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Sample records for radioimmunotherapy ii clinical

  1. Radioimmunotherapy (II): clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Hye Jin; Lim, Sang Moo

    2006-01-01

    Molecular targeting may be defined as the specific concentration of a diagnostic or therapeutic tracer by its interaction with a molecular species that is distinctly present or absent in a disease state. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) is one of the successful agents for targeted therapy in cancer. To enhance the therapeutic effect. the concept of targeting radionuclides to tumors using radiolabeled mAbs against tumor-associated antigens, radioimmunotherapy, was proposed. The efficacy of radioimmunotherapy, however, has to be further optimized. Several strategies to improve targeting of tumors with radiolabeled mAbs have been developed, such as the use of mAb fragments, the use of high-affinity mAbs, the use of labeling techniques that are stable in vivo, active removal of the radiolabeled mAb from the circulation, and pretargeting strategies. Until now, however, there are many kinds of obstacles to be solved in the use of mAb for the targeted therapy. Major technical challenges to molecular targeting are related to the rapid and specific delivery of tracers to the target, the elimination of unwanted background activity, and the development of more specific targets to create a cytocidal effect. Further development of this field will be determined by success in solving these challenges

  2. Targeting radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma with iodine (131I) metuximab injection: Clinical Phase I/II trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhinan; Mi Li; Xu Jing

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: HAb18G/CD147 is a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated antigen. We developed iodine ( 131 I) metuximab injection (Licartin), a novel 131 I-labeled HAb18G/CD147-specific monoclonal antibody F(ab') 2 fragment, and evaluated its safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy on HCC in Phase I/II trials. Methods and Materials: In a Phase I trial, 28 patients were randomly assigned to receive the injection in 9.25-, 18.5-, 27.75-, or 37-MBq/kg doses by hepatic artery infusion. In a multicenter Phase II trial, 106 patients received the injection (27.75 MBq/kg) on Day 1 of a 28-day cycle. Response rate and survival rate were the endpoints. Results: No life-threatening toxic effects were found. The safe dosage was 27.75 MBq/kg. The blood clearance fitted a biphasic model, and its half-life was 90.56-63.93 h. In the Phase II trial, the injection was found to be targeted and concentrated to tumor tissues. Of the 73 patients completing two cycles, 6 (8.22%) had a partial response, 14 (19.18%) minor response, and 43 (58.90%) stable disease. The 21-month survival rate was 44.54%. The survival rate of progression-free patients was significantly higher than that of patients with progressive disease after either one or two cycles (p 131 I) metuximab injection is safe and active for HCC patients

  3. Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, Ruby F.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-01-01

    This brief review covers the concept of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and summarize the results obtained in preclinical animal models and initial phase I clinical trials. Reagents studied have been a bifunctional antibody prepared by crosslinking Fab' fragments from two antibodies with different specificity, one binding the target antigen expressed on tumors and the other binding a radiolabeled peptide. The alternative system is a conjugate of streptavidin linked to the pretargeting agent and radiolabeled biotin. After reaching optimal tumor targeting of the pretargeting agent, a synthetic mono-biotin poly N-acetyl-galactosamine compound was used to clear unbound targeting agent from the circulation before the injection of radiolabeled biotin. Promising therapeutic responses were obtained in various tumor xenograft models in athymic nude mice. A phase I study of an anti-CD20/streptavidin pretargeting agent and 15 mCi/m 2 9 Y-biotin produced objective responses with minimal toxicity among lymphoma patients, with an average tumor-to-whole-body radiation dose ratio of 49. Pretargeting radioimmunotherapy approaches have shown higher tumor-to-whole-body ratios than that usually obtained with one-step radioimmunotherapy

  4. Does immunoscintigraphy serve clinical needs effectively? Is there a future for radioimmunotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chata, J.F.; Peltier, P.; Bardies, M.; Chetanneau, A.; Thedrez, P.; Faivre-Chauvet, A.; Gestin, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1980, immunoscintigraphy has been performed in thousands of patients, and its clinical value has been demonstrated for selective indications in malignant (early detection of recurrences of colorectal and ovarian carcinomas) and non-malignant (cardiovascular and inflammatory) pathology. However, many clinicians are not yet very convinced of its efficiency. Opinions range between favourable interest and marked scepticism. The causes of this inconclusive verdict include an often moderate target-to-background ratio in images, the immunogenicity of injected murine antibodies and the fact that a true benefit for the patient has not yet been clearly demonstrated in large series of patients. Future prospects could significantly improve this and involve the reduction of non-specific activity in normal tissues (to improve disease target contrast and thus make image interpretation easier) and the decreased immunogenicity of injected immunoconjugates (to permit repetition of examinations). Radioimmunotherapy, an innovative and promising approach, is still limited by numerous problems. The results of clinical studies are still inconclusive, being encouraging only for specific indications. In the future, pre-targetting techniques should allow the rapid elimination of radioactivity from normal tissues, resulting in a significant increase in tumour-to-normal tissue ratios. Progress is also required in the choice of radionuclides and labelling techniques and in methods for dosimetric estimations. The clinical indications of radioimmunotherapy after systemic injection will concern mainly radiosensitive tumours such as lymphomas, small-cell lung cancers and neuroblastomas. After endocavitary injection, radioimmunotherapy could prove efficient in the treatment of micrometastases of ovarian carcinomas. For all indications, this new approach should be combined with other therapeutic modalities. (orig.)

  5. Human-Mouse Dosimetry in Clinical Radioimmunotherapy - Special Emphasis on Pediatric Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairemo, K.J.A.; Pyyry, J.; Heiskanen, T.; Flux, G.; Fisher, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody ('MAB') has been developed for targeting secretory alpha-fetoprotein in hepatic tissue. We have used these MABs for radioimmunotherapy and dose planning of recurrent hepatoblastoma, a rare childhood malignancy This MAB has been labelled with In- 111 and Y-90 for clinical purposes, and can be applied for diagnosis and therapy of liver neoplasms. Physiology based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and simulation is a useful method for prediction of biodistribution of macromolecules, it can enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and hence may help in rational design of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Here we also discuss PBPK modeling and simulation of this MAB in mice without tumor and in a pediatric patient. In the clinical study, radiopharmacokinetic parameters for this MAB ( 111 In-DOTA-hAFP31 IgG) were calculated after serial quantitative whole body scans in a child with hepatoblastoma. A 3-D dose planning computer program was used to calculate tumor doses for In-111 and Y-90, the active tumor was delineated on PET/CT images and tumor dose calculation was done based on the In-111-MAB SPECT data using dose point kernel approach both for In-111 and Y-90. The results were compared with MIRD doses obtained for organs in SPECT imaging field, i.e. bone marrow, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, lungs. The simulated results were fitted to experimental time series data by varying parameters which were not fixed a priori. From quantitative serial imaging based on 8 whole body images at 0-168 hrs using In-111- MAB, the half-lives of spleen, lungs, kidneys and whole body were 502 hrs, 230 hrs, 193 hrs and 490 hrs, respectively. The measured blood half-life was 132 hrs, after a total MAB dose of 50 mg and In-111 activity of 105 MBq. The presumed Y-90 dose based on this kinetic behavior was 43 MBq which should had given 0.3Gy bone marrow dose with assumption of bone marrow: blood ratio 0.4 for IgG. The calculated MIRD Y-90 doses were for

  6. Chemotherapy synergizes with radioimmunotherapy targeting La autoantigen in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available To date, inefficient delivery of therapeutic doses of radionuclides to solid tumors limits the clinical utility of radioimmunotherapy. We aim to test the therapeutic utility of Yttrium-90 ((90Y-radio-conjugates of a monoclonal antibody, which we showed previously to bind specifically to the abundant intracellular La ribonucleoprotein revealed in dead tumor cells after DNA-damaging treatment.Immunoconjugates of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB, were prepared using the metal chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA, and then radiolabeled with (90Y. Mice bearing established subcutaneous tumors were treated with (90Y-DOTA-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy. Non-radiosensitizing cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model. Radiosensitizing cisplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2 model, and for the xenograft models of LNCaP prostatic carcinoma and Panc-1 pancreatic carcinoma. We demonstrate the safety, specificity, and efficacy of (90Y-DOTA-DAB4-radioimmunotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. EL4 lymphoma-bearing mice either were cured at higher doses of radioimmunotherapy alone or lower doses of radioimmunotherapy in synergy with chemotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy alone was less effective in chemo- and radio-resistant carcinoma models. However, radioimmunotherapy synergized with radiosensitizing chemotherapy to retard significantly tumor regrowth and so prolong the survival of mice bearing LL2, LNCaP, or Panc-1 subcutaneous tumor implants.We report proof-of-concept data supporting a unique form of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers bystander killing to viable cancer cells after targeting the universal cancer antigen, La, created by DNA-damaging treatment in neighboring dead cancer cells. Subsequently we propose that DAB4-targeted ionizing radiation induces additional cycles of tumor cell death

  7. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with Cetuximab and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in combination with a carbon ion boost for locally advanced tumours of the oro-, hypopharynx and larynx - TPF-C-HIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavtratzas Athanasios

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term locoregional control in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN remains challenging. While recent years have seen various approaches to improve outcome by intensification of treatment schedules through introduction of novel induction and combination chemotherapy regimen and altered fractionation regimen, patient tolerance to higher treatment intensities is limited by accompanying side-effects. Combined radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as well as modern radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and carbon ion therapy (C12 are able to limit toxicity while maintaining treatment effects. In order to achieve maximum efficacy with yet acceptable toxicity, this sequential phase II trial combines induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. We expect this approach to result in increased cure rates with yet manageable accompanying toxicity. Methods/design The TPF-C-HIT trial is a prospective, mono-centric, open-label, non-randomized phase II trial evaluating efficacy and toxicity of the combined treatment with IMRT/carbon ion boost and weekly cetuximab in 50 patients with histologically proven locally advanced SCCHN following TPF induction chemotherapy. Patients receive 24 GyE carbon ions (8 fractions and 50 Gy IMRT (2.0 Gy/fraction in combination with weekly cetuximab throughout radiotherapy. Primary endpoint is locoregional control at 12 months, secondary endpoints are disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, acute and late radiation effects as well as any adverse events of the treatment as well as quality of life (QoL analyses. Discussion The primary objective of TPF-C-HIT is to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of cetuximab in combination with combined IMRT/carbon ion therapy following TPF induction in locally advanced SCCHN. Trial Registration

  8. Radio-immunotherapy; La radio-immunotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodet-Milin, C.; Oudoux, A.; Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Hopital Hotel-Dieu, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 44 - Nantes (France); Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Inserm U892, CRCNA, 44 - Nantes (France); Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France)

    2009-02-15

    Radioimmunotherapy (R.I.T.) is a new modality of targeted therapy in which irradiation from radionuclides is delivered to tumor targets using monoclonal antibodies (MAb) directed to tumor-associated antigen. R.I.T. has been developed for more than 20 years. Today, R.I.T. can be used in clinical practice using non-ablative activity of murine anti-CD20 {sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) for treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphomas (F.L.), with overall response rate of 70 to 80% and 20 to 30% of complete response. Different approaches are explored to improve efficacy of R.I.T. in N.H.L.: myelo-ablative R.I.T. or HD treatment, R.I.T. as consolidation after chemotherapy to target M.R.D., R.I.T. in first-line treatment, fractionated R.I.T., R.I.T. using other Ag targets. For solid tumors, interesting results have been obtained using anti-CEA R.I.T. delivered as consolidation treatment or using pre-targeting system. (authors)

  9. Candidate immune biomarkers for radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Antonin; Nigro, Giulia; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Deutsch, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Newly available immune checkpoint blockers (ICBs), capable to revert tumor immune tolerance, are revolutionizing the anticancer armamentarium. Recent evidence also established that ionizing radiation (IR) could produce antitumor immune responses, and may as well synergize with ICBs. Multiple radioimmunotherapy combinations are thenceforth currently assessed in early clinical trials. Past examples have highlighted the need for treatment personalization, and there is an unmet need to decipher immunological biomarkers that could allow selecting patients who could benefit from these promising but expensive associations. Recent studies have identified potential predictive and prognostic immune assays at the cellular (tumor microenvironment composition), genomic (mutational/neoantigen load), and peripheral blood levels. Within this review, we collected the available evidence regarding potential personalized immune biomarker-directed radiation therapy strategies that might be used for patient selection in the era of radioimmunotherapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Radioimmunotherapy (I): development of radioimmunoconjugates

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    Choi, Tea Hyun; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Monoclonal antibodies are designed to bind specifically to certain antigen, give therapeutic effect to the target and to be produced in large scale with homogeneity. The monoclonal conjugated with radionuclide can deliver therapeutic irradiation to the target, and showed successful results in certain malignancies, which is known as radioimmunotherapy. The target-to-background ratio depends on the antigen expression in the target and normal tissues, which is related to the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity in radioimmunotherapy. For the solid tumor beta-ray energy should be high, but lower beta energy is better for the hematological malignancies. I-131 is widely used in thyroid cancer with low cost and high availability. Labeling monoclonal antibody with I-131 is relatively simple and reproducible. Some preclinical data for the I-131 labeled monoclonal antibodies including acute toxicity and efficacy are available from already published literatures. In KIRAMS, physician sponsored clinical trial protocols using Rituximab, KFDA approved anti-CD20 chimeric monoclonal antibody and I-131 were approved by KFDA and currently are ongoing.

  11. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Press, O.W.

    1992-01-01

    This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ( 131 Iodine, 111 Indium, 90 Yttrium, 99m Technetium, 186 Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer

  12. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Press, O.W.

    1992-03-24

    This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ({sup 131}Iodine, {sup 111}Indium, {sup 90}Yttrium, {sup 99m}Technetium, {sup 186}Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer.

  13. Radioimmunotherapy: Opportunities, obstacles and challenges, with special reference to developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divgi, C.

    2001-01-01

    The targeting characteristics of, combined with the ease of radionuclide conjugation to, monoclonal antibodies makes them ideally suited for the selective delivery of potentially cytotoxic radioactivity to tumour. While early murine monoclonal antibodies were immunogenic, precluding repeat administration, genetic engineering has made possible the development of less immunogenic molecules, including fragments that can be grown in bacterial systems at relatively low cost. It is therefore currently feasible to produce relatively non-immunogenic tumour targeting antibody molecules at a reasonable cost, permitting their application in developing countries. As with chemotherapy, the utility of radioimmunotherapy has been most evident in lymphoma and leukemia. Progress in solid tumours has been exciting but slow. As with thyroid cancer therapy, the most utilized radionuclide in radioimmunotherapy has been iodine-131. The use of radioimmunotherapy as first- or second-line therapy in lymphoma and leukemia is being studied, and it appears likely that radioimmunotherapy could be a suitable, lower-cost alternative to chemotherapy in the treatment of these disorders, especially in developing countries. The cost-benefit of radioimmunotherapy compared to chemotherapy is especially stark when the cost of treating complications of chemotherapy is taken into account. Radioimmunotherapy as cost-effective therapy in developing countries is therefore feasible and has tremendous potential. This review will highlight milestones and pitfalls; suggest guidelines for future development; and outline potential clinical utility for radioimmunotherapy in developing countries. (author)

  14. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Press, O.W.

    1992-03-24

    This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ({sup 131}Iodine, {sup 111}Indium, {sup 90}Yttrium, {sup 99m}Technetium, {sup 186}Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer.

  15. Radio-immunotherapy of non Hodgkin lymphomas: Experience from Lille

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huglo, D.; Morschhauser, F.; Steinling, M.; Huglo, D.; Prangere, T.; Robu, D.; Malek, E.; Petyt, G.; Steinling, M.; Huglo, D.; Morschhauser, F.; Robu, D.

    2009-01-01

    From an experience of radio-immunotherapy of non Hodgkin lymphomas from March 2002 to December 2008 (near 7 years), corresponding to 160 treatments, an analysis of indications has been done: clinical research trials, authorized indications from A.M.M. or medically justified. Some elements which could be problematic are pointed: coordination between the regional Haematology departments and our Nuclear Medicine department, radio labelling and radioprotection. (authors)

  16. Radio-immunotherapy of solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Faivre Chauvet, A.; Bardies, M.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Barbet, J.

    2001-01-01

    A convincing efficacy of radio-immunotherapy of solid tumors has not been documented yet in clinical studies. Consequently, a methodological optimization is needed within the scope in increasing absorbed doses delivered to tumor targets by amplifying cumulative tumor activity and in the same time in reducing absorbed doses delivered normal organs. Multi-step pre-targeting techniques allow to approach these goals. The most developed technique is based on the high affinity for biotin. In a first step an anti-tumor antibody coupled to avidin or biodin is injected. In a second step, 24 hours later, the circulating residual immuno-conjugate is bound to a molecular complex and eliminated through the reticulo endothelial system of the liver ('chase'phase). A third step, a few hours later, consists in injecting biotin coupled to DOTA chelating agent and labeled with yttrium 90. This small molecule rapidly diffuses to tumor targets and binds to pre-localized immuno-conjugate. Another technique, designed and developed in France, is based on antigen-antibody affinity. In a first step an anti-tumor / anti-hapten bi-specific antibody is injected and, in a second step, a few days later, the small hapten molecule is radiolabeled with I-131 and injected. It diffuses rapidly to the tumor targets and binds to the anti-hapten arm of the pre-localized bi-specific antibody. An alternative way to increase radio-immunotherapy efficacy consists in combining this low-dose rate irradiation to radiosensitizing molecules within the scope of an additive or supra additive effect which has previously documented. (author)

  17. Feasibility and toxicity of concomitant radio/immunotherapy with MabThera (Rituximab {sup registered}) for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Results of a prospective phase I/II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haidenberger, Alfred; Popper, Bela-Andre; Skvortsova, Ira; Lukas, Peter [Medical Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy/Radiooncology; Fromm-Haidenberger, Sabine [Hospital Gmunden (Austria). Inst. of Radiology; Vries, Alexander de [Hospital Feldkirch (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy/Radiooncology; Steurer, Michael; Kantner, Johanna; Gunsilius, Eberhard [Medical Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Hematology

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) have a high radio- and chemosensitivity. Although initially responsive, approximately 50% of low grade B-cell lymphomas relapse after 10-15 years. Besides chemo- and radiotherapy, rituximab, a mouse/human chimeric antibody targeting CD20 antigen on the surface of B-cell lymphoma cells, is another treatment approach. In vitro data showed potentiation of radiation-induced apoptosis by addition of rituximab. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of radiotherapy with concomitant application of rituximab in NHL patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 21 patients with B-cell lymphoma (stage I: n = 11; II: n = 5; III: n = 1; IV: n = 4) were included in this study, treated with radiotherapy of 30-40 Gy and weekly application of rituximab (375 mg/m{sup 2}). Nine patients had R-CHOP chemotherapy previously, 1 patient leuceran chemotherapy, and 2 patients an initial treatment with 6 cycles of rituximab. Mean time of follow-up was 41.7 months. Results: No grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death was observed. In 1 patient, rituximab application had to be stopped after 3 cycles due to radiation-induced side effects. No late toxicities were reported. All patients were in complete remission after treatment. Progression or relapse was observed in 6 patients (28%); the mean time to progression was 27 months. The mean overall survival (OS) was 53 months. Conclusion: Combined radio/immunotherapy is feasible and safe. Treatment was well tolerated, no late toxicities were observed, and treatment outcome is promising. Randomized trials are necessary to clarify the benefit of this treatment approach and its applicability. (orig.)

  18. Radioimmunotherapy [INIS-UY-GEO--700

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacchione, R.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is about the radiotherapy, chemo-immunotherapy and radioimmunotherapy treatment. Its adequate response in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma as well as the tolerance and reversibly hematologic toxicity

  19. Trial Watch: Anticancer radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Vitale, Ilio; Tartour, Eric; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-09-01

    Radiotherapy has extensively been employed as a curative or palliative intervention against cancer throughout the last century, with a varying degree of success. For a long time, the antineoplastic activity of X- and γ-rays was entirely ascribed to their capacity of damaging macromolecules, in particular DNA, and hence triggering the (apoptotic) demise of malignant cells. However, accumulating evidence indicates that (at least part of) the clinical potential of radiotherapy stems from cancer cell-extrinsic mechanisms, including the normalization of tumor vasculature as well as short- and long-range bystander effects. Local bystander effects involve either the direct transmission of lethal signals between cells connected by gap junctions or the production of diffusible cytotoxic mediators, including reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and cytokines. Conversely, long-range bystander effects, also known as out-of-field or abscopal effects, presumably reflect the elicitation of tumor-specific adaptive immune responses. Ionizing rays have indeed been shown to promote the immunogenic demise of malignant cells, a process that relies on the spatiotemporally defined emanation of specific damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Thus, irradiation reportedly improves the clinical efficacy of other treatment modalities such as surgery (both in neo-adjuvant and adjuvant settings) or chemotherapy. Moreover, at least under some circumstances, radiotherapy may potentiate anticancer immune responses as elicited by various immunotherapeutic agents, including (but presumably not limited to) immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies, cancer-specific vaccines, dendritic cell-based interventions and Toll-like receptor agonists. Here, we review the rationale of using radiotherapy, alone or combined with immunomodulatory agents, as a means to elicit or boost anticancer immune responses, and present recent clinical trials investigating the therapeutic potential of this approach in

  20. Choice of radionuclides for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, S.J.; Jungerman, J.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Cole, W.C.; Meares, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    Innumerable questions need to be answered and obstacles overcome before radioimmunotherapy can be generally successful in cancer patients. Major developments have greatly enhanced the likelihood of success. The important development of appropriate radionuclides and radiochemistry for this therapy must be intimately linked with the biological and biochemical realities. All aspects must be considered, such as the specific nature of the antigenic target, the pharmacokinetics of the antibody fragment carrier, the capability of in vivo quantitation of tumor uptake and turnover time, as well as total body kinetics. With this knowledge, then, practical radiochemistry methods can be integrated with the suitable radionuclide choices, and production methods can be developed which will deliver effective and dependable products for patient therapy

  1. Trial Watch: Radioimmunotherapy for oncological indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloy, Norma; Pol, Jonathan; Manic, Gwenola; Vitale, Ilio; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    During the past two decades, it has become increasingly clear that the antineoplastic effects of radiation therapy do not simply reflect the ability of X-, β- and γ-rays to damage transformed cells and directly cause their permanent proliferative arrest or demise, but also involve cancer cell-extrinsic mechanisms. Indeed, among other activities, radiotherapy has been shown to favor the establishment of tumor-specific immune responses that operate systemically, underpinning the so-called 'out-of-field' or 'abscopal' effect. Thus, ionizing rays appear to elicit immunogenic cell death, a functionally peculiar variant of apoptosis associated with the emission of a particularly immunostimulatory combination of damage-associated molecular patterns. In line with this notion, radiation therapy fosters, and thus exacerbates, the antineoplastic effects of various treatment modalities, including surgery, chemotherapy and various immunotherapeutic agents. Here, we summarize recent advances in the use of ionizing rays as a means to induce or potentiate therapeutically relevant anticancer immune responses. In addition, we present clinical trials initiated during the past 12 months to test the actual benefit of radioimmunotherapy in cancer patients.

  2. Radiolabeled bivalent haptens for tumor immunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Janevik-Ivanovska, E.; Raguin, O. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Faculte' de Medecine, Paris (France); De Labriolle-Vaylet, C. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Faculte' de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France); Barbet, J. [Universite' de la Mediterranee, Faculte' de Medecine, Marseille (France)

    2001-06-01

    The pre targeting technique referred to as the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) uses bispecific antibodies and radiolabeled bivalent haptens that bind cooperatively to target cells in vivo. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate that DTPA bivalent haptens can deliver large radiation doses to tumor cells with high tumor to normal tissue contrast ratios and long activity residence time in tumors. Preliminary clinical results of radioimmunotherapy of medullary thyroid carcinomas and lung cancers look promising. Very encouraging results in biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy experiments in animals have been obtained with new haptens bearing two histamine-hemisuccinate suitable for {sup 131}I, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}Re labeling. Targeting isotopes to double antigen positive tumor cells provides a binding enhancement that increases specificity for tumor cells as compared to single antigen targeting on normal cells. This approach may be beneficial for targeting isotopes to B type acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Burkitt lymphoma, as well as others tumors co-expressing two markers of low specificity, and might increase tumor irradiation with minimal irradiation of normal cells.

  3. Radiolabeled bivalent haptens for tumor immunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Janevik-Ivanovska, E.; Raguin, O.; De Labriolle-Vaylet, C.; Barbet, J.

    2001-01-01

    The pre targeting technique referred to as the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) uses bispecific antibodies and radiolabeled bivalent haptens that bind cooperatively to target cells in vivo. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate that DTPA bivalent haptens can deliver large radiation doses to tumor cells with high tumor to normal tissue contrast ratios and long activity residence time in tumors. Preliminary clinical results of radioimmunotherapy of medullary thyroid carcinomas and lung cancers look promising. Very encouraging results in biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy experiments in animals have been obtained with new haptens bearing two histamine-hemisuccinate suitable for 131 I, 99m Tc and 188 Re labeling. Targeting isotopes to double antigen positive tumor cells provides a binding enhancement that increases specificity for tumor cells as compared to single antigen targeting on normal cells. This approach may be beneficial for targeting isotopes to B type acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Burkitt lymphoma, as well as others tumors co-expressing two markers of low specificity, and might increase tumor irradiation with minimal irradiation of normal cells

  4. Radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista Cuellar, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma have a worse prognosis compared with other varieties of lymphoma and conventional therapy has specific onco higher incidence of unsatisfactory answers becoming more frequent recurrences of the disease. Radioimmunotherapy has proven to be an effective adjuvant therapy often in cases where conventional therapy this not proving effective. In this paper an exhibition of the current international state of the therapeutic and experiences and possibilities that exist in our environment to develop their use is done. (author)

  5. Radioimmunotherapy for malignant diseases. Current contributions and future options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahe, M.A.; Chatal, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy is based on the use of radioactive agents (iodine 131, yttrium 90), murine-derived monoclonal antibodies and specific tumour-related membrane antigens. This new treatment modality was applied in 800 patients with different types of malignant tumours which had not responded to traditional therapy. Among the haematologic tumours, the most promising results were obtained in B phenotype non-Hodgkin lymphoma. More modest results were obtained for solid tumours although good results were observed after intraperitoneal administration in patients with cancer of the ovary. The main side effects are acute reversible anaphylactic shock, haematologic toxicity and development of anti-murine human antibodies. Several methods are currently under study to increase irradiation dose delivered at the tumoural site since less than 1% of the injected radioactive dose is absorbed by tumoural cells. Several clinical studies are to be conducted in France, particularly for malignant non-Hodgkin lymphoma and cancer of the ovary. (authors). 31 refs

  6. Development and evaluation of copper-67 and samarium-153 labeled conjugates for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Joshi, V.; Kolsky, K.; Sweet, M.; Steplewski, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The potential of utilizing receptor-specific agents such as monoclonal antibodies (MAb), and MAb-derived smaller molecules, as carriers of radionuclides for the selective destruction of tumors has stimulated much research activity. The success of such applications depends on many factors, especially the tumor binding properties of the antibody reagent, the efficiency of labeling and in-vivo stability of the radioconjugate and, on the careful choice of the radionuclide best suited to treat the tumor under consideration. The radiolabeled antibody technique for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), however, has experienced many limitations, and its success has not matched the expectations that were raised more than a decade ago. The problems that have been identified include: (i) degradation of antibody immunoreactivity resulting from chemical manipulations required for labeling; (ii) lack of suitable radioisotopes and methods for stable attachment of the radiolabel; (iii) in-vivo instability of the radioimmunoconjugates; (iv) excessive accumulation of activity in non-target locations; and (v) lack of radioimmunoconjugate accessibility to cells internal to a tumor mass. A careful choice of the radionuclide(s) best suited to treat the tumor under consideration is one of the most important requirements for successful radioimmunotherapy. This study evaluates copper 67 and samarium 153 for tumor radioimmunotherapy

  7. Phase II clinical development of new drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Naitee; Ho, Shuyen; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on how to appropriately plan and develop a Phase II program, and how to design Phase II clinical trials and analyze their data. It provides a comprehensive overview of the entire drug development process and highlights key questions that need to be addressed for the successful execution of Phase II, so as to increase its success in Phase III and for drug approval. Lastly it warns project team members of the common potential pitfalls and offers tips on how to avoid them.

  8. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  9. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma

  10. Immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy of transplanted pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, R.; Greten, H.; Saccavini, J.C.; Dietel, M.

    1985-01-01

    The immunoscintigraphic results in 12 human pancreatic carcinomas established on nude mice (Nu-Nu-Balb-C) are reported. 131 I-labeled monoclonal antibodies against CA 19-9, CEA and CA 125 were used. The result show that pancreatic carcinomas are detectable with the antibodies applied here. The quality of the scintigraphic detection depends, among other factors, on the antibody affinity to the tumor, the localization and the size of the tumor. Preliminary results of the studies on radioimmunotherapy of pancreatic cancer with 131 I-anti-CA 19-9 indicate that effective absorbed doses in the tumor may be achieved via intravenous application only in cases with a rather high expression of the tumor antigen. But direct instillation into the tumor enables therapeutic radiation doses to the tumor even with moderate affinity and a low whole-body burden. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Phase I/II 90Y-Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8) radioimmunotherapy dosimetry results in relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, G.A.; Dunn, W.L.; White, C.A.; Berlfein, J.R.; Ding, E.; Grillo-Lopez, A.J.; Stabin, M.; Erwin, W.; Spies, S.; Dahlbom, M.; Silverman, D.H.S.; Raubitschek, A.; Karvelis, K.; Schultheiss, T.; Witzig, T.E.; Belanger, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetry studies in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were performed to estimate the radiation absorbed dose to normal organs and bone marrow from 90 Y-Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8) treatment in this phase I/II, multicenter trial. The trial was designed to determine the dose of Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20, Rituxan, IDEC-C2B8, MabThera), the unlabeled antibody given prior to the radioconjugate to clear peripheral blood B cells and optimize distribution, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose of 90 Y-Zevalin [7.4, 11, or 15 MBq/kg (0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mCi/kg)]. Patients received 111 In-Zevalin (indium-111 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-In2B8) on day 0 followed by a therapeutic dose of 90 Y-Zevalin on day 7. Both doses were preceded by an infusion of the chimeric, unlabeled antibody Rituximab. Following administration of 111 In-Zevalin, serial anterior/posterior whole-body scans were acquired. Major-organ radioactivity versus time estimates were calculated using regions of interest. Residence times were computed and entered into the MIRDOSE3 computer software program to calculate estimated radiation absorbed dose to each organ. Initial analyses of estimated radiation absorbed dose were completed at the clinical site. An additional, centralized dosimetry analysis was performed subsequently to provide a consistent analysis of data collected from the seven clinical sites. In all patients with dosimetry data (n=56), normal organ and red marrow radiation absorbed doses were estimated to be well under the protocol-defined upper limit of 20 Gy and 3 Gy, respectively. Median estimated radiation absorbed dose was 3.4 Gy to liver (range 1.2-7.8 Gy), 2.6 Gy to lungs (range 0.72-4.4 Gy), and 0.38 Gy to kidneys (range 0.07-0.61 Gy). Median estimated tumor radiation absorbed dose was 17 Gy (range 5.8-67 Gy). No correlation was noted between hematologic toxicity and the following variables: red marrow radiation absorbed dose, blood T 1/2 , blood AUC

  12. Intraperitoneal alpha-radioimmunotherapy in mice using different specific activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Andersson, Håkan; Haglund, Elin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of the alpha-radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in mice, using different specific activities. This study was performed by using the monoclonal antibody, MX35 F(ab')(2), labeled with the alpha-particle-emitter, 211At.......The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of the alpha-radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in mice, using different specific activities. This study was performed by using the monoclonal antibody, MX35 F(ab')(2), labeled with the alpha-particle-emitter, 211At....

  13. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Press, O.W.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells. An attempt was made to examine in vivo the effects of lysosomotropic amines and thioamides on the retention of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies by tumor cells. Experiments also examined the impact of newer radioiodination techniques on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies, and on the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy of neoplasms. The endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with I-131, In-111, and Y-90 were compared. The utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer was investigated

  14. A pretargeting system for tumor PET imaging and radioimmunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise eKraeber-Bodéré

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Labeled antibodies, as well as their fragments and antibody-derived recombinant constructs, have long been proposed as general vectors to target radionuclides to tumor lesions for imaging and therapy. They have indeed shown promise in both imaging and therapeutic applications, but they have not fulfilled the original expectations of achieving sufficient image contrast for tumor detection or sufficient radiation dose delivered to tumors for therapy. Pretargeting was originally developed for tumor immunoscintigraphy. It was assumed that directly-radiolabled antibodies could be replaced by an unlabeled immunoconjugate capable of binding both a tumor-specific antigen and a small molecular weight molecule. The small molecular weight molecule would carry the radioactive payload and would be injected after the bispecific immunoconjugate. It has been demonstrated that this approach does allow for both antibody-specific recognition and fast clearance of the radioactive molecule, thus resulting in improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios. It was subsequently shown that pretargeting also held promise for tumor therapy, translating improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios into more specific delivery of absorbed radiation doses. Many technical approaches have been proposed to implement pretargeting, and two have been extensively documented. One is based on the avidin-biotin system, and the other on bispecific antibodies binding a tumor-specific antigen and a hapten. Both have been studied in preclinical models, as well as in several clinical studies, and have shown improved targeting efficiency. This article reviews the historical and recent preclinical and clinical advances in the use of bispecific-antibody-based pretargeting for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The results of recent evaluation of pretargeting in PET imaging also are discussed.

  15. Antibody conjugate radioimmunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Alan; Hopper, Melanie; Murray, Andrea; Frier, Malcolm; Bishop, Mike

    2002-01-01

    The administration of antibody conjugates for cancer therapy is now proving to be of clinical value. We are currently undertaking a programme of clinical studies using the monoclonal antibody C 595 (gG3) which reacts with the MUC1 glycoprotein antigen that is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of bladder tumours. Radio immuno conjugates of the C 595 antibody have been produced with high radiolabelling efficiency and immuno reactivity using Tc-99 m and In-111 for diagnostic imaging, and disease staging and the cytotoxic radionuclides Cu-67 and Re-188 for therapy of superficial bladder cancer. A Phase I/II therapeutic trail involving the intravesical administration of antibody directly into the bladder has now begun. (author)

  16. Radioimmunotherapy of solid cancers. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairemo, K.J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Depending on radionuclide characteristics, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) relies on radioactivity to destroy cells distant from immunotargeted cells. Therefore, even heterogeneous tumors (for antigen recognition) can be treated, because not all cells have to be targeted. Substantial complete response rates have been reported in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Much more modest results have been reported for patients iwth bulky solid tumors, e.g. adenocarcinomas. The radiation doses delivered by targeting antibodies are generally too low to achieve major therapeutic responses. Dose escalation is limited by myelotoxicity, and higher doses need to be delivered to neoplasmas less radiosensitive than lymphomas. Various trials for both systematic and regional RIT have been reported on. Intraperitoneal adminostration has been applied for colorectal and ovarian carcinomas. Our own results indicate that, e.g., intraperitoneal pseudomyxoma can be treated with RIT. Myelotoxicity can be reduced by anti-antibody-enhancement, 2- and 3-step strategies, bispecific monoclonal antibodies (MABs), and extracorporeal immunoadsorption. The radionuclide has to be selected properly for each purpose; it can be a β-emitter, e.g. I-131, Y-90, Re-188, Re-186, Lu-177 or Sm-153, an α-emitter At-211 or Bi-212 or an Auger-emitter, e.g. I-125, I-123. One major problem with RIT, besides slow penetration rate into tumor tissue and low tumor-to-normal tissue ratio, is the HAMA response, which can be partly avoided by the use of humanized MAbs and immunosuppression. However, RIT will be, because of all the recent developments, an important form of cancer management. (orig.)

  17. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    We plan to extend our success in treating B cell malignancies with 131 I labeled Lym-1 by a major effort in therapy with 67 Cu Lym-1. Yttrium-90 labeled by a macrocycle, DOTA will be studied in patients as a continuation of the 111 In-BAD (DOTA) Lym-1 studies. Excellent images and pharmacokinetics of the 111 In-BAD(DOTA)-Lym-1 studies. Lymphomas and related diseases represent a special case for radioimmunotherapy because of their documented radiosensitivity and immunodeficiency, and thus offer a unique opportunity to conduct therapeutic feasibility studies in a responsive human model. Using marine and chimeric L6 and other MoAb to breast cancer, we have applied the strategies that were developed in taking Lym-1 antibody from the bench to the patient. We have examined a number of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of breast cancer and chose chimeric L6 for prototype studies because of certain characteristics. The chemistry of attachment of conjugates to antibodies and their impact on immunological targeting biological activities (cytotoxicity), metabolic fate, and therapeutic index will continue to be a major strength and function of this program. This grant has supported the conception, synthesis, and development of the first macrocylic, bifunctional chelating agent TETA (6-p-nitrobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazatetradecane-N,N',N double-prime, N'double-prime-tetraacetic acid and its derivatives, including Lym-1-2IT-BAT), for use in Cu-67-based radioimmunodiagnosis and therapy. This work has led to the further development of several new macrocylic bifunctional chelating agents for copper, indium, yttrium and other metals. In addition, successful Cu-67 labelings of Lym-1-2IT-BAT for human radiopharmaceutical have shown patient pharmacokinetics of 67 Cu-BAT(TETA)-Lym-1 with promising therapeutic dosimetry

  18. Immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy in Cuba: experiences with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment (1993-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Yamilé; Perera, Alejandro; Batista, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The availability of monoclonal antibodies in Cuba has facilitated development and application of innovative techniques (immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy) for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Objective Review immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy techniques and analyze their use in Cuba, based on the published literature. In this context, we describe the experience of Havana's Clinical Research Center with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment during the period 1993-2013. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION Basic concepts concerning cancer and monoclonal antibodies were reviewed, as well as relevant international and Cuban data. Forty-nine documents were reviewed, among them 2 textbooks, 34 articles by Cuban authors and 13 by international authors. All works published by the Clinical Research Center from 1993 through 2013 were included. Bibliography was obtained from the library of the Clinical Research Center and Infomed, Cuba's national health telematics network, using the following keywords: monoclonal antibodies, immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy. RESULTS Labeling the antibodies (ior t3, ior t1, ior cea 1, ior egf/r3, ior c5, h-R3, 14F7 and rituximab) with radioactive isotopes was a basic line of research in Cuba and has fostered their use as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The studies conducted demonstrated the good sensitivity and diagnostic precision of immunoscintigraphy for detecting various types of tumors (head and neck, ovarian, colon, breast, lymphoma, brain). Obtaining different radioimmune conjugates with radioactive isotopes such as 99mTc and 188Re made it possible to administer radioimmunotherapy to patients with several types of cancer (brain, lymphoma, breast). The objective of 60% of the clinical trials was to determine pharmacokinetics, internal dosimetry and adverse effects of monoclonal antibodies, as well as tumor response; there were few adverse effects, no damage to vital organs, and a positive

  19. Radioimmunotherapy of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eBodet-Milin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reviews current advances in the use of radioimmunotherapy (RIT for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. RIT has been in use for more than 20 years and has progressed significantly with the discovery of new molecular targets, the development of new stable chelates, the humanization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs, and the use of pretargeting techniques. Today, two products targeting the CD20 antigen are approved: 131I-tositumomab, (Bexxar® and 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan, (Zevalin®. 131I-tositumomab is available in the United States, and 90Y-ibritumumab tiuxetan in Europe, the United States, Asia, and Africa. RIT can be integrated in clinical practice using non-ablative activities for treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL or as consolidation after induction chemotherapy in front-line treatment in FL patients. Despite the lack of phase III studies to clearly define the efficacy of RIT in the management of B lymphoma in the era of rituximab-based therapy, RIT efficacy in NHL has been demonstrated. In relapsing refractory FL and transformed NHL, RIT as a monotherapy induces around 30% complete response with a possibility of durable remissions. RIT consolidation after induction therapy significantly improves the quality of the response. Dose-limiting toxicity of RIT is hematological, depending on bone marrow involvement and prior treatment. Non-hematological toxicity is generally low. Different studies have been published assessing innovative protocols of RIT or new indications, in particular treatment in patients with aggressive lymphomas. High-dose treatment, RIT as consolidation after different therapeutic induction modalities, RIT in first-line treatment or fractionated RIT showed promising results. New MAbs, in particular humanized MAbs, or combinations of naked and radiolabeled MAbs, also appear promising. Personalized dosimetry protocols should be developed to determine

  20. Melanoma stem cells in experimental melanoma are killed by radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandl, Thomas; Revskaya, Ekaterina; Jiang, Zewei; Harris, Matthew; Dorokhova, Olena; Tsukrov, Dina; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In spite of recently approved B-RAF inhibitors and immunomodulating antibodies, metastatic melanoma has poor prognosis and novel treatments are needed. Melanoma stem cells (MSC) have been implicated in the resistance of this tumor to chemotherapy. Recently we demonstrated in a Phase I clinical trial in patients with metastatic melanoma that radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 188-Rhenium( 188 Re)-6D2 antibody to melanin was a safe and effective modality. Here we investigated the interaction of MSC with RIT as a possible mechanism for RIT efficacy. Methods: Mice bearing A2058 melanoma xenografts were treated with either 1.5 mCi 188 Re-6D2 antibody, saline, unlabeled 6D2 antibody or 188 Re-labeled non-specific IgM. Results: On Day 28 post-treatment the tumor size in the RIT group was 4-times less than in controls (P < 0.001). The tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and FACS for two MSC markers — chemoresistance mediator ABCB5 and H3K4 demethylase JARID1B. There were no significant differences between RIT and control groups in percentage of ABCB5 or JARID1B-positive cells in the tumor population. Our results demonstrate that unlike chemotherapy, which kills tumor cells but leaves behind MSC leading to recurrence, RIT kills MSC at the same rate as the rest of tumor cells. Conclusions: These results have two main implications for melanoma treatment and possibly other cancers. First, the susceptibility of ABCB5 + and JARID1B + cells to RIT in melanoma might be indicative of their susceptibility to antibody-targeted radiation in other cancers where they are present as well. Second, specifically targeting cancer stem cells with radiolabeled antibodies to ABCB5 or JARID1B might help to completely eradicate cancer stem cells in various cancers

  1. The feasibility of 225Ac as a source of α-particles in radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geerlings, M.W.; Hout, R. van der; Kaspersen, F.M.; Apostolides, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper proposes the utilization of 225 Ac for the α-radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The isotope decays with a radioactive half-life of 10 days into a cascade of short-lived α-and β-emitting isotopes. In addition, when indicated by the pharmacokinetic requirements of particular clinical applications, 213 Bi, with a radioactive half-life of 47 min, can be chosen as an alternative source of α-particles in radioimmunotherapy. This isotope is the last α emitter in the 225 Ac decay-cascade and can be extracted from a 225 Ac source at the bedside of the patient. 225 Ac can quasi ad infinitum be obtained from one of its precursors, 229 Th, which can be made available by various means. The indications for the use of α-particles as an alternative to more traditional classes of radiation are derived from the particle-kinetic characteristics and the radioactive half-life of their source isotope, as well as from the properties of the target-selective carrier moiety for the source isotope. It may be expected that useful applications, complementary to and/or in conjunction with other means of therapy will be identified. (author)

  2. Interest of a treatment combined by radioimmunotherapy and Avastin 1 in a murine model of thyroid medullary carcinoma; Interet d'un traitement combine par radioimmunotherapie et Avastin1 dans un modele murin de carcinome medullaire de la thyroide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaun, P.Y.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Paris, F.; Frampas, E.; Sai Maurel, C.; Faivre Chauvet, A.; Barbet, J.; Kraeber Bodere, F. [Unite Inserm U892, Brest, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and the toxicity of the association radioimmunotherapy and bevacizumab on a murine model grafted by the human line T.T. of thyroid medullar cancer. After results it appears that in pretreatment, bevacizumab (Avastin) improves the efficiency of radioimmunotherapy without increasing the toxicity face the radioimmunotherapy alone. (N.C.)

  3. Interest of a treatment combined by radioimmunotherapy and Avastin 1 in a murine model of thyroid medullary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaun, P.Y.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Paris, F.; Frampas, E.; Sai Maurel, C.; Faivre Chauvet, A.; Barbet, J.; Kraeber Bodere, F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and the toxicity of the association radioimmunotherapy and bevacizumab on a murine model grafted by the human line T.T. of thyroid medullar cancer. After results it appears that in pretreatment, bevacizumab (Avastin) improves the efficiency of radioimmunotherapy without increasing the toxicity face the radioimmunotherapy alone. (N.C.)

  4. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome II, expanding the clinical spectrum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-06-17

    Jun 17, 2014 ... an autosomal dominant fashion, most cases of TRPS II are sporadic [1]. TRPS III, is a form of brachydactyly due to short metacarpals and severe .... and broad on both sides (black asterisk), the fifth metacarpal bone has similar yet less pronounced appearance (white asterisk). Langer–Giedion syndrome. 91 ...

  5. Activities of AREVA Med. Extraction and purification of the 212Pb isotope from Thorium for radio-immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miquel, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    After having recalled the definition of radio-immunotherapy (RIT) and the benefits of alpha RIT for the treatment of some cancers, this document explains the choice of the 212-Pb isotope instead of the 212-Bi isotope (the first one has a longer half-life than the second). The Pb isotope in fact progressively transforms itself into the Bi isotope. The production process is evoked with its important steps. A second part reports the first clinic tests performed in the Alabama Centre for the treatment of different cancer (breast, colon, ovarian, pancreas, stomach). Processes and doses are discussed

  6. Use of Re-188 labelled anti-EGFr humanized monoclonal antibody h-R3 for radioimmunotherapy of gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, A.; Torres, L.A.; Lopez, G.; Casaco, A.; Batista, J.F.; Pena, Y.; Coca, M.A.; Leyva, R.; Garcia, I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Locally administered monoclonal antibodies labelled with radioisotopes like 90Y, 131I, 186Re, 212Bi, 211At, 177Lu and others, constitute a viable and promising alternative for management different kind of malignancies. The development of 188W/188Re generator has given the possibility of having a radionuclide showing satisfactory features for radioimmunotherapy (Eb2.12 MeV, Eg155 keV, T1/2=16.9 h and easy to make labelling approaches, similar to used for 99mTc). Neuroepithelial-derived tumours show an increased expression of the EGF receptor with regard to adjacent normal tissue. This overexpression could be related with the autocrine stimulation of the neoplasm by EGF and TGFb. Humanized monoclonal antibody h-R3 has shown a high affinity for this EGF receptor, blocking the binding of EGF to it receptor and inducing apoptosis. Thus, it could be a good candidate for radioimmunotherapy of neuroepithelial malignancies. The aim of the present work was to label monoclonal antibody h-R3 with 188Re, to assess it in an animal model and evaluate its internal dosimetry and toxicity in patients with grade III-IV gliomas through a phase I clinical trial. Schwarz's direct labelling method was employed. Briefly, a 2000-fold molar excess of 2-mercaptoethanol was used to reduce bisulfide bonds of the antibody. The amount of sodium glucoheptonate, ascorbic acid and stannous fluoride were varied to achieve optimum labelling yield. 188Re-labeling yield was proportional to the volume of stannous glucoheptonate solution added to the formulation. Radiochemical purity of 188Re-h-R3 was 98.0±0.4%. Challenge against 300-fold molar excess of L-cysteine was made to assess the stability of the tracer. There was no significant difference between stability of 188Re-h-R3 and 99mTc-h-R3 against cysteine challenge up to 24 h. Animal biodistribution study was performed at 3 and 24 h after intravenous administration of 188Re-h-R3 through tale vein of Male Wistar rats. The results were

  7. A New Clinical HIFU System (Teleson II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yixin; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; Rivens, Ian H.; ter Haar, Gail R.

    2007-05-01

    Previous clinical trials with our first prototype HIFU system (Teleson I) for the treatment of liver tumors, demonstrated a major challenge to be treatment of those tumors located behind the ribs. We have designed a new multi-element transducer for rib sparing. Initial simulation and experimental results (using a single channel power amplifier) are very encouraging. A new clinical HIFU system which can drive the multi-element transducer and control each channel independently is being designed and constructed. This second version of a clinical prototype HIFU system consists of a 3D motorised gantry, a multi-channel signal generator, a multi-channel power amplifier, a user interface PC, an embedded controller and auxiliary circuits for real-time interleaving/synchronization control and a to-be-implemented safety monitoring and data logging unit. For multi-element transducers, each element can be individually switched on and off for rib sparing, and phase and amplitude modulated for potential phased array applications. The multi-channel power amplifier can be switched on/off very rapidly at required intervals to interleave with ultrasound B-Scan imaging for HIFU monitoring or radiation force elastography imaging via a dedicated interleaving/timing module. The gantry movement can also be synchronised with power amplifier on/off and phase/amplitude updating for lesion generation under a wide variety of conditions including single lesions, lesion arrays and lesions "tracks" created whilst translating the active transducer. Results from testing the system using excised tissue will be presented.

  8. Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. The interaction of radiation and antibody with lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illidge, T.M.

    1999-06-01

    Whilst many patients with indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) can achieve clinical remissions to first-line chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, most will relapse. Current treatment options for relapsing patients are limited since most patients become resistant to repeated chemotherapy. Death usually occurs within 10 years of diagnosis. Overall, these disappointing results have not changed significantly in a quarter of a century and clearly advocate the urgent priority to research into potential new therapeutic approaches into this diverse and increasingly prevalent group of human tumours. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is currently under investigation as a new approach for the treatment of this disease. In this form of treatment, radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies are able to deliver selective systemic irradiation by recognising tumour-associated antigens. The use of RIT with radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibodies in patients with recurrent B-cell lymphoma has resulted in extremely high rates of durable complete remissions. The optimal approach and mechanisms of action of successful RIT remain however largely unknown. The work described in this thesis has focused on clarifying some of the important determinants and mechanisms of effective RIT of syngeneic B-cell lymphoma, both in vivo and in vitro. A successful animal model of RIT in B cell lymphomas was established by initially generating a panel of antibodies against mouse B cell antigens. The in vitro characteristics of these antibodies have been compared with their subsequent performance, in biodistribution studies and RIT in vivo. For the first time in an in vivo model the relative contributions of antibody and irradiation are described. Some antibodies including anti-MHC Class II were shown to be effective delivery vehicles of low doses of Iodine-131. These antibodies, which appear to be inactive delivery vehicles can cure animals with low burdens of tumour. However antibodies such as anti-idiotype and anti-CD40

  9. Clinical evaluation of the Non-Contact Tonometer Mark II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, B C; Henson, D B

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test the reliability of the American Optical Non-Contact Tonometer Mark II (NCT II) using the Goldmann Applanation Tonometer (GAT) as the validating instrument. The sample contained 102 consecutive patients from our University Eye Clinic, of whom one-half had 4 NCT II measurements first, followed by 4 GAT measurements; the other one-half had 4 GAT measurements first, followed by 4 NCT II measurements. No significant change in intraocular pressure (IOP) was noted over the measurement sequence with either instrument. There was no significant difference between paired NCT II and GAT readings when the NCT II was used first; however, a highly significant difference between paired readings was obtained when the GAT was used first, indicating that the GAT measurement produced a delayed reduction in the IOP. This effect did not occur with the NCT II. Although the NCT II is shown to have a good overall reliability when compared to the GAT in both protocols, the agreement between any two tonometers may be influenced greatly by the very process of taking a measurement and by the dynamic nature of the IOP.

  10. Clinical Benefits of Memantine Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease in the Okayama Memantine Study II (OMS II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Koike, Makoto; Sato, Kota; Kono, Syoichiro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Nakano, Yumiko; Abe, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The clinical benefits of memantine, depending on the baseline cognitive and affective conditions in real world dementia clinics, have not been completely examined. We performed the "Okayama Memantine Study II (OMS II)" to retrospectively evaluate the clinical effects of memantine monotherapy (n = 38) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients using seven batteries to assess dementia at the baseline, at 3, 6, and 12 months. Additionally, we divided 163 AD patients treated with memantine into two subgroups depending on the baseline cognitive score of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE): the MMSE OMS II showed that memantine monotherapy improved BPSD until 12 months. The higher baseline cognitive subgroup (MMSE ≥15) and the worse baseline BPSD subgroup were expected to show better effects with memantine.

  11. Radioimmunotherapy with an antibody to HPV16 E6 oncoprotein is effective in experimental cervical tumor expressing low levels of E6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zewei; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H; Goldberg, Gary L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose HPV16 is associated with ∼50% of all cervical cancers worldwide. The E6 and E7 genes of oncogenic HPV types, such as HPV16, are necessary for the HPV transforming function and tumorogenesis making them ideal targets for novel treatments. Radioimmunotherapy employs systemically administered radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to tumor-associated antigens. Previously we demonstrated in mice that radioimmunotherapy targeting viral antigens with mAb to HPV16 E6 suppressed CasKi cervical tumors expressing high levels of E6 (∼600 copies of HPV per cell). However, that study opened the question whether radioimmunotherapy can suppress the growth of cervical tumors with low E6 and E7 expression, such as may be seen in patients. Experimental Design We evaluated the expression of E6 in patients' tumors and in the SiHa cell line expressing low levels of E6 and E7 (1–2 copies of HPV per cell) and found them comparable. We initiated SiHa tumors in nude mice, radiolabeled C1P5 mAb to E6 with a beta-emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re) and treated tumor-bearing mice with: (1) 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5 alone; (2) proteasome inhibitor MG132 alone; (3) MG132 followed by 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5; (4) unlabeled C1P5; (5) 200 µCi 188Re-18B7 (isotype-matching control mAb); (6) no treatment. 188Re-C1P5 alone and in combination with MG-132 significantly retarded tumor growth compared to all control groups. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the possibility to suppress tumor growth by targeting viral antigens even in cervical tumors with low E6 expression and provide additional evidence for the potential usefulness of radioimmunotherapy targeting HPV-related antigens in the clinic. PMID:20861673

  12. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rStO2) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rStO2 can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises that the bur...

  13. The SafeBoosC phase II clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riera, Joan; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Bravo, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial recently demonstrated the benefits of a combination of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (rStO2) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a treatment guideline to reduce the oxygen imbalance in extremely preterm infants. AIMS: ...

  14. Design of clinical trials Phase I and II with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, C.A.; Soroa, V.E.

    2015-01-01

    We presented some usual designs for clinical studies in Phase I and Phase II. For Phase I we considered the 3 + 3 Classic design, designs with accelerated titration and those with dose escalation schemes with overdose control (EWOC). For Phase II designs with efficacy outcomes are presented. The design proposed by Fleming is discussed as well as those with inclusion of patients in two stages: Gehan’s design and the Optimal two–stage Simon’s design. We also discussed the design of combined endpoints of efficacy and safety of Bryant and Day with an application example of therapeutically Lu-177. Finally some proposals for phase II trials with control group are considered. (authors) [es

  15. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach. Progress report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  16. Criteria for the selection of nuclides for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes many factors that need to be considered if radioimmunotherapy is to become a commonplace reality. For beta-emitting radionuclides, two physical features of importance are half-life and energy, with the latter determining the range. These features must be matched to the pharmacokinetics of the carrier and the distribution of the radionuclide, both macroscopically and microscopically. Alpha-particle emitters could be considered for cells that are readily accessible to the labeled antibody and for populations that uniformly and constantly display the targeted antigen or idiotype, e.g., trafficking cells such as T or B lymphocytes. For cells that concentrate the radioactive label, the use of low-energy electrons should be examined. If the radionuclide is translocated to the nucleus, the Auger effect can be particularly lethal because of the high LET-like biological response. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Criteria for the selection of radionuclides for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Mease, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    The potential of utilizing monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radionuclides for the selective destruction of tumors (radioimmunotherapy, RIT) has stimulated much research activity. From dosimetric and other considerations, the choice of radiolabel is an important factor that needs to be optimized for maximum effectiveness of RIT. This paper reviews and assesses a number of present and future radionuclides that are particularly suitable for RIT based on the various physical, chemical, and biological considerations. Intermediate to high-energy beta emitters' (with and without gamma photons in their emission) are emphasized since they possess a number of advantages over alpha and Auger emitters. Factors relating to the production and availability of candidate radiometals as well as their stable chemical attachment to monoclonal antibodies are discussed. 34 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies Radiolabeling with Rhenium-188 for Radioimmunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Petra; Pasquali, Micol

    2017-01-01

    Rhenium-188, obtained from an alumina-based tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator, is actually considered a useful candidate for labeling biomolecules such as antibodies, antibody fragments, peptides, and DNAs for radiotherapy. There is a widespread interest in the availability of labeling procedures that allow obtaining 188Re-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for various therapeutic applications, in particular for the rhenium attachment to tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mo)Abs for immunotherapy. Different approaches have been developed in order to obtain 188Re-radioimmunoconjugates in high radiochemical purity starting from the generator eluted [188Re]ReO4−. The aim of this paper is to provide a short overview on 188Re-labeled (Mo)Abs, focusing in particular on the radiolabeling methods, quality control of radioimmunoconjugates, and their in vitro stability for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), with particular reference to the most important contributions published in literature in this topic. PMID:28951872

  19. 177Lu-DOTA-Bevacizumab: Radioimmunotherapy Agent for Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Ximena; Calzada, Victoria; Fernandez, Marcelo; Alonso, Omar; Chammas, Roger; Riva, Eloisa; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the classic factors to tumor-induced angiogenesis in several types, including melanoma. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against VEGF. To radiolabel Bevacizumab with 177-Lutetium as a potential radioimmunotherapy agent for melanoma. Bevacizumab was derivatized with DOTA-NHS-ester at 4 ºC for 18 h. DOTABevacizumab was radiolabeled with 177LuCl3 (15 MBq/mg) at 37 ºC for 1 h. The studies were performed in healthy and B16F1 tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice at 24 and 48 h (n = 5). Scinthigraphic imaging studies were performed at 24 h to determine the radiochemical stability, targeting specificity and pharmacokinetics of the 177Lutetium-labeled antibody. DOTA-Bevacizumab was efficiently labeled with 177LuCl3 at 37 °C. The in-vitro stability of labeled product was optimal over 72 h. In-vivo biodistribution studies showed a high liver and tumor uptake of 177Lu-DOTA-Bevacizumab, with tumor-to-muscle ratios of 11.58 and 6.37 at 24 and 48 h p.i. Scintigraphic imaging of melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice showed liver and a high tumor selective uptake of 177Lu-DOTA-Bevacizumab at 24 h. Our results support the potential role of 177Lu-DOTA-Bevacizumab as a novel radioimmunotherapy agent for melanoma. We hope that these novel molecular imaging agents will open the path to new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for Melanoma disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Radioimmunotherapy for first-line and relapse treatment of aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: an analysis of 215 patients registered in the international RIT-Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohloch, Karin; Lankeit, H.K.; Truemper, L. [Georg August University, Hematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Zinzani, P.L. [University of Bologna, Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology ' ' L. e A. Seragnoli' ' , Bologna (Italy); Scholz, C.W. [Charite, University Berlin, Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology, Berlin (Germany); Lorsbach, M.; Windemuth-Kieselbach, C. [Alcedis GmbH, Giessen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Very few reliable clinical data about the use of radioimmunotherapy in aggressive B-cell lymphoma exist. Patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma registered in the international RIT-Network were analysed with regard to prior treatment, response and side effects. The RIT-Network is a web-based registry that collects observational data from radioimmunotherapy-treated patients with malignant lymphoma across 13 countries. This analysis included 215 with aggressive B-cell lymphoma out of 232 patients registered in the RIT-Network. Histological subtypes were as follows: 190 diffuse large B-cell, 15 primary mediastinal, 9 anaplastic large cell, and 1 intravascular lymphoma. The median age of the patients was 62 years (range 17 - 88), with 27 % above the age of 70 years. Radioimmunotherapy was mainly used as consolidation after first-line or second-line chemotherapy (56.1 %), as part of third-line to eighth-line therapy for relapse (16.4 %), and in refractory disease (12.2 %). Grade IV neutropenia and thrombopenia and grade III anaemia were observed. The median time to recovery of blood count was 81 days (range 0 - 600 days). The overall response rate was 63.3 %. The complete response rate was 76.4 % in patients treated as part of first-line therapy, and 44.3 % in patients with relapse. Mean overall survival in first-line therapy patients was 32.7 months and 14.0 months in patients with relapse or refractory disease, respectively. Most patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma in the RIT-Network received radioimmunotherapy as consolidation after first-line therapy with excellent complete remission and overall survival rates compared to published data. In relapsed aggressive B-cell lymphoma, radioimmunotherapy is a safe and feasible treatment leading to satisfactory response rates with acceptable toxicity. (orig.)

  1. Development of dosimetric approaches to treatment planning for radioimmunotherapy. DOE annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The objective of quantitative imaging is to Provide pharmacokinetic information for patients that is analogous to that provided by biodistribution studies in mice. Radio nuclide images depict the distribution of labeled antibodies in-vivo; thus the amount of radio nuclide in a specific organ or site can be estimated by relating the counts detected in a defined region of interest to the total radio nuclide content. This pharmacokinetic information can be used to obtain definitive and relevant answers to basic questions of importance for optimizing radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy and, in addition, can provide a data base from which to calculate the distribution of radiation absorbed doses. The projects supported by this program routinely employ quantitative imaging in evaluating therapies. Quantitative imaging is performed by a certified nuclear medicine technician using the Siemens gamma camera interfaced with the microVAX II. The technician processes the imaging data and obtains pharmacokinetic information from it using programs developed by us and others. During this grant period project staff have acquired and analyzed a large amount of data on the pharmacokinetics, dosimetry and toxicity of radiolabeled monoclonal therapy. Important dosimetry data on the whole body, marrow and tumor doses are available and all studies are archived so that they can be retrospectively analyzed

  2. Development of dosimetric approaches to treatment planning for radioimmunotherapy. Annual report 1989--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1990-12-31

    The objective of quantitative imaging is to provide pharmacokinetic information for patients that is analogous to that provided by biodistribution studies in mice. Radionuclide images depict the distribution of labeled antibodies in-vivo; thus the amount of radionuclide in a specific organ or site can be estimated by relating the counts detected in a defined region of interest to the total radionuclide content. This pharmacokinetic information can be used to obtain definitive and relevant answers to basic questions of importance for optimizing radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy and, in addition, can provide a data base from which to calculate the distribution of radiation absorbed doses. The research employs quantitative imaging in evaluating therapies. Quantitative imaging is performed by a certified nuclear medicine technician using the Siemens gamma camera interfaced with the microVAX II. The technician processes the imaging data and obtains pharmacokinetic information from it using programs developed by the authors and others. A large amount of data has been acquired and analyzed on the pharmacokinetics, dosimetry and toxicity of radiolabeled monoclonal therapy. Important dosimetry data on the whole body, marrow and tumor doses are available and all studies are archived so that they can be retrospectively analyzed. Although the radiation absorbed doses delivered to tumor sites were modest, significant biological responses were found.

  3. Phase II cancer clinical trials for biomarker-guided treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2018-01-01

    The design and analysis of cancer clinical trials with biomarker depend on various factors, such as the phase of trials, the type of biomarker, whether the used biomarker is validated or not, and the study objectives. In this article, we demonstrate the design and analysis of two Phase II cancer clinical trials, one with a predictive biomarker and the other with an imaging prognostic biomarker. Statistical testing methods and their sample size calculation methods are presented for each trial. We assume that the primary endpoint of these trials is a time to event variable, but this concept can be used for any type of endpoint.

  4. Reassessing Phase II Heart Failure Clinical Trials: Consensus Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Hamo, Carine E.; Udelson, James E.; O’Connor, Christopher; Sabbah, Hani N.; Metra, Marco; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Teerlink, John; Bernstein, Harold S.; Brooks, Gabriel; Depre, Christophe; DeSouza, Mary M.; Dinh, Wilfried; Donovan, Mark; Frische-Danielson, Regina; Frost, Robert J.; Garza, Dahlia; Gohring, Udo-Michael; Hellawell, Jennifer; Hsia, Judith; Ishihara, Shiro; Kay-Mugford, Patricia; Koglin, Joerg; Kozinn, Marc; Larson, Christopher J.; Mayo, Martha; Gan, Li-Ming; Mugnier, Pierrre; Mushonga, Sekayi; Roessig, Lothar; Russo, Cesare; Salsali, Afshin; Satler, Carol; Shi, Victor; Ticho, Barry; van der Laan, Michael; Yancy, Clyde; Stockbridge, Norman; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing burden and the continued suboptimal outcomes for patients with heart failure underlines the importance of continued research to develop novel therapeutics for this disorder. This can only be accomplished with successful translation of basic science discoveries into direct human application through effective clinical trial design and execution that results in a substantially improved clinical course and outcomes. In this respect, phase II clinical trials play a pivotal role in determining which of the multitude of potential basic science discoveries should move to the large and expansive registration trials in humans. A critical examination of the phase II trials in heart failure reveals multiple shortcomings in their concept, design, execution, and interpretation. To further a dialogue regarding the challenges and potential for improvement and the role of phase II trials in patients with heart failure, the Food and Drug Administration facilitated a meeting on October 17th 2016 represented by clinicians, researchers, industry members, and regulators. This document summarizes the discussion from this meeting and provides key recommendations for future directions. PMID:28356300

  5. 18F-FDG PET predicts survival after pretargeted radioimmunotherapy in patients with progressive metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaun, Pierre-Yves; Robin, Philippe; Campion, Loic; Ansquer, Catherine; Mathieu, Cedric; Frampas, Eric; Bournaud, Claire; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Taieb, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Drui, Delphine; Mirallie, Eric; Borson-Chazot, Francoise; Goldenberg, David M.; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Barbet, Jacques; Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise

    2014-01-01

    PET is a powerful tool for assessing targeted therapy. Since 18 F-FDG shows a potential prognostic value in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), this study evaluated 18 F-FDG PET alone and combined with morphological and biomarker evaluations as a surrogate marker of overall survival (OS) in patients with progressive metastatic MTC treated with pretargeted anti-CEA radioimmunotherapy (pRAIT) in a phase II clinical trial. Patients underwent PET associated with morphological imaging (CT and MRI) and biomarker evaluations, before and 3 and 6 months, and then every 6 months, after pRAIT for 36 months. A combined evaluation was performed using anatomic, metabolic and biomarker methods. The prognostic value of the PET response was compared with demographic parameters at inclusion including age, sex, RET mutation, time from initial diagnosis, calcitonin and CEA concentrations and doubling times (DT), SUV max , location of disease and bone marrow involvement, and with response using RECIST, biomarker concentration variation, impact on DT, and combined methods. Enrolled in the study were 25 men and 17 women with disease progression. The median OS from pRAIT was 3.7 years (0.2 to 6.5 years) and from MTC diagnosis 10.9 years (1.7 to 31.5 years). After pRAIT, PET/CT showed 1 patient with a complete response, 4 with a partial response and 24 with disease stabilization. The combined evaluation showed 20 responses. For OS from pRAIT, univariate analysis showed the prognostic value of biomarker DT (P = 0.011) and SUV max (P = 0.038) calculated before pRAIT and impact on DT (P = 0.034), RECIST (P = 0.009), PET (P = 0.009), and combined response (P = 0.004) measured after pRAIT. PET had the highest predictive value with the lowest Akaike information criterion (AIC 74.26) as compared to RECIST (AIC 78.06), biomarker variation (AIC 81.94) and impact on DT (AIC 79.22). No benefit was obtained by combining the methods (AIC 78.75). This result was confirmed by the analysis of OS from MTC

  6. {sup 18}F-FDG PET predicts survival after pretargeted radioimmunotherapy in patients with progressive metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaun, Pierre-Yves; Robin, Philippe [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Brest (France); Campion, Loic [ICO-Gauducheau Cancer Institute, Statistical Department, Nantes (France); Ansquer, Catherine; Mathieu, Cedric [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Frampas, Eric [University Hospital, Radiology Department, Nantes (France); Universite de Nantes, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, Inserm, U 892, CNRS, UMR 6299, Nantes (France); Bournaud, Claire [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Lyon (France); Vuillez, Jean-Philippe [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Grenoble (France); Taieb, David [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Marseille (France); Rousseau, Caroline [Universite de Nantes, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, Inserm, U 892, CNRS, UMR 6299, Nantes (France); ICO-Rene Gauducheau, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Drui, Delphine [University Hospital, Endocrinology Department, Nantes (France); Mirallie, Eric [University Hospital, Surgery Department, Nantes (France); Borson-Chazot, Francoise [University Hospital, Endocrinology Department, Lyon (France); Goldenberg, David M. [IBC Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Garden State Cancer Center, Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Chatal, Jean-Francois [GIP ARRONAX, Saint-Herblain (France); Barbet, Jacques [Universite de Nantes, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, Inserm, U 892, CNRS, UMR 6299, Nantes (France); GIP ARRONAX, Saint-Herblain (France); Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Universite de Nantes, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, Inserm, U 892, CNRS, UMR 6299, Nantes (France); ICO-Rene Gauducheau, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Hotel Dieu University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France)

    2014-08-15

    PET is a powerful tool for assessing targeted therapy. Since {sup 18}F-FDG shows a potential prognostic value in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), this study evaluated {sup 18}F-FDG PET alone and combined with morphological and biomarker evaluations as a surrogate marker of overall survival (OS) in patients with progressive metastatic MTC treated with pretargeted anti-CEA radioimmunotherapy (pRAIT) in a phase II clinical trial. Patients underwent PET associated with morphological imaging (CT and MRI) and biomarker evaluations, before and 3 and 6 months, and then every 6 months, after pRAIT for 36 months. A combined evaluation was performed using anatomic, metabolic and biomarker methods. The prognostic value of the PET response was compared with demographic parameters at inclusion including age, sex, RET mutation, time from initial diagnosis, calcitonin and CEA concentrations and doubling times (DT), SUV{sub max}, location of disease and bone marrow involvement, and with response using RECIST, biomarker concentration variation, impact on DT, and combined methods. Enrolled in the study were 25 men and 17 women with disease progression. The median OS from pRAIT was 3.7 years (0.2 to 6.5 years) and from MTC diagnosis 10.9 years (1.7 to 31.5 years). After pRAIT, PET/CT showed 1 patient with a complete response, 4 with a partial response and 24 with disease stabilization. The combined evaluation showed 20 responses. For OS from pRAIT, univariate analysis showed the prognostic value of biomarker DT (P = 0.011) and SUV{sub max} (P = 0.038) calculated before pRAIT and impact on DT (P = 0.034), RECIST (P = 0.009), PET (P = 0.009), and combined response (P = 0.004) measured after pRAIT. PET had the highest predictive value with the lowest Akaike information criterion (AIC 74.26) as compared to RECIST (AIC 78.06), biomarker variation (AIC 81.94) and impact on DT (AIC 79.22). No benefit was obtained by combining the methods (AIC 78.75). This result was confirmed by the

  7. Comparison of radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy in colon cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, R.R.; Wong, J.F.C.; Kuhn, J.A.; Beatty, B.G.; Williams, L.E.; Beatty, J.D.; Wanek, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy were compared in a nude mouse human colon cancer model. Radioimmunotherapy was delivered by intraperitoneal injection of 90 Y-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody (anti-CEA MAB). Single fraction external beam radiotherapy was delivered using a 60 Co teletherapy unit. Control groups received saline, unlabeled anit-CEA monoclonal antibody and labeled nonspecific monoclonal antibody. Tumor growth suppression was expressed as delay to reach 2g compared to saline controls. Unlabeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody and labeled nonspecific monoclonal antibody had no effect. External beam radiotherapy of 300, 600, 1000 and 2000 cGy produced growth delays of 3, 12, 17, and 22 days, respectively. Radioimmunotherapy with 120 μCi, 175 μCi, and 225 μCi resulted in growth delays of 20, 34, and 36 days. Estimated absorbed tumor dose was 1750 cGy in the 120 μCi group. Similar comparisons were done with the more radioresistant WiDr human colon carcinoma cell line. External beam radiotherapy doses of 400, 800, 1200, and 1600 cGy resulted in growth delays of 6, 21, 36 and 48 days, respectively. Radioimmunotherapy of 120 μCi and 175 μCi resulted in growth delays of 9 and 19 days, respectively. The 120 μCi dose delivered an estimated absorbed tumor dose of 1080 cGy to WiDr tumors. In summary, for the radiosensitive LS174T line, radioimmunotherapy produced biologic effects that were comparable to a similar dose of single fraction external beam radiotherapy. For the more radioresistant WiDr tumor, radioimmunotherapy produced a biologic effect which was less than a similar dose of single fraction external beam radiotherapy. These studies suggest that a tumor's response to radioimmunotherapy relative to that of external beam radiotherapy is, in part, dependent on tumor radiosensitivity and repair capacity. 23 refs., 5 figs. 4 tabs

  8. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer: A Clinical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannarkatt, Joseph; Joseph, Joe; Kurniali, Peter C; Al-Janadi, Anas; Hrinczenko, Borys

    2017-04-01

    The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer with adjuvant chemotherapy can be challenging. Although the benefit of treatment is clear in most patients with stage III disease, the decision to provide chemotherapy after surgical resection in stage II disease must be made on an individual basis. Several trials have demonstrated the small but absolute benefits of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer for disease-free survival and overall survival. In an attempt to better understand the role of chemotherapy, several studies were performed that identified high-risk characteristics that can be used prognostically and predictively to aid in the clinical decision making process. ASCO, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the European Society of Medical Oncology have published guidelines describing these high-risk characteristics. Since then, several other molecular markers have emerged that may offer more information on a given patient's risk for recurrence. The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer must be made on an individual basis, considering the risks and benefits of treatment. In this short review, we will present the available evidence and offer possible directions for future study.

  9. Type I-II laryngeal cleft: clinical course and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonimsky, Guy; Carmel, Eldar; Drendel, Michael; Lipschitz, Noga; Wolf, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Laryngeal cleft (LC) is a rare congenital anomaly manifesting in a variety of symptoms, including swallowing disorders and aspirations, dyspnea, stridor and hoarseness. The mild forms (types I-II) may be underdiagnosed, leading to protracted symptomatology and morbidity. To evaluate the diagnostic process, clinical course, management and outcome in children with type I-II laryngeal clefts. We conducted a retrospective case analysis for the years 2005-2012 in a tertiary referral center. Seven children were reviewed: five boys and two girls ranging in age from birth to 5 years. The most common presenting symptoms were cough, aspirations and pneumonia. Evaluation procedures included fiber-optic laryngoscopy (FOL), direct laryngoscopy (DL) and videofluoroscopy. Other pathologies were seen in three children. Six children underwent successful endoscopic surgery and one child was treated conservatively. The postoperative clinical course was uneventful in most of the cases. Types I-II LC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with protracted cough and aspirations. DL is crucial for establishing the diagnosis. Endoscopic surgery is safe and should be applied promptly when conservative measures fail.

  10. Role of nuclear medicine in the treatment of malignant gliomas: the locoregional radioimmunotherapy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riva, P.; Franceschi, G.; Riva, N.; Casi, M.; Santimaria, M.; Adamo, M.

    2000-01-01

    The high-grade malignant gliomas (anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastoma) have a very bad prognosis since the available methods of treatment (surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy) are unable to control the progression of the disease for long. The use of specific monoclonal antibodies labelled with a suitable isotope (iodine-131 or yttrium-90) represents an effective approach to hamper tumour regrowth. Some authors have injected the antibodies intravenously, or have tried to increase the tumour/background ratio with the avidin/ biotin system. In many cases the labelled monoclonal antibodies were injected directly into the tumoral bed after the operation. The authors' experiences concern a quite large locoregional radioimmunotherapy study which was performed by using antitenascin antibodies labelled initially with 131 I and more recently with 90 Y. The clinical results demonstrate the ability of this technique to control, for a long time, the growth of these tumours. The glioblastoma median survival was prolonged to 25 months ( 131 I group) or 31 months ( 90 Y group). The response rate (which comprises PR, CR and NED) was 47.1% (glioblastoma 131 I group) or 40% (glioblastoma 90 Y group). In many cases a significant tumour shrinking effect was radiologically demonstrated. The use of 90 Y proved more favourable in bulky lesions, and reduced the radioprotection problems. (orig.)

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to the pretargeting approach: Developments in the radiopharmaceuticals for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinol, M.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, large experience has been accrued through the clinical application of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis and therapy of malignant disorders. While radioimmunoscintigraphy has established its role in the nuclear medicine practice, radioimmunotherapy has thus far gained limited acceptance mainly due to the low amount of radioactivity that can be targeted to the tumour and to the myelotoxicity which is typically the dose limiting factor. In an attempt to overcome the low uptake of label by the tumour and improve the tumour-to-blood ratio, various studies have examined the concept of tumour pretargeting based on the separate protocols, especially the 3-step approach, with respect to the use of directly labelled antibodies, lies in the lower toxicity observed which has allowed to administer high doses of therapeutic radionuclides, such as Y-90, without bone marrow toxicity. Pilot studies, applied to the treatment of advanced stage tumours, have shown that this approach interferes with the progression of tumours and produce tumours regression in patients no longer responsive to other conventional therapeutic modalities. The potency of pretargeting based on the avidin/biotin system may be exploited in the near future to convey a variety of cytotoxic substances, other than radioactivity, onto cancer cells. (author)

  12. Bivalent fragment of the ior-CEA1 antibody. A challenge to the positive CEA tumors radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelo, Rolando; Sanchez, Iradia; Pimentel, Gilmara; Oliva, Juan; Perez, Lincidio; Ayala, Marta; Bell, Hansell; Gavilondo, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    The directed radiotherapy of the solid tumors with fragments recombinants of radiolabelled antibodies is a topic of current investigation, so much at preclinical level as clinical. This work describes the preclinical characterization of a new fragment type diabody of the AcMo ior CEA1 that has been labelled with 131 I for their use in the diagnosis and the therapy of CEA positive tumors. The radiolabelling methodology used allows the incorporation of more than 90% of the radio iodine to the molecule without committing the capacity of recognition of its antigen significantly. The combination of the favourable properties pharmacy kinetic and high selective accumulation in the tumor, they make of the diabody anti CEA an appropriate candidate for the radioimmunodiagnosis and the radioimmunotherapy of tumors that expresses CEA (Author)

  13. Myeloablative radioimmunotherapies in the conditioning of patients with AML, MDS and multiple myeloma prior to stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmann, I.

    2008-01-01

    patients with multiple myeloma may markedly be improved using a combination of α- and β-anti-CD45-mAbs. This review provides a systematic and critical overview of the currently used radionuclides and antibodies for the treatment of AML, MDS and multiple myeloma and summarizes the present literature on clinical trials of myeloablative radioimmunotherapies for conditioning before both, autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. (orig.)

  14. Repeated Intraperitoneal alpha-Radioimmunotherapy of Ovarian Cancer in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Andersson, Håkan; Jensen, Holger

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of alpha-radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in mice using different fractionated treatment regimens. The study was performed using the monoclonal antibody MX35 F(ab')(2) labeled with the alpha-particle emitter (211)At. Methods....... Nude mice were intraperitoneally inoculated with ~1 x 10(7) cells of the cell line NIH:OVCAR-3. Four weeks later 6 groups of animals were given 400 kBq (211)At-MX35 F(ab')(2) as a single or as a repeated treatment of up to 6 times (n = 18 in each group). The fractionated treatments were given every...... seventh day. Control animals were treated with unlabeled MX35 F(ab')(2) (n = 12). Eight weeks posttreatment the animals were sacrificed and the presence of macro- and microscopic tumors and ascites was determined. Results. The tumor-free fractions (TFFs) of the animals, defined as the fraction of animals...

  15. Dosimetric considerations in radioimmunotherapy of patients with hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leichner, P.K.; Klein, J.L.; Order, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    Dosimetric studies of I-131 labeled antiferritin have provided the foundation for preparative and administrative aspects of radiolabeled antibody treatment of patients with hepatoma. Tumor response to I-131 labeled antiferritin IgG was encouraging and radioimmunotherapy with Y-90 labeled antiferritin IgG was recently initiated. For these patients, In-111 labeled antiferritin IgG was used as the imaging agent, with administered activities ranging from 0.8 - 7 mCi. Serial gamma camera imaging from 30 minutes to 6 days post injection demonstrated that 5-30% of the administered activity localized in hepatomas (8/12 patients). The mean value of the effective half-life in the tumor and liver was 2.8 d. Disappearance curves for the blood circulation, spleen, and other normal tissues were biphasic such that 50% of the activity disappeared within 24 hours post injection. The eight patients who demonstrated sufficient tumor localization where subsequently treated with Y-90 labeled antiferritin IgG. Administered activities were dependent on tumor volume and uptake of radiolabeled IgG and ranged from 8 - 20 mCi. The remaining patients were treated under other existing protocols. 10 references

  16. Radioimmunotherapy. Dose calculation and radionuclides used in treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, S.

    1995-10-01

    In radioimmunotherapy (RIT) monoclonal antibodies to cancer-associated antigens can be utilized for the transport of therapeutic radioisotopes to cancer cells. Intravenous administration of radiolabelled antibody is a potentially curative form of therapy in hematological amignancies as circulating antibodies have easy access to tumour sites. Intravenous RIT is less effective in the treatment of solid tumours because of the low fractional uptake of the injected dose, particularly in the central parts of tumours. In solid tumours more promising results have been achieved by local RIT applications. The choice of radiation - α, β or γ - will depend of the characteristics of the tumour. The importance of radiation delivered by Auger electrons has been largely underestimated in the past, but recent research has resulted in a remarkable reassessment of this issue significantly influencing the selection of radioisotopes for RIT. Research is now being focused on the therapeutic aspects of different isotopes and microdosimetric problems. There are now good prospects of RIT becoming an important form of cancer treatment before year 2000. (orig.) (78 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.)

  17. Secondary antibodies as tools to improve tumor to non tumor ratio at radioimmunolocalisation and radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullen, A.; Riklund Aalstroem, K.; Hietala, S.O.; Nilsson, B.; Aerlestig, L.; Stigbrand, T.

    1996-01-01

    One way of selectively improving the efficiency of radioimmunolocalization and radioimmunotherapy is to eliminate redundant, circulating, non-targeting radiolabeled antibodies after saturation of the target sites. Secondary antibodies of different types have been proposed as clearing agents for such purposes. The conceptually different approaches of the 'secondary antibody' strategy including its advantages and limitations are discussed. This mini-review also presents a model describing the kinetics of the components (the antigen, the primary and secondary antibodies) and approaches required to improve the efficacy of both radioimmunolocalization and radioimmunotherapy. (orig.)

  18. Calculation of dose point kernels for five radionuclides used in radio-immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okigaki, S.; Ito, A.; Uchida, I.; Tomaru, T.

    1994-01-01

    With the recent interest in radioimmunotherapy, attention has been given to calculation of dose distribution from beta rays and monoenergetic electrons in tissue. Dose distribution around a point source of a beta ray emitting radioisotope is referred to as a beta dose point kernel. Beta dose point kernels for five radionuclides such as 131 I, 186 Re, 32 P, 188 Re, and 90 Y appropriate for radioimmunotherapy are calculated by Monte Carlo method using the EGS4 code system. Present results were compared with the published data of experiments and other calculations. Accuracy and precisions of beta dose point kernels are discussed. (author)

  19. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II): natural history and clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Judith G; Flora, Christina; Scott, Charles I; Pauli, Richard M; Tanaka, Kimi I

    2004-09-15

    A description of the clinical features of Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is presented based on 58 affected individuals (27 from the literature and 31 previously unreported cases). The remarkable features of MOPD II are: severe intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), severe postnatal growth retardation; relatively proportionate head size at birth which progresses to true and disproportionate microcephaly; progressive disproportion of the short stature secondary to shortening of the distal and middle segments of the limbs; a progressive bony dysplasia with metaphyseal changes in the limbs; epiphyseal delay; progressive loose-jointedness with occasional dislocation or subluxation of the knees, radial heads, and hips; unusual facial features including a prominent nose, eyes which appear prominent in infancy and early childhood, ears which are proportionate, mildly dysplastic and usually missing the lobule; a high squeaky voice; abnormally, small, and often dysplastic or missing dentition; a pleasant, outgoing, sociable personality; and autosomal recessive inheritance. Far-sightedness, scoliosis, unusual pigmentation, and truncal obesity often develop with time. Some individuals seem to have increased susceptibility to infections. A number of affected individuals have developed dilation of the CNS arteries variously described as aneurysms and Moya Moya disease. These vascular changes can be life threatening, even in early years because of rupture, CNS hemorrhage, and strokes. There is variability between affected individuals even within the same family. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. The interaction of radiation and antibody with lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illidge, T.M

    1999-06-01

    Whilst many patients with indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) can achieve clinical remissions to first-line chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, most will relapse. Current treatment options for relapsing patients are limited since most patients become resistant to repeated chemotherapy. Death usually occurs within 10 years of diagnosis. Overall, these disappointing results have not changed significantly in a quarter of a century and clearly advocate the urgent priority to research into potential new therapeutic approaches into this diverse and increasingly prevalent group of human tumours. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is currently under investigation as a new approach for the treatment of this disease. In this form of treatment, radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies are able to deliver selective systemic irradiation by recognising tumour-associated antigens. The use of RIT with radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibodies in patients with recurrent B-cell lymphoma has resulted in extremely high rates of durable complete remissions. The optimal approach and mechanisms of action of successful RIT remain however largely unknown. The work described in this thesis has focused on clarifying some of the important determinants and mechanisms of effective RIT of syngeneic B-cell lymphoma, both in vivo and in vitro. A successful animal model of RIT in B cell lymphomas was established by initially generating a panel of antibodies against mouse B cell antigens. The in vitro characteristics of these antibodies have been compared with their subsequent performance, in biodistribution studies and RIT in vivo. For the first time in an in vivo model the relative contributions of antibody and irradiation are described. Some antibodies including anti-MHC Class II were shown to be effective delivery vehicles of low doses of Iodine-131. These antibodies, which appear to be inactive delivery vehicles can cure animals with low burdens of tumour. However antibodies such as anti-idiotype and anti

  1. Microcephalic Osteodysplastic Primordial Dwarfism, Type II: a Clinical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bober, Michael B; Jackson, Andrew P

    2017-04-01

    This review will provide an overview of the microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) class of disorders and provide the reader comprehensive clinical review with suggested care guidelines for patients with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type II (MOPDII). Over the last 15 years, significant strides have been made in the diagnosis, natural history, and management of MOPDII. MOPDII is the most common and well described form of MPD. The classic features of the MPD group are severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation, with marked microcephaly. In addition to these features, individuals with MOPDII have characteristic facies, skeletal dysplasia, abnormal dentition, and an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease and insulin resistance. Biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the pericentrin gene cause MOPDII, which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.

  2. Combination radioimmunotherapy approaches and quantification of immuno-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Su [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which play a prominent role in cancer therapy, can interact with specific antigens on cancer cells, thereby enhancing the patient' immune response via various mechanisms, or mAbs can act against cell growth factors and, thereby, arrest the proliferation of tumor cells. Radionuclide-labeled mAbs, which are used in radioimmunotherapy (RIT), are effective for cancer treatment because tumor associated-mAbs linked to cytotoxic radionuclides can selectively bind to tumor antigens and release targeted cytotoxic radiation. Immunological positron emission tomography (immuno-PET), which is the combination of PET with mAb, is an attractive option for improving tumor detection and mAb quantification. However, RIT remains a challenge because of the limited delivery of mAb into tumors. The transport and uptake of mAb into tumors is slow and heterogeneous. The tumor microenvironment contributed to the limited delivery of the mAb. During the delivery process of mAb to tumor, mechanical drug resistance such as collagen distribution or physiological drug resistance such as high intestinal pressure or absence of lymphatic vessel would be the limited factor of mAb delivery to the tumor at a potentially lethal mAb concentration. When α-emitter-labeled mAbs were used, deeper penetration of α-emitter-labeled mAb inside tumors was more important because of the short range of the α emitter. Therefore, combination therapy strategies aimed at improving mAb tumor penetration and accumulation would be beneficial for maximizing their therapeutic efficacy against solid tumors.

  3. Cure of human ovarian carcinoma solid xenografts by fractionated [211At] alpha-radioimmunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäck, Tom A; Chouin, Nicolas; Lindegren, Sture

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate if targeted alpha therapy (TAT) could be used to successfully treat also macro tumors, in addition to its established role for treating micrometastatic and minimal disease. We used an intravenous (i.v.) fractionated regimen of alpha-radioimmunotherapy (α-...

  4. Dosimetry and quantitative radionuclide imaging in radioimmunotherapy: Final report, July 15, 1992-July 14, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leichner, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Brief summaries of the principal accomplishments of this project on the development of quantitative SPECT for high energy photons (87Y, 19F) and stability testing of 87Y-labeled antibodies in the nude mouse model, development of an unified approach to photon and beta particle dosimetry, quantitative SPECT for nonuniform attenuation, and development of patient-specific dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy

  5. Alpha radioimmunotherapy of multiple myeloma: study of feasibility of ex vivo medullary purge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, O.; Filippovitch, I.V.; Sorokina, N.I.; Cherel, M.; Thedrez, P.; Faivre-Chauvet, A.; Chatal, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiency of the radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using beta emitters has been clinically proved in treatments of refractory forms of lymphoma. The alpha-emitting radioelements of short half-life are also good potential candidates for RIT, applicable to tumor targets accessible rapidly to the molecules of the radio-immuno-conjugates of size compatible with the short range of alpha particles (50 to 80 μm). The goal of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach on a model of myeloma multiply targeted by specific antibodies (B-B4) coupled to bismuth-213 with a chelating agent (benzyl-DTPA). The efficiency of the alpha RIT was evaluated in vitro by means of different techniques analyzing the cellular mortality (the method of limited dilution), the effects on DNA (the testing of micro-nuclei), the analysis of radio-induced apoptosis (the test with acridine orange) and finally the study of non-specific irradiation on population of cells of hematopoietic system un-recognized by the B-B4 benzyl-DTPA) immuno-conjugate. The first results have shown besides the technical feasibility of the project a strong dose dependent cellular mortality with a survival falling rapidly from 28% to around 1 o/oo for a single doubling of the dose from 14.8 kBq / 10 5 cells (0.4 μCi) to 29.6 kBq/10 5 cells (0.8 μCi). The cellular mortality was total at 300 kBq/10 5 cells (8 μCi). The cells in an apoptosis state were evidenced at rates up to 40% for a dose of 7.4 kBq/10 5 cells (0.2 μ Ci). New experiments will permit confirming these first results and determining the irradiation range having in view a utilization in protocols of purging of the myeloma cells on pockets obtained after plasmaphereses

  6. A model for hematopoietic death in man from irradiation of bone marrow during radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, B R; Dillehay, L E

    1990-11-01

    There are numerous institutions worldwide performing clinical trials of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for cancer. For RIT, an exponentially decaying radionuclide is attached by using a chelating agent to a specific monoclonal or polyclonal tumour antibody (e.g. antiferritin IgG). The major limitation to RIT is toxicity to normal tissue in organs other than the one containing the tumour (e.g. bone marrow). The focus of this manuscript is on modelling the risk (or probability) of hematopoietic death in man for exponentially decaying patterns of high-energy beta irradiation (e.g. 90Y) of bone marrow by radioimmunoglobulin injected into the blood. The analytical solutions presented are only applicable to protocols for which significant uptake of radioactivity by the bone marrow does not occur, and only for high energy beta emitters. However, the generic equation used to obtain the analytical solutions is applicable to any continuous pattern of high energy beta irradiation. A model called the "normalized dose model" was used to generate calculated values for the LD50 as a function of the effective half-time for the radioimmunoglobulin in the blood. A less complicated empirical model was used to describe the calculated values. This model is presumed to be valid for effective half-times in blood of up to about 20 days. For longer effective half-times, the LD50 can be estimated using the normalized-dose model presented. In this manuscript, we also provide a modified Weibull model that allows estimation of the risk of hematopoietic death for single or multiple injections (in one cycle) of radioimmunoglobulin, for patients with normal susceptibility to irradiation and for patients with heightened susceptibility. With the modified Weibull model, the risk of hematopoietic death depends on the level of medical treatment provided to mitigate radiation injuries.

  7. Cuban Monoclonal Antibodies for Radioimmunodiagnosis and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancer Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casaco, A.

    2009-01-01

    tumours. Nevertheless, the lack of a direct evidence of this antigenic display in human cancers has kept the subject controversial. For the first time, we described herein the 'in vivo' detection of GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside in human breast primary tumours using a radioimmunoscintigraphic technique with 14F7, a highly specific anti-GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside monoclonal antibody, labelled with 99mTc. In an open, prospective Phase I/II clinical trial, including women diagnosed in stage II breast cancer, the 14F7 monoclonal antibody accumulation in tumours at doses of 0.3 (n=5), 1 (n=5) and 3 mg (n=4) was evaluated. Noteworthy, the immunoscintigraphic study showed antibody accumulation in 100% of patients' tumours for the 1 mg dose group. In turn, the radioimmunoconjugate injected at doses of 0.3 mg or 3 mg of the antibody, was uptaken by 60 and 33.3% of breast tumours, respectively. 'In vivo' immune recognition of GM3(NeuGc) in breast tumours reinforces the value of this peculiar target for cancer immunotherapy. In two phase II Clinical Trials including women with metastatic breast cancer (n=14) and patients with colon cancer (n=19) in all stages, the 14F7 monoclonal antibody (3 mg) labelled with 99mTc (30-40 mCi) was also able to detect distant metastasis over expressing the GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside. (author)

  8. Use of PET volume determination by fuzzy logic in the follow up of lymphomas treated by radio-immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esnault, J.M.; Steinling, M.; Huglo, D.; Vermandel, M.; Vermandel, M.; Steinling, M.; Huglo, D.; Morschhauser, F.

    2007-01-01

    Purposes: the aim of this study was to assess if the evaluation of tumoral volumes by fuzzy logic was workable for clinical use. This study was performed with patients followed up for radio-immunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with a comparison of the respective contributions of this quantification and Standardized Uptake Value (S.U.V.). Materials and methods: thirty patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET before treatment and then in an iterative way. The analysis of 217 lesions allowed to evaluate their volumes and S.U.V.. The evolution of these parameters of quantification was compared. Results: these two quantitative parameters did not statistically differ but there were important discrepancies in some examinations. The determination of volumes was sometimes limited by tumoral localization or junction of lesions. Conclusion: this study proved the feasibility of the determination of tumoral volumes by fuzzy method in clinical use. Quantification supplemented the subjective visual analysis, which in most cases was sufficient to appreciate the progression of the disease. This quantification, usually given by the value of the S.U.V., could be improved by the volume data either in a separated way, or combining intensity and volume (total lesion glycolysis). Further work is necessary to specify the predictive value of these parameters in this particular indication. (authors)

  9. RadioImmunotherapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma: a single-institution series of combined treatment with cetuximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Local control in adjuvant/definitive RT of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is largely dose-dependent. However, some clinical situations do not allow application of tumouricidal doses (i.e. re-irradiation) hence radiation sensitization by exploitation of high endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expression in ACC seems beneficial. This is a single-institution experience of combined radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with the EGFR-inhibitor cetuximab. Methods Between 2006 and 2010, 9 pts received RIT for advanced/recurrent ACC, 5/9 pts as re-irradiation. Baseline characteristics as well as treatment parameters were retrieved to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of the combination regimen were evaluated. Control rates (local/distant) and overall survival were calculated using Kaplan-Meier estimation. Results Median dose was 65 Gy, pts received a median of 6 cycles cetuximab. RIT was tolerated well with only one °III mucositis/dysphagia. Overall response/remission rates were high (77,8%); 2-year estimate of local control was 80% hence reaching local control levels comparable to high-dose RT. Progression-free survival (PFS) at 2 years and median overall survival were only 62,5% and 22,2 mo respectively. Conclusion While local control and treatment response in RIT seems promising, PFS and overall survival are still hampered by distant failure. The potential benefit of RIT with cetuximab warrants exploration in a prospective controlled clinical trial. PMID:21047402

  10. RadioImmunotherapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma: a single-institution series of combined treatment with cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weichert Wilko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local control in adjuvant/definitive RT of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC is largely dose-dependent. However, some clinical situations do not allow application of tumouricidal doses (i.e. re-irradiation hence radiation sensitization by exploitation of high endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR-expression in ACC seems beneficial. This is a single-institution experience of combined radioimmunotherapy (RIT with the EGFR-inhibitor cetuximab. Methods Between 2006 and 2010, 9 pts received RIT for advanced/recurrent ACC, 5/9 pts as re-irradiation. Baseline characteristics as well as treatment parameters were retrieved to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of the combination regimen were evaluated. Control rates (local/distant and overall survival were calculated using Kaplan-Meier estimation. Results Median dose was 65 Gy, pts received a median of 6 cycles cetuximab. RIT was tolerated well with only one °III mucositis/dysphagia. Overall response/remission rates were high (77,8%; 2-year estimate of local control was 80% hence reaching local control levels comparable to high-dose RT. Progression-free survival (PFS at 2 years and median overall survival were only 62,5% and 22,2 mo respectively. Conclusion While local control and treatment response in RIT seems promising, PFS and overall survival are still hampered by distant failure. The potential benefit of RIT with cetuximab warrants exploration in a prospective controlled clinical trial.

  11. Activation of PDGFr-β Signaling Pathway after Imatinib and Radioimmunotherapy Treatment in Experimental Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Michio [Minamata City Hospital and Medical Center, Minamata City, Kumamoto 867 (Japan); Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P.; Enke, Charles A.; Mack, Elizabeth; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina, E-mail: jbaranow@unmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, J. Bruce Henriksen Cancer Research Laboratories, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2011-05-25

    Pancreatic cancer does not respond to a single-agent imatinib therapy. Consequently, multimodality treatments are contemplated. Published data indicate that in colorectal cancer, imatinib and radioimmunotherapy synergize to delay tumor growth. In pancreatic cancer, the tumor response is additive. This disparity of outcomes merited further studies because interactions between these modalities depend on the imatinib-induced reduction of the tumor interstitial fluid pressure. The examination of human and murine PDGFr-β/PDGF-B pathways in SW1990 pancreatic cancer xenografts revealed that the human branch is practically dormant in untreated tumors but the insult on the stromal component produces massive responses of human cancer cells. Inhibition of the stromal PDGFr-β with imatinib activates human PDGFr-β/PDGF-B signaling loop, silent in untreated xenografts, via an apparent paracrine rescue pathway. Responses are treatment-and time-dependent. Soon after treatment, levels of human PDGFr-β, compared to untreated tumors, are 3.4×, 12.4×, and 5.7× higher in imatinib-, radioimmunotherapy + imatinib-, and radioimmunotherapy-treated tumors, respectively. A continuous 14-day irradiation of imatinib-treated xenografts reduces levels of PDGFr-β and phosphorylated PDGFr-β by 5.3× and 4×, compared to earlier times. Human PDGF-B is upregulated suggesting that the survival signaling via the autocrine pathway is also triggered after stromal injury. These findings indicate that therapies targeting pancreatic cancer stromal components may have unintended mitogenic effects and that these effects can be reversed when imatinib is used in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy.

  12. Activation of PDGFr-β Signaling Pathway after Imatinib and Radioimmunotherapy Treatment in Experimental Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Michio; Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P.; Enke, Charles A.; Mack, Elizabeth; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer does not respond to a single-agent imatinib therapy. Consequently, multimodality treatments are contemplated. Published data indicate that in colorectal cancer, imatinib and radioimmunotherapy synergize to delay tumor growth. In pancreatic cancer, the tumor response is additive. This disparity of outcomes merited further studies because interactions between these modalities depend on the imatinib-induced reduction of the tumor interstitial fluid pressure. The examination of human and murine PDGFr-β/PDGF-B pathways in SW1990 pancreatic cancer xenografts revealed that the human branch is practically dormant in untreated tumors but the insult on the stromal component produces massive responses of human cancer cells. Inhibition of the stromal PDGFr-β with imatinib activates human PDGFr-β/PDGF-B signaling loop, silent in untreated xenografts, via an apparent paracrine rescue pathway. Responses are treatment-and time-dependent. Soon after treatment, levels of human PDGFr-β, compared to untreated tumors, are 3.4×, 12.4×, and 5.7× higher in imatinib-, radioimmunotherapy + imatinib-, and radioimmunotherapy-treated tumors, respectively. A continuous 14-day irradiation of imatinib-treated xenografts reduces levels of PDGFr-β and phosphorylated PDGFr-β by 5.3× and 4×, compared to earlier times. Human PDGF-B is upregulated suggesting that the survival signaling via the autocrine pathway is also triggered after stromal injury. These findings indicate that therapies targeting pancreatic cancer stromal components may have unintended mitogenic effects and that these effects can be reversed when imatinib is used in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy

  13. Combination of anti-retroviral drugs and radioimmunotherapy specifically kills infected cells from HIV infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Tsukrov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT, a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infect-ed cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely down-regulated in patients on an-tiretroviral therapy (ART, we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells us-ing both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal anti-body to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. conjugated to the human monoclonal antibody 2556, which binds to HIV gp41. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: ten on ART and five ART-naive. We found that 213Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow 213Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that 213Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART, and supports continued development of 213Bi

  14. The radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy: current state and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    The antibodies can be satisfactorily labelled with technitium-99 m or indium-111 for tumor immunoscintigraphy. The immunoscintigraphy is not useful for the primary tumor diagnosis. It can be useful for the diagnosis of the some cancer extension and for recurrent tumor visualization. The immunoscintigraphy is widely competed with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which gives accurate results. In the future the immunoscintigraphy, in pre-therapeutic stage, contribute to the estimation of the dose delivered to the tumor and to normal organs for adopting or not a radioimmunotherapy. The antibodies can also be labeled with Iodine-131 for an application in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). The RIT is efficient in the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment because of their great radiosensitivity. Until now the results have been very modest in solid tumor treatment but methodological and biotechnological progresses have to improve the efficiency especially for the small tumors. In the future iodine-131 which requires the confinement (very expensive) of patients will be substituted by yttrium-90 beta emitter, more energetic than iodine-131 and can be injected in walking case. In the long term, the alpha emitter radionuclides (astatine-211 or bismuth-213) can be used for hematologic cancer treatment. In conclusion the future of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies is essentially therapeutic. The radioimmunotherapy associated to the chemotherapy give promising perspectives for the radiosensitive cancer treatment and in general small solid tumor treatment (F.M.)

  15. Radioimmunotherapy for treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Conceptual chances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmann, I.; Helisch, A.; Bartenstein, P.; Meyer, R.G.; Herr, W.

    2005-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has improved considerably by introduction of aggressive consolidation chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, only 20-30% of patients with AML achieve long-term disease-free survival after SCT. The most common cause of treatment failure is relapse. Additionally, mortality rates are significantly increased by therapy-related causes such as toxicity of chemotherapy and complications of SCT. Including radioimmunotherapies in the treatment of AML and myelodyplastic syndrome (MDS) allows for the achievement of a pronounced antileukaemic effect for the reduction of relapse rates on the one hand. On the other hand, no increase of acute toxicity and later complications should be induced. These effects are important for the primary reduction of tumour cells as well as for the myelblative conditioning before SCT. This paper provides a systematic and critical review of the currently used radionuclides and immunoconjugates for the treatment of AML and MDS and summarizes the literature on primary tumour cell reductive radioimmunotherapies on the one hand and conditioning radioimmunotherapies before SCT on the other hand. (orig.)

  16. Detecting comorbid Axis-II status among inpatients using the MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical Scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, J.H.; Arbisi, P.A.; Ben-Porath, Y.S.; McNulty, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the differential diagnostic utility of the MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical Scales (RCS) and Clinical Scales (CS) in detecting a complex multivariate clinical phenomenon: that is, comorbid Axis-II status in two matched samples of inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with

  17. MAJEWSKI OSTEODYSPLASTIC PRIMORDIAL DWARFISM TYPE II: CLINICAL FINDINGS AND DENTAL MANAGEMENT OF A CHILD PATIENT

    OpenAIRE

    Terlemez, Arslan; Altunsoy, Mustafa; Çelebi, Hakkı

    2015-01-01

    Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is an unusual autosomal recessive inherited form of primordial dwarfism, which is characterized by a small head diameter at birth, but which also progresses to severe microcephaly, progressive bony dysplasia, and characteristic facies and personality. This report presents a case of a five-year-old girl with MOPD II syndrome. The patient was referred to our clinic with the complaint of severe tooth pain at the left mandibular prima...

  18. EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE – II. CLINICAL USE AND CRITICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Čuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence-based medicine employs systematic searching, evaluation and use of current research findings as the basis for clinical decision-making. However, there are some problems and uncertainties hindering introduction and spreading of the use of the method in clinical practice. Physicians often have no time for literature searching and for use of the method in practice. For certain questions in clinical practice there are no answers in medical literature. Most of the evidences in medical literature are only available in English. Introduction of the method is hampered also by the fact that clinical decision-making is complex and does not allow procedures prescribed in advance. Rigidity and universality of decisions resulting from the evidence may appear impersonal and may affect the relationship between the physician and the patient. Trends towards evidence based medicine are followed also by big multinational pharmaceutical corporations. They carry out large and expensive clinical trials using the results for promotional purposes. In this way, they get the competitive advantage and influence the objectivity of physicians’ clinical decision-making.Conclusions. With introduction of evidence based medicine into clinical practice physicians acquire new information and use a new form of continuing education by following new developments in their field. This way, new findings from medical literature get into clinical practice faster and more efficiently. In addition, physicians get more professional satisfaction and quality in clinical practice is higher.

  19. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) complicated by stroke: clinical report and review of cerebral vascular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancati, Francesco; Castori, Marco; Mingarelli, Rita; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2005-12-15

    We report on a 2 9/12-year-old boy with disproportionate short stature, microcephaly, subtle craniofacial dysmorphisms, and generalized skeletal dysplasia, who developed a left hemiparesis. Brain neuroimaging disclosed a complex cerebral vascular anomaly (CVA) with stenosis of the right anterior cerebral artery and telangiectatic collateral vessels supplying the cerebral cortex, consistent with moyamoya disease. Based on clinical and skeletal features, a diagnosis of Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) was established. Review of 16 published patients with CVA affected by either Seckel syndrome or MOPD II suggested that CVA is preferentially associated to the latter subtype affecting about 1/4 of the patients. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Radioimmunotherapy using 131I-rituximab in patients with advanced stage B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienert, Maren; Reisinger, Ingrid; Humplik, Beatrice I.; Reim, Christel; Kroessin, Thomas; Avril, Norbert; Munz, Dieter L.; Srock, Stefanie; Pezzutto, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, toxicity and therapeutic response of non-myeloablative radioimmunotherapy using 131 I-rituximab in previously heavily treated patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). Nine patients with relapsed, refractory or transformed B-NHL received ten radioimmunotherapies. Patients had a median of 5 (range 2-7) prior standard therapies. Four patients had received prior high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, and eight had received prior rituximab therapy. Histopathology consisted of four mantle cell, one follicular and four diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Rituximab, a monoclonal chimeric anti-CD20 antibody (IDEC-C2B8), was labelled with 131 I using the Iodogen method. The administered activity (2,200±600 MBq) was based on a dosimetrically calculated 45 cGy total-body radiation dose. All patients received an infusion of 2.5 mg/kg of rituximab prior to administration of the radiopharmaceutical. No acute adverse effects were observed after the administration of 131 I-rituximab. Radioimmunotherapy was safe in our patient group and achieved one complete response ongoing at 14 months and two partial responses progressing at 12 and 13 months after treatment. One partial responder was re-treated with radioimmunotherapy and achieved an additional progression-free interval of 7 months. Four non-responders with bulky disease died 4.8±2.0 months after therapy. Three patients had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level prior to radioimmunotherapy and none of the patients responded. Of two patients who received radioimmunotherapy as an additional treatment after salvage chemotherapy, one continues to be disease-free at 9 months and one relapsed at 5 months' follow-up. Reversible grade 3 or 4 haematological toxicity occurred in seven of nine patients. Median nadirs were 35 days for platelets, 44 days for leucocytes and 57 days for erythrocytes. (orig.)

  1. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Kane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin-II (UII, which binds to its receptor UT, plays an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland and CNS. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in ACAT-1 activity leading to SMC proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII, as well as inflammation, high blood pressure and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  2. CLINICAL RISK INDEX FOR BABIES (CRIB) II SCORE AS A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... Clinical Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, P. O. Box ... specificity of 75.3%, and a predictive value of 77.7% compared to 72.5, 71.2, and 71.8% ... with worst prognosis in level 3 and 4. ... Social Sciences (SPSS).

  3. Waardenburg syndrome: clinical differentiation between types I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardono, Eliete; van Bever, Yolande; van den Ende, Jenneke; Havrenne, Poti C; Iughetti, Paula; Maestrelli, Sylvia R P; Costa F, Orozimbo; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Frota-Pessoa, Oswaldo; Otto, Paulo A

    2003-03-15

    Here we present the results of a study performed on 59 patients affected by Waardenburg syndrome (WS), 30 with the I variant, 21 having the type II, and 8 of them being isolated cases without telecanthus. These patients belong to 37 families; the main contributions and conclusions are based on the detailed study of 25 of these families, examined using standard procedures. All patients were examined as to the presence of eight cardinal signs important for the diagnosis of the condition; from each patient, from many of his/her normal relatives, and from a control sample of 300 normal individuals stratified by age and sex, 23 different craniofacial measurements were obtained. We also estimated, using our own data as well those collected from the literature, the frequencies of the cardinal signs, based on a total sample of 461 affected individuals with WSI and 121 with WSII. In order to originate discriminant functions to separate individuals affected by one of the two variants, both metric (from craniofacial measurements) as well as categoric data (based on the frequencies of the cardinal signs or symptoms) were used. Discriminant analysis based on the frequency of the eight cardinal signs can improve the separation of WSI patients without telecanthus from those presenting the variant II. We present also a Table with the conditional probabilities favoring the diagnosis of WSI for suspect subjects without telecanthus and any combination of the other seven signs/symptoms. The discriminant function based on the four ocular measurements (inner and outer intercanthal, interpupillary, and inferior lacrymal distances), on the other side, perfectly classifies patients affected by one of the variants of WS, the same taking place when the average values of the W index of all affected individuals per family are used. The discriminant function based solely in the individual W index values of patients correctly classifies 93% of WSII subjects, but only 60% of the patients with the

  4. Accessing the public MIMIC-II intensive care relational database for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel J; Lee, Joon; Silva, Ikaro; Park, Shinhyuk; Moody, George B; Celi, Leo A; Mark, Roger G

    2013-01-10

    The Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database is a free, public resource for intensive care research. The database was officially released in 2006, and has attracted a growing number of researchers in academia and industry. We present the two major software tools that facilitate accessing the relational database: the web-based QueryBuilder and a downloadable virtual machine (VM) image. QueryBuilder and the MIMIC-II VM have been developed successfully and are freely available to MIMIC-II users. Simple example SQL queries and the resulting data are presented. Clinical studies pertaining to acute kidney injury and prediction of fluid requirements in the intensive care unit are shown as typical examples of research performed with MIMIC-II. In addition, MIMIC-II has also provided data for annual PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenges, including the 2012 Challenge "Predicting mortality of ICU Patients". QueryBuilder is a web-based tool that provides easy access to MIMIC-II. For more computationally intensive queries, one can locally install a complete copy of MIMIC-II in a VM. Both publicly available tools provide the MIMIC-II research community with convenient querying interfaces and complement the value of the MIMIC-II relational database.

  5. [Prescribed drug use for bipolar disorder type I and II in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Charlotte; Kardell, Mathias; Karanti, Alina; Isgren, Anniella; Annerbrink, Kristina; Landen, Mikael

    2017-01-10

    Prescribed drug use for bipolar disorder type I and II in clinical practice Practice guidelines based on available evidence and clinical consensus are available for the treatment of bipolar disorder. We surveyed to which extent those guidelines are implemented in clinical practice in Sweden. We analysed pharmacological treatment in patients with bipolar disorder in 2015 using the national quality register for bipolar disorder (BipoläR). We compared bipolar disorder type I (BDI) with type bipolar disorder type II (BDII). The vast majority of patients were prescribed a mood stabilizer either as monotherapy or as a part of combination therapy (BDI 87%, BDII 83%, pbipolar disorder.

  6. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of California-Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  7. Radioimmunotherapy with Tenarad, a {sup 131}I-labelled antibody fragment targeting the extra-domain A1 of tenascin-C, in patients with refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloj, Luigi [Istituto Nazionale Tumori ' ' Fondazione G. Pascale' ' - IRCCS, Struttura Complessa di Medicina Nucleare, Napoli (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Laura; Aurilio, Michela; Morisco, Anna; Caraco' , Corradina; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Lastoria, Secondo [Istituto Nazionale Tumori ' ' Fondazione G. Pascale' ' - IRCCS, Struttura Complessa Medicina Nucleare, Napoli (Italy); Frigeri, Ferdinando; Capobianco, Gaetana; Pinto, Antonio [Istituto Nazionale Tumori ' ' Fondazione G. Pascale' ' - IRCCS, Struttura Complessa di Ematologia Oncologica, Napoli (Italy); Giovannoni, Leonardo; Menssen, Hans D. [Philogen, SpA, Siena (Italy); Neri, Dario [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    The extra-domain A1 of tenascin-C (TC-A1) is highly expressed in the extracellular matrix of tumours and on newly formed blood vessels and is thus a valuable target for radionuclide therapy. Tenarad is a fully human miniantibody or small immunoprotein (SIP, molecular weight 80 kDa) labelled with {sup 131}I that is derived from a TC-A1-binding antibody. Previous phase I/II studies with a similar compound ({sup 131}I-L19SIP) used for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) have shown preliminary efficacy in a variety of cancer types. In this ongoing phase I/II trial, Tenarad was administered to patients with recurrent Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) refractory to conventional treatments. Eight patients (four men, four women; age range 19 - 41) were enrolled between April 2010 and March 2011. All patients had received a median of three previous lines of chemotherapy (range three to six) and seven had also undergone autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) or bone marrow transplantation. In addition, seven patients received external beam radiation. All patients had nodal disease, constitutional B symptoms and some showed extranodal disease in skeletal bone (four patients), lung (three), liver (two) and spleen (one). Baseline assessments included whole-body FDG PET with contrast-enhanced CT and diagnostic Tenarad planar and SPECT studies. Patients were considered eligible to receive a therapeutic dose of Tenarad (2.05 GBq/m{sup 2}) if tumour uptake was more than four times higher than that of muscle. All patients were eligible and received the therapeutic dose of Tenarad. Only one patient developed grade 4 thrombocytopenia and leucocytopenia, requiring hospitalization and therapeutic intervention. All other patients had haematological toxicity of grade 3 or lower, which resolved spontaneously. At the first response assessment (4 - 6 weeks after therapy), one patient showed a complete response, one showed a partial response (PR) and five had disease stabilization (SD). Five patients

  8. Forensic psychiatric nursing: skills and competencies: II clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, T; Coyle, D; Lovell, A

    2008-03-01

    This study reports on research undertaken to identify the skills and competencies of forensic psychiatric nurses working in secure psychiatric services in the UK. The rationale for this research is the lack of clarity in the role definition of nurses working in these environments and the specific content that may underscore the curriculum for training forensic nurses. Over 3300 questionnaires were distributed to forensic psychiatric nurses, non-forensic psychiatric nurses and other disciplines and information obtained on (1) the perceived clinical problems that give forensic nurses the most difficulty; (2) the skills best suited to overcome those problems; and (3) the priority aspects of clinical nursing care that needs to be developed. A 35% response rate was obtained with 1019 forensic psychiatric nurses, 110 non-forensic psychiatric nurses and 43 other disciplines. The results highlighted a 'top ten' list of main problems with possible solutions and main areas for development. The conclusions drawn include a focus on skills and competencies regarding the management of personality disorders and the management of violence and aggression.

  9. PERICARDITIS: ETIOLOGY, CLASSIFICATION, CLINIC, DIAGNOSTICS, TREATMENT. PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Sugak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericarditis maybe caused by different agents: viruses, bacteria, tuberculosis, and it may be autoimmune. All these types of diseases have similar clinical signs, but differ by prevalence, prognosis and medical tactics. Due to achievements of radial methods of visualization, molecular biology, and immunology, we have an opportunity to provide early specific diagnostics and etiological treatment of inflammatory diseases of pericardium. The second part of lecture presents main principles of differential diagnostics of specific types of pericarditis, gives characteristics of several often accruing types of disease, and describes treatment and tactics of management of patients with pericarditis.Key words: children, pericarditis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(3:76-81

  10. [Polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Part II: application in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, D; Fulín, P; Slouf, M; Jahoda, D; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2010-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is one of the up-to-date organic polymer thermoplastics with applications in orthopaedics and trauma medicine. This study presents a detailed analysis of its tests and applications in clinical medicine. A wide range of PEEK modifications and composites are commercially available, e.g., PEEK-Classix, PEEK-Optima, Endolign and Motis. They differ in their physical properties, which makes them suitable for different applications. Other forms, so-called PEEK bioactive composites, contain beta-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite. Research in this field is also concerned with the surface finish of this polymer thermoplastic and involves macroporous titanium and hydroxyapatite layers, or treatment with laser for an exactly defined surface structure. The clinical applications of PEEK and its composites include, in addition to components for spinal surgery, osteosynthesis plates, screws, intramedullary nails or external fixators, which are implants still at the stage of prototypes. In this review, attention is paid to the use of PEEK thermoplastics for joint replacement. Mid-term studies involving hundreds of patients have shown that, for instance, the VerSys Epoch Fullcoat Hip System (Zimmer) has a markedly lower stress-shielding effect. Carbon fibre-reinforced (CFR-PEEK) composites are used to make articulating components for total hip replacement. Their convenient properties allow for production of much thinner liners and an enlargement of the femoral head diameter, thus reducing the wear of joint implants. CFR-PEEK composites are particularly effective for hip resurfacing in which the Mitch PCR (Stryker) acetabular component has been used with good results. The MOTIS polymer acetabular cup (Invibio Ltd.) is another example. Further PEEK applications include the construction of finger-joint prostheses (Mathys AG), suture anchors (Stryker) and various kinds of augmentations (Medin). Based on the information obtained, the authors suggest

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids in schizophrenia Part II: Clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róg Joanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ω-3 unsaturated fatty acids are compounds belonging to the group of essential fatty acids (EFAs. The history of the discovery of EFAs dates back to the 1930s of the twentieth century, however, growing interest in ω-3 EFAs in the context of mental health has been observed since the year 2000. In view of their multidirectional action, these compounds are a promising form of adjunctive therapy of many illnesses, including psychiatric disorders. The present article aims to review the literature on the clinical applicability of ω-3 EFAs in treating schizophrenia. We present the results of preclinical studies in this area and the mechanisms of ω-3 EFAs action discussed by the authors. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating the possibility of using ω-3 EFAs in schizophrenia are characterized in detail. The results of the tests are not clear, which may result from the methodological diversity of interventions made. Ω-3 EFAs seem to be a promising form of adjunctive therapy of schizophrenia. Further research is needed, which will allow for defining groups of patients in which intervention will bring the expected results.

  12. Ocular toxoplasmosis II: clinical features, pathology and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nicholas J; Furtado, João M; Winthrop, Kevin L; Smith, Justine R

    2014-01-01

    The term, ocular toxoplasmosis, refers to eye disease related to infection with the parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Recurrent posterior uveitis is the typical form of this disease, characterized by unilateral, necrotizing retinitis with secondary choroiditis, occurring adjacent to a pigmented retinochoroidal scar and associated with retinal vasculitis and vitritis. Multiple atypical presentations are also described, and severe inflammation is observed in immunocompromised patients. Histopathological correlations demonstrate focal coagulative retinal necrosis, and early in the course of the disease, this inflammation is based in the inner retina. For typical ocular toxoplasmosis, a diagnosis is easily made on clinical examination. In atypical cases, ocular fluid testing to detect parasite DNA by polymerase chain reaction or to determine intraocular production of specific antibody may be extremely helpful for establishing aetiology. Given the high seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in most communities, serological testing for T. gondii antibodies is generally not useful. Despite a lack of published evidence for effectiveness of current therapies, most ophthalmologists elect to treat patients with ocular toxoplasmosis that reduces or threatens to impact vision. Classic therapy consists of oral pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine, plus systemic corticosteroid. Substantial toxicity of this drug combination has spurred interest in alternative antimicrobials, as well as local forms of drug delivery. At this time, however, no therapeutic approach is curative of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:22712598

  13. Radiobiological comparison of external beam irradiation and radioimmunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessels, B.W.; Vessella, R.L.; Palme, D.F. II; Berkopec, J.M.; Smith, G.K.; Bradley, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    Growth delay was measured in TK-82 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) xenografts implanted in nude mice receiving single fraction external beam irradiation (SF-XRT), multifraction external beam irradiation (MF-XRT), or radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Thermoluminescent dosimeter(s) (TLD) and autoradiography were used to ascertain the average absorbed dose delivered and the degree of heterogeneous uptake of radiolabeled antibody for the RIT irradiations. For intravenous administered activities of 100, 200, 400, and 600 microCi of I-131 labeled A6H antibody, volume doubling times (VDT) and TLD absorbed dose measurements for each administered activity were 7 days (341 cGy), 38 days (383 cGy), 85 days (886 cGy) and no regrowth (1034 cGy), respectively. For SF-XRT irradiations of 500, 1000, and 1500 cGy, VDT times were 11, 62, and 103 days, respectively. MF-XRT of 4 X 250 cGy over a 2-week period yielded a VDT of 25 days. Marked peripheral activity deposition was noted on most autoradiographs from multiple tumor samples. These data suggest that an equivalent to superior tumor growth delay is obtained for absorbed doses delivered by exponentially decaying low dose rate radioimmunotherapy RIT compared to similar doses of acute dose rate XRT as quantitated by the TLD method

  14. Radioimmunotherapy of human lymphoma in athymic, nude mice as monitored by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, S.J.; Matson, G.B.; Epstein, A.L.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Human B cell lymphoma (Raji) growing in athymic, nude mice has been successfully treated with a single pulse dose of 131 I-labeled monoclonal antibody (Lym-1) specific for this tumor. Sequential in vivo measurements of phosphate metabolites in the tumors by 31 P surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance showed a significant initial decrease of phosphocreatine following radioimmunotherapy. Diminution of relative ATP to Pi peak area ratio suggesting tissue damage occurred within 3-4 days. The sequence of alterations of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra from tumors of treated mice were strikingly different from sequential nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained from tumors of control mice. These observations lead us to conclude that 31 P surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance is a promising non-invasive method for assessing and predicting the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Further spatial discrimination of the region of tissue observed by the surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance experiment is under exploration in an effort to increase the utility of these methods

  15. Five-Year Safety and Performance Results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D; Humayun, Mark S; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C; Ho, Allen C; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc, Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind as a result of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception resulting from end-stage RP. Prospective, multicenter, single-arm clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the nonimplanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared with their vision with the Argus II. Thirty participants in 10 centers in the United States and Europe. The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by 3 computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively scored real-world tasks. Twenty-four of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years after implantation. Only 1 additional serious adverse event was experienced after the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the Argus II on than off on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. The 5-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind as a result of RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants : Phase II randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; Van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Franz, Axel R.; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Grevstad, Berit; Hagmann, Cornelia; Lemmers, Petra; Van Oeveren, Wim; Pichler, Gerhard; Plomgaard, Anne Mette; Riera, Joan; Sanchez, Laura; Winkel, Per; Wolf, Martin; Greisen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. Design: Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. Setting Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care units in

  17. PET/CT Imaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T; Goldsmith, Stanley J

    2011-01-01

    disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Antiprostate-specific membrane antigen RIT demonstrates......Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis...... of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in the imaging of prostate cancer...

  18. Five-year safety and performance results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D.; Humayun, Mark S.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E.; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B.; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V.; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L.; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Ho, Allen C.; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V.; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception due to end-stage RP. Design The study is a prospective, multicenter, single-arm, clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the non-implanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared to their vision when using the System. Subjects There were 30 subjects in 10 centers in the U.S. and Europe. Methods The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II System. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by three computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively-scored real-world tasks. Results Twenty-four out of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years post-implant. Only one additional serious adverse event was experienced since the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the System ON than OFF on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. Conclusions The five-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind from RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. PMID:27453256

  19. [How to assess clinical practice guidelines with AGREE II: The example of neonatal jaundice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renesme, L; Bedu, A; Tourneux, P; Truffert, P

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a very frequent condition that occurs in approximately 50-70% of term or near-term (>35 GA) babies in the 1st week of life. In some cases, a high bilirubin blood level can lead to kernicterus. There is no consensus for the management of neonatal jaundice and few countries have published national clinical practice guidelines for the management of neonatal jaundice. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of these guidelines. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for national clinical practice guidelines for the management of neonatal jaundice in term or near-term babies. Four independent reviewers assessed the quality of each guideline using the AGREE II evaluation. For each of the clinical practice guidelines, the management modalities were analyzed (screening, treatment, follow-up, etc.). Seven national clinical practice guidelines were found (South Africa, USA AAP, UK NICE, Canada, Norway, Switzerland, and Israel). The AGREE II score showed widespread variation regarding the quality of these national guidelines. There was no major difference between the guidelines concerning the clinical management of these babies. The NICE guideline is the most valuable guideline regarding the AGREE II score. NICE showed that, despite a strong and rigorous methodology, there is no evidenced-based recommended code of practice (RCP). Comparing RCPs, we found no major differences. The NICE guideline showed the best quality. The AGREE II instrument should be used as a framework when developing clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of the future guideline. In France, a national guideline is needed for a more standardized management of neonatal jaundice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of 90Y-DOTA-nimotuzumab Fab fragment for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Martinez, L.M.; Marylaine Perez-Malo Cruz; Rene Leyva Montana; Calzada Falcon, V.N.; Minely Zamora Barrabi; Alejandro Arbesu Valdivia; Ignacio Hernandez Gonzalez; Mariela Leon Perez

    2014-01-01

    Yttrium-90-( 90 Y) labeled monoclonal antibodies prepared with a chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), have been used for radioimmunotherapy of cancer. In the present work, the Fab fragment of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody nimotuzumab was prepared with high purity, integrity and biological activity. The Fab fragment with high specific recognition of EGFR in NCI-H125 human lung adenocarcinoma cells was derivatized with DOTA-NHS applying a simple procedure. DOTA-nimotuzumab Fab fragment was successfully radiolabeled with 90 Y with high radiochemical yield. The in vitro stability of labeled product was optimal over 24 h in buffered solution at 37 deg C. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies correctly evaluated the in vivo non-tumor uptake, dosage regimen and excretion pathway in normal Wistar rats. (author)

  1. Screening for sporadic or familial medullary thyroid carcinoma. Scintiscan s and radio-immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhmer, V.; Murat, A.

    2000-01-01

    The screening for sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma relies upon calcitoninemia level, basal or during pentagastrine stimulation test. MEN2 are associated with nearly the third of medullary thyroid carcinoma. In these cases, prognosis of thyroid carcinoma is mainly driven by the tumor status at the time of surgery. Up to date, diagnosis relies upon the genetic screening. Prophylactic thyroidectomy indication may take account of calcitoninemia. Most of the molecules that have been suggested for scintiscan lack of accuracy and large use cannot be recommended. Promising results have been obtained with monoclonal antibodies anti-CEA, particularly with dual targeting antiCEA antiDTPA. This last technique may also be used for radio-guided surgery. Its use for radio-immunotherapy is under investigation. (authors)

  2. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek; Oehr, Peter

    2009-01-01

    of a number of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. J591, a monoclonal antibody, which targets the extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen, shows promising results. HER2 receptors may also have a potential as target for PET/CT imaging and RIT of advanced prostate cancer. SUMMARY: PET......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Traditional morphologically based imaging modalities are now being complemented by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in prostate cancer. Metastatic prostate cancer is an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) as no effective therapies...... are available. This review highlights the most important achievements within the last year in PET/CT and RIT of prostate cancer. RECENT FINDINGS: Conflicting results exist on the use of choline for detection of malignant disease in the prostate gland. The role of PET/CT in N-staging remains to be elucidated...

  3. Advantage of dose fractionation in monoclonal antibody-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlom, J.; Molinolo, A.; Simpson, J.F.; Siler, K.; Roselli, M.; Hinkle, G.; Houchens, D.P.; Colcher, D.

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) B72.3 IgG was radiolabeled with 131I and administered to female athymic NCr-nu mice bearing the LS-174T human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft to determine if fractionation of MAb dose had any advantage in tumor therapy. In the LS-174T xenograft, only approximately 30%-60% of tumor cells express the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen. The LS-174T xenograft was used to reflect the heterogeneity of the TAG-72 antigen often seen in biopsy specimens from patients. In contrast to a single 600-muCi dose of 131I-B72.3 IgG where 60% of the animals died from toxic effects, two 300-muCi doses of 131I-B72.3 IgG reduced or eliminated tumor growth in 90% of mice, with only 10% of the animals dying from toxic effects. Dose fractionation even permitted escalation of the dose to three doses of 300 muCi of 131I-B72.3 IgG, resulting in even more extensive tumor reduction or elimination and minimal toxic effects. The use of an isotype-matched control MAb revealed a nonspecific component to tumor growth retardation, but the use of the specific B72.3 IgG demonstrated a much greater therapeutic effect. Tumors that had escaped MAb therapy were analyzed for expression of the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen with the use of the immunoperoxidase method; they were shown to have the same antigenic phenotype as the untreated tumors. We verified tumor elimination by killing the test animals after a 7-week observation period and performing histologic examination of tumor sites. We also monitored toxic effects by histologic examination of numerous organs. These studies thus demonstrate the advantage of dose fractionation of a radiolabeled MAb for tumor therapy. We anticipate that the concept of dose fractionation can be practically applied in radioimmunotherapeutic clinical trials with the development and use of recombinant-chimeric MAbs and modified constructs

  4. [New intensifying screens in clinical radiology. II. Examinations in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyschmidt, J; Saure, D; Hagemann, G

    1976-09-01

    A clinically applicable procedure for testing new intensifying rare earth screens, as well as the special Siemens' screen is described. The results are related to universal screens. The film-screen combination alpha 4XD (gadolinium oxysulphide with normal, green sensitive film) results in a reduction of radiation dose to half with detail comparable with universal screens. The Siemens' special screen has similar advantages. Screens with a higher intensification factor and reduction of the mAs to one sixth results in loss of detail. This does not necessarily reduce their clinical use if they are used for appropriate purposes. The results of this clinically orientated technique agreed well with physically objective methods using lead grids. The advantages of the new screens are discussed in terms of their practical application.

  5. Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, Claudia; Lubatschofski, Annelie; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Kotzerke, Joerg; Buchmann, Inga; Reske, Sven N.

    2003-01-01

    Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for high-risk leukaemia and lymphoma. In bone marrow-selective radioimmunotherapy, beta-irradiation is applied using iodine-131, yttrium-90 or rhenium-188 labelled radioimmunoconjugates. However, the mechanisms by which beta-irradiation induces cell death are not understood at the molecular level. Here, we report that beta-irradiation induced apoptosis and activated apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells depending on doses, time points and dose rates. After beta-irradiation, upregulation of CD95 ligand and CD95 receptor was detected and activation of caspases resulting in apoptosis was found. These effects were completely blocked by the broad-range caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. In addition, irradiation-mediated mitochondrial damage resulted in perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-9 activation and cytochrome c release. Bax, a death-promoting protein, was upregulated and Bcl-x L , a death-inhibiting protein, was downregulated. We also found higher apoptosis rates and earlier activation of apoptosis pathways after gamma-irradiation in comparison to beta-irradiation at the same dose rate. Furthermore, irradiation-resistant cells were cross-resistant to CD95 and CD95-resistant cells were cross-resistant to irradiation, indicating that CD95 and irradiation used, at least in part, identical effector pathways. These findings demonstrate that beta-irradiation induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells using both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. Understanding the timing, sequence and molecular pathways of beta-irradiation-mediated apoptosis may allow rational adjustment of chemo- and radiotherapeutic strategies. (orig.)

  6. Reproducing a Prospective Clinical Study as a Computational Retrospective Study in MIMIC-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, Fabrício S P; Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we sought to reproduce, as a computational retrospective study in an EHR database (MIMIC-II), a recent large prospective clinical study: the 2013 publication, by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM), about disseminated intravascular coagulation, in the journal Critical Care (PMID: 23787004). We designed in SQL and Java a set of electronic phenotypes that reproduced the study's data sampling, and used R to perform the same statistical inference procedures. All produced source code is available online at https://github.com/fabkury/paamia2015. Our program identified 2,257 eligible patients in MIMIC-II, and the results remarkably agreed with the prospective study. A minority of the needed data elements was not found in MIMIC-II, and statistically significant inferences were possible in the majority of the cases.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and Dosimetry Studies for Optimization of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in CEA-Expressing Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eBodet-Milin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. A phase I pretargeted radioimmunotherapy trial (EudractCT 200800603096 was designed in patients with metastatic lung cancer expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA to optimize bispecific antibody and labelled peptide doses, as well as the delay between their injections.Methods. Three cohorts of 3 patients received the anti-CEA x anti-histamine-succinyl-glycine (HSG humanized trivalent bispecific antibody (TF2 and the IMP288 bivalent HSG-peptide. Patients underwent a pre-therapeutic imaging session S1 (44 or 88 nmol/m2 of TF2 followed by 4.4 nmol/m2, 185 MBq, of 111In-labelled IMP288, and, 1-2 weeks later, a therapy session S2 (240 or 480 nmol/m2 of TF2 followed by 24 nmol/m2, 1.1 GBq/m2, 177Lu-labeled IMP288. The pretargeting delay was 24 or 48 hours. The dose schedule was defined based on pre-clinical TF2 pharmacokinetic studies, on our previous clinical data using the previous anti-CEA pretargeting system and on clinical results observed in the first patients injected using the same system in the Netherlands.Results. TF2 pharmacokinetics (PK was represented by a two-compartment model in which the central compartment volume was linearly dependent on the patient's surface area. PK were remarkably similar, with a clearance of 0.33 +/- 0.03 L/h per m2. 111In- and 177Lu-IMP288 PK were also well represented by a two-compartment model. IMP288 PK were faster (clearance 1.4 to 3.3 l/h. The central compartment volume was proportional to body surface area and IMP288clearance depended on the molar ratio of injected IMP288 to circulating TF2 at the time of IMP288 injection. Modelling of image quantification confirmed the dependence of IMP288 kinetics on circulating TF2, but tumour activity PK were variable. Organ absorbed doses were not significantly different in the 3 cohorts, but the tumour dose was significantly higher with the higher molar doses of TF2 (p < 0.002. S1 imaging predicted absorbed doses calculated in S2. Conclusion. The best

  8. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II: clinical findings and dental management of a child patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlemez, Arslan; Altunsoy, Mustafa; Celebi, Hakki

    2015-01-01

    Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is an unusual autosomal recessive inherited form of primordial dwarfism, which is characterized by a small head diameter at birth, but which also progresses to severe microcephaly, progressive bony dysplasia, and characteristic facies and personality. This report presents a case of a five-year-old girl with MOPD II syndrome. The patient was referred to our clinic with the complaint of severe tooth pain at the left mandibular primary molar teeth. Clinical examination revealed that most of the primary teeth had been decayed and all primary teeth were hypoplastic. Patient's history revealed delayed development in the primary dentition and radiographic examination showed rootless primary molar teeth and short-rooted incisors. The treatment was not possible due to the lack of root of the left mandibular primary molars; so the teeth were extracted. Thorough and timely dental evaluation is crucial for the prevention of dental problems and the maintenance of oral health in patients with MOPD II syndrome is of utmost importance.

  9. MAJEWSKI OSTEODYSPLASTIC PRIMORDIAL DWARFISM TYPE II: CLINICAL FINDINGS AND DENTAL MANAGEMENT OF A CHILD PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Terlemez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II is an unusual autosomal recessive inherited form of primordial dwarfism, which is characterized by a small head diameter at birth, but which also progresses to severe microcephaly, progressive bony dysplasia, and characteristic facies and personality. This report presents a case of a five-year-old girl with MOPD II syndrome. The patient was referred to our clinic with the complaint of severe tooth pain at the left mandibular primary molar teeth. Clinical examination revealed that most of the primary teeth had been decayed and all primary teeth were hypoplastic. Patient’s history revealed delayed development in the primary dentition and radiographic examination showed rootless primary molar teeth and short-rooted incisors. The treatment was not possible due to the lack of root of the left mandibular primary molars; so the teeth were extracted. Thorough and timely dental evaluation is crucial for the prevention of dental problems and the maintenance of oral health in patients with MOPD II syndrome is of utmost importance.

  10. Issues in the assessment of personality disorder and substance abuse using the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, P M; McCann, J T; Fairbank, J A

    1995-05-01

    Substance abuse treatment clients often present other severe mental health problems that affect treatment outcomes. Hence, screening and assessment for psychological distress and personality disorder are an important part of effective treatment, discharge, and aftercare planning. The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II) frequently is used for this purpose. In this paper, several issues of concern to MCMI-II users are addressed. These include the extent to which MCMI-II scales correspond to DSM-III-R disorders; overdiagnosis of disorders using the MCMI-II; accuracy of MCMI-II diagnostic cut-off scores; and the clinical utility of MCMI-II diagnostic algorithms. Approaches to addressing these issues are offered.

  11. Clinical efficacy of terlipressin in treatment of type II hepatorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DING Xiaohong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical efficacy of domestic terlipressin in the treatment of type II hepatorenal syndrome (HRS-II. MethodsA total of 25 HRS-II patients admitted to our hospital from November 2011 to June 2014 were recruited into the treatment group, and 28 HRS-II patients treated with dopamine before 2011 were recruited into the control group. Patients in the treatment group were randomly divided into two subgroups: one subgroup (n=12 was given terlipressin once every 8 h, and the other subgroup (n=13 was given terlipressin once every 12 h. Both groups received albumin (Alb infusion to expand the blood volume before treatment with terlipressin or dopamine, and the course of treatment was 7 days. The improvement in clinical symptoms, levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine and electrolytes, urine volume, changes in liver function, and ascites disappearance in the two groups before and after treatment were compared. Comparison of categorical data between the two groups was made by χ2 test, and comparison of continuous data was made by t test. ResultsPatients in the control group showed no obvious symptom relief, but those in the treatment group had varying degrees of improvement in clinical symptoms. Neither group had significant changes in liver function and serum sodium level after treatment. The treatment group had significantly more patients whose ascites volume had decreased from large to medium than the control group (χ2=5.705, P<0.05. There was a slight but not significant decrease in the levels of BUN and serum creatinine in the control group after treatment with dopamine (all P>0.05, whereas the urine volume showed significant difference after the treatment (t=15.534, P<0.01. The treatment group showed significant differences in the levels of BUN and serum creatinine and urine volume after terlipressin treatment (t=11.535, 9.941, and 19.685, respectively; all P<0.01, and significant differences in

  12. Failsafe automation of Phase II clinical trial interim monitoring for stopping rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Roger S

    2010-02-01

    In Phase II clinical trials in cancer, preventing the treatment of patients on a study when current data demonstrate that the treatment is insufficiently active or too toxic has obvious benefits, both in protecting patients and in reducing sponsor costs. Considerable efforts have gone into experimental designs for Phase II clinical trials with flexible sample size, usually implemented by early stopping rules. The intended benefits will not ensue, however, if the design is not followed. Despite the best intentions, failures can occur for many reasons. The main goal is to develop an automated system for interim monitoring, as a backup system supplementing the protocol team, to ensure that patients are protected. A secondary goal is to stimulate timely recording of patient assessments. We developed key concepts and performance needs, then designed, implemented, and deployed a software solution embedded in the clinical trials database system. The system has been in place since October 2007. One clinical trial tripped the automated monitor, resulting in e-mails that initiated statistician/investigator review in timely fashion. Several essential contributing activities still require human intervention, institutional policy decisions, and institutional commitment of resources. We believe that implementing the concepts presented here will provide greater assurance that interim monitoring plans are followed and that patients are protected from inadequate response or excessive toxicity. This approach may also facilitate wider acceptance and quicker implementation of new interim monitoring algorithms.

  13. Differences in clinical presentation between bipolar I and II disorders in the early stages of bipolar disorder: A naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Rie Lambaek; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Christensen, Ellen Margrethe; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-15

    In a naturalistic clinical study of patients in the early stages of bipolar disorders the aim was to assess differences between patients with bipolar I (BD I) and bipolar II (BD II) disorders on clinical characteristics including affective symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, functional level, the presence of comorbid personality disorders and coping strategies. Diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and functional status using the Functional Assessment Short Test. Cognitive complaints were assessed using the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, the presence of comorbid personality disorders using the Standardized Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale and coping style using the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. In total, 344 patients were included (BD I (n=163) and BD II (n=181). Patients with BD II presented with significantly more depressive symptoms, more cognitive complaints, lower overall functioning, and a higher prevalence of comorbid personality disorders. Finally, they exhibited a trend towards using less adaptive coping styles. It cannot be omitted that some patients may have progressed from BD II to BD I. Most measures were based on patient self report. Overall, BD II was associated with a higher disease burden. Clinically, it is important to differentiate BD II from BD I and research wise, there is a need for tailoring and testing specific interventions towards BD II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Using AGREE II to Evaluate the Quality of Traditional Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Li, Le; Wang, Zixia; Chang, Xiaonan; Li, Rui; Fang, Ziye; Wei, Dang; Yao, Liang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Wang, Qi; An, Guanghui

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate/assess the quality of the Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) of traditional medicine in China. We systematically searched the literature databases WanFang Data, VIP, CNKI and CBM for studies published between 1978 and 2012 to identify and select CPGs of traditional medicine. We used the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument to evaluate these guidelines. A total of 75 guidelines were included, of which 46 guidelines (62%) were on Traditional Chinese Medicine, 19 (25%) on Chinese Integrated Medicine, and 10 (13%) on Uyghur Medicine. Most traditional medicine CPGs published in domestic journals scored medicine. In each domain of AGREE II, traditional Medicine CPGs performed clearly better than international CPGs. The same trend was seen in guidelines of Modern Medicine. An increasing amount of CPGs are being published, but their quality is low. Referring to the key points of international guidelines development, supervision through AGREE II, cooperating with international groups and exploring the strategy of guideline development could improve the quality of CPGs on traditional medicine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical Results of Flexor Tendon Repair in Zone II Using a six Strand Double Loop Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidou, Christiana; Tsai, Tsu-Min

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the clinical results after repair of flexor tendon zone II injuries utilizing a 6-strand double-loop technique and early post-operative active rehabilitation. We retrospectively reviewed 22 patients involving 51 cases with zone II flexor tendon repair using a six strand double loop technique from September 1996 to December 2012. Most common mechanism of injuries was sharp lacerations (86.5 %). Tendon injuries occurred equally in manual and non-manual workers and were work-related in 33 % of the cases. The Strickland score for active range of motion (ROM) postoperatively was excellent and good in the majority of the cases (81 %). The rupture rate was 1.9 %. The six strand double loop technique for Zone II flexor tendon repair leads to good and excellent motion in the majority of patients and low re- rupture rate. It is clinically effective and allows for early postoperative active rehabilitation.

  16. Two-year clinical evaluation of IPS Empress II ceramic onlays/inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagtekin, D A; Ozyöney, G; Yanikoglu, F

    2009-01-01

    The stronger the ceramic material, the longer the restoration stays in the mouth. The current study evaluated the two-year clinical performance of a strong ceramic system, IPS Empress II, with increased strength on onlay/inlay restorations of molars. Teeth from 35 patients, including three premolars and 32 molars, were prepared for 28 onlay and seven inlay restorations with IPS Empress II ceramics. The restorations were cemented with a highly viscous, dual-curing luting composite cement (Bifix) and evaluated by two examiners using USPHS criteria at baseline (one week following insertion), six months, one year and two years. The baseline scores and recalls were assessed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Statistically significant marginal discoloration at the Bravo level was found at the 12- and 24-month recalls (p=0.046). One debonding was statistically insignificant. No changes were observed with respect to anamnesis, such as any symptom from the TMJ or masticatory muscles. No restorations were replaced due to hypersensitivity or were missing at the two-year evaluation. Any wear on the restoration, antagonist tooth or any changes of proximal contacts were not observed. IPS Empress II Ceramics were found to be appropriate as onlay/inlay restorations for clinical use under the conditions of the current study.

  17. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type II: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kant

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited genetic disease characterized by sclerosis of the skeleton caused by the absence or malfunction of osteoclasts. Three distinct forms of the disease have been recognized, autosomal dominant osteopetrosis being the most common. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis exhibits a heterogeneous trait with milder symptoms, often at later childhood or adulthood. The aim of this case report is to present the clinical and radiographic features of a 35-year-old female patient with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II who exhibited features of chronic generalised periodontitis, and the radiographs revealed generalised osteosclerosis and hallmark radiographic features of ADO type II, that is, “bone-within-bone appearance” and “Erlenmeyer-flask deformity.”

  18. Differences in clinical presentation between bipolar I and II disorders in the early stages of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Rie Lambaek; Kirkegaard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Aim In a naturalistic clinical study of patients in the early stages of bipolar disorders the aim was to assess differences between patients with bipolar I (BD I) and bipolar II (BD II) disorders on clinical characteristics including affective symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, functional...... level, the presence of comorbid personality disorders and coping strategies. Methods Diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and functional status using...... Inventory for Stressful Situations. Results In total, 344 patients were included (BD I (n=163) and BD II (n=181). Patients with BD II presented with significantly more depressive symptoms, more cognitive complaints, lower overall functioning, and a higher prevalence of comorbid personality disorders...

  19. Continuity Between DSM-5 Section II and III Personality Disorders in a Dutch Clinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbons, Irene M J; Rossi, Gina; Verheul, Roel; Schoutrop, Mirjam J A; Derksen, Jan L L; Segal, Daniel L; van Alphen, Sebastiaan P J

    2018-05-14

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the continuity across the Section II personality disorders (PDs) and the proposed Section III model of PDs in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-5]; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a ). More specifically, we analyzed association between the DSM-5 Section III pathological trait facets and Section II PDs among 110 Dutch adults (M age = 35.8 years, range = 19-60 years) receiving mental health care. We administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders to all participants. Participants also completed the self-report Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) as a measure of pathological trait facets. The distributions underlying the dependent variable were modeled as criterion counts, using negative binomial regression. The results provided some support for the validity of the PID-5 and the DSM-5 Section III Alternative Model, although analyses did not show a perfect match. Both at the trait level and the domain level, analyses showed mixed evidence of significant relationships between the PID-5 trait facets and domains with the traditional DSM-IV PDs.

  20. Physical activity in type II Diabetes Mellitus, an effective therapeutic element: review of the clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Iván Arias-Vázquez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A review was conducted in databases (PubMed, PEDro of type studies clinical trial, cohort study, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and clinical practice guidelines based on evidence they have studied the benefits of physical activity in the prevention , treatment and decreased risk of complications and death in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Realization regular physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of developing Diabetes Mellitus; likewise was associated with decrease in glycated hemoglobin percentage A1C values. Diabetic patients undergoing high levels of physical activity had decreased risk of complications and death from cardiovascular disease and all causes. At present the scientific evidence on the impact of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of Diabetes Mellitus is solid, so it must be emphasized promoting physical activity as a fundamental part of the therapeutic regimens for this disease.

  1. Effect of cetuximab in combination with alpha-radioimmunotherapy in cultured squamous cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestor, Marika, E-mail: marika.nestor@bms.uu.s [Unit of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Unit of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Sundstroem, Magnus [Unit of Molecular Pathology, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University (Sweden); Anniko, Matti [Unit of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Tolmachev, Vladimir [Unit of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-01-15

    Aim: The monoclonal antibody cetuximab, targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is a promising molecular targeting agent to be used in combination with radiation for anticancer therapy. In this study, effects of cetuximab in combination with alpha-emitting radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in a panel of cultured human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were assessed. Methods: SCC cell lines were characterized and treated with cetuximab in combination with anti-CD44v6 RIT using the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36 ({sup 211}At-cMAb U36). Effects on {sup 211}At-cMAb U36 uptake, internalization and cell proliferation were then assessed in SCC cells. Results: Cetuximab in combination with {sup 211}At-cMAb U36 mediated increased growth inhibition compared to RIT or cetuximab alone in two cell lines. However, cetuximab also mediated radioprotective effects compared to RIT alone in two cell lines. The radioprotective effects occurred in the cell lines in which cetuximab clearly inhibited cell growth during radiation exposure. Cetuximab treatment also influenced {sup 211}At-cMAb-U36 uptake and internalization, suggesting interactions between CD44v6 and EGFR. Conclusions: Results from this study demonstrate the vast importance of further clarifying the mechanisms of cetuximab and radiation response, and the relationship between EGFR and suitable RIT targets. This is important not only in order to avoid potential radioprotective effects, but also in order to find and utilize potential synergistic effects from these combinations.

  2. Radioimmunotherapy. Dose calculation and radionuclides used in treatment; Radioimmunoterapia. Hoidon radionuklidit ja annoslaskenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Kairemo, K [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Chemistry; Liewendahl, K [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Isotopes; Rannikko, S [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-10-01

    In radioimmunotherapy (RIT) monoclonal antibodies to cancer-associated antigens can be utilized for the transport of therapeutic radioisotopes to cancer cells. Intravenous administration of radiolabelled antibody is a potentially curative form of therapy in hematological amignancies as circulating antibodies have easy access to tumour sites. Intravenous RIT is less effective in the treatment of solid tumours because of the low fractional uptake of the injected dose, particularly in the central parts of tumours. In solid tumours more promising results have been achieved by local RIT applications. The choice of radiation - {alpha}, {beta} or {gamma} - will depend of the characteristics of the tumour. The importance of radiation delivered by Auger electrons has been largely underestimated in the past, but recent research has resulted in a remarkable reassessment of this issue significantly influencing the selection of radioisotopes for RIT. Research is now being focused on the therapeutic aspects of different isotopes and microdosimetric problems. There are now good prospects of RIT becoming an important form of cancer treatment before year 2000. (orig.) (78 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.).

  3. Effect of cetuximab in combination with alpha-radioimmunotherapy in cultured squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestor, Marika; Sundstroem, Magnus; Anniko, Matti; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The monoclonal antibody cetuximab, targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is a promising molecular targeting agent to be used in combination with radiation for anticancer therapy. In this study, effects of cetuximab in combination with alpha-emitting radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in a panel of cultured human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were assessed. Methods: SCC cell lines were characterized and treated with cetuximab in combination with anti-CD44v6 RIT using the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36 ( 211 At-cMAb U36). Effects on 211 At-cMAb U36 uptake, internalization and cell proliferation were then assessed in SCC cells. Results: Cetuximab in combination with 211 At-cMAb U36 mediated increased growth inhibition compared to RIT or cetuximab alone in two cell lines. However, cetuximab also mediated radioprotective effects compared to RIT alone in two cell lines. The radioprotective effects occurred in the cell lines in which cetuximab clearly inhibited cell growth during radiation exposure. Cetuximab treatment also influenced 211 At-cMAb-U36 uptake and internalization, suggesting interactions between CD44v6 and EGFR. Conclusions: Results from this study demonstrate the vast importance of further clarifying the mechanisms of cetuximab and radiation response, and the relationship between EGFR and suitable RIT targets. This is important not only in order to avoid potential radioprotective effects, but also in order to find and utilize potential synergistic effects from these combinations.

  4. Aptamer-based radioimmunotherapy. The feasibility and prospect in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Hui Wang; Shujie Liao; Wei Li; Weina Zhang; Dan Liu; Bo Cao; Shixuan Wang; Ding Ma; Wei Wang; Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou; Xiangshang Xu; Keng Shen

    2011-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has emerged as an attractive and promising strategy for the management of malignant diseases. It has been proven to be quite effective in the treatment of numerous tumors, such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma, metastatic prostate cancer, melanoma, thyroid cancer, colon cancer and so on. The RIT currently used is mainly based on monoclonal antibodies to recognize target antigens. As antibodies are large molecules, this method of RIT has some limitations in in vivo use, such as the immunogenicity, the high costs and low efficiency of production. Aptamer is discovered and selected by SELEX technology. As specific recognizers and binders, aptamers and antibodies have such a close similarity as to be interchangeable to some extent. But, aptamers have many advantages over antibodies: higher affinity and specificity, smaller molecular weight, more easily synthesized and modified, more rapidly penetrating into tumors, higher tumor-to-blood distribution ratio and more easily to be cleared. In addition, since aptamer has almost no immunogenicity in vivo, it can be repeatedly administered. Thus, we believe that aptamer-based RIT will be a feasible and promising way to treat human cancers, and it might display better results in cancer treatment than antibody-based RIT. In conclusion, aptamer-based RIT is hopeful to become a key therapeutics in cancer radiotherapy in the near future. (author)

  5. Preparation and biological evaluation of {sup 177}Lu conjugated PR81 for radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salouti, Mojtaba, E-mail: saloutim@yahoo.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Zanjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Zanjan 45156-58145 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, Mohammad Hossein [Nuclear Biomolecule Laboratory, Radioisotope Department, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran 14144-1339 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajabi, Hossein [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran 14115-111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasaee, Mohammad javad [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran 14115-111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Aim: PR81 is a monoclonal antibody that binds with high affinity to MUC1 antigen that is over expressed in 80% of breast cancers. In this study, we developed a method for indirect labeling of PR81 with lutetium-177 and performed all preclinical qualifications in production of a biologic agent for radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: The radiochemical purity and in vitro stability of {sup 177}Lu labeled PR81 was determined by instant thin layer chromatography. The immunoreactivity and cell toxicity of the complex were tested on MCF7 cell line. The biodistribution and scintigraphy studies were performed in BALB/c mice with breast tumor. Results: The radiochemical purity was 91.2{+-}3.8% after 2 h. The in vitro stabilities in phosphate buffer and human blood serum were 83.1{+-}3.4% and 76.2{+-}3.6% at 96 h, respectively. The immunoreactivity of the complex was 83.4{+-}2.4%. The cell toxicity study showed that the complex inhibited 85.2{+-}3.4% growth of MCF7 cells at a concentration of 2500 ng/ml after 96 h. The biodistribution and scintigraphy studies showed the accumulation of the complex at the site of tumors with high sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion: The results showed that one may consider {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-PR81 as a potential radiopharmaceutical for therapy of human breast cancer, which needs further investigations.

  6. [Verrucous pastern dermatitis syndrome in heavy draught horses. Part II: Clinical findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geburek, F; Deegen, E; Hewicker-Trautwein, M; Ohnesorge, B

    2005-07-01

    In the present field study the skin of the feet of 37 heavy draught horses of different breeds showing verrucous pastern dermatitis was examined clinically. Included were the degree of severity of the disease and the prevalence of anatomically normal structures associated with the skin: fetlock tufts of hair ("feathering"), ergots, chestnuts, bulges in the pastern region, cannon circumference. Each horse was examined for Chorioptes sp. skin mites. Information was also collected on the development of the skin alterations and housing conditions and feeding. These individual data were correlated with the clinical degree of severity of verrucous pastern dermatitis, which was evaluated using a numerical code (scoring system). In addition, punch biopsies were taken from the diseased skin of the feet and from healthy skin of the neck for comparative patho-histological examination (see Part III). Verrucous pastern dermatitis is a chronic disease which can be divided into four groups: scaling (group I), hyperkeratotic and hyperplastic plaque-like lesions (group II), tuberous skin masses (group III), and verrucous skin lesions with rugged surfaces (group IV). No correlation was found between the clinical degree of severity of the skin lesions and sex, breed, amount of work, use of stallions for breeding, grooming condition of the hair, white markings in the foot region, or Chorioptes sp. infestation. In regard to feeding it was found that the amount of maize and oats fed had some influence on the clinical degree of severity. Statistical analysis revealed a significant correlation between the clinical degree of severity and the age, the grooming condition of the hooves, and the mean cannon circumference. The prevalence of fetlock tufts of hair, chestnuts, ergots, and anatomically normal bulges in the pastern region also increased significantly with the clinical degree of severity. Furthermore the study revealed that the clinical degree of severity depended on the hygienic

  7. Closure of the patent ductus arteriosus with the Amplatzer Duct Occluder II: a clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Tevfik; Akin, Alper; Ertuğrul, Ilker; Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan; Alehan, Dursun; Ozer, Sema; Ozkutlu, Süheyla

    2012-12-01

    The aim of our study was to share our clinical experience on cases with patent ductus arteriosus treated with the Amplatzer Duct Occluder II. Between 2008 and 2012, 26 of 31 patients with patent ductus arteriosus underwent successful transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus using the Amplatzer Duct Occluder II. Mean age was 3.3 years and mean weight was 15.7 kilograms. The presence of a residual shunt, left pulmonary artery or aortic obstruction was explored by administering contrast material during the procedure. The patients were discharged 24 hours after the procedure. The procedure was successful in 26 of 31 patients and failed in five patients. According to the Krichenko classification, 26 patients had type A, one patient had type B and 4 patients had type C ductus. The mean narrowest ductus diameter was 3.2 mm and the mean ductus length was 6.7 mm. Complete angiographic occlusion occurred immediately after the procedure in 22 out of 26 patients in whom the ductus was closed successfully with the Amplatzer Duct Occluder II. Complete occlusion was achieved in the remaining patients with residual shunt one month after the procedure. The procedure was preceded by closure with an Amplatzer Duct Occluder I in two patients and an Amplatzer Vascular Plug I in one patient. Amplatzer Duct Occluder II is highly effective in transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus. We think that an alternative closure device and alternative techniques can be attempted in patients with type C ductus. The success rate could increase with accumulating experience.

  8. Clinical effects of Angelica dahurica dressing on patients with I-II phase pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fen; Niu, Junzhi; Pei, Xing

    2016-11-02

    Angelica dahurica is a well-known traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), while little information is available about its effects on pressure sores. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of Angelica dahurica on patients with I-II phase pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Patients (n = 98) with phase I and phase II pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to control and treated groups. In addition to holistic nursing, patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream, while patients in the treated group received continuous 4 weeks of external application of Angelica dahurica dressing. Therapeutic effect was recorded, along with the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, HaCaT cells were cultured with different concentrations of Angelica dahurica, and then cell viability, clone formation numbers, cell cycle, and levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 were determined. The total effective rate in the treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of IL-8, EGF, TGF-β, and VEGF were statistically increased by Angelica dahurica. In addition, the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by Angelica dahurica in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, and levels of cyclin D1 and CDK2 were significantly elevated. Our results suggest that Angelica dahurica may provide an effective clinical treatment for I-II phase pressure sores.

  9. Methodology of phase II clinical trials in metastatic elderly breast cancer: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarrou, B; Mourey, L; Dalenc, F; Balardy, L; Kanoun, D; Roché, H; Boher, J M; Rougé-Bugat, M E; Filleron, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    As the incidence of invasive breast cancer will increase with age, the number of elderly patients with a diagnosis metastatic breast cancer will also rise. But the use of cytotoxic drugs in elderly metastatic breast cancer patients is not systematic and is dreaded by medical oncologists. The need for prospective oncologic data from this population seems increasingly obvious. The main objective of this review is to investigate design and characteristics of phase II trials that assess activity and feasibility of chemotherapies in elderly advanced/metastatic breast cancer patients. An electronic search in PUBMED allowed us to retrieve articles published in English language on phase II trials in elderly metastatic breast cancer between January 2002 and May 2016. Sixteen publications were finally included in this review. The primary endpoint was a simple, a composite, and a co-primary endpoints in 11, three, and two studies, respectively. Efficacy was the primary objective in 15 studies: simple (n = 10), composite (n = 3), co-primary endpoints (n = 2). Composite or co-primary endpoints combined efficacy and toxicity. Thirteen studies used multistage designs. Only five studies evaluated the feasibility, i.e., to jointly assess efficacy and tolerance to treatment (toxicity, quality of life, etc) as primary endpoint. Development of elderly specific phase III clinical trials might be challenging, it therefore seems essential to conduct phase II clinical trials evaluating jointly efficacy and toxicity in a well-defined geriatric population. Use of multistage designs that take into account heterogeneity would allow to identify a subpopulation at interim analysis and to reduce the number of patients exposed to an inefficient or a toxic treatment regimen. It is crucial to evaluate new therapies (targeted therapies, immunotherapies) using adequate methodologies (Study design, endpoint).

  10. Effect of Oral Voriconazole on Fungal Keratitis in the Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial II (MUTT II): A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajna, N Venkatesh; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Rajaraman, Revathi; Patel, Sushila; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Das, Manoranjan; Ray, Kathryn J; O'Brien, Kieran S; Oldenburg, Catherine E; McLeod, Stephen D; Zegans, Michael E; Porco, Travis C; Acharya, Nisha R; Lietman, Thomas M; Rose-Nussbaumer, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    To compare oral voriconazole with placebo in addition to topical antifungals in the treatment of filamentous fungal keratitis. The Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial II (MUTT II), a multicenter, double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, was conducted in India and Nepal, with 2133 individuals screened for inclusion. Patients with smear-positive filamentous fungal ulcers and visual acuity of 20/400 (logMAR 1.3) or worse were randomized to receive oral voriconazole vs oral placebo; all participants received topical antifungal eyedrops. The study was conducted from May 24, 2010, to November 23, 2015. All trial end points were analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis. Study participants were randomized to receive oral voriconazole vs oral placebo; a voriconazole loading dose of 400 mg was administered twice daily for 24 hours, followed by a maintenance dose of 200 mg twice daily for 20 days, with dosing altered to weight based during the trial. All participants received topical voriconazole, 1%, and natamycin, 5%. The primary outcome of the trial was rate of corneal perforation or the need for therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (TPK) within 3 months. Secondary outcomes included microbiologic cure at 6 days, rate of re-epithelialization, best-corrected visual acuity and infiltrate and/or scar size at 3 weeks and 3 months, and complication rates associated with voriconazole use. A total of 2133 patients in India and Nepal with smear-positive ulcers were screened; of the 787 who were eligible, 240 (30.5%) were enrolled. Of the 119 patients (49.6%) in the oral voriconazole treatment group, 65 were male (54.6%), and the median age was 54 years (interquartile range, 42-62 years). Overall, no difference in the rate of corneal perforation or the need for TPK was determined for oral voriconazole vs placebo (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.57-1.18; P = .29). In prespecified subgroup analyses comparing treatment effects among organism subgroups, there was some

  11. Clinical evaluation of Dyslipidemia among type II diabetic patients at Public hospital Penang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Nada F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global views emphasize the need for early; effective intervention against the atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular diseases. Our aim was to determine the clinical practices and compliance among dyslipidemia with type II diabetes and hypertension in multiracial society. Method(s Study was carried out in out-patient department of General hospital Penang over a period of ten months (Jan - Oct 2008. Study reflects the retrospective data collection covering a period of three years from Jan 2005 - Dec 2007. Universal sampling technique was used to select all the patients' undergone treatment for diabetes type II and dyslipidemia. All the concerned approvals were obtained from Clinical research Committee (CRC. Data was analyzed by using SPSS 15®. Result(s A total of 501 diabetes type 2 patients with dyslipidemia were identified in this study. The demographic data showed that 55.9% (n = 280 were female patients and 44.1% (n = 221 were males. Patients on combination therapy of metformin with other antidiabetic agent were 79%, while 21% were on monotherapy. Lovastatin was received as monotherapy in 83% of study population, while only 17% were on combination with gemfibrozil. Means of FPG and lipid profile were reduced from the initial (2005 to the latest level (2007 significantly (p Conclusion Metformin and lovastatin use among patients of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia is significantly improved the clinical outcomes. No significant association of metformin or lovastatin is found against the hypertension. Metformin and calcium channel blocker combination therapy was found to be the best choice in the co-treatment of diabetes and hypertension.

  12. The Value of the SYNTAX Score II in Predicting Clinical Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Nicola; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Salinas, Pablo; Aldazábal, Andrés; Cerrato, Enrico; Gonzalo, Nieves; Del Trigo, María; Núñez-Gil, Iván; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos; Escaned, Javier

    2017-11-27

    The predictive value of the SYNTAX score (SS) for clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is very limited and could potentially be improved by the combination of anatomic and clinical variables, the SS-II. We aimed to evaluate the value of the SS-II in predicting outcomes in patients undergoing TAVI. A total of 402 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing transfemoral TAVI were included. Preprocedural TAVI angiograms were reviewed and the SS-I and SS-II were calculated using the SS algorithms. Patients were stratified in 3 groups according to SS-II tertiles. The coprimary endpoints were all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), a composite of all-cause death, cerebrovascular event, or myocardial infarction at 1 year. Increased SS-II was associated with higher 30-day mortality (P=.036) and major bleeding (P=.015). The 1-year risk of death and MACE was higher among patients in the 3rd SS-II tertile (HR, 2.60; P=.002 and HR, 2.66; P<.001) and was similar among patients in the 2nd tertile (HR, 1.27; P=.507 and HR, 1.05; P=.895) compared with patients in the 1st tertile. The highest SS-II tertile was an independent predictor of long-term mortality (P=.046) and MACE (P=.001). The SS-II seems more suited to predict clinical outcomes in patients undergoing TAVI than the SS-I. Increased SS-II was associated with poorer clinical outcomes at 1 and 4 years post-TAVI, independently of the presence of coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in hepatitis E - II: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Amit; Aggarwal, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the commonest cause of acute hepatitis worldwide. This infection, with fecal-oral transmission, was previously thought to be limited to humans residing in developing countries with poor sanitation, spreading via contaminated drinking water. In recent years, our understanding of epidemiology and clinical spectrum of this infection have changed markedly. This article reviews the epidemiology, including routes of transmission, and clinical manifestations of HEV infection around the world. In addition, recent findings on transmission-associated HEV infection, extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E and chronic infection with HEV, and treatment and prevention of this infection are discussed. Expert commentary: HEV infection has two distinct epidemiologic forms and clinical patterns of disease: (i) acute epidemic or sporadic hepatitis caused by fecal-oral (usually water-borne) transmission of genotype 1 and 2 HEV from a human reservoir in areas with poor hygiene and frequent water contamination, and (ii) infrequent sporadic hepatitis E caused by zoonotic infection, possibly from an animal source through ingestion of undercooked animal meal, of genotype 3 or 4 virus. In disease-endemic areas, pregnant women are at a particular risk of serious disease and high mortality. In less-endemic areas, chronic infection with HEV among immunosuppressed persons is observed. HEV can also be transmitted through Transfusion of blood and blood products. Ribivirin treatment is effective in chronic hepatitis E. Two efficacious vaccines have been tried in humans; one of these has received marketing approval in its country of origin.

  14. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research.

  15. Clinical effects of fixed functional Herbst appliance in the treatment of class II/1 malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sagittal mandible deficiency is the most common cause of skeletal Class II malocclusion. Treatment objective is to stimulate sagittal mandible growth. Fixed functional Herbst appliance use is beneficial for shortening the time required for treatment and does not depend on patient compliance. Case outline. A 13-year-old girl was referred to the Clinic of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry in Belgrade following previous unsuccessful treatment of her skeletal Class II malocclusion using an activator. The patient's poor cooperation had led to failure of the treatment. Patient was subjected to the Herbst treatment for 6 months followed by fixed appliance for another 8 months. Lateral cephalograms before and after the treatment was performed. The remodelation of condylar and fossal articulation was assessed by superimposition of pre- and post-treatment temporomandibular joint tomograms. The promotion of oral hygiene and fluoride use was performed because orthodontic treatment carries a high caries risk and risk for periodontal disease. Skeletal and dental changes were observed after treatment (correction [Max+Mand]: molar relation 7 mm, overjet 8 mm, skeletal relation 5 mm, molars 2 mm, incisors 3 mm. Combination of Herbst and fixed appliances was effective in the treatment of dental and skeletal irregularities for a short period of time. Conclusion . In the retention period, 14 months after treatment, occlusal stability exists. Follow-up care in oral prevention is based on regular recalls at the dental office and supervision at home by the parents.

  16. Radioimmunotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; positioning, safety, and efficacy of 90Y-Ibritumomab. 10 years of experience and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, A; Martínez-Ramirez, M; Martínez-Caballero, D; Beneit, P; Clavel, J; Figueroa, G; Verdú, J

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is one of the therapies directed against molecular targets in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). To evaluate the positioning, safety, and effectiveness of RIT with 90Y-Ibritumomab in NHL patients. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with NHL who received RIT with 90Y-Ibritumomab. An evaluation was made of the concordance with clinical guidelines, toxicity as rated by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), and effectiveness was assessed based on response to treatment, overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS). RIT was requested in 26 patients, of whom 21 (11 women, mean age 56±10 years) were included in the study, with the following distribution: Follicular NHL, 67%, Mantle NHL, 14%, Diffuse large B-cell NHL, 9.5%, and Transformed NHL 9.5%. Twelve patients with refractory NHL, 7 for consolidation response, and 2 transplant conditioning, were treated. Adverse effects were observed in 71% of patients, which were usually manageable and transient, and with the most common being thrombocytopenia. At 3-4 months, overall response rate was 76.2% (71.4% complete and 4.8% partial response), and 19% had progression of disease. With a median follow up of 70 months, the OS was 96±8 months, and the PFS was 54±11 months. RIT showed a moderate correlation with clinical guidelines, and is probably underused. Adverse effects were common, mild, and manageable. The data show a high complete response rate and an increase in the OS and PFS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. Levels and clinical significance of serum IGF-II in patients with five kinds of malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Falian; Xu Jun; Du Xiumin; Ke Bingkun; Yang Daoli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the levels and clinical significance of serum IGF-II in patients with malignant tumor. Methods: Levels of serum IGF-II were detected in patients with gastric cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer, ovarian carcinoma and endometrial carcinoma by radioimmunoassay, levels in patients with hepatic cirrhosis, uterine myoma and normal controls were also determined for comparison. Results: The levels of serum IGF-II in patients with gastric cancer, lung cancer and liver cancer were significantly higher than those in normal controls (p 0.05). Conclusion: The determination of serum IGF-II has no clinical significance in patients with endometrial carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma and uterine myoma but it could be useful to judge the severity and evaluate the prognosis in patients with gastric cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer and cirrhosis

  18. Evaluating changes in stable chromosomal translocation frequency in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Wang Jianyi; Liu An; Odom-Maryon, Tamara; Shively, John E.; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Williams, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The lack of any consistent correlation between radioimmunotherapy (RIT) dose and observed hematologic toxicity has made it difficult to validate RIT radiation dose estimates to marrow. Stable chromosomal translocations (SCT) which result after radiation exposure may be a biologic parameter that more closely correlates with RIT radiation dose. Increases in the frequency of SCT are observed after radiation exposure and are highly correlated with absorbed radiation dose. SCT are cumulative after multiple radiation doses and conserved through an extended number of cell divisions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether increases in SCT frequency were detectable in peripheral lymphocytes after RIT and whether the magnitude of these increases correlated with estimated radiation dose to marrow and whole body. Methods and Materials: Patients entered in a Phase I dose escalation therapy trial each received 1-3 intravenous cycles of the radiolabeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody, 90 Y-chimeric T84.66. Five mCi of 111 In-chimeric T84.66 was co-administered for imaging and biodistribution purposes. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to the start of therapy and 5-6 weeks after each therapy cycle. Peripheral lymphocytes were harvested after 72 hours of phytohemagglutinin stimulation and metaphase spreads prepared. Spreads were then stained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using commercially available chromosome paint probes to chromosomes 3 and 4. Approximately 1000 spreads were evaluated for each chromosome sample. Red marrow radiation doses were estimated using the AAPM algorithm and blood clearance curves. Results: Eighteen patients were studied, each receiving at least one cycle of therapy ranging from 5-22 mCi/m 2 . Three patients received 2 cycles and two patients received 3 cycles of therapy. Cumulative estimated marrow doses ranged from 9.2 to 310 cGy. Increases in SCT frequencies were observed after

  19. Application of ICHD-II Criteria in a Headache Clinic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhao; Di, Hai; Dai, Wei; Liang, Jingyao; Pan, Meiyan; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhou, Zhibin; Li, Zheng; Liu, Ruozhuo; Yu, Shengyuan

    2012-01-01

    Background China has the huge map and the largest population in the world. Previous studies on the prevalence and classification of headaches were conducted based on the general population, however, similar studies among the Chinese outpatient population are scarce. This study aimed to analyze the characteristics of 1843 headache patients enrolled in a North China headache clinic of the General Hospital for Chinese People's Liberation Army from October 2011 to May 2012, with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-II). Methods and Results Personal interviews were carried out and a detailed questionnaire was used to collect medical records including age, sex and headache characteristics. Patients came from 28 regions of China with the median age of 40.9 (9–80) years and the female/male ratio of 1.67/1. The primary headaches (78.4%) were classified as the following: migraine (39.1%), tension-type headache (32.5%), trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (5.3%) and other primary headache (1.5%). Among the rest patients, 12.9% were secondary headaches, 5.9% were cranial neuralgias and 2.5% were unspecified or not elsewhere classified. Fourteen point nine percent (275/1843) were given an additional diagnosis of chronic daily headache, including medication-overuse headache (MOH, 49.5%), chronic tension-type headache (CTTH, 32.7%) and chronic migraine (CM, 13.5%). The visual analogue scale (VAS) score of TTH with MOH was significantly higher than that of CTTH (6.8±2.0 vs 5.6±2.0, Pheadache clinic outpatients in a tertiary hospital of North China that migraine is the most common diagnosis. Furthermore, most headaches in this patient population can be classified using ICHD-II criteria. PMID:23239993

  20. Hospital-level Variation in Utilization of Surgery for Clinical Stage I-II Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Douglas S; Mulvihill, Sean J; Skarda, David E; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Stoddard, Gregory J; Ott, Mark J; Firpo, Matthew A; Scaife, Courtney L

    2017-07-11

    To (1) evaluate rates of surgery for clinical stage I-II pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), (2) identify predictors of not undergoing surgery, (3) quantify the degree to which patient- and hospital-level factors explain differences in hospital surgery rates, and (4) evaluate the association between adjusted hospital-specific surgery rates and overall survival (OS) of patients treated at different hospitals. Curative-intent surgery for potentially resectable PDAC is underutilized in the United States. Retrospective cohort study of patients ≤85 years with clinical stage I-II PDAC in the 2004 to 2014 National Cancer Database. Mixed effects multivariable models were used to characterize hospital-level variation across quintiles of hospital surgery rates. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the effect of adjusted hospital surgery rates on OS. Of 58,553 patients without contraindications or refusal of surgery, 63.8% underwent surgery, and the rate decreased from 2299/3528 (65.2%) in 2004 to 4412/7092 (62.2%) in 2014 (P < 0.001). Adjusted hospital rates of surgery varied 6-fold (11.4%-70.9%). Patients treated at hospitals with higher rates of surgery had better unadjusted OS (median OS 10.2, 13.3, 14.2, 16.5, and 18.4 months in quintiles 1-5, respectively, P < 0.001, log-rank). Treatment at hospitals in lower surgery rate quintiles 1-3 was independently associated with mortality [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (1.01, 1.21), HR 1.08 (1.02, 1.15), and HR 1.09 (1.04, 1.14) for quintiles 1-3, respectively, compared with quintile 5] after adjusting for patient factors, hospital type, and hospital volume. Quality improvement efforts are needed to help hospitals with low rates of surgery ensure that their patients have access to appropriate surgery.

  1. Modern trends in radioimmunotherapy of cancer. Pre targeting strategies for the treatment of ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcquarrie, S.A.; Xiao, Z.; Mercer, J. R.; Suresh, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    A review of published data on some of the problems associated in treating cancer using radioimmunotherapy is presented. Potential improvements for this type of therapy using pretargeting strategies are discussed and preliminary results on a novel multistep regimen to treat human ovarian cancer are presented. A pretargeting strategy using ovarian cancer are presented. A pretargeting strategy using a biotinylated, anti-CA 125 monoclonal antibody (MAb) to attract biotinylated long-circulating liposomes to the surface of CA 125-expressing ovarian cancer cells, was employed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescent labels were used to establish the biodistribution patterns in NIH:OVCAR-3 (CA-125 positive) and SK-OV-3 (CA-125 negative) human ovarian cancer cells. Shedding kinetics of the pretargeted stage were measured using 125 I labeled MAbs. No significant internalization of the MAb used in the pretargeting step was observed by 4 hrs. The antibody was gradually internalized starting at 6 hrs, and most of the labelled MAb was detected in cytoplasm by 24 hrs. Shedding and exocytosis of the antigen-MAb complex was not significant for up to 6-hours following administration of the iodinated MAb. Biotinylated liposomes were shown to specifically target the biotinylated MAb/streptavidin complex on the cell surface. It has been demonstrated that by a three-step pretargeting approach, biotinylated liposomes can be specifically delivered to cells pretargeted with biotinylated MAb/SAv complex. The slow internalization and shedding properties of the two MAbs are ideal for multistep pretargeting methods. A successful multistep linkage was established with the biotinylated MAb B27.1, streptavidin and biotinylated liposomes to OVCAR-3 cells, but not to SK-OV-3 cells

  2. Preparation and characterization of a cysteine based DTPA derivative and its immunoconjugate for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Hong, Y. D.; Choi, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, radioimmunotherapy (RIT), which uses a monoclonal antibody in addition to a radionuclide to deliver radiation to the sites of a disease, has been extensively studied in this population. To label an antibody with radionuclides it is necessary to introduce a bifunctional chelating agent (BFCA) such a DTPA since it can not be directly labeled to a radionuclide. Therefore, developing a better BFCA for chelating biomolecule and radionuclide has been of major interest in developing radioimmunotherapeutic agents. Thereby, we describe the entantiospecific synthesis of a DTPA analogue which is derived from L-cysteine via bis N-alkylation. And the prepared DTPA derivative was conjugated with human Immunoglobulin G, and a characterization of the immunoconjugate was carried out. N, N-Bis[(tert-butoxycarbonyl)methyl]-2-ethanolamine, N, N-Bis[(tert-butoxycarbony)methyl]-2-bromoethyl-amine, 2-(4-N-Boc-aminophenyl) ethanol, 1-(4-N-Boc-aminophenyl)-2-bromoethane, S-((4-N-Boc-arninophenyl)-1-ethyl)-cysteine methylester, S-(N-Boc-aminophenyl)-Cys(tBu4-DTPA) methylester, -aminophenylethyl-Cys-DTPA, isothiocyanate-cysteine-DTPA, Immunoconjugation with IgG. The optimal molar DTPA derivative to IgG conjugation ratio was 1: 1. At higher amounts of DTPA derivative, amounts of unbounded DTPA derivative increased, and the immunoactivities of immunoconjugates reduced. Gel electrophoresis analysis of the immunoconjugates showed no degradation products or other impurities. This demonstrates the stability of the IgG in DTPA derivative. We established the preparation of an amino acid based DTPA by producing 4-Ethylaniline-DTPA-L-Cysteine. At the same molar this DTPA derivative to IgG, the immunoconjugate has stable molecular structure. In conclusion, 4-Ethylaniline-DTPA-L-Cysteine as a BFCA will show good properties for preparing a specific regional delivery system such as in radiopharmaceuticals, as a radiotracer, and NMR contrasting agents

  3. Avidin chase can reduce myelotoxicity associated with radioimmunotherapy of experimental liver micrometastases in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Noriko; Saga, Tsuneo; Sakahara, Harumi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Zhao, Songji; Iida, Yasuhiko; Konishi, Junji; Kuroki, Masahide; Endo, Keigo

    2000-01-01

    Myelotoxicity is the main factor which decides the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Since bone marrow is mostly irradiated from blood radioactivity, enhancing the clearance of unbound circulating radiolabeled antibody is important to reduce myelotoxicity and to increase the MTD. We applied the avidin chase method, which was devised to obtain high tumor-to-background ratios in tumor-targeting, to RIT of experimental liver micrometastases and evaluated its influence on the side effects and therapeutic outcome. Seven days after intrasplenic injection of human colon cancer LS174T cells, nude mice were intravenously injected with biotinylated 131 I-labeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MAb) (24-38 μg, 11.1 MBq). Mice of the chase group then received an intravenous injection of avidin twice (24 and 30 h, 72-115 μg each). Biodistribution, side effects (white blood cell counts and body weight change), and short- and long-term therapeutic effects were determined. Avidin chase markedly accelerated the clearance of radiolabeled MAb from the blood (P<0.0001) and normal tissues, resulting in milder leukocytopenia and body weight loss, both of which recovered earlier than in the non-chase group (P<0.01). The tumor uptake of radiolabeled MAb was also decreased by avidin chase, but the metastases-to-background ratios were increased. Avidin chase gave the therapeutic gain ratio of 1.89. Treated groups with and without avidin chase showed significant therapeutic effects compared to the non-treated group. There was no significant difference in the therapeutic effects between the two treated groups. Avidin chase effectively reduced the side effects of RIT and should increase the MTD. (author)

  4. Radioimmunotherapy for liver micrometastases in mice. Pharmacokinetics, dose estimation, and long-term effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saga, Tsuneo; Sakahara, Harumi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Sato, Noriko; Zhao, Songji; Iida, Yasuhiko; Konishi, Junji; Kuroki, Masahide; Endo, Keigo

    1999-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic dose of 131 I-labeled antibody and the absorbed dose in liver micrometastases of human colon cancer LS174T in female BALB/c nu/nu mice were investigated, along with the long-term therapeutic effect. Mice with liver micrometastases were given an intravenous injection of 131 I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody F33-104 (8.88 MBq/40 μg). The biodistribution of the antibody was determined 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 days later. The absorbed dose was estimated for three hypothetical tumor diameters; 1,000, 500, and 300 μm. Autoradiography showed a homogeneous distribution of radioactivity in the micrometastases, and a high uptake was maintained until day 6 (24.0% injected dose (ID)/g on day 1 to 17.8% ID/g on day 6), but decreased thereafter. The absorbed doses in the 1,000-, 500-, and 300-μm tumors were calculated to be 19.1, 12.0, and 8.2 Gy, respectively. The intravenous injection of the 131 I-labeled antibody also showed a dose-dependent therapeutic effect (all mice of the nontreated group died, with a mean survival period of 4 weeks; 3 of the 8 mice that received 9.25 MBq survived up to 120 days with no sign of liver metastasis). These data give further evidence that micrometastasis is a good target of radioimmunotherapy, and that an absorbed dose of less than 20 Gy can effectively control small metastatic lesions. (author)

  5. A Prototype {sup 212}Pb Medical Dose Calibrator for Alpha Radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.F.; Patil, A.; Russ, W.R.; Newman, J. [CANBERRA Industries, Inc. (United States); Torgue, J. [AREVA Med (United States)

    2015-07-01

    AREVA Med, an AREVA group subsidiary, is developing innovative cancer-fighting therapies involving the use of {sup 212}Pb for alpha radioimmunotherapy. Canberra Industries, the nuclear measurement subsidiary of AREVA, has been working with AREVA Med to develop a prototype measurement system to assay syringes containing a {sup 212}Pb solution following production by an elution system. The relative fraction of emitted radiation from the source associated directly with the {sup 212}Pb remains dynamic for approximately 6 hours after the parent is chemically purified. A significant challenge for this measurement application is that the short half-life of the parent nuclide requires assay prior to reaching equilibrium with progeny nuclides. A gross counting detector was developed to minimize system costs and meet the large dynamic range of source activities. Prior to equilibrium, a gross counting system must include the period since the {sup 212}Pb was pure to calculate the count rate attributable to the parent rather than the progeny. The dynamic state is determined by solving the set of differential equations, or Bateman equations, describing the source decay behavior while also applying the component measurement efficiencies for each nuclide. The efficiencies were initially estimated using mathematical modeling (MCNP) but were then benchmarked with source measurements. The goal accuracy of the system was required to be within 5%. Independent measurements of the source using a high resolution spectroscopic detector have shown good agreement with the prototype system results. The prototype design was driven by cost, compactness and simplicity. The detector development costs were minimized by using existing electronics and firmware with a Geiger-Mueller tube derived from Canberra's EcoGamma environmental monitoring product. The acquisition electronics, communications and interface were controlled using Python with the EcoGamma software development kit on a Raspberry

  6. Dosimetric model for intraperitoneal targeted liposomal radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer micrometastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syme, A M; McQuarrie, S A; Middleton, J W; Fallone, B G

    2003-01-01

    A simple model has been developed to investigate the dosimetry of micrometastases in the peritoneal cavity during intraperitoneal targeted liposomal radioimmunotherapy. The model is applied to free-floating tumours with radii between 0.005 cm and 0.1 cm. Tumour dose is assumed to come from two sources: free liposomes in solution in the peritoneal cavity and liposomes bound to the surface of the micrometastases. It is assumed that liposomes do not penetrate beyond the surface of the tumours and that the total amount of surface antigen does not change over the course of treatment. Integrated tumour doses are expressed as a function of biological parameters that describe the rates at which liposomes bind to and unbind from the tumour surface, the rate at which liposomes escape from the peritoneal cavity and the tumour surface antigen density. Integrated doses are translated into time-dependent tumour control probabilities (TCPs). The results of the work are illustrated in the context of a therapy in which liposomes labelled with Re-188 are targeted at ovarian cancer cells that express the surface antigen CA-125. The time required to produce a TCP of 95% is used to investigate the importance of the various parameters. The relative contributions of surface-bound radioactivity and unbound radioactivity are used to assess the conditions required for a targeted approach to provide an improvement over a non-targeted approach during intraperitoneal radiation therapy. Using Re-188 as the radionuclide, the model suggests that, for microscopic tumours, the relative importance of the surface-bound radioactivity increases with tumour size. This is evidenced by the requirement for larger antigen densities on smaller tumours to affect an improvement in the time required to produce a TCP of 95%. This is because for the smallest tumours considered, the unbound radioactivity is often capable of exerting a tumouricidal effect before the targeting agent has time to accumulate

  7. Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (Albers-Schönberg disease): clinical and radiological manifestations in 42 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénichou, O D; Laredo, J D; de Vernejoul, M C

    2000-01-01

    Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO II, Albers-Schonberg disease) is a genetic condition characterized by generalized osteosclerosis predominating in some skeletal sites such as the spine and pelvis. ADO II is rare, and most available clinical descriptions are based on small numbers of patients. We report the clinical and radiological manifestations in 42 ADO II patients. To our knowledge, this is the largest series reported so far. Our inclusion criterion was presence on radiographs of the spine of vertebral endplate thickening, producing the classic sandwich vertebra appearance. We found various patterns of sandwich vertebra, of which we provide a description to assist physicians in diagnosing ADO II. The classic bone-within-bone appearance was present in most but not all skeletal sites. The radiological penetrance of the disease was high (90%) and increased after 20 years of age. As many as 81% of our patients experienced clinical manifestations. Fractures were common (78% of patients) and healed slowly. Hip osteoarthritis developed in 27% of patients and required arthroplasty in 9 of the 16 affected hips. Nonmandibular osteomyelitis occurred in 4 cases (11%). Twenty-four percent of patients had thoracic or lumbar scoliosis. Orthopedic surgery was performed in 52.8% of patients, of whom half had at least three surgical procedures for internal fracture fixation, arthroplasty, limb deformity correction, or treatment of surgical complications. There was a high rate of surgical complications including nonunion, infection, prosthesis loosening, and intraoperative fractures. Nearly two-thirds of patients (64%) had stomatologic manifestations, including mandibular osteomyelitis in 4 patients (11%). Cranial nerve involvement responsible for hearing loss, bilateral optic atrophy, and/or facial palsy was present in 14 patients but was clearly attributable to ADO II in only 6 cases (16%). This large series sheds new light on several aspects of ADO II, most

  8. Postoperative vaginal cuff irradiation using high dose rate remote afterloading: a Phase II clinical protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, William R.; Bastin, Kenneth; Edwards, Scott A.; Buchler, Dolores A.; Stitt, Judith A.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Fowler, Jack F.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: In September 1989, a postoperative Phase II high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy protocol was started for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma. This review reports the overall survival, local control, and complication rates for the initial 63 patients treated in this Phase II study. Methods and Materials: High dose rate brachytherapy was delivered using an Iridium-192 HDR remote afterloader. Sixty-three patients were entered into the Phase II protocol, each receiving two vaginal cuff treatments 1 week apart (range 4-12 days) with vaginal ovoids (diameter 2.0-3.0 cm). No patient received adjuvant external beam radiation. A dose of 32.4 Gy in two fractions was prescribed to the ovoid surface in 63 patients. The first three patients treated at our institution received 15, 16.2, and 29 Gy, respectively, to determine acute effects. Results: At a median follow-up of 1.6 years (range 0.75-4.3 years) no patient has developed a vaginal cuff recurrence. One regional recurrence (1.6%) occurred at 1.2 years at the pelvic side wall. This patient is alive and without evidence of disease 7 months after completion of salvage irradiation, which resulted in the only vaginal stenosis (1.6%). Fourteen patients (22%) experienced vaginal apex fibrosis by physical exam, which was clinically symptomatic in four patients. Two patients reported stress incontinence; however, these symptoms were noted prior to their HDR therapy. One patient died 2.4 years after HDR therapy due to cardiovascular disease without evidence of cancer at autopsy. Conclusion: Preliminary results of our phase II HDR vaginal cuff protocol for postoperative FIGO Stage IA, Grade 3 or Stage IB, Grade 1-2 patients demonstrate that 32.4 Gy in two fractions is well tolerated by the vaginal cuff mucosa. Local control appears comparable to our prior experience and others with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Additional patient accrual and further follow

  9. Mixed-state bipolar I and II depression: time to remission and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, In Hee; Woo, Young Sup; Jun, Tae-Youn; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-01-01

    We compared the time to achieve remission and the clinical characteristics of patients with bipolar depressive mixed state and those with bipolar depressive non-mixed state. The subjects (N=131) were inpatients diagnosed between 2006 and 2012 with bipolar I or II disorder, depression and were classified into the following three groups: "pure depressive state" (PD, n=70), "sub-threshold mixed state" (SMX, n=38), and "depressive mixed state" (DMX, n=23). Diagnosis of a DMX was in accordance with Benazzi's definition: three or more manic symptoms in a depressive episode. The subjects' charts were retrospectively reviewed to ascertain the time to achieve remission from the index episode and to identify other factors, such as demographic and clinical characteristics, specific manic symptoms, and pharmacological treatment, that may have contributed to remission. The time to achieve remission was significantly longer in the DMX (p=0.022) and SMX (p=0.035) groups than in the PD group. Adjustment for covariates using a Cox proportional hazards model did not change these results. Clinically, subjects with a DMX were more likely to have manic symptoms in the index episode, especially inflated self-esteem and psychomotor agitation than those in the PD. We investigated only inpatients and therefore could not comment on outpatients. These findings showed that sub-syndromal manic symptoms in bipolar depression had different clinical characteristics and a more severe illness course, including a longer time to achieve remission, than did a pure depressive state. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [The external patello-tibial transfixation (EPTT). Part II: Clinical application and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaque, B; Gotzen, L; Ziring, E; Petermann, J

    1999-07-01

    In part I of the paper the biomechanical and technical background of the EPTT using the MPT fixator and the indications for this procedure have been described. In part II we report about the clinical application of the EPTT in 67 patients with a wide spectrum of repairs and reconstructions of the extensor mechanism. 48 patients had fresh injuries, 18 of them with severe concomitant knee lesions and 19 patients had neglected rsp. unsuccessfully operated injuries. There were 4 deep infections, two of them related to the MPT fixator. In the patients with uneventful healing the fixator remained in place for 7.3 weeks in average. The clinical, isokinetic and radiological results were reviewed in 17 patients with an average follow-up time of 37.3 months. There were 5 patients with partial patellectomy and tendon reattachment because of lower patella pole comminution and 12 patients with tendon reattachment ruptured at the inferior patella pole or suture repair in midsubstance rupture. The clinical results according to the IKDC score were rated in 3 patients as normal, in 10 patients as nearly normal and in 4 patients as abnormal. This rating was highly dependend on the subjective judgement by the patients who considered their operated knees not as normal as the contralateral knees. From our clinical experiences and results we can derive that the EPTT enables the surgical management of extensor mechanism disruptions with a minimum of internal fixation material and provides a safe protection of the repairs and reconstructions during the healing period. The EPTT allows immediate unrestricted functional rehabilitation and early walking without crutches. Thus the EPTT represents an effective alternative to the patello-tibial cerclage with a wire or synthetic ligaments.

  11. American tertiary clinic-referred bipolar II disorder versus bipolar I disorder associated with hastened depressive recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Shah, Saloni; Do, Dennis; Yuen, Laura D; Hooshmand, Farnaz; Wang, Po W; Miller, Shefali; Ketter, Terence A

    2017-12-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, frequently comorbid condition characterized by high rates of mood episode recurrence and suicidality. Little is known about prospective longitudinal characterization of BD type II (BD II) versus type I (BD I) in relation to time to depressive recurrence and recovery from major depressive episode. We therefore assessed times to depressive recurrence/recovery in tertiary clinic-referred BD II versus I patients. Outpatients referred to Stanford BD Clinic during 2000-2011 were assessed with Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD) Affective Disorders Evaluation and with Clinical Monitoring Form during up to 2 years of naturalistic treatment. Prevalence and clinical correlates of bipolar subtype in recovered (euthymic ≥8 weeks) and depressed patients were assessed. Kaplan-Meier analyses assessed the relationships between bipolar subtype and longitudinal depressive severity, and Cox proportional hazard analyses assessed the potential mediators. BD II versus BD I was less common among 105 recovered (39.0 vs. 61.0%, p = 0.03) and more common among 153 depressed (61.4 vs. 38.6%, p = 0.006) patients. Among recovered patients, BD II was associated with 6/25 (24.0%) baseline unfavorable illness characteristics/mood symptoms/psychotropics and hastened depressive recurrence (p = 0.015). Among depressed patients, BD II was associated with 8/25 (33.0%) baseline unfavorable illness characteristics/mood symptoms/psychotropics, but only non-significantly associated with delayed depressive recovery. BD II versus BD I was significantly associated with current depression and hastened depressive recurrence, but only non-significantly associated with delayed depressive recovery. Research on bipolar subtype relationships with depressive recurrence/recovery is warranted to enhance clinical management of BD patients.

  12. Divergences between clinical and research methods for assessing personality disorders: implications for research and the evolution of axis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westen, D

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which instruments for assessing axis II diverge from clinical diagnostic processes. Subjects in the first study were 52 clinicians with experience in assessment and treatment of patients with personality disorders, who were surveyed about the methods they use in clinical practice to make diagnoses and other aspects of the diagnostic process. A second study replicated the major findings with a random national sample of 1,901 experienced psychiatrists and psychologists. Whereas current instruments rely primarily on direct questions derived from DSM-IV, clinicians of every theoretical persuasion found direct questions useful for assessing axis I disorders but only marginally so for axis II. They made axis II diagnoses, instead, by listening to patients describe interpersonal interactions and observing their behavior with the interviewer. In contrast to findings with current research instruments, most patients with personality disorders in clinical practice receive only one axis II diagnosis, and if they receive more than one, one is considered primary. Clinicians reported treating a substantial number of patients for enduring personality patterns that current axis II instruments do not assess, many of which meet neither axis I nor axis II criteria, notably problems with relatedness, work, self-esteem, and chronic subclinical depressive traits. Measurements of axis II were constructed by using a model derived from axis I instruments that diverges from clinical diagnostic procedures in a way that may be problematic for the assessment of personality disorders and the development of a more clinically and empirically sound taxonomy.

  13. Study of in vivo generators Pb-212/Bi--212 and U-230/Th-226 for alpha radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Du, A.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-radioimmunotherapy is a promising cancer therapy that uses a-particles vectorized by monoclonal antibody to break down cancerous tumors. The notion of in vivo generator was introduced in 1989 by Leonard Mausner. The concept involves labeling of various molecular carriers (antibodies, peptides, etc) with intermediate half-life generator parents, which after accumulation in the desired tissue generate much shorter half-life daughter radionuclide. This thesis focuses on the study of two in vivo generators potentially interesting for alpha-radioimmunotherapy: Pb-212 / Bi-212 generator and U-230 / Th-226 generator. The first part of this work presents the Pb-212 / Bi-212 generator, two approaches allowing the vectorization. Chelation approach on a protein and an approach by encapsulation in liposomes have been proposed. This last approach appears to be the most interesting. In vitro stability studies have been performed on these labeling. The second part of this work presents the U-230 / Th-226 generator. Studies have first been made to achieve a theoretical model to describe the speciation of Th(IV) in human serum. The efficacy of DTPA as chelating agent for complexation of Th(IV) in human serum could thus be estimated. (author)

  14. Phase II drugs under clinical investigation for the treatment of chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Shilan; Didari, Tina; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Chronic constipation (CC) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorder that significantly impairs the quality of life in affected subjects. As almost half of the patients suffering from CC are not satisfied with currently available medicines, there is a need to develop new molecules with better effectiveness and tolerability. The authors include all experimental and clinical trials (up to Phase II) about new investigational drugs for the treatment of CC. The article identifies nine new agents: mitemcinal, TD-8954, YKP10811, itopride, RM-131, KWA-0711, elobixibat, velusetrag, and naronapride. All nine agents have shown prokinetic effects in different stages of the development. The mechanisms of new developing drugs include: the activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine type-4 (5-HT4), ghrelin and motilin receptors, antagonizing dopamine type-2 (D2) receptors, inhibition of ileal bile acid reabsorption and acetylcholine esterase, as well as water absorption from the GI tract. At this current point in time, new generations of 5-HT4 receptor agonists (velusetrag, noranopride and YKP10811) are hoped to progress, further in the future, due to better efficiency and safety. However, it is not possible to make a concise conclusion at this current time due to a lack of evidence. Further clinical trials with a longer duration and a larger sample size are warranted.

  15. [Clinical Practice Guidelines for Management of Schizophrenia: Evaluation Using AGREE II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Ávila, Mauricio J; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; García Valencia, Jenny; Arenas Borrero, Álvaro Enrique; Vélez Traslaviña, Ángela; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Colombia is developing multiple national practice guidelines from a range of diseases. Clinical practice guidelines represent a very useful tool to be able to take decision over a patient care that is widely available for the clinician. In psychiatry there are a good number of international clinical guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia nevertheless there is no article that evaluate them scientifically In the settings of developing a Colombian schizophrenia practice guideline, a systematic search was performed in multiple databases and the results were then evaluated by two trained persons. We present the results globally and by domains. We found 164 matches for possible guidelines. After screening 7 guidelines were evaluated with the AGREE II instrument. Globally and by the different domains, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) was the guideline that got the best score. From the guidelines that were reviewed, 4 were from Europe and only 2 were from Latin America. None of the guidelines used GRADE methodology for the recommendations. The diversity of the schizophrenia treatment guidelines does not allow an easy adoption of the recommendation by a psychiatrist in Colombia. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Donepezil improves gait performance in older adults with mild Alzheimer's disease: a phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Muir-Hunter, Susan W; Oteng-Amoako, Afua; Gopaul, Karen; Islam, Anam; Borrie, Michael; Wells, Jennie; Speechley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Gait deficits are prevalent in people with dementia and increase their fall risk and future disability. Few treatments exist for gait impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) but preliminary studies have shown that cognitive enhancers may improve gait in this population. To determine the efficacy of donepezil, a cognitive enhancer that improves cholinergic activity, on gait in older adults newly diagnosed with AD. Phase II clinical trial in 43 seniors with mild AD who received donepezil. Participants had not previously received treatment with cognitive enhancers. Primary outcome variables were gait velocity (GV) and stride time variability (STV) under single and dual-task conditions measured using an electronic walkway. Secondary outcomes included attention and executive function. After four months of treatment, participants with mild AD improved their GV from 108.4 ± 18.6 to 113.3 ± 19.5 cm/s, p = 0.010; dual-task GV from 80.6 ± 23.0 to 85.3 ± 22.3 cm/s, p = 0.028. Changes in STV were in the expected direction although not statistically significant. Participants also showed improvements in Trail Making Tests A (p = 0.030), B (p = 0.001), and B-A (p = 0.042). Donepezil improved gait in participants with mild AD. The enhancement of dual-task gait suggests the positive changes achieved in executive function as a possible causal mechanism. This study yielded a clinically significant estimate of effect size; as well, the findings are relevant to the feasibility and ethics considerations for the design of a Phase III clinical trial.

  17. Mechanisms of Cell Killing Response from Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET Radiation Originating from 177Lu Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Disseminated Intraperitoneal Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Joong Yong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs provide efficient tools for cancer therapy. The combination of low energy β−-emissions (500 keVmax; 130 keVave along with a γ-emission for imaging makes 177Lu (T1/2 = 6.7 day a suitable radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy (RIT of tumor burdens possibly too large to treat with α-particle radiation. RIT with 177Lu-trastuzumab has proven to be effective for treatment of disseminated HER2 positive peritoneal disease in a pre-clinical model. To elucidate mechanisms originating from this RIT therapy at the molecular level, tumor bearing mice (LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were treated with 177Lu-trastuzumab comparatively to animals treated with a non-specific control, 177Lu-HuIgG, and then to prior published results obtained using 212Pb-trastuzumab, an α-particle RIT agent. 177Lu-trastuzumab induced cell death via DNA double strand breaks (DSB, caspase-3 apoptosis, and interfered with DNA-PK expression, which is associated with the repair of DNA non-homologous end joining damage. This contrasts to prior results, wherein 212Pb-trastuzumab was found to down-regulate RAD51, which is involved with homologous recombination DNA damage repair. 177Lu-trastuzumab therapy was associated with significant chromosomal disruption and up-regulation of genes in the apoptotic process. These results suggest an inhibition of the repair mechanism specific to the type of radiation damage being inflicted by either high or low linear energy transfer radiation. Understanding the mechanisms of action of β−- and α-particle RIT comparatively through an in vivo tumor environment offers real information suitable to enhance combination therapy regimens involving α- and β−-particle RIT for the management of intraperitoneal disease.

  18. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  19. A clinical evaluation of a bioresorbable membrane and porous hydroxyapatite in the treatment of human molar class II furcations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gita Malathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is predictable regeneration of a functional attachment apparatus destroyed as a result of periodontitis. Reconstructive procedures have been used with varying success during the past decades to accomplish this goal. Aim: To evaluate whether the use of porous hydroxyapatite alone or a bioresorbable membrane alone would enhance the clinical results in the treatment of class II furcation defects in human lower molars. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with chronic periodontitis, aged between 39 and 49 years, with a pair of similar bilateral class II furcation defects (classification of Hamp et al. in mandibular first molars were selected. A split-mouth design was incorporated and the selected 30 furcation defects were assigned to one of the two treatment groups, i.e., Group I treated with a bioresorbable membrane from bovine-derived collagen guided tissue regeneration membrane and Group II treated using porous hydroxyapatite bone graft material on the contralateral sides. Evaluation of clinical parameters, probing depths and attachment levels, and radiographs was done preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. Results: Both the groups showed statistically significant mean reduction in probing depths and gain in clinical attachment levels and linear bone fill. Comparison between Group I and Group II showed insignificant difference. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, both the treatment modalities are beneficial for the treatment of human mandibular class II furcation defects.

  20. Application of ICHD-II criteria in a headache clinic of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Dong

    Full Text Available China has the huge map and the largest population in the world. Previous studies on the prevalence and classification of headaches were conducted based on the general population, however, similar studies among the Chinese outpatient population are scarce. This study aimed to analyze the characteristics of 1843 headache patients enrolled in a North China headache clinic of the General Hospital for Chinese People's Liberation Army from October 2011 to May 2012, with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-II.Personal interviews were carried out and a detailed questionnaire was used to collect medical records including age, sex and headache characteristics. Patients came from 28 regions of China with the median age of 40.9 (9-80 years and the female/male ratio of 1.67/1. The primary headaches (78.4% were classified as the following: migraine (39.1%, tension-type headache (32.5%, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (5.3% and other primary headache (1.5%. Among the rest patients, 12.9% were secondary headaches, 5.9% were cranial neuralgias and 2.5% were unspecified or not elsewhere classified. Fourteen point nine percent (275/1843 were given an additional diagnosis of chronic daily headache, including medication-overuse headache (MOH, 49.5%, chronic tension-type headache (CTTH, 32.7% and chronic migraine (CM, 13.5%. The visual analogue scale (VAS score of TTH with MOH was significantly higher than that of CTTH (6.8±2.0 vs 5.6±2.0, P<0.001. The similar result was also observed in VAS score between migraine with MOH and CM (8.0±1.5 vs 7.0±1.5, P = 0.004. The peak age at onset of TTH for male and female were both in the 3(rd decade of life. However, the age distribution at onset of migraine shows an obvious sex difference, i.e. the 2(nd decade for females and the 1(st decade for males.This study revealed the characteristics of the headache clinic outpatients in a tertiary hospital of North China that migraine is

  1. Prospective double blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of the pectoral nerves (Pecs) block type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versyck, B.; Geffen, G.J. van; Houwe, P. Van

    2017-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: The aim of this clinical trial was to test the hypothesis whether adding the pectoral nerves (Pecs) block type II to the anesthetic procedure reduces opioid consumption during and after breast surgery. DESIGN: A prospective randomized double blind placebo-controlled study. SETTING:

  2. Targeting angiogenesis for radioimmunotherapy with a {sup 177}Lu-labeled antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; Hernandez, Reinier [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Lacognata, Saige; Jiang, Dawei [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Ferreira, Carolina A. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); Goel, Shreya [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); Jeffery, Justin J. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Small Animal Imaging Facility, Madison, WI (United States); Theuer, Charles P. [TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Increased angiogenesis is a marker of aggressiveness in many cancers. Targeted radionuclide therapy of these cancers with angiogenesis-targeting agents may curtail this increased blood vessel formation and slow the growth of tumors, both primary and metastatic. CD105, or endoglin, has a primary role in angiogenesis in a number of cancers, making this a widely applicable target for targeted radioimmunotherapy. The anti-CD105 antibody, TRC105 (TRACON Pharmaceuticals), was conjugated with DTPA for radiolabeling with {sup 177}Lu (t{sub 1/2} 6.65 days). Balb/c mice were implanted with 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, and five study groups were used: {sup 177}Lu only, TRC105 only, {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-IgG (a nonspecific antibody), {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105 low-dose, and {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105 high-dose. Toxicity of the agent was monitored by body weight measurements and analysis of blood markers. Biodistribution studies of {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105 were also performed at 1 and 7 days after injection. Ex vivo histology studies of various tissues were conducted at 1, 7, and 30 days after injection of high-dose {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105. Biodistribution studies indicated steady uptake of {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105 in 4T1 tumors between 1 and 7 days after injection (14.3 ± 2.3%ID/g and 11.6 ± 6.1%ID/g, respectively; n = 3) and gradual clearance from other organs. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in the high-dose group, with a corresponding significant increase in survival (p < 0.001, all groups). In most study groups (all except the nonspecific IgG group), the body weights of the mice did not decrease by more than 10%, indicating the safety of the injected agents. Serum alanine transaminase levels remained nearly constant indicating no damage to the liver (a primary clearance organ of the agent), and this was confirmed by ex vivo histological analyses. {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105, when administered at a sufficient dose, is able to curtail tumor growth and provide a

  3. Phase II Clinical Trial of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunos, Charles A.; Brindle, James; Waggoner, Steven; Zanotti, Kristine; Resnick, Kimberly; Fusco, Nancy; Adams, Ramon; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recurrent gynecologic cancers are often difficult to manage without significant morbidity. We conducted a phase II study to assess the safety and the efficacy of ablative robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) in women with metastatic gynecologic cancers. Methods: A total of 50 patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer who had single or multiple (≤4) metastases underwent robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT (24Gy/3 daily doses). Toxicities were graded prospectively by common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). SBRT target responses were recorded following RECIST criteria (version 1.0). Rates of clinical benefit for SBRT and non-radiosurgical disease relapse were calculated. Disease-free and overall survivals were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for prognostic variables. Findings: SBRT was safely delivered, with 49 (98%) of 50 patients completing three prescribed fractions. The most frequent grade 2 or higher adverse events attributed to SBRT included fatigue (16%), nausea (8%), and diarrhea (4%). One (2%) grade four hyperbilirubinemia occurred. SBRT target response was 96% (48 of 50 patients). A 6-month clinical benefit was recorded in 34 [68% (95% CI, 53.2, 80.1)] patients. No SBRT targeted disease progressed. Non-radiosurgical disease relapse occurred in 31 (62%) patients. Median disease-free survival was 7.8 months (95% CI, 4.0, 11.6). Median overall survival was 20.2 months (95% CI, 10.9, 29.5). Interpretation: SBRT safely controlled metastatic gynecologic cancer targets. Given an observed high rate of non-radiosurgical disease relapse, a phase I trial assessing co-administration of SBRT and cytotoxic chemotherapy is underway. Funding: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center.

  4. Phase II clinical trial of robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery for metastatic gynecologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eKunos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Recurrent gynecologic cancers are often difficult to manage without significant morbidity. We conducted a phase II study to assess the safety and the efficacy of ablative robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT in women with metastatic gynecologic cancers. Methods A total of 50 patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer who had single or multiple (≤4 metastases underwent robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT (24Gy/3 daily doses. Toxicities were graded prospectively by common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0. SBRT target responses were recorded following RECIST criteria (version 1.0. Rates of clinical benefit for SBRT and non-radiosurgical disease relapse were calculated. Disease-free and overall survivals were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for prognostic variables.Findings SBRT was safely delivered, with 49 (98% of 50 patients completing three prescribed fractions. The most frequent grade 2 or higher adverse events attributed to SBRT included fatigue (16%, nausea (8% and diarrhea (4%. One (2% grade 4 hyperbilirubinemia occurred. SBRT target response was 96% (48 of 50 patients. A 6-month clinical benefit was recorded in 34 (68% [95% CI, 53.2, 80.1] patients. No SBRT-targeted disease progressed. Non-radiosurgical disease relapse occurred in 31 (62% patients. Median disease-free survival was 7.8 months (95% CI, 4.0, 11.6. Median overall survival was 20.2 months (95% CI, 10.9, 29.5.Interpretation SBRT safely controlled metastatic gynecologic cancer targets. Given an observed high rate of non-radiosurgical disease relapse, a phase I trial assessing co-administration of SBRT and cytotoxic chemotherapy is underway.Funding Case Comprehensive Cancer Center

  5. Phase II Clinical Trial of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunos, Charles A.; Brindle, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Waggoner, Steven; Zanotti, Kristine; Resnick, Kimberly; Fusco, Nancy; Adams, Ramon; Debernardo, Robert, E-mail: charles.kunos@uhhospitals.org [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-12-05

    Background: Recurrent gynecologic cancers are often difficult to manage without significant morbidity. We conducted a phase II study to assess the safety and the efficacy of ablative robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) in women with metastatic gynecologic cancers. Methods: A total of 50 patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer who had single or multiple (≤4) metastases underwent robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT (24Gy/3 daily doses). Toxicities were graded prospectively by common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). SBRT target responses were recorded following RECIST criteria (version 1.0). Rates of clinical benefit for SBRT and non-radiosurgical disease relapse were calculated. Disease-free and overall survivals were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for prognostic variables. Findings: SBRT was safely delivered, with 49 (98%) of 50 patients completing three prescribed fractions. The most frequent grade 2 or higher adverse events attributed to SBRT included fatigue (16%), nausea (8%), and diarrhea (4%). One (2%) grade four hyperbilirubinemia occurred. SBRT target response was 96% (48 of 50 patients). A 6-month clinical benefit was recorded in 34 [68% (95% CI, 53.2, 80.1)] patients. No SBRT targeted disease progressed. Non-radiosurgical disease relapse occurred in 31 (62%) patients. Median disease-free survival was 7.8 months (95% CI, 4.0, 11.6). Median overall survival was 20.2 months (95% CI, 10.9, 29.5). Interpretation: SBRT safely controlled metastatic gynecologic cancer targets. Given an observed high rate of non-radiosurgical disease relapse, a phase I trial assessing co-administration of SBRT and cytotoxic chemotherapy is underway. Funding: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center.

  6. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Generic Locking Plate Utilization at a Level II Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcphillamy, Austin; Gurnea, Taylor P; Moody, Alastair E; Kurnik, Christopher G; Lu, Minggen

    2016-12-01

    In today's climate of cost containment and fiscal responsibility, generic implant alternatives represent an interesting area of untapped resources. As patents have expired on many commonly used trauma implants, generic alternatives have recently become available from a variety of sources. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical and economic impact of a cost containment program using high quality, generic orthopaedic locking plates. The implants available for study were anatomically precontoured plates for the clavicle, proximal humerus, distal radius, proximal tibia, distal tibia, and distal fibula. Retrospective review. Level II Trauma center. 828 adult patients with operatively managed clavicle, proximal humerus, distal radius, proximal tibia, tibial pilon, and ankle fractures. Operative treatment with conventional or generic implants. The 414 patients treated with generic implants were compared with 414 patients treated with conventional implants. There were no significant differences in age, sex, presence of diabetes, smoking history or fracture type between the generic and conventional groups. No difference in operative time, estimated blood loss or intraoperative complication rate was observed. No increase in postoperative infection rate, hardware failure, hardware loosening, malunion, nonunion or need for hardware removal was noted. Overall, our hospital realized a 56% reduction in implant costs, an average savings of $1197 per case, and a total savings of $458,080 for the study period. Use of generic orthopaedic implants has been successful at our institution, providing equivalent clinical outcomes while significantly reducing implant expenditures. Based on our data, the use of generic implants has the potential to markedly reduce operative costs as long as quality products are used. Therapeutic Level III.

  7. The potential of SGLT2 inhibitors in phase II clinical development for treating type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafili, K; Maltezos, E; Papanas, N

    2016-10-01

    There is now an abundance of anti-diabetic agents. However, only few patients achieve glycemic targets. Moreover, current glucose-lowering agents mainly depend upon insulin secretion or function. Sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors present a novel glucose-lowering therapy, inducing glycosuria in an insulin-independent fashion. In this review, the authors discuss the key efficacy and safety data from phase II clinical trials in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) of the main SGLT2 inhibitors approved or currently in development, and provide a rationale for their use in T2DM. Despite the very promising characteristics of this new therapeutic class, a number of issues await consideration. One important question is what to expect from head-to-head comparison data. We also need to know if dual inhibition of SGLT1/SGLT2 is more efficacious in reducing HbA1c and how this therapy affects metabolic and cardiovascular parameters. Additionally, several SGLT2 agents that have not yet come to market have hitherto been evaluated in Asian populations, whereas approved SGLT2 inhibitors have been frequently studied in other populations, including Caucasian subjects. Thus, we need more information on the potential role of ethnicity on their efficacy and safety.

  8. Comparative clinical characteristics of depression in bipolar affective disorders types I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tyuvina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the clinical features of depression within bipolar affective disorders types I and II (BADI and BADII.Patients and methods. An examination was made in 100 depressive patients, including 25 with BADI, 37 with BADII, and 38 with recurrent depressive disorder (RDD (a comparison group. The patients' status was evaluated in accordance with the ICD-10 and DSM-V affective disorder criteria, by using a specially developed questionnaire.Results. BAD-related depression has features distinguishing it from RDD: sexual preference (men; an earlier age of disease onset; a shorter duration, but a higher frequency of exacerbations; a greater tendency for the continuum; a more marked decrease in social and family adaptation; development in people with predominantly hyperthymic premorbid; more frequently a family history of affective disorders, schizophrenia, and alcoholism; high comorbidity with metabolic diseases and psychoactive substance abuse; worse health more commonly in autumn and winter; a predominant anxious affect and an obviously decreasing interest in the structure of depression; a higher incidence of atypical sleep, appetite, and weight disorders; high suicidal activity; higher motor retardation (in BADI; relatively small involvement of somatic complaints in BAD I and frequent panic attacks in BADII.Conclusion. Knowledge of the specific features of BAD-related depression will be able to make a more accurate differential diagnosis and to perform more effective treatment in these patients.

  9. Clinical significance of nuclide renal dynamic imaging and urine microalbumin inspection of type II diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Jin Yaoge; Shi Xueying; Gao Yong

    2011-01-01

    To investigate clinical value of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine microalbumin in early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy, GFR in 60 patients with type II diabetes mellitus and a control group of 20 were determined using 99 Tc m DTPA renal dynamic imaging and urine microalbumin. The following results were obtained.Among the 60 patients with diabetes, 5 patients had increased GFRs of, 142.0±13.6 mg/min, which was 35% higher than that of controls and differed significantly from the control (P<0.01); 20 patients had GFRs of 102.2±10.2 mg/min, which differed little from the control; and 35 patients had declined GFRs of 57.2±18.0 mg/min, which was 54.3% lowered than the control and differed significantly from the control (P<0.01). The urine microalbumin in diabetes patients was significantly higher than the control. In conclusion, the GFR is a good index of the early kidney injury in diabetic patients. The combined detection of GFR and urine microalbumin can improve the early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy, and may help to monitor the treatment response and assess prognosis. (authors)

  10. Clinical practice guidelines for treatment of acne vulgaris: a critical appraisal using the AGREE II instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclemente, Gloria; Acosta, Jorge-Luis; Tamayo, Maria-Eulalia; Bonfill, Xavier; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    A significant number of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) about the treatment of acne vulgaris in adolescents and adults have been published worldwide. However, little is known about the quality of CPGs in this field. The aim of this study was to appraise the methodological quality of published acne vulgaris CPGs. We performed a systematic review of published CPGs on acne vulgaris therapy from July 2002 to July 2012. Three reviewers independently assessed each CPG using the AGREE II instrument. A standardized score was calculated for each of the six domains. Our search strategy identified 103 citations but just six met our inclusion criteria. Agreement among reviewers was very good: 0.981. The domains that scored better were: "scope and purpose" and "clarity and presentation". Those that scored worse were "stakeholder involvement", "rigor of development", and "applicability". The European and the Malaysian CPGs were the only recommended with no further modifications. In addition, the Mexican, Colombian and the United States guidelines were recommended with provisos, with lower scores regarding stakeholder involvement, rigor of development and applicability. Only two guidelines clearly reported outcome measures for evaluating efficacy or included quality of life outcomes. CPGs varied regarding the consideration of light/laser therapy or consideration of complementary/alternative medicines. None of them included cost considerations of drugs such as systemic isotretinoin. In conclusion, published acne vulgaris CPGs for acne therapy vary in quality with a clear need to improve their methodological rigor. This could be achieved with the adherence to current CPGs development standards.

  11. Comparative Analysis between preoperative Radiotherapy and postoperative Radiotherapy in Clinical Stage I and II Endometrial Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol; Chung, Eun Ji; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Woo Cheol; Chang, Sei Kyung; Oh, Young Taek; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To obtain the optical treatment method in patients with endometrial carcinoma(clinical stage FIGO I, II) by comparative analysis between preoperative radiotherapy(pre-op R) and postoperative radiotherapy(post-op RT). Materials and Methods : A retrospective review of 62 endometrial carcinoma patients referred to the Yonsei Cancer Center for radiotherapy between 1985 and 1991 was undertaken. Of 62 patients, 19 patients(Stage I; 12 patients, Stage II; 7 patients) received pre-op RT before TAH(Total Abdominal Hysterectomy) and BSO(Bilateral Salphingoophorectomy) (Group 1) and 43 patients( Stage 1; 32 patients, Stage 2; 11 patients) received post-op RT after TAH and BSO (Group 2). Pre-op irradiation was given 4-6 weeks prior to surgery and post-op RT was administered on 4-5 weeks following surgery. All patients exept 1 patient(Group2; ICR alone) received external irradiation. Seventy percent(13/19) of pre-op RT group and 54 percent(23/42) of post-op RT group received external pelvic irradiation and intracavitary radiation therapy(ICR). External radiation dose was 39.6-55Gy(median 45Gy) in 5-6 week through opposed AP/PA fields or 4-field box technique treating daily, five days per week, 180cGy per fraction. ICR doses were prescribed to point A(20-39.6 Gy, median 39Gy) in Group 1 and 0.5cm depth from vaginal surface (18-30 Gy, median 21Gy) in Group2. Results : The overall 5 year survival rate was 95%. No survival difference between pre-op and post-op RT group.(89.3% vs 97.7%, p>0.1) There was no survival difference by stage, grade and histology between two groups. The survival rate was not affected by presence of residual tumor of surgical specimen after pre-op RT in Group 1(p>0.1), but affected by presence of lymph node metastasis in post-op RT group(p<0.5). The complication rate of pre-op RT group was higher than post-op RT.(16% vs 5%) Conclusion : Post-op radiotherapy offers the advantages of accurate surgical-pathological staging and low complication rate

  12. Differentiation of irradiation and cetuximab induced skin reactions in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer undergoing radioimmunotherapy: the HICARE protocol (Head and neck cancer: ImmunoChemo and Radiotherapy with Erbitux) – a multicenter phase IV trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habl, G; Potthoff, K; Haefner, MF; Abdollahi, A; Hassel, JC; Boller, E; Indorf, M; Debus, J

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCCHN) not being capable to receive platinum-based chemoradiation, radiotherapy can be intensified by addition of cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab is a feasible treatment option showing a favourable toxicity profile. The most frequent side effect of radiotherapy is radiation dermatitis, the most common side effect of treatment with cetuximab is acneiform rash. Incidence and severity of these frequent, often overlapping and sometimes limiting skin reactions, however, are not well explored. A clinical and molecular differentiation between radiogenic skin reactions and skin reactions caused by cetuximab which may correlate with outcome, have never been described before. The HICARE study is a national, multicenter, prospective phase IV study exploring the different types of skin reactions that occur in patients with LASCCHN undergoing radioimmun(chemo)therapy with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab. 500 patients with LASCCHN will be enrolled in 40 participating sites in Germany. Primary endpoint is the rate of radiation dermatitis NCI CTCAE grade 3 and 4 (v. 4.02). Radioimmunotherapy will be applied according to SmPC, i.e. cetuximab will be administered as loading dose and then weekly during the radiotherapy. Irradiation will be applied as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or 3D-dimensional radiation therapy. The HICARE trial is expected to be one of the largest trials ever conducted in head and neck cancer patients. The goal of the HICARE trial is to differentiate skin reactions caused by radiation from those caused by the monoclonal antibody cetuximab, to evaluate the incidence and severity of these skin reactions and to correlate them with outcome parameters. Besides, the translational research program will help to identify and confirm novel

  13. Usher syndrome clinical types I and II: could ocular symptoms and signs differentiate between the two types?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilou, Ekaterini T; Rubin, Benjamin I; Caruso, Rafael C; Reed, George F; Pikus, Anita; Hejtmancik, James F; Iwata, Fumino; Redman, Joy B; Kaiser-Kupfer, Muriel I

    2002-04-01

    Usher syndrome types I and II are clinical syndromes with substantial genetic and clinical heterogeneity. We undertook the current study in order to identify ocular symptoms and signs that could differentiate between the two types. Sixty-seven patients with Usher syndrome were evaluated. Based on audiologic and vestibular findings, patients were classified as either Usher type I or II. The severity of the ocular signs and symptoms present in each type were compared. Visual acuity, visual field area, electroretinographic amplitude, incidence of cataract and macular lesions were not significantly different between Usher types I and II. However, the ages when night blindness was perceived and retinitis pigmentosa was diagnosed differed significantly between the two types. There seems to be some overlap between types I and II of Usher syndrome in regard to the ophthalmologic findings. However, night blindness appears earlier in Usher type I (although the difference in age of appearance appears to be less dramatic than previously assumed). Molecular elucidation of Usher syndrome may serve as a key to understanding these differences and, perhaps, provide a better tool for use in clinical diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counseling.

  14. Radioimmunotherapy using {sup 131}I-rituximab in patients with advanced stage B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienert, Maren; Reisinger, Ingrid; Humplik, Beatrice I.; Reim, Christel; Kroessin, Thomas; Avril, Norbert; Munz, Dieter L. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Srock, Stefanie; Pezzutto, Antonio [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Haematology and Oncology, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, toxicity and therapeutic response of non-myeloablative radioimmunotherapy using {sup 131}I-rituximab in previously heavily treated patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). Nine patients with relapsed, refractory or transformed B-NHL received ten radioimmunotherapies. Patients had a median of 5 (range 2-7) prior standard therapies. Four patients had received prior high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, and eight had received prior rituximab therapy. Histopathology consisted of four mantle cell, one follicular and four diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Rituximab, a monoclonal chimeric anti-CD20 antibody (IDEC-C2B8), was labelled with {sup 131}I using the Iodogen method. The administered activity (2,200{+-}600 MBq) was based on a dosimetrically calculated 45 cGy total-body radiation dose. All patients received an infusion of 2.5 mg/kg of rituximab prior to administration of the radiopharmaceutical. No acute adverse effects were observed after the administration of{sup 131}I-rituximab. Radioimmunotherapy was safe in our patient group and achieved one complete response ongoing at 14 months and two partial responses progressing at 12 and 13 months after treatment. One partial responder was re-treated with radioimmunotherapy and achieved an additional progression-free interval of 7 months. Four non-responders with bulky disease died 4.8{+-}2.0 months after therapy. Three patients had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level prior to radioimmunotherapy and none of the patients responded. Of two patients who received radioimmunotherapy as an additional treatment after salvage chemotherapy, one continues to be disease-free at 9 months and one relapsed at 5 months' follow-up. Reversible grade 3 or 4 haematological toxicity occurred in seven of nine patients. Median nadirs were 35 days for platelets, 44 days for leucocytes and 57 days for erythrocytes. (orig.)

  15. Nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: preliminary study of a Phase II clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jun Liang,1 Mingyan E,2 Gang Wu,3 Lujun Zhao,4 Xia Li,5 Xia Xiu,6 Ning Li,1 Bo Chen,1 Zhouguang Hui,1 Jima Lv,1 Hui Fang,1 Yu Tang,1 Nan Bi,1 Wenqing Wang,1 Yirui Zhai,1 Tao Li,1 Dongfu Chen,1 Shuangmei Zou,7 Ning Lu,7 Rolando Perez-Rodríguez,8 Junqi Zheng,9 Luhua Wang11Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Radiotherapy, Tongji Cancer Center Hospital, Wuhan, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 5Department of Radiotherapy, LiaoNing Province Cancer Hospital, Shenyang, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Radiotherapy, Beijing Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 7Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 8Center of Molecular Immunology, Havana, Cuba; 9School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaObjective: To determine the safety and therapeutic effects of nimotuzumab (h-R3 combined with radiotherapy in esophageal cancer.Methods: This Phase II clinical trial involved 42 patients with stage II (inoperable or refused surgery to stage IV (supraclavicular lymph node metastasis only esophageal cancers treated between November 2008 and July 2010. All patients had squamous cell carcinomas, and all received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 200 mg nimotuzumab per week during radiotherapy.Results: There were 9, 25, and 8 patients with stage II, III and IV disease, respectively. All except two patients received 50–70 Gy radiation; 37 patients (88.1% received more than five nimotuzumab doses. Grade III toxicities (21.4% of all adverse events included esophagitis and gastrointestinal, dermatological and hematological

  16. The clinical-familial correlates and naturalistic outcome of panic-disorder-agoraphobia with and without lifetime bipolar II comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Cristina

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of the literature on panic disorder (PD-bipolar disorder (BP cormorbidity concerns BP-I. This literature emphasizes the difficulties encountered in pharmacologic treatment and outcome when such comorbidity is present. The present report explores these issues with respect to BP-II. Methods The sample comprised 326 outpatients (aged 34.5 ± 11.5 years old; 222 females with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 3rd edn, revised (DSM-III-R PD-agoraphobia; among them 52 subjects (16% were affected by lifetime comorbidity with BP-II. Patients were evaluated by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID, the Panic-Agoraphobia Interview, and the Longitudinal Interview Follow-up Examination (Life-Up and treated according to routine clinical practice at the University of Pisa, Italy, for a period of 3 years. Clinical and course features were compared between subjects with and without BP-II. All patients received the clinicians' choice of antidepressants and, in the case of the subsample with BP-II, mood stabilizers (for example, valproate, lithium were among the mainstays of treatment. Results In comparison to patients without bipolar comorbidity, those with BP-II showed a significantly greater frequency of social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, alcohol-related disorders, and separation anxiety during childhood and adolescence. Regarding family history, a significantly greater frequency of PD and mood disorders was present among the BP-II. No significant differences were observed in the long-term course of PD or agoraphobic symptoms under pharmacological treatment or the likelihood of spontaneous pharmacological treatment interruptions. Conclusion Although the severity and outcome of panic-agoraphobic symptomatology appear to be similar in patients with and without lifetime bipolar comorbidity, the higher number of concomitant disorders in our PD patients with BP-II does indicate a greater

  17. Ultrasensitive detection of pepsinogen I and pepsinogen II by a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay and its preliminary clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Biao [Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province 214063 (China) and Southern Yangzi University, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province 214036 (China)]. E-mail: huangbiao78@hotmail.com; Xiao Hualong [Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province 214063 (China); Zhang Xiangrui [Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province 214063 (China); Zhu, Lan [Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province 214063 (China); Liu Haiyan [Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province 214063 (China); Jin Jian [Southern Yangzi University, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province 214036 (China)

    2006-06-30

    .8 {+-} 7.4 for the PG I/PG II ratio. The normal ranges of Serum PG I levels for healthy volunteers were 58.2-266.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}, and those of serum PG II levels were less than 25.3 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The availability of a highly sensitive, reliable, and convenient PG-TRFIA method for quantifying PG will allow investigations into the possible diagnostic value of this analysis in various clinical conditions, including gastric carcinoma, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastritis. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the assay were satisfactory for clinical applications.

  18. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Jun; Fisher, Darrell R.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-01-01

    We report a novel approach for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin core-shell nanoparticles based on an apoferritin template, conjugated to the protein biotin. To prepare the nanoparticle conjugates, we used non-radioactive lutetium as a model target or surrogate for radiolutetium (177Lu). The central cavity, multi-channel structure, and chemical properties of apoferritin are well-suited for sequentially diffusing lutetium and phosphate ions into the cavity--resulting in a stable core-shell composite. We characterized the synthesized LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We tested the pre-targeting capability of biotin-modified lutetium/apoferritin nanoparticle using streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and streptavidin-modified fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tracer. This paper presents a simple, fast, and efficient method for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle conjugates with biotin for potential applications in radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoimaging of cancer

  19. EANM procedure guideline for radio-immunotherapy for B-cell lymphoma with 90Y-radiolabelled ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennvall, Jan; Fischer, Manfred; Brans, Boudewijn; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Bombardieri, Emilio; Bodei, Lisa; Giammarile, Francesco; Lassmann, Michael; Oyen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    In January 2004, EMEA approved 90 Y-radiolabelled ibritumomab tiuxetan, Zevalin, in Europe for the treatment of adult patients with rituximab-relapsed or -refractory CD20+ follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The number of European nuclear medicine departments using Zevalin is continuously increasing, since the therapy is often considered successful. The Therapy, Oncology and Dosimetry Committees have worked together in order to define some EANM guidelines on the use of Zevalin, paying particular attention to the problems related to nuclear medicine. The purpose of this guideline is to assist the nuclear medicine physician in treating and managing patients who may be candidates for radio-immunotherapy. The guideline also stresses the need for close collaboration with the physician(s) treating the patient for the underlying disease. (orig.)

  20. Polypharmacy as a Risk Factor for Clinically Relevant Sarcopenia: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Maximilian; Spira, Dominik; Demuth, Ilja; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Norman, Kristina

    2017-12-12

    Sarcopenia affects more than 10% of older adults. Next to age-associated physiologic changes, diseases like diabetes or inflammatory, neurological, malignant and endocrine disorders may contribute to the development of sarcopenia. Likewise, polypharmacy, i.e., multiple drug use, is common among older adults. Although the two conditions frequently co-occur, the association of polypharmacy with sarcopenia has not yet been examined. We investigated the association of polypharmacy and sarcopenia in a large cohort of community-dwelling older adults (60-84 years). Thousand five hundred and two participants from the Berlin Aging Study II were included. Polypharmacy was defined as concurrent use of 5 or more drugs (prescription and nonprescription). Body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and appendicular lean mass (ALM) was calculated as sum of the four limbs' lean mass. Sarcopenia was defined as low ALM-to-body mass index (BMI)-ratio using validated sex-specific cutoffs. Mean age was 68.7 ± 3.7 years, 50.7% were female. The median (interquartile range) number of drugs was 2 (1-4); 21.1% of subjects reported regular use of ≥5 drugs. Subjects with polypharmacy were more often sarcopenic according to the applied ALM/BMI-cutoffs (16.3% vs 6.9%, p sarcopenia (odds ratio = 2.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33-3.75). Polypharmacy is associated with clinically relevant sarcopenia, as assessed by a low ALM/BMI. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Treatment of geographic atrophy with subconjunctival sirolimus: results of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai T; Dresner, Samuel; Forooghian, Farzin; Glaser, Tanya; Doss, Lauren; Zhou, Mei; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y

    2013-04-26

    To investigate the safety and effects of subconjunctival sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor and immunosuppressive agent, for the treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). The study was a single-center, open-label phase II trial, enrolling 11 participants with bilateral GA; eight participants completed 24 months of follow-up. Sirolimus (440 μg) was administered every 3 months as a subconjunctival injection in only one randomly assigned eye in each participant for 24 months. Fellow eyes served as untreated controls. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in the total GA area at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in visual acuity, macular sensitivity, central retinal thickness, and total drusen area. The study drug was well tolerated with few symptoms and related adverse events. Study treatment in study eyes was not associated with structural or functional benefits relative to the control fellow eyes. At month 24, mean GA area increased by 54.5% and 39.7% in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.41), whereas mean visual acuity decreased by 21.0 letters and 3.0 letters in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.03). Substantial differences in mean changes in drusen area, central retinal thickness, and macular sensitivity were not detected for all analysis time points up to 24 months. Repeated subconjunctival sirolimus was well-tolerated in patients with GA, although no positive anatomic or functional effects were identified. Subconjunctival sirolimus may not be beneficial in the prevention of GA progression, and may potentially be associated with effects detrimental to visual acuity. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00766649.).

  2. 177Lu labeling of Herceptin and preclinical validation as a new radiopharmaceutical for radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Daha, Fariba Johari

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In the present study, Herceptin was labeled with lutetium-177 via DOTA, and the necessary preclinical quality control tests (in vitro and in vivo) were performed to evaluate its use as a radioimmunotherapy agent. Material and Methods: Herceptin was conjugated to DOTA as a chelator in three different conjugation buffers (ammonium acetate, carbonate and HEPES buffer); each of the resulting conjugates was compared with respect to in vitro characteristics such as number of chelates per antibody, incorporated activity, immunoreactivity and in vitro stability in PBS buffer and blood serum. The biodistribution study and gamma camera imaging were performed in mice bearing breast tumors. To assess the therapeutic effects of 177 Lu-Herceptin, cytotoxicity was investigated for 7 days in a SKBr3 breast cancer cell line. Results: Carbonate buffer was the best conjugation buffer (number of chelates per antibody: 6; incorporated activity: 81%; immunoreactivity: 87%; buffer stability: 86%; serum stability: 81%, after 4 days). The efficient tumor uptake observed in the biodistribution studies was consistent with the gamma camera image results. At a concentration of 4 μg ml -1 , 177 Lu-Herceptin (surviving cells: 5±0.6% of the total cells) of the total cells corresponded to an approximately eightfold increase in cytotoxicity in comparison to unmodified Herceptin (surviving cells: 43±3.9%). Conclusion: The new complex described herein could be considered for further evaluation in animals and potentially in humans as a radiopharmaceutical for use in the radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer. These results may be important for patients who cannot tolerate the therapeutic dosage of Herceptin currently used because of heart problems.

  3. Phase-II Clinical Validation of a Powered Exoskeleton for the Treatment of Elbow Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Simona; Cempini, Marco; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Posteraro, Federico; Vitiello, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Spasticity is a typical motor disorder in patients affected by stroke. Typically post-stroke rehabilitation consists of repetition of mobilization exercises on impaired limbs, aimed to reduce muscle hypertonia and mitigate spastic reflexes. It is currently strongly debated if the treatment's effectiveness improves with the timeliness of its adoption; in particular, starting intensive rehabilitation as close as possible to the stroke event may counteract the growth and postpone the onset of spasticity. In this paper we present a phase-II clinical validation of a robotic exoskeleton in treating subacute post-stroke patients. Methods: Seventeen post-stroke patients participated in 10 daily rehabilitation sessions using the NEUROExos Elbow Module exoskeleton, each one lasting 45 min: the exercises consisted of isokinetic passive mobilization of the elbow, with torque threshold to detect excessive user's resistance to the movement. We investigated the safety by reporting possible adverse events, such as mechanical, electrical or software failures of the device or injuries or pain experienced by the patient. As regards the efficacy , the Modified Ashworth Scale, was identified as primary outcome measure and the NEEM metrics describing elbow joint resistance to passive extension (i.e., maximum extension torque and zero-torque angle) as secondary outcomes. Results: During the entire duration of the treatments no failures or adverse events for the patients were reported. No statistically significant differences were found in the Modified Ashworth Scale scores, between pre-treatment and post-treatment and between post-treatment and follow-up sessions, indicating the absence of spasticity increase throughout (14 days) and after (3-4 months follow-up) the treatment. Exoskeleton metrics confirmed the absence of significant difference in between pre- and post-treatment data, whereas intra-session data highlighted significant differences in the secondary outcomes

  4. Phase-II Clinical Validation of a Powered Exoskeleton for the Treatment of Elbow Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Crea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spasticity is a typical motor disorder in patients affected by stroke. Typically post-stroke rehabilitation consists of repetition of mobilization exercises on impaired limbs, aimed to reduce muscle hypertonia and mitigate spastic reflexes. It is currently strongly debated if the treatment's effectiveness improves with the timeliness of its adoption; in particular, starting intensive rehabilitation as close as possible to the stroke event may counteract the growth and postpone the onset of spasticity. In this paper we present a phase-II clinical validation of a robotic exoskeleton in treating subacute post-stroke patients.Methods: Seventeen post-stroke patients participated in 10 daily rehabilitation sessions using the NEUROExos Elbow Module exoskeleton, each one lasting 45 min: the exercises consisted of isokinetic passive mobilization of the elbow, with torque threshold to detect excessive user's resistance to the movement. We investigated the safety by reporting possible adverse events, such as mechanical, electrical or software failures of the device or injuries or pain experienced by the patient. As regards the efficacy, the Modified Ashworth Scale, was identified as primary outcome measure and the NEEM metrics describing elbow joint resistance to passive extension (i.e., maximum extension torque and zero-torque angle as secondary outcomes.Results: During the entire duration of the treatments no failures or adverse events for the patients were reported. No statistically significant differences were found in the Modified Ashworth Scale scores, between pre-treatment and post-treatment and between post-treatment and follow-up sessions, indicating the absence of spasticity increase throughout (14 days and after (3–4 months follow-up the treatment. Exoskeleton metrics confirmed the absence of significant difference in between pre- and post-treatment data, whereas intra-session data highlighted significant differences in the

  5. Intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas. First clinical results of Tsukuba phase I/II trial using JAERI mixed thermal-epithermal beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Shibata, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Since October 1999, a clinical trial of intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT) is in progress at JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor-4) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using mixed thermal-epithermal beam (thermal neutron beam I: TNB-I). Compared to pure thermal beam (thermal neutron beam II: TNB-II), TNB-I has an improved neutron delivery into the deep region than TNB-II. The clinical protocol and the preliminary results will be discussed. (author)

  6. {sup 124}I-L19-SIP for immuno-PET imaging of tumour vasculature and guidance of {sup 131}I-L19-SIP radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijink, Bernard M.; Perk, Lars R.; Budde, Marianne; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Leemans, C.R. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Visser, Gerard W.M.; Kloet, Reina W. [VU University Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dinkelborg, Ludger M. [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany); Neri, Dario [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland); Dongen, Guus A.M.S. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-08-15

    The human monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragment L19-SIP is directed against extra domain B (ED-B) of fibronectin, a marker of tumour angiogenesis. A clinical radioimmunotherapy (RIT) trial with {sup 131}I-L19-SIP was recently started. In the present study, after GMP production of {sup 124}I and efficient production of {sup 124}I-L19-SIP, we aimed to demonstrate the suitability of {sup 124}I-L19-SIP immuno-PET for imaging of angiogenesis at early-stage tumour development and as a scouting procedure prior to clinical {sup 131}I-L19-SIP RIT. {sup 124}I was produced in a GMP compliant way via {sup 124}Te(p,n){sup 124}I reaction and using a TERIMO trademark module for radioiodine separation. L19-SIP was radioiodinated by using a modified version of the IODO-GEN method. The biodistribution of coinjected {sup 124}I- and {sup 131}I-L19-SIP was compared in FaDu xenograft-bearing nude mice, while {sup 124}I PET images were obtained from mice with tumours of <50 to {proportional_to}700 mm{sup 3}. {sup 124}I was produced highly pure with an average yield of 15.4 {+-} 0.5 MBq/{mu}Ah, while separation yield was {proportional_to}90% efficient with <0.5% loss of TeO{sub 2}. Overall labelling efficiency, radiochemical purity and immunoreactive fraction were for {sup 124}I-L19-SIP: {proportional_to}80, 99.9 and >90%, respectively. Tumour uptake was 7.3{+-}2.1, 10.8{+-}1.5, 7.8{+-}1.4, 5.3{+-}0.6 and 3.1{+-}0.4%ID/g at 3, 6, 24, 48 and 72 h p.i., resulting in increased tumour to blood ratios ranging from 6.0 at 24 h to 45.9 at 72 h p.i. Fully concordant labelling and biodistribution results were obtained with {sup 124}I- and {sup 131}I-L19-SIP. Immuno-PET with {sup 124}I-L19-SIP using a high-resolution research tomograph PET scanner revealed clear delineation of the tumours as small as 50 mm{sup 3} and no adverse uptake in other organs. {sup 124}I-MAb conjugates for clinical immuno-PET can be efficiently produced. Immuno-PET with {sup 124}I-L19-SIP appeared qualified for sensitive

  7. Pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting of 131I-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of the chimeric monoclonal antibody G250: preclinical and clinical pilot studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.H.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Buijs, W.C.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical and animal studies of chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 (moAb cG250) for the targeting of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), to date, have been with the intact IgG form. To determine whether F(ab')2 fragments are more suited for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) than intact IgG,

  8. Comparison between radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiation therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhao-Chong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 136 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Tang, Zhao-You; Yang, Bing-Hui; Liu, Kang-Da; Wu, Zhi-Quan; Fan, Jia; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Zhou, Jian [Liver Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Jiang, Guo-Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital. Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2002-12-01

    It has previously been observed in animal studies that, at equivalent doses, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is 2.5 times more effective than multiple fractions of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in inhibiting tumour growth. In this study, we compared the use of RIT and EBRT in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), treated during the past 10 years. Of 67 patients without extrahepatic involvement, 32 were treated with hepatic artery ligation combined with RIT (the RIT group) while 35 were treated with a combination of hepatic arterial chemo-embolisation and EBRT (the EBRT group). The patients in the RIT group received {sup 131}I-Hepama-1 monoclonal antibody, which was infused through the hepatic artery catheter. The patients in the EBRT group received transcatheter arterial chemo-embolisation and limited-field EBRT using a linear accelerator. Parameters observed include tumour response, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level in serum, human anti-murine antibody (HAMA) assay, T lymphocyte subsets, survival rates, routine parameters, sequential resection rates and histopathological status of the resection specimens. The sequential resection rates were 53% (17/32) and 23% (8/35), and tumour response rates were 72% (23/32) and 86% (30/35) in the RIT and EBRT groups, respectively. The main side-effects in the RIT group were mild allergic reactions. The most common toxicity in the EBRT group was an increase in liver enzymes. The liver tissue in the target volume was injured by EBRT. The injured liver tissue revealed a low-attenuation area adjacent to the hepatic tumour within the target volume on follow-up computed tomography studies after EBRT. On pathological evaluation, the low-attenuation area revealed hyperaemia, distended hepatic sinusoids packed with erythrocytes and hepatic cell loss. The sequential resection specimens from both the RIT and the EBRT group showed residual cancer tissue located at the edge of the mass. The residual cancer cells presented as giant

  9. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  10. Clinical, Immunological, and Molecular Findings in Five Patients with Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Deficiency from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnavi Aluri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive form of primary immunodeficiency disorder (PID characterized by the deficiency of MHC class II molecules. This deficiency affects the cellular and humoral immune response by impairing the development of CD4+ T helper (Th cells and Th cell-dependent antibody production by B cells. Affected children typically present with severe respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the only curative therapy available for treating these patients. This is the first report from India wherein we describe the clinical, immunological, and molecular findings in five patients with MHC class II deficiency. Our patients presented with recurrent lower respiratory tract infection as the most common clinical presentation within their first year of life and had a complete absence of human leukocyte antigen-antigen D-related (HLA-DR expression on B cells and monocytes. Molecular characterization revealed novel mutations in RFAXP, RFX5, and CIITA genes. Despite genetic heterogeneity, these patients were clinically indistinguishable. Two patients underwent HSCT but had a poor survival outcome. Detectable level of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs were measured in our patients, highlighting that this form of PID may be missed by TREC-based newborn screening program for severe combined immunodeficiency.

  11. Distinguishing bipolar II depression from major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder: demographic, clinical, and family history differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Martinez, Jennifer H; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2013-09-01

    Because of the potential treatment implications, it is clinically important to distinguish between bipolar II depression and major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder. The high frequency of diagnostic co-occurrence and resemblance of phenomenological features has led some authors to suggest that borderline personality disorder is part of the bipolar spectrum. Few studies have directly compared patients with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. In the present study from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we compared these 2 groups of patients on demographic, clinical, and family history variables. From December 1995 to May 2012, 3,600 psychiatric patients presenting to the outpatient practice at Rhode Island Hospital (Providence, Rhode Island) were evaluated with semistructured diagnostic interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II disorders. The focus of the present study is the 206 patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder and borderline personality disorder (MDD-BPD) and 62 patients with DSM-IV bipolar II depression without borderline personality disorder. The patients with MDD-BPD were significantly more often diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (P depression had a significantly higher morbid risk for bipolar disorder in their first-degree relatives than the MDD-BPD patients (P depression and major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder differed on a number of clinical and family history variables, thereby supporting the validity of this distinction. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  12. Early loading of plalatal implants (ortho-type II a prospective multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedrange Tomasz

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In orthodontic treatment, anchorage control is a fundamental aspect. Usually conventional mechanism for orthodontic anchorage control can be either extraoral or intraoral that is headgear or intermaxillary elastics. Their use are combined with various side effects such as tipping of occlusal plane or undesirable movements of teeth. Especially in cases, where key-teeth are missing, conventional anchorage defined as tooth-borne anchorage will meet limitations. Therefore, the use of endosseous implants for anchorage purposes are increasingly used to achieve positional stability and maximum anchorage. Methods/Design The intended study is designed as a prospective, multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT, comparing and contrasting the effect of early loading of palatal implant therapy versus implant loading after 12 weeks post implantation using the new ortho-implant type II anchor system device (Orthosystem Straumann, Basel, Switzerland. 124 participants, mainly adult males or females, whose diagnoses require temporary stationary implant-based anchorage treatment will be randomized 1:1 to one of two treatment groups: group 1 will receive a loading of implant standard therapy after a healing period of 12 week (gold standard, whereas group 2 will receive an early loading of orthodontic implants within 1 week after implant insertion. Participants will be at least followed for 12 months after implant placement. The primary endpoint is to investigate the behavior of early loaded palatal implants in order to find out if shorter healing periods might be justified to accelerate active orthodontic treatment. Secondary outcomes will focus e.g. on achievement of orthodontic treatment goals and quantity of direct implant-bone interface of removed bone specimens. As tertiary objective, a histologic and microtomography evaluation of all retrieved implants will be performed to obtain data on the performance of the SLA surface in human bone

  13. Myeloablative radioimmunotherapies in the conditioning of patients with AML, MDS and multiple myeloma prior to stem cell transplantation; Myeloablative Radioimmuntherapien zur Konditionierung bei Patienten mit AML, MDS und multiplem Myelom vor Stammzelltransplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmann, I. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    leukemic blasts. They enable the treatment of leukemia patients with a high medullar tumor load or extramedullar leukemic blast infiltration. Specific doses (Gy/GBq) for the {sup 90}Y-anti-CD45-mAb YAML568 are 6.4 {+-} 1.2 (bone marrow), 3.9 {+-} 1.4 (liver) and 1.1 {+-} 0.4 (kidneys). CD45 is expressed also on the extramedullar clonogenic myeloma progenitor cell that circulates in the peripheral blood. Thus, the conditioning of patients with multiple myeloma may markedly be improved using a combination of {alpha}- and {beta}-anti-CD45-mAbs. This review provides a systematic and critical overview of the currently used radionuclides and antibodies for the treatment of AML, MDS and multiple myeloma and summarizes the present literature on clinical trials of myeloablative radioimmunotherapies for conditioning before both, autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. (orig.)

  14. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part II: Approved Clinical Instructor and Student Perceptions of and Influences on Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context: Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) are expected to provide feedback to athletic training students (ATSs) during clinical education experiences. Researchers in other fields have found that clinical instructors and students often have different perceptions of actual and ideal feedback and that several factors may influence the feedback exchanges between instructors and students. However, understanding of these issues in athletic training education is minimal. Objective: To investigate the current characteristics and perceptions of and the influences on feedback exchanges between ATSs and ACIs. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: One entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: Four ACIs and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis: Individual, semistructured interviews were conducted with participants and integrated with field notes and observations for analysis. We used the constant comparative approach to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results: Participants described that feedback plays an important role in clinical education and has several purposes related to improving performance. The ACIs and ATSs also discussed several preferred characteristics of feedback. Participants identified 4 main influences on their feedback exchanges, including the ACI, the ATS, personalities, and the learning environment. Conclusions: The ACIs and ATSs had similar perceptions of ideal feedback in addition to the actual feedback that was provided during their clinical education experiences. Most of the preferences for feedback were aligned with recommendations in the literature, suggesting that existing research findings are applicable to athletic training clinical education. Several factors influenced the

  15. The Spider Venom Peptide Lycosin-II Has Potent Antimicrobial Activity against Clinically Isolated Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have been accepted as excellent candidates for developing novel antibiotics against drug-resistant bacteria. Recent studies indicate that spider venoms are the source for the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we isolated and characterized an antibacterial peptide named lycosin-II from the venom of the spider Lycosa singoriensis. It contains 21 amino acid residue lacking cysteine residues and forms a typical linear amphipathic and cationic α-helical conformation. Lycosin-II displays potent bacteriostatic effect on the tested drug-resistant bacterial strains isolated from hospital patients, including multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, which has presented a huge challenge for the infection therapy. The inhibitory ability of lycosin-II might derive from its binding to cell membrane, because Mg2+ could compete with the binding sites to reduce the bacteriostatic potency of lycosin-II. Our data suggest that lycosin-II might be a lead in the development of novel antibiotics for curing drug-resistant bacterial infections.

  16. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, CRP levels after treatment in pediatric patients with broncho-pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chuanbin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), CRP levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchopneumonia. Methods: Serum IGF-II levels were measured with RIA and serum CRP levels with immune method both before and after treatment in 33 pediatric patients with bronchopneumonia and 35 controls. Results: Before treatment the serum levels of IGF-II, CRP were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Determination of serum IGF-II, CRP levels is clinically useful in the management of pediatric patients with bronchopneumonia. (authors)

  17. Comparative clinical evaluation of removable partial dentures made of two different materials in Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundal, Maninder; Madan, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Cast Chromium Cobalt alloy has been the material of choice for fabricating Removable Partial Dentures (RPDs) but has certain drawbacks. Newer materials like the flexible Nylon based Super Polyamide have been introduced to overcome these drawbacks. The present study has compared the above two materials for nine clinical parameters. The study was carried out on 30 patients presenting with a Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation who were divided into two equal groups and clinically assessed. Statistically significant results were obtained in favor of flexible RPDs, in the parameters of 'aesthetics' and 'overall patient satisfaction'. Both groups showed more or less similar values for 'frequency of fracture of the prosthesis during usage' with the incidence being slightly higher for patients wearing the cast RPDs. The clinical parameters of 'oral soft tissue tolerance', 'gingival health', 'periodontal health' and 'adaptability in areas with undercut' were statistically at par for all the 30 patients thus suggesting the comparable biocompatibility of the two materials. The highlight of this study was the relative ease in fabrication of the flexible RPDs as compared to the cast RPDs. Based on the favorable clinical results of this study, it can be summarized that the flexible RPDs is a viable alternative to cast RPDs in Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation in the short term.

  18. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Dorrer, Holger; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Koester, Ulli; Tuerler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 67 Cu- and 177 Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide 177 Lu and the potential alternative 161 Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched 160 Gd targets. 161 Tb and 177 Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. 161 Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the 177 Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the 177 Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM 161 Tb RIT is more effective compared to 177 Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts. These results suggest that 161 Tb is a promising candidate for future clinical

  19. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [ITG Isotope Technologies Garching GmbH, Garching (Germany); Koester, Ulli [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Berne (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with {sup 67}Cu- and {sup 177}Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide {sup 177}Lu and the potential alternative {sup 161}Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched {sup 160}Gd targets. {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. {sup 161}Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the {sup 177}Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM {sup 161}Tb RIT is more effective compared to {sup 177}Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts

  20. Use of Rome II criteria in childhood defecation disorders: Applicability in clinical and research practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuijl, Wieger P.; Heijmans, Jarom; Heijmans, Hugo S. A.; Taminiau, Jan A. J. M.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders with the use of the Rome II criteria and to compare these data with the classic Iowa criteria. Study design Patients recorded defecation and encopresis frequency. A standard history was taken and a physical

  1. The hypoxic cytotoxin SR 4233 increases the effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in mice with human non-Hodgkin's lymphoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, R B; McGann, J K; Sutherland, W R; Waller, E K; Minchinton, A I; Goris, M L; Knox, S J

    1994-01-01

    To determine if either the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer etanidazole (SR 2508) or the hypoxic cytotoxin SR 4233 could improve the effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy. LC4 (an IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed toward malignant T cells) and MB-1 (an irrelevant isotype-matched control antibody) were injected intraperitoneally into severe combined immunodeficient phenotype mice with human cutaneous T cell lymphoma xenografts in order to determine the distribution of the antibodies in the tumors and normal tissues as a function of time. Computerized-pO2-histography was used to measure the median oxygen tension in the tumors. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with: (a) LC4; (b) 90Y-LC4; (c) 90Y-MB-1; (d) whole body irradiation delivered via an external 137Cs source; (e) etanidazole and 90Y-LC4; (f) SR 4233 and 90Y-LC4; (g) etanidazole; and (h) SR 4233. An additional group of mice received no treatment and served as controls. A tumor growth delay assay was used to assess the effectiveness of the different treatment regimens. LC4 accumulated in the tumors to a significantly greater extent than MB-1 (p LC4 by itself was able to produce a minor decrease in tumor size (control vs. LC4; p = 0.001). 90Y-LC4 produced greater tumor growth delay than LC4 alone (LC4 vs. 90Y-LC4; p = 0.01); however, the Yttrium-90 caused neutropenia and weight loss. The 90Y-labeled tumor-specific and non-specific antibodies both exerted greater tumor growth delay than externally delivered whole body irradiation (p LC4 (90Y-LC4 vs etanidazole and 90Y-LC4, p = 0.13). SR 4233, on the other hand, did enhance the tumor growth delay produced by 90Y-LC4 (90Y-LC4 vs. SR 4233 and 90Y-LC4, p = 0.046). The neutropenia and weight loss caused by 90Y-LC4 were exacerbated slightly (< 10%) by the administration of SR 4233. A first generation hypoxic cytotoxin, SR 4233, was able to enhance the tumor growth delay produced by radioimmunotherapy in severe combined immunodeficient phenotype mice with human cutaneous T cell

  2. Fibromyalgia in the adult Danish population: II. A study of clinical features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Jacobsen, S; Kjøller, M

    1993-01-01

    Clinical characteristics of fibromyalgia have so far been based mainly on patients identified in rheumatologic settings. This paper offers the clinical findings in fibromyalgia based on a national health interview survey, in which 123 persons fulfilled preset criteria for widespread pain. Clinical......, headache, difficulty in stair-climbing, and poorer self-evaluated health with more tender points was found. Contrary to that which was expected, fibromyalgia subjects did not suffer from sleep disturbances, irritable bowels or morning stiffness. Our findings indicate that clinical characteristics...... of fibromyalgia in the general population may differ from those found in rheumatological settings....

  3. Clinical significance of determination of serum insulin-like growth factor II levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Changming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of the changes of serum insulinlike growth factor II (IGF-II) levels in patients with chronic obstruive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Methods: The serum IGF-II levels was determined with radioimmunoassay in 60 patients with COPD and 30 controls. Results: The serum IGF-II levels in patients with COPD were significantly higher than those in controls (0.65 ± 0.22μg/L vs 0.51±0.18μg/L, P<0.01). There were no significant differences among the levels in patients of different stages (stages I, II, III). Levels of IGF-II were significantly higher in patients succumbed to the dis- ease than those in patients recoverd (P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum IGF-II levels were significantly increased in patients with COPD, especially in those succumbed. (authors)

  4. Short-interval test-retest interrater reliability of the Dutch version of the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV personality disorders (SCID-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weertman, A; ArntZ, A; Dreessen, L; van Velzen, C; Vertommen, S

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the short-interval test-retest reliability of the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-II: First, Spitzer, Gibbon, & Williams, 1995) for DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs). The SCID-II was administered to 69 in- and outpatients on two occasions separated by 1 to 6 weeks. The

  5. Metabolic and clinical effects of Ramadan fasting in patients with type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarahmadi, S.; Larijani, B.; Bastanhagh, M.H.; Pajouhi, M.; Bardar, J. R.; Zahedi, F.; Zendehdel, K.; Akrami, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of fasting on anthropometric indices and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in patients with type II diabetes. Results: Daily cholesterol intake increased in all subjects (p 0.01). Blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and serum fructosamine did not change during the study. Plasma insulin (p < 0.05), C-peptide (p < 0.01) and insulin resistance (p < 0.01) decreased only in men. Total and LDL cholesterol increased significantly in all subjects during the study. Conclusion: Ramadan fasting does not alter carbohydrate metabolism or tissue insulin sensitivity in patients with type II diabetes given appropriate dietary education and rescheduling of oral hypoglycaemic medication. Lipid profile is unfavorably altered due to changes in both diet and biochemical response to starvation. (author)

  6. Hip protectors: recommendations for conducting clinical trials--an international consensus statement (part II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, I D; Robinovitch, S; Birge, S

    2010-01-01

    While hip protectors are effective in some clinical trials, many, including all in community settings, have been unable to demonstrate effectiveness. This is due partly to differences in the design and analysis. The aim of this report is to develop recommendations for subsequent clinical research....

  7. Clinical and psychopathological features associated with treatment-emergent mania in bipolar-II depressed outpatients exposed to antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Michele; Anastasia, Annalisa; Monaco, Francesco; Novello, Stefano; Fusco, Andrea; Iasevoli, Felice; De Berardis, Domenico; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2018-07-01

    Treatment-emergent affective switch (TEAS), including treatment-emergent mania (TEM), carry significant burden in the clinical management of bipolar depression, whereas the use of antidepressants raises both efficacy, safety and tolerability concerns. The present study assesses the prevalence and clinical correlates of TEM in selected sample of Bipolar Disorder (BD) Type-II (BD-II) acute depression outpatients. Post-hoc analysis of the clinical and psychopathological features associated with TEM among 91 BD-II depressed outpatients exposed to antidepressants. Second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) (p = .005), lithium (≤ .001), cyclothymic/irritable/hyperthymic temperaments (p = ≤ .001; p = .001; p = .003, respectively), rapid-cycling (p = .005) and depressive mixed features (p = .003) differed between TEM + cases vs. TEM - controls. Upon multinomial logistic regression, the accounted psychopathological features correctly classified as much as 88.6% of TEM + cases (35/91 overall sample, or 38.46% of the sample), yet not statistically significantly [Exp(B) = .032; p = ns]. Specifically, lithium [B = - 2.385; p = .001], SGAs [B = - 2.354; p = .002] predicted lower rates of TEM + in contrast to the number of lifetime previous psychiatric hospitalizations [B = 2.380; p = .002], whereas mixed features did not [B = 1.267; p = ns]. Post-hoc analysis. Lack of systematic pharmacological history record; chance of recall bias and Berkson's biases. Permissive operational criterion for TEM. Relatively small sample size. Cyclothymic temperament and mixed depression discriminated TEM + between TEM - cases, although only lithium and the SGAs reliably predicted TEM +/- grouping. Larger-sampled/powered longitudinal replication studies are warranted to allow firm conclusions on the matter, ideally contributing to the identification of clear-cut sub-phenotypes of BD towards patient-tailored-pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy, Part II: Comparing the literature with practice across diverse clinical populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Felicity; Wigram, Tony; Stott, Dave

    2009-01-01

      A growing body of literature on therapeutic songwriting with diverse clinical populations indicates that clinicians employ a wide range of approaches. The purpose of this research was to establish trends in the clinical practice of songwriting as implemented across a range of clinical populations....... Responses to a 21-question on-line survey were obtained from 419 professional music therapists practicing in 29 countries which focused on approaches to songwriting within their practice with a single clinical population. Results suggest that in general, the literature provides good representation for what...... is occurring in clinical practice. Generally, songs were composed with individual clients in single sessions, with lyrics created prior to the music. Clinicians had a significant role in creating the music with improvised and pre-determined musical structures being equally employed.  Chi-square or comparable...

  9. A Phase II Clinical Trial Evaluating the Preventive Effectiveness of Lactobacillus Vaginal Suppositories in Patients with Recurrent Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koichiro; Uehara, Shinya; Ishii, Ayano; Sadahira, Takuya; Yamamoto, Masumi; Mitsuhata, Ritsuko; Takamoto, Atsushi; Araki, Motoo; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Masami; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections in women, and many patients experience frequent recurrence. The aim of this report is to introduce an on-going prospective phase II clinical trial performed to evaluate the preventive effectiveness of Lactobacillus vaginal suppositories for prevention of recurrent cystitis. Patients enrolled in this study are administered vaginal suppositories containing the GAI 98322 strain of Lactobacillus crispatus every 2 days or 3 times a week for one year. The primary endpoint is recurrence of cystitis and the secondary endpoints are adverse events. Recruitment began in December 2013 and target sample size is 20 participants.

  10. Radiosensitizing efficacy of iso-metronidazole after intravesical application in bladder cancer. A clinical phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kob, D.; Lilienthal, A.; Bauhardt, H.; Merkle, K.; Schroeder, E.; Schroeder, E.; Hentschel, M.

    1991-01-01

    The radiosensitizing efficacy of iso-Metronidazole, a 4-Nitroimidazole derivative, was evaluated in a prospective clinical phase II study. The results of combined radiotherapy of 25 patients with bladder cancer were compared with those of a control group of 25 patients treated with radiotherapy only. Tumor regression six months after radiotherapy was used as an endpoint. The surgical procedure was performed as double TUR. Evaluating the local tumor control after additional application of iso-Metronidazole a gain factor of 1.2 is obtained. (orig.) [de

  11. Whole Brain Radiotherapy and RRx-001: Two Partial Responses in Radioresistant Melanoma Brain Metastases from a Phase I/II Clinical Trial: A TITE-CRM Phase I/II Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michelle M; Parmar, Hemant; Cao, Yue; Pramanik, Priyanka; Schipper, Matthew; Hayman, James; Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron; Heth, Jason; Carter, Corey A; Oronsky, Arnold; Knox, Susan J; Caroen, Scott; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Lawrence, Theodore S; Lao, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with RRx-001 and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. RRx-001 is an reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent systemically nontoxic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with vascular normalizing properties under investigation in patients with various solid tumors including those with brain metastases. Metastatic melanoma to the brain is historically associated with poor outcomes and a median survival of 4 to 5 months. WBRT is a mainstay of treatment for patients with multiple brain metastases, but no significant therapeutic advances for these patients have been described in the literature. To date, candidate radiosensitizing agents have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit in patients with brain metastases, and in particular, no agent has demonstrated improved outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma. Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with novel radiosensitizing agent RRx-001 and WBRT without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Improved survival of mice bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells treated with a combination of radioimmunotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Bai, Jingming; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Naoto; Shuke, Noriyuki

    2004-01-01

    We attempted to determine whether the combined regimen of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and antiangiogenic therapy would favorably affect the survival of animals bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells. Daily antiangiogenic therapy with 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), 75 mg/kg, was initiated at 3 days following intrasplenic cell inoculation of LS180 colon cancer cells. RIT with 7 MBq of 131 I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, or 131 I-HPMS-1, an irrelevant IgG1, was conducted at 7 days. Production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by LS180 cells was assessed in vitro. All nontreated mice died by 31 days following cell inoculation (n=5). Monotherapy comprising 2-ME treatment resulted in slightly better survival of mice (n=8) (P 131 I-A7 RIT displayed a marked therapeutic effect (n=8) (P 131 I-A7 RIT and antiangiogenic therapy demonstrated a superior therapeutic effect in comparison to monotherapy consisting of either RIT or antiangiogenic therapy (n=10) (P 131 I-HPMS-1 RIT failed to provide an appreciable benefit (n=5). Treatment with 2-ME decreased VEGF production by LS180 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, a combination regimen comprising RIT and antiangiogenic therapy initiated at the early stage of metastasis would be of great benefit in terms of improvement of the therapeutic efficacy with respect to liver metastases. (orig.)

  13. Carrier-free 194Ir from an 194Os/194Ir generator - a new candidate for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Rice, D.E.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Iridium-194 (t 1/2 = 19.15 h) decays by beta-particle emission (E max = 2.236 MeV) and is a potential candidate for radioimmunotherapy. An important characteristic is availability of 194 Ir from decay of reactor-produced 194 Os (t 1/2 = 6y). We report the fabrication of the first 194 Os/ 194 Ir generator system using activated carbon. In addition, a novel gas thermochromatographic method was developed for the one step conversion of metallic Os to OsO 4 and subsequent separation and purification of OsO 4 . In this manner, the reactor irradiated enriched 192 Os target was converted to 194 OsO 4 , which was then converted to the K 2 OsCl 6 for generator loading. The yield and the elution profile of carrier-free 194 Ir, and 194 Os breakthrough were determined for a prototype generator which was evaluated over a 10-month period. (author)

  14. Radiolabeling of trastuzumab with {sup 177}Lu via DOTA, a new radiopharmaceutical for radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasaneh, Samira [Department of Medical Physics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajabi, Hossein [Department of Medical Physics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: hrajabi@modares.ac.ir; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Daha, Fariba Johari [Department of Radioisotope, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salouti, Mojtaba [Department of Biology, School of Sciences, Islamic Azad University - Zanjan Branch, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Aim: Trastuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that is used in treating breast cancer. We labeled this monoclonal antibody with lutetium-177 and performed in vitro quality control tests as a first step in the production of a new radiopharmaceutical. Material and Methods: Trastuzumab was labeled with lutetium-177 using DOTA as chelator. Radiochemical purity and stability in buffer and human blood serum were determined using thin layer chromatography. Immunoreactivity and toxicity of the complex were tested on MCF7 breast cancer cell line. Results: The radiochemical purity of the complex was 96{+-}0.9%. The stabilities in phosphate buffer and in human blood serum at 96 h postpreparation were 93{+-}1.2% and 85{+-}3.5%, respectively. The immunoreactivity of the complex was 89{+-}1.4%. At a concentration of 1 nM, the complex killed 70{+-}3% of MCF7 cells. At 1.9 nM, 90{+-}5% of the cells were killed. Conclusions: The results showed that the new complex could be considered for further evaluation in animals and possibly in humans as a new radiopharmaceutical for use in radioimmunotherapy against breast cancer.

  15. Real-time, in vivo measurement of radiation dose during radioimmunotherapy in mice using a miniature MOSFET dosimeter probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladstone, D.J.; Chin, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the first real-time measurement of absorbed radiation dose during radioimmunotherapy in mice. Dose rate and total dose at the center of the tumor were measured after administration of 90 Y-labeled antibodies using a miniature metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor radiation dosimeter probe which was inserted into the center of the tumor volume. Continuous real-time measurements were made for as long as 23 h after injection of the radiolabeled antibodies. Comparison of the real-time dose-rate measurements with estimates based on the MIRD formalism indicates good agreement. The real-time measurements are further compared to measurements made in a second experiment in which groups of mice were sacrificed at individual times after injection of the same radiolabeled antibodies. The real-time measurements agree well with the measurements in excised tumors. The real-time measurements have greater time resolution and are much more efficient than traditional uptake measurements. 17 refs., 2 figs

  16. Bloqueio do nervo supraescapular: procedimento importante na prática clínica. Parte II Suprascapular nerve block: important procedure in clinical practice. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rassi Fernandes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O bloqueio do nervo supraescapular é um método de tratamento reprodutível, confiável e extremamente efetivo no controle da dor no ombro. Esse método tem sido amplamente utilizado por profissionais na prática clínica, como reumatologistas, ortopedistas, neurologistas e especialistas em dor, na terapêutica de enfermidades crônicas, como lesão irreparável do manguito rotador, artrite reumatoide, sequelas de AVC e capsulite adesiva, o que justifica a presente revisão (Parte II. O objetivo deste estudo foi descrever as técnicas do procedimento e suas complicações descritas na literatura, já que a primeira parte reportou as indicações clínicas, drogas e volumes utilizados em aplicação única ou múltipla. Apresentamse, detalhadamente, os acessos para a realização do procedimento tanto direto como indireto, anterior e posterior, lateral e medial, e superior e inferior. Diversas são as opções para se realizar o bloqueio do nervo supraescapular. Apesar de raras, as complicações podem ocorrer. Quando bem indicado, este método deve ser considerado.The suprascapular nerve block is a reproducible, reliable, and extremely effective treatment method in shoulder pain control. This method has been widely used by professionals in clinical practice such as rheumatologists, orthopedists, neurologists, and pain specialists in the treatment of chronic diseases such as irreparable rotator cuff injury, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke sequelae, and adhesive capsulitis, which justifies the present review (Part II. The objective of this study was to describe the techniques and complications of the procedure described in the literature, as the first part reported the clinical indications, drugs, and volumes used in single or multiple procedures. We present in details the accesses used in the procedure: direct and indirect, anterior and posterior, lateral and medial, upper and lower. There are several options to perform suprascapular nerve block

  17. Enclomiphene citrate stimulates testosterone production while preventing oligospermia: a randomized phase II clinical trial comparing topical testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiehle, Ronald D; Fontenot, Gregory K; Wike, Jenny; Hsu, Kuang; Nydell, Jennifer; Lipshultz, Larry

    2014-09-01

    To determine the effect of enclomiphene citrate in men with secondary hypogonadism. Phase II clinical trial. Community dwelling men making visits to physician offices. Men with secondary hypogonadism. Oral administration of enclomiphene citrate or 1% topical T gel. Luteinizing hormone, FSH, T, and semen analysis. Treatment with enclomiphene citrate resulted in increased morning serum T, E2, and LH levels similar to those obtained with a topical T gel in men with secondary hypogonadism. Follicle-stimulating hormone and LH were increased with enclomiphene, and sperm counts were conserved. Enclomiphene citrate reverses the two hallmarks of secondary hypogonadism, namely, low serum total T and low or inappropriately normal LH while preserving sperm production. NCT01270841 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01270841). Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. GA(2)LEN skin test study II: clinical relevance of inhalant allergen sensitizations in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burbach, G J; Heinzerling, L M; Edenharter, G

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin prick testing is the standard for diagnosing IgE-mediated allergies. A positive skin prick reaction, however, does not always correlate with clinical symptoms. A large database from a Global Asthma and Allergy European Network (GA(2)LEN) study with data on clinical relevance was ...... the clinical relevance of positive skin prick tests and calls for further studies, which may, ultimately, help increase the positive predictive value of allergy testing.......BACKGROUND: Skin prick testing is the standard for diagnosing IgE-mediated allergies. A positive skin prick reaction, however, does not always correlate with clinical symptoms. A large database from a Global Asthma and Allergy European Network (GA(2)LEN) study with data on clinical relevance...... was used to determine the clinical relevance of sensitizations against the 18 most frequent inhalant allergens in Europe. The study population consisted of patients referred to one of the 17 allergy centres in 14 European countries (n = 3034, median age = 33 years). The aim of the study was to assess...

  19. Clinical significance of measurement of changes of serum IGF-II, NO levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Huajiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum IGF-II and NO levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial pneumonia. Methods: Serum IGF-II (with RIA) and NO (with Biochemical method) levels were measured in 38 pediatric patients with bronchial pneumonia both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, in the patients the serum IGF-II, and NO levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Serum IGF-II and NO levels changes could reflect the disease status of the patients as well as the progress of diseases. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of the quality of the reporting of phase II clinical trials in oncology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoirard, Romain; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Oriol, Mathieu; Tinquaut, Fabien; Chauvin, Franck; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas; Bourmaud, Aurélie

    2018-05-01

    To describe the current state of knowledge concerning the quality of reporting in phase II clinical trials in oncology and to describe the various methods published allowing this quality evaluation. databases including MEDLINE and COCHRANE were searched. Reviews and meta-analyses analyzing the quality of the reporting of phase II trials in oncology were included. Descriptive analysis of the results was performed. Thirteen publications were retained. Only 2 publications adopted a systematic approach of evaluation of the quality of reporting by overall scores. The Key Methodological Score (KMS), proposed by Grellety et al., gathering 3 items, seemed adapted for such an evaluation. A score of 3/3 was found in 16.1% of the 156 phase II trials analysed by this score. The other reviews used a qualitative analysis to evaluate the reporting, via an analysis of a single criterion, generally the statistical plan of the study. This item was considered as having been correctly reported in less than 50% of the analysed articles. The quality of reporting in phase II trials in oncology is a field that has been investigated very little (13 publications). When it is studied, the estimated level of quality is not satisfactory, whatever the method employed. The use of an overall score of evaluation is a path which should be pursued, in order to get reliable results. It also seems necessary to propose strong recommendations, which would create a consensus for the methodology and the reporting of these studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E; Cuny, Gregory D; Uhlig, Holm H; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-09-17

    RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. BOP2: Bayesian optimal design for phase II clinical trials with simple and complex endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heng; Lee, J Jack; Yuan, Ying

    2017-09-20

    We propose a flexible Bayesian optimal phase II (BOP2) design that is capable of handling simple (e.g., binary) and complicated (e.g., ordinal, nested, and co-primary) endpoints under a unified framework. We use a Dirichlet-multinomial model to accommodate different types of endpoints. At each interim, the go/no-go decision is made by evaluating a set of posterior probabilities of the events of interest, which is optimized to maximize power or minimize the number of patients under the null hypothesis. Unlike other existing Bayesian designs, the BOP2 design explicitly controls the type I error rate, thereby bridging the gap between Bayesian designs and frequentist designs. In addition, the stopping boundary of the BOP2 design can be enumerated prior to the onset of the trial. These features make the BOP2 design accessible to a wide range of users and regulatory agencies and particularly easy to implement in practice. Simulation studies show that the BOP2 design has favorable operating characteristics with higher power and lower risk of incorrectly terminating the trial than some existing Bayesian phase II designs. The software to implement the BOP2 design is freely available at www.trialdesign.org. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A phase I/II clinical trial for the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi; Uno, Takashi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Kuroda, Yuki; Yoshio, Kotaro; Itami, Jun

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes about a study protocol of phase I/II multicenter prospective clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy (HBT) for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer patients. Patients with histologically confirmed FIGO stage IB2, IIA2, IIB, and IIIB uterine cervical carcinoma width of which is larger than 5 cm assessed by MRI will be entered to this clinical trial. Protocol therapy is 30-30.6 Gy in 15-17 fractions of whole pelvic radiotherapy concurrent with weekly CDDP (40 mg/m(2)), followed by 24 Gy in 4 fractions of HBT and central shield EBRT up to 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. Tumor width is assessed again within one week before the first HBT and if the tumor width is larger than 4 cm, patients proceed to the secondary registration. In phase I section, feasibility of this will be investigated. If less than 10 % out of 20 patients experienced greater than grade 3 acute non-hematologic adverse effects, the study proceeds to phase II part. In phase II part a total of 55 patients will be accrued and the efficacy of the HBT will be investigated comparing with historical control data. If the lower margin of 90 % confidence interval of the 2-year pelvic progression-free survival of the HBT trial is higher than 64 %, the HBT is considered to be more effective than conventional ICBT. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the HBT for locally advanced cervical cancer. This trial will clarify the indication, feasibility, and efficacy of this new technique. UMIN000019081 ; Registration date: 2015/9/30.

  4. The periodontal abscess (II). Short-term clinical and microbiological efficacy of 2 systemic antibiotic regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, D; Roldán, S; O'Connor, A; Sanz, M

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this short-term open parallel longitudinal clinical study was to compare the clinical and microbiological efficacy of 2 different antibiotic regimes in the treatment of acute periodontal abscesses. After patient selection, a clinical examination was carried out recording the following variables: pain, edema, redness, swelling, bleeding on probing, suppuration, tooth mobility, lymphadenopathy, and probing pocket depth. Microbiological samples were taken from the lesion and the patient was randomly assigned to one of two antibiotic regimes: azithromycin or amoxicillin/clavulanate. Clinical variables were recorded, and microbiological samples were taken, at 3-5 days, 10-12 days and 30 days. Additional mechanical treatment (debridement and scaling) was performed in the third visit (10-12 days). Blood and urine samples were collected at baseline and after 10-12 days. Microbiological samples were processed by anaerobic culturing, and isolated periodontal pathogens were tested for antibiotic susceptibility by means of the spiral gradient endpoint methodology. 15 patients took azithromycin, and 14 amoxicillin/clavulanate. Subjective clinical variables demonstrated statistically significant improvements with both antibiotic regimes, which lasted for at least 1 month (pperiodontal abscesses in periodontitis patients.

  5. Morfeo Study II: Clinical Course and Complications in Patients With Long-Term Disorders of Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Caterina; Bertoletti, Erik; Matera, Nunzio; Farinelli, Marina; Pedone, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    The life expectancy of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOCs) is ever-increasing, but little is known about their clinical course over late stages. Several issues (premorbid conditions, complications and pressure sores) are to be considered for their effect on clinical outcome, risk of death and recovery of functional performance. Unfortunately, in late stages of long-term rehabilitation, these aspects are still more neglected than in acute and postacute stages. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical course and the complications of patients in the late stages of DOCs and to explore the relationship between mortality and specific biomarkers. A total of 112 patients, admitted over 10 years in a dedicated ward, were retrospectively studied. Sociodemographic data, preadmission and inpatient clinical features were collected. Disability Rating Scale scores, complications including pressure sores and blood markers were assessed monthly. Data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and correlations using SPSS. Most patients were men older than 50 years with a nontraumatic etiology and a history of hypertension (42.86%). The most common complication was pneumonia (76.79%). No association was found between sex and mortality or between etiology and mortality (P > 0.05). Mortality correlated significantly with sepsis (ρ = 0.253), albumin (ρ = -0.558), hemoglobin (ρ = -0.354) and white blood cells (ρ = 0.243). Only 42% of patients remained unchanged at Disability Rating Scale evaluation. These data confirmed that DOCs are not static conditions and they require ongoing monitoring and assessment of clinical status, level of consciousness and laboratory biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Clinical classification and genetic mutation study of two pedigrees with type II Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2015-12-01

    To explore the molecular etiology of two pedigrees affected with type II Waardenburg syndrome (WS2) and to provide genetic diagnosis and counseling. Blood samples were collected from the proband and his family members. Following extraction of genomic DNA, the coding sequences of PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were amplified with PCR and subjected to DNA sequencing to detect potential mutations. A heterozygous deletional mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene has been identified in all patients from the first family, while no mutation was found in the other WS2 related genes including PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2. The heterozygous deletion mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in the first family. It is expected that other genes may also underlie WS2.

  7. Myeloablative radioimmunotherapy with 188Re-CD66mAb before stem cell transplantation. No increase of proinflammatory cytokine levels of TNF-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutschler, J.; Reske, S.N.; Steinbach, G.; Bunjes, D.; Buchmann, I.

    2009-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) serum levels may increase due to intensive conditioning regimes with high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation (TBI) before stem cell transplantation. This increases the risk for developing acute graft versus host disease (aGvHD) after stem cell transplantation. In this prospective study we investigated the influence of radioimmunotherapy with 188 Re-CD-66-mAb on changes on TNF-α serum levels. Patients, methods: In 18 patients we measured TNF-α before and up to 96 hours after radioimmunotherapy, in 2 patients in addition following TBI, in 9 patients also following chemotherapy. For measuring TNF-α we used an automated immunochemiluminescence assay (Immulite 1000 DPC Biermann, Bad Nauheim). The mean follow up period to record incidence of aGVHD was 100 days after stem cell transplantation. Compared to the basal levels before, the levels of TNF-α after conditioning with 188 Re-CD-66-mAb did not increase significantly and remained in the physiological range. In contrast, these initial physiological cytokine levels increased and became pathological following 48 h after total body irradiation (13.2 ± 6.6 pg/ml) and chemotherapy (10.8 ± 15.7 pg/ml). In our study we found a low incidence of aGvHD (22.2%, n = 4/18). Conclusion: These results demonstrate that additional conditioning therapy with 188 Re-CD-66-mAb does not increase proinflammatory cytokine levels of TNF-α. This finding may indicate that additive radioimmunotherapy may not be a significant factor for increasing the rate of conditioning- associated aGvHD. (orig.)

  8. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano P, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Experimental study on 211At labelled monoclonal antibody 3H11 and its Fab fragment radioimmunotherapy for human gastric cancer xenografts in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jiannan; Liu Ning; Zhang Shuyuan; Zhang Shiyuan; Luo Deyuan; Zhou Maolun

    1996-01-01

    Experimental radioimmunotherapy investigation of α-emitting radionuclide 211 At labelled anti-gastric cancer monoclonal antibody 3H11 and its Fab fragment for nude mice carrying human gastric cancer xenografts was conducted. Three i.p. injections of 14.8 or 22.2 kBq/g mouse were given, once every 5 days. The results showed that the growth of tumor xenografts was inhibited efficiently. The most evident therapy effect was observed at 15 days after treatment, and the tumor inhibition rates were 65% and 72%, respectively. No radiation injury of important organs was found

  10. Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: Polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs

    KAUST Repository

    Kieler-Ferguson, Heidi M.

    2013-01-17

    For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting. Although a number of macromolecular-drug conjugates have progressed to clinical trials, tuning drug release to maintain efficacy in conjunction with controlling drug toxicity has prevented the clinical adoption of many vehicles. In this article, we review the motivations for and approaches to polymer and liposomal delivery with regard to camptothecin and cisplatin delivery. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2013, 5:130-138. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1209 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Conflict of interest: Drs Kieler-Ferguson and Fréchet declare no conflicts of interest. Dr Szoka is the founder of a liposome drug delivery company that is not working on any of the compounds mentioned in this article. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Prolongevity medicine: Antagonic-Stress drug in distress, geriatrics, and related diseases. II. Clinical review--2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, S; Riga, D; Schneider, F

    2004-06-01

    Distress and senescence, their reciprocal aggravating-quickening connections, and their related pathologies have a large worldwide impact on healthcare systems in this new millennium. For this reason, Antagonic-Stress (AS)--an advanced integrative therapy, with specific synergistic composition, and patented internationally--represents a significant strategy in health, aging, and longevity. Clinical research with AS proves the drug's efficacy in the management of distress (neurotic, stress-related, and affective disorders; behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors; mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance uses) and psychogeriatrics [organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders (OMD)]. Specific multiaxial psychopathological instruments and psychometric tests in multiple assessments used for gerontopsychiatry demonstrated strong improvements after AS administration in early-moderate stages of Alzheimer or vascular dementia, as well as in other OMD. In addition, comparative clinical studies evinced the superiority of AS (synergistic multitherapy) versus monotherapy [meclofenoxate (MF), piracetam (PA), pyritinol (PT), and nicergoline (NE), respectively]. These comparative clinical trials agreed closely with comparative preclinical research and confirmed AS synergistic homeostatic, adaptogenic, antioxidative, cerebrovascular, neurometabolic, and nootropic actions. Also, the AS protective actions against oxidative stress recommend this orthomolecular therapy in stress, aging, and free radical pathology.

  12. Analysis of a kinetic multi-segment foot model part II: kinetics and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, Dustin A; Cooney, Kevin M; Buczek, Frank L

    2012-04-01

    Kinematic multi-segment foot models have seen increased use in clinical and research settings, but the addition of kinetics has been limited and hampered by measurement limitations and modeling assumptions. In this second of two companion papers, we complete the presentation and analysis of a three segment kinetic foot model by incorporating kinetic parameters and calculating joint moments and powers. The model was tested on 17 pediatric subjects (ages 7-18 years) during normal gait. Ground reaction forces were measured using two adjacent force platforms, requiring targeted walking and the creation of two sub-models to analyze ankle, midtarsal, and 1st metatarsophalangeal joints. Targeted walking resulted in only minimal kinematic and kinetic differences compared with walking at self selected speeds. Joint moments and powers were calculated and ensemble averages are presented as a normative database for comparison purposes. Ankle joint powers are shown to be overestimated when using a traditional single-segment foot model, as substantial angular velocities are attributed to the mid-tarsal joint. Power transfer is apparent between the 1st metatarsophalangeal and mid-tarsal joints in terminal stance/pre-swing. While the measurement approach presented here is limited to clinical populations with only minimal impairments, some elements of the model can also be incorporated into routine clinical gait analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A prospective phase II trial exploring the association between tumor microenvironment biomarkers and clinical activity of ipilimumab in advanced melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Omid

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ipilimumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has demonstrated an improvement in overall survival in two phase III trials of patients with advanced melanoma. The primary objective of the current trial was to prospectively explore candidate biomarkers from the tumor microenvironment for associations with clinical response to ipilimumab. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, phase II biomarker study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00261365, 82 pretreated or treatment-naïve patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma were induced with 3 or 10 mg/kg ipilimumab every 3 weeks for 4 doses; at Week 24, patients could receive maintenance doses every 12 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated per modified World Health Organization response criteria and safety was assessed continuously. Candidate biomarkers were evaluated in tumor biopsies collected pretreatment and 24 to 72 hours after the second ipilimumab dose. Polymorphisms in immune-related genes were also evaluated. Results Objective response rate, response patterns, and safety were consistent with previous trials of ipilimumab in melanoma. No associations between genetic polymorphisms and clinical activity were observed. Immunohistochemistry and histology on tumor biopsies revealed significant associations between clinical activity and high baseline expression of FoxP3 (p = 0.014 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (p = 0.012, and between clinical activity and increase in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs between baseline and 3 weeks after start of treatment (p = 0.005. Microarray analysis of mRNA from tumor samples taken pretreatment and post-treatment demonstrated significant increases in expression of several immune-related genes, and decreases in expression of genes implicated in cancer and melanoma. Conclusions Baseline expression of immune-related tumor biomarkers and a post-treatment increase in TILs may be positively associated with

  14. Patient-Specific Dosimetry of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using CC49 Fusion Protein in Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Shang; Forero, Andres; LoBuglio, Albert F.; Breitz, H.; Khazaeli, M. B.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wang, W. Q.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2005-01-01

    Patient-Specific Dosimetry of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using CC49 Fusion Protein in Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies. Shen S, Forero A, Lobuglio AF, Breitz H, Khazaeli MB, Fisher DR, Wang W, Meredith RF. Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, and Radioisotopes Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using CC49 fusion protein, comprised of CC49-(scFv)(4) and streptavidin, in conjunction with (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin (DOTA = dodecanetetraacetic acid) provides a new opportunity to improve efficacy by increasing the tumor-to-normal tissue dose ratio. To our knowledge, the patient-specific dosimetry of pretargeted (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin after CC49 fusion protein in patients has not been reported previously. METHODS: Nine patients received 3-step pretargeted RIT: (a) 160 mg/m(2) of CC49 fusion protein, (b) synthetic clearing agent (sCA) at 48 or 72 h later, and (c) (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin 24 h after the sCA administration. Sequential whole-body (111)In images were acquired immediately and at 2-144 h after injection of (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin. Geometric-mean quantification with background and attenuation correction was used for liver and lung dosimetry. Effective point source quantification was used for spleen, kidneys, and tumors. Organ and tumor (90)Y doses were calculated based on (111)In imaging data and the MIRD formalism using patient-specific organ masses determined from CT images. Patient-specific marrow doses were determined based on radioactivity concentration in the blood. RESULTS: The (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin had a rapid plasma clearance, which was biphasic with <10% residual at 8 h. Organ masses ranged from 1,263 to 3,855 g for liver, 95 to 1,009 g for spleen, and 309 to 578 g for kidneys. The patient-specific mean (90)Y dose (cGy/37 MBq, or rad/mCi) was 0.53 (0.32-0.78) to whole body

  15. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buunen, M; Bonjer, H J; Hop, W C J

    2009-01-01

    clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...... analysis. RESULTS: By July 2008, 27 hospitals from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Denmark, South Korea and Canada had included 739 patients. The intra-operative conversion rate in the laparoscopic group was 17%. Distribution of age, location of the tumor and radiotherapy were equal...

  16. A critical appraisal of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders clinical practice guidelines using the AGREE II instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekercioglu, Nigar; Al-Khalifah, Reem; Ewusie, Joycelyne Efua; Elias, Rosilene M; Thabane, Lehana; Busse, Jason W; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Iorio, Alfonso; Isayama, Tetsuya; Martínez, Juan Pablo Díaz; Florez, Ivan D; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-02-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) suffer high rates of morbidity and mortality, in particular related to bone and cardiovascular outcomes. The management of CKD-MBD remains challenging. The objective of this systematic survey is to critically appraise clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) addressing CKD-MBD. Data sources included MEDLINE, EMBASE, the National Guideline Clearinghouse, Guideline International Network and Turning Research into Practice up to May 2016. Teams of two reviewers, independently and in duplicate, screened titles and abstracts and potentially eligible full text reports to determine eligibility and subsequently appraised the guidelines using the Advancing Guideline Development, Reporting and Evaluation in Health Care instrument II (AGREE). Sixteen CPGs published from 2003 to 2015 addressing the diagnosis and management of CKD-MBD in adult patients (11 English, two Spanish, one Italian, one Portuguese and one Slovak) proved eligible. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guideline performed best with respect to AGREE II criteria; only three other CPGs warranted high scores on all domains. All other guidelines received scores of under 60% on one or more domains. Major discrepancies in recommendations were not, however, present, and we found no association between quality of CPGs which was not associated with resulting recommendations. Most guidelines assessing CKD-MBD suffer from serious shortcomings using AGREE criteria although limitations with respect to AGREE criteria do not necessarily lead to inappropriate recommendations.

  17. Measurement of DSM-5 section II personality disorder constructs using the MMPI-2-RF in clinical and forensic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Pymont, Carly; Smid, Wineke; De Saeger, Hilde; Kamphuis, Jan H

    2015-09-01

    In the current study, we evaluated the associations between the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) scale scores and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) Section II personality disorder (PD) criterion counts in inpatient and forensic psychiatric samples from The Netherlands using structured clinical interviews to operationalize PDs. The inpatient psychiatric sample included 190 male and female patients and the forensic sample included 162 male psychiatric patients. We conducted correlation and count regression analyses to evaluate the utility of relevant MMPI-2-RF scales in predicting PD criterion count scores. Generally, results from these analyses emerged as conceptually expected and provided evidence that MMPI-2-RF scales can be useful in assessing PDs. At the zero-order level, most hypothesized associations between Section II disorders and MMPI-2-RF scales were supported. Similarly, in the regression analyses, a unique set of predictors emerged for each PD that was generally in line with conceptual expectations. Additionally, the results provided general evidence that PDs can be captured by dimensional psychopathology constructs, which has implications for both DSM-5 Section III specifically and the personality psychopathology literature more broadly. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Studies on the optimization of leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma therapies using opioids, chemotherapy and radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscher, Mareike

    2013-01-01

    Despite complex treatment schedules for cancer, the occurrence of resistances and relapses is a major concern in oncology. Hence, novel treatment options are needed. In this thesis, different approaches using radioimmunotherapy and the opioid D,L-methadone alone or in combination with doxorubicin were analyzed regarding their cytotoxic potential and the triggered signalling pathways in sensitive and resistant leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The radioimmunoconjugates [Bi-213]anti-CD33 and [Bi-213]anti-CD20 for treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or NHL, respectively, were applied exemplary for the use of targeted alpha-therapies (TAT). Depending on the analyzed cell lines, the used activity concentrations and specific activities (MBq/μg antibody) apoptosis was induced abrogating radio- and chemo-cross-resistances specifically. The cell death was caspase-dependent activating the mitochondrial pathway and was executed by downregulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP and Bcl-xL. D,L-Methadone induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo in opioid-receptor (OR) expressing cells depending on the OR density and the used concentrations. Resistances could be overcome and proliferation was inhibited. In combination with doxorubicin, a synergistic effect regarding cytotoxicity in ex vivo patient cells and cell lines was observed. This effect depends on the increase of doxorubicin uptake co-administering D,L-methadone whereas doxorubicin enhances OR expression. The activation of OR leads to the downregulation of cAMP playing a pivotal role in apoptosis induction. In vivo, the therapeutic potential of D,L-methadone alone or in combination with doxorubicin could be proven as mice transplanted with human T-ALL-cells could be identified as tumour free. In summary, these studies show that TAT using [Bi-213]anti-CD33 and [Bi-213]anti-CD20 as well as the opioid D,L-methadone harbour the potential to optimize conventional treatment modalities for leukaemia and NHL.

  19. Eradication of colon cancer cells before tumour formation in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated with intraperitoneal Re-186 radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, S.; Hiramatsu, T.; Michigishi, T.

    2006-01-01

    A treatment adjuvant to surgical resection of the primary lesion has been proven to be beneficial in improving the prognosis of patients with high risks of peritoneal dissemination of colon cancer. This study was performed to determine the comparative efficacy of intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using Re-186 or I-131 labeled murine antibodies in the extermination of cancer cells. A murine anti-colorectal IgG1, A7 monoclonal antibody, was radio-labeled either with I-131 (by the chloramine-T method) or Re-186 (by the MAG3 pre-chelated method). A total number of 16 mice were subjected to RIT with Re-186 A7 (N=8) or I-131 A7 (N=8) at equitoxic doses in Balb/c bu/nu mice 10 min after intraperitoneal injection of LS180 human colon cancer cells. A third group of mice were subjected to chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil at 30 mg/kg for 4 consecutive days following the intraperitoneal injection of the same LS180 human colon cancer cells. There were 19 mice in the control group who were not subjected to any form of therapy. The results revealed that the mean survival of mice in the control (N-19), I-131 A7 RIT (N=8) and Chemotherapy (N=6) groups were 33.8 ± 1.0, 80.1 ± 2.5 and 49.3 ± 5.3 days respectively. The eight mice who were subjected to Re-186 A7 RIT showed much better survival compared to the other groups. Two of the eight mice from this group died at 105 and 111 days following Re-186 A7 RIT. Other six mice were sacrificed at 172 days, and autopsy revealed no macroscopic peritoneal tumor growth. Based on this pilot study we concluded that individual tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity would be effectively exterminated by intraperitoneal RIT with Re-186 A7. (author)

  20. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis; Slusarczyk, Adrian L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cieslewicz, Maryelise [Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ruiz-Yi, Benjamin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bhushan, Kumar R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Frangioni, John V. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wittrup, K. Dane, E-mail: wittrup@mit.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods: We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to DOTA, reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results: Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten-binding affinity of 100 pM is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nM to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2{+-}1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a {sup 111}In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions: We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity, DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals.

  1. Phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials: proposal of a two-stage Bayesian design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Chevret, Sylvie

    2003-02-01

    We propose a new design for phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials aiming at determining a dose of an experimental treatment to satisfy safety (respectively efficacy) requirements, at treating a sufficiently large number of patients to estimate the toxicity (respectively failure) probability of the dose level with a given reliability, and at stopping the trial early if it is likely that no dose is safe (respectively efficacious). A two-stage design was derived from the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM), with implementation of Bayesian criteria to generate stopping rules. A simulation study was conducted to compare the operating characteristics of the proposed two-stage design to those reached by the traditional CRM. Finally, two applications to real data sets are provided.

  2. A clinical follow up of unemployed. II: Sociomedical evaluations as predictors of re-employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussen, B

    1993-12-01

    To frame and study sociomedical evaluations in clinical work with unemployed people. In a two-year follow up of routine health examinations, three sociomedical evaluations were set up. The first was the direct conclusion of the check-up, based on sickness and possibilities of treatment. The second dealt with work identity, and the last was a diagnostic set of main unemployment problem. The four municipalities of Grenland, Norway. A representative sample aged 16 to 63 who had been registered with the labour market authorities for more than 12 weeks. 21% of the unemployed needed further treatment. 7% were classified as "discouraged", being on their way out of the labour market, while the majority of the study group was healthy job seekers. Work identity seemed to be wage earning for 83%, homemaking for 9%, cultural work for 3%, and being a pensioner for 5%. The main unemployment problem was lack of work for 46% of the examined. Other problems were poor health, being less attractive workers, or having little courage for job search. The evaluations predicted re-employment after two years. They divided the unemployed in groups with from five to seven times difference in re-employment rate. These standardized sociomedical evaluations seen to be useful in clinical work with unemployed people.

  3. Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction: II. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A; Gruenwald, Ilan; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam; Lowenstein, Lior; Pyke, Robert E; Reisman, Yakov; Revicki, Dennis A; Rubio-Aurioles, Eusebio

    2016-12-01

    The second article in this series, Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction, focuses on measurement of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Together with the design of appropriate phase I to phase IV clinical trials, the development, validation, choice, and implementation of valid PRO measurements-the focus of the present article-form the foundation of research on treatments for male and female sexual dysfunctions. PRO measurements are assessments of any aspect of a patient's health status that come directly from the patient (ie, without the interpretation of the patient's responses by a physician or anyone else). PROs are essential for assessing male and female sexual dysfunction and treatment response, including symptom frequency and severity, personal distress, satisfaction, and other measurements of sexual and general health-related quality of life. Although there are some relatively objective measurements of sexual dysfunction (ie, intravaginal ejaculatory latency time, frequency of sexual activity, etc), these measurements do not comprehensively assess the occurrence and extent of sexual dysfunction or treatment on the patient's symptoms, functioning, and well-being. Data generated by a PRO instrument can provide evidence of a treatment benefit from the patient's perspective. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Methodology Series Module 9: Designing Questionnaires and Clinical Record Forms - Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2017-01-01

    This article is a continuation of the previous module on designing questionnaires and clinical record form in which we have discussed some basic points about designing the questionnaire and clinical record forms. In this section, we will discuss the reliability and validity of questionnaires. The different types of validity are face validity, content validity, criterion validity, and construct validity. The different types of reliability are test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, and intra-rater reliability. Some of these parameters are assessed by subject area experts. However, statistical tests should be used for evaluation of other parameters. Once the questionnaire has been designed, the researcher should pilot test the questionnaire. The items in the questionnaire should be changed based on the feedback from the pilot study participants and the researcher's experience. After the basic structure of the questionnaire has been finalized, the researcher should assess the validity and reliability of the questionnaire or the scale. If an existing standard questionnaire is translated in the local language, the researcher should assess the reliability and validity of the translated questionnaire, and these values should be presented in the manuscript. The decision to use a self- or interviewer-administered, paper- or computer-based questionnaire depends on the nature of the questions, literacy levels of the target population, and resources.

  5. Methodology Series Module 9: Designing Questionnaires and Clinical Record Forms – Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2017-01-01

    This article is a continuation of the previous module on designing questionnaires and clinical record form in which we have discussed some basic points about designing the questionnaire and clinical record forms. In this section, we will discuss the reliability and validity of questionnaires. The different types of validity are face validity, content validity, criterion validity, and construct validity. The different types of reliability are test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, and intra-rater reliability. Some of these parameters are assessed by subject area experts. However, statistical tests should be used for evaluation of other parameters. Once the questionnaire has been designed, the researcher should pilot test the questionnaire. The items in the questionnaire should be changed based on the feedback from the pilot study participants and the researcher's experience. After the basic structure of the questionnaire has been finalized, the researcher should assess the validity and reliability of the questionnaire or the scale. If an existing standard questionnaire is translated in the local language, the researcher should assess the reliability and validity of the translated questionnaire, and these values should be presented in the manuscript. The decision to use a self- or interviewer-administered, paper- or computer-based questionnaire depends on the nature of the questions, literacy levels of the target population, and resources. PMID:28584367

  6. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α levels after treatment in children with bronchopneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yue

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α levels after treatment in children with bronchopneumonia. Methods: Serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α levels with RIA were detected both before and after treatment in 33 patients with children bronchopneumonia as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusions: Serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α could take part in the pathogenesis of children bronchopneumonia in various ways and determination of these levels was clinically important. (authors)

  7. CLINICAL PROFILE OF PATTERN OF DYSLIPIDAEMIA AND ISCHAEMIC HEART DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Vijayrao Rajkondawar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present research was undertaken to study the pattern of dyslipidaemia and varied clinical manifestations of ischaemic heart disease, its risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Diabetes Mellitus (DM has become major public health problem in India. It is not only increasing in morbidity and mortality, but also decreases the quality of life. Also, disease and its complications are causing heavy economic burden for patients suffering from it.1,2 Diabetes is endemic globally with increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. Diabetes is a major cause of mortality, but several studies indicate that it is likely underreported as a cause of death. A recent estimate suggested that diabetes was the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and was responsible for almost 3 million deaths annually (1.7-5.2% of all deaths. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients attending the outpatient department or admitted to medical wards, ICU of tertiary care centre and fulfilling the inclusion criteria were evaluated clinically. A baseline Electrocardiogram (ECG was taken in all cases irrespective of clinical evidence of cardiac involvement. Patients with normal ECG pattern were further evaluated by Treadmill Testing (TMT or stress test for subclinical cardiac involvement. Risk factor evaluation was done in all cases. RESULTS Prevalence of IHD was found to be 41% with a male predominance (1.067:1. Evaluation of risk factors has shown its strong association with IHD. Incidence of IHD was high when low HDL (P 25 had negatively significant association with IHD in type 2 diabetics (P=0.072. Smoking was not statistically associated (P=0.577 and in male alcoholics, IHD had positive association with alcohol (P=0.193. CONCLUSION The current study points out that there exists an increased incidence of ischaemic heart disease in diabetics with few, but not all risk factors contributing to it. Early detection, optimal glycaemic

  8. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels after treatment in children with acute nephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoyan; Zhou Hong; Xu Weiqin; Li Xinghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF- α levels after treatment in children with acute nephritis. Methods: Serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels (with RIA) were measured in 31 pediatric patients with acute nephritis and 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P< O.01). After treatment for 3 months, the serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels, though markedly corrected, remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: Determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α contents after treatment might be of prognostic importance in pediatric patients with acute nephritis. (authors)

  9. Clinical significance of measurement of changes of serum IGF-II, EGF and CYFRA21-1 levels after chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianlin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum IGF-II, EGF and CYFRA21-1 levels after chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer. Methods: Serum IGF-II, EGF (with RIA), and CYFRA21-1 (with ECLIA) levels were determined both before and after chemotherapy in 39 patients with lung cancer as well as once in 35 controls. Results: Before chemotherapy, serum IGF-II, EGF and CYFRA21-1 levels were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls(P<0.01). Six months after chemotherapy, serum IGF-II, EGF and CYFRA21-1 levels dropped markedly, but remained significantly higher than those in controls(P<0.05). Conclusion: The development of lung cancer in patients was closely related to the serum IGF-II, EGF and CYFRA21-1 levels. (authors)

  10. [Pharmacology of local anesthetics and clinical aspects of segmental blocking. II. Spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, S P; Svetlov, V A; Luk'ianov, M V

    1998-01-01

    Clinical picture of development of segmental blocking after subarachnoidal injection of hyperbaric solutions of 0.75% bupivacaine, 5% ultracaine, and isobaric 0.5% bupivacaine is studied. A total of 152 patients operated on the lower part of the body and the lower limbs were examined under conditions of single, prolonged subarachnoidal, and combined spinal epidural anesthesia. Ultracaine and bupivacaine in different concentrations with different barism provided anesthesia equivalent by the efficacy, depth, and dissemination of sensory block. Segmental blocking with 5% ultracaine was characterized by the shortest latent period (3.14 +/- 0.16 min, p anesthesia in comparison with a single injection, and combined spinal epidural anesthesia shortened the latent period of segmental blocking and ensured intraoperative anesthesia and postoperative analgesia at the expense of the epidural component.

  11. Supplementation of iron in pulmonary hypertension: Rationale and design of a phase II clinical trial in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Luke S.G.E.; Watson, Geoffrey M.J.; Wharton, John; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Chan, Kakit; Khengar, Rajeshree; Robbins, Peter A.; Kiely, David G.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliott, Charlie A.; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Sheares, Karen; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Davies, Rachel; Ashby, Deborah; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Wilkins, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to assess the safety and potential clinical benefit of intravenous iron (Ferinject) infusion in iron deficient patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Iron deficiency in the absence of anemia (1) is common in patients with IPAH; (2) is associated with inappropriately raised levels of hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis; and (3) correlates with disease severity and worse clinical outcomes. Oral iron absorption may be impeded by reduced absorption due to elevated hepcidin levels. The safety and benefits of parenteral iron replacement in IPAH are unknown. Supplementation of Iron in Pulmonary Hypertension (SIPHON) is a Phase II, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial of iron in IPAH. At least 60 patients will be randomized to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject) or saline placebo with a crossover point after 12 weeks of treatment. The primary outcome will be the change in resting pulmonary vascular resistance from baseline at 12 weeks, measured by cardiac catheterization. Secondary measures include resting and exercise hemodynamics and exercise performance from serial bicycle incremental and endurance cardiopulmonary exercise tests. Other secondary measurements include serum iron indices, 6-Minute Walk Distance, WHO functional class, quality of life score, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and cardiac anatomy and function from cardiac magnetic resonance. We propose that intravenous iron replacement will improve hemodynamics and clinical outcomes in IPAH. If the data supports a potentially useful therapeutic effect and suggest this drug is safe, the study will be used to power a Phase III study to address efficacy. PMID:23662181

  12. Construction of McSPECT II - a clinical brain SPECT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, W.; Jin, Y.; Liu, J. [Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke`s Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Since reported the design concept and system configuration of the McSPECT II last year, we have settled the design details and moved on to the construction phase. The major components being developed in this phase are: detector, collimator, electronics, interfaces, acquisition and processing software, and gantry systems. To provide adequate number of angular sampling (= views), we have increased the number of transverse detector elements to 120 NaI(Tl) bar-detectors in the new cylindrical detector system. These bar-detector are housed in 24 detector modules. Since we have developed a new light-guide and implemented a new 2-step centriod position calculation, the intrinsic performance of the detector modules has been substantially improved. These improvements lead to a simpler position estimation which yields < 4 mm FWHM spatial resolution in the 12 cm axial FOV. The imaging volume is 21 cm (dia.) x 12.8 (axial) cm. The number of collimator units (= rays) is increased to 100 to achieve high linear sampling density (2.3 mm) and sampling resolution ({approximately}5.6 mm). The collimator is still being manufacture. The electronics, acquisition, and processing systems are all in the final phases of debugging through simulated testing. The electronics is divided into 24 independent channels, one for each module. A 10-bit 1.0{mu}s ADC is connected to each of the 72 PMTs. A Pentium based PC performs real-time position calculation in 20 {mu}s/event. After de-randomizing, we expect 50 K/sec count-rate performance with little loss. Linearity and energy corrections are being implemented, in a separate calibration procedure, to yield <0.5 mm non-linearity and {approximately}10% energy resolution at 140 keV. The gantry construction is moving along well but slowly. The large (27.5 cm) aperture and the adjustable orientation of the gantry plane promise easy operation and patient comfort. The system construction should be completed soon to allow imaging studies to be performed.

  13. Bone marrow dosimetry using blood-based models for 131i-anti-cd20 rituximab radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Choi, T. H.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimations of radiation absorbed dose are essential part of evaluating the risks and benefits associated with radiotherapy. Determination of red marrow dose is important because myelotoxicity is often dose limiting in radioimmunotherapy. The aim of this study is to set up the procedures of dosimetry with activities in the blood and whole-body and to estimate the dose of patients according to MIRD schema. Therapy activities of 131I (136, 185, 200 mCi) were administrated to patients (n=3). Blood activity concentrations and whole-body images by gamma camera were collected from patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (5min, 6h, 24h, 48h, 72h, 2week). Two kinds of patient specific approaches based on Sgouros bone marrow dosimetry methodology were considered to estimate bone marrow dose. The mean effective half-life in blood and whole-body were 25.2h and 27.1h respectively and the mean absorbed dose to bone marrow was 0.48Gy (0.22∼0.93Gy). The dominant contribution of dose was found to be from bone marrow self-dose (over 60%). The procedures of dosimetry with blood and gamma camera image were established. These enable to estimate the radioimmunotherapy patient's dose retrospectively. Some parts of the procedures need to be elaborated to obtain more accurate dose in the near future

  14. Micropulse diode laser trabeculoplasty (MDLT: A phase II clinical study with 12 months follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Maria Fea

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Maria Fea, Alex Bosone, Teresa Rolle, Beatrice Brogliatti, Federico Maria GrignoloIstituto di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Clinica Oculistica dell’ Università di Torino, Torino, ItalyObjective: This pilot study evaluates the pressure lowering potential of subthreshold micropulse diode laser trabeculoplasty (MDLT for a clinically meaningful duration in patients with medically uncontrolled open angle glaucoma (OAG.Design: prospective interventional case series.Participants: Thirty-two eyes of 20 consecutive patients with uncontrolled OAG (12 bilateral and 8 unilateral.Methods: Confluent subthreshold laser applications over the inferior 180° of the anterior TM using an 810 nm diode laser in a micropulse operating mode. The intraocular pressure (IOP was measured at baseline and at 1 hour, 1 day, 1 week, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-treatment. Flare was measured with a Kowa FM 500 flare-meter at baseline and at 3 hours, 1 day, 1 week, and 12 months post-treatment. After treatment, the patients were maintained on their pre-treatment drug regimen.Main outcome measures: Criteria for treatment response were IOP reduction ≥3 mm Hg and IOP ≤21 mm Hg within the first week after MDLT. Eyes not complying to the above criteria during the follow-up were considered treatment failure. Mean IOP change and percentage of IOP reduction during the follow-up were calculated.Results: One eye was analyzed for bilateral patients. A total of 20 eyes were thus included. Four eyes (20% did not respond to treatment during the first week. One additional eye failed at the 6 month visit. The treatment was successful in 15 eyes (75% at 12 months. The IOP was significantly lower throughout follow-up (p < 0.01. At 12 months, the mean percentage of IOP reduction in the 15 respondent eyes was 22.1% and 12 eyes (60% had IOP reduction higher than 20%. During the first two postoperative days, one eye with pigmentary glaucoma experienced a significant increase of flare

  15. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly

  16. Initial experience with locoregional radioimmunotherapy using {sup 131}I-labelled monoclonal antibodies against tenascin (BC-4) for treatment of glioma (WHO III and IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poepperl, G.; Gildehaus, F.J.; Hahn, K.; Tatsch, K. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany); Goetz, C.; Reulen, H.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany); Yousry, T.A. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der LMU Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Aim: None of the established treatments (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy) for malignant glioma has improved its very poor prognosis. Adjuvant locoregional radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents a new therapeutic approach. We present our initial experience with this therapeutic tool with respect to adverse effects, biokinetics and clinical follow-up. Methods: Following surgery and radiotherapy, 12 patients with glioma (4, WHO stage III; 8, WHO stage IV) underwent 1-5 RIT-cycles (average dose 1100 MBq {sup 131}labelled monoclonal BC-4 antibodies) at six week intervals. Follow-up included serial FDG-PET and MRI investigations. Evaluation of biokinetics included whole body scans, together with analysis of blood, urine and fluid from the tumor cavity. Results: Following RIT, four patients experienced temporary seizures, which, in one case, were associated with temporary aphasia. Eight patients developed HAMA (human anti-mouse anti-bodies) during follow-up. Mean biologic half-life of the radiopharmaceutical in the resection cavity was 3.9 d (range: 1.0-10.2 d) and remained stable intraindividually during further RIT-cycles. The antibody/radionuclide conjugate remain stable in the tumor cavity for at least 5 d. Median survival presently stands at 18.5 months compared to 9.7 months in a historical patient group (n=89) undergoing conventional therapeutic strategies. Five patients show no signs of recurrence. In three patients with post-surgical evidence of residual tumor, one patient showed partial remission, one stable disease, and one progressive disease during RIT. Four patients without evidence of residual tumor mass at the beginning of RIT developed recurrence during therapy. Conclusions: Initial experience demonstrates that locoregional RIT is a well tolerated treatment modality that may represent a promising new approach in the management of patients with malignant glioma. Advantages of local application include passage of the blood-brain barrier, high concentration

  17. Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns in Outpatient Emergency Clinics at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children's Hospital, Jordan, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Niemat, Sahar I; Aljbouri, Tareq M; Goussous, Lana S; Efaishat, Rania A; Salah, Rehab K

    2014-07-01

    To investigate antibiotics prescribing patterns in the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children's Hospital at Royal Medical Services in Amman, Jordan. The data was collected from the emergency pharmacy over the period of a -five consecutive months. The methodology recommended by the World Health Organization for investigating drug use in a health facility was followed. The study measures the percentage of encounter with a prescribed antibiotic and the percentage share of each antibiotic category. The distribution of diagnostic categories that accounted for all antibiotics being prescribed and the distribution of each antibiotic being prescribed for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) were also measured. Antibiotic prescribing was frequent during pediatric visits to the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic resulting in a high percentage of encounters (85%) when compared to appropriate. Emergency physicians continue to frequently prescribe broad spectrum antibiotics which accounted for approximately (60%) of the total prescribed antibiotics and (83%) of prescribed antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections and macrolides (primarily azithromycin) were the leading class among them. Our results showed high consumption of antibiotics by emergency department pediatricians which highlight the importance for interventions to promote rational and judicious prescribing. An insight into factors influencing antibiotics prescribing patterns by military prescribers is required.

  18. Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns in Outpatient Emergency Clinics at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children's Hospital, Jordan, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar I. Al-Niemat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate antibiotics prescribing patterns in the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic at Queen Rania Al Abdullah II Children’s Hospital at Royal Medical Services in Amman, Jordan. Methods: The data was collected from the emergency pharmacy over the period of a -five consecutive months. The methodology recommended by the World Health Organization for investigating drug use in a health facility was followed. The study measures the percentage of encounter with a prescribed antibiotic and the percentage share of each antibiotic category. The distribution of diagnostic categories that accounted for all antibiotics being prescribed and the distribution of each antibiotic being prescribed for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs were also measured. Results: Antibiotic prescribing was frequent during pediatric visits to the outpatient pediatric emergency clinic resulting in a high percentage of encounters (85% when compared to appropriate. Emergency physicians continue to frequently prescribe broad spectrum antibiotics which accounted for approximately (60% of the total prescribed antibiotics and (83% of prescribed antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections and macrolides (primarily azithromycin were the leading class among them. Conclusion: Our results showed high consumption of antibiotics by emergency department pediatricians which highlight the importance for interventions to promote rational and judicious prescribing. An insight into factors influencing antibiotics prescribing patterns by military prescribers is required.

  19. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K Friedman

    Full Text Available Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy.

  20. Cognitive and adaptive measurement endpoints for clinical trials in mucopolysaccharidoses types I, II, and III: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Darren; Delaney, Kathleen A; Shapiro, Elsa G

    2017-06-01

    Sensitive, reliable measurement instruments are critical for the evaluation of disease progression and new treatments that affect the brain in the mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). MPS I, II, and III have early onset clinical phenotypes that affect the brain during development and result in devastating cognitive decline and ultimately death without treatment. Comparisons of outcomes are hindered by diverse protocols and approaches to assessment including applicability to international trials necessary in rare diseases. We review both cognitive and adaptive measures with the goal of providing evidence to a Delphi panel to come to a consensus about recommendations for clinical trials for various age groups. The results of the consensus panel are reported in an accompanying article. The following data were gathered (from internet resources and from test manuals) for each measure and summarized in the discussion: reliability, validity, date and adequacy of normative data, applicability of the measure's metrics, cross cultural validity including translations and adaptations, feasibility in the MPS population, familiarity to sites, sensitivity to change, and interpretability. If, resulting from this consensus, standard protocols are used for both natural history and treatment studies, patients, their families, and health care providers will benefit from the ability to compare study outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Post-treatment resistance analysis of hepatitis C virus from phase II and III clinical trials of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyles, David; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S; Doehle, Brian P; Martin, Ross; Afdhal, Nezam H; Kowdley, Kris V; Lawitz, Eric; Brainard, Diana M; Miller, Michael D; Mo, Hongmei; Gane, Edward J

    2017-04-01

    Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir combination treatment in phase III clinical trials resulted in sustained viral suppression in 94-99% of patients. This study characterized drug resistance in treatment failures, which may help to inform retreatment options. We performed NS5A and NS5B deep sequencing of hepatitis C virus (HCV) from patients infected with genotype (GT) 1 who participated in ledipasvir/sofosbuvir phase II and III clinical trials. Fifty-one of 2144 (2.4%) (42 GT1a and 9 GT1b) treated patients met the criteria for resistance analysis due to virologic failure following the end of treatment. The majority of patients with virologic failure (38 of 51; 74.5%) had detectable ledipasvir-specific resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) at the time of virologic failure (1% deep sequencing cut-off). The percent of patients with NS5A RASs at virologic failure were 37.5%, 66.7%, 94.7% and 100% in patients treated for 6, 8, 12 and 24weeks, respectively. The common substitutions detected at failure were Q30R/H, and/or Y93H/N in GT1a and Y93H in GT1b. At failure, 35.3% (18/51) of virologic failure patients' viruses had two or more NS5A RASs and the majority of patients harbored NS5A RASs conferring a 100-1000-fold (n=10) or >1000-fold (n=23) reduced susceptibility to ledipasvir. One patient in a phase II study with a known ledipasvir RAS at baseline (L31M) developed the S282T sofosbuvir (NS5B) RAS at failure. In GT1 HCV-infected patients treated with ledipasvir/sofosbuvir±ribavirin, virologic failure was rare. Ledipasvir resistance in NS5A was selected or enhanced in most patients with virologic failure, one of whom also developed resistance to sofosbuvir. Clinical studies have shown that combination treatment with ledipasvir/sofosbuvir efficiently cures most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C infection. For the few patients failing treatment, we show that resistance to ledipasvir was observed in most patients, whereas resistance to sofosbuvir was less common. This has

  2. PREVALENCE OF MEIBOMIAN GLAND DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETIC PATIENTS & ITS CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS

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    Reshma Pathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS : To study the prevalence of the meibomian gland disease in typ e 2 diabetic patients and its clinical presentations. SETTING AND DESIGN : A hospital based cross sectional descriptive study of 100 type 2 diabetic patients attending a medical college was conducted. METHODS : Detailed diabetic history was recorded. Assessment of ocular surface i.e. the lid margins , conjunctiva , corneal surface was done via slit lamp biomicroscopy. Meibomian gland disease (MGD severity was assessed by the quality and expressibility of the meibomian secretion. Dry eye tests like schir mer’s test and tear film breakup time were done. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED : SPSS statistical software version 17 was used. RESULTS : 56% of the patients out of 100 diabetic patients had MGD. The most common symptom was burning (46.9% , followed by dryness ( 23.5% , 5.6% had conjunctival injection , 7.14% had corneal erosions , 25% had mucus debris , 53.65% had dry eye which was statistically significant (p=0.001 , 56.25% males and 72.2% females had the disease which was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION : The prevalence of Meibomian gland disease in the diabetic population was 56% which is more than the general population prevalence. Apart from other disorders diabetics are also more prone for ocular surface diseases like Meibomian gland disease. MGD is an important pre disposer for severe diseases like Dry eye in this subgroup of patients which can lead to complications like conjunctival keratinisations , corneal erosions and perforations. Careful examination of these patients for ocular surface disease and prompt treatment is required.

  3. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder characteristics: II. Clinical correlates of irritable mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Paul J.; Bennett, David S.; Elia, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    Background This study describes the relationship of irritable mood (IRR) with affective disorders in youths with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Five hundred ADHD subjects were assessed with the childhood version of the Schedule for Affective Disorder & Schizophrenia. Subjects were in a genetic ADHD protocol and limited to those of Caucasian/European descent. Results The most prevalent concurrent diagnoses were oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) (43.6%), minor depression/dysthymic disorder (MDDD) (18.8%), and generalized anxiety (13.2%)/overanxious disorder (12.4%). IRR subjects (21.0%) compared to the non-IRR (NIRR) group had higher rates of all affective disorders (76.2% vs. 9.6%) and ODD (83.8% vs. 32.9%) but lower rates of hyperactive ADHD (1.9% vs. 8.9%). Among those without comorbidities, 98.3% were NIRR. Logistic regression found IRR mood significantly associated with major depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR]: 33.4), MDDD (OR: 11.2), ODD (OR: 11.6), and combined ADHD (OR: 1.7) but not with anxiety disorders. Among symptoms, it associated IRR mood with a pattern of dysthymic and ODD symptoms but with fewer separation anxiety symptoms. Diagnostic and symptomatic parameters were unaffected by demographic variables. Limitations Potential confounders influencing these results include patient recruitment from only one clinical service; a cohort specific sample effect because some presumed affective disorders and non-Caucasians were excluded; and the young mean age (10.2 years) limiting comorbid patterns. Conclusions The prominence of an MDDD pattern suggests this IRR group is appropriate in the DSM V's proposed chronic depressive disorder, possibly with or without temper dysregulation. A new diagnosis of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder may be unwarranted. PMID:22868057

  4. Radioimmunotherapy of indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with Yttrium-90 labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy does not preclude subsequent chemotherapy or autologous hematologic stem cell transplantation therapy in most patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, G.A.; Witzig, T.E.; Ansell, S.M.; Ristow, K.M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Yttrium-90 (Y-90) labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (ibritumomab tiuxetan or Zevalin TM ) is a novel therapy for patients with relapsed CD20+ B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Patients treated with Zevalin radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are limited from higher doses due to transient and reversible platelet and neutrophil suppression. Patients with indolent NHL who relapse or are refractory to chemotherapy have a 70-80% overall response rate and a 20-30% complete response rate when treated with Zevalin RIT. Therefore additional treatment is required in a minority of patients shortly after Zevalin therapy and in many others at relapse. Relapsed patients are generally treated with chemotherapy alone or high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplantation. We wanted to evaluate the ability of patients to tolerate subsequent therapy given at relapse following Zevalin RIT. Methods: We had 58 patients who relapsed after receiving Zevalin RIT and later received additional therapy. The clinical records and lab results were reviewed and compared with a matched control group of patients treated prior to Zevalin availability who received chemotherapy without prior Zevalin RIT. Results: The toxicity in 58 patients treated with Zevalin RIT and subsequent therapy was not significantly different from the control group who did not receive Zevalin RIT. Patients had a median of two subsequent therapies (range, 1-7) after Zevalin. Twenty eight percent required blood cell growth factor support with subsequent chemotherapy and 2 patients required reductions from the standard chemotherapy doses due to prolonged myelosuppression. Eight patients subsequently had successful autologous hematologic stem cell transplant with cells collected after Zevalin. Thirteen of the 58 patients (28%) treated with standard dose chemotherapy were hospitalized for neutropenic fever or thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Chemotherapy or high dose chemotherapy with autologous transplantation

  5. Theranostic pretargeted radioimmunotherapy of colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using picomolar affinity Y-86- or Lu-177-DOTA-Bn binding scFv C825/GPA33 IgG bispecific immunoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Xu, Hong; Guo, Hong-fen; Lee, Sang-gyu; Punzalan, Blesida; Chalasani, Sandhya; Fung, Edward K.; Jungbluth, Achim; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; O’Donoghue, Joseph; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose GPA33 is a colorectal cancer (CRC) antigen with unique retention properties after huA33-mediated tumor targeting. We tested a pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) approach for CRC using a tetravalent bispecific antibody with dual specificity for GPA33 tumor antigen and DOTA-Bn (radiolanthanide metal) complex. Methods PRIT was optimized in vivo by titrating sequential intravenous doses of huA33-C825, the dextran-based clearing agent (CA), and the C825-haptens 177Lu-or 86Y-DOTA-Bn in mice bearing the SW1222 subcutaneous (s.c.) CRC xenograft model. Results Using optimized PRIT, therapeutic indices (TIs) for tumor radiation absorbed dose of 73 (tumor/blood) and 12 (tumor/kidney) were achieved. Estimated absorbed doses (cGy/MBq) to tumor, blood, liver, spleen, and kidney for single-cycle PRIT were 65.8, 0.9 (TI: 73), 6.3 (TI: 10), 6.6 (TI: 10), and 5.3 (TI: 12), respectively. Two cycles of PRIT treatment (66.6 or 111 MBq 177Lu-DOTA-Bn) were safe and effective, with 9/9 complete responses of established s.c. tumors (100–700 mm3) and 2/9 alive without recurrence >140 d. Tumor log kill in this model was estimated to be 2.1–3.0 based time to 500-mm3 tumor recurrence. In addition, PRIT dosimetry/diagnosis was performed by PET imaging of the positron-emitting DOTA-hapten 86Y-DOTA-Bn. Conclusions We have developed anti-GPA33 PRIT, as a triple-step theranostic strategy for pre-clinical detection, dosimetry and safe targeted radiotherapy of established human colorectal mouse xenografts. PMID:26596724

  6. Clinical impact of the temporal relationship between depression and type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle diabetes study phase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Bruce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical features of type 2 diabetes may differ depending on whether first depression episode precedes or follows the diagnosis of diabetes. METHODS: Type 2 patients from the observational community-based Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II underwent assessment of lifetime depression using the Brief Lifetime Depression Scale (developed and validated for this study supplemented by information on current depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, 9-item version and use of antidepressants. Patients were categorized as never depressed (Group 1, having had depression before diabetes diagnosis (Group 2, diagnosed with depression and diabetes within 2 years of each other (Group 3 and having depression after diabetes diagnosis (Group 4. RESULTS: Of 1391 patients, 20.8% were assigned to Group 2, 6.0% to Group 3 and 14.5% to Group 4. In Group 2, depression occurred a median 15.6 years before diabetes onset at age 37.2±14.7 years. These patients had similar clinical characteristics to never depressed patients except for reduced self-care behaviours and having more symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. In Group 4, depression occurred a median 9.9 years after diabetes onset at age 59.8±13.0 years. These patients had long duration diabetes, poor glycaemic control, more intensive management and more diabetic complications. Group 4 patients had more current depression than Group 2 but were less likely to be receiving antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The clinical features of depression and type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous depending on their temporal relationship. There may be corresponding differences in the pathogenesis of depression in diabetes that have implications for diagnosis and management.

  7. Portable digital assistants (PDAs) in dentistry: part II--pilot study of PDA use in the dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, P A; Harper, J; Dunne, S; Cox, M; Myint, Y K

    2007-04-28

    To describe a simple technical evaluation of the access, security issues and uses of wireless networked PDAs in a dental clinic and report a pilot study investigating students' educational use of PDAs to access a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) in a dental clinic. To undertake a technical evaluation of wireless networking to PDAs focusing on security issues, robustness of the system and accessibility particularly to educational resources. To evaluate the impact of using a PDA on undergraduate students in the dental clinic and at home. Part II describes the technical and educational evaluation of PDAs used by one group of 12 undergraduate fourth year students in the Primary Dental Care clinic. A cross over trial of six students with PDAs and six without was carried out during one semester of 12 weeks. Technical issues such as secure internet access using wireless connectivity were addressed. An assessment of the general and educational use and the students' attitudes towards using PDAs was undertaken using online questionnaires and focus group discussions. Over 90% of participants wanted PDAs as part of their dental kit. The potential of PDA use in dental training was demonstrated by a good to excellent response by over 75% of participants to having access to online support materials, particularly videos, being able to make notes for individual study and to keep a diary of their commitments to teaching sessions. Recreational use included a 100% good to excellent response to playing games and keeping a diary. The PDA proved to be a convenient and versatile mode of access to online education. Technical solutions enabled a substantial proportion of the functionality of WebCT (Web Course Tools) to be accessed by the students in a clinical environment. Both novice and experienced users were able to appreciate the use of the PDA and the less able considered that their ICT skills had improved. However, further research is needed to determine how students use a range of

  8. Intravitreal sirolimus for the treatment of geographic atrophy: results of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Philip A; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T

    2014-12-18

    To investigate the safety and effects of intravitreal sirolimus for the potential treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). The study was a single-center, open-label, phase I/II trial enrolling six participants with bilateral GA treated with intravitreal sirolimus in only one randomly assigned eye, with the fellow eye as control. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in total GA area from baseline on color fundus photography (CFP); secondary outcomes included changes in GA area on fundus autofluorescence (FAF), visual acuity, central retinal thickness (CRT), and macular sensitivity from baseline. Although no systemic adverse events were attributed to treatment, two of six participants had ocular adverse events that were possibly associated. The treated eye of one participant developed abnormal paralesional changes on FAF that were associated with accelerated retinal thinning. This accelerated retinal thinning was also seen in the treated eye of a second participant. Because of concern that these events were associated with treatment, treatment was suspended. Comparisons of treated and fellow eyes for change in visual acuity, change in GA area, and change in CRT showed no evidence of treatment benefit and generally favored the untreated fellow eye. While paralesional FAF changes and rapid retinal thinning observed are potentially part of the natural course of GA, they may possibly be related to treatment. No general evidence of anatomical or functional benefit was detected in treated eyes. Further data on intravitreal sirolimus for GA treatment will be available from a larger phase II trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01445548.). Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  9. Use of angiotensin II receptor blockers alone and in combination with other drugs: a large clinical experience trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Weir

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II receptor blockers are the newest class of antihypertensive drugs to be developed. No large-scale clinical trials have been performed to evaluate their efficacy alone, or in combination with other drugs. A large-scale, eight week, open-label, non-placebo-controlled, single-arm trial evaluated the efficacy, tolerability and dose-response of candesartan cilexetil, 16—32 mg once-daily, either as monotherapy or as part of combination therapy, in a diverse hypertensive population in actual practice settings. 6465 patients with high blood pressure, of whom 52% were female and 16% African American, with a mean age of 58 years, were included. 5446 patients had essential hypertension and 1014 patients had isolated systolic hypertension. In order to be included in this study, patients had either untreated or uncontrolled hypertension (systolic blood pressure (SBP 140—179 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP 90—109 mmHg inclusive at baseline, despite a variety of other antihypertensive drugs. Of the 5156 patients with essential hypertension and at least one post baseline efficacy measurement, the mean pretreatment blood pressure (BP was 156/97 mmHg. Candesartan cilexetil monotherapy reduced mean SBP/DBP by 18.0/12.2 mmHg. Similarly, in the 964 patients with isolated systolic hypertension and at least one post baseline efficacy measurement, candesartan cilexetil monotherapy reduced SBP/DBP from 158/81 by 16.5/4.5 mmHg. Candesartan cilexetil was similarly effective when employed as add-on therapy. When added to baseline antihypertensive medication in 51% of the patients with essential hypertension not achieving BP control, additional reduction in BP was achieved regardless of the background therapy, including diuretics (17.8/11.7 mmHg calcium antagonists (16.6/11.2 mmHg, beta-blockers (16.5/10.4 mmHg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I (15.3/10.0 mmHg, and alpha blockers (16.4/10.4 mmHg. Likewise, when

  10. Loeys-Dietz syndrome type I and type II: clinical findings and novel mutations in two Italian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calzavara-Pinton Pier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder showing the involvement of cutaneous, cardiovascular, craniofacial, and skeletal systems. In particular, LDS patients show arterial tortuosity with widespread vascular aneurysm and dissection, and have a high risk of aortic dissection or rupture at an early age and at aortic diameters that ordinarily are not predictive of these events. Recently, LDS has been subdivided in LDS type I (LDSI and type II (LDSII on the basis of the presence or the absence of cranio-facial involvement, respectively. Furthermore, LDSII patients display at least two of the major signs of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. LDS is caused by mutations in the transforming growth factor (TGF beta-receptor I (TGFBR1 and II (TGFBR2 genes. The aim of this study was the clinical and molecular characterization of two LDS patients. Methods The exons and intronic flanking regions of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes were amplified and sequence analysis was performed. Results Patient 1 was a boy showing dysmorphic signs, blue sclerae, high-arched palate, bifid uvula; skeletal system involvement, joint hypermobility, velvety and translucent skin, aortic root dilatation, tortuosity and elongation of the carotid arteries. These signs are consistent with an LDSI phenotype. The sequencing analysis disclosed the novel TGFBR1 p.Asp351Gly de novo mutation falling in the kinase domain of the receptor. Patient 2 was an adult woman showing ascending aorta aneurysm, with vascular complications following surgery intervention. Velvety and translucent skin, venous varicosities and wrist dislocation were present. These signs are consistent with an LDSII phenotype. In this patient and in her daughter, TGFBR2 genotyping disclosed in the kinase domain of the protein the novel p.Ile510Ser missense mutation. Conclusion We report two novel mutations in the TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes in two patients affected with LDS and showing marked

  11. Predictive patient-specific dosimetry and individualized dosing of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoffelen, Rafke; Woliner-van der Weg, Wietske; Visser, Eric P.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Goldenberg, David M. [Garden State Cancer Center, Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); IBC Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Sharkey, Robert M.; McBride, William J.; Chang, Chien-Hsing [Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Rossi, Edmund A. [IBC Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Graaf, Winette T.A. van der [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) with bispecific antibodies (bsMAb) and a radiolabeled peptide reduces the radiation dose to normal tissues. Here we report the accuracy of an {sup 111}In-labeled pretherapy test dose for personalized dosing of {sup 177}Lu-labeled IMP288 following pretargeting with the anti-CEA x anti-hapten bsMAb, TF2, in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In 20 patients bone marrow absorbed doses (BMD) and doses to the kidneys were predicted based on blood samples and scintigrams acquired after {sup 111}In-IMP288 injection for individualized dosing of PRIT with {sup 177}Lu-IMP288. Different dose schedules were studied, varying the interval between the bsMAb and peptide administration (5 days vs. 1 day), increasing the bsMAb dose (75 mg vs. 150 mg), and lowering the peptide dose (100 μg vs. 25 μg). TF2 and {sup 111}In/{sup 177}Lu-IMP288 clearance was highly variable. A strong correlation was observed between peptide residence times and individual TF2 blood concentrations at the time of peptide injection (Spearman's ρ = 0.94, P < 0.0001). PRIT with 7.4 GBq {sup 177}Lu-IMP288 resulted in low radiation doses to normal tissues (BMD <0.5 Gy, kidney dose <3 Gy). Predicted {sup 177}Lu-IMP288 BMD were in good agreement with the actual measured doses (mean ± SD difference -0.0026 ± 0.028 mGy/MBq). Hematological toxicity was mild in most patients, with only two (10 %) having grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia. A correlation was found between platelet toxicity and BMD (Spearman's ρ = 0.58, P = 0.008). No nonhematological toxicity was observed. These results show that individual high activity doses in PRIT in patients with CEA-expressing CRC could be safely administered by predicting the radiation dose to red marrow and kidneys, based on dosimetric analysis of a test dose of TF2 and {sup 111}In-IMP288. (orig.)

  12. Benefits of combined radioimmunotherapy and anti-angiogenic therapy in a liver metastasis model of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Kinuya, Seigo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Naoto; Shuke, Noriyuki

    2002-01-01

    The combined use of anti-angiogenic therapy (AT) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) may improve the therapeutic outcome in patients with cancer lesions. This hypothesis is based on the ability of AT to suppress tumour endothelial compartments and the direct action of RIT against tumour cells. We previously confirmed this hypothesis in an established subcutaneous xenograft model of colon cancer. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine the benefit of this combination within a liver metastasis model, which mimics treatment of minimal disease in an adjuvant setting. Liver metastases were established in nude mice by intrasplenic inoculation of LS180 colon cancer cells; following such inoculation, metastases of 131 I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, was conducted at 2 weeks. RIT employing an irrelevant IgG1, 131 I-HPMS-1, was implemented for comparison. The weight of liver metastases was measured 4 weeks after cell inoculation. The effect of AT on 131 I-A7 accumulation in metastases was also observed. Toxicity of treatment was monitored by blood cell counts. Monotherapy with 2-ME AT or 131 I-A7 RIT significantly suppressed metastasis growth (P 131 I-A7 RIT. Combination of AT and 131 I-A7 RIT more effectively suppressed the growth to 0.28±0.32 g (P 131 I-HPMS-1 RIT, which suppressed metastasis growth to 2.25±0.88 g, was significant in comparison with the control (P 131 I-HPMS-1 RIT (which suppressed growth to 1.41±0.68 g) was far less effective than the combination of AT and 131 I-A7 RIT. AT did not decrease 131 I-A7 accumulation in metastases. AT did not affect RIT myelotoxicity. The results of this study demonstrating the combined effects of AT and 131 I-A7 RIT in a small metastasis model indicate that such combination therapy may be suitable for the treatment of minimal disease. (orig.)

  13. SU-C-201-05: Imaging 212Pb-TCMC-Trastuzumab for Alpha Radioimmunotherapy for Ovarian Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, S; Meredith, R; Azure, M; Yoder, D [University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States); Torgue, J; Banaga, E [AREVA Med LLC, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To support the phase I trial for toxicity, biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of intra-peritoneal (IP) 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in patients with HER-2 expressing malignancy. A whole body gamma camera imaging method was developed for estimating amount of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab left in the peritoneal cavity. Methods: {sup 212}Pb decays to {sup 212}Bi via beta emission. {sup 212}Bi emits an alpha particle at an average of 6.1 MeV. The 238.6 keV gamma ray with a 43.6% yield can be exploited for imaging. Initial phantom was made of saline bags with 212Pb. Images were collected for 238.6 keV with a medium energy general purpose collimator. There are other high energy gamma emissions (e.g. 511keV, 8%; 583 keV, 31%) that penetrate the septae of the collimator and contribute scatter into 238.6 keV. An upper scatter window was used for scatter correction for these high energy gammas. Results: A small source containing 212Pb can be easily visualized. Scatter correction on images of a small 212Pb source resulted in a ∼50% reduction in the full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), while change in full width at half maximum (FWHM) was <10%. For photopeak images, substantial scatter around phantom source extended to > 5 cm outside; scatter correction improved image contrast by removing this scatter around the sources. Patient imaging, in the 1st cohort (n=3) showed little redistribution of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab out of the peritoneal cavity. Compared to the early post-treatment images, the 18-hour post-injection images illustrated the shift to more uniform anterior/posterior abdominal distribution and the loss of intensity due to radioactive decay. Conclusion: Use of medium energy collimator, 15% width of 238.6 keV photopeak, and a 7.5% upper scatter window is adequate for quantification of 212Pb radioactivity inside peritoneal cavity for alpha radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer. Research Support: AREVA Med, NIH 1UL1RR025777-01.

  14. Clinical significance of estimation of changes in serum IGF-II, TNF-α and TSGF levels after chemotherapy in patients with acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huijie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes in serum IGF-II, TNF-α and TSGF levels after chemotherapy in patients with acute leukemia. Methods: Serum IGF-II, TNF-α (with RIA) and TSGF (with biochemistry) levels were determined in 33 patients with acute leukemia both before and after chemotherapy as well as in 35 normal healthy Controls. Results: Before chemotherapy, serum IGF-II, TNF-α and TSGF levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01), 6 months after chemotherapy the levels in 28 patients without recurrence dropped markedly and approached those in controls. However, in the 5 eases with recurrence, the levels after return again, approaching those before chemotherapy. Conclusion: Changes of serum levels on IGF-II, TNF-α and TSGF might be useful as indicative parameters for diagnosis and curative effect in patients with acute leukemia. (authors)

  15. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 and hs-CRP levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchopneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghui; Chen Chuanbing; Wang Xianwu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 and hs-CRP levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchopneumonia. Methods: Serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 (with RIA) and hs-CRP (with immunoturbidity method) levels were determined in 36 pediatric patients with bronchopneumonia both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 and hs-CRP levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Determination of serum IGF-II, IL-6, IL-8 and hs-CRP levels in pediatric patients with bronchopneumonia was important for diagnosis and outcome prediction. (authors)

  16. Clinical significance of measurement of changes of serum IGF-II and NO levels after treatment in elderly patients with chronic bronchitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Tao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum IGF-II and NO levels after treatment in elderly patients with chronic bronchitis. Methods: Serum IGF-II (with RIA) and NO (with Biochemical method) levels were measured in 42 elderly patients with chronic bronchitis both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment in the patients the serum IGF-II levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01), while the NO levels were significantly lower (P<0.01). After two weeks of treatment, the levels though dropped markedly, lemained higher than those in controls (P<0. 05). Conclusion: Serum IGF-II and NO levels changes could reflect the disease status as well as the progress of diseases. (authors)

  17. Clinical significance of changes of serum IGF-II, IL-2 and SOD levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hong; Hu Yan; Wei Guoyu; Huang Jufeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum IGF-II, IL-2 and SOD levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial pneumonia. Methods: Serum IGF-II, IL-2 and SOD (with RIA) levels were measured in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial pneumonia both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, serum IGF-II levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Changes of serum IGF-II, IL-2 and SOD levels both before and after treatment could reflect the diseases status of the patients as well as the progress of diseases, and might be of prognostic importance in pediatric patients with bronchial pneumonia. (authors)

  18. Three-year randomized controlled clinical study of a one step universal adhesive and a two-step self-etch adhesive in Class II resin composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 3-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive bonding system and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations. Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 yr......) received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class II restorations. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage resin......) success rates (p>0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively.The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture. Conclusion: Class II resin composite restorations placed with a one-step universal adhesive showed good short time effectiveness....

  19. Distinct genetic difference between the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from North Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun-Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee-Ling

    2015-02-21

    Plasmodium knowlesi is one of the monkey malaria parasites that can cause human malaria. The Duffy binding protein of P. knowlesi (PkDBPαII) is essential for the parasite's invasion into human and monkey erythrocytes. A previous study on P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia reported high level of genetic diversity in the PkDBPαII. Furthermore, 36 amino acid haplotypes were identified and these haplotypes could be separated into allele group I and allele group II. In the present study, the PkDBPαII of clinical isolates from the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah in North Borneo was investigated, and compared with the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia isolates. Blood samples from 28 knowlesi malaria patients were used. These samples were collected between 2011 and 2013 from hospitals in North Borneo. The PkDBPαII region of the isolates was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The genetic diversity, natural selection and phylogenetics of PkDBPαII haplotypes were analysed using MEGA5 and DnaSP ver. 5.10.00 programmes. Forty-nine PkDBPαII sequences were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence revealed 58 synonymous and 102 non-synonymous mutations. Analysis on these mutations showed that PkDBPαII was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 38 different PkDBPαII haplotypes were identified. Twelve of the 28 blood samples had mixed haplotype infections. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the haplotypes were in allele group I, but they formed a sub-group that was distinct from those of Peninsular Malaysia. Wright's FST fixation index indicated high genetic differentiation between the North Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia haplotypes. This study is the first to report the genetic diversity and natural selection of PkDBPαII of P. knowlesi from Borneo Island. The PkDBPαII haplotypes found in this study were distinct from those from

  20. Oral minocycline for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME): results of a phase I/II clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine A; Petrou, Philip; Chew, Emily Y; Meyerle, Catherine B; Wong, Wai T

    2012-06-22

    Inflammation contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema (DME). In particular, retinal microglia demonstrate increased activation and aggregation in areas of DME. Study authors investigated the safety and potential efficacy of oral minocycline, a drug capable of inhibiting microglial activation, in the treatment of DME. A single-center, prospective, open-label phase I/II clinical trial enrolled five participants with fovea-involving DME who received oral minocycline 100 mg twice daily for 6 months. Main outcome measurements included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal subfield thickness (CST), and central macular volume using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and late leakage on fluorescein angiography (FA). Findings indicated that the study drug was well tolerated and not associated with significant safety issues. In study eyes, mean BCVA improved continuously from baseline at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months by +1.0, +4.0, +4.0, and +5.8 letters, respectively, while mean retinal thickness (CST) on OCT decreased by -2.9%, -5.7%, -13.9, and -8.1% for the same time points. At month 6, mean area of late leakage on FA decreased by -34.4% in study eyes. Mean changes in contralateral fellow eyes also demonstrated similar trends. Improvements in outcome measures were not correlated with concurrent changes in systemic factors. In this pilot proof-of-concept study of DME, minocycline as primary treatment was associated with improved visual function, central macular edema, and vascular leakage, comparing favorably with historical controls from previous studies. Microglial inhibition with oral minocycline may be a promising therapeutic strategy targeting the inflammatory etiology of DME. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01120899.).

  1. Readability and Content Assessment of Informed Consent Forms for Phase II-IV Clinical Trials in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Gaiyan; Liu, Xinchun; Huang, Lihua; Shu, Jingxian; Xu, Nana; Chen, Ruifang; Huang, Zhijun; Yang, Guoping; Wang, Xiaomin; Xiang, Yuxia; Lu, Yao; Yuan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    To explore the readability and content integrity of informed consent forms (ICFs) used in China and to compare the quality of Chinese local ICFs with that of international ICFs. The length, readability and content of 155 consent documents from phase II-IV drug clinical trials from the Third Xiangya Hospital Ethics Committee from November 2009 to January 2015 were evaluated. Reading difficulty was tested using a readability formula adapted for the Chinese language. An ICF checklist containing 27 required elements was successfully constructed to evaluate content integrity. The description of alternatives to participation was assessed. The quality of ICFs from different sponsorships were also compared. Among the 155 evaluable trials, the ICFs had a median length of 5286 words, corresponding to 7 pages. The median readability score was 4.31 (4.02-4.41), with 63.9% at the 2nd level and 36.1% at the 3rd level. Five of the 27 elements were frequently neglected. The average score for the description of alternatives to participation was 1.06, and 27.7% of the ICFs did not mention any alternatives. Compared with Chinese local ICFs, international ICFs were longer, more readable and contained more of the required elements (P readability and content integrity than Chinese local ICFs. More efforts should thus be made to improve the quality of consent documents in China.

  2. Treatment of nonneovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia type 2 with intravitreal ranibizumab: results of a phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Brian C; Koo, Euna; Cukras, Catherine; Meyerle, Catherine B; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab for nonneovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia Type 2. Single-center, open-label Phase II clinical trial enrolling five participants with bilateral nonneovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia Type 2. Intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5 mg) was administered every 4 weeks in the study eye for 12 months with the contralateral eye observed. Outcome measures included changes in best-corrected visual acuity, area of late-phase leakage on fluorescein angiography, and retinal thickness on optical coherence tomography. The study treatment was well tolerated and associated with few adverse events. Change in best-corrected visual acuity at 12 months was not significantly different between treated study eyes (0.0 ± 7.5 letters) and control fellow eyes (+2.2 ± 1.9 letters). However, decreases in the area of late-phase fluorescein angiography leakage (-33 ± 20% for study eyes, +1 ± 8% for fellow eyes) and in optical coherence tomography central subfield retinal thickness (-11.7 ± 7.0% for study eyes and -2.9 ± 3.5% for fellow eyes) were greater in study eyes compared with fellow eyes. Despite significant anatomical responses to treatment, functional improvement in visual acuity was not detected. Intravitreal ranibizumab administered monthly over a time course of 12 months is unlikely to provide a general and significant benefit to patients with nonneovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia Type 2.

  3. Treatment of Non-neovascular Idiopathic Macular Telangiectasia Type 2 with Intravitreal Ranibizumab: Results of a Phase II Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Brian C.; Koo, Euna; Cukras, Catherine; Meyerle, Catherine B.; Chew, Emily Y.; Wong, Wai T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab for non-neovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia, type 2 (IMT2). Methods Single-center, open-label phase II clinical trial enrolling 5 participants with bilateral non-neovascular IMT2. Intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5mg) was administered every 4 weeks in the study eye for 12 months with the contralateral eye observed. Outcome measures included changes in: best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), area of late-phase leakage on fluorescein angiography (FA), and retinal thickness on optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results The study treatment was well-tolerated and associated with few adverse events. Change in BCVA at 12 months was not significantly different between treated study eyes (0.0±7.5 letters) and control fellow eyes (+2.2±1.9 letters). However, decreases in the area of late-phase FA leakage (−33±20% for study eyes, +1±8% for fellow eyes) and in OCT central subfield retinal thickness (−11.7±7.0% for study eyes and −2.9±3.5% for fellow eyes) were greater in study eyes compared to fellow eyes. Conclusions Despite significant anatomical responses to treatment, functional improvement in visual acuity was not detected. Intravitreal ranibizumab administered monthly over a time course of 12 months is unlikely to provide a general and significant benefit to patients with non-neovascular IMT2. PMID:22266930

  4. Clinical significance of determination of serum NSE and plasma ET, IGF-II, CNP levels in patients with acute brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of plasma ET, IGF-II, CNP and serum NSE contents in patients with acute brain injury. Methods: Serum contents of neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured with chemiluminescence immunoassay and plasma endothelin (ET), insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) were measured with radioimmunoassay in 30 patients with acute brain injury and 35 controls. Results: Serum contents of NSE and plasma IGF-II, CNP were not much different in patients with mild brain injury from those in controls (P >0.05), but plasma contents of ET were already significantly higher in patients with mild brain injury than those in controls(P < 0.01). The serum NSE and plasma ET levels in patients with moderate and severe brain injury were significantly higher than those in patients with mild brain injury and controls (P < 0.01). Decrease of plasma levels of IGF-II and CNP was not significant in patients with mild brain injury (vs controls). However, the plasma levels of IGF-II and CNP were significantly lower in patients with moderate and severe brain injury than those in patients with mild brain injury and controls (P <0.01). As a whole, the magnitude of changes of these parameters was proportional to the severity of the injury. Conclusion: Changes of serum NSE and plasma IGF-II, ET and CNP levels were closely related to the pathological process of brain injury. Determination of these parameters was of clinical importance for evaluation of the severity of injury and outcome prediction. (authors)

  5. Sequential radioimmunotherapy with 177Lu- and 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody BR96 in a syngeneic rat colon carcinoma model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Sophie E; Elgström, Erika; Bäck, Tom

    2014-01-01

    for small, established tumors. A combination of such radionuclides may be successful in regimens of radioimmunotherapy. In this study, rats were treated by sequential administration of first a 177Lu-labeled antibody, followed by a 211At-labeled antibody 25 days later. METHODS: Rats bearing solid colon...... carcinoma tumors were treated with 400 MBq/kg body weight 177Lu-BR96. After 25 days, three groups of animals were given either 5 or 10 MBq/kg body weight of 211At-BR96 simultaneously with or without a blocking agent reducing halogen uptake in normal tissues. Control animals were not given any 211At-BR96....... The rats suffered from reversible myelotoxicity after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Sequential administration of 177Lu-BR96 and 211At-BR96 resulted in tolerable toxicity providing halogen blocking but did not enhance the therapeutic effect....

  6. A radiolabeled antibody targeting CD123+ leukemia stem cells – initial radioimmunotherapy studies in NOD/SCID mice engrafted with primary human AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V. Leyton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT with anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody CSL360 modified with nuclear translocation sequence (NLS peptides and labeled with the Auger electron-emitter, 111In (111In-NLS-CSL360 was studied in the prevalent NOD/SCID mouse AML engraftment assay. Significant decreases in CD123+ leukemic cells and impairment of leukemic stem cell self-renewal were achieved with high doses of RIT. However, NOD/SCID mice were very radiosensitive to these doses. At low non-toxic treatment doses, 111In-NLS-CSL360 demonstrated a trend towards improved survival associated with decreased spleen/body weight ratio, an indicator of leukemia burden, and almost complete eradication of leukemia from the bone marrow in some mice.

  7. Clinical utility of the DSM-5 alternative model for borderline personality disorder: Differential diagnostic accuracy of the BFI, SCID-II-PQ, and PID-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J Christopher; Madan, Alok; Allen, Jon G; Patriquin, Michelle; Sharp, Carla; Oldham, John M; Frueh, B Christopher

    2018-01-01

    With the publication of DSM 5 alternative model for personality disorders it is critical to assess the components of the model against evidence-based models such as the five factor model and the DSM-IV-TR categorical model. This study explored the relative clinical utility of these models in screening for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Receiver operator characteristics and diagnostic efficiency statistics were calculated for three personality measures to ascertain the relative diagnostic efficiency of each measure. A total of 1653 adult inpatients at a specialist psychiatric hospital completed SCID-II interviews. Sample 1 (n=653) completed the SCID-II interviews, SCID-II Questionnaire (SCID-II-PQ) and the Big Five Inventory (BFI), while Sample 2 (n=1,000) completed the SCID-II interviews, Personality Inventory for DSM5 (PID-5) and the BFI. BFI measure evidenced moderate accuracy for two composites: High Neuroticism+ low agreeableness composite (AUC=0.72, SE=0.01, ptrait constellation for diagnosing BPD. Limitations of the study include the single inpatient setting and use of two discrete samples to assess PID-5 and SCID-II-PQ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Theoretical estimation of absorbed dose to organs in radioimmunotherapy using radionuclides with multiple unstable daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamacher, K.A.; Sgouros, G.

    2001-01-01

    The toxicity and clinical utility of long-lived alpha emitters such as Ac-225 and Ra-223 will depend upon the fate of alpha-particle emitting unstable intermediates generated after decay of the conjugated parent. For example, decay of Ac-225 to a stable element yields four alpha particles and seven radionuclides. Each of these progeny has its own free-state biodistribution and characteristic half-life. Therefore, their inclusion for a more accurate prediction of absorbed dose and potential toxicity requires a formalism that takes these factors into consideration as well. To facilitate the incorporation of such intermediates into the dose calculation, a previously developed methodology (model 1) has been extended. Two new models (models 2 and 3) for allocation of daughter products are introduced and are compared with the previously developed model. Model 1 restricts the transport to a function that yields either the place of origin or the place(s) of biodistribution depending on the half-life of the parent radionuclide. Model 2 includes the transient time within the bloodstream and model 3 incorporates additional binding at or within the tumor. This means that model 2 also allows for radionuclide decay and further daughter production while moving from one location to the next and that model 3 relaxes the constraint that the residence time within the tumor is solely based on the half-life of the parent. The models are used to estimate normal organ absorbed doses for the following parent radionuclides: Ac-225, Pb-212, At-211, Ra-223, and Bi-213. Model simulations are for a 0.1 g rapidly accessible tumor and a 10 g solid tumor. Additionally, the effects of varying radiolabled carrier molecule purity and amount of carrier molecules, as well as tumor cell antigen saturation are examined. The results indicate that there is a distinct advantage in using parent radionuclides such as Ac-225 or Ra-223, each having a half-life of more than 10 days and yielding four alpha

  9. Single Chain Fv Constructs of Anti-Ganglioside GD2 Antibodies for Radioimaging and Radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2003-01-01

    because of its broad and usually homogeneous distribution in human solid tumors, and most importantly, their absence on cell membranes of normal human tissues. In separate experiments, we have shown that T-cells transduced with the herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene can be radiolabeled with 131 I-FIAU to a safe nuclear radiation dose. Using a dicistronic construct we are inserting chimeric immune receptor plus HSV-tk into T-cells to allow such their trafficking to be radioactively monitored. We plan to study the role of cytokines, chemoreceptors and CD4 helper T-cells in recruiting CD8+ transduced T-cells to the tumor site. These studies should provide us with an adoptive cell therapy approach to target cytotoxicity to human tumors, and a lymphocyte tracking tool to study delivery to the tumor sites, to determine if they proliferate locally and/or recirculate. Such pharmacologic information is crucial for optimizing gene-modified T-cells in future clinical trials. Single chain FV constructs of anti-ganglioside GD2 antibodies for radioimaging

  10. Type II diabetes and its therapy in clinical practice - results from the standardised non-interventional registry SIRTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallwitz, B; Kusterer, K; Hildemann, S; Fresenius, K

    2014-12-01

    Modern antidiabetic therapies should achieve low HbA1c values and avoid hypoglycaemic complications. The registry SIRTA included 1522 patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from 306 German medical practices. Patients had an HbA1c > 6.5% under the maximum tolerated metformin dose. If required, they received combination therapy with other antidiabetics according to the guideline of the German Diabetes Society [Deutsche Diabetes Gesellschaft (DDG)] or usual medical practice. Patients were followed up for 6 months. The target criteria included the achievement of HbA1c target values and the emergence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes. Most patients (64.0%) were planned to achieve an HbA1c target < 6.5%, the standard target recommended by the 2009 DDG guideline valid throughout the registry. Primarily to reduce the individual risk for hypoglycaemia, 32.4% of patients had a less strict HbA1c-target of 6.5-7.0%. These targets were achieved by 31.3% and 44.3% of patients, respectively. Combination therapies increased from 45% to 56% over the 6 months registry. Four patients had severe hypoglycaemias (0.26%). The registry confirms results from other epidemiologic studies on the therapy of T2DM in everyday practice. The treatment strategies applied effectively reduced blood glucose and avoided severe hypoglycaemias. An early therapy of insufficiently controlled patients with T2DM is important, as lower baseline values facilitated achieving HbA1c targets. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, controlled clinical trial of chicken type II collagen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Wei, Wei; Xiao, Feng; Xu, Jian-Hua; Bao, Chun-De; Ni, Li-Qing; Li, Xing-Fu

    2008-07-15

    To assess the efficacy and safety of chicken type II collagen (CCII) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with methotrexate (MTX). We conducted a prospective, 24-week, followup, multicenter, double-blind, controlled study of CCII (0.1 mg/day) versus MTX (10 mg/week) in patients with active RA. Clinical assessments were performed at screening and at 12, 18, and 24 weeks of treatment. A total of 236 RA patients were included; 211 patients (89.4%) completed the 24-week followup. In both groups there was a decrease in pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, Health Assessment Questionnaire score, and investigator and patient assessment of function; all differences were statistically significant. In the MTX group, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level decreased. Rheumatoid factor did not change in either group. At 24 weeks, 68.57% of patients in the CCII group and 83.02% in the MTX group met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20), and 40.95% and 57.54%, respectively, met the ACR50 criteria. The ACR20 and ACR50 response rates in the CCII group were lower than those in the MTX group, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal symptoms were common in both groups. There were fewer and milder side effects in the CCII group than the MTX group. The difference in incidence of adverse events between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). CCII is effective in the treatment of RA. CCII is well tolerated, and the incidence of adverse events of CCII is lower than that of MTX.

  12. Comparison of VATS and Robotic Approaches For Clinical Stage I and II NSCLC Using the STS Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Brian E.; Wilson, Jennifer L.; Kim, Sunghee; Cerfolio, Robert J.; Park, Bernard J.; Farivar, Alexander S.; Vallières, Eric; Aye, Ralph W.; Burfeind, William R.; Block, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data from selected centers show that robotic lobectomy (RL) is safe, effective and has comparable 30-day mortality to video assisted lobectomy (VATS). However, widespread adoption of RL is controversial. We used the STS-GTS-Database to evaluate quality metrics for these two minimally invasive lobectomy techniques. Methods A database query for primary clinical stage I or II NSCLC at high volume centers from 2009 to 2013 identified 1,220 RLs and 12,378 VATS. Quality metrics evaluated included operative morbidity, 30-day mortality and nodal upstaging (NU), defined as cN0 to pN1. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate NU. Results RL patients were older, less active, less likely to be an ever smoker, and had higher BMI (all p<0.05). They were also more likely to have coronary heart disease or hypertension (all p<0.001) and to have had preoperative mediastinal staging (p<0.0001). RL operative times were longer (median 186 vs 173 min, p<0.001); all other operative parameters were similar. All postoperative outcomes were similar including complications and 30-day mortality (RL 0.6% vs VATS 0.8%, p=0.4). Median length of stay was 4 days for both, but a higher proportion of RLs stayed < 4 days: 48% vs 39%, p<0.001. NU overall was similar (p=0.6), but with trends favoring VATS in the cT1b group, and RL in the cT2a group. Conclusions RL patients had more co-morbidities and RL operative times were longer, but quality outcome measures including complications, hospital stay, 30-day mortality, and NU suggest RL and VATS are equivalent. PMID:27209613

  13. Glycemia in Acute Stroke II study: a call to improve post-stroke hyperglycemia management in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, B; Sanz-Cuesta, B E; Gutiérrez-Fernández, M; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Lisbona, A; Madero-Jarabo, R; Delgado-Mederos, R; Gállego-Cullere, J; Rodríguez-Yáñez, M; Martínez-Zabaleta, M; Freijo, M; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Portilla, J C; Gil-Núñez, A; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of conventional glucose management, which aimed to maintain glucose levels stroke (IS) in a clinical practice setting. This was a multicenter, prospective cohort study of patients with acute IS. Patients were classified into four groups based on their initial 48-h capillary glucose levels and the administration of and response to corrective treatment: (i) untreated and maximum glucose levels <155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L) within the first 48 h; (ii) treated and good responders [glucose levels persistently <155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L)]; (iii) treated and non-responders [any glucose values ≥155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L) during the 24 h after the start of corrective treatment]; and (iv) untreated with any glucose value ≥155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L). The primary outcome was death or dependence at 3 months (blinded rater). A total of 213 patients were included. Ninety-seven (45.5%) patients developed glucose levels ≥155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L), 69 (71.1%) underwent corrective treatment and 31 patients underwent no corrective treatment at the physician's discretion [28 of whom had isolated values ≥155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L)]. Only 11 (16%) patients responded to conventional treatment, whereas 58 (84%) patients were non-responsive. Non-responders showed a twofold higher risk of death or dependence at 3 months (odds ratio, 2.472; 95% confidence interval, 1.096-5.576; P = 0.029). Lack of response to conventional treatment for glucose management in acute IS is frequent and associated with poor outcomes. © 2017 EAN.

  14. Prospective double blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of the pectoral nerves (Pecs) block type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versyck, Barbara; van Geffen, Geert-Jan; Van Houwe, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to test the hypothesis whether adding the pectoral nerves (Pecs) block type II to the anesthetic procedure reduces opioid consumption during and after breast surgery. A prospective randomized double blind placebo-controlled study. A secondary hospital. 140 breast cancer stage 1-3 patients undergoing mastectomy or tumorectomy with sentinel node or axillary node dissection. Patients were randomized to receive either a Pecs block with levobupivacaine 0.25% (n=70) or placebo block with saline (n=70). The pain levels were evaluated by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) pain scores at 15-minute intervals during the post anesthesia care unit stay time (PACU), at 2-hour intervals for the first 24h on the ward and at 4-hour intervals for the next 24h. Intraoperative and postoperative opioid consumption were recorded during the full stay. Patient satisfaction was evaluated upon discharge using a 10-point scale. Intraoperative sufentanil requirements were comparable for the Pecs and placebo group (8.0±3.5μg and 7.8±3.0μg, P=0.730). Patients in the Pecs group experienced significantly less pain than patients in the control group (P=0.048) during their PACU stay. Furthermore, patients in the Pecs group required significant less postoperative opioids (9.16±10.15mg and 14.97±14.38mg morphine equivalent, P=0.037) and required significant fewer postsurgical opioid administration interventions than patients in the control group (P=0.045). Both patient-groups were very satisfied about their management (9.6±0.6 and 9.1±1.8 on a 10-point scale, P=0.211). The Pecs block reduces postsurgical opioid consumption during the PACU stay time for patients undergoing breast surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of geographic atrophy by the topical administration of OT-551: results of a phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai T; Kam, Waynekid; Cunningham, Denise; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Meyerle, Catherine B; Cukras, Catherine; Chew, Emily Y; Sadda, Srinivas R; Ferris, Frederick L

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the safety and preliminary efficacy of OT-551, a disubstituted hydroxylamine with antioxidant properties, for the treatment of geographic atrophy (GA), the advanced atrophic form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The study was a single-center, open-label phase II trial, enrolling 10 participants with bilateral GA. Topical 0.45% OT-551 was administered in one randomly assigned eye three times daily for 2 years. Safety measures were assessed by complete ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, and review of symptoms. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in best corrected visual acuity at 24 months. Secondary efficacy measures included changes in area of GA, contrast sensitivity, microperimetry measurements, and total drusen area from baseline. Study drug was well tolerated and was associated with few adverse events. The mean change in BCVA at 2 years was +0.2 ± 13.3 letters in the study eyes and -11.3 ± 7.6 letters in fellow eyes (P = 0.0259). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the study and fellow eyes for all other secondary outcome measures. OT-551 was well tolerated by study participants and was not associated with any serious adverse effects. Efficacy measurements in this small study indicate a possible effect in maintaining visual acuity. However, the absence of significant effects on other outcomes measures in this study suggests that OT-551, in the current concentration and mode of delivery, may have limited or no benefit as a treatment for GA (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00306488).

  16. Bolus and continuous infusion mitoxantrone in newly diagnosed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of two consecutive phase II clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Y; Akpek, G; Kansu, E; Kars, A; Tekuzman, G; Baltali, E; Güler, N; Barista, I; Güllü, I; Ozisik, Y; Firat, D

    1998-01-01

    Two consecutive phase II clinical studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bolus and continuous infusion (CI) mitoxantrone (MTZ) in 39 patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). MTZ was used as part of the classical ALL induction regimen. Twenty patients were treated with bolus MTZ (10 mg/m2 for 3 days) combined with vincristine and prednisone. The same regimen was given to a second set of 19 patients, except that MTZ was administered as a 24-hr CI. Both groups received bimonthly intensifications with vincristine and prednisone for 3 years, along with oral maintenance therapy. Patients in the CI-MTZ study arm received additional MTZ on the first day of intensification cycles. Seventeen patients (85%) in the bolus arm and 15 patients (79%) in the CI arm achieved complete remission (CR). Median disease-free survivals (DFS) in the bolus and CI groups were 11 and 15 months after median follow-ups of 16 (3.5-96) and 13 (2.3-32) months, respectively. At 2.5 years, DFS rates were 29.4% and 34.4% in the bolus and CI groups (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences between two groups in rates of early death, degree of organ toxicity, or duration of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Significant cardiac toxicity was not observed in either group. Bolus or CI administration of MTZ was equally effective and was well tolerated. Neither the mode of administration nor increasing the dose intensity of MTZ by incorporating intensification cycles reduced relapse rates. Development of new antileukemia agents and novel treatment approaches are still needed to improve the high relapse rates in adult ALL once a complete response is achieved.

  17. Clinical significance of measurement of serum insulin-like growth factor II and adrenomedulion levels in patients with essential hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Bifu; Ji Naijun; Mei Yibin; Wang Chengyao; Chen Donghai; Li Fuyuan; Guan Lihua; Gao Meiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum levels of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) and adrenomedullin (ADM) in patients with essential hypertension. Methods: Serum IGF II and ADM levels were measured in 62 cases of hypertension and 40 controls with RIA. Results: Serum IGF II and ADM levels were significantly bigger in hypertensive patients than those in the controls (t = 4.454, p < 0.01; t = 3.992, p < 0.01). The serum IGF II level was significantly positively correlated to the serum ADM levels (r = 0.379, p < 0.05) and both were significantly positively correlated to the mean arterial pressure (r = 0.346, r = 0.353, p < 0.05) but not with BMI. Serum ADM levels increased gradually as the disease progressed from stage I to stage III (p < 0.05) with levels in stage III markedly higher than those in stage I (p < 0.01). In EH patients with heart and/or brain and/or renal complications the serum ADM levels were significantly higher than those in EH patients without complications (t = 2.050, p < 0.05). Such differences did not exist in the case of IGF II. Conclusion: Serum IGF II and ADM levels were increased markedly in hypertensive patients. These two factors were mutually positively correlated and both were positively correlated to mean arterial pressure. ADM levels increased gradually as the disease progressing but IGF II levels remained stable

  18. Association of time-to-surgery with outcomes in clinical stage I-II pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with upfront surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Douglas S; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P; Firpo, Matthew A; Mulvihill, Sean J; Scaife, Courtney L

    2018-04-01

    Time-to-surgery from cancer diagnosis has increased in the United States. We aimed to determine the association between time-to-surgery and oncologic outcomes in patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma undergoing upfront surgery. The 2004-2012 National Cancer Database was reviewed for patients undergoing curative-intent surgery without neoadjuvant therapy for clinical stage I-II pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. A multivariable Cox model with restricted cubic splines was used to define time-to-surgery as short (1-14 days), medium (15-42), and long (43-120). Overall survival was examined using Cox shared frailty models. Secondary outcomes were examined using mixed-effects logistic regression models. Of 16,763 patients, time-to-surgery was short in 34.4%, medium in 51.6%, and long in 14.0%. More short time-to-surgery patients were young, privately insured, healthy, and treated at low-volume hospitals. Adjusted hazards of mortality were lower for medium (hazard ratio 0.94, 95% confidence interval, .90, 0.97) and long time-to-surgery (hazard ratio 0.91, 95% confidence interval, 0.86, 0.96) than short. There were no differences in adjusted odds of node positivity, clinical to pathologic upstaging, being unresectable or stage IV at exploration, and positive margins. Medium time-to-surgery patients had higher adjusted odds (odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval, 1.03, 1.20) of receiving an adequate lymphadenectomy than short. Ninety-day mortality was lower in medium (odds ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval, 0.65, 0.85) and long time-to-surgery (odds ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval, 0.60, 0.88) than short. In this observational analysis, short time-to-surgery was associated with slightly shorter OS and higher perioperative mortality. These results may suggest that delays for medical optimization and referral to high volume surgeons are safe. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Radioimmunotherapy with Y-90-epratuzumab in patients with previously treated B-cell lymphoma. A fractionated dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, O.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Tennvall, J.; Hindorf, C.; Olsson, T.; Strand, S.E.; Stenberg, L.; Wingardh, K.

    2002-01-01

    unequivocal CD22 expression, as compared with one of four patients with weak expression, exhibited OR. Tumour CD22 assessments before and during therapy were made in three patients, indicating down regulation of CD22. Conclusion: Radioimmunotherapy using a 2-4 weekly injection schedule with 90 Y-epratuzumab can result in durable OR in patients with various subtypes of B-cell lymphoma. Three weekly infusions 185 MBq/m 2 resulted in only minor haematological toxicity. Unequivocally CD22 expressing lymphoma seems more responsive. Low toxicity as well as evidence of down regulation of CD22 expression during therapy make fractionated treatment with 90 Y-epratuzumab warrants further study

  20. Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus types I and II (HTLV-I/II in French Guiana: clinical and molecular epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazanji Mirdad

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We review here the epidemiological studies performed by our group on human retrovirus HTLV-I and HTLV-II infections and the associated diseases in French Guiana since 1984. French Guiana is an overseas French administrative district located between Brazil and Surinam. Its population is characterized by a large variety of ethnic groups, including several populations of African origin and various populations of Amerindian origin. Several epidemiological studies of large samples of pregnant women and in remote villages showed that HTLV-I is highly endemic in this area but is restricted to groups of African origin, especially the Noir-Marrons. In this endemic population, the results of segregation analysis in a genetic epidemiological study were consistent with the presence of a dominant major gene predisposing to HTLV-I infection, especially in children. In contrast, HTLV-II infection appears to be rare in French Guiana, having been found in only a few individuals of Brazilian origin. From a molecular point of view, the HTLV-I strains present in the Noir-Marrons, Creoles and Amerindians appear to originate from Africa, as they belong to the large cosmopolitan molecular subtype A.

  1. Survival analysis of patients with clinical stages I or II Hodgkin's disease who have relapsed after initial treatment with radiotherapy alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwich, A.; Specht, L.; Ashley, S.

    1997-01-01

    relapse included initial stage, age, sex, histology, number of involved areas, mediastinal involvement, E-lesions, B-symptoms, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, alkaline phosphatase, serum albumin and haemoglobin. As well as presentation variables, we analysed the disease-free interval after initial......To aid treatment choice in early stage of Hodgkin's disease, we analysed patients registered in the IDHD Database with clinical stages I or II Hodgkin's disease who were not staged with laparotomy and whose initial treatment was with radiotherapy alone. The factors analysed for outcome after first...... radiotherapy and the extent of disease at relapse. A total of 1364 patients with clinical stage I or II Hodgkin's disease were treated with initial radiotherapy, of whom 473 relapsed. The probability of survival 10 years after relapse was 63%. For cause-specific survival (CSS), both multivariate and univariate...

  2. Clinical Comparison of Autogenous Bone Graft with and without Plasma Rich in Growth Factors in the Treatment of Grade II Furcation Involvement of Mandibular Molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Lafzi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF is a concentrated suspension of growth factors, which is used to promote periodontal tissue regeneration. The aim of this randomized, controlled, clinical trial was to evaluate of the treatment of grade II mandibular molar furcation involvement using autogenous bone graft with and without PRGF. Materials and methods. In this double-blind clinical trial, thirty mandibular molars with grade II furcation involvement in 30 patients were selected. The test group received bone graft combined with PRGF, while the control group was treated with bone graft only. Clinical parameters included clinical probing depth (CPD, vertical clinical attachment level (V-CAL, horizontal clinical attachment level (H-CAL, location of gingival margin (LGM, surgically exposed horizontal probing depth of bony defect (E-HPD, vertical depth of bone crest (V-DBC, vertical depth of the base of bony defect (V-DBD, and length of the intrabony defect (LID. After six months, a re-entry surgery was performed. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14, using Kolmogorov, Mann-Whitney U, and paired t-test. Results. After 6 months, both treatment methods led to significant improvement in V-CAL and H-CAL and significant decreases in CPD, E-HPD, V-DBD and LID; there was no significant difference in LGM and V-DBC in any of the treated groups compared to the baseline values. Also, none of the parameters showed significant differences between the study groups. Conclusion. Although autogenous bone grafts, with or without PRGF, were successful in treating grade II furcation involvement, no differences between the study groups were observed.

  3. Clinical Comparison of Autogenous Bone Graft with and without Plasma Rich in Growth Factors in the Treatment of Grade II Furcation Involvement of Mandibular Molars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafzi, Ardeshir; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Jabali, Sahar; Shayan, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) is a concentrated suspension of growth factors, which is used to promote periodontal tissue regeneration. The aim of this randomized, controlled, clinical trial was to evaluate of the treatment of grade II mandibular molar furcation involvement using autogenous bone graft with and without PRGF. Materials and methods In this double-blind clinical trial, thirty mandibular molars with grade II furcation involvement in 30 patients were selected. The test group received bone graft combined with PRGF, while the control group was treated with bone graft only. Clinical parameters included clinical probing depth (CPD), vertical clinical attachment level (V-CAL), horizontal clinical attachment level (H-CAL), location of gingival margin (LGM), surgically exposed horizontal probing depth of bony defect (E-HPD), vertical depth of bone crest (V-DBC), vertical depth of the base of bony defect (V-DBD), and length of the intrabony defect (LID). After six months, a re-entry surgery was performed. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14, using Kolmogorov, Mann-Whitney U, and paired t-test. Results After 6 months, both treatment methods led to significant improvement in V-CAL and H-CAL and significant decreases in CPD, E-HPD, V-DBD and LID; there was no significant difference in LGM and V-DBC in any of the treated groups compared to the baseline values. Also, none of the parameters showed significant differences between the study groups. Conclusion Although autogenous bone grafts, with or without PRGF, were successful in treating grade II furcation involvement, no differences between the study groups were observed. PMID:23486928

  4. Guided tissue regeneration and platelet rich growth factor for the treatment of Grade II furcation defects: A randomized double-blinded clinical trial - A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Jenabian

    2017-01-01

    Results: Eight patients were finally enrolled for this study. Overly, general and specific clinical and furcation parameters were improved except REC that was deteriorated insignificantly and FAC improved not significantly. Intergroup comparison revealed better improvement of FHC in GTR/PRGF group (P = 0.02. Conclusion: A significant improvement in the Grade II furcation defects treated with either GTR or PRGF/GTR was noticed. Further large-scale trials are needed to reveal differences of mentioned treatment in more details.

  5. Antisocial Personality Disorder Subscale (Chinese Version) of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis II disorders: validation study in Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D Y Y; Liu, A C Y; Leung, M H T; Siu, B W M

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVE. Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a risk factor for violence and is associated with poor treatment response when it is a co-morbid condition with substance abuse. It is an under-recognised clinical entity in the local Hong Kong setting, for which there are only a few available Chinese-language diagnostic instruments. None has been tested for its psychometric properties in the Cantonese-speaking population in Hong Kong. This study therefore aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the ASPD subscale of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis II Disorders (SCID-II) in Hong Kong Chinese. METHODS. This assessment tool was modified according to dialectal differences between Mainland China and Hong Kong. Inpatients in Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong, who were designated for priority follow-up based on their assessed propensity for violence and who fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the study, were recruited. To assess the level of agreement, best-estimate diagnosis made by a multidisciplinary team was compared with diagnostic status determined by the SCID-II ASPD subscale. The internal consistency, sensitivity, and specificity of the subscale were also calculated. RESULTS. The internal consistency of the subscale was acceptable at 0.79, whereas the test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability showed an excellent and good agreement of 0.90 and 0.86, respectively. Best-estimate clinical diagnosis-SCID diagnosis agreement was acceptable at 0.76. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 0.91, 0.86, 0.83, and 0.93, respectively. CONCLUSION. The Chinese version of the SCID-II ASPD subscale is reliable and valid for diagnosing ASPD in a Cantonese-speaking clinical population.

  6. Clinical analysis of the changes of plasma PRA, AT-II and Aid levels in patients with acute renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiuyue; Yang Yongqing

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of changes of plasma PRA, AT-II and Ald levels in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure. Methods: Plasma PRA, AT-II and Ald levels were determined with RIA in 40 normal subjects and 72 cases of acute renal failure. Results: Plasma PRA, AT-II and Ald levels in the patients were markedly increased as compared with those in normal subjects (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.001 respectively). There were no linearity and exponential relationship between plasma PRA, AT-II, Ald levels and the 24 h urinary sodium excretion amount (within the range of 89.1 - 365.2 mEq). Conclusion: Acute renal failure could activate the RAAS function

  7. Clinical evaluation of the Byk LIA-mat CA125 II assay: discussion of a reference value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfrer, J M; Korse, C M; Verstraeten, R A; van Kamp, G J; Hart, G A; Kenemans, P

    1997-03-01

    The Byk LIA-mat CA125 II assay was compared with the Centocor IRMA CA125 II. Serum samples studied (n = 1012) were obtained from 652 apparently healthy females, 61 pregnant women, and 299 patients with benign and malignant gynecological tumors. The CA125 II assay value at the 95th percentile of the total healthy group was 29 kU/L for the LIA-mat and 32 kU/L for the Centocor assay. For the LIA-mat assay the 95th percentile was 31 kU/L (Centocor 36 kU/L) for the group 55 years of age. By using ROC curves we found the optimal pretreatment Byk LIA-mat CA125 II value differentiating between benign and malignant ovarian tumors to be 95 kU/L. Pretreatment CA125 values > 1000 kU/L were detected in serum samples of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

  8. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  9. Efficacy and tolerability of lodenafil carbonate for oral therapy in erectile dysfunction: a phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Sidney; Toscano, Iderpol; Gomatzky, Celso; de Góes, Plínio Moreira; Júnior, Archimedes Nardozza; Claro, Joaquim Francisco de Almeida; Pagani, Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    Oral treatment with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5) is considered the first-line treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). Lodenafil carbonate (LC) is a novel PDE5. This is a phase II, prospective, randomized, double-blind, and placebo controlled clinical trial of LC. Efficacy end points were International Index of Sexual Function (IIEF) erectile domain, IIEF questions 3 and 4, and Sexual Encounter Profile (SEP) questions 2 and 3, before and after the use of LC or placebo. Seventy-two men older than 18 years, with ED for at least 6 months with stable sexual relationship were enrolled. Patients were randomized to placebo or LC 80 mg, 40 mg, or 20 mg and followed for 4 weeks. IIEF erectile domain scores before and after the use of medications were (mean +/- standard deviation [SD]): placebo: 11.9 +/- 3.4 and 12.6 +/- 5.5; LC 20 mg: 15.8 +/- 4.1 and 18.9 +/- 6.6; LC 40 mg: 11.9 +/- 4.4 and 15.4 +/- 8.1; LC 80 mg: 14.2 +/- 4.7 and 22.8 +/- 6.0 (ANOVA P < 0.01). The SEP-2 scores before and after the use of medications were (Mean +/- SD): placebo: 71.0 +/- 33.1 and 51.2 +/- 43.1; LC 20 mg 70.3 +/- 34.2 and 75.5 +/- 31.5; LC 40 mg: 48.4 +/- 42.1 and 60.8 +/- 42.5; LC 80 mg: 68.6 +/- 33.5 and 89.6 +/- 26.0. The SEP-3 scores were: placebo 23.3 +/- 27.6 and 33.6 +/- 42.3; LC 20 mg: 32.3 +/- 38.9 and 51.2 +/- 41.7; LC 40 mg: 39.7 +/- 44.7 and 46.7 +/- 41.1; LC 80 mg* 17.2 +/- 29.5 and 74.3 +/- 36.4 (*P < 0.05 for difference to placebo). The drug was well tolerated. Adverse reactions were mild and self-limited and included headache, rhinitis, flushing, color visual disorders, and dyspepsia. This study showed that the dosage of 80 mg of LC was significantly more efficacious than placebo and well tolerated.

  10. Clinical application of antibody monoclonal humanized anti-EGFrnimotuzumab labeled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera Pintado, Alejandro; Peña Quián, Yamilé; Batista Cuéllar, Juan F.; Prats Capote, Anaís; Torres Aroche, Leonel A.; Casacó Santana, Caridad; Sánchez Mendosa, Elvia L.; Sánchez González, Yolaine; Romero Collado, Susana; Quesada Pozo, Rodobaldo; Valladares Oviedo, Lourdes; Masquida García, Elsa M.; Leyva Montaña, René; Casacó, Angel; Ramos Suzarte, Mayra; Crombet, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Most malignant tumors are of epithelial origin. These are characterized by overexpression of the receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR), which the neoplastic cells escape the regulatory mechanisms are allowed, so its high concentration of membrane is generally associated with a poor prognosis . By binding an antibody specifically to this receptor, preventing binding of EGF latter and activation mechanism tyrosine kinase inhibiting cell mitosis and apoptosis causing tumor cell. For this reason, the EGFr has been considered as an attractive target for anti-tumor therapy. The humanized monoclonal antibody anti-EGFr nimotuzumab was developed by the Center of Molecular Immunology (Havana, Cuba). Numerous clinical trials have been developed in the Department of Clinical Research Center Isotopes (Cuba), in which it has been applied this antibody, both labeled with 99mTc for immuno gammagraphic detection of tumors, as labeled with 188 Re for radioimmunotherapy of gliomas high degree of malignancy. The aim of this paper is to show the experience of the Department of Clinical Research of CENTIS in various clinical trials with marking for both immuno gammagraphics detection of tumors, such as for radioimmunotherapy nimotuzumab. (author)

  11. Clinical results of Hi-tech Knee II total knee arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid athritis: 5- to 12-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanaka Hajime

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common form of treatment to relieve pain and improve function in cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Good clinical outcomes have been reported with a variety of TKA prostheses. The cementless Hi-Tech Knee II cruciate-retaining (CR-type prosthesis, which has 6 fins at the anterior of the femoral component, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL retention, flat-on-flat surface component geometry, all-polyethylene patella, strong initial fixation by the center screw of the tibial base plate, 10 layers of titanium alloy fiber mesh, and direct compression molded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE, is appropriate for TKA in the Japanese knee. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical results of primary TKA in RA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis. Materials and methods We performed 32 consecutive primary TKAs using cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis in 31 RA patients. The average follow-up period was 8 years 3 months. Clinical evaluations were performed according to the American Knee Society (KS system, knee score, function score, radiographic evaluation, and complications. Results The mean postoperative maximum flexion angle was 115.6°, and the KS knee score and function score improved to 88 and 70 after surgery, respectively. Complications, such as infection, occurred in 1 patient and revision surgery was performed. There were no cases of loosening in this cohort, and prosthesis survival rate was 96.9% at 12 years postoperatively. Conclusion These results suggest that TKA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis is a very effective form of treatment in RA patients at 5 to 12 years postoperatively. Further long-term follow-up studies are required to determine the ultimate utility of this type of prosthesis.

  12. New modalities (setting, fractionation) of radioimmunotherapy by 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (90Y zevalin) in first line treatment of follicular type non Hodgkin malignant lymphomas: efficiency, toxicity and personalized dosimetry approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morschhauser, F.

    2008-12-01

    Rationale: radioimmunotherapy (R.I.T.) with 90 Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan ([ 90 Y] Zevalin ) is a new treatment option for patients with relapsed/refractory non Hodgkin follicular lymphoma (F.L.). Efficacy increases when Zevalin is used earlier in the disease course. Currently, Zevalin dosage is based on weight and not dosimetry. This most likely results in a wide range of absorbed dose to critical organs and tumor, which in turn translates in unpredictable efficacy and toxicity. Optimizing R.I.T. with [ 90 Y] Zevalin will require its use as part of first-line therapy and implementation of patient-specific dosimetry methods in clinical trials. Objectives and methods: we have consecutively studied 2 new modalities of using Zevalin in first line therapy of F.L.. First, we conducted an international, randomized, phase 3 trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of consolidation with Zevalin(15 MBq/Kg) in patients with advanced-stage F.L. achieving at least a partial response after induction immuno chemotherapy. A second approach consisted of evaluating a fractionated schedule with 2 doses of Zevalin (11.1 MBq/kg each), 9 to 13 weeks apart, as front line therapy in F.L. patients with high tumor burden. As part of this second approach, we designed a refined imaging-based (planar and 3-dimensional) dosimetry protocol to improve prediction of dose efficacy and toxicity after each dose of zevalin. Data acquisition was performed in 3 centers (Lille, Nantes and Manchester) while data treatment and specific dose calculations for major organ, tumor masses and bone marrow were centralized. Conclusion: Consolidation of first remission with 90 Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan in advanced-stage follicular lymphoma is highly effective with no unexpected toxicities, prolonging P.F.S. by 2 years and resulting in high P.R.-to-C.R. conversion rates regardless of type of first-line induction treatment. Preliminary data show the feasibility of front line fractionated R.I.T. with Zevalin in patient

  13. Clinical significance of measurement of changes of serum IGF-II, SCC and CYFRA21-1 levels after operation in patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Lei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum IGF-II, SCC and CYFRA21-1 levels after operation in patients with carcinoma uterine cervix. Methods: Serum levels of IGF-II, SCC and CYFRA21-1 were determined with RIA repeatedly in 31 patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix (before operation 1 month after operation and 6 month after operation) and once in 35 controls. Results: Before operation,serum levels of IGF-II, SCC and CYFRA21-1 in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). One month after operation all the serum levels were approaching normal. Six month later,the levels in the patients without recurrence remained normal. However, the levels in the 6 patients with recurrence returned to those before operation again. Conclusion: Changes of serum IGF-II, SCC and CYFRA21-1 levels are closely related to the tumor burden and may be of prognostic importance. (authors)

  14. Phase II and III Clinical Studies of Diphtheria-Tetanus-Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Containing Inactivated Polio Vaccine Derived from Sabin Strains (DTaP-sIPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kenji; Miyazaki, Chiaki; Kino, Yoichiro; Ozaki, Takao; Hirose, Mizuo; Ueda, Kohji

    2013-07-15

    Phase II and III clinical studies were conducted to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of a novel DTaP-IPV vaccine consisting of Sabin inactivated poliovirus vaccine (sIPV) and diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP). A Phase II study was conducted in 104 healthy infants using Formulation H of the DTaP-sIPV vaccine containing high-dose sIPV (3, 100, and 100 D-antigen units for types 1, 2, and 3, respectively), and Formulations M and L, containing half and one-fourth of the sIPV in Formulation H, respectively. Each formulation was administered 3 times for primary immunization and once for booster immunization. A Phase III study was conducted in 342 healthy infants who received either Formulation M + oral polio vaccine (OPV) placebo or DTaP + OPV. The OPV or OPV placebo was orally administered twice between primary and booster immunizations. Formulation M was selected as the optimum dose. In the Phase III study, the seropositive rate was 100% for all Sabin strains after primary immunization, and the neutralizing antibody titer after booster immunization was higher than in the control group (DTaP + OPV). All adverse reactions were clinically acceptable. DTaP-sIPV was shown to be a safe and immunogenic vaccine. JapicCTI-121902 for Phase II study, JapicCTI-101075 for Phase III study (http://www.clinicaltrials.jp/user/cte_main.jsp).

  15. [Clinical efficacy of alprostan in combination with "Bioptron-II" rays and iruxol-miramistin in the treatment of the diabetic foot complicated by atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomashuk, I P; Tomashuk, I I

    2001-08-01

    Experience of clinical treatment of 9 patients with diabetes mellitus and diabetic angiopathy using alprostan in combination with rays "Bioptron-II" and iruxol-miramistinum in conditions of polyclinic was summarized. Antidiabetic preparations, mainly insulin, were administered to all patients together with abovementioned treatment. Optimal scheme of treatment constitutes daily slow (no less than 6 h) dropper intravenous infusion of alprostan in 0.1 mg dosage in 150-200 ml isotonic solution of sodium chloride during 15 days. Before and after infusion of alprostan ulcer was locally irradiated using "Bioptron-II" lamp from 5 cm distance during 6 min, bandage with iruxol-miramistinum ointment was applied in ratio 1:1. In 6 patients pain in lower extremities disappeared, ulcers epithelized, in 3--ulcers reduced by 50%.

  16. Non-clinical studies in the process of new drug development - Part II: Good laboratory practice, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety and dose translation to clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E L; Bento, A F; Cavalli, J; Oliveira, S K; Schwanke, R C; Siqueira, J M; Freitas, C S; Marcon, R; Calixto, J B

    2016-12-12

    The process of drug development involves non-clinical and clinical studies. Non-clinical studies are conducted using different protocols including animal studies, which mostly follow the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. During the early pre-clinical development process, also known as Go/No-Go decision, a drug candidate needs to pass through several steps, such as determination of drug availability (studies on pharmacokinetics), absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) and preliminary studies that aim to investigate the candidate safety including genotoxicity, mutagenicity, safety pharmacology and general toxicology. These preliminary studies generally do not need to comply with GLP regulations. These studies aim at investigating the drug safety to obtain the first information about its tolerability in different systems that are relevant for further decisions. There are, however, other studies that should be performed according to GLP standards and are mandatory for the safe exposure to humans, such as repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and safety pharmacology. These studies must be conducted before the Investigational New Drug (IND) application. The package of non-clinical studies should cover all information needed for the safe transposition of drugs from animals to humans, generally based on the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from general toxicity studies. After IND approval, other GLP experiments for the evaluation of chronic toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, are carried out during the clinical phase of development. However, the necessity of performing such studies depends on the new drug clinical application purpose.

  17. Diagnostic Efficiency among Psychiatric Outpatients of a Self-Report Version of a Subset of Screen Items of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders (SCID-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germans, Sara; Van Heck, Guus L.; Masthoff, Erik D.; Trompenaars, Fons J. W. M.; Hodiamont, Paul P. G.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the identification of a 10-item set of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) items, which proved to be effective as a self-report assessment instrument in screening personality disorders. The item selection was based on the retrospective analyses of 495 SCID-II interviews. The…

  18. DEMO-II trial. Aerobic exercise versus stretching exercise in patients with major depression-a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Videbech, Poul; Thomsen, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The effect of referring patients from a clinical setting to a pragmatic exercise intervention for depressive symptoms, cognitive function, and metabolic variables has yet to be determined.......The effect of referring patients from a clinical setting to a pragmatic exercise intervention for depressive symptoms, cognitive function, and metabolic variables has yet to be determined....

  19. World Endometriosis Research Foundation Endometriosis Phenome and biobanking harmonization project: II. Clinical and covariate phenotype data collection in endometriosis research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitonis, Allison F.; Vincent, Katy; Rahmioglu, Nilufer

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo harmonize the collection of nonsurgical clinical and epidemiologic data relevant to endometriosis research, allowing large-scale collaboration.......ObjectiveTo harmonize the collection of nonsurgical clinical and epidemiologic data relevant to endometriosis research, allowing large-scale collaboration....

  20. [Orthopedic treatment of dento-skeletal Class II by the association minivis + Forsus(TM): a clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    The use of customized combination mechanics with two auxillaries such as mini screws and Forsus(TM) Springs that up to now have been used independently, achieved unexpected results in the correction of a non-surgical skeletal Class II malocclusion. The use of mini implants to control the canting of the occlusal plane that is frequently reported during the use of hyperpropulsors with fixed appliances made it possible to achieve a better mandibular outcome. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2014.

  1. Medulloblastoma in children and adolescents: a systematic review of contemporary phase I and II clinical trials and biology update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Francisco; Fioravantti, Victoria; de Rojas, Teresa; Carceller, Fernando; Madero, Luis; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Moreno, Lucas

    2017-11-01

    Survival rates for patients with medulloblastoma have improved in the last decades but for those who relapse outcome is dismal and new approaches are needed. Emerging drugs have been tested in the last two decades within the context of phase I/II trials. In parallel, advances in genetic profiling have permitted to identify key molecular alterations for which new strategies are being developed. We performed a systematic review focused on the design and outcome of early-phase trials evaluating new agents in patients with relapsed medulloblastoma. PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov, and references from selected studies were screened to identify phase I/II studies with reported results between 2000 and 2015 including patients with medulloblastoma aged <18 years. A total of 718 studies were reviewed and 78 satisfied eligibility criteria. Of those, 69% were phase I; 31% phase II. Half evaluated conventional chemotherapeutics and 35% targeted agents. Overall, 662 patients with medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors were included. The study designs and the response assessments were heterogeneous, limiting the comparisons among trials and the correct identification of active drugs. Median (range) objective response rate (ORR) for patients with medulloblastoma in phase I/II studies was 0% (0-100) and 6.5% (0-50), respectively. Temozolomide containing regimens had a median ORR of 16.5% (0-100). Smoothened inhibitors trials had a median ORR of 8% (3-8). Novel drugs have shown limited activity against relapsed medulloblastoma. Temozolomide might serve as backbone for new combinations. Novel and more homogenous trial designs might facilitate the development of new drugs. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer: influence of care structures' characteristics on a controversial clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Eléonore; Phelip, Jean-Marc; Guilhot, Jean-Noel; Matysiak, Michel; Vermorel, Michel; Roblin, Xavier

    2007-11-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer is a controversial practice and is not recommended by the French Consensus Conference outside of therapeutic trial. To assess, within a well-defined population, the influence of hospital characteristics in this practice. In the Rhône-Alpes region (10% of the French population), 534 patients presenting with colon cancer stage II were operated on in 81 hospitals in the year 2000. The influence of hospital characteristics on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy was assessed using a multivariate logistic regression. Overall, 19.5% of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Younger age, T4 tumour, hospital volume lower than 20 colon cancer surgeries [odds ratio (OR) 2.96; Pclinical complications at diagnosis were independently associated with higher rates of chemotherapy. On the other hand, a number of examined lymph nodes lower than recommendations did not have any influence on chemotherapy use. Hospital characteristics had independently influenced the practice of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer. The more important institutional factor was the hospital procedure volume. The decisions of the multidisciplinary committees appeared at times paradoxical; a more comprehensive evaluation of this practice is needed.

  3. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV; Gammagrafia osea: utilidad en la evaluacion y seguimiento de pacientes con cancer de mama en estadio clinico II, III, IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano P, R A

    1996-12-31

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. The experimental study on the radioimmunotherapy of the hepatoma in nude mice model with intratumoral injection of 131I-human anti-HBsAg Fab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Rongcheng; Wu Guichen; Han Huanxing; You Changxuan; Ding Xuemei; Li Aimin; Wang Chuanbin; Zhang Mingjiang

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapeutic efficacy of radioimmunotherapy of 131 I-human anti-HBsAg Fab via different routes of administration. Methods: The human hepatoma bearing nude mice we reinjected with 131 I-human anti-HBsAg Fab intra-tumor (IT) and intra-peritoneum (IP). Biodistribution was measured on the 5th day. The tumor growth inhibition rate was determined by measurement of tumor volume. Results: In the IT-treated mice, tumor uptake of 131 I-human anti-HBsAg Fab was four-fold greater than in the IP-treated mice, and normal organ uptake was half of that in the IP-treated mice. At the 3rd week after the infusion, the tumor growth inhibition rate in IT-treated mice was higher than that in the IP-treated mice. Conclusions: Intratumoral administration of 131 I-human anti-HBsAg Fab makes high level of radioactivity retained in tumor with significantly lower radioactivity retained in normal tissues, and provides a more effective regional therapy

  5. Radioimmunotherapy targeting the extra domain B of fibronectin in C6 rat gliomas: a preliminary study about the therapeutic efficacy of iodine-131-labeled SIP(L19)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaeth, Nicolas; Wyss, Matthias T.; Pahnke, Jens; Biollaz, Gregoire; Trachsel, Eveline; Drandarov, Konstantin; Treyer, Valerie; Weber, Bruno; Neri, Dario; Buck, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment protocols, patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme still experience poor outcome. Therefore, new adjuvant therapeutic options such as radioimmunotherapy (RIT) have been studied and have resulted in significant survival benefit. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of a novel radioimmunotherapeutic approach targeting the extra domain B (EDB) of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, in glioma-bearing rats. Methods: C6 gliomas were induced intracerebrally in Wistar rats. Ten to 11 days later, 220-360 MBq of iodine-131-labeled anti-EDB SIP(L19) ('small immunoprotein') was administered intravenously into nine animals, yielding a radiation dose of 13-21 Gy. Another nine rats served as controls. Then the following parameters were compared: median survival time, tumor size and histology. Results: Histological examination of the tumors revealed typical glioblastoma characteristics. Eleven of 18 rats developed a tumor size bigger than 150 mm 3 . When these animals were used for survival analysis, median survival did significantly differ between groups [22 days (therapy; n=7) vs. 16 days (control; n=4); P 131 I-SIP(L19)-RIT showed promising potential in treating C6 gliomas, warranting further studies. However, larger trials with preferentially higher doses are needed to confirm this finding and, potentially, to further increase the efficacy of this treatment

  6. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin used for non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinical application of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience of expert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical and mechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of the specific properties of each product. In general, thermoplastic resin has lower color-stability and higher risk for fracture than polymethyl methacrylate. Additionally, the surface of thermoplastic resin becomes roughened more easily than polymethyl methacrylate. Studies related to material properties of thermoplastic resin, treatment efficacy and follow-up are insufficient to provide definitive conclusions at this time. Therefore, this position paper should be revised based on future studies and a clinical guideline should be provided. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Anniversaries of the foundation of the dental clinics. II. The dental clinics at the Mikszáth Kálmán Square in Budapest, Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kóbor, András

    2010-03-01

    After 1952 the building of the Department of Stomatology was no more able to fulfill the increased demands, when the independent dental education had been started at the Medical University of Budapest. The leadership of the new Dental Faculty--officially founded in 1955--was looking for a solution to find a new building for clinical purposes. Finally in 1959 the new dental departments moved to a once residential building at Mikszáth Kálmán Square converted into dental clinics. This site had been in operation until the opening of the New Dental Education Center in 2007.

  8. A clinical trial of Empress II porcelain inlays luted to vital teeth with a dual-curing adhesive system and a self-curing resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabianelli, Andrea; Goracci, Cecilia; Bertelli, Egidio; Davidson, Carel L; Ferrari, Marco

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to clinically evaluate Empress II inlays cemented with a dual-curing bonding agent and a self-curing luting system. Forty patients were selected to receive one Empress II inlay. Empress II is a heat-pressed glass ceramic containing lithium disilicate and lithium orthophosphate crystals, purported to provide higher stress resistance and improved strength. The restorations were placed between March and May 2000. Recalls were performed after 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. At the 3-year recall, 7 patients were lost to follow-up. Inlays were evaluated for postoperative sensitivity, marginal integrity, marginal leakage, color stability, surface staining, retention, and surface crazing (microcracks). At the 3-year recall, all the restorations were in place and only one showed postoperative sensitivity (at the first recall, 1 week after placement). Only 3 inlays showed slight marginal staining, and 4 inlays showed gaps, with little surface staining or microcracks. No inlay debonded or fractured during theobservation period. All the evaluated inlays were in place and acceptable.

  9. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  10. Sunitinib in relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a clinical and pharmacodynamic phase II multicenter study of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckstein, Rena; Kuruvilla, John; Chua, Neil; Lee, Christina; Macdonald, David A; Al-Tourah, Abdulwahab J; Foo, Alison H; Walsh, Wendy; Ivy, S Percy; Crump, Michael; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A

    2011-05-01

    There are limited effective therapies for most patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We conducted a phase II trial of the multi-targeted vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, 37.5 mg given orally once daily in adult patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. Of 19 enrolled patients, 17 eligible patients were evaluable for toxicity and 15 for response. No objective responses were seen and nine patients achieved stable disease (median duration 3.4 months). As a result, the study was closed at the end of the first stage. Grades 3-4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 29% and 35%, respectively. There was no relationship between change in circulating endothelial cell numbers (CECs) and bidimensional tumor burden over time. Despite some activity in solid tumors, sunitinib showed no evidence of response in relapsed/refractory DLBCL and had greater than expected hematologic toxicity.

  11. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Sean; O'Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-07-18

    There is a clear link between irregular breathing and errors in medical imaging and radiation treatment. The audiovisual biofeedback system is an advanced form of respiratory guidance that has previously demonstrated to facilitate regular patient breathing. The clinical benefits of audiovisual biofeedback will be investigated in an upcoming multi-institutional, randomised, and stratified clinical trial recruiting a total of 75 lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. To comprehensively perform a clinical evaluation of the audiovisual biofeedback system, a multi-institutional study will be performed. Our methodological framework will be based on the widely used Technology Acceptance Model, which gives qualitative scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are fundamental determinants for user acceptance. A total of 75 lung cancer patients will be recruited across seven radiation oncology departments across Australia. Patients will be randomised in a 2:1 ratio, with 2/3 of the patients being recruited into the intervention arm and 1/3 in the control arm. 2:1 randomisation is appropriate as within the interventional arm there is a screening procedure where only patients whose breathing is more regular with audiovisual biofeedback will continue to use this system for their imaging and treatment procedures. Patients within the intervention arm whose free breathing is more regular than audiovisual biofeedback in the screen procedure will remain in the intervention arm of the study but their imaging and treatment procedures will be performed without audiovisual biofeedback. Patients will also be stratified by treating institution and for treatment intent (palliative vs. radical) to ensure similar balance in the arms across the sites. Patients and hospital staff operating the audiovisual biofeedback system will complete questionnaires to assess their experience with audiovisual biofeedback. The objectives of this

  12. Inflammation's Association with Metabolic Profiles before and after a Twelve-Week Clinical Trial in Drug-Naïve Patients with Bipolar II Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Yu Lee

    Full Text Available Inflammation is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BP and metabolic syndrome. Prior studies evaluated the association between metabolic profiles and cytokines only during certain mood states instead of their changes during treatment. We enrolled drug-naïve patients with BP-II and investigated the correlation between changes in mood symptoms and metabolic indices with changes in plasma cytokine levels after 12 weeks of pharmacological treatment. Drug-naïve patients (n = 117 diagnosed with BP-II according to DSM-IV criteria were recruited. Metabolic profiles (cholesterol, triglyceride, HbA1C, fasting serum glucose, body mass index (BMI and plasma cytokines (TNF-α, CRP, IL-6, and TGF-β were measured at baseline and 2, 8, and 12 weeks post-treatment. To adjust within-subject dependence over repeated assessments, multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used. Seventy-six (65.0% patients completed the intervention. Changes in plasma CRP were significantly associated with changes in BMI (P = 1.7E-7 and triglyceride (P = 0.005 levels. Changes in plasma TGF-β1 were significantly associated with changes in BMI (P = 8.2E-6, cholesterol (P = 0.004, and triglyceride (P = 0.006 levels. However, changes in plasma TNF-α and IL-6 were not associated with changes in any of the metabolic indices. Changes in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly associated with changes in IL-6 (P = 0.003 levels; changes in Young Mania Rating Scale scores were significantly associated with changes in CRP (P = 0.006 and TNF-α (P = 0.039 levels. Plasma CRP and TGF-β1 levels were positively correlated with several metabolic indices in BP-II after 12 weeks of pharmacological intervention. We also hypothesize that clinical symptoms are correlated with certain cytokines. These new findings might be important evidence that inflammation is the pathophysiology

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside clinical trials II-An ISPOR Good Research Practices Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott D; Willke, Richard J; Glick, Henry; Reed, Shelby D; Augustovski, Federico; Jonsson, Bengt; Briggs, Andrew; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-03-01

    Clinical trials evaluating medicines, medical devices, and procedures now commonly assess the economic value of these interventions. The growing number of prospective clinical/economic trials reflects both widespread interest in economic information for new technologies and the regulatory and reimbursement requirements of many countries that now consider evidence of economic value along with clinical efficacy. As decision makers increasingly demand evidence of economic value for health care interventions, conducting high-quality economic analyses alongside clinical studies is desirable because they broaden the scope of information available on a particular intervention, and can efficiently provide timely information with high internal and, when designed and analyzed properly, reasonable external validity. In 2005, ISPOR published the Good Research Practices for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Alongside Clinical Trials: The ISPOR RCT-CEA Task Force report. ISPOR initiated an update of the report in 2014 to include the methodological developments over the last 9 years. This report provides updated recommendations reflecting advances in several areas related to trial design, selecting data elements, database design and management, analysis, and reporting of results. Task force members note that trials should be designed to evaluate effectiveness (rather than efficacy) when possible, should include clinical outcome measures, and should obtain health resource use and health state utilities directly from study subjects. Collection of economic data should be fully integrated into the study. An incremental analysis should be conducted with an intention-to-treat approach, complemented by relevant subgroup analyses. Uncertainty should be characterized. Articles should adhere to established standards for reporting results of cost-effectiveness analyses. Economic studies alongside trials are complementary to other evaluations (e.g., modeling studies) as information for decision

  14. Coronally positioned flap with or without acellular dermal matrix graft in the treatment of class II gingival recession defects: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha Jagannathachary

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the randomized controlled single blind study is to evaluate the treatment of Miller′s class II gingival recessions by coronally positioned flap (CPF with or without acellular dermal matrix allograft (ADMA. Ten patients with 20 sites with maxillary bilateral Miller′s class II facial recession defects were selected randomly into two groups of test (ADMA+CPF and control (CPF alone group with each group having 10 recession defects to be treated. The clinical parameters included plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, recession height (RH, recession width (RW, height of the keratinized tissue (HKT, and thickness of the keratinized tissue (TKT. These measurements were recorded at baseline and after 6 months post-surgery. Statistical analysis was made by the paired "t" test for intragroup and intergroup comparison was done by the unpaired "t" test. The percentage of root coverage for both the experimental and control groups were 82.2% and 50%, respectively. The changes from baseline to 6 months were significant in both the groups for PD, CAL, and RH; however, for parameters such as RW, HKT, and TKT significance was seen only in the experimental group. On comparison between two groups, only TKT showed statistically significance. It can be concluded that the amount of root coverage obtained with ADMA + CPF was superior compared to CPF alone.

  15. The World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Scale (WHODAS II: Links between self-rated health and objectively defined and clinical parameters in the population of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinerte V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many clinical and objectively defined parameters that are used to evaluate a person's disability. Since the World Health Organisation has presented the WHODAS II as a means of objectively measuring subjectively defined functions, greater attention has been focused on self-rated health. Only a few studies, however, have been conducted about differences between self-rated health and objectively defined parameters. The survey for this study was conducted on the basis of WHODAS II and the population in Latvia with spinal cord injury. Respondents were between 18 and 65, and 98 questionnaires were analysed. The results show that people with spinal cord injury on average rate their functioning as limited (33–40 points of 100. Most respondents have been declared to be disabled, which is defined as very serious or severe functional disorders. More than 40% have paid jobs, while one-third do not work for reasons of health. The research shows that there is a close coherence (p< 0.05 between individual, objectively and clinically defined indicators on the one hand and the aspects of the questionnaire in which physical functioning was an important factor on the other hand. In order to understand the real functional abilities of patients and the individual factors that influence those abilities, it is necessary to define functional self-rated health in addition to objectively defined indicators.

  16. An Immature Type II Dens Invaginatus in a Mandibular Lateral Incisor with Talon’s Cusp: A Clinical Dilemma to Confront

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshul Gangwar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens invaginatus (DI is a malformation of teeth probably resulting from an infolding of the dental papilla during tooth development. DI is classified as type I, II, and III by Oehlers depending on the severity of malformation. The maxillary lateral incisor is the most commonly affected tooth. Structural defects do exist in the depth of the invagination pits, and as a consequence, the early development of caries and the subsequent necrosis of the dental pulp, as well as abscess and cyst formation are clinical implications associated with DI. Occasionally, we can see more than one developmental anomaly occurring in a single tooth. In such cases it becomes important to identify the anomalies and initiate a proper treatment plan for good prognosis. In this paper, an unusual case of DI which clinically presented as a huge talons cusp affecting a mandibular lateral incisor tooth is described. This case report illustrates grinding of the talons cusp followed by nonsurgical endodontic management of dens invaginatus type II with an immature apex and periapical lesions, in which Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA shows a complete periapical healing with bone formation at the site of the lesions.

  17. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, Sean; O’Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    There is a clear link between irregular breathing and errors in medical imaging and radiation treatment. The audiovisual biofeedback system is an advanced form of respiratory guidance that has previously demonstrated to facilitate regular patient breathing. The clinical benefits of audiovisual biofeedback will be investigated in an upcoming multi-institutional, randomised, and stratified clinical trial recruiting a total of 75 lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. To comprehensively perform a clinical evaluation of the audiovisual biofeedback system, a multi-institutional study will be performed. Our methodological framework will be based on the widely used Technology Acceptance Model, which gives qualitative scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are fundamental determinants for user acceptance. A total of 75 lung cancer patients will be recruited across seven radiation oncology departments across Australia. Patients will be randomised in a 2:1 ratio, with 2/3 of the patients being recruited into the intervention arm and 1/3 in the control arm. 2:1 randomisation is appropriate as within the interventional arm there is a screening procedure where only patients whose breathing is more regular with audiovisual biofeedback will continue to use this system for their imaging and treatment procedures. Patients within the intervention arm whose free breathing is more regular than audiovisual biofeedback in the screen procedure will remain in the intervention arm of the study but their imaging and treatment procedures will be performed without audiovisual biofeedback. Patients will also be stratified by treating institution and for treatment intent (palliative vs. radical) to ensure similar balance in the arms across the sites. Patients and hospital staff operating the audiovisual biofeedback system will complete questionnaires to assess their experience with audiovisual biofeedback. The objectives of this

  18. The fitness for the Ageing Brain Study II (FABS II: protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating the effect of physical activity on cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ames David

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have documented a potential protective effect of physical exercise in older adults who are at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. The Fitness for the Ageing Brain II (FABS II study is a multicentre randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT aiming to determine whether physical activity reduces the rate of cognitive decline among individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This paper describes the background, objectives of the study, and an overview of the protocol including design, organization and data collection methods. Methods/Design The study will recruit 230 community-dwelling participants diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Participants will be randomly allocated to two treatment groups: usual care group or 24-week home-based program consisting of 150 minutes per week of tailored moderate physical activity. The primary outcome measure of the study is cognitive decline as measured by the change from baseline in the total score on the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive section. Secondary outcomes of interest include behavioral and psychological symptoms, quality of life, functional level, carer burden and physical function (strength, balance, endurance, physical activity. Primary endpoints will be measured at six and twelve months following the baseline assessment. Discussion This RCT will contribute evidence regarding the potential benefits of a systematic program of physical activity as an affordable and safe intervention for people with Alzheimer's disease. Further, if successful, physical activity in combination with usual care has the potential to alleviate the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and improve its management and the quality of life of patients and their carers. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000755235

  19. Beating the odds: Successful establishment of a Phase II/III clinical research trial in resource-poor Liberia during the largest-ever Ebola outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Doe-Anderson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that a country such as Liberia, not fully recovered from the devastation of decades of civil unrest, lacked the appropriate ethical and regulatory framework, basic human and health care services, and infrastructure to carry out clinical trials according to international standards of quality during a public health emergency. However, as Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea were being ravaged by the largest and most devastating Ebola Virus Disease (EVD outbreak ever recorded, the topic of conducting clinical trials of experimental vaccine and treatment candidates in these resource-poor countries generated the keen interest and concern of scientists, researchers, physicians, bioethicists, philanthropists, and even politicians. Decisive action on behalf of the Liberian government, and a timely positive and supportive response from the United States (U.S. government, led to the formation of PREVAIL (Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia – a clinical research partnership between the two governments. Within a span of 12 weeks, this partnership accomplished the unimaginable: the successful initiation of a Phase II/III vaccine clinical trial for EVD in Liberia. This paper will discuss the dynamics of the research collaboration, barriers encountered, breakthroughs realized, key elements of success, and lessons learned in the process.

  20. Long term results of mantle irradiation(MRT) alone in 261 patients with clinical stage I-II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, A.; Byram, D.; Chao, M.; Corry, J.; Davis, S.; Kiffer, J.; Laidlaw, C.; Quong, G.; Ryan, G.; Liew, K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We report our results using MRT for clinical stage I-II HD and assess the value of published prognostic criteria in our study population. Pts and Methods: Between 1969 and 1994, 261 pts were treated with MRT alone for clinical stage I-II supradiaphragmatic HD. Pt characteristics: median age-30; M-54%/F-46%; stage IA-52%, IB-2%, IIA-37%, IIB-8%; histology LP-21%, NS-51%, MC-23%, other 5%; median ESR 18. CT abdomen and LAG were performed in 61% and 60% respectively. No pt had prior staging laparotomy. No pt received infradiaphragmatic RT. Central axis dose was 32 Gy-36 Gy. Univariate analysis was performed for prognostic factors for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival(OS). Outcome was assessed in favourable subsets as defined by: EORTC (v. favourable: CSIA, LP or NS histology, age < 40, female, no bulk, ESR < 50; favourable: CSI-II, age < 50, < 4 sites, no bulky mediastinal mass, ESR < 50 with no B symptoms or ESR < 30 with B symptoms); Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) (IA-IIA, LP or NS histology, ESR < 40, age < 50, no large mediastinal mass, no E lesion). Results: 261 pts completed RT, with 5% requiring treatment interruption for toxicity. Significant factors (P<0.05) for PFS were stage, performance status, histology, B symptoms, number of sites, ESR and bulk. Significant factors (P<0.05) for OS were age, performance status, histology and B symptoms. (The results of a multivariate analysis will be presented.) Results in our study population using published prognostic criteria (in %): Thirty-six percent progressed following RT: 8% in-field; 24% out of field only (including 10% in the paraaortic/splenic region alone); 4% marginal; Fifty-seven percent of relapsed pts remain progression free after subsequent salvage treatment. Two cases of acute leukaemia, 8 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 14 (non-skin) carcinomas occurred, of which 11 were in-field. Seventy pts have died. The cause was: HD 41%; other malignancy 20%; cardiovascular 17%; other 15

  1. Sham surgery versus labral repair or biceps tenodesis for type II SLAP lesions of the shoulder: a three-armed randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrøder, Cecilie Piene; Skare, Øystein; Reikerås, Olav; Mowinckel, Petter; Brox, Jens Ivar

    2017-12-01

    Labral repair and biceps tenodesis are routine operations for superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion of the shoulder, but evidence of their efficacy is lacking. We evaluated the effect of labral repair, biceps tenodesis and sham surgery on SLAP lesions. A double-blind, sham-controlled trial was conducted with 118 surgical candidates (mean age 40 years), with patient history, clinical symptoms and MRI arthrography indicating an isolated type II SLAP lesion. Patients were randomly assigned to either labral repair (n=40), biceps tenodesis (n=39) or sham surgery (n=39) if arthroscopy revealed an isolated SLAP II lesion. Primary outcomes at 6 and 24 months were clinical Rowe score ranging from 0 to 100 (best possible) and Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) ranging from 0 (best possible) to 2100. Secondary outcomes were Oxford Instability Shoulder Score, change in main symptoms, EuroQol (EQ-5D and EQ-VAS), patient satisfaction and complications. There were no significant between-group differences at any follow-up in any outcome. Between-group differences in Rowe scores at 2 years were: biceps tenodesis versus labral repair: 1.0 (95% CI -5.4 to 7.4), p=0.76; biceps tenodesis versus sham surgery: 1.6 (95% CI -5.0 to 8.1), p=0.64; and labral repair versus sham surgery: 0.6 (95% CI -5.9 to 7.0), p=0.86. Similar results-no differences between groups-were found for WOSI scores. Postoperative stiffness occurred in five patients after labral repair and in four patients after tenodesis. Neither labral repair nor biceps tenodesis had any significant clinical benefit over sham surgery for patients with SLAP II lesions in the population studied. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00586742. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Clinical librarianship in the UK: temporary trend or permanent profession? Part II: present challenges and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Janet; Sargeant, Sally J E

    2004-12-01

    This article is the second part of a two-part series reporting a study of the role of the Clinical Librarian (CL) in the UK. A qualitative method of semi-structured interviews was used to explore in-depth the role of the CL. The interviews provided a rich source of data and give insight into this new and emerging role as practised in the National Health Service (NHS). Similarities and differences are examined between the CL population and reported within themes, specifically: personal qualities and skills required, training for the CLs, marketing the CL service, working in the clinical environment, monitoring and evaluation and the acceptance of the CL in the NHS. A common understanding of the skills and knowledge required to undertake the CL role was shared by the respondents. However, practice differed as this was often dictated by local circumstances. The study confirmed the need for the CLs to work with clinical colleagues in the clinical setting to enhance patient care. The importance of using best evidence to support patient care is a message that is slowly becoming the norm in the NHS and the CL role in this practice is demonstrated by this study.

  3. High-dose intravenous vitamin C combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: a phase I-II clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L John Hoffer

    Full Text Available Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail.We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement.Despite IVC's biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC's value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify specific clusters of cancer type

  4. High-dose intravenous vitamin C combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: a phase I-II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, L John; Robitaille, Line; Zakarian, Robert; Melnychuk, David; Kavan, Petr; Agulnik, Jason; Cohen, Victor; Small, David; Miller, Wilson H

    2015-01-01

    Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC) could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail. We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement. Despite IVC's biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC's value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify specific clusters of cancer type, chemotherapy

  5. Local Heat Application for the Treatment of Buruli Ulcer: Results of a Phase II Open Label Single Center Non Comparative Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bratschi, Martin W; Bolz, Miriam; Um Boock, Alphonse; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pluschke, Gerd; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease most prevalent among West African children. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is sensitive to temperatures above 37°C. We investigated the safety and efficacy of a local heat application device based on phase change material. In a phase II open label single center noncomparative clinical trial (ISRCTN 72102977) under GCP standards in Cameroon, laboratory confirmed BU patients received up to 8 weeks of heat treatment. We assessed efficacy based on the endpoints 'absence of clinical BU specific features' or 'wound closure' within 6 months ("primary cure"), and 'absence of clinical recurrence within 24 month' ("definite cure"). Of 53 patients 51 (96%) had ulcerative disease. 62% were classified as World Health Organization category II, 19% each as category I and III. The average lesion size was 45 cm(2). Within 6 months after completion of heat treatment 92.4% (49 of 53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 81.8% to 98.0%) achieved cure of their primary lesion. At 24 months follow-up 83.7% (41 of 49, 95% CI, 70.3% to 92.7%) of patients with primary cure remained free of recurrence. Heat treatment was well tolerated; adverse effects were occasional mild local skin reactions. Local thermotherapy is a highly effective, simple, cheap and safe treatment for M. ulcerans disease. It has in particular potential as home-based remedy for BU suspicious lesions at community level where laboratory confirmation is not available. ISRCT 72102977. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  6. Appropriate customization of radiation therapy for stage II and III rectal cancer: Executive summary of an ASTRO Clinical Practice Statement using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Karyn A; Patton, Caroline E; Fisher, George A; Hoffe, Sarah E; Haddock, Michael G; Parikh, Parag J; Kim, John; Baxter, Nancy N; Czito, Brian G; Hong, Theodore S; Herman, Joseph M; Crane, Christopher H; Hoffman, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    To summarize results of a Clinical Practice Statement on radiation therapy for stage II-III rectal cancer, which addressed appropriate customization of (neo)adjuvant radiation therapy and use of non-surgical therapy for patients who are inoperable or refuse abdominoperineal resection. The RAND/University of California, Los Angeles, Appropriateness Method was applied to combine current evidence with multidisciplinary expert opinion. A systematic literature review was conducted and used by the expert panel to rate appropriateness of radiation therapy options for different clinical scenarios. Treatments were categorized by median rating as Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate. In the neoadjuvant setting, chemoradiation was rated Appropriate and the ratings indicated short-course radiation therapy, chemotherapy alone, and no neoadjuvant therapy are potential options in selected patients. However, neoadjuvant endorectal brachytherapy was rated Rarely Appropriate. For adjuvant therapy, chemoradiation (plus ≥4 months of chemotherapy) was rated Appropriate and chemotherapy alone May Be Appropriate for most scenarios. For medically inoperable patients, definitive external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy alone were rated May Be Appropriate, whereas endorectal brachytherapy and chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy were possible approaches for some scenarios. The last option, definitive chemoradiation, was rated Appropriate to May Be Appropriate based on performance status. Finally, for patients with low-lying tumors refusing abdominoperineal resection, definitive chemoradiation alone, chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy, and chemoradiation plus external beam radiation therapy were all rated Appropriate. This Clinical Practice Statement demonstrated the central role of radiation therapy in stage II-III rectal cancer management and evaluated ways to better individualize its use in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and definitive settings

  7. Four-year clinical evaluation of Class II nano-hybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the 4-year clinical performance of an ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X; Dentsply/DeTrey) in Class II restorations placed with a one-step self-etch (Xeno III; Dentsply/DeTrey) and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (I...

  8. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of Bio-Gen with biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of class II furcation defects: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    JENABIAN, Niloofar; HAGHANIFAR, Sina; MABOUDI, Avideh; BIJANI, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective Treatment of furcation defects are thought to be challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic parameters of Bio-Gen with Biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of Class II furcation defects. Material and Methods In this clinical trial, 24 patients with Class II furcation defect on a buccal or lingual mandibular molar were recruited. After oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing and achievement of acceptable plaque control, the patients were randomly chosen to receive either connective tissue and Bio-Gen (case group) or Biocollagen and Bio-Gen (control group). The following parameters were recorded before the first and re-entry surgery (six months later): vertical clinical attachment level (VCAL), gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), horizontal probing depth (HPD), vertical probing depth (VPD), gingival recession (GR), furcation vertical component (FVC), furcation to alveolar crest (FAC), fornix to base of defect (FBD), and furcation horizontal component (FHC) were calculated at the time of first surgery and during re-entry. A digital periapical radiograph was taken in parallel before first surgery and re-entry. The radiographs were then analyzed by digital subtraction. The differences with p value <0.05 were considered significant. Results Only the mean changes of FAC, FHC, mean of FHC, FBD in re-entry revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups. HPD, VPD, FBD, FAC, and FHC showed statistically significant differences after 6 months in the case group. However, in the control group, statistically significant differences were found in GR and HPD. We did not observe any significant difference in radiographic changes among the two groups. Conclusion The results of this trial indicate that better clinical outcomes can be obtained with connective tissue grafts in combination with bone material compared with a resorbable barrier with bone material

  9. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of Bio-Gen with biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of class II furcation defects: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Jenabian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Treatment of furcation defects are thought to be challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic parameters of Bio-Gen with Biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of Class II furcation defects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this clinical trial, 24 patients with Class II furcation defect on a buccal or lingual mandibular molar were recruited. After oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing and achievement of acceptable plaque control, the patients were randomly chosen to receive either connective tissue and Bio-Gen (case group or Biocollagen and Bio-Gen (control group. The following parameters were recorded before the first and re-entry surgery (six months later: vertical clinical attachment level (VCAL, gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, horizontal probing depth (HPD, vertical probing depth (VPD, gingival recession (GR, furcation vertical component (FVC, furcation to alveolar crest (FAC, fornix to base of defect (FBD, and furcation horizontal component (FHC were calculated at the time of first surgery and during re-entry. A digital periapical radiograph was taken in parallel before first surgery and re-entry. The radiographs were then analyzed by digital subtraction. The differences with p value <0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: Only the mean changes of FAC, FHC, mean of FHC, FBD in re-entry revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups. HPD, VPD, FBD, FAC, and FHC showed statistically significant differences after 6 months in the case group. However, in the control group, statistically significant differences were found in GR and HPD. We did not observe any significant difference in radiographic changes among the two groups. CONCLUSION: The results of this trial indicate that better clinical outcomes can be obtained with connective tissue grafts in combination with bone material compared with a resorbable barrier with bone

  10. World Endometriosis Research Foundation Endometriosis Phenome and biobanking harmonization project: II. Clinical and covariate phenotype data collection in endometriosis research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitonis, Allison F.; Vincent, Katy; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Fassbender, Amelie; Buck Louis, Germaine M.; Hummelshoj, Lone; Giudice, Linda C.; Stratton, Pamela; Adamson, G. David; Becker, Christian M.; Zondervan, Krina T.; Missmer, Stacey A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To harmonize the collection of nonsurgical clinical and epidemiologic data relevant to endometriosis research, allowing large-scale collaboration. Design An international collaboration involving 34 clinical/academic centers and three industry collaborators from 16 countries on five continents. Setting In 2013, two workshops followed by global consultation, bringing together 54 leaders in endometriosis research. Patients None. Intervention(s) Development of a self-administered endometriosis patient questionnaire (EPQ), based on [1] systematic comparison of questionnaires from eight centers that collect data from endometriosis cases (and controls/comparison women) on a medium to large scale (publication on >100 cases); [2] literature evidence; and [3] several global consultation rounds. Main Outcome Measure(s) Standard recommended and minimum required questionnaires to capture detailed clinical and covariate data. Result(s) The standard recommended (EPHect EPQ-S) and minimum required (EPHect EPQ-M) questionnaires contain questions on pelvic pain, subfertility and menstrual/reproductive history, hormone/medication use, medical history, and personal information. Conclusion(s) The EPQ captures the basic set of patient characteristics and exposures considered by the WERF EPHect Working Group to be most critical for the advancement of endometriosis research, but is also relevant to other female conditions with similar risk factors and/or symptomatology. The instruments will be reviewed based on feedback from investigators, and–after a first review after 1 year–triannually through systematic follow-up surveys. Updated versions will be made available through http://endometriosisfoundation.org/ephect. PMID:25256930

  11. Randomized noninferiority clinical trial evaluating 3 commercial dry cow mastitis preparations: II. Cow health and performance in early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, A G; Godden, S; Rapnicki, P; Gorden, P; Timms, L; Aly, S S; Lehenbauer, T W; Champagne, J

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this randomized noninferiority clinical trial was to compare the effect of treatment with 3 different dry cow therapy formulations at dry-off on cow-level health and production parameters in the first 100 d in milk (DIM) in the subsequent lactation, including 305-d mature-equivalent (305 ME) milk production, linear score (LS), risk for the cow experiencing a clinical mastitis event, risk for culling or death, and risk for pregnancy by 100 DIM. A total of 1,091 cows from 6 commercial dairy herds in 4 states (California, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) were randomly assigned at dry-off to receive treatment with 1 of 3 commercial products: Quartermaster (QT; Zoetis Animal Health, Madison, NJ), Spectramast DC (SP; Zoetis Animal Health) or ToMorrow Dry Cow (TM; Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., St Joseph, MO). All clinical mastitis, pregnancy, culling, and death events occurring in the first 100 DIM were recorded by farm staff using an on-farm electronic record-keeping system. Dairy Herd Improvement Association test-day records of milk production and milk component testing were retrieved electronically. Mixed linear regression analysis was used to describe the effect of treatment on 305ME milk production and LS recorded on the last Dairy Herd Improvement Association test day before 100 DIM. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to describe the effect of treatment on risk for experiencing a case of clinical mastitis, risk for leaving the herd, and risk for pregnancy between calving and 100 DIM. Results showed no effect of treatment on adjusted mean 305 ME milk production (QT=11,759 kg, SP=11,574 kg, and TM=11,761 kg) or adjusted mean LS (QT=1.8, SP=1.9, and TM=1.6) on the last test day before 100 DIM. Similarly, no effect of treatment was observed on risk for a clinical mastitis event (QT=14.8%, SP=12.7%, and TM=15.0%), risk for leaving the herd (QT=7.5%, SP=9.2%, and TM=10.3%), or risk for pregnancy (QT=31.5%, SP=26.1%, and TM=26

  12. Study protocol of a phase IB/II clinical trial of metformin and chloroquine in patients with IDH1-mutated or IDH2-mutated solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; Coelen, Robert J S; Khurshed, Mohammed; Roos, Eva; Caan, Matthan W A; van Linde, Myra E; Kouwenhoven, Mathilde; Bramer, Jos A M; Bovée, Judith V M G; Mathôt, Ron A; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Vandertop, W Peter; Gelderblom, Hans; van Gulik, Thomas M; Wilmink, Johanna W

    2017-06-10

    High-grade chondrosarcoma, high-grade glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are aggressive types of cancer with a dismal outcome. This is due to the lack of effective treatment options, emphasising the need for novel therapies. Mutations in the genes IDH1 and IDH2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) occur in 60% of chondrosarcoma, 80% of WHO grade II-IV glioma and 20% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. IDH1/2 -mutated cancer cells produce the oncometabolite D -2-hydroxyglutarate ( D -2HG) and are metabolically vulnerable to treatment with the oral antidiabetic metformin and the oral antimalarial drug chloroquine. We describe a dose-finding phase Ib/II clinical trial, in which patients with IDH1/2 -mutated chondrosarcoma, glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are treated with a combination of metformin and chloroquine. Dose escalation is performed according to a 3+3 dose-escalation scheme. The primary objective is to determine the maximum tolerated dose to establish the recommended dose for a phase II clinical trial. Secondary objectives of the study include (1) determination of pharmacokinetics and toxic effects of the study therapy, for which metformin and chloroquine serum levels will be determined over time; (2) investigation of tumour responses to metformin plus chloroquine in IDH1/2 -mutated cancers using CT/MRI scans; and (3) whether tumour responses can be measured by non-invasive D -2HG measurements (mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy) of tumour tissue, serum, urine, and/or bile or next-generation sequencing of circulating tumour DNA (liquid biopsies). This study may open a novel treatment avenue for IDH1/2 -mutated high-grade chondrosarcoma, glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma by repurposing the combination of two inexpensive drugs that are already approved for other indications. This study has been approved by the medical-ethical review committee of the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The report

  13. Fully human IgG and IgM antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA Gold 4 epitope and designed for radioimmunotherapy (RIT of colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugnière Martine

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs are needed for colon cancer radioimmunotherapy (RIT to allow for repeated injections. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA being the reference antigen for immunotargeting of these tumors, we developed human anti-CEA MAbs. Methods XenoMouse®-G2 animals were immunized with CEA. Among all the antibodies produced, two of them, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM, were selected for characterization in vitro in comparison with the human-mouse chimeric anti-CEA MAb X4 using flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and binding to radiolabeled soluble CEA and in vivo in human colon carcinoma LS174T bearing nude mice. Results Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated binding of MAbs on CEA-expressing cells without any binding on NCA-expressing human granulocytes. In a competitive binding assay using five reference MAbs, directed against the five Gold CEA epitopes, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were shown to be directed against the Gold 4 epitope. The affinities of purified VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were determined to be 0.19 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1 and 1.30 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1, respectively, as compared with 0.61 ± 0.05 × 108 M-1 for the reference MAb X4. In a soluble phase assay, the binding capacities of VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM to soluble CEA were clearly lower than that of the control chimeric MAb X4. A human MAb concentration of about 10-7 M was needed to precipitate approximatively 1 ng 125I-rhCEA as compared with 10-9 M for MAb X4, suggesting a preferential binding of the human MAbs to solid phase CEA. In vivo, 24 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ demonstrated a high tumor uptake (25.4 ± 7.3%ID/g, close to that of 131I-X4 (21.7 ± 7.2%ID/g. At 72 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ was still concentrated in the tumor (28.4 ± 11.0%ID/g whereas the tumor concentration of 131I-X4 was significantly reduced (12.5 ± 4.8%ID/g. At no time after injection was there any accumulation of the radiolabeled MAbs in normal tissues. A pertinent analysis of

  14. Clinically Effective Treatment of Fibromyalgia Pain With High-Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Phase II Open-Label Dose Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Saavedra, Laura; Gebodh, Nigel; Bikson, Marom; Diaz-Cruz, Camilo; Brandao, Rivail; Coutinho, Livia; Truong, Dennis; Datta, Abhishek; Shani-Hershkovich, Revital; Weiss, Michal; Laufer, Ilan; Reches, Amit; Peremen, Ziv; Geva, Amir; Parra, Lucas C; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Despite promising preliminary results in treating fibromyalgia (FM) pain, no neuromodulation technique has been adopted in clinical practice because of limited efficacy, low response rate, or poor tolerability. This phase II open-label trial aims to define a methodology for a clinically effective treatment of pain in FM by establishing treatment protocols and screening procedures to maximize efficacy and response rate. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) provides targeted subthreshold brain stimulation, combining tolerability with specificity. We aimed to establish the number of HD-tDCS sessions required to achieve a 50% FM pain reduction, and to characterize the biometrics of the response, including brain network activation pain scores of contact heat-evoked potentials. We report a clinically significant benefit of a 50% pain reduction in half (n = 7) of the patients (N = 14), with responders and nonresponders alike benefiting from a cumulative effect of treatment, reflected in significant pain reduction (P = .035) as well as improved quality of life (P = .001) over time. We also report an aggregate 6-week response rate of 50% of patients and estimate 15 as the median number of HD-tDCS sessions to reach clinically meaningful outcomes. The methodology for a pivotal FM neuromodulation clinical trial with individualized treatment is thus supported. Registered in Clinicaltrials.gov under registry number NCT01842009. In this article, an optimized protocol for the treatment of fibromyalgia pain with targeted subthreshold brain stimulation using high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation is outlined. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vitek 2 ANC card versus BBL Crystal Anaerobe and RapID ANA II for identification of clinical anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blairon, Laurent; Maza, Mengi L; Wybo, Ingrid; Piérard, Denis; Dediste, Anne; Vandenberg, Olivier

    2010-08-01

    The Vitek 2 Anaerobe and Corynebacterium Identification Card (ANC) was recently evaluated in a multicentre study. In the present work, this system was compared with the BBL Crystal Anaerobe and RapID ANA II panels. These kits were tested using 196 strains of anaerobes that had been previously identified by gas-liquid chromatography. Identification to the species or to the genus level was 75.0%, 81.1% and 70.9% for Crystal, RapID and Vitek, respectively. Vitek ANC failed to provide any identification in 20.4% of the strains, but it had fewer misidentifications than RapID. The confidence factors provided on the results report of each kit were not always correlated with a lower risk of major errors, with the exception of Vitek 2 in which a confidence factor higher than 0.86 excluded the risk of misidentification in more than 87% of isolates. The lower rate of identification by the Vitek and Crystal panels is mostly due the lower ability of these systems to identify the Clostridia. Overall, the three panels are comparable but need improvement to a better accuracy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical trials update from the American Heart Association: REPAIR-AMI, ASTAMI, JELIS, MEGA, REVIVE-II, SURVIVE, and PROACTIVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, John G F; Freemantle, Nick; Coletta, Alison P; Clark, Andrew L

    2006-01-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials presented at the American Heart Association meeting held in November 2005, relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. In REPAIR-AMI an improvement in ejection fraction was observed in post-MI patients following infusion of bone marrow stem cells. However, the ASTAMI study showed no benefit of stem cell implantation in a similar patient cohort. The JELIS study reported a reduction in major coronary events in patients receiving statins plus fish oil compared to statins alone. MEGA showed that low dose statins in a low risk population reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events. Two studies of levosimendan in acute heart failure gave conflicting results, in the REVIVE-II study levosimendan was reported to have a superior effect on the composite primary outcome compared to placebo, however, in SURVIVE despite a trend to early benefit with levosimendan, there was no difference in effect on long-term outcome versus dobutamine. The PROACTIVE study showed encouraging results for the use of pioglitazone in post-myocardial infarction patients with concomitant type 2 diabetes.

  17. Evaluation of 177Lu[Lu]-CHX-A″-DTPA-6A10 Fab as a radioimmunotherapy agent targeting carbonic anhydrase XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, L; Kellner, M; Gosewisch, A; Oos, R; Böning, G; Lindner, S; Albert, N; Bartenstein, P; Reulen, H-J; Zeidler, R; Gildehaus, F J

    2018-05-01

    Due to their infiltrative growth behavior, gliomas have, even after surgical resection, a high recurrence tendency. The approach of intracavitary radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is aimed at inhibiting tumor re-growth by directly administering drugs into the resection cavity (RC). Direct application of the radioconjugate into the RC has the advantage of bypassing the blood-brain barrier, which allows the administration of higher radiation doses than systemic application. Carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII) is highly expressed on glioma cells while being absent from normal brain and thus an attractive target molecule for RIT. We evaluated a CA XII-specific 6A10 Fab (fragment antigen binding) labelled with 177 Lu as an agent for RIT. 6A10 Fab fragment was modified and radiolabelled with 177 Lu and characterized by MALDI-TOF, flow cytometry and radio-TLC. In vitro stability was determined under physiological conditions. Biodistribution studies, autoradiography tumor examinations and planar scintigraphy imaging were performed on SCID-mice bearing human glioma xenografts. The in vitro CA XII binding capacity of the modified Fab was confirmed. Radiochemical purity was determined to be >90% after 72 h of incubation under physiological conditions. Autoradiography experiments proved the specific binding of the Fab to CA XII on tumor cells. Biodistribution studies revealed a tumor uptake of 3.0%ID/g after 6 h and no detectable brain uptake. The tumor-to-contralateral ratio of 10/1 was confirmed by quantitative planar scintigraphy. The radiochemical stability in combination with a successful in vivo tumor uptake shows the potential suitability for future RIT applications with the 6A10 Fab. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nature of the bifunctional chelating agent used for radioimmunotherapy with yttrium-88 monoclonal antibodies: critical factors in determining in vivo survival and organ toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, R.W.; Raubitschek, A.; Mirzadeh, S.; Brechbiel, M.W.; Junghaus, R.; Gansow, O.A.; Waldmann, T.A. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-05-15

    One factor that is critical to the potential effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy is the design of radiometal-chelated antibodies that will be stable in vivo. Stability in vivo depends on the condition that both the chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures not alter antibody specificity and biodistribution. In addition, synthesis and selection of the chelating agent is critical for each radiometal in order to prevent inappropriate release of the radiometal in vivo. In the present study, we compare the in vivo stability of seven radioimmunoconjugates that use different polyaminocarboxylate chelating agents to complex yttrium-88 to the mouse anti-human interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac. Chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures did not alter the immunospecificity of anti-Tac. In order to assess whether yttrium was inappropriately released from the chelate-coupled antibody in vivo, iodine-131-labeled and yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies were simultaneously administered to the same animals to correlate the decline in yttrium and radioiodinated antibody activity. The four stable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies studied displayed similar iodine-131 and yttrium-88 activity, indicating minimal elution of yttrium-88 from the complex. In contrast, the unstable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies had serum yttrium-88 activities that declined much more rapidly than their iodine-131 activities, suggesting loss of the radiolabel yttrium-88 from the chelate. Furthermore, high rates of yttrium-88 elution correlated with deposition in bone. Four chelating agents emerged as promising immunotherapeutic reagents: isothiocyanate benzyl DTPA and its derivatives 1B3M, MX, and 1M3B.

  19. Radioimmunotherapy in refractory b-cell nonhodgkins lymphoma with I-131-labeled chimeric anti cd-20 c2b8 (I-131 rituximab): preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Park, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sung Eun and others

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the native chimeric human-mouse anti CD-20 antibody IDEC-C2B8 (Rituximab) has been widely applied in NHL. This ongoing phase study was to evaluate whether radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with I-131 rituximab is effective in refractory B-cell NHL. Inclusion criteria were as follows: B-cell NHL with relapsed or refractory to primary standard therapy, measurable disease, adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function, informed consent. The rituximab (Mabthera, Roach) was radiolabeled with iodine-131(I-131) using a modified chloramine T method with high radiochemical purity (95%) and preservation of immuno-reactivity. All patients received loading doses of unlabeled rituximab (median, 40 mg: range, 20∼70 mg) immediately prior to administration of therapeutic dose (51.4∼152.2 MBq/kg), and then underwent gamma camera scan. 11 patients were enrolled (4 low-grade B-cell NHL, 7 DLBCL, median age 63 years). Patients had received a median of three prior chemotherapy regimens. The objective response rate was 36.4% (1 CR, 3 PRs). These all responses were observed in low-grade B-cell NHL, except one with DLBCL. Adverse events were primarily hematologic toxicities; the incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was 27.3%, 45.5%, and 18.2%, respectively. The treatment-related mortality was observed in one patient, who had been previously treated with high-dose chemotherapy plus TBI with autologous stem cell transplantation. RIT with I-131 rituximab seems to be effective tolerable in refractory low-grade B-cell NHL, although modest activity in refractory DLBCL. Further studies to define the efficacy of I-131 rituximab in DLBCL are warranted

  20. Radioimmunotherapy in refractory b-cell nonhodgkins lymphoma with I-131-labeled chimeric anti cd-20 c2b8 (I-131 rituximab): preliminary result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Park, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sung Eun and others [Korea University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Recently, the native chimeric human-mouse anti CD-20 antibody IDEC-C2B8 (Rituximab) has been widely applied in NHL. This ongoing phase study was to evaluate whether radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with I-131 rituximab is effective in refractory B-cell NHL. Inclusion criteria were as follows: B-cell NHL with relapsed or refractory to primary standard therapy, measurable disease, adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function, informed consent. The rituximab (Mabthera, Roach) was radiolabeled with iodine-131(I-131) using a modified chloramine T method with high radiochemical purity (95%) and preservation of immuno-reactivity. All patients received loading doses of unlabeled rituximab (median, 40 mg: range, 20{approx}70 mg) immediately prior to administration of therapeutic dose (51.4{approx}152.2 MBq/kg), and then underwent gamma camera scan. 11 patients were enrolled (4 low-grade B-cell NHL, 7 DLBCL, median age 63 years). Patients had received a median of three prior chemotherapy regimens. The objective response rate was 36.4% (1 CR, 3 PRs). These all responses were observed in low-grade B-cell NHL, except one with DLBCL. Adverse events were primarily hematologic toxicities; the incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was 27.3%, 45.5%, and 18.2%, respectively. The treatment-related mortality was observed in one patient, who had been previously treated with high-dose chemotherapy plus TBI with autologous stem cell transplantation. RIT with I-131 rituximab seems to be effective tolerable in refractory low-grade B-cell NHL, although modest activity in refractory DLBCL. Further studies to define the efficacy of I-131 rituximab in DLBCL are warranted.

  1. Development of DOTA-Rituximab to be Labeled with 90Y for Radioimmunotherapy of B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari doha, Fariba; Rahmani, Siyavash; Rikhtechi, Pedram; Rasaneh, Samira; Sheikholislam, Zahra; Shahhosseini, Soraya

    2017-01-01

    NHL is the most common hematologic cancer in adults. Rituximab is the FDA approved treatment of relapsed or refractory low grade B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). But patients eventually become resistant to rituximab. Since lymphocytes and lymphoma cells are highly radiosensitive, low grade NHL that has relapsed or refractory to standard therapy is treated by RIT in which a beta-emitting radionuclide coupled to anti-CD20 antibody. The association of beta emitter radionuclide to rituximab enhances its therapeutic efficacy. The cells which lack antigen or cells which cannot be reached due to poor vascularization and intratumoral pressure in a bulky tumor would be irradiated and killed by cross fire effect of beta emitter. 90Y, a pure high energy β-emitter with a half-life of 64 h, a maximum energy of 2.28 MeV, and maximum board of 11.3 mm in tissue is radionuclide of choice for radioimmunotherapy of outpatient administration. In this study, rituximab was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with 90YCl3. The stability, affinity, and immunoreactivity of radiolabeled antibody was determined in vitro and the conditions were optimized. Biodistribution studies were done in normal mice. The optimum conditions of conjugation and radiolabeling was 1-2 h at 37 °C and 1 h at 45 °C, respectively. Results showed approximately 4 DOTA molecules conjugated per antibody molecule. The purified antibody was stable and intact over 6 months stored at -20 °C. The result of immunoreactivity (≈70%), affinity (≈3 nM) and biodistribution in normal mice are acceptable. PMID:28979315

  2. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy with 90Y but not 177Lu is effective treatment in a syngeneic murine leukemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnnie J Orozco

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT for treatment of hematologic malignancies has primarily employed monoclonal antibodies (Ab labeled with 131I or 90Y which have limitations, and alternative radionuclides are needed to facilitate wider adoption of RIT. We therefore compared the relative therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT employing 90Y and 177Lu in a syngeneic, disseminated murine myeloid leukemia (B6SJLF1/J model. Biodistribution studies showed that both 90Y- and 177Lu-anti-murine CD45 Ab conjugates (DOTA-30F11 targeted hematologic tissues, as at 24 hours 48.8 ± 21.2 and 156 ± 14.6% injected dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g of 90Y-DOTA-30F11 and 54.2 ± 9.5 and 199 ± 11.7% ID/g of 177Lu-DOTA-30F11 accumulated in bone marrow (BM and spleen, respectively. However, 90Y-DOTA-30F11 RIT demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit: 60% of mice treated with 300 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 lived over 180 days after therapy, and mice treated with 100 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 had a median survival 66 days. 90Y-anti-CD45 RIT was associated with transient, mild myelotoxicity without hepatic or renal toxicity. Conversely, 177Lu- anti-CD45 RIT yielded no long-term survivors. Thus, 90Y was more effective than 177Lu for anti-CD45 RIT of AML in this murine leukemia model.

  3. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases of the Mexican College of Rheumatology. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel; Barrera Cruz, Antonio; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio Rafael; Jara Quezada, Luis Javier; Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Álvarez Nemegyei, José; Fraga Mouret, Antonio; Orozco Alcalá, Javier; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cruz Reyes, Claudia Verónica; Andrade Ortega, Lilia; Vera Lastra, Olga Lidia; Mendoza Pinto, Claudia; Sánchez González, Antonio; Cruz Cruz, Polita Del Rocío; Morales Hernández, Sara; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Pérez Cristóbal, Mario; Medina García, Gabriela; Hernández Romero, Noé; Velarde Ochoa, María Del Carmen; Navarro Zarza, José Eduardo; Portillo Díaz, Verónica; Vargas Guerrero, Angélica; Goycochea Robles, María Victoria; García Figueroa, José Luis; Barreira Mercado, Eduardo; Amigo Castañeda, Mary Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is associated with several maternal and fetal complications. The development of clinical practice guidelines with the best available scientific evidence may help standardize the care of these patients. To provide recommendations regarding prenatal care, treatment, and a more effective monitoring of pregnancy in women with lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Nominal panels were formed for consensus, systematic search of information, development of clinical questions, processing and staging of recommendations, internal validation by peers and external validation of the final document. The quality criteria of the AGREE II instrument were followed. The panels answered 37 questions related to maternal and fetal care in lupus erythematosus, RA and APS, as well as for use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations were discussed and integrated into a final manuscript. Finally, the corresponding algorithms were developed. In this second part, the recommendations for pregnant women with RA, APS and the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation are presented. We believe that the Mexican clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with RA and APS integrate the best available evidence for the treatment and follow-up of patients with these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Critical Appraisal of International Clinical Practice Guidelines in Kidney Transplantation Using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Education (AGREE) II Tool: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼDonoghue, Katriona Jane Marie; Reed, Rhiannon D; Knight, Simon R; O'Callaghan, John M; Ayaz-Shah, Anam A; Hassan, Sevda; Weissenbacher, Annemarie; Morris, Peter J; Pengel, Liset H M

    2018-05-22

    Whilst Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) are used for the development of local protocols in kidney transplantation (Ktx), the quality of their methodology is variable. This systematic review aimed to critically appraise international CPGs in all aspects of Ktx using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II tool. CPGs in Ktx and donation published between 2010 and 2017 were identified from MEDLINE, Embase, National Guideline Clearinghouse, NHS and NICE Evidence Searches, and the websites of transplant societies. Using AGREE II, 3 appraisers assessed the quality of CPGs. Interrater reliability was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Searches identified 3,168 records and 115 CPGs were included. The highest scoring AGREE II domain was 'Scope and Purpose' (80%; Range 30-100%), followed by 'Clarity of Presentation' (77%; Range 43-98%), 'Editorial independence' (52%; Range 0-94%), 'Rigour of Development' (47%; Range 6-97%) and 'Stakeholder Involvement' (41%; Range 11-85%). The poorest scoring domain was 'Applicability' (31%; Range 3-74%). Most CPGs were recommended for future use either with (63%) or without modifications (18%). A small number were not recommended for future use (14%) or reviewers did not agree on recommending the CPG (5%). The overall mean CPG quality score was 4 out of 7 (Range 2-7). The mean ICC of 0.74 indicated substantial agreement between reviewers. The quality of international CPGs in Ktx was variable, and most CPGs lacked key aspects of methodological robustness and transparency. Improvements in methodology, patient involvement and strategies for implementation are required.

  5. An evidence-based assessment of the clinical guidelines for replanted avulsed teeth. Part II: prescription of systemic antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckfuss, Susan Elisabeth; Messer, Louise Brearley

    2009-04-01

    Current clinical guidelines recommend prescribing systemic antibiotic therapy (SAT) for patients having an avulsed permanent tooth replanted. The principles of evidence-based dentistry can be used to assess whether this is the best approach based on currently-available evidence. The objective of this study was to use the principles of evidence-based dentistry to answer the PICO question: (P) for a replanted avulsed permanent tooth, (I) is prescribing SAT, (C) compared with not prescribing SAT, (O) associated with an increased likelihood of successful periodontal healing after tooth replantation? A literature search was performed across four internet databases (Ovid Medline, Cochrane Library, PubMed, ISI Web of Science), for relevant citations (n = 35 702). Limiting citations to those in English and removing duplicates produced a set of titles (n = 14 742) that were sieved according to evidence-based dentistry principles. Relevant titles were selected for abstract assessment (n = 782), identifying papers for examination (n = 74). Inclusion criteria were applied and three papers (326 total teeth) met the final criteria for meta-analysis. Meta-analyses found no statistically significant difference between prescribing or not prescribing antibiotics for acceptable periodontal healing without progressive root resorption (common odds ratio = 0.90, SE = 0.29, 95% confidence intervals = 0.51-1.58). The evidence for an association between prescribing SAT and an increased likelihood of acceptable periodontal healing outcome is inconclusive. This investigation of antibiotic use as defined in the clinical guidelines indicates there is inconclusive clinical evidence from studies of replanted avulsed human teeth to either contradict or support the guideline. Pending future research to the contrary, dentists are recommended to follow current guidelines in prescribing SAT when replanting avulsed teeth.

  6. Efficacy and safety of retinol palmitate ophthalmic solution in the treatment of dry eye: a Japanese Phase II clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshida H

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Toshida,1 Toshinari Funaki,2 Koichi Ono,3 Nobuhito Tabuchi,4 Sota Watanabe,4 Tamotsu Seki,5 Hiroshi Otake,6 Takuji Kato,7 Nobuyuki Ebihara,8 Akira Murakami2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Shizuoka, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo Tokyo Koto Geriatric Medical Center, Tokyo, 4Pharmaceutical Research Laboratories, Lion Corporation, Kanagawa, 5Tamagawa Eye Clinic, Tokyo, 6Otake Eye Clinic, Kanagawa, 7Kato Eye Clinic, Tokyo, 8Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba, Japan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of the administration of retinol palmitate (VApal ophthalmic solution (500 IU/mL for the treatment of patients with dry eye. Patients and methods: This study included 66 patients with dry eye. After a 2-week washout period, patients were randomized (1:1 into either a VApal ophthalmic solution or a placebo group, and a single drop of either solution was administered six times daily for 4 weeks. Efficacy measures were 12 subjective symptoms, rose bengal (RB and fluorescein staining scores, tear film breakup time, and tear secretion. Safety measures included clinical blood and urine analyses and adverse event recordings. Results: In comparisons of the two groups, the mean change in RB staining score from baseline was significantly lower in the VApal group at 2 and 4 weeks (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively. Furthermore, the fluorescein clearance rate (fluorescein staining score was significantly higher in the VApal group at 4 weeks (P<0.05. The VApal group showed a significant improvement in blurred vision at 1 and 2 weeks (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively, and the mean change in the total score for subjective symptoms from baseline was significantly lower in the VApal group at 1 week (P<0.05. In before- and after-intervention comparisons, the

  7. A multicentre study of 513 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. II. Disease mortality and clinical factors of prognostic value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Petersen, J; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    influence on survival related to mortality caused by infections. Diffuse central nervous system disease and myocarditis were related to increased SLE-related mortality, whereas photosensitivity predicted a decreased mortality. Non-fatal infections and thrombotic events predicted a decreased overall survival......In this Danish multicentre study, predictive clinical factors of mortality and survival were calculated for 513 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 122 of whom died within a mean observation period of 8.2 years equalling a mortality rate of 2.9% per year. Survival rates were 97%, 91...

  8. Clinical significance of measurement of changes of plasma ET-1 and serum TGF-β1, urinary microalbuminuria (MAU) levels in patients with type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Liming; Xu Shan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of plasma ET-1 and serum TGF-β 1 , urinary microalbuminuria levels in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Plasma ET-1 (with RIA) serum TGF-β 1 (with ELISA)microalbuminuria (with immune method) levels were determination in 40 cases of DM2 without nephropathy, 32 cases of DM2 with nephropathy and 35 controls. Results: The plasma ET-1, serum TGF-β 1 , microalbuminuria levels in diabetic patients with nephropathy were significantly higher than those in controls(P 0.05). Conclusion: Plasma ET-1 and serum TGF-β 1 , microalbuminuria levels increased gradually as the diabetic nephropathy got more severe. They could be used as sensitive markers for early diagnosis of development of diabetic nephropathy. (authors)

  9. The NAA system at the reactor BER II clinical analysis of fluorine, calcium, phosphorus and aluminium in bone biopsies, comparison with photon activation analysis and ion sensitive electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawlik, D.; Gatschke, W.; Behne, D.; Braetter, P.

    1981-01-01

    Over the past few years an irradiation and measuring system has been developed for the reactor BER II at the Hahn-Meitner-Institute. It was to be suited in particular to the neutron activation analysis of biological material via short lived radionuclides. The general characteristics of this equipment and some experimental details as the recycling facility and the device used for measuring the irradiation time, the waiting time and the neutron fluency are described. This equipment was used to determine physiological concentrations of the elements sodium, chlorine, aluminium, phosphorus, fluorine, calcium, copper and selenium in biological material. The results have been compared with those obtained by photon activation analysis or ion sensitive electrode. As an example of the application of the apparatus the authors report on the clinical analysis of Ca, F, P and Al in the control of the treatment of patients suffering from osteoporosis. (author)

  10. Clinical and Pathogenetic Significance of Osteoassociated Microelements in the Joint Diseases. Report II: Microelementosis in the Hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Syniachenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The relevance. Microelementosis (imbalance of certain microelements in the body, ME is considered as one of the most important clinical and pathogenetic components of degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases. ME can play the role of co-factors involved in the processes of articular inflammation. Objective. To study the levels in the hair and to assess the clinical and pathogenetic significance of osteoassociated ME (cobalt — Co, copper — Cu, iron — Fe, lithium — Li, manganese — Mn, lead — Pb, strontium — Sr, zinc — Zn at a variety of arthritis — rheumatoid (RA, chlamydia-induced (ReA, psoriatic (PsA, gouty (PA and osteoarthritis (OA. Material and methods. There were 262 patients under observation, among them 89 persons suffered from RA, 31 — ReA, 35 — PsA, 49 — GA and 58 — OA. The distribution of males and females in these groups was 1 : 2, 2 : 1, 1 : 1, 11 : 1, 1 : 3, respectively, the average age of the patients was 47, 34, 42, 48 and 58 years old, while the duration of clinical manifestations of disease was 10, 4, 11, 7 and 12 years. ME in the hair was examined by atomic absorption spectrometer with electrographite atomizer «SolAAr-Mk2-MOZe». Results. All patients with arthritis are prone to have microelementosis in hair. All nosological forms of joint pathology are associated with a significant decrease of Mn level in hair, when the level of Pb and Fe accumulated. Only RA was characterized by the absence of changes in the hair level of Co, PsA — of Cu, PA — Li and Sr. If, in comparison with healthy persons, the PA proceeds with an increased concentration level of Zn in the hair, the OA is characterized by an increased level of ME, that has a certain differential diagnostic value. There is either direct relationship between the hair and blood serum indexes (Mn, Pb or multi-directional (Fe ones. Microelement blood composition depends on the activity level, clinical and laboratory signs of disease, the

  11. A phase I/II exploratory clinical trial for intracordal injection of recombinant hepatocyte growth factor for vocal fold scar and sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shigeru; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Tateya, Ichiro; Mizuta, Masanobu; Kishimoto, Yo; Hiwatashi, Nao; Kawai, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Takuya; Suzuki, Ryo; Kaneko, Mami; Naito, Yasushi; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Kanemaru, Shin-Ichi

    2018-04-01

    Vocal fold scar and sulcus are intractable diseases with no effective established treatments. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has preclinically proven to have potent antifibrotic and regenerative effects on vocal fold scar. The current Phase I/II clinical trial aims to examine the safety and effectiveness of intracordal injection of a recombinant human HGF drug for patients with vocal fold scar or sulcus. This is an open-label, dose-escalating, first-in-human clinical trial. Eighteen patients with bilateral vocal fold scar or sulcus were enrolled and divided into three groups: Step I received 1 μg of HGF per vocal fold; Step II received 3 μg of HGF; and Step III received 10 μg of HGF. Injections were administered once weekly for 4 weeks. The protocol treatment was performed starting with Step I and escalating to Step III. Patients were followed for 6 months post-treatment. Local and systemic safety aspects were examined as primary endpoints, and therapeutic effects were assessed as secondary endpoints using voice handicap index-10; maximum phonation time; vocal fold vibratory amplitude; grade, rough, breathy, asthenic, strained scale; and jitter. The results indicated no serious drug-related adverse events in either the systemic or local examinations. In whole-subject analysis, voice handicap index-10, vocal fold vibratory amplitude, and grade, rough, breathy, asthenic, strained scale were significantly improved at 6 months, whereas maximum phonation time and jitter varied. There were no significant differences in phonatory data between the step groups. In conclusion, intracordal injection of a recombinant human HGF drug was safe, feasible, and potentially effective for human patients with vocal fold scar or sulcus. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Quality assessment of recent evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults using the AGREE II instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Muhammad A; Al-Fahed, Ousama B; Arif, Samir I; Amer, Yasser S; Titi, Maher A; Al-Rukban, Mohammed O

    2018-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide and national public health problem that has a great impact on the population in Saudi Arabia. High-quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are cornerstones in improving the health care provided for patients with diabetes. This study evaluated the methodological rigour, transparency, and applicability of recently published CPGs. Our group conducted a systematic search for recently published CPGs for T2DM. The searching and screening for Source CPGs were guided by tools from the ADAPTE methods with specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Five reviewers using the second version of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) Instrument independently assessed the quality of the retrieved Source CPGs. Domains of Scope and purpose and Clarity of presentation received the highest scores in all CPGs. Most of the assessed CPGs (86%) were considered with high overall quality and were recommended for use. Rigour of development and applicability domains were together highest in 3 CPGs (43%). The overall high quality of DM CPGs published in the last 3 years demonstrated the continuous development and improvement in CPG methodologies and standards. Health care professionals should consider the quality of any CPG for T2DM before deciding to use it in their daily clinical practice. Three CPGs have been identified, using the AGREE criteria, as high-quality and trustworthy. Ideally, the resources provided by the AGREE trust including the AGREE II Instrument should be used by a clinician to scan through the large number of published T2DM CPGs to identify the CPGs with high methodological quality and applicability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the novel antituberculous vaccine RUTI: randomized, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial in patients with latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Andre S; D'lom, Eva; Bouic, Patrick; Sabaté, Montserrat; Bosser, Ramon; Picas, Jordi; Amat, Mercè; Churchyard, Gavin; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of three different doses (5, 25 and 50 µg) of the novel antituberculous vaccine RUTI compared to placebo in subjects with latent tuberculosis infection. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase II Clinical Trial (95 patients randomized). Three different RUTI doses and placebo were tested, randomized both in HIV-positive (n = 47) and HIV-negative subjects (n = 48), after completion of one month isoniazid (INH) pre-vaccination. Each subject received two vaccine administrations, 28 Days apart. Five patients withdrew and 90 patients completed the study. Assessment of safety showed no deaths during study. Two subjects had serious adverse events one had a retinal detachment while taking INH and was not randomized and the other had a severe local injection site abscess on each arm and was hospitalized; causality was assessed as very likely and by the end of the study the outcome had resolved. All the patients except 5 (21%) patients of the placebo group (3 HIV+ and 2 HIV-) reported at least one adverse event (AE) during the study. The most frequently occurring AEs among RUTI recipients were (% in HIV+/-): injection site reactions [erythema (91/92), induration (94/92), local nodules (46/25), local pain (66/75), sterile abscess (6/6), swelling (74/83), ulcer (20/11), headache (17/22) and nasopharyngitis (20/5)]. These events were mostly mild and well tolerated. Overall, a polyantigenic response was observed, which differed by HIV- status. The best polyantigenic response was obtained when administrating 25 µg RUTI, especially in HIV-positive subjects which was not increased after the second inoculation. This Phase II clinical trial demonstrates reasonable tolerability of RUTI. The immunogenicity profile of RUTI vaccine in LTBI subjects, even being variable among groups, allows us considering one single injection of one of the highest doses in future trials, preceded by an extended safety clinical

  14. Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal tumors with genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (TREAT-ME1): study protocol of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niess, Hanno; von Einem, Jobst C; Thomas, Michael N; Michl, Marlies; Angele, Martin K; Huss, Ralf; Günther, Christine; Nelson, Peter J; Bruns, Christiane J; Heinemann, Volker

    2015-04-08

    Adenocarcinoma originating from the digestive system is a major contributor to cancer-related deaths worldwide. Tumor recurrence, advanced local growth and metastasis are key factors that frequently prevent these tumors from curative surgical treatment. Preclinical research has demonstrated that the dependency of these tumors on supporting mesenchymal stroma results in susceptibility to cell-based therapies targeting this stroma. TREAT-ME1 is a prospective, uncontrolled, single-arm phase I/II study assessing the safety and efficacy of genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) as delivery vehicles for a cell-based gene therapy for advanced, recurrent or metastatic gastrointestinal or hepatopancreatobiliary adenocarcinoma. Autologous bone marrow will be drawn from each eligible patient after consent for bone marrow donation has been obtained (under a separate EC-approved protocol). In the following ~10 weeks the investigational medicinal product (IMP) is developed for each patient. To this end, the patient's MSCs are stably transfected with a gamma-retroviral, replication-incompetent and self-inactivating (SIN) vector system containing a therapeutic promoter - gene construct that allows for tumor-specific expression of the therapeutic gene. After release of the IMP the patients are enrolled after given informed consent for participation in the TREAT-ME 1 trial. In the phase I part of the study, the safety of the IMP is tested in six patients by three treatment cycles consisting of re-transfusion of MSCs at different concentrations followed by administration of the prodrug Ganciclovir. In the phase II part of the study, sixteen patients will be enrolled receiving IMP treatment. A subgroup of patients that qualifies for surgery will be treated preoperatively with the IMP to verify homing of the MSCs to tumors as to be confirmed in the surgical specimen. The TREAT-ME1 clinical study involves a highly innovative therapeutic strategy combining cell

  15. Comprehensive analysis of published phase I/II clinical trials between 1990-2010 in osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma confirms limited outcomes and need for translational investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Maldegem Annemiek M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High grade primary bone sarcomas are rare cancers that affect mostly children and young adults. Osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma are the most common histological subtypes in this age group, with current multimodality treatment strategies achieving 55-70% overall survival. As there remains an urgent need to develop new therapeutic interventions, we have reviewed published phase I/II trials that have been reported for osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma in the last twenty years. Results We conducted a literature search for clinical trials between 1990 and 2010, either for trials enrolling bone sarcoma patients as part of a general sarcoma indication or trials specifically in osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. We identified 42 clinical trials that fulfilled our search criteria for general sarcoma that enrolled these patient groups, and eight and twenty specific trials for Ewing and osteosarcoma patients, respectively. For the phase I trials which enrolled different tumour types our results were incomplete, because the sarcoma patients were not mentioned in the PubMed abstract. A total of 3,736 sarcoma patients were included in these trials over this period, 1,114 for osteosarcoma and 1,263 for Ewing sarcoma. As a proportion of the worldwide disease burden over this period, these numbers reflect a very small percentage of the potential patient recruitment, approximately 0.6% for Ewing sarcoma and 0.2% for osteosarcoma. However, these data show an increase in recent activity overall and suggest there is still much room for improvement in the current trial development structures. Conclusion Lack of resources and commercial investment will inevitably limit opportunity to develop sufficiently rapid improvements in clinical outcomes. International collaboration exists in many well founded co-operative groups for phase III trials, but progress may be more effective if there were also more investment of molecular and translational research into

  16. Efficacy and safety of retinol palmitate ophthalmic solution in the treatment of dry eye: a Japanese Phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshida, Hiroshi; Funaki, Toshinari; Ono, Koichi; Tabuchi, Nobuhito; Watanabe, Sota; Seki, Tamotsu; Otake, Hiroshi; Kato, Takuji; Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of the administration of retinol palmitate (VApal) ophthalmic solution (500 IU/mL) for the treatment of patients with dry eye. This study included 66 patients with dry eye. After a 2-week washout period, patients were randomized (1:1) into either a VApal ophthalmic solution or a placebo group, and a single drop of either solution was administered six times daily for 4 weeks. Efficacy measures were 12 subjective symptoms, rose bengal (RB) and fluorescein staining scores, tear film breakup time, and tear secretion. Safety measures included clinical blood and urine analyses and adverse event recordings. In comparisons of the two groups, the mean change in RB staining score from baseline was significantly lower in the VApal group at 2 and 4 weeks ( P ophthalmic solution (500 IU/mL) is safe and effective for the treatment of patients with dry eye.

  17. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems. Part II. Experimental assessment of spatial resolution performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) methods have been introduced to clinical CT systems and are being used in some clinical diagnostic applications. The purpose of this paper is to experimentally assess the unique spatial resolution characteristics of this nonlinear reconstruction method and identify its potential impact on the detectabilities and the associated radiation dose levels for specific imaging tasks. Methods: The thoracic section of a pediatric phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 or 100 times using a 64-slice clinical CT scanner at four different dose levels [CTDI{sub vol} =4, 8, 12, 16 (mGy)]. Both filtered backprojection (FBP) and MBIR (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for image reconstruction and results were compared with one another. Eight test objects in the phantom with contrast levels ranging from 13 to 1710 HU were used to assess spatial resolution. The axial spatial resolution was quantified with the point spread function (PSF), while the z resolution was quantified with the slice sensitivity profile. Both were measured locally on the test objects and in the image domain. The dependence of spatial resolution on contrast and dose levels was studied. The study also features a systematic investigation of the potential trade-off between spatial resolution and locally defined noise and their joint impact on the overall image quality, which was quantified by the image domain-based channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detectability index d′. Results: (1) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR depends on both radiation dose level and image contrast level, whereas it is supposedly independent of these two factors in FBP. The axial spatial resolution of MBIR always improved with an increasing radiation dose level and/or contrast level. (2) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR became equivalent to that of FBP at some transitional contrast level, above which MBIR demonstrated superior spatial resolution than

  18. [The clinical significance of the measurement of plasma transferrin as a growth factor. II. The changes in various endocrine status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, M; Odagaki, E; Morioka, T; Nakagawa, K

    1987-05-20

    The clinical significance of the measurement of plasma transferrin (Tf) in patients with hypophysial disorders was reported in our previous papers. In the present study, we determined plasma Tf levels in 55 patients with various endocrine states and considered their clinical significance compared with plasma somatomedin-C (SM-C) levels. Plasma Tf levels decreased significantly in patients with anorexia nervosa (p less than 0.02), hyperthyroidism (p less than 0.05), primary hypothyroidism (p less than 0.05) and Cushing's syndrome (p less than 0.05), while they were elevated significantly in pregnancy (p less than 0.01) or females using estrogens (p less than 0.05). The former two declines were considered a reflection of the malnutritional state of the patients since a significant negative correlation was observed between plasma Tf levels and the percentile deficit from the ideal body weight in patients with anorexia nervosa (p less than 0.01), or between plasma Tf levels and elevated T3 levels which induce hypermetabolism in patients with hyperthyroidism (p less than 0.01). A significant correlation was observed between the SM-C and Tf levels in these subjects (including normal controls and patients with hypophysial disorders) as a whole (r = 0.79, p less than 0.001). These data indicate that plasma Tf is changeable according to the endocrinological and nutritional conditions with good correlation to the SM-C, and it is suggested that Tf also operates as a growth factor in vivo.

  19. Biomarker and Tumor Responses of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Trametinib: A Phase II Neoadjuvant Window-of-Opportunity Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppaluri, Ravindra; Winkler, Ashley E; Lin, Tianxiang; Law, Jonathan H; Haughey, Bruce H; Nussenbaum, Brian; Paniello, Randal C; Rich, Jason T; Diaz, Jason A; Michel, Loren P; Wildes, Tanya; Dunn, Gavin P; Zolkind, Paul; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Siegel, Barry A; Chernock, Rebecca D; Lewis, James S; Adkins, Douglas R

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Ras/MEK/ERK pathway activation is common in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC). We performed a neoadjuvant (preoperative) trial to determine the biomarker and tumor response of OCSCC to MEK inhibition with trametinib. Experimental Design: Patients with stage II-IV OCSCC received trametinib (2 mg/day, minimum 7 days) prior to surgery. Primary tumor specimens were obtained before and after trametinib to evaluate immunohistochemical staining for p-ERK1/2 and CD44, the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints included changes in clinical tumor measurements and metabolic activity [maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT), and in tumor downstaging. Drug-related adverse events (AE) and surgical/wound complications were evaluated. Results: Of 20 enrolled patients, 17 (85%) completed the study. Three patients withdrew because of either trametinib-related ( n = 2: nausea, duodenal perforation) or unrelated ( n = 1: constipation) AEs. The most common AE was rash (9/20 patients, 45%). Seventeen patients underwent surgery. No unexpected surgical/wound complications occurred. Evaluable matched pre- and posttrametinib specimens were available in 15 (88%) of these patients. Reduction in p-ERK1/2 and CD44 expression occurred in 5 (33%) and 2 (13%) patients, respectively. Clinical tumor response by modified World Health Organization criteria was observed in 11 of 17 (65%) evaluable patients (median 46% decrease, range 14%-74%). Partial metabolic response (≥25% reduction in SUV max ) was observed in 6 of 13 (46%) evaluable patients (median 25% decrease, range 6%-52%). Clinical-to-pathologic tumor downstaging occurred in 9 of 17 (53%) evaluable patients. Conclusions: Trametinib resulted in significant reduction in Ras/MEK/ERK pathway activation and in clinical and metabolic tumor responses in patients with OCSCC. Clin Cancer Res; 23(9); 2186-94. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer

  20. A clinical stydy on the effectiveness of slow - resorbing collagen membrane barrier therapy to guide regeneration in mandibular class II furcations in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazli N

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The present clinical trial was designed to evaluate the regenerative potential of periodontal tissues in degree II"nfurcation defects at mandibular molars of human using a slow-resorbing collagen membrane and a surgical treatment"ntechnique based on the principles of guided tissue regeneration."nThe patient sampleinclude 8 subjects who had periodontal lessions in right and left mandibular molars regions, including moderate to advance periodonal destruction within the radicular area. Following a baseline examination including recording the clinical measurements (PD, Al, HC, F.G.M , the furcation- involved molars were randomly assigned in each patient to either a test or a control treatment procedure. Included the evevation of mucoperiosteal flaps, recording measurement from the cemento enamel junction (C.E.J directly coronal to the furcation area to the alveolar crest and to the base of the defect-Horizontal furcation measurements were also made using a William's probe, finally a collagen membrrane placed on the involved area to cover the entrance of the furcation and adjucent root surfaces as well as a portion of the alveolar bone apical to the crest. The flaps were repositioned and secured with interdental sutures. A procedure identical to the one used at the test teeth was Performed at the control teeth region with the exception of the placement of the collagen membrance. Following surgery all patients were placed on a plaque control regimen. All Patients received normal postsurgical care and at 6 month post-surgery were scheduled for re-entry surgery. Before re-entry surgery all clinical parameters recorded again. The re-entry mucoperiosteal flaps were designed to expose the furcation area for measurements, as describedabove. There was clinical improvement in all measurements made in both the test and control patients (especially in test group over the 6 month period. The horizontal and vertical furcation measurements did yield a

  1. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, controlled phase III clinical trial of chicken type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Xu, Jian-Hua; Xiao, Feng; Bao, Chun-De; Ni, Li-Qing; Li, Xing-Fu; Wu, Yu-Qing; Sun, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Rong-Hua; Sun, Bao-Liang; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Liu, Shang; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Jie; Liu, Hua-Xiang; Wang, Ren-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Chicken type II collagen (CCII) is a protein extracted from the cartilage of chicken breast and exhibits intriguing possibilities for the treatment of autoimmune diseases by inducing oral tolerance. A 24-week, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, methotrexate (MTX)-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CCII in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five hundred three RA patients were included in the study. Patients received either 0.1 mg daily of CCII (n = 326) or 10 mg once a week of MTX (n = 177) for 24 weeks. Each patient was evaluated for pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), assessments by investigator and patient, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) by using the standard tools at baseline (week 0) and at weeks 12 and 24. Additionally, rheumatoid factor (RF) was evaluated at weeks 0 and 24. Measurement of a battery of biochemical parameters in serum, hematological parameters, and urine analysis was performed to evaluate the safety of CCII. Four hundred fifty-four patients (94.43%) completed the 24-week follow-up. In both groups, there were decreases in pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, HAQ, and assessments by investigator and patient, and all differences were statistically significant. In the MTX group, ESR and CRP decreased. RF did not change in either group. At 24 weeks, 41.55% of patients in the CCII group and 57.86% in the MTX group met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR-20) and 16.89% and 30.82%, respectively, met the ACR 50% improvement criteria (ACR-50). Both response rates for ACR-20 and ACR-50 in the CCII group were lower than those of the MTX group, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The DAS28 (disease activity score using 28 joint counts) values of the two treatment groups were calculated, and there was a statistically

  2. Bayesian enhancement two-stage design for single-arm phase II clinical trials with binary and time-to-event endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haolun; Yin, Guosheng

    2018-02-21

    Simon's two-stage design is one of the most commonly used methods in phase II clinical trials with binary endpoints. The design tests the null hypothesis that the response rate is less than an uninteresting level, versus the alternative hypothesis that the response rate is greater than a desirable target level. From a Bayesian perspective, we compute the posterior probabilities of the null and alternative hypotheses given that a promising result is declared in Simon's design. Our study reveals that because the frequentist hypothesis testing framework places its focus on the null hypothesis, a potentially efficacious treatment identified by rejecting the null under Simon's design could have only less than 10% posterior probability of attaining the desirable target level. Due to the indifference region between the null and alternative, rejecting the null does not necessarily mean that the drug achieves the desirable response level. To clarify such ambiguity, we propose a Bayesian enhancement two-stage (BET) design, which guarantees a high posterior probability of the response rate reaching the target level, while allowing for early termination and sample size saving in case that the drug's response rate is smaller than the clinically uninteresting level. Moreover, the BET design can be naturally adapted to accommodate survival endpoints. We conduct extensive simulation studies to examine the empirical performance of our design and present two trial examples as applications. © 2018, The International Biometric Society.

  3. Clinical comparison of Bio-Oss plus 10% collagen with a bioabsorbable collagen barrier or coronally advanced flap in treatment of mandibular molars class II furcation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radafshar G.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Furcation defects are one of the most challenging problems in periodontal therapy. Regenerative treatment significantly improves the prognosis of the involved teeth. The aim of this study was to compare Bio-Oss plus 10% collagen in combination with either a bioabsorbable collagen barrier (BO/GTR, or coronally advanced flap (BO/CF, in treating human mandibular class II furcation defects. "nMaterials and Methods: This clinical trial included 10 patients with 10 pairs of similar periodontal defects. Each defect was randomly assigned to treatment with BO/CF or BO/GTR. Following basic therapy, baseline measurements were recorded including probing pocket depth (PPD,closed horizontal probing depth (CHPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, and gingival margin position (CEJ-GM, together with plaque and gingival indices. Hard tissue measurements were performed during surgery to determine alveolar crestal height (CEJ-AC, and vertical and horizontal open probing depth (OVPD, OHPD.After 6 months, all sites were re-entered and soft and hard tissue measurements were recorded. "nResults: Both surgical procedures significantly reduced probing depth and improved clinical attachment levels, with no significant difference between groups. Gingival margin position (CEJ-GM, was improved in the BO/CF group (0.66±0.51 mm, p<0.05, but not statistically different from BO/GTR group in which remained relatively constant (0.00±0.81 mm. Vertical defect resolution was significant in each groups (BO/CF:3.17±1.47 mm, BO/GTR:3.33±0.51mm. Horizontal defect resolution was also significant with either procedure (BO/CF:3.67±1.31 mm, BO/GTR:3.80±1.83 mm, with no statistically significant difference between groups. Data were analyzed with wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, treatment of mandibular class II furcation defects with both procedures resulted in statistically

  4. [Post-marketing surveillance of antibacterial activities of cefozopran against various clinical isolates--II. Gram-negative bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Nobuyoshi; Akiyama, Kazumitsu; Koyama, Tsuneo

    2003-10-01

    As a post-marketing surveillance, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cefozopran (CZOP), an agent of cephems, against various clinical isolates were yearly evaluated and compared with those of other cephems, oxacephems, carbapenems, monobactams, and penicillins. Changes in CZOP susceptibility among bacteria were also evaluated with the bacterial resistance ratio calculated from the breakpoint MIC. Twenty-five species (4,154 strains) of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from the clinical materials annually collected from 1996 to 2001, and consisted of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, Serratia liquefaciens, Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter koseri, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Morganella morganii, Providencia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Bacteroides fragilis group, and Prevotella/Porphyromonas. CZOP preserved its antibacterial activity against M. (B.) catarrhalis (MIC90: 4 micrograms/mL) and showed comparable activity to carbapenems against H. influenzae (MIC90: 1 microgram/mL). The antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. coli was preferable (MIC90: 0.125 microgram/mL) and comparable to those of cefpirome (CPR), cefepime (CFPM), and imipenem (IPM). The MIC90 of CZOP against K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca was 1 and 0.25 microgram/mL, respectively. The MIC90 of CZOP against E. cloacae increased during 6 years (32 to 128 micrograms/mL). The antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. aerogenes was preferable (MIC90: 1 microgram/mL). The antibacterial activities of CZOP against S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens were relatively potent (MIC90: 0.5 and 0.25 microgram/mL) and comparable to those of CPR, CFPM, and carumonam. CZOP preserved comparable antibacterial

  5. Conventional and advanced implant treatment in the type II diabetic patient: surgical protocol and long-term clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Georges; Younan, Roland; Azar, Pierre; Sleilati, Ghassan

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of type-2 diabetes on implant survival and complication rate. Prospective study enrolling type-2 diabetic patients suffering from edentulism, having a mean perioperative HbA1c level of 7.2%, and compliant with a maintenance program. All the patients underwent dental and periodontal examinations and had laboratory testing for HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, blood lipids, and microalbuminuria. Nondiabetic patients matched for implant treatment indication served as controls. The influence of clinical diabetes-related factors and periodontal parameters (Plaque Index, bleeding on probing, probing depth) on implant survival were assessed via univariate then multivariate methods. Forty-five diabetic patients, followed for 1 to 12 years, mean age 64.7 years, received 255 implants: 143 following a classical protocol and 112 in cases of sinus floor elevation, immediate loading, and guided bone regeneration. Forty-five nondiabetic control patients received 244 implants: 142 following a classical protocol and 102 in cases of advanced surgery. Implant survival following conventional or advanced implant therapy was not statistically different between the well-controlled (HbA1c diabetic group was 97.2% (control 98.8%) and was not significantly different for age, gender, diabetes duration, smoking, or type of hypoglycemic therapy. The mean peri-implant bone loss was 0.41 +/- 0.58 mm (control, 0.49 +/- 0.64 mm). PI and BOP fairly correlated with postoperative complications. HbA1c was the only multivariate independent factor affecting the complication rate (P = .04). No statistically significant difference was found for patients (P = .81) or for implants (P = .66) for the advanced surgery cases or the conventional approach in diabetic patients compared to nondiabetic patients.

  6. Salvage of relapse of patients with Hodgkin's disease in clinical stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy and initially treated with radiotherapy alone. A report from the international database on Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Horwich, A.; Ashley, S.

    1994-01-01

    patients in the International Database on Hodgkin's Disease who were initially in clinical Stages I or II, who were staged with laparotomy, and who relapsed after initial treatment with irradiation alone. Factors analyzed for outcome after first relapse included initial stage, age, sex, histology......PURPOSE: To analyze presentation variables that might indicate a high or low likelihood of success of the treatment of patients relapsing after initial radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease in clinical Stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data were analyzed on 681...

  7. Molar-incisor-hypomineralisation (MIH). A retrospective clinical study in Greek children. II. Possible medical aetiological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygidakis, N A; Dimou, G; Marinou, D

    2008-12-01

    This was to examine the potential medical aetiological factors involved in the development of MIH. During the years 2003--2005, all MIH cases diagnosed according to set criteria were selected from the new patients clinic of a Community Dental Centre for Children (Athens). The age, gender and teeth involved were recorded. A control group of socio-demographically matched controls was also identified. The potential aetiological factors were retrieved through personal interview with the parents and from each child and mother's medical book. Only verified aetiological factors were recorded. Evaluation of the correlation of affected teeth and the timing of the insult was performed in a separate group of 225 affected children aged 8-12 with their entire 12 'index' teeth erupted. From the 3,518, 5.5 to 12 years old children examined, 360 (10.2%) had MIH. Aetiology of MIH: 44 children (12.2%), presented without any relevant medical history, the remaining 316 (87.8%) recorded various medical problems associated with MIH, compared with 18.9% for controls. Perinatal (163, 33.6%) and postnatal (162, 33.9%) problems were the most frequently found and prenatal the least (33, 8.6%). For 42 children (11.7%) problems occurred in more than one chronological period, mainly during both the perinatal and postnatal period (11.1%). The most common prenatal problem was repeated episodes of high fever (12/33), in the perinatal period birth by Caesarean section (92/163) and other birth complications (34/163). Various respiratory conditions (88/162), repeated episodes of high fever (31/162) and neonatal illness (28/162) were the commonly reported problems in the postnatal period. Many MIH cases presented with more than one medical problem during the peri-and postnatal period. Children with MIH recorded 68.9% more frequent medical problems than controls (pMIH children with all their 'index' teeth erupted. Children with MIH present with more medical problems than controls during their prenatal

  8. Axitinib dose titration: analyses of exposure, blood pressure and clinical response from a randomized phase II study in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, B I; Melichar, B; Fishman, M N; Oya, M; Pithavala, Y K; Chen, Y; Bair, A H; Grünwald, V

    2015-07-01

    In a randomized, double-blind phase II trial in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), axitinib versus placebo titration yielded a significantly higher objective response rate. We evaluated pharmacokinetic and blood pressure (BP) data from this study to elucidate relationships among axitinib exposure, BP change, and efficacy. Patients received axitinib 5 mg twice daily during a lead-in period. Patients who met dose-titration criteria were randomized 1:1 to stepwise dose increases with axitinib or placebo. Patients ineligible for randomization continued without dose increases. Serial 6-h and sparse pharmacokinetic sampling were carried out; BP was measured at clinic visits and at home in all patients, and by 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in a subset of patients. Area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h throughout the course of treatment (AUCstudy) was higher in patients with complete or partial responses than those with stable or progressive disease in the axitinib-titration arm, but comparable between these groups in the placebo-titration and nonrandomized arms. In the overall population, AUCstudy and efficacy outcomes were not strongly correlated. Mean BP across the population was similar when measured in clinic, at home, or by 24-h ABPM. Weak correlations were observed between axitinib steady-state exposure and diastolic BP. When grouped by change in diastolic BP from baseline, patients in the ≥10 and ≥15 mmHg groups had longer progression-free survival. Optimal axitinib exposure may differ among patients with mRCC. Pharmacokinetic or BP measurements cannot be used exclusively to guide axitinib dosing. Individualization of treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including axitinib, is thus more complex than anticipated and cannot be limited to a single clinical factor. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical

  9. Long-term oncological outcomes of a phase II trial of neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy followed by radical prostatectomy for patients with clinically localised, high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Poon, Stephen A; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Maschino, Alexandra C; Vickers, Andrew J; Bernie, Aaron; Konety, Badrinath R; Kelly, W Kevin; Eastham, James A

    2015-07-01

    To determine long-term oncological outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) after neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy (CHT) for clinically localised, high-risk prostate cancer. In this phase II multicentre trial of patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PSA level >20 ng/mL, Gleason ≥8, or clinical stage ≥T3), androgen-deprivation therapy (goserelin acetate depot) and paclitaxel, carboplatin and estramustine were administered before RP. We report the long-term oncological outcomes of these patients and compared them to a contemporary cohort who met oncological inclusion criteria but received RP only. In all, 34 patients were enrolled and followed for a median of 13.1 years. Within 10 years most patients had biochemical recurrence (BCR-free probability 22%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-37%). However, the probability of disease-specific survival at 10 years was 84% (95% CI 66-93%) and overall survival was 78% (95% CI 60-89%). The CHT group had higher-risk features than the comparison group (123 patients), with an almost doubled risk of calculated preoperative 5-year BCR (69% vs 36%, P < 0.01). After adjusting for these imbalances the CHT group had trends toward improvement in BCR (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, 95% CI 0.43-1.34; P = 0.3) and metastasis-free survival (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.24-1.29; P = 0.2) although these were not statistically significant. Neoadjuvant CHT followed by RP was associated with lower rates of BCR and metastasis compared with the RP-only group; however, these results were not statistically significant. Because this treatment strategy has known harms and unproven benefit, this strategy should only be instituted in the setting of a clinical trial. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Borderline personality disorder subscale (Chinese version) of the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV axis II personality disorders: a validation study in Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H M; Chow, L Y

    2011-06-01

    Borderline personality disorder is an important but under-recognised clinical entity, for which there are only a few available diagnostic instruments in the Chinese language. None has been tested for its psychometric properties in the Cantonese-speaking population in Hong Kong. The present study aimed to assess the validity of the Chinese version of the Borderline Personality Disorder subscale of the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) in Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong Chinese. A convenience sampling method was used. The subjects were seen by a multidisciplinary clinical team, who arrived at a best-estimate diagnosis and then by application of the SCID-II rater using the Chinese version of the Borderline Personality Disorder subscale. The study was carried out at the psychiatric clinic of the Prince of Wales Hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 87 patients of Chinese ethnicity aged 18 to 64 years who attended the clinic in April 2007 were recruited. The aforementioned patient parameters were used to examine the internal consistency, best-estimate clinical diagnosis-SCID diagnosis agreement, sensitivity, and specificity of the Chinese version of the subscale. The Borderline Personality Disorder subscale (Chinese version) of SCID-II had an internal consistency of 0.82 (Cronbach's alpha coefficient), best-estimate clinical diagnosis-SCID diagnosis agreement of 0.82 (kappa), sensitivity of 0.92, and specificity of 0.94. The Borderline Personality Disorder subscale (Chinese version) of the SCID-II rater had reasonable validity when applied to Cantonese-speaking Chinese subjects in Hong Kong.

  11. Joint stability characteristics of the ankle complex in female athletes with histories of lateral ankle sprain, part II: clinical experience using arthrometric measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, John E; Heitman, Robert J; Gurchiek, Larry R; Hollis, J M; Liu, Wei; Pearsall, Albert W

    2014-01-01

    This is part II of a 2-part series discussing stability characteristics of the ankle complex. In part I, we used a cadaver model to examine the effects of sectioning the lateral ankle ligaments on anterior and inversion motion and stiffness of the ankle complex. In part II, we wanted to build on and apply these findings to the clinical assessment of ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with a history of unilateral ankle sprain. To examine ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with reported history of lateral ankle sprain. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory. Twenty-five female college athletes (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 170.2 ± 7.4 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 10.0 kg) with histories of unilateral ankle sprain. All ankles underwent loading with an ankle arthrometer. Ankles were tested bilaterally. The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Anterior displacement of the ankle complex did not differ between the uninjured and sprained ankles (P = .37), whereas ankle-complex rotation was greater for the sprained ankles (P = .03). The sprained ankles had less anterior and inversion end-range stiffness than the uninjured ankles (P ankle-complex laxity and end-range stiffness were detected in ankles with histories of sprain. These results indicate the presence of altered mechanical characteristics in the soft tissues of the sprained ankles.

  12. Guided tissue regeneration and platelet rich growth factor for the treatment of Grade II furcation defects: A randomized double-blinded clinical trial - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenabian, Niloofar; Haghanifar, Sina; Ehsani, Hodis; Zahedi, Ehsan; Haghpanah, Masumeh

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of furcation area defects remained as a challenging issue in periodontal treatments. Regeneration treatment of furcation defects is the most discussed periodontal treatment. Although not completely hopeless in prognosis, the presence of the furcation involvement significantly increases the chance of tooth loss. The current research was conductedeto compare theeadditive effect of combined guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and platelet-rich growth factor (PRGF) on the treatment of furcation bony defects. A randomized, triple-blinded, split-mouth study was designed. It included patients with a moderate to severe chronic periodontitis with bilateral Grade II furcation involvement of first or second mandibular molars. Each side of mouth was randomly allocated for the treatment with either Bio-Gide American Society of Anesthesiologists GTR or a PRGF or PRGF by itself. Plaque index, gingival index, vertical clinical attachment level, vertical probing depth, recession depth (REC), horizontal probing depth, fornix to alveolar crest (FAC), fornix to base of defect (FBD), furcation vertical component and furcation horizontal component (FHC) were recorded. The current research was conducted to compare the additive effect of combined GTR and PRGF on treatment of furcation bony defects. Altman's nomogram, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Friedman test, general linear model, repeated measures, and paired t -test were used as statistical analysis in this research. P PRGF group ( P = 0.02). A significant improvement in the Grade II furcation defects treated with either GTR or PRGF/GTR was noticed. Further large-scale trials are needed to reveal differences of mentioned treatment in more details.

  13. The quantity and quality of complementary and alternative medicine clinical practice guidelines on herbal medicines, acupuncture and spinal manipulation: systematic review and assessment using AGREE II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jeremy Y; Liang, Laurel; Gagliardi, Anna R

    2016-10-29

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is often not disclosed by patients, and can be unfamiliar to health care professionals. This may lead to underuse of beneficial CAM therapies, and overuse of other CAM therapies with little proven benefit or known contraindications. No prior research has thoroughly evaluated the credibility of knowledge-based resources. The purpose of this research was to assess the quantity and quality of CAM guidelines. A systematic review was conducted to identify CAM guidelines. MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were searched in January 2016 from 2003 to 2015. The National Guideline Clearinghouse, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health web site, and two CAM journals were also searched. Eligible guidelines published in English language by non-profit agencies on herbal medicine, acupuncture, or spinal manipulation for adults with any condition were assessed with the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument. From 3,126 unique search results, 17 guidelines (two herbal medicine, three acupuncture, four spinal manipulation, eight mixed CAM therapies) published in 2003 or later and relevant to several clinical conditions were eligible. Scaled domain percentages from highest to lowest were clarity of presentation (85.3 %), scope and purpose (83.3 %), rigour of development (61.2 %), editorial independence (60.1 %), stakeholder involvement (52.0 %) and applicability (20.7 %). Quality varied within and across guidelines. None of the 17 guidelines were recommended by both appraisers; 14 were recommended as Yes or Yes with modifications. Guidelines that scored well could be used by patients and health care professionals as the basis for discussion about the use of these CAM therapies. In future updates, guidelines that achieved variable or lower scores could be improved according to specifications in the AGREE II instrument, and with insight from a large number of resources that are available

  14. Evaluation of glycodendron and synthetically-modified dextran clearing agents for multi-step targeting of radioisotopes for molecular imaging and radioimmunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Yoo, Barney; Boughdad, Sarah; Punzalan, Blesida; Yang, Guangbin; Dilhas, Anna; Torchon, Geralda; Pu, Jun; Axworthy, Don B.; Zanzonico, Pat; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Larson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    A series of N-acetylgalactosamine-dendrons (NAG-dendrons) and dextrans bearing biotin moieties were compared for their ability to complex with and sequester circulating bispecific anti-tumor antibody (scFv4) streptavidin (SA) fusion protein (scFv4-SA) in vivo, to improve tumor to normal tissue concentration ratios for targeted radioimmunotherapy and diagnosis. Specifically, a total of five NAG-dendrons employing a common synthetic scaffold structure containing 4, 8, 16, or 32 carbohydrate residues and a single biotin moiety were prepared (NAGB), and for comparative purposes, a biotinylated-dextran with average molecular weight (MW) of 500 kD was synthesized from amino-dextran (DEXB). One of the NAGB compounds, CA16, has been investigated in humans; our aim was to determine if other NAGB analogs (e.g. CA8 or CA4) were bioequivalent to CA16 and/or better suited as MST reagents. In vivo studies included dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging of 124I-labelled-scFv4-SA clearance and dual-label biodistribution studies following multi-step targeting (MST) directed at subcutaneous (s.c.) human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts in mice. The MST protocol consists of three injections: first, a bispecific antibody specific for an anti-tumor associated glycoprotein (TAG-72) single chain genetically-fused with SA (scFv4-SA); second, CA16 or other clearing agent; and third, radiolabeled biotin. We observed using PET imaging of 124I-labelled-scFv4-SA clearance that the spatial arrangement of ligands conjugated to NAG (i.e. biotin) can impact the binding to antibody in circulation and subsequent liver uptake of the NAG-antibody complex. Also, NAGB CA32-LC or CA16-LC can be utilized during MST to achieve comparable tumor- to-blood ratios and absolute tumor uptake seen previously with CA16. Finally, DEXB was equally effective as NAGB CA32-LC at lowering scFv4-SA in circulation, but at the expense of reducing absolute tumor uptake of radiolabeled biotin. PMID:24219178

  15. α-Imaging Confirmed Efficient Targeting of CD₄₅-Positive Cells After ²¹¹At-Radioimmunotherapy for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, Sophia; Miller, Brian W.; Back, Tom; Santos, E. B.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Knoblaugh, E.; Frayo, Shani; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Storb, Rainer; Press, O. W.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Pagel, John M.; Sandmaier, B. M.

    2015-09-03

    Alpha-radioimmunotherapy (α-RIT) targeting CD45 may substitute for total body irradiation in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) preparative regimens for lymphoma. Our goal was to optimize the anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody (MAb; CA12.10C12) protein dose for astatine-²¹¹(²¹¹At)-RIT, extending the analysis to include intra-organ ²¹¹At activity distribution and α-imaging-based small-scale dosimetry, along with imunohistochemical staining. Methods: Eight normal dogs were injected with either 0.75 (n=5) or 1.00 mg/kg (n=3) of ²¹¹At-B10-CA12.10C12 (11.5–27.6 MBq/kg). Two were euthanized and necropsied 19–22 hours postinjection (p.i.), and six received autologous HCT three days after ²¹¹At-RIT, following lymph node and bone marrow biopsies at 2–4 and/or 19 hours p.i. Blood was sampled to study toxicity and clearance; CD45 targeting was evaluated by flow cytometry. ²¹¹At localization and small scale dosimetry were assessed using two α-imaging : α-camera and iQID. Results: Uptake of ²¹¹At was highest in spleen (0.31–0.61 %IA/g), lymph nodes (0.02–0.16 %IA/g), liver (0.11–0.12 %IA/g), and marrow (0.06–0.08 %IA/g). Lymphocytes in blood and marrow were efficiently targeted using either MAb dose. Lymph nodes remained unsaturated, but displayed targeted ²¹¹At localization in T lymphocyte-rich areas. Absorbed doses to blood, marrow, and lymph nodes were estimated at 3.9, 3.0, and 4.2 Gy/210 MBq, respectively. All transplanted dogs experienced transient hepatic toxicity. Liver enzyme levels were temporarily elevated in 5 of 6 dogs; 1 treated with 1.00 mg MAb/kg developed ascites and was euthanized 136 days after HCT. Conclusion: ²¹¹At-anti-CD45 RIT with 0.75 mg MAb/kg efficiently targeted blood and marrow without severe toxicity. Dosimetry calculations and observed radiation-induced effects indicated that sufficient ²¹¹At-B10-CA12.10C12 localization was achieved for efficient conditioning for HCT.

  16. The impact of radiotherapy dose and other treatment-related and clinical factors on in-field control in stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Sachin S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Lynch, James W.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess local (in-field) disease control, identify potential prognostic factors, and elucidate the optimal radiotherapy dose in various clinical settings of Stage I and II nonHodgkin's lymphoma (non-CNS). Materials and Methods: A total of 285 consecutive patients with Stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with curative intent, including 159 with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 126 with combined-modality therapy (CMT). Of these, 72 patients had low-grade lymphomas (LGL), 92 had intermediate or high-grade lymphomas (I/HGL), and 21 had unclassified lymphomas. Clinical and treatment variables with potential prognostic significance for in-field disease control, freedom from relapse (FFR), and absolute survival (AS) were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5-, 10-, and 20-year actuarial AS rates were 73%, 46%, and 33% for patients with LGL and 64%, 44%, and 18% for patients with I/HGL, respectively. The 5-, 10-, and 20-year actuarial FFR rates were 62%, 59%, and 49% for patients with LGL and 66%, 57%, and 57% for patients with I/HGL, respectively. Significant prognostic factors identified by the multivariate analysis were age, tumor size, and histology for AS; tumor size and treatment for FFR; and only tumor size for in-field disease control. There were 95 total failures, with only 12 occurring infield. Most failures (65%) were in contiguous unirradiated sites. All 4 in-field failures in patients with LGL occurred after RT doses 6 cm, and 4 with less than a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy. Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that the overwhelming problem in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is not in-field failure but, rather, failure in contiguous unirradiated sites. A dose of 20-25 Gy may be sufficient for small-volume LGL of the orbit. A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for LGL in general, as well as for patients with nonbulky (≤ 6 cm) I/HGL treated with CMT who have a CR. However, patients with I

  17. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and acute toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a Clinical Trial Application for a Phase I/II clinical trial of 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Karen; Chan, Conrad; Done, Susan J.; Levine, Mark N.; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: 111 In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab is a novel imaging probe for detecting changes in HER2 expression in breast cancer (BC) caused by treatment with trastuzumab (Herceptin). Our aim was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, normal tissue biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and acute toxicity of 111 In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab in non-tumor bearing mice in order to obtain regulatory approval to advance this agent to a first-in-humans Phase I/II clinical trial. Methods: Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies were performed in non-tumor bearing Balb/c mice injected i.v. with 111 In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab (2.5 MBq; 2 μg). The cumulative number of disintegrations per source organ derived from the biodistribution data was used to predict the radiation absorbed doses in humans using OLINDA/EXM software. Acute toxicity was studied at two weeks post-injection of 111 In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab (1.0 MBq, 20 μg) with comparison to control mice injected with unlabeled BzDTPA-pertuzumab (20 μg) or Sodium Chloride Injection USP. The dose of 111 In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab corresponded to 23-times the human radioactivity dose and 10-times the protein dose on a MBq/kg and mg/kg basis, respectively. Toxicity was assessed by monitoring body mass, complete blood cell count (CBC), hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Hb), serum creatinine (SCr) and alanine aminotransferease (ALT) and by histopathological examination of tissues at necropsy. Results: 111 In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab exhibited a biphasic elimination from the blood with a distribution half-life (t 1/2 α) of 3.8 h and an elimination half-life (t 1/2 β) of 228.2 h. The radiopharmaceutical was distributed mainly in the blood, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys and spleen. The projected whole-body radiation absorbed dose in humans was 0.05 mSv/MBq corresponding to a total of 16.8 mSv for three separate administrations of 111 In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab (111 MBq) planned for the Phase I/II trial. There were slight changes in Hb and SCr levels associated with

  18. Preparation and radiolabeling of a lyophilized (kit) formulation of DOTA-rituximab with ⁹⁰Y and ¹¹¹In for domestic radioimmunotherapy and radioscintigraphy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Nazila; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Khalaj, Ali; Johari-Daha, Fariba; Yavari, Kamal; Sabzevari, Omid; Khanchi, Ali Reza; Akhlaghi, Mehdi

    2014-07-29

    On the basis of results of our previous investigations on 90Y-DTPA-rituximab and in order to fulfil national demands to radioimmunoconjugates for radioscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL), preparation and radiolabeling of a lyophilized formulation (kit) of DOTA-rituximab with 111In and 90Y was investigated. 111In and 90Y with high radiochemical and radionuclide purity were prepared by 112Cd (p,2n)111In nuclear reaction and a locally developed 90Sr/90Y generator, respectively. DOTA-rituximab immunoconjugates were prepared by the reaction of solutions of p-SCN-Bz-DOTA and rituximab in carbonate buffer (pH = 9.5) and the number of DOTA per molecule of conjugates were determined by transchelation reaction between DOTA and arsenaso yttrium(III) complex. DOTA-rituximab immunoconjugates were labeled with 111In and 90Y and radioimmunoconjugates were checked for radiochemical purity by chromatography methods and for immunoreactivity by cell-binding assay using Raji cell line. The stability of radiolabeled conjugate with the approximate number of 7 DOTA molecules per one rituximab molecule which was prepared in moderate yield and showed moderate immunoreactivity, compared to two other prepared radioimmunoconjugates, was determined at different time intervals and against EDTA and human serum by chromatography methods and reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. The biodistribution of the selected radioimmunoconjugate in rats was determined by measurement of the radioactivity of different organs after sacrificing the animals by ether asphyxiation. The radioimmunoconjugate with approximate DOTA/rituximab molar ratio of 7 showed stability after 24 h at room temperature, after 96 h at 4°C, as the lyophilized formulation after six months storage and against EDTA and human serum. This radioimmunoconjugate had a biodistribution profile similar to that of 90Y-ibritumomab, which is approved by FDA for radioimmunotherapy of NHL

  19. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial : A Treatment Guideline for Targeted Near-Infrared-Derived Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation versus Standard Treatment in Extremely Preterm Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Hagmann, Cornelia; Hellstroem-Westas, Lena; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Lemmers, Petra; Naulaers, Gunnar; Pichler, Gerhard; Roll, Claudia; van Bel, Frank; van Oeveren, Wim; Skoog, Maria; Wolf, Martin; Austin, Topun

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rSto(2)) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rSto(2) can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises that the

  20. Efficacy and safety of thalidomide for the treatment of severe recurrent epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: results of a prospective phase II clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Rosangela; Quaglia, Federica; Klersy, Caherine; Pagella, Fabio; Ornati, Federica; Chu, Francesco; Matti, Elina; Spinozzi, Giuseppe; Plumitallo, Sara; Grignani, Pierangela; Olivieri, Carla; Bastia, Raffaella; Bellistri, Francesca; Danesino, Cesare; Benazzo, Marco; Balduini, Carlo L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disease that leads to multiregional angiodysplasia. Severe recurrent epistaxis is the most common presentation, frequently leading to severe anemia. Multiple therapeutic approaches have been tried, but they are largely palliative with variable results.We aimed to assess the efficacy of thalidomide in reducing epistaxis in patients with HHT refractory to standard therapy. Methods HHT patients with severe recurrent epistaxis refractory to mini-invasive surgical procedures were included in an open label, phase II, prospective, non-randomized, single-centre study. Thalidomide was administered at a starting dose of 50 mg/day orally. In the event of no response, thalidomide dosage was increased by 50 mg/day every four weeks until response to a maximum dose of 200 mg/day. After response achievement, patients were treated for eight to16 additional weeks. Monthly follow-up was based on the epistaxis severity score and transfusion need, with adverse events being reported (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01485224). Findings Thirty-one patients, mean age 62∙6 (SD 11∙1) years, were enrolled (median follow-up 15∙9 months, 25th-75th 10∙1-22∙3). Treatment induced cessation of bleeding in three cases (9∙7%) and a significant decrease in all epistaxis parameters in 28 cases (90∙3%). Twenty-five patients (80∙7%) obtained remission with 50 mg/day of thalidomide, five (16∙1%) with 100 mg/day and one (3∙2%) with 150 mg/day. Treatment significantly increased hemoglobin levels (pepistaxis in HHT patients, allowing for a rapid, often durable clinical improvement. Funding Telethon Foundation PMID:26686256

  1. Evaluation of plitidepsin in patients with primary myelofibrosis and post polycythemia vera/essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis: results of preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardanani, A; Tefferi, A; Guglielmelli, P; Bogani, C; Bartalucci, N; Rodríguez, J; Extremera, S; Pérez, I; Alfaro, V; Vannucchi, A M

    2015-01-01

    Previous data established that plitidepsin, a cyclic depsipeptide, exerted activity in a mouse model of myelofibrosis (MF). New preclinical experiments reported herein found that low nanomolar plitidepsin concentrations potently inhibited the proliferation of JAK2V617F-mutated cell lines and reduced colony formation by CD34+ cells of individuals with MF, at least in part through modulation of p27 levels. Cells of MF patients had significantly reduced p27 content, that were modestly increased upon plitidepsin exposure. On these premise, an exploratory phase II trial evaluated plitidepsin 5 mg/m 2 3-h intravenous infusion administered on days 1 and 15 every 4 weeks (q4wk). Response rate (RR) according to the International Working Group for Myelofibrosis Research and Treatment consensus criteria was 9.1% (95% CI, 0.2–41.3%) in 11 evaluable patients during the first trial stage. The single responder achieved a red cell transfusion independence and stable disease was reported in nine additional patients (81.8%). Eight patients underwent a short-lasting improvement of splenomegaly. In conclusion, plitidepsin 5 mg/m 2 3-h infusion q4wk was well tolerated but had a modest activity in patients with primary, post-polycythaemia vera or post-essential thrombocythaemia MF. Therefore, this trial was prematurely terminated and we concluded that further clinical trials with plitidepsin as single agent in MF are not warranted

  2. Assessment of pulmonary antibodies with induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage induced by nasal vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a clinical phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freihorst Joachim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a desirable albeit challenging strategy for prevention of airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We assessed the immunogenicity of a nasal vaccine based on the outer membrane proteins F and I from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lower airways in a phase I/II clinical trial. Methods N = 12 healthy volunteers received 2 nasal vaccinations with an OprF-OprI gel as a primary and a systemic (n = 6 or a nasal booster vaccination (n = 6. Antibodies were assessed in induced sputum (IS, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, and in serum. Results OprF-OprI-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were found in both BAL and IS at comparable rates, but differed in the predominant isotype. IgA antibodies in IS did not correlate to the respective serum levels. Pulmonary antibodies were detectable in all vaccinees even 1 year after the vaccination. The systemic booster group had higher IgG levels in serum. However, the nasal booster group had the better long-term response with bronchial antibodies of both isotypes. Conclusion The nasal OprF-OprI-vaccine induces a lasting antibody response at both, systemic and airway mucosal site. IS is a feasible method to non-invasively assess bronchial antibodies. A further optimization of the vaccination schedule is warranted.

  3. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study: a phase-II randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya Carlos J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy produces a significant decrease in HIV-1 replication and allows an increase in the CD4 T-cell count, leading to a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and mortality. However, the cost, side effects and complexity of antiretroviral regimens have underscored the immediate need for additional therapeutic approaches. Statins exert pleiotropic effects through a variety of mechanisms, among which there are several immunoregulatory effects, related and unrelated to their cholesterol-lowering activity that can be useful to control HIV-1 infection. Methods/design Randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled, single-center, phase-II clinical trial. One hundred and ten chronically HIV-1-infected patients, older than 18 years and naïve for antirretroviral therapy (i.e., without prior or current management with antiretroviral drugs will be enrolled at the outpatient services from the most important centres for health insurance care in Medellin-Colombia. The interventions will be lovastatin (40 mg/day, orally, for 12 months; 55 patients or placebo (55 patients. Our primary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on viral replication. The secondary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on CD4+ T-cell count in peripheral blood. As tertiary aims we will explore differences in CD8+ T-cell count, expression of activation markers (CD38 and HLA-DR on CD4 and CD8 T cells, cholesterol metabolism, LFA-1/ICAM-1 function, Rho GTPases function and clinical evolution between treated and not treated HIV-1-infected individuals. Discussion Preliminary descriptive studies have suggested that statins (lovastatin may have anti HIV-1 activity and that their administration is safe, with the potential effect of controlling HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals who had not received antiretroviral medications. Considering that there is limited clinical data available on

  4. Phase II clinical trial of whole-brain irradiation plus three-dimensional conformal boost with concurrent topotecan for brain metastases from lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Xiao-hui; Liu, Miao-ling; Lin, Qiang; Ren, Xiao-cang; Liu, Yue-e; Chen, Xue-ji; Wang, Dong-ying; Wang, Yong-qiang; Cao, Bin; Li, Zhi-gang

    2013-01-01

    Patients with brain metastases from lung cancer have poor prognoses and short survival time, and they are often excluded from clinical trials. Whole-cranial irradiation is considered to be the standard treatment, but its efficacy is not satisfactory. The purpose of this phase II clinical trial was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and safety of the treatment of whole-brain irradiation plus three-dimensional conformal boost combined with concurrent topotecan for the patients with brain metastases from lung cancer. Patients with brain metastasis from lung cancer received concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy: conventional fractionated whole-brain irradiation, 2 fields/time, 1 fraction/day, 2 Gy/fraction, 5 times/week, and DT 40 Gy/20 fractions; for the patients with ≤ 3 lesions with diameter ≥ 2 cm, a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal localised boost was given to increase the dosage to 56–60 Gy; and during radiotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy with topotecan was given (the chemoradiotherapy group, CRT). The patients with brain metastasis from lung cancer during the same period who received radiotherapy only were selected as the controls (the radiotherapy-alone group, RT). From March 2009 to March 2012, both 38 patients were enrolled into two groups. The median progression-free survival(PFS) time , the 1- and 2-year PFS rates of CRT group and RT group were 6 months, 42.8%, 21.6% and 3 months, 11.6%, 8.7% (χ 2 = 6.02, p = 0.014), respectively. The 1- and 2-year intracranial lesion control rates of CRT and RT were 75.9% , 65.2% and 41.6% , 31.2% (χ 2 = 3.892, p = 0.049), respectively. The 1- and 2-year overall survival rates (OS) of CRT and RT were 50.8% , 37.9% and 40.4% , 16.5% (χ 2 = 1.811, p = 0.178), respectively. The major side effects were myelosuppression and digestive toxicities, but no differences were observed between the two groups. Compared with radiotherapy alone, whole-brain irradiation plus 3-D conformal boost irradiation and concurrent

  5. The influence of psychoeducation on regulating biological rhythm in a sample of patients with bipolar II disorder: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria AD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Augusto Duarte Faria,1 Luciano Dias de Mattos Souza,2 Taiane de Azevedo Cardoso,2 Karen Amaral Tavares Pinheiro,2 Ricardo Tavares Pinheiro,2 Ricardo Azevedo da Silva,2 Karen Jansen21Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande – FURG, Rio Grande, RS, Brazil; 2Health and Behavior Postgraduate Program, Universidade Católica de Pelotas – UCPEL, Pelotas, RS, BrazilIntroduction: Changes in biological rhythm are among the various characteristics of bipolar disorder, and have long been associated with the functional impairment of the disease. There are only a few viable options of psychosocial interventions that deal with this specific topic; one of them is psychoeducation, a model that, although it has been used by practitioners for some time, only recently have studies shown its efficacy in clinical practice.Aim: To assess if patients undergoing psychosocial intervention in addition to a pharmacological treatment have better regulation of their biological rhythm than those only using medication.Method: This study is a randomized clinical trial that compares a standard medication intervention to an intervention combined with drugs and psychoeducation. The evaluation of the biological rhythm was made using the Biological Rhythm Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, an 18-item scale divided in four areas (sleep, activity, social rhythm, and eating pattern. The combined intervention consisted of medication and a short-term psychoeducation model summarized in a protocol of six individual sessions of 1 hour each.Results: The sample consisted of 61 patients with bipolar II disorder, but during the study, there were 14 losses to follow-up. Therefore, the final sample consisted of 45 individuals (26 for standard intervention and 19 for combined. The results showed that, in this sample and time period evaluated, the combined treatment of medication and psychoeducation had no statistically significant impact on the

  6. Country report: Italy (Chinol). Pre-clinical evaluation of a new biotin-DOTA conjugate labeled with 90Y for application in pretargeting clinical protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinol, Marco

    2010-01-01

    In the attempt to improve the therapeutic efficacy of radiolabeled mAbs in cancer radioimmunotherapy, various studies have examined the concept of tumor pretargeting. The so called three-step pretargeting technique, employing the avidin–biotin system, was applied in phase I-II clinical trials showing low toxicity and therapeutic efficacy. The final step of the pretargeting protocols consists in the systemic injection of radiolabeled biotin. The worldwide recognized “successful association” is between 90 Y and the tetraazamacrocycle DOTA chelator chemically bound to biotin. Improvements in the structure of the biotin-DOTA conjugate have been reported by our group following a novel approach which simplified the synthetic pattern by reducing the amide group to a methylene group, thus transforming the amide into a secondary amine without affecting the length of the biotin side arm. Preliminary in-vitro experiments, previously published by our group, indicated the potential of the new conjugate. Based on our previous experience with avidin-based pre-targeting followed 90 Y-DOTA-biotin in the locoregional treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis and malignant glioma suggested that similar radionuclide therapy might be worth investigating as a partial replacement of external beam radiotherapy in breast cancer. We have developed IART® the Intra-operative Avidination for Radionuclide Therapy that relies on the avidin-biotin binding system. In fact, the “avidination” of the anatomical area of the tumor with native avidin, directly injected by the surgeon into and around the tumor bed, provides a target for the radiolabeled biotin intravenously (iv) injected one day later. In order to optimize the overall strategy, further efforts were needed to optimize the use of the labeled new biotin conjugate and to elucidate its chemical and biological properties. In the first 18 months of this CRP, the pre-clinical evaluation of this new reduced biotinamidohexylamine

  7. Country report: Italy (Chinol). Pre-clinical evaluation of a new biotin-DOTA conjugate labeled with {sup 90}Y for application in pretargeting clinical protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinol, Marco

    2010-07-01

    In the attempt to improve the therapeutic efficacy of radiolabeled mAbs in cancer radioimmunotherapy, various studies have examined the concept of tumor pretargeting. The so called three-step pretargeting technique, employing the avidin–biotin system, was applied in phase I-II clinical trials showing low toxicity and therapeutic efficacy. The final step of the pretargeting protocols consists in the systemic injection of radiolabeled biotin. The worldwide recognized “successful association” is between {sup 90}Y and the tetraazamacrocycle DOTA chelator chemically bound to biotin. Improvements in the structure of the biotin-DOTA conjugate have been reported by our group following a novel approach which simplified the synthetic pattern by reducing the amide group to a methylene group, thus transforming the amide into a secondary amine without affecting the length of the biotin side arm. Preliminary in-vitro experiments, previously published by our group, indicated the potential of the new conjugate. Based on our previous experience with avidin-based pre-targeting followed {sup 90}Y-DOTA-biotin in the locoregional treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis and malignant glioma suggested that similar radionuclide therapy might be worth investigating as a partial replacement of external beam radiotherapy in breast cancer. We have developed IART® the Intra-operative Avidination for Radionuclide Therapy that relies on the avidin-biotin binding system. In fact, the “avidination” of the anatomical area of the tumor with native avidin, directly injected by the surgeon into and around the tumor bed, provides a target for the radiolabeled biotin intravenously (iv) injected one day later. In order to optimize the overall strategy, further efforts were needed to optimize the use of the labeled new biotin conjugate and to elucidate its chemical and biological properties. In the first 18 months of this CRP, the pre-clinical evaluation of this new reduced biotinamidohexylamine

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well ... confirm how well treatments work, further examine side effects, and compare new treatments with other available treatments. ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... new treatments in small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well treatments work and further review these treatments for safety. Phase ...

  10. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Valine (2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid), is a chemical compound containing .... Stability constant (Kf). Gibb's free energy. ) (. 1. −. ∆. Mol. JG. [CuL2(H2O)2] ... synthesis and characterization of Co(ii), Ni(ii), Cu (II), and Zn(ii) complexes with ...

  11. A phase II clinical trial of a dental health education program delivered by aboriginal health workers to prevent early childhood caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinkhorn Fiona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early Childhood Caries (ECC is a widespread problem in Australian Aboriginal communities causing severe pain and sepsis. In addition dental services are difficult to access for many Aboriginal children and trying to obtain care can be stressful for the parents. The control of dental caries has been identified as a key indictor in the reduction of Indigenous disadvantage. Thus, there is a need for new approaches to prevent ECC, which reflect the cultural norms of Aboriginal communities. Methods/Design This is a Phase II single arm trial designed to gather information on the effectiveness of a dental health education program for Aboriginal children aged 6 months, followed over 2 years. The program will deliver advice from Aboriginal Health Workers on tooth brushing, diet and the use of fluoride toothpaste to Aboriginal families. Six waves of data collection will be conducted to enable estimates of change in parental knowledge and their views on the acceptability of the program. The Aboriginal Health Workers will also be interviewed to record their views on the acceptability and program feasibility. Clinical data on the child participants will be recorded when they are 30 months old and compared with a reference population of similar children when the study began. Latent variable modeling will be used to interpret the intervention effects on disease outcome. Discussion The research project will identify barriers to the implementation of a family centered Aboriginal oral health strategy, as well as the development of evidence to assist in the planning of a Phase III cluster randomized study. Trial registration ACTRN12612000712808

  12. [Comparison of the clinical performance of the ECLusys HBsAg II assay with the Lumipulse f and HISCL 2000-i HBsAg screening assays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Aya; Iwahara, Kunihiro; Suga, Yasuyuki; Uchiyama, Sachinori; Maekawa, Masato

    2012-02-01

    We compared the ECLusys HBsAgII (ECL HBsAg) assay to the Lumipulse Forte (LPf HBsAg) and HISCL (HIS HBsAg) assays. Measurement of dilution panels for which the WHO HBsAg international reference panel was the parent specimen revealed that the ECL and HIS assays enabled detection to a theoretical level of 0.04 IU/mL, whereas the LPf assay enabled detection to a level of 0.08 IU/mL. In a specificity test using high RF positive specimens (n = 33), pregnancy specimens (n = 35), cytomegalovirus antibody positive specimens (n = 36), and high M protein positive specimens (n = 21) that were confirmed negative for HBsAg by the LPf assay, negative results were obtained for all specimens on the HIS assay, but the ECL assay yielded a positive result for one of the high RF positive specimens. This individual was suggested on further testing to be an HBV carrier who was strongly positive for HBc antibody. In HBsAg mutants detection test, the detection rate was 92.3% with the ECL assay and 69.2% with the HIS assay. In a correlation test using routinely collected clinical specimens (n = 155), including positive stock specimens, aside from the one case where the LPf assay gave a negative result but both the ECL and HIS assays gave positive results, all of the results were consistent for all specimens. The above results confirmed that the ECL assay is both highly sensitive and specific, and also enables a high rate of HBsAg mutant detection.

  13. Comparison of clinical imaging characteristics of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC with 111In-DTPA-octreotide: first result of a prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, M.; Decristoforo, C.; Wenger, M.; Guggenberg, E. von; Moncayo, R.; Mather, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC(Tc-TOC) shows very similar clinical pharmacokinetics compared with 111 In-DTPA-octreotide (In-OCT), the gold standard for somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy, and is a promising agent to image SSTR-positive tumors. Here we present the first results of a phase II trial comparing the clinical value of Tc-TOC in a prospective intra-patient comparison with In-OCT. Until now 26 oncological patients were enrolled in the study after giving informed consent. The patients presented with thyroid adeno-carcinomas (n=5), MW (n=3), GEP-tumors (n=10), carcinoid syndromes with unknown primary lesions (n=4), paragangliomas (n=2) and pituitary tumor (n=2), one of whom due to MEN. Posterior and anterior views and SPECT images of the corresponding ROIs were acquired at 4 hrs and 24 hrs alter injection of 111 MBq of In-OCT (octreoscan(r)). TcTOC was given at a dose of 300-350 MBq and imaging was done at 4 hrs p.i. including whole body planar and SPECT studies. Interpretations of these two sets of planar data were done independently by two different viewers. Final confirmation of suspected lesions was obtained by correlative inspection of matched CT or MR scans. In 7 patients SSTR-scintigraphy was negative with both Tc-TOC and In-OCT. Matching positive scintigraphic results with both tracers were obtained in 17 out of 19 patients. In-OCT failed to detect two CT-positive thoracic lesions in two patients with thyroid cancer, whereby these lesions were seen by Tc-TOC. In this series of patients 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-TOC imaging resulted in equivalent diagnostic information on the SSTR-Status, with advantages of a single acquisition, one day protocol and lower radiation dose. The excellent imaging properties resulted in improved diagnosis in 2 of 26 patients when compared to 111 In-DTPA-octreotide. (author)

  14. The impact of radiotherapy dose and other treatment-related and clinical factors on control of stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in irradiated sites

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    Kamath, Sachin S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Lynch, James W.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To study the effect of radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic parameters on local or in-field (IF) disease control; to identify other treatment-related and clinical factors of potential prognostic significance, and to elucidate the optimal radiotherapy dose in various clinical settings. Materials and Methods: Two hundred eighty-five patients with non-CNS presentations of Stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) were treated with either radiotherapy (RT) alone (n=159) or combined modality therapy (CMT) using induction chemotherapy followed by consolidative RT (n=126). Ninety-three percent (67 of 72 patients) with low grade lymphomas (LGLs) were treated with RT alone. Ninety-two of 213 patients with intermediate/high grade lymphomas (I/HGLs) were treated with RT alone and 121 received CMT. Ninety-one patients (72%) of those receiving CMT were given four or more cycles of chemotherapy; CHOP was the regimen used most often (n=81). The RT treatment volumes included involved field (n=151), extended field (n=123), and comprehensive lymphatic irradiation (n=11). Minimum follow-up was 2 yr (median, 6.5 yr). Variables of potential prognostic significance for IF disease control, freedom from relapse (FFR), and absolute survival (AS) were evaluated by both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5, 10, and 20 yr actuarial AS rates were 73%, 46%, and 33% for patients with LGL; and 64%, 44%, and 18% for patients with I/HGL, respectively. The 5, 10, and 20 yr actuarial FFR rates were 62%, 59%, and 49% for LGLs and 66%, 57%, and 57% for I/HGLs, respectively. Significant prognostic factors identified by the multivariate analysis were age, tumor size, and histology for AS; tumor size and treatment modality (RT alone vs. CMT) for FFR; and only tumor size for IF disease control. Of the 95 total failures, only 12 were IF. Most of the failures (65%) were observed in contiguous unirradiated sites. All 4 IF failures in the LGLs occurred in patients treated

  15. Radioimmunotherapy of small cell lung cancer xenograft mice with a 90Y anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody: Pathological study of effects on tumor and normal organs

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    Fujiwara, K.; Koyama, K.; Kitada, T.; Takahashi, M.; Momose, T.; Suga, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. ROBO1 is a membrane protein that is concerned about axon guidance. It is reported that ROBO1 contributes to tumor metastasis and angio genesis. ROBO1 is specifically expressed at high levels in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). In this study, we performed radioimmunotherapy (RIT) to SCLC models, and analyzed pathological alteration of tumor and organs. Methods: For the biodistribution study, 111 In-DOTA anti-ROBO1 IgG (about 370 kBq, 111 In anti-ROBO1) was injected into NCI-H69 xenograft mice via tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effect, RIT study was performed. 90 Y-DOTA anti-ROBO1 IgG (about 7.4 MBq, 90 Y anti-ROBO1) was injected. The experiments measured tumor volume, mouse weights and blood cell counts periodically. The tumors and organs (liver, kidney, intestine, spleen, femoral and sternum) of mice were obtained, and histopathologic analysis were carried out. Results: as a result of biodistribution study, the specific accumulation in the tumor of 111 In anti-ROBO1 was observed. Liver, kidney, spleen and lung showed comparatively high accumulation of 111 In anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90 Y anti-ROBO1 significantly reduced tumor volume compared with original volume and increased median survival time to 58 days (p<0.01, versus saline, 28 days), while 90 Y anti-ROBO1 induced transient pancytopenia. Histopathologic analysis of tumors and organs further validated the therapeutic efficacy and the systemic toxicity of 90 Y anti-ROBO1. In day 7 when tumor volume reduced to 60% compared with original volume, irreversible nuclear denaturation and fibrosis were observed. The percentage of TUNEL-positive cells increased to 11.4%±5.1 in the day 7 (p<0.01, versus control, 4.14%±1.4), which showed increase of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in the tumor tissues. Normal organs excluding spleen and sternum showed no significant injury. In day 7 post injection, spleen showed transient reduction of hematopoietic cells. Hematopoietic cells in

  16. Hematological toxicity in radioimmunotherapy is predicted both by the computed absorbed whole body dose (cGy) and by the administered dose (mCi)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Sheri D.; Knox, Susan J.; Trisler, Kirk D.; Goris, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has yielded encouraging response rates in patients with recurrent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but myelotoxicity remains the dose limiting factor. Dose optimization is theoretically possible, since a pretreatment biodistribution study with tracer doses allows for a fairly accurate estimate of the whole body (and by implication the bone marrow) dose in patients. It has been shown that the radiation dose as a function of the administered dose varies widely from patient to patient. The pretreatment study could therefore be used to determine the maximum tolerable dose for each individual patient. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the administered dose or the estimated whole body absorbed radiation dose were indeed predictors of bone marrow toxicity. Materials and Methods: We studied two cohorts of patients to determine if the computed integral whole body or marrow dose is predictive of myelotoxicity. The first cohort consisted of 13 patients treated with Yttrium-90 labeled anti-CD20 (2B8) monoclonal antibody. Those patients were treated in a dose escalation protocol, based on the administered dose, without correction for weight or body surface. The computed whole body dose varied from 41 to 129 cGy. The second cohort (6 patients) were treated with Iodine-131 labeled anti-CD20 (B1) antibody. In this group the administered dose was tailored to deliver an estimated 75 cGy whole body dose. The administered dose varied from 54 to 84 mCi of Iodine-131. For each patient, white blood cell count with differential, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet levels were measured before and at regular intervals after RIT was administered. Using linear regression analysis, a relationship between administered dose, absorbed dose and myelotoxicity was determined for each patient cohort. Results: Marrow toxicity was measured by the absolute decrease in white blood cell (DWBC), platelet (DPLAT), and neutrophil (DN) values. In the Yttrium

  17. Synergistic anti-cancer response to chemotherapy and 177Lu-labelled APOMABR radioimmunotherapy in a preclinical model of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudacher, A.H.; Brown, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    after chemotherapy. However, combination of chemotherapy and 177 Lu-labelled APOMAB R had a synergistic response, resulting in a significant decrease in tumour growth and increased survival of tumour-bearing mice. Bio-distribution analysis revealed that radio-labelled APOMAB R targeted tumour tissue, and chemotherapy specifically increased tumour uptake of radio-labelled APOMAB R . Importantly, chemotherapy was not associated with increased normal tissue uptake of radio-labelled APOMAB R . Conclusions: We have demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo that APOMAB R is a dead tumour-cell specific antibody, and that 177 Lu-labelled APOMAB R is a safe and effective anti-cancer treatment when combined with chemotherapy. Given the safety and efficacy of a single cycle of β-radioimmunotherapy, multiple cycles of treatment, the substitution of an alpha-emitting radionuclide, or both, may provide further benefit and increase the anti-tumour response. (authors)

  18. Evaluation of Efficacy of Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-Labeled Fully Human Anti-Transferrin Receptor Monoclonal Antibody in Pancreatic Cancer Mouse Models.

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    Aya Sugyo

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor and the prognosis remains poor. Therefore, development of more effective therapy is needed. We previously reported that 89Zr-labeled TSP-A01, an antibody against transferrin receptor (TfR, is highly accumulated in a pancreatic cancer xenograft, but not in major normal organs. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT with 90Y-TSP-A01 in pancreatic cancer mouse models.TfR expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, MIAPaCa-2 was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. 111In-labeled anti-TfR antibodies (TSP-A01, TSP-A02 were evaluated in vitro by cell binding assay with the three cell lines and by competitive inhibition assay with MIAPaCa-2. In vivo biodistribution was evaluated in mice bearing BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 xenografts. Tumor volumes of BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 were sequentially measured after 90Y-TSP-A01 injection and histological analysis of tumors was conducted.MIAPaCa-2 cells showed the highest TfR expression, followed by AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. 111In-TSP-A01 and 111In-TSP-A02 bound specifically to the three cell lines according to TfR expression. The dissociation constants for TSP-A01, DOTA-TSP-A01, TSP-A02, and DOTA-TSP-A02 were 0.22, 0.28, 0.17, and 0.22 nM, respectively. 111In-TSP-A01 was highly accumulated in tumors, especially in MIAPaCa-2, but this was not true of 111In-TSP-A02. The absorbed dose for 90Y-TSP-A01 was estimated to be 8.3 Gy/MBq to BxPC-3 and 12.4 Gy/MBq to MIAPaCa-2. MIAPaCa-2 tumors treated with 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01 had almost completely disappeared around 3 weeks after injection and regrowth was not observed. Growth of BxPC-3 tumors was inhibited by 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01, but the tumor size was not reduced.90Y-TSP-A01 treatment achieved an almost complete response in MIAPaCa-2 tumors, whereas it merely inhibited the growth of BxPC-3 tumors. 90Y-TSP-A01 is a promising RIT agent for pancreatic