 3) and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Recommendation for ablative {sup 131}I therapy is given for all differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) >1 cm. Regarding DTC {<=}1 cm {sup 131}I ablation may be helpful in an individual constellation. Preparation for {sup 131}I ablation requires low iodine diet for two weeks and TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroid hormone medication or by use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The advantages of rhTSH (no symptoms of hypothyroidism, lowerblood activity) and the advantages of endogenous TSH stimulation (necessary for {sup 131}I-therapy in patients with metastases, higher sensitivity of {sup 131}I whole-body scan) are discussed. In most centers standard activities are used for {sup 131}I ablation. If pretherapeutic dosimetry is planned, the diagnostic administration of {sup 131}I should not exceed 1-10MBq, alternative tracers are {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I. The recommendations for contraception and family planning are harmonized with the recommendation of ATA and ETA. Regarding the best possible protection of salivary glands the evidence is insufficient to recommend a specific setting. To minimize the risk of dental caries due to xerostomia patients should use preventive strategies for dental hygiene. (orig.)

  11. High-dose I-131 MIBG treatment for young children with high-risk neuroblastoma, and its practical problem. From the experience of the youngest case in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Raita; Nishimura, Ryosei; Mase, Shintaro

    2012-01-01

    High-dose I-131 MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) therapy combined with auto- or allo-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is becoming a potential treatment for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma worldwide. However, only older children, who can perform personal care, had been given high-dose I-131 MIBG treatment to avoid the needless radiation exposure to caregivers and medical staff in Japan. In this case report, we have used the high dose MIBG therapy followed by autologous PBSCT (peripheral blood stem cell transplantation) for a 1-year-old boy with a newly diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma with MYCN amplifications. The total radiation exposure to all parties involved was very limited, even in the youngest case in Japan, probably due to adequate preparations. This encouraging experience may remove the age limit for high-dose I-131 MIBG treatment for the patients with high-risk neuroblastoma in Japan. (author)

  12. Reduction in relapse rate of radioiodine therapy in patients of toxic multinodular goiter: a quality improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Sujata; Muthu, Sonai G.

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy is the definitive treatment of toxic multinodular goiter (TMNG). Treatment failure may result in relapse after 131 I therapy. The present study was undertaken to reduce treatment failure rate of 131 I therapy in TMNG patients. Multiple causes may have lead to treatment failure of 131 I in TMNG patients making it difficult to establish a direct cause-effect relationship and take corrective action. Therefore, the JURAN methodology of quality improvement was applied. The treatment failure rate in 80 TMNG patients treated with 131 I in the period 2003-06 was 29%. The root cause analysis identified delay in decision to radioablate and concomitant antithyroid drugs (ATD) with 131 I therapy as factors leading to relapse. In 2007, a change in management was introduced with decision to radioablate all TMNG patients not remitting at 1 year of ATD and to withdraw ATD for 2 weeks prior to 131 I therapy. A total of 63 patients of TMNG followed the changed protocol between 2007 and 2009. Further analysis showed that one of the factors identified in the initial brainstorming (high iodide pool in the patient) had not been addressed in the protocol currently followed. The protocol was modified to include patient preparation and implemented after standardization. The post- 131 I relapse rate in patients treated after implementation of the new protocol from 2007 to 2009 was 18% which further reduced to 16% in 2011 after modification of the protocol. The failure rate of 131 I therapy in TMNG reduced from 29% to 16% through standardization of the treatment procedure achieved by the use of Juran Methodology that helped to identify process-related defects. (author)

  13. Reduction in relapse rate of radioiodine therapy in patients of toxic multinodular goiter: a quality improvement project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Sujata; Muthu, Sonai G., E-mail: sujatamitra@tatasteel.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tata Main Hospital, Jamshedpur (India)

    2012-01-15

    Radioiodine ({sup 131}I) therapy is the definitive treatment of toxic multinodular goiter (TMNG). Treatment failure may result in relapse after {sup 131}I therapy. The present study was undertaken to reduce treatment failure rate of {sup 131}I therapy in TMNG patients. Multiple causes may have lead to treatment failure of {sup 131}I in TMNG patients making it difficult to establish a direct cause-effect relationship and take corrective action. Therefore, the JURAN methodology of quality improvement was applied. The treatment failure rate in 80 TMNG patients treated with {sup 131}I in the period 2003-06 was 29%. The root cause analysis identified delay in decision to radioablate and concomitant antithyroid drugs (ATD) with {sup 131}I therapy as factors leading to relapse. In 2007, a change in management was introduced with decision to radioablate all TMNG patients not remitting at 1 year of ATD and to withdraw ATD for 2 weeks prior to {sup 131}I therapy. A total of 63 patients of TMNG followed the changed protocol between 2007 and 2009. Further analysis showed that one of the factors identified in the initial brainstorming (high iodide pool in the patient) had not been addressed in the protocol currently followed. The protocol was modified to include patient preparation and implemented after standardization. The post-{sup 131}I relapse rate in patients treated after implementation of the new protocol from 2007 to 2009 was 18% which further reduced to 16% in 2011 after modification of the protocol. The failure rate of {sup 131}I therapy in TMNG reduced from 29% to 16% through standardization of the treatment procedure achieved by the use of Juran Methodology that helped to identify process-related defects. (author)

  14. Investigations on the retention of I-131 by an iodine filter of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.; Gerlach, K.

    1984-01-01

    The retention of I-131 by an equipment room exhaust filter of a German pressurized water reactor was determined by various methods to particularly obtain reliable results. Moreover, investigations were performed to clarify the reason for aging of the carbon contained in the iodine filter mentioned. The actual retention of the organic I-131, corresponding to a value of 99.9%, was limited by I-131 in the form of penetrating iodine compounds. It was lower than the retention of CH 3 I-131 under layout conditions by more than one order of magnitude. The aging was essentially caused by the adsorption of low-volatile organic compounds. (orig.) [de

  15. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J; Joe, Alexius Y; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  16. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger; Brink, Ingo; Krause, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15±9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256±80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  17. Simultaneous treatment of toxic diffuse goiter with I-131 and antithyroid drugs: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, J.J.; Donoghue, G.D.; Goldman, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    We report a prospective study to evaluate the effect of antithyroid drugs containing the sulfhydryl radical on the outcome of I-131 (RAI) therapy. Twenty-four male patients with toxic diffuse goiter were assigned randomly into two treatment groups: Group A received RAI treatment while on antithyroid drugs after attainment of euthyroidism; Group B received no antithyroid drugs before, or when, RAI was given. Patients in each group received a dose of RAI calculated to deliver approximately 5000 rads per treatment. The incidence of hypothyroidism at 12 mo was 8% for Group A and 36% for Group B (p 0.45). The improved therapeutic outcome of patients in Group A suggests that further validation of the method in a larger patient population, including females, is warranted

  18. Effectiveness of radioiodine (131-I) as definitive therapy in patients with autoimmune and non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, B; Ciuoli, C; Di Cairano, G; Guarino, E; Mazzucato, P; Montanaro, A; Burroni, L; Vattimo, A G; Pacini, F

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the outcome of radioiodine (RAI) therapy in 100 consecutive patients treated in the period 2000-2001 for hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease (GD), toxic adenoma (TA) and toxic multinodular goiter (TMG). Thyroid function was measured before and after therapy every 3-6 months up to 3 yr. Three years after therapy, 75% of TA patients were euthyroid, 18.7% were hypothyroid and 6.3% hyperthyroid. Of the TMG patients, 62.2% were euthyroid, 18.9% were hypothyroid and 18.9% hyperthyroid. In GD patients euthyroidism was achieved in 12.9% of the patients, hypothyroidism in 74.2% and hyperthyroidism persisted in 12.9%. Definitive hypothyroidism was significantly higher in GD (p<0.0001) than in TA and TMG patients. Overall, positive effect of RAI (definitive hypothyroidism or euthyroidism) was very high: 93.7% in TA, 81.1% in TMG and 87.1% in GD patients. Thyroid volume reduction was observed in all patients, but was higher in GD patients (mean reduction of 76%) and in TA patients (mean nodule reduction of 69%). In TMG, mean reduction was of 32%. The median activity of RAI received by the 86 cured patients was 555 MBq (15 mCi) compared to 407 Mbq (11 mCi) received by the 14 patients who remained hyperthyroid. No influence was found between outcome and clinical parameters at the moment of 131-I therapy. In conclusion, our results indicate that RAI therapy is highly effective and safe for the control of hyperthyroidism.

  19. A theoretical model for prescription of the patient-specific therapeutic activity for radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Martino, F.; Traino, A.C.; Lazzeri, M.; Brill, A.B.; Stabin, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental function of the thyroid is to extract iodine from the blood, synthesize it into thyroid hormones, and release it into the circulation under feedback control by pituitary-secreted hormones. This capability of the thyroid, termed as functionality, can in principle be related to the severity of hyperthyroidism in individual patients. In this paper the uptake and release of 131 I by the thyroid following the administration of 131 I therapy for Graves' disease has been theoretically studied. The kinetics of iodine in the thyroid and blood have been evaluated using a two-compartment model. This simplified model appears to be adequate for dosimetry purposes and allows one to correlate levels of increased thyroid functionality (hyperthyroidism) with clinically measurable kinetic parameters. An expression has been derived for the rate of change of thyroid mass following therapy; this has the same form as an empirical relationship described in an earlier work. A method is presented for calculation of the amount of radioiodine activity to be administered to individual patients in order to achieve the desired final functionality of the gland. The activity to be administered is based on measurements of 131 I kinetics after the administration of a 'low-activity' (1850 kBq) tracer for treatment planning. (author)

  20. Radioiodine Therapy: Care of the Helpless Patient and Handling of the Radioactive Corpse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geaves, C. D.; Tendale, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Nurses caring for a helpless patient following a nominal 800 MBq administration of radioiodine were concerned about their radiation dose. Using published data, a nurse could receive an estimated 650 micro Sv per shift. A regime to restrict their dose was planned using a 500 micro Sv dose constraint. Thermoluminescent dosimeters indicated a maximum whole body effective dose of 250 micro Sv. Three days post 131 I administration the patient died (estimated activity in the body 400 MBq). A minimum delay of two weeks was advised prior to a post-mortem. Special precautions were issued to minimise contamination. Dose rates (micro Sv h-1), measured one day after the patient died, at the level of the thyroid, chest and bladder at 0.01 m from the corpse were 1800, 290 and 73 respectively. At 1.0 m the dose rate was 26 micro Sv h-1 at all levels. The pathologist was estimated to have received a maximum whole-body dose of 400 micro Sv during the postmortem. Contamination measurements (Bq cm-2) made following the postmortem were as follows: pathologist's hands 5, clothes 0, towels 1.8, saw 5, instruments 0.5, plastic sheet 0.8, scales 0.4 and floors/walls 1.1. These data indicate that with appropriate radiation protection guidelines, staff can be reassured that their doses in these circumstances are very low. (author)

  1. Outcome of radioiodine-131 therapy in hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules: a 20 years' retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Claudia; Bencivelli, Walter; Vitti, Paolo; Grasso, Lucia; Pinchera, Aldo

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the risk of hypothyroidism after radioiodine (131I) treatment for hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. Retrospective analysis of patients treated with 131I for hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and followed up for a maximum of 20 years. A total of 346 patients treated with 131I in the years 1975-95, for a single hyperfunctioning nodule. Hypothyroidism was defined as TSH levels > 3.7 mU/l. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to analyse permanence of euthyroidism after 131I. A stepwise Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify factors influencing the progression to hypothyroidism. The cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism was 7.6% at 1 year, 28% at 5 years, 46% at 10 years and 60% at 20 years. Age (P thyroid and nodule size, thyroid status at diagnosis and degree of extranodular thyroid parenchymal suppression had no influence. In hyperthyroid patients with partial parenchymal suppression, however, previous MMI treatment was the most important prognostic factor (P hyperfunctioning nodule are hypothyroid. Factors increasing the risk of hypothyroidism are age, 131I uptake and MMI pretreatment. The prognostic value of this last factor, however, depends on the degree of suppression of the extranodular thyroid parenchyma at the scan.

  2. Recurrent/metastatic thyroid carcinomas false negative for serum thyroglobulin but positive by posttherapy I-131 whole body scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul; Chung, June-Key; Lim, Il Han; Park, Do Joon; Cho, Bo Youn

    2009-01-01

    Serum Tg and I-131 WBS have been used to detect recurrent and metastatic thyroid cancers postoperatively. Tg is known to be more sensitive than I-131 WBS, and therefore, false-negative WBS cases with elevated Tg levels are frequently found. However, the clinical characteristics of false-negative Tg cases with positive WBS have not been clarified. The authors evaluated 824 postoperative patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma who underwent post-ablation/therapy I-131 WBS. Tg negativity was defined as a Tg level of ≤2 ng/mL without TgAb under thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulation. Remission, recurrence, and metastasis were confirmed using pathologic or clinically findings. Fifty-two patients (6.3%) with functioning metastasis and negativity for TgAb were Tg-negative and posttherapy I-131 WBS-positive (TgN group), and 128 patients with functioning metastases were Tg positive and WBS positive (TgP group). The TgN group consisted of 45 cases of cervical/mediastinal lymph node metastases (86.5%) and seven cases of distant metastasis to lung or bone by follow-up WBS. The TgN group demonstrated significantly higher profiles of regional involvement than the TgP group (P < 0.029). In 47 patients in the TgN group, metastatic uptake disappeared in 33, ameliorated in four, and persisted in ten during follow-up. A significant number of differentiated thyroid cancer patients were Tg-/TgAb-negative despite a positive WBS finding. Cervical and mediastinal lymph nodes were predominant sites of metastasis in the TgN group. WBS should be undertaken routinely as a complementary modality to detect functioning recurrence and metastasis regardless of serum Tg results. (orig.)

  3. The influence of saliva flow stimulation on the absorbed radiation dose to the salivary glands during radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer using 124I PET(/CT) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentzen, Walter; Schmitz, Jochen; Freudenberg, Lutz; Eising, Ernst; Bockisch, Andreas; Stahl, Alexander; Balschuweit, Dorothee; Hilbel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A serious side effect of high-activity radioiodine therapy in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer is radiogenic salivary gland damage. This damage may be diminished by lemon-juice-induced saliva flow immediately after 131 I administration. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing lemon slices on the absorbed (radiation) doses to the salivary glands. Ten patients received (pretherapy) 124 I PET(/CT) dosimetry before their first radioiodine therapy. The patients underwent a series of six PET scans at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 48 and ≥96 h and one PET/CT scan at 24 h after administration of 27 MBq 124 I. Blood samples were also collected at about 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 h. Contrary to the standard radioiodine therapy protocol, the patients were not stimulated with lemon juice. Specifically, the patients chewed no lemon slices during the pretherapy procedure and neither ate food nor drank fluids until after completion of the last PET scan on the first day. Organ absorbed doses per administered 131 I activity (ODpAs) as well as gland and blood uptake curves were determined and compared with published data from a control patient group, i.e. stimulated per the standard radioiodine therapy protocol. The calculations for both groups used the same methodology. A within-group comparison showed that the mean ODpA for the submandibular glands was not significantly different from that for the parotid glands. An intergroup comparison showed that the mean ODpA in the nonstimulation group averaged over both gland types was reduced by 28% compared to the mean ODpA in the stimulation group (p=0.01). Within each gland type, the mean ODpA reductions in the nonstimulation group were statistically significant for the parotid glands (p=0.03) but not for the submandibular glands (p=0.23). The observed ODpAs were higher in the stimulation group because of increased initial gland uptake rather than group differences in blood kinetics. The 124 I PET(/CT) salivary gland

  4. Experience in treatment of hyperthyroidism with I-131 diagnosis, patient preparation and therapeutic procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhongyun, Pan

    2003-01-01

    Treatment of hyperthyroidism with I-131 diagnosis is being performed after clinical diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis based on clinical manifestations of hypermetabolic state, serumT3 and T4 determination; medical preparation of patients and therapeutic procedure is obtained for better efficacy, relieve symptoms and prevent aggravation of thyrotoxicosis after I-131 treatment

  5. Bioaccumulation factor for I-131 in aquatic biota II fish - tilapia (Tilapia Mossambica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.F.; Casyao, J.M.; Bautista, E.Rb.

    1982-01-01

    The study was undertaken to provide local values for an essential parameter in the estimation of the dose contribution of I-131 through ingestion of fresh water fish. The result showed that the tilapia used in the experiment did not vary significantly in weight and no definite conclusion can be derived as to the effect of body size to bioaccumulation of I-131. (ELC)

  6. First results of radioiodine therapy of multifocal and disseminated functional thyroid autonomy using a TcTUs-adapted dose concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oexle, C.; Reinhardt, M.; Moser, E.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: The presented study examines prospectively the efficiency of a dose concept for radioiodine therapy (RIT) adapted to the pretherapeutic 99m Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression (TcTU s ) in patients with multifocal (MFA) and disseminated (DISA) autonomy. This concept considers the total thyroid as target volume and uses target doses from 150 Gy to 300 Gy according to the TcTU s , which is as a measure for the 'autonomous volume' of the thyroid. Methods: The data of 75 patients (54 female, 21 male; age 71±9 years) with MFA or DISA were evaluated. RIT was performed on patients presenting with normal values for free triiodothyronine and thyroxine and endogenous suppression of the basal thyrotropin (TSH). The following target doses were used: For a TcTU s of 1,5-2,5% 150 Gy, for 2,51-3,5% 200 Gy, for 3,51-4,5% 250 Gy, and for >4,5% 300 Gy. The radiation dose to be administered was calculated using a modified Marinelli formula. The therapy was considered as successful when the basal TSH was above 0,5 mU/l and autonomous areas had disapeared in thyroid scintigraphy or the TcTU was below 1,5%, respectively. The average follow-up period was 8±4 months. Results: The success rates average to 92%. Only in one case a subsequent subclinical hypothyroidism and in a further case an immunogenic hyperthyroidism occured. Conclusion: The presented data indicate, that even patients with a marked autonomy (TcTU s >3,5%) can thus expected to be cured by of a onetime therapy with success rate of over 90% using the presented dose concept. The rate of early hypothyroidism can alltogether be estimated as very low. (orig.) [de

  7. Estimation of radiation burden to relatives of patients treated with radioiodine for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Pankaj; Rohatgi, Rupali; Gaur, P.K.; Rao, B.S.; Gill, B.S.; Hari Babu, T.; Venkatesh, Meera

    2005-01-01

    Patients treated with radioiodine present a radiation hazard and precautions are necessary to limit the radiation dose to family members, nursing staff and members of the public. The precautions advised are usually based on the instantaneous dose rates or iodine retention and do not take into account the time spent in close proximity with a patient. The purpose of this study was to draw guidelines based on the actual measurements and confirm if the present guidelines for discharge of the 131 I-treated thyroid cancer patients are adequate or not. External exposure rates were measured on 37 patients using a calibrated ionization survey meter. The patients' exposure rates were measured at the time of the discharge from the hospital. The patient and their relatives were given lockets embedded with CaSO 4 :Dy dosimeters at the time of discharge from the hospital. These lockets were given with a chain to be worn in the neck for 15 days. These lockets were collected after a fortnight and read out in a conventional TLD reader. These dose estimates can be used to calculate the limits for the patient movements so as to limit doses received to less than 1 mSv for the family members. This study dealt only with the external exposure; the problem of internal contamination was not considered. In our study the doses to the patient have also been measured in order to estimate the percentage of dose received by their relatives. In our study, most of the cases the dose received by the relatives of the patients are more than 1 mSv, which is more than the limit prescribed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the general public. (author)

  8. Synthesis, chemical and biological quality control of radioiodinated peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, H.; Khalaj, A.; Beiki, D.; Motameidi, F.; Maloobi, M.; Karimian-dehghan, M.; Keshavarrzi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Iodinated compounds with I-131, 125 and 123 have been widely used for biochemical function studies. In conjunction with SPECT, [I-123] labelled proteins have various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine. Preparation of some radioiodinated peptides with tyrosine and/or lysine groups on their main chain molecules can be carried out with both direct and indirect methods, but lack of these groups in molecule cause the molecule dose not lend itself for direct radioiodination. In this study, human IgG and Formyl-Methyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine, FMLF, have been chosen as a model compounds for direct and indirect radioiodination respectively. Here, we will describe the labelling procedure of [I-125] IgG using chloramine-T as a suitable oxidant agent and [I-125 and I-131] FMLF by indirect method using ATE/SIB as a prosthetic group in multi-step reactions. The obtained results for chemical quality control of intermediate radioiodinated SIB by HPLC and two labelled IgG and FMLF will be also discussed. Biological results, biodistribution studies and SPECT scans on mice per-injected labelled FMLF show a low uptake of thyroid but a high at urine and bladder, perhaps because of low molecular weight of FMLF. In this case, it seems to be better to separate the reaction mixture of labelled FMLF by BPLC than Sephadex-G50 gel filtration. (Author)

  9. Efficacy of different I-131 doses for thyroid remnant ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, X.C.; Thiep, T.V.; Hung, N.C.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive iodine 131 I has been widely used as a treatment modality of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The need for high dose radioiodine ablation of thyroid remnant is still in question. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the efficacy of 131 I different single and fractionated doses in ablation of post-operative thyroid remnant. Patients and methods: One hundred-twelve patients were included in this study. Sixty-one patients with TSH≥30 μU/ml were treated 30 mCi in group 1 (36 patients) or 100 mCi in group 2 (25 patients). Fifty one patients with TSH 131 I high dose of 100 mCi and no severe adverse effect in the other groups. Conclusion: Single high dose (100 mCi) may be more efficient than single low dose (30 mCi) for post-operative remnant ablation with serum TSH≥30 μU/ml and the efficacy of low fractionated doses (30+30 mCi) was comparable with high-fractionated dose (30+100 mCi) for post-operative remnant ablation with low serum TSH in differentiated thyroid carcinoma. (author)

  10. Prognostic Value of Tc99m-Pertechnetate Thyroid Scintigraphy in Radioiodine Therapy in a Cohort of Chinese Graves’ Disease Patients: A Pilot Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study is to assess the prognostic value of Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy for predicting the outcomes of fixed low dose of radioiodine therapy (RIT in a cohort of Chinese Graves’ disease (GD patients. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective study of GD patients who received RIT with a single dose of radioiodine (5 mCi. All the patients received Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy prior to RIT. Thyroid mass, Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake, gender, age at diagnosis, duration of the disease, ophthalmopathy, and serum levels of FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3 prior to RIT were analyzed as potential interference factors for outcomes of RIT. Results. One hundred and eighteen GD patients who completed RIT were followed up for 12 months. The outcomes (euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism were found to be significantly associated with thyroid mass and Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake. Patients with thyroid mass ≤ 40.1 g or Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake ≤ 15.2% had higher treatment success. Conclusions. A fixed low dose of 5 mCi radioiodine seems to be practical and effective for the treatment of Chinese GD patients with thyroid mass ≤ 40.1 g and Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake ≤ 15.2%. This study demonstrates Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy is an important prognostic factor for predicting the outcomes of RIT.

  11. Clinical comparison of I-131 orthoiodohippurate and the kit formulation of Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Ziffer, J.A.; Steves, A.; Eshima, D.; Delaney, V.B.; Welchel, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans have shown that technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) purified by high-performance liquid chromatography is a renal tubular agent with characteristics similar to those of iodine-131 orthoiodohippurate (OIH). A kit formulation for Tc-99m MAG3 has been developed and compared with I-131 OIH in 17 patients with suspected renal dysfunction and three potential kidney donors. There were no adverse reactions. Tc-99m MAG3 images were of good quality and consistently better than I-131 OIH images. There was no significant difference in the relative renal uptake of Tc-99m MAG3 and I-131 OIH. The 30-minute urinary excretion of Tc-99m MAG3 was 36.4%, versus 40.4% for I-131 OIH. The average plasma clearance of Tc-99m MAG3 (138 mL/min +/- 117) was less than that of I-131 OIH (272 mL/min +/- 205) (P less than .001); however, there was good correlation between the Tc-99m MAG3 and I-131 OIH clearances (r = .87). The volume of distribution of Tc-99m MAG3 (5.96 L +/- 1.94) was less than that of I-131 OIH (9.41 L +/- 3.73) (P less than .001). These characteristics and the advantages of a simple kit formulation should lead to widespread clinical use

  12. The normal and abnormal distribution of the adrenomedullary imaging agent m-[I-131]iodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG) in man: evaluation by scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajo, M.; Shapiro, B.; Copp, J.; Kalff, V.; Gross, M.D.; Sisson, J.C.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scintigraphic distribution of m-[ 131 I]iodobenzylguanidine (I- 131 MIBG), an adrenal medullary imaging agent, was studied to determine the patterns of uptake of this agent in man. The normal distribution of I- 131 MIBG includes clear portrayal of the salivary glands, liver, spleen, and urinary bladder. The heart, middle and lower lung zones, and colon were less frequently or less clearly seen. The upper lung zones and kidneys were seldom visualized. The thyroid appeared only in cases of inadequate thyroidal blockade. The ''normal'' adrenal glands were seldom seen and faintly imaged in 2% at 24 hr after injection and in 16% at 48 hr, in patients shown not to have pheochromocytomas, whereas intra-adrenal, extraadrenal, and malignant pheochromocytomas usually appeared as intense focal areas of I- 131 MIBG uptake at 24 through 72 hr

  13. Normal and abnormal distribution of the adrenomedullary imaging agent m-[I-131]iodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG) in man; evaluation by scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajo, M.; Shapiro, B.; Copp, J.; Kalff, V.; Gross, M.D.; Sisson, J.C.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scintigraphic distribution of m-[ 131 I]iodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG), an adrenal medullary imaging agent, was studied to determine the patterns of uptake of this agent in man. The normal distribution of I-131 MIBG includes clear portrayal of the salivary glands, liver, spleen, and urinary bladder. The heart, middle and lower lung zones, and colon were less frequently or less clearly seen. The upper lung zones and kidneys were seldom visualized. The thyroid appeared only in cases of inadequate thyroidal blockade. The normal adrenal glands were seldom seen and faintly imaged in 2% at 24 h after injection and in 16% at 48 h, in patients shown not to have pheochromocytomas, whereas intra-adrenal, extra-adrenal, and malignant pheochromocytomas usually appeared as intense focal areas of I-131 MIBG uptake at 24 through 72 h

  14. Our first experience in the application of I-131 MIBG in a patient with neuroblastoma (A case report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarina, G.; Poksi, A.

    2005-01-01

    was operated on whereby the tumor was partially resected from the left orbital region. A MRT scan performed two months later showed progression of tumor mass to the orbit (50 x 40 x 30 mm) with destruction of the maxillary sinus and metastases to BM in vertebrae and femoral bones. A subsequent BM biopsy demonstrated evidence of high malignancy of the tumor metastases. Repeated Tc-99m MDP bone scans were not positive for bone metastases. This year the patient had different combinations of chemotherapy constantly, but without any clinical success. At that stage a clinician of the Pediatric Oncology Department decided to perform I-131 MIBG therapy. The child's parents received information about the procedure and specific instructions concerning radiation safety precautions. In order to minimize thyroidal uptake of free iodide in the child and her father, they were given 200 mg of oral potassium iodide per day, which was started 48 hours before I-131 MIBG administration and continued up to 10 days after the therapy. The administration of the 162 mCi I-131 MIBG was performed during 2.5 hours with a radiation safety system, the patient being under supervision in an isolated and monitored hospital room. Side effects, such as mild nausea and vomiting, were observed immediately after the administration. During the therapies the child watched TV and videos, drew pictures and played with her games or toys. Radiation dosimetry was performed daily. After the I-131 therapy scan (the whole body and SPECT of the head and neck) we verified the presence of multiple sites of the tumor in the head (the left and right orbital region and the left parieto-occipital region) and bone marrow infiltration in the left arm and both lower limbs. The patient went home on the 8th day after the injection of I-131 MIBG. During the first two weeks the patient's clinical condition was stable. During the next two weeks the clinical test showed rapid progression of the tumor in the left orbital region (it

  15. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy predict increased risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism following radioiodine therapy for refractory hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Noboru; Momotani, Naoko; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Yoshimura Noh, Jaeduk; Okamoto, Yasuyuki; Konishi, Toshiaki; Ito, Koichi; Ito, Kunihiko

    2011-01-01

    Serum levels of TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) often increase after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, and high-serum levels of maternal TRAb in late pregnancy indicate a risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism. The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the characteristics of Graves' women who had a history of radioiodine treatment for intractable Graves' disease, and whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism. The subjects of this study were 45 patients with Graves' disease who became pregnant during the period from 1988 to 1998 after receiving radioiodine treatment at Ito Hospital. 25 of the 45 subjects had had a relapse of hyperthyroidism after surgical treatment for Graves' disease. 19 pregnancies were excluded because of artificial or spontaneous abortion. In the remaining 44 pregnancies of 35 patients, neonatal hyperthyroidism developed in 5 (11.3%) pregnancies of 4 patients. Serum levels of TRAb at delivery were higher in patients whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism (NH mother) than those of patients who delivered normal infants (N mother). Furthermore, serum levels of TRAb in NH mother did not change during pregnancy, although those of 4 patients of N mother, in which serum levels of TRAb before radioiodine treatment were as high as in NH mother, decreased significantly during pregnancy. In conclusion, women who delivered neonates with hyperthyroidism following radioiodine treatment seem to have very severe and intractable Graves' disease. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy observed in those patients may be a cause of neonatal hyperthyroidism.

  16. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy predict increased risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism following radioiodine therapy for refractory hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Noboru; Konishi, Toshiaki; Momotani, Naoko; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Yoshimura Noh, Jaeduk; Ito, Koichi; Ito, Kunihiko; Okamoto, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody (TRAb) often increase after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, and high-serum levels of maternal TRAb in late pregnancy indicate a risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism. The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the characteristics of Graves' women who had a history of radioiodine treatment for intractable Graves' disease, and whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism. The subjects of this study were 45 patients with Graves' disease who became pregnant during the period from 1988 to 1998 after receiving radioiodine treatment at Ito Hospital. 25 of the 45 subjects had a relapse of hyperthyroidism after surgical treatment for Graves' disease. 19 pregnancies were excluded because of artificial or spontaneous abortion. In the remaining 44 pregnancies of 35 patients, neonatal hyperthyroidism developed in 5 (11.3%) pregnancies of 4 patients. Serum levels of TRAb at delivery were higher in patients whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism (NH mother) than those of patients who delivered normal infants (N mother). Furthermore, serum levels of TRAb in NH mother did not change during pregnancy, although those of 4 patients of N mother, in which serum levels of TRAb before radioiodine treatment were as high as in NH mother, decreased significantly during pregnancy. In conclusion, women who delivered neonates with hyperthyroidism following radioiodine treatment seem to have very severe and intractable Graves' disease. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy observed in those patients may be a cause of neonatal hyperthyroidism. (author)

  17. Study of ablation efficiency of 3600 MBq of I-131 in the treatment of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takavar, A.; Eftekhari, M.; Fard-Esfahani, A.; Beiki, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The basic question of threshold for the ablation of thyroid remnant after surgery remains unanswered. However, radioiodine therapy is still being used as a standard method of treatment. In present investigation treatment responses of 100 patients with thyroid cancer treated with 3600 MBq of 131 I is studied. Response to treatment of 100 patients (33 males and 67 females) was evaluated by serum TSH, Tg levels and areas of thyroid remnant as measured by whole body scan with 131 I performed 6 months after therapy. Treatment response was evident by decreased or lack of 131 I uptake in the thyroid bed and Tg 5 ng/ml. Remnant area was decreased about 74.5% in females and 75.5% in males. No significant difference between sex groups was observed. Because of radiation protection concerns and socioeconomic reasons, lower ablations doses of 131 I ( 1110 MBq) might be as effective, and should be evaluated. (author)

  18. Emerging comorbidities in Graves' disease patients treated with radioiodine with more than 10 years of follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Fernanda Vieira Ramalho de; Blotta, Francisco Gomes da Silva; Goirgetta, Juliana Malheiros; Vaisman, Mario; Noe, Rosangela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the occurrence of cardiovascular disease and malignant tumors and the mortality rate in patients who received radioiodine treatment for hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease with at least ten years of follow-up. Materials and methods: The medical records of all patients who were treated with I 131 for Graves' disease at Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, were reviewed retrospectively, between January, 1981 and November, 1999. Results: Data from 107 patients (14 men and 93 women), with median age of 54 years were analyzed. Comparing the group of patients who were treated with I 131 therapy with a group of euthyroid patients post-treatment with antithyroid drugs, a significant increase in the occurrence of hypertension and dyslipidemia was observed, but not in mortality rate. Conclusion: To evaluate the real influence of the treatment with radioactive iodine in the occurrence of these comorbidities and the mortality rate, we need a longer follow-up. The age and time of exposure to the effects of hyperthyroidism seem to influence the occurrence of these comorbidities. (author)

  19. Results of radioiodine therapy of patients with immunogenic and non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism using different radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, E.; Pickardt, C.R.; Mann, K.; Engelhardt, D.; Kirsch, C.M.; Knesewitsch, P.; Tatsch, K.; Kreisig, T.; Kurz, C.; Saller, B.; Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen; Muenchen Univ.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was to check the efficacy of radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy (RIT) in a large number of patients (n = 506) suffering from immunogenic or non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease, Plummer's disease). Since there is no causal cure for immunogenic hyperthyroidism RIT provides, like all other modalities, only a moderate rate of success which is clearly dose-related. Applying 60 Gy, normal thyroid function can be achieved is only 54% of the cases. A dose of 150 Gy succeeds in 86% of the cases. The solitary decompensated autonomous adenoma (DAA) can be eliminated surgically as well as by RIT with a high degree of success (95%). Contrary to surgery, RIT does not have any noticeable early or late morbidity. The high rate of success of RIT in patients with DAA could be confirmed in two groups with different follow-up periods (16 and 65 months). As expected, the rate of hypothyroidism increased from 11% in the early group to 23% in the late group. Multinodular autonomous adenomas can be eliminated successfully using RIT as well. The concept to apply a dose of 400 Gy to the total functional autonomous tissue as determined by ultrasound yields better results (95%) than 150 Gy to the whole thyroid gland as measured by ultrasound (88%). The rate of hypothyroidism as shown by these results (up to a maximum of 62% after RIT of Graves' disease using 150 Gy) is the lesser evil compared to remaining or recurrent hyperthyroidism since these patients can be treated with thyroid hormones without problems. (orig.) [de

  20. The Sonographic Features of the Thyroid Gland After Treatment with Radioiodine Therapy in Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Collette; Casey, Ruth; Bell, Marcia; Bergin, Diane; Murphy, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the typical sonographic features of the thyroid gland in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism after radioiodine therapy (RIT). Thirty patients (21 female and 9 male) with a mean age of 53 y (standard deviation [SD] ± 11.3) and with previous Graves' disease who had been successfully treated with RIT were enrolled in the study. All were hypothyroid or euthyroid after treatment. The thyroid ultrasound was carried out by a single experienced operator with an 8-MHz linear transducer. Volume, vascularity, echogenicity and echotexture of the glands were noted. The presence of nodules and lymph nodes was also documented. The mean volumes of the right lobe were 2.4 mL ± 2.9 SD (0.6-14) and the left lobe were 1.8 mL ± 1.9 SD (0.4-9.1), with a mean total volume of 4.2 mL ± 4.7 SD (1.3-19.1). Of those who had a pre-treatment ultrasound (23%), the percentage reduction in volume was 87% (p < 0.05); 93% of the glands were hypovascular, with the remaining 7% showing normal vascularity. The glands were hyperechoic and of coarse echotexture. Overall, the sonographic features of the post-RIT gland included a significantly reduced mean total volume of 4.2 mL, hypovascularity, coarse echotexture and hyperechogenicity. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A prospective randomized study of the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of high and low dose regimens of I-131 treatment in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuwan, Pawana; Tuntawiroon, Malulee; Sritongkul, Nopamol; Chaudakshetrin, Pachee; Nopmaneejumruslers, Cherdchai; Komoltri, Chulalak; Thepamongkhol, Kullathorn; Khiewvan, Benjapa; Tuchinda, Pongpija; Sriussadaporn, Sutin

    2011-03-01

    To compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of high and low dose regimens of I-131 treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. One hundred fifty patients with proven hyperthyroidism were randomly allocated into the high (74 patients) and low (76 patients) dose regimen of I-131 treatment. Four patients of the high dose group and one patient of the low dose group were excluded because of lost follow-up. A gland-specific dosage was calculated on the estimated weight of thyroid gland and 24-hour I-131 uptake. The high and low I-131 dose regimens were 150 microCi/gm and 100 microCi/gm, respectively. The first mean radioiodine activity administered to the high and low dose group was 10.2 and 8 mCi, respectively. Repeated treatment was given to 25 patients of the high dose group and 40 patients of the low dose group. Clinical outcome and calculated costs for outpatient attendances, and laboratory tests together with initial and subsequent treatments were evaluated for one year after I-131 treatment. Elimination of hyperthyroidism that resulted in either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism was classified as therapeutic success. The cost effectiveness was also compared. At 6 months after treatment, 45 (64.3%) patients receiving high dose and 59 (78.7%) patients receiving low dose were hyperthyroidism. Clinical outcome at one year showed persistence of hyperthyroidism in 21 (30%) patients of the high dose regimen and 36 (48%) patients of the low dose regimen. At one year post treatment, it was demonstrated that the high dose regimen could eliminate hyperthyroidism in a significantly shorter time than the low dose regimen, i.e., 259.6 days and 305.5 days, respectively, p = 0.008). For the persistent hyperthyroid patients, the average total cost of treatment in the low dose group was significantly higher than that of the high dose group, i.e., 13,422.78 baht and 10,942.79 baht, respectively; p = 0.050). A high dose regimen of radioactive iodine treatment is more effective than

  2. Chemo-radionuclide therapy for thyroid cancer. Initial experimental study with cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Takashi; Iwata, Masahiro; Iida, Yasuhiro; Kasagi, Kanji; Konishi, Junji

    2002-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy has long been used for distant metastases of thyroid cancer. Although partially effective in most cases, it can render a complete cure only in a limited number of patients. One way to enhance its efficacy would be to combine it with antineoplastic agents. Here we describe an initial in vitro evaluation with 4 thyroid cancer cell lines. Cells were sparsely seeded in microtiter plates and allowed to grow for 2 days; then they were exposed to sublethal concentrations of cisplatin (CDDP), doxorubicin (Dox), or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), followed by treatment with I-131 for 48 hr. Cell survival was measured with a commercial kit based on the colorimetry of succinate dehydrogenase activity. Chemotherapeutic drugs exerted similar concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects in all 4 cell lines. The doses necessary to reduce the surviving fraction to half of the control were about 3 μg/ml for CDDP, 0.3 μg/ml for Dox, and 3 μg/ml for 5-FU (when used continuously for 48 hours). On the other hand, sensitivity to I-131 irradiation differed among the lines; same doses (7.4-14.8 MBq/ml) caused the greatest damage in FRO cells, a modest effect in NPA and WRO, and only minimal change in B-CPAP. The combined effect was most demonstrable in wells treated with Dox and radioiodine, whereas the addition of CDDP or 5-FU had marginal or insignificant merit, respectively. In FRO cells, half-lethal doses of the above mentioned CDDP, Dox, and 5-FU, when used together with 14.8 MBq/ml I-131, reduced cell survival to 54.5%, 29.4% and 33.4%, respectively, vs. 60.2% with radioiodine alone. In vitro, clinical concentrations of Dox can accelerate the killing of thyroid cancer cells by radioiodine. These favorable experimental results warrant future studies to evaluate whether this new bidisciplinary approach is clinically relevant and feasible. (author)

  3. Chemo-radionuclide therapy for thyroid cancer. Initial experimental study with cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misaki, Takashi; Iwata, Masahiro; Iida, Yasuhiro; Kasagi, Kanji; Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    Radioiodine therapy has long been used for distant metastases of thyroid cancer. Although partially effective in most cases, it can render a complete cure only in a limited number of patients. One way to enhance its efficacy would be to combine it with antineoplastic agents. Here we describe an initial in vitro evaluation with 4 thyroid cancer cell lines. Cells were sparsely seeded in microtiter plates and allowed to grow for 2 days; then they were exposed to sublethal concentrations of cisplatin (CDDP), doxorubicin (Dox), or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), followed by treatment with I-131 for 48 hr. Cell survival was measured with a commercial kit based on the colorimetry of succinate dehydrogenase activity. Chemotherapeutic drugs exerted similar concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects in all 4 cell lines. The doses necessary to reduce the surviving fraction to half of the control were about 3 {mu}g/ml for CDDP, 0.3 {mu}g/ml for Dox, and 3 {mu}g/ml for 5-FU (when used continuously for 48 hours). On the other hand, sensitivity to I-131 irradiation differed among the lines; same doses (7.4-14.8 MBq/ml) caused the greatest damage in FRO cells, a modest effect in NPA and WRO, and only minimal change in B-CPAP. The combined effect was most demonstrable in wells treated with Dox and radioiodine, whereas the addition of CDDP or 5-FU had marginal or insignificant merit, respectively. In FRO cells, half-lethal doses of the above mentioned CDDP, Dox, and 5-FU, when used together with 14.8 MBq/ml I-131, reduced cell survival to 54.5%, 29.4% and 33.4%, respectively, vs. 60.2% with radioiodine alone. In vitro, clinical concentrations of Dox can accelerate the killing of thyroid cancer cells by radioiodine. These favorable experimental results warrant future studies to evaluate whether this new bidisciplinary approach is clinically relevant and feasible. (author)

  4. Relationship between serum TSH and the responsiveness of toxic solitary autonomous thyroid nodules to radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Kirkegaard, B C

    1998-01-01

    hypothyroidism both had detectable serum TSH at the time of 131I treatment. No other clinical parameter seemed to influence the outcome. CONCLUSION: There is no clinically significant effect of circulating TSH on the response of toxic solitary autonomous thyroid nodules to 131I therapy. However, keeping...... the patients subclinically hyperthyroid when receiving 131I treatment may possibly result in a reduced frequency of hypothyroidism.......) were euthyroid, three (8%) had responded insufficiently and required further antithyroid therapy, and two (5%) had developed hypothyroidism. No significant difference in the response pattern between patients with suppressed or detectable serum TSH could be demonstrated. The two patients who developed...

  5. Follow-up on thyroidal uptake after radioiodine therapy. How robust is the peri-therapeutic dosimetry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschner, Wolfgang; Kobe, Carsten; Schicha, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) for benign thyroid diseases in Germany requires the patient to stay in a nuclear medicine therapy ward for at least 48 hours and the dose to the thyroid to be computed from activity measurements performed during that stay. A major part of the total dose will be delivered after the patient's discharge from the hospital and thus has to be predicted through extrapolation with the effective half-life measured peri-therapeutically. We performed repeated thyroid uptake measurements on patients up to five months post therapy to investigate post-therapeutic changes in their effective half-lives and examine the dosimetric consequences. 12 patients (4 m, 8 f; age 36 - 76 y; 4 Graves' disease, 4 toxic adenoma, 3 toxic goitre, 1 non-toxic goitre) underwent late uptake measurements (1 - 7 meas., 13 - 154 d post administration, median 54 d, performed with thyroid probe resp. whole body counter at lower activities). Doses calculated from late measurements were compared to those predicted at discharge; half-lives calculated from the late measurement closest to the median delay (54 d) were compared to those determined at time of discharge. A cross-calibration between activity calibrator, thyroid probe, and whole body counter over an activity range from 52 MBq down to 45 Bq revealed linearity to within 6%, which was considered sufficient. In 9 out of 12 patients the achieved dose was within the range predicted at discharge. Averaged deviation between achieved and predicted dose was 3.1 ± 2.2% (median 2.5%, range 0.7% - 7.2%). Averaged deviation between post- and peri-therapeutic half-lives was 5.1 ± 3.9% (median 3.5%, range 1.3% - 12.5%). For n=5 patients discharged after 3 days, averaged deviations were greater (dose 4.0%, half-life 5.6%) than for those patients (n = 7) who stayed in the hospital for a minimum of 4 days (dose 2.5%, half-life 4.8%). Excretion of iodine from the thyroid remains practically unchanged for at least two months after RIT. The

  6. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses

  7. Greater Efficacy of Total Thyroidectomy versus Radioiodine Therapy on Hyperthyroidism and Thyroid-Stimulating Immunoglobulin Levels in Patients with Graves' Disease Previously Treated with Antithyroid Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautbally, Shakeel; Alexopoulou, Orsalia; Daumerie, Chantal; Jamar, François; Mourad, Michel; Maiter, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Aims We compared the effects of total thyroidectomy (TTx) and radioiodine (RAI) administration on the course of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI) in patients with Graves' disease. Methods We retrospectively studied 80 patients initially treated with antithyroid drugs and requiring either RAI (8.3 ± 1.7 mCi of 131I; n = 40) or TTx (n = 40) as second-line therapy. Results The TTx and RAI groups were not different, except for larger goiter, higher FT3 and more frequent Graves' orbitopathy at diagnosis in the surgery group (p antithyroid drugs. PMID:24783007

  8. Lithium as adjuvant to radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: clinical and in vitro studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y. Y.; van der Pluijm, G.; Karperien, M.; Stokkel, M. P. M.; Pereira, A. M.; Morreau, J.; Kievit, J.; Romijn, J. A.; Smit, J. W. A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithium has been reported to increase radioactive iodine (RaI) doses in benign thyroid disease and in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). It is not known whether lithium influences the outcome of RaI therapy in DTC. We therefore studied the clinical effects of RaI without and with lithium

  9. Software for dosimetry hypothyroid patients treated with I131 pick up and using probe gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Felstrom, D.; Luis simon, J.; Reyes Garcia, R.; Derecho Torres, P.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this communication the process recently implemented in our hospital for pre and post treatment of patients treated with I-131 in benign diseases of the thyroid gland internal dosimetry is described. We have developed a proprietary software that facilitates the process of dosimetry. Through scans Planar or pictures Spect be determines the mass of the gland thyroid. In function of the mass, is calculated by Monte Carlo the media power absorbed by disintegration of the I-131 in said gland endocrine. (Author)

  10. Sialadenitis after radioiodine therapy. Analysis of factors that influence the response to medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geres, Alejandra E; Mereshian, Paula Szafryk; Fernández, Silvia; Rey Caro, Daniel Gonzalo; Castro, Ricardo; Podio, Ricardo; Ojeda, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    To assess the incidence of 131I-induced sialadenitis (SD) in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), to analyze clinical and other factors related to metabolic radiotherapy that may predict the lack of response to conventional medical therapy (CMT), and to determine the effectiveness of intraductal steroid instillation in patients failing CMT. Fifty-two patients with DTC, 45 females (86.5%) and 7 males (13.5%) with a mean age of 44.21±13.3 years (r=17-74) who received ablation therapy with 131I after total thyroidectomy. Patients with diseases and/or medication causing xerostomia were excluded. Patients underwent salivary gland scintigraphy with 99Tc (10mCi). Eighteen patients (34.62%) had SD and received antibiotics, antispasmodics, and oral steroids for 15 days. They were divided into two groups: responders to medical therapy (n=12, age 44.3±14.4 years, 2 men [17%], 10 women [83%], cumulative dose 225±167.1 mCi) and non-responders to medical treatment, who underwent steroid instillation into the Stensen's duct (n=6 [33%], 2 men [33%], 4 women [67%], age 50±13.8 years, cumulative dose 138.3±61.7 mCi). Scintigraphy showed damage to the parotid and submaxillary glands. Incidence of 131I-induced sialadenitis was similar to that reported by other authors. Age, mean cumulative dose of 131I, and involvement of parotid and submaxillary glands did not condition response to CMT; however, male sex was a conditioning factor. Symptom persistence for more than 15 days makes instillation into the Stensen's duct advisable. This is an effective and safe method to avoid surgical excision of salivary glands. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient management in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease; Radiojodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen: Ambulante Vorbereitung und Nachsorge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Benign thyroid disease ranks by far as the most frequent therapy in nuclear medicine. In Germany approximately 25 000 cases of hyperthyreosis are being treated in association with autonomy or Graves` disease, but also for the reduction of goiters or the correction of latent functional disturbances. In such indications radiotherapy is virtually free of risk as opposed to surgery and ranks more favorable in regard to costs and curative effects versus pharmacological long term treatment. Still regional varying therapeutical concepts and intentions are being pursued and trials of improvements described. There is consent in therapy that quality of treatment is closely linked to a specialized out-door platient preparation, individual hospital activity dosage and lifelong follow up including continued evaluation of therapeutical results. In this paper minimal requirements of outpatient measures before and after therapy are summarized which in Germany is only permitted on an inhospital patient basis. Considering basics of radioactive preventive law, scientific evidence of available results of therapeutical studies and a survey of German therapeutic centers, suggestions for a quality maintaining management in view of the most effective utilization for the limited available number of beds is presented for discussion. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die mit Abstand haeufigste nuklearmedizinische Therapie betrifft die gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen. In Deutschland werden jaehrlich etwa 25 000 Hyperthyreosen bei Autonomie oder Morbus Basedow, aber auch Strumen zur Verkleinerung oder Beseitigung einer latenten Funktionsstoerung behandelt. Die Radiojodtherapie ist bei den genannten Indikationen gegenueber der Operation praktisch risikofrei, gegenueber einer medikamentoesen Langzeitbehandlung kurativ und kostenguenstiger. Nach wie vor werden regional variierende Behandlungskonzepte und -ziele verfolgt und Optimierungsversuche beschrieben. Einigkeit besteht bei den Therapeuten, dass die

  12. Role of antithyroid drug treatment prior to radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Pradhan, P.K.; Senthilnathan, M.S.; Malhotra, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radio Iodine (RI) therapy is preceded by anti thyroid drug treatment in most centres. There is a general notion that this is a pre-requisite for RI therapy. There have been some sporadic reports in the past emphasizing that euthyroid state is not necessary in all cases before RI. However, no prospective randomized study has been reported in recent literature. The aim of this prospective study was to find out whether prior treatment with anti thyroid drugs showed any advantage in comparison to direct application of radio iodine in hyperthyroid patients. Seventy-two clinically and bio chemically proven cases of hyperthyroidism were randomized into two groups , each with 36 patients. They were matched by age, sex and size of goiter. After establishment of the diagnosis the patients were either subjected to anti thyroid drug treatment (Group A) or given calculated dose of radio iodine (Group B). After being euthyroid for at least 4 weeks the Group A patients were asked to stop the drugs (Neomercazole) for 3-5 days and radio iodine was administered. Patients in both groups were prescribed beta blockers for 4-6 weeks. Average radio iodine dose in both groups was 5 ± 0.92 mCi. All patients were evaluated both clinically and bio chemically 3, 6, 12 months after the radio iodine application. The duration to achieve euthyroid state, patient tolerance and side effects if any were meticulously recorded. In the pre treated group 72.1, 83.4 and 97.2% of the patients attained euthyroid state at 3, 6, 12 months respectively. Five patients needed a second dose after 3 months. No side effect or complications were observed. In group B 77.7, 88.8 and 94.4% of patients achieved euthyroid status at 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. There was no side effects or complications noted. However, 16.7 and 22.2% of the patients in group A and 27.7 and 36.1% of the group B became hypothyroid at 6 and 12 months respectively. They were treated with Thyroxine supplementation. Overall

  13. TH-AB-206-01: Advances in Radionuclide Therapy - From Radioiodine to Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, the field of nuclear medicine has made long strides with the continued advancement of related sciences and engineering and the availability of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides. Leveraging these advancements while combining the advantages of therapeutic and diagnostic radionuclides into one radiopharmaceutical has also created a new subfield “theranostics” in nuclear medicine that has the potential to further propel the field into the future. This session is composed of two talks; one focused on the physics principles of theranostics from properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides to dosimetric models and quantification; while the second describes preclinical and clinical applications of theranostics and discusses the challenges and opportunities of bringing them to the clinic. At the end of the session the listener should be able to identify: The different properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides Which radionuclides are selected for which nuclear medicine therapies and why How PET can be used to accurately quantify the uptake of tumor targeting molecules How individualized dosimetry can be performed from the management of thyroid cancer to novel radiolabeled antibody therapies Promising pre-clinical radiopharmaceutical pairs in prostate cancer and melanoma. Promising clinical Theranostics in neuroendocrine cancers. Challenges of bringing Theranostics to the clinic. E. Delpassand, RITA Foundation -Houston; SBIR Grant; CEO and share holder of RadioMedix.

  14. TH-AB-206-01: Advances in Radionuclide Therapy - From Radioiodine to Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humm, J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In the past few decades, the field of nuclear medicine has made long strides with the continued advancement of related sciences and engineering and the availability of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides. Leveraging these advancements while combining the advantages of therapeutic and diagnostic radionuclides into one radiopharmaceutical has also created a new subfield “theranostics” in nuclear medicine that has the potential to further propel the field into the future. This session is composed of two talks; one focused on the physics principles of theranostics from properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides to dosimetric models and quantification; while the second describes preclinical and clinical applications of theranostics and discusses the challenges and opportunities of bringing them to the clinic. At the end of the session the listener should be able to identify: The different properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides Which radionuclides are selected for which nuclear medicine therapies and why How PET can be used to accurately quantify the uptake of tumor targeting molecules How individualized dosimetry can be performed from the management of thyroid cancer to novel radiolabeled antibody therapies Promising pre-clinical radiopharmaceutical pairs in prostate cancer and melanoma. Promising clinical Theranostics in neuroendocrine cancers. Challenges of bringing Theranostics to the clinic. E. Delpassand, RITA Foundation -Houston; SBIR Grant; CEO and share holder of RadioMedix.

  15. Bilateral optic nerve swelling after thyroidectomy followed by a course of radioiodine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioyleva E.E.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common cancer of the endocrine system is thyroid cancer, representing 1.0–1.5 % all newly diagnosed cases of cancer. According to the cancer society of Russia, the thyroid cancer in children is much rarer than in adults. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents is characterized by an adverse clinical course and a high risk of developing metastases in the lymph nodes. The main method of treatment for pediatric thyroid cancer is total thyroidectomy with central neck lymph node dissection followed by radioactive iodine therapy. In foreign and domestic literature, complications of the organ of vision, namely, changes of the optic disc, after surgical treatment for thyroid cancer are poorly understood. The risk of transient hypocalcemia and hypothyroidism increases after thyroidectomy. In the literature, there are two reported cases of the optic nerve swelling combined with hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia. While hypocalcemia intracranial hypertension and swelling of the optic nerves are often recorded. In this article, the authors present their own clinical observation of a 13-year-old patient after thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine therapy with detailed analysis of the clinical data and study results. According to the survey of the patient, bilateral swelling of the optic disc was revealed, which could occur due to hypothyroid state. Objective: to identify the cause of the development of bilateral optic nerve swelling in a patient after thyroidectomy and treatment course with radioactive iodine.

  16. Estimation dose in organs of hyperthyroidism patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias de Lima, F.; Khoury, H.C.; Bertelli Neto, L.; Hazin, C.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The absorbed dose in organs of hyperthyroidism patients, which received 370 MBq and 555 MBq of I-131 were estimated, using the MIRDOSE computational program and data of the ICRP-53 publication. The calculus were done considering an equal uptake to 45% and an effective half life of 5 days, these values are closed to the average values found in 17 studied patients. The thyroidal masses were previously determined by the physicians and varied between 40 g and 80 g The results showed that the dose in the thyroid, for an activity of 370 MBq, varied between 99 Gy and 49,5 Gy for the masses of 40 g and 80 g respectively. In the case of the administration of 555 MBq the patients had thyroidal masses between 60 g and 80 g and the doses varied between 99 Gy and 74,2 Gy, respectively. These values showed that the absorbed doses in thyroid are within limits expected for the hyperthyroidism therapy, which are of 506 Gy to 100 Gy. The 100 Gy dose would be exceeded, if the patients with thyroidal mass of 40 g had received a therapeutic dose of 555 MBq. The estimated media doses in others organs were relatively low, with inferior values of 0,1 Gy in kidneys, bone marrow and ovaries and of 0,19 Gy in stomach

  17. Gonadal radiation dose and its genetic significance in radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.S.; Gorman, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Published estimates of radiation dose to the gonads from 131 I therapy of Graves' disease vary widely, largely because of differences in assumptions regarding the details of iodine kinetics. The calculations described in this paper show that hyperthyroid patients treated with 10 mCi of 131 I will usually receive a total radiation dose to the ovaries or testes of less than 3 rad. Several common roentgenographic diagnostic procedures may involve a greater radiation dose and a greater genetic hazard than does the usual 131 I treatment for hyperthyroidism. It is important to minimize total exposure to radiation, but it seems unreasonable to deny 131 I treatment for hyperthyroidism to young men and nonpregnant young women on the grounds of genetic hazard alone

  18. Long-term results of radioiodine (131I) therapy in 331 patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shintaro; Sakurada, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Makiko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Kaise, Kazuo

    1980-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term results of 131 I treatment for Graves' disease, the thyroid function was studied in 331 patients 5 - 17 years after this therapy. Twenty-five patients were hypothyroid and had already been on thyroid medication. Among the remaining 306 patients without any treatment for thyroid disorder, 188 patients (61.4%) had a normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level (less than 10 μU/ml) of whom 151 were euthyroid with normal thyroxine (T 4 ) and triiodothyronine (T 3 ) level. 118 patients (38.6%) had a high TSH level, of whom 22 were hypothyroid with low T 4 and T 3 levels and 38 were with normal T 3 and low T 4 levels, and 14 patients out of this 38 were clinically hypothyroid. Although all of the patients with high TSH levels do not require the replacement therapy for hypothyroidism, the overt hypothyroidism seems to occur sooner or later in patients with a lower T 4 level. Among 331 patients studied, 61 (18.4%) were clinically hypothyroid. The incidence of hypothyroidism was 20.7% after 10 years of 131 I treatment and 33% after 15 - 17 years. The incidence of patients with high TSH levels was 50% after 10 years of 131 I treatment and 60% after 15 - 17 years. Both of cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism and patients with high TSH levels increased linearly with years after the treatment, which coincided with the linear decrease of mean T 4 and T 3 levels and linear increase of mean TSH level with years after the treatment. The difference of positive incidence of antithyroid antibodies between cases of normal TSH level and high TSH level was not significant. (author)

  19. Radioiodine therapy in skeletal metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer: a Johannesburg experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Sindy Perumal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim.The purpose of this study was to examine the outcome of patients with skeletal metastases from well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma and analyse the effect of variables that influence the prognosis of this disease. Method. We retrospectively reviewed 352 patients treated and followed-up at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital’s thyroid cancer clinic from 1982 - 1999. Findings. Skeletal metastases were diagnosed in 24 (6.8%, 17 at presentation to the thyroid clinic, and 7 at follow-up. Patients’ ages ranged from 30 - 77 years (mean 53.9 years and the female:male ratio was 3.8:1. Based on the original pathology reports from resected tumours, 9 were papillary and 15 were follicular cancers. Twenty-three of the 24 patients underwent thyroid surgery as the initial management – total thyroidectomy in 18, subtotal thyroidectomy in 3, and lobectomy plus neck dissection in one. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was based on lobectomy in a single subject. Radioactive iodine (RAI was used as part of the original treatment; external radiation therapy (XRT was mainly used to alleviate severe symptoms. Twenty-one patients (87.5% were treated with RAI; 11 (45.8% received radiotherapy. Seven patients died – 4 from neurological disease directly associated with bone metastases. Of the 17 surviving patients, 2 appeared to be disease-free, 8 were asymptomatic despite overt bony disease, and 7 had persistent symptoms which much improved in 5. Bone metastases were uncommon, and follicular cancer predominated in this survey. Conclusion. RAI therapy improves quality of life in most patients. There is a place for XRT.

  20. Results of preventive radioiodine therapy in euthyroid patients with history of hyperthyroidism prior to administration of amiodarone with permanent atrial fibrillation--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Zgorzalewicz-Stachowiak, Małgorzata; Woliński, Kosma; Płazińska, Maria Teresa; Miechowicz, Izabela; Kwiecińska, Barbara; Czepczyński, Rafał; Królicki, Leszek; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine (RAI) therapy is a standard procedure in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. However, the use of RAI in euthyroid patients requiring chronic administration of amiodarone (AM) where other antiarrhythmic drugs may lack efficacy is still controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of an AM therapy prior to treatment with radioiodine therapy in euthyroid patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (PAF), who had been treated for hyperthyroidism in the past. This was a retrospective observational study. Patients were assessed at baseline and two, six, eight, and 12 months after RAI therapy. 17 euthyroid patients with PAF were qualified to the RAI (female/male 3/14; age range 65 to 87, median 71). The patients required chronic administration of AM as a prophylaxis against sudden death. Each patient received an ablative dose of 800 MBq (22 mCi) of 131I. At baseline and during follow-up, no side effects of the therapy and no signs of drug intolerance were observed. Subclinical hyperthyroidism occurred in two (11.8%) cases after two months of RAI and five weeks of AM administration. In this situation, RAI therapy was repeated. Three patients (17.6%) after six months, and another two (11.8%) after eight months, required an additional dose of 131I due to amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT). Twelve patients (70.6%) returned to spontaneous sinus rhythm within two months. Fourteen patients (82.4%) had sinus rhythm during follow-up after six and 12 months of treatment. Preventive RAI in euthyroid (but previously hyperthyroid) patients with PAF before administration of AM may be the method of choice. This is particularly important for patients who will require permanent AM administration as a life-saving drug.

  1. Radioiodine therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism due to non-voluminous nodular goiter and its effect on bone metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley [Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Endocrinology Service

    2013-05-01

    Objective: To evaluate {sup 131}I therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH) due to nodular disease and who did not receive antithyroid drugs (ATDs), and the effect of the treatment on bone metabolism. Subjects and methods: Thirty-six patients with TSH {<=} 0.1mIU/L and non-voluminous goiter (< 60 cm{sup 3} were studied. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed in 17 women with osteopenia. Results: Mean 24-h {sup 131}I uptake was 17.5%. Symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were reported by two (5.5%) patients in the first week after therapy. One year after radioiodine treatment, SCH was resolved in 30 (83.3%) patients, and hypothyroidism was detected in one (2.7%). In the patients in whom TSH returned to normal, femoral and lumbar spine BMD increased by 1.9% and 1.6%, respectively, in average. Conclusions: In elderly patients with SCH and non-voluminous goiter, radioiodine not preceded by ATDs is a safe and effective therapeutic alternative. Resolution of SCH has beneficial effects on BMD in postmenopausal women with osteopenia. (author)

  2. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients according to thyroid uptake of 99mTc-pertechnetate: applicability to unifocal thyroid autonomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Biermann, Kim; Brockmann, Holger; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Wissmeyer, Michael; Juengling, Freimut D.; Krause, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of applying a previously described dose strategy based on 99m Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU s ) to radioiodine therapy for unifocal thyroid autonomy. A total of 425 consecutive patients (302 females, 123 males; age 63.1±10.3 years) with unifocal thyroid autonomy were treated at three different centres with 131 I, using Marinelli's formula for calculation of three different absorbed dose schedules: 100-300 Gy to the total thyroid volume according to the pre-treatment TcTU s (n=146), 300 Gy to the nodule volume (n=137) and 400 Gy to the nodule volume (n=142). Successful elimination of functional thyroid autonomy with either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism occurred at a mean of 12 months after radioiodine therapy in 94.5% of patients receiving 100-300 Gy to the thyroid volume, in 89.8% of patients receiving 300 Gy to the nodule volume and in 94.4% receiving 400 Gy to the nodule volume. Reduction in thyroid volume was highest for the 100-300 Gy per thyroid and 400 Gy per nodule strategies (36±19% and 38±20%, respectively) and significantly lower for the 300 Gy per nodule strategy (28±16%; p s can be used independently of the scintigraphic pattern of functional autonomous tissue in the thyroid. (orig.)

  3. Radioiodine therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism due to non-voluminous nodular goiter and its effect on bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate 131I therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH) due to nodular disease and who did not receive antithyroid drugs (ATDs), and the effect of the treatment on bone metabolism. Thirty-six patients with TSH ≤ 0.1 mIU/L and non-voluminous goiter (< 60 cm³) were studied. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed in 17 women with osteopenia. Mean 24-h 131I uptake was 17.5%. Symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were reported by two (5.5%) patients in the first week after therapy. One year after radioiodine treatment, SCH was resolved in 30 (83.3%) patients, and hypothyroidism was detected in one (2.7%). In the patients in whom TSH returned to normal, femoral and lumbar spine BMD increased by 1.9% and 1.6%, respectively, in average. In elderly patients with SCH and non-voluminous goiter, radioiodine not preceded by ATDs is a safe and effective therapeutic alternative. Resolution of SCH has beneficial effects on BMD in postmenopausal women with osteopenia.

  4. Radioiodine therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism due to non-voluminous nodular goiter and its effect on bone metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 131 I therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH) due to nodular disease and who did not receive antithyroid drugs (ATDs), and the effect of the treatment on bone metabolism. Subjects and methods: Thirty-six patients with TSH ≤ 0.1mIU/L and non-voluminous goiter ( 3 were studied. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed in 17 women with osteopenia. Results: Mean 24-h 131 I uptake was 17.5%. Symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were reported by two (5.5%) patients in the first week after therapy. One year after radioiodine treatment, SCH was resolved in 30 (83.3%) patients, and hypothyroidism was detected in one (2.7%). In the patients in whom TSH returned to normal, femoral and lumbar spine BMD increased by 1.9% and 1.6%, respectively, in average. Conclusions: In elderly patients with SCH and non-voluminous goiter, radioiodine not preceded by ATDs is a safe and effective therapeutic alternative. Resolution of SCH has beneficial effects on BMD in postmenopausal women with osteopenia. (author)

  5. Hepatic uptake of radioiodine in patients with thyroid cancer: the good, the bad and the aesthetically impaired

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, M.; Larcos, G.; Gruenewald, S.; Devadas, M.; Boyages, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: There is debate over the prognostic significance of diffuse hepatic uptake (DHU) of radioiodine in patients with thyroid cancer (DTC). Accordingly we compared outcome in DTC patients with and without DHU and no abnormality on their radioiodine scan. We reviewed 408 studies in 198 patients who underwent radioiodine scanning (treatment or surveillance) for DTC over a five-year period. Of these 234 (57%) showed DHU; 100/408 showed no evidence of functioning thyroid tissue. These were 22 high dose I 131 treatments, 48 I 131 and 30 I 123 surveillance scans in 72 patients (54 women, 18 men, age: 43( 14 years; tumour type: 88% papillary, 10% follicular, 2% other; mean follow-up 12.2 (11.1 months). Outcome was assessed by clinical, pathological (thyroglobulin or histopathology) and/or radioiodine scanning. Of the 100 scans there were 17 (17%) that had DHU (group A) and 83 (83%) that were negative (group B). In group A, eight of 17 (47%) had or developed residual functioning thyroid tissue or DTC versus 29 of 83 (35%) in group B (p=ns). The only factor associated with DHU was high dose I 131 (p<0.001) but not the gender, age or type of cancer. We conclude that (a) DHU is common in patients with DTC; (b) if there is otherwise physiological distribution of radioiodine, DHU does not indicate an adverse short term outcome in DTC patients. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  6. Occupational exposure of nursing staff working with radioiodine therapy during 11 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegaro, Jose Ulisses Manzzini; Teixeira, Sandra Mara Pessano

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the occupational exposure of nursing staff in charge of inpatients undergoing 131 I therapy during 11 years. Materials and methods: The exposure situations were classified according to a questionnaire answered by three nursing attendants, correlating the procedures with activities, distances and amount of time in the iodotherapy room. Records of received doses by two types of dosimeters were evaluated over two subsequent periods. In both periods the nursing attendants received instructions about radiological protection. Results: In usual situations, their amount of time in the iodotherapy room was in compliance with the standard time established by the service. In unusual situations, where the patient needed assistance for mobility, the exposure period was above the standard. However, this exposure occurs casually (only one or two times a year). During the period between 1993 and 1999 (dosimetric films) there were ten dose records, all of them at record level. From 2000 to 2003 (thermoluminescent dosimeters) ten dose records were also obtained, with only one of them at the investigation level. During this study period, the mean 131 I activity was doubled. Conclusion: Despite the increased levels of activity there was no significant increase in dose to nursing attendants. (author)

  7. Preoperative F-18-FDG PET for the detection of metastatic cervical lymph nodes in recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma patients with negative I-131 whole body scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Byung Hyun; Urn, Sang Moo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Guk Haeng; Lee, Yong Sik; Shim, Youn Sang

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET for the detection of metastatic cervical lymph nodes in recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma patients with negative I-131 scan. All patients had total thyroidectomy and following I-131 ablation therapy. In the follow-up period, FDG-PET showed suspected cervical lymph nodes metastases and neck dissection was performed within 3 months after FDG-PET. It had shown for all patients the negative I-131 scan within 3 months before FDG-PET or negative I-131 scan during the period of cervical lymph nodes metastases suspected on the basis of FDG-PET, CT, or ultrasonography until the latest FDG-PET. Preoperative FDG-PET results were compared with the pathologic findings of lymph nodes specimens of 19 papillary thyroid carcinoma patients. Serum Tg, TSH, and Tg antibody levels at the time of latest I-131 scan were reviewed. The size of lymph node was measured by preoperative CT or ultrasonography. In 45 cervical lymph node groups dissected, 31 lymph node groups revealed metastasis. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for metastasis were 74.2% (23 of 31) and 50.0% (7 of 14), respectively. Except for patients with elevated Tg antibody levels, all patients showed the elevated serum Tg levels than normal limits at the TSH of =30uIU/ml. 8 lesions without suspected metastatic findings on FDG-PET revealed metastasis (false negative), and none of them exceeded 8mm in size (4 to 8mm, median= 6mm). On the other hand, 23 true positive lesions on FDG-PET were variable in size (6 to 17mm, median=9mm). FDG-PET is suitable for the detection of metastatic cervical lymph nodes in patients with recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma. However, false positive or false negative should be considered according to the size of lymph node

  8. False-positive I-131 scan by contaminated muffler in a patient with thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Han Kyung; Kim, Min Woo; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    A 39-year-old female patient who had undergone a total thyroidectomy for a papillary thyroid carcinoma underwent a whole body scan with I-131. The I-131 scan was performed 72 hours after administering 185 MBq (5 mGi) of an I-131 solution. The anterior image of head, neck, and upper chest showed multiple areas of increased uptake in the mediastinal area considering of functional metastasis. However, radioactivity was not evident in the image taken after removing her clothes and muffler. The image obtained after placing the muffler on the pallet showed that the radioactivity was still present. It is well known that artifacts on an I-131 scan can be produced by styling hair sputum, drooling during sleep, chewing gum, and paper or a cloth handkerchief that is contaminated with the radioactive iodine from either perspiration or saliva. This activity might be mistaken for a functional metastasis. Therefore, it is essential that an image be obtained after removing the patient's clothes. In this study, artifacts due to a contaminated muffler on the I-131 scan were found. These mimicked a functional metastasis of the mediastinal area in a patient with a papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  9. I131-MIBG in early diagnose of neuroblastoma in symptomatic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddadi, F.S.; Kargarzadeh, F.K.; Yaghoobi, N.Y.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Neuroblastoma is the second most common solid tumors in childhood which derivates from neural crest. It is very malignant and almost always patient comes with metastasis. However there are some diagnostic tools to detection of lesion in the early stage of tumor. We decided to have a review with using I-131 MIBG in patients suspected and/or proved to have neuroblastoma. Material and Methods: 300-500 μci I 131 MIBG was injected intravenously in patients (5 patients with age range 4 years old) referred for their bone pain and pelvic mass(detected with anatomical tools). Images were obtained 24 to 72 hours throughout the body with ADAC gamma camera and SPECT was performed in each local abnormal uptake. Each patient has already had a WBBS with TcMDP. Results: All abnormal tracer uptakes were seen in bone scan were revealed clearly in I131 MIBG. However, three to five other abnormal tracer activities were only seen in MIBG scan. The main tumoral lesions were showed perfectly in pelvic,that was not seen in WBBS. With a statistical analysis, I131 MIBG has 94% sensitivity 85-100% specificity, compare to Tc99m-MDP that was 78% and 51% respectively. Conclusions: We found that I131 MIBG is the most useful method to diagnose of patients with neuroblastoma and reproved that it has a competitive role in management, follow-up of these tumors especially in detection of metastasis

  10. Use of recombinant human thyrotropin (rh TSH) as a method of preparation for radioiodine therapy in thyroid disorders; Utilisation de la thyreostimuline humaine recombinante dans la preparation au traitement par iode-131 des pathologies thyroidiennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Guillet, B.A.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2008-02-15

    The introduction of recombinant human TSH (rh TSH) as a method of preparation for radioiodine therapy of follicular-derived thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) is a significant medical advance. Rh TSH has been approved for use in remnants ablation after total thyroidectomy for carcinoma. There are other potential uses for rh TSH that have not yet been licensed. The use of rh TSH allows to reduce administrated doses in goiters through an increase of iodine uptake and a more homogeneous distribution of radioiodine in the gland. Rh TSH also improves thyroid cancer patients quality of life by avoiding hypothyroidism. (authors)

  11. Radioiodine therapy in veterinary medicine: treatment of hyperthyroidism in a cat; Die Radioiodtherapie in der Veterinaermedizin: Behandlung der Schilddruesenueberfunktion bei einer Katze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinartz, P.; Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Kinzel, S.; Kuepper, W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Bachmann, T. [Tierarztpraxis Dr. med. vet. Thomas Bachmann, Glashhuetten (Germany)

    1999-06-01

    A nine-year-old cat with symptoms of a distinct hyperthyroidism was presented at the University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen. The clinical symptoms as well as the diagnostic procedures performed at the hospital confirmed the diagnosis. After five weeks of thyreostatic medication a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland was established, followed by a radioiodine therapy with 70.3 MBq 131-iodine. Subsequently, the cat was hospitalized for two days before it could be released in good condition. Six weeks after treatment the former drastically reduced weight of the cat recovered to near normal. Even though the chemical analysis detected a discrete hyperthyroidism, clinical symptoms were no longer prominent. Three months after treatment, the final examination showed a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland without a specific thyroidal medication. The presented case illustrates that radioiodine therapy is a safe and efficient treatment of thyroidal dysfunctions in veterinary medicine. (orig.) [Deutsch] Eine neun Jahre alte, europaeische Langhaarkatze wurde mit Symptomen einer ausgepraegten Schilddruesenueberfunktion im Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen vorgestellt. Sowohl die klinische Symptomatik als auch die Labordiagnostik und die apparativ erhobenen Befunde belegten das Vorliegen einer Hyperthyreose. Im Anschluss an eine fuenfwoechige thyreostatische Therapie, mit der eine euthyreote Stoffwechsellage erreicht werden konnte, wurde eine Radioiodtherapie mit 70,3 MBq 131-Iod durchgefuehrt. Nach einer nur zweitaegigen komplikationslosen Hospitalisierung konnte die Katze in gutem Allgemeinzustand entlassen werden. Sechs Wochen nach der Therapie hatte sich das zuvor deutlich reduzierte Koerpergewicht auf nahezu normgerechte Werte erhoeht; klinische Symptome der Schilddruesenueberfunktion liessen sich trotz einer laborchemisch diagnostizierten diskreten Gesamtthyroxiderhoehung nicht mehr nachweisen. Bei einer abschliessenden Kontrolle drei Monate nach Entlassung wies

  12. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge [de

  13. Estimation of foetal brain dose from I-131 in the foetal thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hare, N.J.; Murphy, D.; Malone, J.F.; Gilligan, P.

    1997-01-01

    The ingestion of I-131 by pregnant women can have consequences for the developing foetus, in particular brain function. As the foetal thyroid accumulates iodine from the twelfth week of gestation onwards, the determination of foetal brain dose resulting from such I-131 accumulation is essential. Normal dosimetric methods fail to treat the case of the foetus. Using an approximation method based on the MIRD approach, a foetal dose estimation scheme is developed to allow the determination of foetal brain dose from foetal thyroid irradiation. Dose values are obtained for the foetus based on the maternal intake of I-131. It was found that the choice of biokinetic model for the mother/foetus has a large impact on the determined dose estimate. (author)

  14. Radiopharmaceutical therapy in Dominican Republic. Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johny Osvaldo de los Santos

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this paper we present experience in Dominican Republic on Radiopharmaceutical Therapy. In our country, there are 8 Center with Nuclear Medicine Department. Only, 7 centers are working with Radiopharmaceutical Therapy. Radioiodine treatment with I-131 in Thyroid diseases(Thyroid Cancer and Hyperthyroidism). This is only Nuclear Medicine therapy available in Dominican Republic. The objectives of this paper are to analyze and assess the difficulties and facilities for the development of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy in Dominican Republic. We made surveys with the help of Nuclear Medicine Physicians of different Nuclear Medicine departments. 8 Nuclear Physicians accepted the interview. Two of these Nuclear Medicine Centers are Department of a Cancer Center and they have many patients for therapies. In the majority opinion of Physicians, Cost of Radiopharmaceuticals is principal problem to use Therapy in Dominican Republic. In addition the following problems were identified: Lack of awareness about new therapy in Nuclear Medicine among Physicians of other specialties, lack of adequate training in the current trends of radionuclide therapy and finally lack of basic infrastructure, equipment and finances to buy radiopharmaceuticals and introduce radionuclide therapy. For this reason, Nuclear Medicine Centers prefer to work with only I-131 Therapy and they do not have new programs to start other therapies. In the near future, our department of Nuclear Medicine will work with I-131, pain palliation, treatment of metastatic disease and Treatment of benign diseases. We have interest in offering other therapies in the department and we hope that other departments with more resources, have the same interest, to enhance practice of radionuclide therapy in our country. (author)

  15. Radioiodine treatment for pediatric hyperthyroid Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ma; Jiawei, Xie; Guoming, Wang; Jianbin, Liu; Wanxia, Liu; Driedger, Al; Shuyao, Zuo; Qin, Zhang

    2009-10-01

    Grave's disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease in which excessive amounts of thyroid hormones circulate in the blood. Treatment for pediatric GD includes (1) antithyroid drugs (ATD), (2) radioiodine, and (3) thyroidectomy. Yet, the optimal therapy remains controversial. We collected studies from all electronically available sources as well as from conferences held in China. All studies using radioiodine and/or ATD and/or thyroidectomy were included. Information was found on 1,874 pediatric GD patients treated with radioiodine, 1,279 patients treated with ATD and 1,362 patients treated surgically. The cure rate for radioiodine was 49.8%; the incidence of hypothyroidism, 37.8%; of relapse, 6.3%; of adverse effects, 1.55%; and of drop outs, 0.6%. These data show that radioiodine treatment is safe and effective in pediatric GD with significant lower incidence of relapse and adverse effects but significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism as compared with both ATD and thyroidectomy. For the time being, radioiodine treatment for pediatric GD remains an excellent first-line therapy and a good second-line therapy for patients with ATD failure, severe complications, or poor compliance.

  16. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy on the basis of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Mallek, Dirk von; Manka-Waluch, Agnieszka; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Bonn (Germany); Joe, Alexius; Zimmerlin, Martina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise radioiodine therapy of diffuse and nodular toxic goitre by calculation of the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid on the basis of the pretreatment technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU{sub s}). The TcTU{sub s} value serves as a substitute for the non-suppressible iodine turnover and the functional autonomous mass. Marinelli's formula was used to calculate tissue absorbed doses of 150 Gy, 200 Gy, 250 Gy and 300 Gy to the thyroids of 438 patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy. The mean age of patients was 70{+-}9 years, and the mean thyroid volume was 54{+-}26 ml. Two hundred and sixty-one of the patients had at least one documented previous episode of overt hyperthyroidism. Tissue absorbed doses were adapted to the pretreatment TcTU{sub s}: 150 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 1.5%-2.49%, 200 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 2.5%-3.49%, 250 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 3.5%-4.49% and 300 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of {>=}4.5%. Normalisation of TcTU{sub s} and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid volume reduction and frequency of hypothyroidism and recurrent hyperthyroidism were evaluated 1 year after a single radioiodine therapy. The presented dose strategy resulted in normalisation of TcTU{sub s} in 96% and an increase in TSH to the normal range in 92%. Recurrent hyperthyroidism was observed in only five patients. Thyroid volume decreased from 54{+-}26 before treatment to 34{+-}20 ml, a mean reduction of 37%. The frequency of hypothyroidism, at 0.9%, was encouragingly low. Dose selection in accordance with pretreatment TcTU{sub s} can be recommended for elimination of functional autonomous tissue with a single radioiodine therapy in patients of advanced age with enlarged thyroid glands and relevant autonomous masses who are at risk of developing iodine-induced hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  17. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy on the basis of 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Mallek, Dirk von; Manka-Waluch, Agnieszka; Palmedo, Holger; Joe, Alexius; Zimmerlin, Martina; Krause, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise radioiodine therapy of diffuse and nodular toxic goitre by calculation of the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid on the basis of the pretreatment technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU s ). The TcTU s value serves as a substitute for the non-suppressible iodine turnover and the functional autonomous mass. Marinelli's formula was used to calculate tissue absorbed doses of 150 Gy, 200 Gy, 250 Gy and 300 Gy to the thyroids of 438 patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy. The mean age of patients was 70±9 years, and the mean thyroid volume was 54±26 ml. Two hundred and sixty-one of the patients had at least one documented previous episode of overt hyperthyroidism. Tissue absorbed doses were adapted to the pretreatment TcTU s : 150 Gy for a TcTU s of 1.5%-2.49%, 200 Gy for a TcTU s of 2.5%-3.49%, 250 Gy for a TcTU s of 3.5%-4.49% and 300 Gy for a TcTU s of ≥4.5%. Normalisation of TcTU s and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid volume reduction and frequency of hypothyroidism and recurrent hyperthyroidism were evaluated 1 year after a single radioiodine therapy. The presented dose strategy resulted in normalisation of TcTU s in 96% and an increase in TSH to the normal range in 92%. Recurrent hyperthyroidism was observed in only five patients. Thyroid volume decreased from 54±26 before treatment to 34±20 ml, a mean reduction of 37%. The frequency of hypothyroidism, at 0.9%, was encouragingly low. Dose selection in accordance with pretreatment TcTU s can be recommended for elimination of functional autonomous tissue with a single radioiodine therapy in patients of advanced age with enlarged thyroid glands and relevant autonomous masses who are at risk of developing iodine-induced hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  18. The therapeutic use of I-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, O.; Lumbroso, J.D.; Lemerle, J.; Schlumberger, M.; Parmentier, C.; Ricard, M.; Aubert, B.; Coornaert, S.; Merlin, L.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the use of intensified conventional chemotherapy the complete response rate of advanced neuroblastoma remains low. The use of high-dose chemo-radiotherapy followed by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) improved the duration of disease free survival but, even after these high-dose regimens the relapse rate remains high. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) labelled with I-131 or I-123 can be used for scintigraphic imaging of neuroblastoma. In order to evaluate the therapeutic role of I-131-MIBG in the treatment of neuroblastoma patients, a phase II study was performed in 12 patients. Results are presented in this paper

  19. Immunoscintigraphy of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice with I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments of monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senekowitsch, R.; Maul, F.D.; Wenisch, H.J.C.; Kriegel, H.; Hor, G.

    1985-01-01

    In the present study radioiodinated F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments of CA19-9 and antibody that reacts specifically with human gastrointestinal cancer were examined for their ability to detect human pancreatic carcinoma hosted in nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 80μCi of I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/ with a specific activity of 1.8μCi/μg. All mice were imaged after the injection and every 24hr up to 6 days. The retained radioactivity was also registered with a whole-body counter immediately after imaging. As a control F(ab's)/sub 2/ of a nonspecific antibody were administered in parallel to another group of animals bearing the same tumor. Three animals of each group were killed at 1,2,4 and 8 days for determination of the distribution of both labeled antibody-fragments. On scintigraphic images obtained with the CA19-9-F(ab')/sub 2/ the tumors could be visualized 24hr after injection, the best dilineation however was achieved 96hr p.i.. The biodistribution data exhibited a more rapid blood clearance for the specific fragments compared to that for the unspecific ones. Tumors showed an increase in uptake up to 48hr reaching 1.7% of the injected dose per gram, declining to values of 0.08%/g at day 6 p.i.. The highest tumor-to-blood ratios were found after 96h. They were 7 for the CA19-9-fragments compared to 1.5 for the unspecific fragments. The whole body counting revealed a more rapid excretion for the fragments of the specific monoclonal antibodies than for the unspecific ones. In summary the authors were able to show that CA19-9-F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments can be used for immunodetection of human pancreatic carcinoma hosted in nude mice

  20. GATE based Monte Carlo simulation of planar scintigraphy to estimate the nodular dose in radioiodine therapy for autonomous thyroid adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammes, Jochen; Schmidt, Matthias; Schicha, Harald; Eschner, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Pietrzyk, Uwe [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM-4); Wuppertal Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich C - Physik

    2011-07-01

    The recommended target dose in radioiodine therapy of solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules is 300-400 Gy and therefore higher than in other radiotherapies. This is due to the fact that an unknown, yet significant portion of the activity is stored in extranodular areas but is neglected in the calculatory dosimetry. We investigate the feasibility of determining the ratio of nodular and extranodular activity concentrations (uptakes) from post-therapeutically acquired planar scintigrams with Monte Carlo simulations in GATE. The geometry of a gamma camera with a high energy collimator was emulated in GATE (Version 5). A geometrical thyroid-neck phantom (GP) and the ICRP reference voxel phantoms 'Adult Female' (AF, 16 ml thyroid) and 'Adult Male' (AM, 19 ml thyroid) were used as source regions. Nodules of 1 ml and 3 ml volume were placed in the phantoms. For each phantom and each nodule 200 scintigraphic acquisitions were simulated. Uptake ratios of nodule and rest of thyroid ranging from 1 to 20 could be created by summation. Quantitative image analysis was performed by investigating the number of simulated counts in regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs were created by perpendicular projection of the phantom onto the camera plane to avoid a user dependant bias. The ratio of count densities in ROIs over the nodule and over the contralateral lobe, which should be least affected by nodular activity, was taken to be the best available measure for the uptake ratios. However, the predefined uptake ratios are underestimated by these count density ratios: For an uptake ratio of 20 the count ratios range from 4.5 (AF, 1 ml nodule) to 15.3 (AM, 3 ml nodule). Furthermore, the contralateral ROI is more strongly affected by nodular activity than expected: For an uptake ratio of 20 between nodule and rest of thyroid up to 29% of total counts in the ROI over the contralateral lobe are caused by decays in the nodule (AF 3 ml). In the case of the 1 ml nodules this

  1. GATE based Monte Carlo simulation of planar scintigraphy to estimate the nodular dose in radioiodine therapy for autonomous thyroid adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Jochen; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Schmidt, Matthias; Schicha, Harald; Eschner, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    The recommended target dose in radioiodine therapy of solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules is 300-400Gy and therefore higher than in other radiotherapies. This is due to the fact that an unknown, yet significant portion of the activity is stored in extranodular areas but is neglected in the calculatory dosimetry. We investigate the feasibility of determining the ratio of nodular and extranodular activity concentrations (uptakes) from post-therapeutically acquired planar scintigrams with Monte Carlo simulations in GATE. The geometry of a gamma camera with a high energy collimator was emulated in GATE (Version 5). A geometrical thyroid-neck phantom (GP) and the ICRP reference voxel phantoms "Adult Female" (AF, 16ml thyroid) and "Adult Male" (AM, 19ml thyroid) were used as source regions. Nodules of 1ml and 3ml volume were placed in the phantoms. For each phantom and each nodule 200 scintigraphic acquisitions were simulated. Uptake ratios of nodule and rest of thyroid ranging from 1 to 20 could be created by summation. Quantitative image analysis was performed by investigating the number of simulated counts in regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs were created by perpendicular projection of the phantom onto the camera plane to avoid a user dependant bias. The ratio of count densities in ROIs over the nodule and over the contralateral lobe, which should be least affected by nodular activity, was taken to be the best available measure for the uptake ratios. However, the predefined uptake ratios are underestimated by these count density ratios: For an uptake ratio of 20 the count ratios range from 4.5 (AF, 1ml nodule) to 15.3 (AM, 3ml nodule). Furthermore, the contralateral ROI is more strongly affected by nodular activity than expected: For an uptake ratio of 20 between nodule and rest of thyroid up to 29% of total counts in the ROI over the contralateral lobe are caused by decays in the nodule (AF 3 ml). In the case of the 1ml nodules this effect is smaller: 9-11% (AF

  2. GATE based Monte Carlo simulation of planar scintigraphy to estimate the nodular dose in radioiodine therapy for autonomous thyroid adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammes, Jochen; Schmidt, Matthias; Schicha, Harald; Eschner, Wolfgang; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Wuppertal Univ.

    2011-01-01

    The recommended target dose in radioiodine therapy of solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules is 300-400 Gy and therefore higher than in other radiotherapies. This is due to the fact that an unknown, yet significant portion of the activity is stored in extranodular areas but is neglected in the calculatory dosimetry. We investigate the feasibility of determining the ratio of nodular and extranodular activity concentrations (uptakes) from post-therapeutically acquired planar scintigrams with Monte Carlo simulations in GATE. The geometry of a gamma camera with a high energy collimator was emulated in GATE (Version 5). A geometrical thyroid-neck phantom (GP) and the ICRP reference voxel phantoms 'Adult Female' (AF, 16 ml thyroid) and 'Adult Male' (AM, 19 ml thyroid) were used as source regions. Nodules of 1 ml and 3 ml volume were placed in the phantoms. For each phantom and each nodule 200 scintigraphic acquisitions were simulated. Uptake ratios of nodule and rest of thyroid ranging from 1 to 20 could be created by summation. Quantitative image analysis was performed by investigating the number of simulated counts in regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs were created by perpendicular projection of the phantom onto the camera plane to avoid a user dependant bias. The ratio of count densities in ROIs over the nodule and over the contralateral lobe, which should be least affected by nodular activity, was taken to be the best available measure for the uptake ratios. However, the predefined uptake ratios are underestimated by these count density ratios: For an uptake ratio of 20 the count ratios range from 4.5 (AF, 1 ml nodule) to 15.3 (AM, 3 ml nodule). Furthermore, the contralateral ROI is more strongly affected by nodular activity than expected: For an uptake ratio of 20 between nodule and rest of thyroid up to 29% of total counts in the ROI over the contralateral lobe are caused by decays in the nodule (AF 3 ml). In the case of the 1 ml nodules this effect is smaller: 9

  3. Iodine-131 Therapy and Nasolacrimal Duct Obstructions: What We Know and What We Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Javed

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the current review are to summarize the etiopathogenesis, symptomatology, management, complications, and outcomes of iodine-131-induced nasolacrimal duct obstructions, to propose a screening protocol and elucidate the potential avenues of future research. The authors performed an electronic database (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library) search of all articles published in English on nasolacrimal duct obstructions following radioiodine therapy. These articles were reviewed along with their relevant cross references. Data reviewed included demographics, presentations, investigations, management, complications, and outcomes. In addition, based on relevant unanswered questions and current lacunae in literature, potential avenues for further research have been elucidated. The frequency of nasolacrimal duct obstruction is reported to range from 2.2% to 18% following I-131 therapy. They are mostly bilateral and noted in patients who receive more than 150 mCi radioiodine. Exact etiopathogenesis is unknown but radiotoxicity to lacrimal sac and nasolacrimal duct is believed to be mediated through a sodium-iodine symporter protein. Although uncommon, it is important to increase awareness among treating physicians and patients receiving radioiodine therapy about the potential side effect of nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Imaging modalities are useful adjuncts in the diagnosis. Dacryocystorhinostomy is the most common modality of management with good outcomes. Nasolacrimal duct obstruction following radioiodine treatment is a distinct clinical entity. Increased awareness would facilitate timely diagnosis, management, and an enhanced quality of life for the patients.

  4. An oncolytic adenovirus regulated by a radiation-inducible promoter selectively mediates hSulf-1 gene expression and mutually reinforces antitumor activity of I131-metuximab in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Fang, Lin; Zhang, Quan'an; Zheng, Qin; Tong, Jinlong; Fu, Xiaohui; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Su, Changqing; Zheng, Junnian

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy and antibody approaches are crucial auxiliary strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previously, we established a survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus that has inhibitory effect on HCC growth. The human sulfatase-1 (hSulf-1) gene can suppress the growth factor signaling pathways, then inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and enhance cellular sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. I(131)-metuximab (I(131)-mab) is a monoclonal anti-HCC antibody that conjugated to I(131) and specifically recognizes the HAb18G/CD147 antigen on HCC cells. To integrate the oncolytic adenovirus-based gene therapy and the I(131)-mab-based radioimmunotherapy, this study combined the CArG element of early growth response-l (Egr-l) gene with the survivin promoter to construct a radiation-inducible enhanced promoter, which was used to recombine a radiation-inducible oncolytic adenovirus as hSulf-1 gene vector. When I(131)-mab was incorporated into the treatment regimen, not only could the antibody produce radioimmunotherapeutic effect, but the I(131) radiation was able to further boost adenoviral proliferation. We demonstrated that the CArG-enhanced survivin promoter markedly improved the proliferative activity of the oncolytic adenovirus in HCC cells, thereby augmenting hSulf-1 expression and inducing cancer cell apoptosis. This novel strategy that involved multiple, synergistic mechanisms, including oncolytic therapy, gene therapy and radioimmunotherapy, was demonstrated to exert an excellent anti-cancer outcome, which will be a promising approach in HCC treatment. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The risk for cancer and genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism; Zum Krebs- und genetischen Risiko nach Radioiodtherapie der Hyperthyreose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiners, C. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1997-12-01

    According to recent studies, the risk for thyroid cancer is not increased after radioiodine treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. Only the risk of cancer of the stomach seems to be increased slightly in patents treated with I-131 because of functional autonomy. However, the risk for gastric cancer is not increased after higher activities of I-131 because of thyroid cancer. There is no increased risk for genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [Deutsch] Aktuelle Studien zum Karzinomrisiko nach Radioiodtherapie wegen Hyperthyreose ergeben keinen Anhalt fuer eine erhoehte Inzidenz des Schilddruesenkarzinoms nach therapeutischer Gabe von I-