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Sample records for radiography computed tomography

  1. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  2. Conventional radiography and computed tomography of cardiac assist devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Schertler, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wilhelm, Markus J.; Lachat, Mario [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-09-15

    Patients intended for circulatory support by cardiac assist devices (CAD) usually suffer from end-stage acute or chronic heart failure. Since the introduction of CAD in 1963 by DeBakey and coworkers, the systems have gone through a substantial evolution and have been increasingly used in the intervening decades. The spectrum of CAD includes a variety of systems serving to assist the systolic function of the left ventricle, the right ventricle, or both. Conventional radiography and multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) are the most commonly used radiological techniques for imaging patients with a CAD. CT is very useful for evaluating CAD systems by using both two- and three-dimensional reconstructions of the volumetric data sets. The two techniques together allow for the comprehensive assessment of patients with devices by imaging the in- and outflow cannulae, the anastomoses, the position of the pump, as well as associated complications. A close collaboration with cardiac surgeons with expertise in the field of circulatory support is deemed necessary for adequate image interpretation. This article describes the technical diversity of the currently available CAD systems. The imaging characteristics on conventional radiography and multislice spiral CT as well as the typical complications of their use are demonstrated. (orig.)

  3. Computed Tomography and Computed Radiography of late Bronze Age Cremation Urns from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvig, Lise Lock; Lynnerup, Niels; Amsgaard Ebsen, Jannie

    2012-01-01

    To improve methods used to study prehistoric cremation rituals, cremation urns from the Danish late Bronze Age were examined using Computed Tomography and Computed Radiography (Digital X-ray). During microexcavation, the digital images were used as registration tool. Our results suggest...

  4. Comparison of computed tomography and radiography for detecting changes induced by malignant nasal neoplasia in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.D.; Beck, E.R.; LeCouteur, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of computed tomography and radiography to detect changes associated with nasal neoplasia was compared in dogs. Eighteen areas or anatomic structures were evaluated in 21 dogs for changes indicative of neoplasia. Computed tomography was superior (P < or = 0.05) to radiography for detecting changes in 14 of 18 areas. Radiography was not superior for detecting changes in any structure or area. Computed tomography reveals vital information not always detected radiographically to assist in providing a prognosis and in planning treatment for nasal neoplasms in dogs

  5. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) Product Improvement Plan (PIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Roney; Bob Pink; Karen Wendt; Robert Seifert; Mike Smith

    2010-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing and deploying x-ray inspection systems for chemical weapons containers for the past 12 years under the direction of the Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM). In FY-10 funding was provided to advance the capabilities of these systems through the DRCT (Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography) Product Improvement Plan (PIP), funded by the PMNSCM. The DRCT PIP identified three research tasks; end user study, detector evaluation and DRCT/PINS integration. Work commenced in February, 2010. Due to the late start and the schedule for field inspection of munitions at various sites, it was not possible to spend sufficient field time with operators to develop a complete end user study. We were able to interact with several operators, principally Mr. Mike Rowan who provided substantial useful input through several discussions and development of a set of field notes from the Pueblo, CO field mission. We will be pursuing ongoing interactions with field personnel as opportunities arise in FY-11.

  6. Internal anatomy of the hornbill casque described by radiography, contrast radiography, and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Kathryn C

    2007-03-01

    Hornbills are distinguished from most other avian taxa by the presence of a casque on the dorsal maxillary beak, which, in all but 1 of the 54 extant hornbill species, is described as essentially an air-filled cavity enclosed by minimal cancellous bone. The external casque has been described in detail, but little has been described about its internal anatomy and the communications between the casque and the paranasal sinuses. In this study, 10 intact casque and skull specimens of 7 hornbill species were collected opportunistically at necropsy. The anatomy of the casque and the skull for each of the specimens was examined by radiography, contrast radiography, and computed tomography. After imaging, 8 specimens were submitted for osteologic preparation to directly visualize the casque and the skull interior. Through this standardized review, the baseline anatomy of the internal casque was described, including identification of a novel casque sinus within the paranasal sinus system. These observations will assist clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the casque in hornbill species.

  7. Real-time radiography, digital radiography, and computed tomography for nonintrusive waste drum characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Roberson, G.P.

    1994-07-01

    We are investigating and developing the application of x-ray nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and gamma-ray nondestructive assay (NDA) methods to nonintrusively characterize 208-liter (55-gallon) mixed waste drums. Mixed wastes contain both hazardous and radioactive materials. We are investigating the use of x-ray NDE methods to verify the content of documented waste drums and determine if they can be used to identify hazardous and nonconforming materials. These NDE methods are also being used to help waste certification and hazardous waste management personnel at LLNL to verify/confirm and/or determine the contents of waste. The gamma-ray NDA method is used to identify the intrinsic radioactive source(s) and to accurately quantify its strength. The NDA method may also be able to identify some hazardous materials such as heavy metals. Also, we are exploring techniques to combine both NDE and NDA data sets to yield the maximum information from these nonintrusive, waste-drum characterization methods. In this paper, we report an our x-ray NDE R ampersand D activities, while our gamma-ray NDA activities are reported elsewhere in the proceedings. We have developed a data, acquisition scanner for x-ray NDE real-time radiography (RTR), as well as digital radiography transmission computed tomography (TCT) along with associated computational techniques for image reconstruction, analysis, and display. We are using this scanner and real-waste drums at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In this paper, we discuss some issues associated with x-ray imaging, describe the design construction of an inexpensive NDE drum scanner, provide representative DR and TCT results of both mock- and real-waste drums, and end with a summary of our efforts and future directions. The results of these scans reveal that RTR, DR, and CT imaging techniques can be used in concert to provide valuable information about the interior of low-level-, transuranic-, and mock-waste drums without

  8. Computed tomography and plain radiography in experimental fracture healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Goldstein, S.A.; Ku, J.; Smith, P.; Matthews, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the relative contribution of plain radiographs and computed tomography to the assessment of fracture healing under experimental circumstances. In 15 sheep, we performed midshaft femoral osteotomies and internal fixation of the resultant segmental fractures. Radiographs were obtained preoperatively and immediately postoperatively. Animals were sacrificed at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 24 weeks, and 36 weeks after surgery, and the femoral specimens radiographed. After removal of the internal fixation devices, computed tomographic scans of the specimens were performed. Computed tomography may be of value in the evaluation of fractures of long bones in those cases in which clinical examination and plain radiographs fail to give adequate information as to the status of healing. (orig./SHA)

  9. Rib Radiography versus Chest Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

     The accurate diagnosis of rib fractures is important in chest trauma. Diagnostic images following chest trauma are usually obtained via chest X-ray, chest computed tomography, or rib radiography. This study evaluated the diagnostic characteristics of rib radiography and chest computed tomography.  Seventy-five rib fracture patients who underwent both chest computed tomography and rib radiography between April 2008 and December 2013 were included. Rib radiographs, centered on the site of pain, were taken from two directions. Chest computed tomography was performed using a 16-row multidetector scanner with 5-mm slice-pitch without overlap, and axial images were visualized in a bone window.  In total, 217 rib fractures were diagnosed in 75 patients. Rib radiography missed 43 rib fractures in 24 patients. The causes were overlap with organs in 15 cases, trivial fractures in 21 cases, and injury outside the imaging range in 7 cases. Left lower rib fractures were often missed due to overlap with the heart, while middle and lower rib fractures were frequently not diagnosed due to overlap with abdominal organs. Computed tomography missed 21 rib fractures in 17 patients. The causes were horizontal fractures in 10 cases, trivial fractures in 9 cases, and insufficient breath holding in 1 case.  In rib radiography, overlap with organs and fractures outside the imaging range were characteristic reasons for missed diagnoses. In chest computed tomography, horizontal rib fractures and insufficient breath holding were often responsible. We should take these challenges into account when diagnosing rib fractures. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Diagnostic Imaging of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Neonatal Foals: Radiography and Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Kara M; Joslyn, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an essential role in the diagnosis and monitoring of lower respiratory disease in neonatal foals. Radiography is most widely available to equine practitioners and is the primary modality that has been used for the characterization of respiratory disease in foals. Computed tomography imaging, although still limited in availability to the general practitioner, offers advantages over radiography and has been used diagnostically in neonatal foals with respiratory disease. Recognition of appropriate imaging protocols and patient-associated artifacts is critical for accurate image interpretation regardless of the modality used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heavy-ion radiography and heavy-ion computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; McFarland, E.W.; Tobias, C.a.

    1982-02-01

    Heavy-ion projection and CT radiography is being developed into a safe, low-dose, noninvasive radiological procedure that can quantitate and image small density differences in human tissues. The applications to heavy-ion mammography and heavy-ion CT imaging of the brain in clinical patients suggest their potential value in cancer diagnosis

  12. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = radiography (P radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run.

  13. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza, Marcello R.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.; Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januario, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures

  14. Computer radiography - indirect digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jezierski, G.

    2008-01-01

    Implementation of the new European standards for industrial radiography with the use of storage phosphor imaging plates will result in the arousing of interest among numerous laboratories in non-destructive testing with application of the new method of testing to replace conventional radiography used so far, i.e. film radiography. Computer radiography is quite commonly used for medical radiography, where the fundamental problem consists in reduction of the radiation dose during the examination of a patient. However, it must be kept in mind that industrial applications have a little bit different requirements when compared with medical radiography. The article describes only new method for radiographic testing. (author)

  15. Computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupchek, G.

    2004-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is an image acquisition process that is used to create digital, 2-dimensional radiographs. CR employs a photostimulable phosphor-based imaging plate, replacing the standard x-ray film and intensifying screen combination. Conventional radiographic exposure equipment is used with no modification required to the existing system. CR can transform an analog x-ray department into a digital one and eliminates the need for chemicals, water, darkrooms and film processor headaches. (author)

  16. Intramodality and intermodality agreement in radiography and computed tomography of equine distal limb fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crijns, C P; Martens, A; Bergman, H-J; van der Veen, H; Duchateau, L; van Bree, H J J; Gielen, I M V L

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is increasingly accessible in equine referral hospitals. To document the level of agreement within and between radiography and CT in characterising equine distal limb fractures. Retrospective descriptive study. Images from horses that underwent radiographic and CT evaluation for suspected distal limb fractures were reviewed, including 27 horses and 3 negative controls. Using Cohen's kappa and weighted kappa analysis, the level of agreement among 4 observers for a predefined set of diagnostic characteristics for radiography and CT separately and for the level of agreement between the 2 imaging modalities were documented. Both CT and radiography had very good intramodality agreement in identifying fractures, but intermodality agreement was lower. There was good intermodality and intramodality agreement for anatomical localisation and the identification of fracture displacement. Agreement for articular involvement, fracture comminution and fracture fragment number was towards the lower limit of good agreement. There was poor to fair intermodality agreement regarding fracture orientation, fracture width and coalescing cracks; intramodality agreement was higher for CT than for radiography for these features. Further studies, including comparisons with surgical and/or post mortem findings, are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography in the diagnosis and characterisation of equine distal limb fractures. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Imaging suspected cervical spine injury: Plain radiography or computed tomography? Systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, Gavin [Diagnostic Radiographer, Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, Colchester General Hospital, Turner Road, Colchester, CO4 5JL Essex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gavincain8@hotmail.com; Shepherdson, Jane; Elliott, Vicki; Svensson, Jon [Faculty of Health and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 9PT Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Brennan, Patrick [UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Health Science Building, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: (1) to establish which modality offers the greatest accuracy in the detection of cervical spine injury (CSI) Following trauma: plain radiography or computed tomography (CT), and (2) make an evidence-based recommendation for the initial imaging modality of choice. Method: A systematic literature review was performed to identify primary research studies which compare the diagnostic accuracy of plain radiography and CT with the results of a reference standard in the detection of CSI. A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Science Direct and Pubmed Central databases was conducted. Results: Ten studies were identified. Critical appraisal identified limitations among all studies. There was heterogeneity in the sensitivity estimates for plain radiography, whereas estimates for CT were consistently high. Examination of the reported sensitivities shows that CT outperforms plain radiography in the detection of CSI. Conclusion: CT is superior to plain radiography in the detection of CSI. However, the optimal imaging strategy depends on the patients' relative risk of injury. If at high-risk cervical CT is indicated. If at low-risk the increased cost and radiation exposure mean that screening CT may not be warranted, good-quality plain radiographs are sufficient.

  18. Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia: a comparative evaluation of plain chest radiography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu Manavijit; Mukhopadhyay Sima; Sharma, S.K. [All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Plain chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) of the chest were performed on 10 patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE). Chest radiographs revealed bilateral diffuse lesions in the lungs of all the patients with relative sparing of lower lobes in one patient. However, computed tomography revealed bilateral diffuse lung lesions in all of the patients with relative sparing of lower lobes in three patients. In seven (70%) of the 10 patients, CT provided additional information. Computed tomography was found to be superior for the detection of reticulonodular pattern, bronchiectasis, air trapping, calcification and mediastinal adenopathy. No correlation was found between pulmonary function and gas exchange data using CT densities. There was also no correlation between the absolute eosinophil count (AEC) and the radiological severity of lesions. In six patients, high-resolution CT (HRCT) was performed in addition to conventional CT (CCT), and nodularity of lesions was better appreciated in these patients. It is concluded from this study that CT is superior to plain radiography for the evaluation of patients with TPE. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Differentiating lung abscess and empyema: radiography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.; Podrasky, A.E.; Webb, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans of 70 inflammatory thoracic lesions in 63 patients were reviewed and scored for diagnostic features. Pathologic confirmation of the final diagnosis was available in 42% (5/12) of lung abscesses and 31% (18/58) of empyemas. CT alone was sufficient to correctly diagnose 100% (70/70) of cases. Diagnostic information not available from conventional chest radiographs was obtained in 47% (33/70) of cases; in an additional 34% of patients, CT more accurately defined the extent of disease. The most reliable CT features for the differential diagnosis of lung abscess and empyema were wall characteristics, pleural separation, and lung compression. Conventional radiographic features such as size, shape, and the angle of the lesion with the chest wall were less helpful, though also best assessed by CT

  20. Basilar skull fracture in a Thoroughbred colt: Radiography or computed tomography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kin Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A two-year-old Thoroughbred colt was presented to the Equine Clinic, Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital for head trauma after rearing and falling backwards, hitting his head on the ground. Following medical therapy for acute onset neurological impairment secondary to a suspected basilar skull fracture, the horse was anaesthetised and computed tomography of the skull was performed. A diagnosis of a comminuted basilar skull fracture was made and skull radiographs were taken for comparison. The horse was subsequently euthanased owing to the poor prognosis; necropsy findings were compatible with imaging findings. The value and limitation of computed tomography versus radiography for the diagnosis of basilar skull fracture are discussed in this report. Introduction

  1. Basilar skull fracture in a Thoroughbred colt: Radiography or computed tomography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kin Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A two-year-old Thoroughbred colt was presented to the Equine Clinic, Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital for head trauma after rearing and falling backwards, hitting his head on the ground. Following medical therapy for acute onset neurological impairment secondary to a suspected basilar skull fracture, the horse was anaesthetised and computed tomography of the skull was performed. A diagnosis of a comminuted basilar skull fracture was made and skull radiographs were taken for comparison. The horse was subsequently euthanased owing to the poor prognosis; necropsy findings were compatible with imaging findings. The value and limitation of computed tomography versus radiography for the diagnosis of basilar skull fracture are discussed in this report.

  2. Comparative study of mesothelioma and asbestosis using computed tomography and conventional chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, T.G.; Efremidis, S.C.; Cohen, B.; Dan, S.; Efremidis, A.; Chahinian, A.P.; Teirstein, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study using computed tomography and conventional posteroanterior radiography was performed on 27 patients with mesothelioma and 13 patients with advanced asbestosis. The major pathologic features of both asbestosis and mesothelioma were well demonstrated by both modalities; computed tomography demonstrated the findings more frequently and in greater detail. No distinguishing features could be established based on configuration and size of the lesion. Many pleural plaques associated with advanced asbestosis were large and irregular and resembled those associated with mesothelioma. However, nodular involvement of the pleural fissures, pleural effusion, and ipsilateral volume loss with a fixed mediastinum were features predominating in mesothelioma. Growth determination of the plaques associated with asbestosis may be of minimal value since such plaques also undergo growth due to active inflammatory changes

  3. Accuracy of cone beam computed tomography, intraoral radiography, and periodontal probing for periodontal bone defects measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskandarlo A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT produces high-quality data about diagnosis and periodontal treatment. To date, there is not enough research regarding periodontal bone measurement using CBCT. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of CBCT in measuring periodontal defects to that of intraoral radiography and probing methods."nMaterials and Methods: Two-hundred and eighteen artificial osseous defects (buccal and lingual infrabony, interproximal, horizontal, crater, dehiscence and fenestration defects were created on 13 mandibles of dry skulls. The mandibles were put into a plexiglass box full of water to simulate soft tissue. CBCT images, radiographic images taken with parallel technique and direct measurements using a WHO periodontal probe were recorded and compared to a standard reference (digital caliper. Inter and intra observe consistencies were assessed using Intra class correlation coefficient and pearson correlation."nResults: Inter and intra observer consistencies were high for CBCT and probing methods (ICC- Intra class correlation coefficient>88%, but moderate for intraoral radiography (ICC-Intra class correlation coefficient > 54%. There were not any significant differences between observers for all techniques (P>0/05. According to paired T-test analysis, mean difference for CBCT technique (0.01 mm was lower than that for probing (0.04 mm and radiography (0.62 mm. CBCT was able to measure all kinds of lesions, but radiography could not measure defects in the buccal and lingual sites."nConclusion: All three modalities are useful for identifying periodontal defects. Compared to probing and radiography, the CBCT technique has the most accuracy in measuring periodontal defects.

  4. Comparison of plain radiography, conventional tomography, and computed tomography in detecting intrathoracic lymph node metastases from lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, D.R.; Korobkin, M.; Ravin, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-two patients with T2 bronchogenic carcinoma were evaluated with plain radiography, conventional 55 0 oblique hilar and anteroposterior mediastinal tomography, and computed tomography (CT) to compare their accuracy in assessing mediastinal and hilar nodal metastases. Definitive staging was achieved by thoracotomy and histopathological evaluation of resected specimens. All modalities demonstrated about the same accuracy, however, in the 25 patients with hilar and/or mediastinal lymphadenopathy, CT of the mediastinum was more sensitive but not more specific than the other two and conventional tomography was no more accurate than CT for hilar evaluation. Overall, no technicue was accurate enough for routine staging; their value may lie in directing biopsy or in treatment planning in patients with inoperable disease

  5. A comparison of radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of palmar process fractures in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneps, A.J.; Koblik, P.D.; Freeman, D.M.; Pool, R.R.; O'Brien, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The relative sensitivity of radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting palmar process fractures of the distal phalanx in foals was determined and the imaging findings were compared with histomorphologic evaluations of the palmar processes. Compared to radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not improve the sensitivity for detection of palmar process fractures. Statistical agreement for palmar process fracture diagnosis was excellent among the three imaging modalities. Histomorphologic evaluations were more sensitive for diagnosis of palmar process fracture than any of the imaging modalities. Three-dimensional image reconstructions and volume measurements of distal phalanges and palmar process fracture fragments from computed tomography studies provided more complete anatomical information than radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that the deep digital flexor tendon insertion on the distal phalanx is immediately axial to the site where palmar process fractures occur, and differentiated cartilage, bone, and soft tissue structures of the hoof

  6. Diagnostic sensitivity of ultrasound, radiography and computed tomography for gender determination in four species of lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Francesco; Volta, Antonella; Pelizzone, Igor; Manfredi, Sabrina; Gnudi, Giacomo; Parmigiani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Gender determination is frequently requested by reptile breeders, especially for species with poor or absent sexual dimorphism. The aims of the current study were to describe techniques and diagnostic sensitivities of ultrasound, radiography, and computed tomography for gender determination (identification of hemipenes) in four species of lizards. Nineteen lizards of known sex, belonging to four different species (Pogona vitticeps, Uromastyx aegyptia, Tiliqua scincoides, Gerrhosaurus major) were prospectively enrolled. With informed owner consent, ultrasound, noncontrast CT, contrast radiography, and contrast CT (with contrast medium administered into the cloaca) were performed in conscious animals. Imaging studies were reviewed by three different operators, each unaware of the gender of the animals and of the results of the other techniques. The lizard was classified as a male when hemipenes were identified. Nineteen lizards were included in the study, 10 females and nine males. The hemipenes were seen on ultrasound in only two male lizards, and appeared as oval hypoechoic structures. Radiographically, hemipenes filled with contrast medium appeared as spindle-shaped opacities. Noncontrast CT identified hemipenes in only two lizards, and these appeared as spindle-shaped kinked structures with hyperattenuating content consistent with smegma. Hemipenes were correctly identified in all nine males using contrast CT (accuracy of 100%). Accuracy of contrast radiography was excellent (94.7%). Accuracy of ultrasound and of noncontrast CT was poor (64.3% and 63.1%, respectively). Findings from the current study supported the use of contrast CT or contrast radiography for gender determination in lizards. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  7. Diagnostic value of computed tomography, radiography and ultrasonography in metacarpophalangeal joint disorders in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M.V. Machado

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In modern society the work and athletic performance of horses has led to a very important animal production sector in which Brazil possesses the third largest horse stock. Among all equine lesions described, metacarpophalangeal (fetlock joint lesions are considered one of the main causes of lameness. Consequently, there is a need to improve the understanding and diagnosis of these injuries. The most efficient imaging diagnostic methods for the fetlock region are computed tomography, radiography and ultrasound. Imaging studies of the anatomical structures involving this joint are extremely important to obtain a more precise diagnose. The present study was performed in order to evaluate the capacity of different imaging diagnostic modalities to detect a variety of lesions in different fetlock structures. Twenty horses (Equus caballus used for horsemanship activities were referred to the Department of Animal Reproduction and Veterinary Radiology of São Paulo State University, Botucatu campus, with clinical signs of metacarpophalangeal joint injuries. Horses were submitted to radiographic and ultrasonographic exam and computed tomography scan. Image analysis revealed a significant capacity of these methods to characterize lesions in this region. However, computed tomography provided broader and better evaluation of lesions in bones and adjacent structures, because it allows the analysis to be performed on three-dimensional projections, with attenuation coefficients (window selections and tissue density measurement through Hounsfield Units (HU.

  8. A comparison of digital tomosynthesis and chest radiography in evaluating airway lesions using computed tomography as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ji Yung; Lee, Ki Yeol; Yu, Ami; Kim, Je-Hyeong; Lee, Seung Heon; Choi, Jung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Oh, Yu Whan

    2016-09-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and chest radiography for detecting airway abnormalities, using computed tomography (CT) as a reference. We evaluated 161 data sets from 149 patients (91 with and 70 without airway abnormalities) who had undergone radiography, DTS, and CT to detect airway problems. Radiographs and DTS were evaluated to localize and score the severity of the airway abnormalities, and to score the image quality using CT as a reference. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC), McNemar's test, weighted kappa, and the paired t-test were used for statistical analysis. The sensitivity of DTS was higher (reader 1, 93.51 %; reader 2, 94.29 %) than chest radiography (68.83 %; 71.43 %) in detecting airway lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of DTS (90.91 %; 94.70 %) was also significantly better than that of radiography (78.03 %; 82.58 %, all p chest radiography (1.83, 2.74; p < 0.05) in the results of both readers. The inter-observer agreement with respect to DTS findings was moderate and superior when compared to radiography findings. DTS is a more accurate and sensitive modality than radiography for detecting airway lesions that are easily obscured by soft tissue structures in the mediastinum. • Digital tomosynthesis offers new diagnostic options for airway lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis is more sensitive and accurate than radiography for airway lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis shows better image quality than radiography. • Assessment of lesion severity, via tomosynthesis is comparable to computed tomography.

  9. Accuracy of digital peripical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creanga, Adriana Gabriela [Division of Dental Diagnostic Science, Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, Newark (United States); Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Mcmahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio (United States); Teixeira, Fabrico B. [Dept. of Endodontics, University of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption.

  10. Acute Knee Trauma: Analysis of Multidetector Computed Tomography Findings and Comparison with Conventional Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, A.O.T.; Kiuru, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of acute knee trauma and to compare radiography with MDCT in patients referred ta level 1 trauma center. Material and Methods: During a 5-year period, a total of 415 MDCT examinations were performed on 409 patients with acute knee trauma to reveal complex fracture anatomy or rule out a fracture. MDCT and primary radiographs were re-evaluated with respect to fracture location and trauma mechanism. Tibial plateau fractures were further analyzed depending on anatomical location: anterior-medial, anterior-lateral, posterior-lateral, and posterior-medial regions. Maximal depression of the tibial articular surface was measured. Findings on the primary knee radiographs were compared with MDCT findings. Results: Of the 409 patients, 356 (87%) had a knee fracture. A total of 451 fractures were found in all anatomic regions: distal femur ( n = 49), proximal tibia ( n 307), patella ( n = 23), and proximal fibula ( n = 72). Primary radiographs were available in 316 (76%) cases. Of these, 225 (71%) had MDCT in order to reveal the fracture anatomy better, and 91 (29%) had a subsequent MDCT after negative plain radiographs. Overall sensitivity of radiography was 83%, while negative predictive value was 49%. On radiography, tibial plateau articular depression was underestimated in all regions except when the fracture consisted of the whole half of the anterior or posterior plateau. The three main injury mechanisms were traffic accident, a simple fall, and sport. In 49 cases (15%), primary radiographs were suboptimal due to positioning. Conclusion: In severely injured patients, diagnostically sufficient radiographs are difficult to obtain, and therefore a negative radiograph is not reliable in ruling out a fracture. In these patients, MDCT is a fast and accurate examination and is also recommended in patients with tibial plateau fractures or complex knee injuries in order to evaluate the fracture adequately

  11. Projection radiography and tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Benton, E.V.; Holley, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Our program on heavy-ion radiography began soon after heavy ions were accelerated to high energies. Heavy ions are capable of very high electron density discrimination combined with good radial image resolution and low dose. Since heavy-ion beams produce many secondries, plastic nuclear detectors have an advantage for recording heavy-ion images. Projection imaging is now a practical technique that can resolve density differences between normal tissue and tumor tissue in some cases in which X rays could not make a distinction. Initial attempts at heavy-ion tomography also indicate potential for high resolution in this field. The physical basis for heavy-ion radiography and tomographic reconstruction studies are discussed in detail

  12. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Abe, Takayuki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA -950 ) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P -950 . The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA -950 . (orig.)

  13. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Abe, Takayuki; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Ogawa, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA-950) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P pulmonary emphysema. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tomosynthesis were 0.875, 0.968, 0.955 and 0.910, respectively, whereas the values for radiography were 0.479, 0.913, 0.815 and 0.697, respectively. For both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity increased with increasing LAA-950. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA-950. • Tomosynthesis showed significantly better diagnostic performance for pulmonary emphysema than radiography. • Interobserver agreement for tomosynthesis was significantly higher than that for radiography. • Sensitivity increased with increasing LAA -950 in both tomosynthesis and radiography. • Tomosynthesis imparts a similar radiation dose to two projection chest radiography. • Radiation dose and cost of tomosynthesis are lower than those of MDCT.

  14. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nippon Koukan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Kuribayashi, Sachio [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Takayuki [Keio University School of Medicine, Center for Clinical Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Kenji [Nippon Koukan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA{sub -950}) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P < 0.0001) of tomosynthesis than radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tomosynthesis were 0.875, 0.968, 0.955 and 0.910, respectively, whereas the values for radiography were 0.479, 0.913, 0.815 and 0.697, respectively. For both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity increased with increasing LAA{sub -950}. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA{sub -950}. (orig.)

  15. A comparison of digital tomosynthesis and chest radiography in evaluating airway lesions using computed tomography as a reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Ji Yung; Lee, Ki Yeol; Choi, Jung Won; Yu, Ami; Kim, Je-Hyeong; Lee, Seung Heon; Kang, Eun-Young; Oh, Yu Whan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and chest radiography for detecting airway abnormalities, using computed tomography (CT) as a reference. We evaluated 161 data sets from 149 patients (91 with and 70 without airway abnormalities) who had undergone radiography, DTS, and CT to detect airway problems. Radiographs and DTS were evaluated to localize and score the severity of the airway abnormalities, and to score the image quality using CT as a reference. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC), McNemar's test, weighted kappa, and the paired t-test were used for statistical analysis. The sensitivity of DTS was higher (reader 1, 93.51 %; reader 2, 94.29 %) than chest radiography (68.83 %; 71.43 %) in detecting airway lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of DTS (90.91 %; 94.70 %) was also significantly better than that of radiography (78.03 %; 82.58 %, all p < 0.05). DTS image quality was significantly better than chest radiography (1.83, 2.74; p < 0.05) in the results of both readers. The inter-observer agreement with respect to DTS findings was moderate and superior when compared to radiography findings. DTS is a more accurate and sensitive modality than radiography for detecting airway lesions that are easily obscured by soft tissue structures in the mediastinum. (orig.)

  16. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  17. Post-operative observation of ilio-apophyseal transplants on the basis of radiography, computed tomography, autoradiography and histological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klatt, U.

    1987-01-01

    A study in 25 rabbits, in which the acetabular roof was reinforced by inserting a wedge-shaped autologous tissue fragment of the apophysis, led to the following conclusions: That complete healing and ossification of the implant took place within the observation period; that radiography, computed tomography, autoradiography and histology consistently provided evidence in confirmation of ossification; that a wedge-shaped fragment of apophyseal cartilage is a suitable material for plastic surgery in the acetabular roof. (TRV) [de

  18. Comparative adoption of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography machines across Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A; Critchley, S; Monsour, P A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the current adoption of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiography (PR) machines across Australia. Information regarding registered CBCT and PR machines was obtained from radiation regulators across Australia. The number of X-ray machines was correlated with the population size, the number of dentists, and the gross state product (GSP) per capita, to determine the best fitting regression model(s). In 2014, there were 232 CBCT and 1681 PR machines registered in Australia. Based on absolute counts, Queensland had the largest number of CBCT and PR machines whereas the Northern Territory had the smallest number. However, when based on accessibility in terms of the population size and the number of dentists, the Australian Capital Territory had the most CBCT machines and Western Australia had the most PR machines. The number of X-ray machines correlated strongly with both the population size and the number of dentists, but not with the GSP per capita. In 2014, the ratio of PR to CBCT machines was approximately 7:1. Projected increases in either the population size or the number of dentists could positively impact on the adoption of PR and CBCT machines in Australia. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Analysis of edentulous maxillae using computed tomography and panoramic radiography in the surgical planning of dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahuinco, Humberto Lazaro Choquepuma; Souza, Ricardo Pires de

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to determine agreement of three observers on analysis of linear measurements of edentulous maxillae using computed tomography and panoramic radiography in the surgical planning of dental implants. Material and Method: the samples of 17 patients were analyzed with computed tomography and panoramic radiography. Linear measurements obtained from both methods were made at the following anatomical points: left tuberosity, left canine pillar, incisive foramen, right canine pillar and right tuberosity. Kendall's W test was applied to assess the level of agreement. Results: measured W-values from the samples of the anatomical points mentioned above, analyzed with panoramic radiography and computed tomography, were: 0.75 and 0.901; 0.916 and 0.956; 0.843 and 0.964; 0.963 and 0.931; 0.95 and 0.89 respectively. Statistical analysis showed that there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: agreement occurred in the measurements of variables.That means that if the three observers were to select an implant to be placed in each of the anatomical regions studied, there would be a good chance whey would choose the same type. (author)

  20. Indications for computed tomography (CT-) diagnostics in proximal humeral fractures: a comparative study of plain radiography and computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Weise Kuno; Pereira Philippe L; Dietz Klaus; Eingartner Christoph; Schmal Hagen; Südkamp Norbert P; Rolauffs Bernd; Bahrs Christian; Lingenfelter Erich; Helwig Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Precise indications for computed tomography (CT) in proximal humeral fractures are not established. The purpose of this study was a comparison of conventional radiographic views with different CT reconstructions with 2 D and 3 D imaging to establish indications for additional CT diagnostics depending on the fractured parts. Methods In a prospective diagnostic study in two level 1 trauma centers, 44 patients with proximal humeral fractures were diagnosed with conventional X...

  1. Peri-implant assessment via cone beam computed tomography and digital periapical radiography: an ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolau Silveira-Neto

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This research evaluated detail registration in peri-implant bone using two different cone beam computer tomography systems and a digital periapical radiograph. METHODS: Three different image acquisition protocols were established for each cone beam computer tomography apparatus, and three clinical situations were simulated in an ex vivo fresh pig mandible: buccal bone defect, peri-implant bone defect, and bone contact. Data were subjected to two analyses: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative analyses involved a comparison of real specimen measures using a digital caliper in three regions of the preserved buccal bone – A, B and E (control group – to cone beam computer tomography images obtained with different protocols (kp1, kp2, kp3, ip1, ip2, and ip3. In the qualitative analyses, the ability to register peri-implant details via tomography and digital periapical radiography was verified, as indicated by twelve evaluators. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05. RESULTS: The quantitative assessment showed means statistically equal to those of the control group under the following conditions: buccal bone defect B and E with kp1 and ip1, peri-implant bone defect E with kp2 and kp3, and bone contact A with kp1, kp2, kp3, and ip2. Qualitatively, only bone contacts were significantly different among the assessments, and the p3 results differed from the p1 and p2 results. The other results were statistically equivalent. CONCLUSIONS: The registration of peri-implant details was influenced by the image acquisition protocol, although metal artifacts were produced in all situations. The evaluators preferred the Kodak 9000 3D cone beam computer tomography in most cases. The evaluators identified buccal bone defects better with cone beam computer tomography and identified peri-implant bone defects better with digital periapical radiography.

  2. COMPARISON OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND ABDOMINAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF CANINE MECHANICAL INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Wm Tod; Green, Eric M; Zekas, Lisa J; Aarnes, Turi K; Su, Lillian; Habing, Gregory G

    2016-07-01

    Vomiting, often caused by mechanical intestinal obstruction, is common in dogs. Equivocal radiographic signs often necessitate repeat radiographs or additional imaging procedures. For our prospective, case-controlled, accuracy study, we hypothesized the following: (1) using computed tomography (CT), radiologists will be more sensitive and specific for detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery compared to using radiographs; and (2) using measurements, radiologists will be more sensitive and specific using radiographs or CT for detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery. Twenty dogs had abdominal radiographs and abdominal CT. Seventeen dogs had abdominal surgery and three dogs were not obstructed based on clinical follow-up. Confidence levels (five-point scale) of three experienced radiologists for mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery were recorded before and after making selected measurements. Eight dogs had surgically confirmed mechanical intestinal obstruction, and 12 dogs did not have obstruction. For detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction, CT was more sensitive (95.8% vs. 79.2%) and specific (80.6% vs. 69.4%) compared to radiographs, but the difference was not statistically significant. For recommending surgery, radiography was more sensitive (91.7% vs. 83.3%) and specific (83.3% vs. 72.2%) than using CT, but differences were not statistically significant. We reported objective CT measurements for predicting small mechanical intestinal obstruction. By incorporating these objective data, the diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction changed in five of 120 instances (radiographs and CT). In no instance (0/120), did the objective data change the recommendation for surgery. Using CT or abdominal radiographs for the detection of canine mechanical intestinal obstruction is sensitive and specific when evaluated by experienced veterinary radiologists. © 2016 American College of

  3. Quantitative evaluation of anatomical noise in chest digital tomosynthesis, digital radiography, and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.; Kim, D.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the worldwide leading cause of death from cancer. Thus, detection of lung cancer at its early stages is critical for improving the survival rate of patients. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently developed imaging modality, combining many advantages of digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). This method has the potential to be widely used in the clinical setting. In this study, we introduce a developed CDT R/F system and compare its image quality with those of DR and CT, especially with respect to anatomical noise and lung nodule conspicuity, for LUNGMAN phantoms. The developed CDT R/F system consists of a CsI scintillator flat panel detector, X-ray tube, and tomosynthesis data acquisition geometry. For CDT R/F imaging, 41 projections were acquired at different angles, over the ± 20° angular range, in a linear translation geometry. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the CDT R/F system, the acquired images were compared with CT (Philips brilliance CT 64, Philips healthcare, U.S.) and DR (ADR-M, LISTEM, Korea) phantom images in terms of the anatomical noise power spectrum (aNPS). DR images exhibited low conspicuity for a small-size lung nodule, while CDT R/F and CT exhibited relatively high sensitivity for all lung nodule sizes. The aNPS of the CDT R/F system was better than that of DR, by resolving anatomical overlapping problems. In conclusion, the developed CDT R/F system is likely to contribute to early diagnosis of lung cancer, while requiring a relatively low patient dose, compared with CT.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of anatomical noise in chest digital tomosynthesis, digital radiography, and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Kim, D.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2017-04-01

    Lung cancer is currently the worldwide leading cause of death from cancer. Thus, detection of lung cancer at its early stages is critical for improving the survival rate of patients. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently developed imaging modality, combining many advantages of digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). This method has the potential to be widely used in the clinical setting. In this study, we introduce a developed CDT R/F system and compare its image quality with those of DR and CT, especially with respect to anatomical noise and lung nodule conspicuity, for LUNGMAN phantoms. The developed CDT R/F system consists of a CsI scintillator flat panel detector, X-ray tube, and tomosynthesis data acquisition geometry. For CDT R/F imaging, 41 projections were acquired at different angles, over the ± 20° angular range, in a linear translation geometry. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the CDT R/F system, the acquired images were compared with CT (Philips brilliance CT 64, Philips healthcare, U.S.) and DR (ADR-M, LISTEM, Korea) phantom images in terms of the anatomical noise power spectrum (aNPS). DR images exhibited low conspicuity for a small-size lung nodule, while CDT R/F and CT exhibited relatively high sensitivity for all lung nodule sizes. The aNPS of the CDT R/F system was better than that of DR, by resolving anatomical overlapping problems. In conclusion, the developed CDT R/F system is likely to contribute to early diagnosis of lung cancer, while requiring a relatively low patient dose, compared with CT.

  5. Accuracy of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography on periapical radiolucency detection in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Daugela, Povilas; Strazdas, Marijus; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images) from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women) a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible) were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42) and radiographic (n = 24) examinations (P cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  6. Comparison of cone - beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography in detection of recurrent caries under composite restorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Shokri, Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Rahmani, Hamid, E-mail: Dr.a.shokri@gmail.com [Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeh, Samira [Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Secondary caries is the most common cause of dental restoration failures. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital intraoral radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detection of recurrent caries around composite restorations mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared using bur on 45 extracted sound human molar teeth. The teeth were divided into 3 groups. In the control group, cavities were restored with composite resin after etching and bonding (n=15). In Group 2, 500-μm thick wax was placed over the buccal, lingual and gingival walls and the cavities were restored with composite resin. Group 3 specimens were subjected to pH cycling and artificial caries were created on the buccal, lingual and gingival walls. The cavities were restored with composite. Conventional and digital photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP; Optime) radiographs and two CBCTs images (NewTom 3G and Cranex 3D) were obtained from them. Presence or absence of caries in the cavity walls was assessed on these images. Data were analyzed using Kappa statistic. The diagnostic accuracy of CBCT was significantly higher than that of digital and conventional intraoral radiography (p<0.05). The accuracy was 0.83, 0.78, 0.55 and 0.49 for CBCT Cranex 3D, CBCT NewTom 3G, conventional and digital intraoral radiography, respectively. CBCT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than digital and conventional intraoral radiography for detection of secondary caries around composite restorations. (author)

  7. Comparison of radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of sacroiliitis accompanying ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wei; Feng Feng; Yang Hongzen; Jiang Ming; Dion, E.; Genant, H.K.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To compare magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography (CT), and radiography in the detection of sacroiliitis accompanying ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Design and subjects. Nine volunteers and 24 patients were recruited. Radiography, CT, and MR imaging were completed within a 1-week period in 24 patients with AS. In precontrast MR examination, spin-echo T1, fast spin-echo T2, and gradient echo with rephasing T2* images were obtained without fat saturation using a 0.3-T imager for all volunteers and patients. Postcontrast MR examination was performed using the same precontrast SE T1 sequence for patients with AS. Results and conclusions. MR imaging directly showed the normal cartilage in all 16 sacroiliac joints of the 8 volunteers. In the 24 patients with AS, cartilage abnormalities were observed in 42 sacroiliac joints. More diagnoses of sacroiliitis were made using MR and CT imaging than using radiography (P<0.001). Therefore, low-field-strength MR can be useful in detecting early sacroiliitis in patients with AS. MR imaging was able to reveal early cartilage changes and bone marrow edema, which could not be found by either CT or radiography. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of cone - beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography in detection of recurrent caries under composite restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Shokri, Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Rahmani, Hamid; Khajeh, Samira

    2017-01-01

    Secondary caries is the most common cause of dental restoration failures. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital intraoral radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detection of recurrent caries around composite restorations mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared using bur on 45 extracted sound human molar teeth. The teeth were divided into 3 groups. In the control group, cavities were restored with composite resin after etching and bonding (n=15). In Group 2, 500-μm thick wax was placed over the buccal, lingual and gingival walls and the cavities were restored with composite resin. Group 3 specimens were subjected to pH cycling and artificial caries were created on the buccal, lingual and gingival walls. The cavities were restored with composite. Conventional and digital photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP; Optime) radiographs and two CBCTs images (NewTom 3G and Cranex 3D) were obtained from them. Presence or absence of caries in the cavity walls was assessed on these images. Data were analyzed using Kappa statistic. The diagnostic accuracy of CBCT was significantly higher than that of digital and conventional intraoral radiography (p<0.05). The accuracy was 0.83, 0.78, 0.55 and 0.49 for CBCT Cranex 3D, CBCT NewTom 3G, conventional and digital intraoral radiography, respectively. CBCT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than digital and conventional intraoral radiography for detection of secondary caries around composite restorations. (author)

  9. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic abilities of conventional radiography, storage phosphor, and cone beam computed tomography to determine occlusal and approximal caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayipmaz, Saadettin, E-mail: kayipmaz@ktu.edu.tr [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Sezgin, Omer Said, E-mail: omersaidsezgin@gmail.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Saricaoglu, Senem Tugra, E-mail: senem_tugra@hotmail.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Can, Gamze, E-mail: gcanktu@yahoo.com [Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine Department of Public Health (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare conventional radiography, storage phosphor plate, and cone beam computed tomography for in vitro determination of occlusal and approximal caries. Methods: A total of 72 extracted human premolar and molar teeth were selected. Teeth were radiographed with conventional intraoral radiography, a storage phosphor plate system, and cone beam computed tomography and evaluated by two observers. The teeth were then separated and examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanner at approximately 8x magnification. Results: CBCT was statistically superior to conventional radiography and phosphor plate for determining occlusal caries. No significant difference from CBCT, conventional radiography and the phosphor plate system for determining approximal caries was found. Conclusion: The CBCT system may be used as an auxiliary method for the detection of caries.

  10. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic abilities of conventional radiography, storage phosphor, and cone beam computed tomography to determine occlusal and approximal caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Omer Said; Saricaoglu, Senem Tugra; Can, Gamze

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare conventional radiography, storage phosphor plate, and cone beam computed tomography for in vitro determination of occlusal and approximal caries. Methods: A total of 72 extracted human premolar and molar teeth were selected. Teeth were radiographed with conventional intraoral radiography, a storage phosphor plate system, and cone beam computed tomography and evaluated by two observers. The teeth were then separated and examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanner at approximately 8x magnification. Results: CBCT was statistically superior to conventional radiography and phosphor plate for determining occlusal caries. No significant difference from CBCT, conventional radiography and the phosphor plate system for determining approximal caries was found. Conclusion: The CBCT system may be used as an auxiliary method for the detection of caries.

  11. Visibility of Different Intraorbital Foreign Bodies Using Plain Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadrashid, Reza; Golamian, Masoud; Shahrzad, Maryam; Hajalioghli, Parisa; Shahmorady, Zahra; Fouladi, Daniel F; Sadrarhami, Shohreh; Akhoundzadeh, Leila

    2017-05-01

    The study sought to compare the usefulness of 4 imaging modalities in visualizing various intraorbital foreign bodies (IOFBs) in different sizes. Six different materials including metal, wood, plastic, stone, glass. and graphite were cut in cylindrical shapes in 4 sizes (dimensions: 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm) and placed intraorbitally in the extraocular space of fresh sheep's head. Four skilled radiologists rated the visibility of the objects individually using plain radiography, spiral computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in accordance with a previously described grading system. Excluding wood, all embedded foreign bodies were best visualized in CT and CBCT images with almost equal accuracies. Wood could only be detected using MRI, and then only when fragments were more than 2 mm in size. There were 3 false-positive MRI reports, suggesting air bubbles as wood IOFBs. Because of lower cost and using less radiation in comparison with conventional CT, CBCT can be used as the initial imaging technique in cases with suspected IOFBs. Optimal imaging technique for wood IOFBs is yet to be defined. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of survey radiography and comparison with x-ray computed tomography for detection of hyperfunctioning adrenocortical tumors in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhout, G.; Stolp, R.; Rijnberk, A.; Waes, P.F.G.M. van

    1990-01-01

    Results of abdominal survey radiography and x-ray computed tomography (CT) were compared in 13 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism histologically attributed to adrenocortical tumors. X-ray computed tomography enabled accurate localization of the tumor in all 13 dogs. Apart from 2 poorly demarcated irregular-shaped and mineralized carcinomas, there were no differences between adenoma (n = 3) and carcinoma (n = 10) on CT images. In 1 dog, invasion of the caudal vena cava by the tumor was suggested on CT images and was confirmed during surgery. Suspicion of adhesions between tumors of the right adrenal gland and the caudal vena cava on the basis of CT images was confirmed during surgery in only 2 of 6 dogs. Survey radiography allowed accurate localization of the tumor in 7 dogs (4 on the right side and 3 on the left). In 6 of these dogs, the tumor was visible as a well-demarcated soft tissue mass and, in the other dog, as a poorly demarcated mineralized mass. The smallest tumor visualized on survey radiographs had a diameter of 20 mm on CT images. Six tumors with diameter less than or equal to 20 mm were not visualized on survey radiographs. In 1 of these dogs, a mineralized nodule was found in the left adrenal region, without evidence of a mass. In a considerable number of cases, survey radiography can provide presurgical localization of adrenocortical tumors in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism; CT is redundant in these instances. In the absence of positive radiographic findings, CT is valuable for localization of adrenocortical tumors

  13. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Vessoni Iwaki, Lilian Cristina; Da Silva, Mariliani Chicarelli; Tonin, Renata Hernandes

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL). Materials and Methods: ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth – directly on the mandibles (control), using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin), digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional panoramic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Three programs were used to measure ABL on the images: Image tool 3.0 (University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA), Kodak Imaging 6.1 (Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1, Carestream Health®, Rochester, NY, USA), and i-CAT vision 1.6.20. Statistical analysis used ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Results: The tomographic images showed the highest means, whereas the lowest were found for periapical with Han-Shin. Controls differed from periapical with Han-Shin (P digital periapical (P = 0.0027). Conventional periapicals with film holders differed from each other (P = 0.0007). Digital periapical differed from conventional periapical with Han-Shin (P = 0.0004). Conclusions: Conventional periapical with Han-Shin film holder was the only method that differed from the controls. CBCT had the closest means to the controls. PMID:25191066

  14. Indications for computed tomography (CT- diagnostics in proximal humeral fractures: a comparative study of plain radiography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weise Kuno

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise indications for computed tomography (CT in proximal humeral fractures are not established. The purpose of this study was a comparison of conventional radiographic views with different CT reconstructions with 2 D and 3 D imaging to establish indications for additional CT diagnostics depending on the fractured parts. Methods In a prospective diagnostic study in two level 1 trauma centers, 44 patients with proximal humeral fractures were diagnosed with conventional X-rays (22 AP + axillary views, 22 AP + scapular Y-views and CT (multi-planar reconstruction (MPR and maximum intensity projection (MIP with 2 D and 3 D imaging. 3 observers assessed the technical image quality, the assessment of the relevant anatomical structures (2-sample-t-test and the percentage of the osseous overlap of the proximal humerus (Welch-test using a scoring system. The quality of the different diagnostic methods was assessed according to the number of fractured parts (Bonferroni-Holm adjustment. Results There was significantly more overlap of the fractured region on the scapular Y-views (mean 71.5%, range 45–90% than on axillary views (mean 56.2%, range 10.5–100%. CT-diagnostics allowed a significantly better assessment of the relevant structures than conventional diagnostics (p Conclusion Conventional X-rays with AP view and a high-quality axillary view are useful for primary diagnostics of the fracture and often but not always show a clear presentation of the relevant bony structures such as both tuberosities, the glenoid and humeral head. CT with thin slices technology and additional 3 D imaging provides always a clear presentation of the fractured region. Clinically, a CT should be performed – independently of the number of fractured parts – when the proximal humerus and the shoulder joint are not presented with sufficient X-ray-quality to establish a treatment plan.

  15. Accuracy of Digital Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography on Periapical Radiolucency Detection in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Venskutonis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. Results: In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42 and radiographic (n = 24 examinations (P < 0.05. In molar teeth, CBCT identify a significantly higher amount of periapical lesions than with the radiographic method (P < 0.05. There were significant differences between CBCT and PR in the mean number of lesions identified per tooth (1.2 vs 0.66, P = 0.03, number of teeth with lesions (0.71 vs 0.46, P = 0.03 and number of lesions identified per canal (0.57 vs 0.33, P = 0.005. Considering CBCT as “gold standard” in lesion detection with the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy considering as score 1, then the same parameters of PR were 0.57, 1 and 0.76 respectively. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  16. Radiation doses in examination of lower third molars with computed tomography and conventional radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, A; Kull, L; Andersson, J; Flygare, L

    2008-12-01

    To measure organ doses and calculate effective doses for pre-operative radiographic examination of lower third molars with CT and conventional radiography (CR). Measurements of organ doses were made on an anthropomorphic head phantom with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters. The dosemeters were placed in regions corresponding to parotid and submandibular glands, mandibular bone, thyroid gland, skin, eye lenses and brain. The organ doses were used for the calculation of effective doses according to proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection 2005 guidelines. For the CT examination, a Siemens Somatom Plus 4 Volume Zoom was used and exposure factors were set to 120 kV and 100 mAs. For conventional radiographs, a Scanora unit was used and panoramic, posteroanterior, stereographic (scanogram) and conventional spiral tomographic views were exposed. The effective doses were 0.25 mSv, 0.060 mSv and 0.093 mSv for CT, CR without conventional tomography and CR with conventional spiral tomography, respectively. The effective dose is low when CT examination with exposure factors optimized for the examination of bone structures is performed. However, the dose is still about four times as high as for CR without tomography. CT should therefore not be a standard method for the examination of lower third molars. In cases where there is a close relationship between the tooth and the inferior alveolar nerve the advantages of true sectional imaging, such as CT, outweighs the higher effective dose and is recommended. Further reduction in the dose is feasible with further optimization of examination protocols and the development of newer techniques.

  17. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Chest Radiography in the Detection of Rib Fractures in Abused Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Walton, John W.; Rosas, Angela J.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Rogers, Kristen K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs (CXR) are the standard method for evaluating rib fractures in abused infants. Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive method to detect rib fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare CT and CXR in the evaluation of rib fractures in abused infants. Methods: This retrospective study included all 12 abused infants…

  18. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  19. Chest radiography and thoracic computed tomography findings in children who have family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzum, Kazim; Karahan, Okkes I.; Dogan, Sukru; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Topcu, Faik

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The chest radiography and TCT findings in children who had contacted with adult family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis were compared. The contributions of thoracic computed tomography to the diagnosis of tuberculosis were investigated. Methods and material: The children who were 0-16 years old (n=173) and children of families with an adult member which was diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated. The children were considered in two groups based on the absence (n=125) or presence (n=48) of complaints and/or ambiguous symptoms such as lack of appetite, mild cough, sweating, history of lung infection, low body weight and those with suspicious chest radiography findings (12 cases) were included in this study. Asymptomatic patients (n=125) did not undergo TCT. Patients who had positive PPD skin tests only received isoniazid. If the TCT demonstrated enlarged lymph nodes or parenchymal lesions, minimally active pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed and antituberculous treatment was given. Results and discussions: TCT revealed lymph node enlargement or parenchymal lesions in 39 children (81.2%). Of the 12 children whose CXRs revealed suspicious lymph node enlargement and/or infiltration, five had normal findings in TCT whereas the initial findings were confirmed in the remaining seven. These data suggest that there is a correlation between the presence of ambiguous symptoms in exposed children and TCT findings; chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield parallel findings. All the patients who received anti-TB treatment were resolved in the control examinations. Conclusion: In this study there is a correlation between presence of ambiguous symptoms and TCT findings, but the chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield harmony in exposed children with ambiguous symptoms (suspicious tuberculosis cases). These observations should be considered in children with symptoms similar to those of exposed children, but with no definite history of

  20. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma

  1. Single source dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of gout: Diagnostic reliability in comparison to digital radiography and conventional computed tomography of the feet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Tobias; Diekhoff, Torsten [Department of Radiology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität, Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Sandra [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Stroux, Andrea [Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Mews, Jürgen; Blobel, Jörg [Toshiba Medical Systems Europe, BV, Zilverstraat 1, 2701 RP Zoetermeer (Netherlands); Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität, Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Kay-Geert A., E-mail: kghermann@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität, Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography (SDECT) in gouty arthritis and to compare its capability to detect urate depositions with digital radiography (DR) and conventional computed tomography (CT). Methods: Forty-four patients who underwent SDECT volume scans of the feet for suspected gouty arthritis were retrospectively analyzed. SDECT, CT (both n = 44) and DR (n = 36) were scored by three blinded readers for presence of osteoarthritis, erosions, and tophi. A diagnosis was made for each imaging modality. Results were compared to the clinical diagnosis using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria. Results: The patient population was divided into a gout (n = 21) and control (n = 23) group based on final clinical diagnosis. Osteoarthritis was evident in 15 joints using CT and 30 joints using DR (p = 0.165). There were 134 erosions detected by CT compared to 38 erosions detected by DR (p < 0.001). In total 119 tophi were detected by SDECT, compared to 85 tophi by CT (p = 0.182) and 25 tophi by DR (p < 0.001). SDECT had best diagnostic value for diagnosis of gout compared to DR and conventional CT (sensitivity and specificity for SDECT: 71.4% and 95.7%, CT: 71.4% and 91.3% and DR: 44.4% and 83.3%, respectively). For all three readers, Cohen’s kappa for DR and conventional CT were substantial for all scoring items and ranged from 0.75 to 0.77 and 0.72–0.76, respectively. For SDECT Cohen’s kappa was good to almost perfect with 0.77–0.84. Conclusions: SDECT is capable to detect uric acid depositions with good sensitivity and high specificity in feet, therefore diagnostic confidence is improved. Using SDECT, inter-reader variance can be markedly reduced for the detection of gouty tophi.

  2. Single source dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of gout: Diagnostic reliability in comparison to digital radiography and conventional computed tomography of the feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Tobias; Diekhoff, Torsten; Hermann, Sandra; Stroux, Andrea; Mews, Jürgen; Blobel, Jörg; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography (SDECT) in gouty arthritis and to compare its capability to detect urate depositions with digital radiography (DR) and conventional computed tomography (CT). Methods: Forty-four patients who underwent SDECT volume scans of the feet for suspected gouty arthritis were retrospectively analyzed. SDECT, CT (both n = 44) and DR (n = 36) were scored by three blinded readers for presence of osteoarthritis, erosions, and tophi. A diagnosis was made for each imaging modality. Results were compared to the clinical diagnosis using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria. Results: The patient population was divided into a gout (n = 21) and control (n = 23) group based on final clinical diagnosis. Osteoarthritis was evident in 15 joints using CT and 30 joints using DR (p = 0.165). There were 134 erosions detected by CT compared to 38 erosions detected by DR (p < 0.001). In total 119 tophi were detected by SDECT, compared to 85 tophi by CT (p = 0.182) and 25 tophi by DR (p < 0.001). SDECT had best diagnostic value for diagnosis of gout compared to DR and conventional CT (sensitivity and specificity for SDECT: 71.4% and 95.7%, CT: 71.4% and 91.3% and DR: 44.4% and 83.3%, respectively). For all three readers, Cohen’s kappa for DR and conventional CT were substantial for all scoring items and ranged from 0.75 to 0.77 and 0.72–0.76, respectively. For SDECT Cohen’s kappa was good to almost perfect with 0.77–0.84. Conclusions: SDECT is capable to detect uric acid depositions with good sensitivity and high specificity in feet, therefore diagnostic confidence is improved. Using SDECT, inter-reader variance can be markedly reduced for the detection of gouty tophi.

  3. Computed radiography in paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.

    1996-01-01

    Computed radiography has also been called storage phosphor technology, digital luminescence radiography and scintillation phosphor technology, since it relies on phosphor imaging plate as an alternative to screen-film. One of the major advantages in the use of computed radiography (CR) is the consistent image quality independence of the radiographer and exposure used. And secondly a marked reduction in the need for repeat films was achieved and thus a decrease in dose to the patient. In some cases, dose was able to be reduced further due to the fact that the plates respond to lower doses and still provide adequate image quality. Digitalising the Cr image allows it to be transmitted to an imaging console. The images can then be stored on optical disc. 7 refs

  4. High-resolution computed tomography versus chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Ana Beatriz Cordeiro de; Calderaro, Debora; Moreira, Caio; Guimaraes, Silvana Mangeon Meirelles; Tavares Junior, Wilson Campos; Leao Filho, Hilton Muniz; Andrade, Diego Correa de; Ferreira, Cid Sergio; Vieira, Jose Nelson Mendes

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Materials And Methods: HRCT scans and chest radiographs in postero-anterior and lateral views were performed in 34 patients with systemic sclerosis, according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary criteria for the diagnosis of SSc. The prevalence of radiological findings suggestive of interstitial lung disease in SSc seen on both imaging methods was compared. Results: Interstitial disease was observed on HRCT images of 31 patients (91%) and in the chest radiographs of 16 patients (47%). The most frequent findings observed on HRCT were septal lines (74%), honeycombing (56%) and parenchymal bands (26%). Chest radiographs showed reticular areas of attenuation in 11 patients (32%) and parenchymal distortion in 12% of the patients. In 18 patients (53%) with normal chest radiographs HRCT showed septal lines in 55%, ground glass in 44%, honeycombing in 38.5% and cysts in 33%. Conclusion: HRCT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the evaluation of incipient interstitial lung involvement in patients with SSc and can provide a justification for immunosuppressive therapy in patients with early disease. (author)

  5. A Comparison of Plain Radiography with Computer Tomography in Determining Coronal and Sagittal Alignments following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solayar GN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimal coronal and sagittal component positioning is important in achieving a successful outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Modalities to determine post-operative alignment include plain radiography and computer tomography (CT imaging. This study aims to determine the accuracy and reliability of plain radiographs in measuring coronal and sagittal alignment following TKA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective, consecutive study of 58 patients undergoing TKA was performed comparing alignment data from plain radiographs and CT imaging. Hip- knee-angle (HKA, sagittal femoral angle (SFA and sagittal tibial angle (STA measurements were taken by two observers from plain radiographs and compared with CT alignment. Intra- and inter-observer correlation was calculated for each measurement. RESULTS: Intra-observer correlation was excellent for HKA (r>0.89 with a mean difference of 0.95 and STA (r>0.8 compared to SFA (r=0.5. When comparing modalities (radiographs vs CT, HKA estimations for both observers showed the least maximum and mean differences while SFA observations were the least accurate. CONCLUSION: Radiographic estimation of HKA showed excellent intra- and inter-observer correlation and corresponds well with CT imaging. However, radiographic estimation of sagittal plane alignment was less reliably measured and correlated less with CT imaging. Plain radiography was found to be inferior to CT for estimation of biplanar prosthetic alignment following TKA.

  6. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Mitsunari Takeshita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL. Materials and Methods: ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth - directly on the mandibles (control, using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin, digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional panoramic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Three programs were used to measure ABL on the images: Image tool 3.0 (University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA, Kodak Imaging 6.1 (Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1, Carestream Health ® , Rochester, NY, USA, and i-CAT vision 1.6.20. Statistical analysis used ANOVA and Tukey′s test at 5% significance level. Results: The tomographic images showed the highest means, whereas the lowest were found for periapical with Han-Shin. Controls differed from periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001. CBCT differed from panoramic (P = 0.0130, periapical with Rinn XCP (P = 0.0066, periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001, and digital periapical (P = 0.0027. Conventional periapicals with film holders differed from each other (P = 0.0007. Digital periapical differed from conventional periapical with Han-Shin (P = 0.0004. Conclusions: Conventional periapical with Han-Shin film holder was the only method that differed from the controls. CBCT had the closest means to the controls.

  7. Skeletal imaging following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament: in vivo comparison of fluoroscopy, radiography, and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osti, Michael; Benedetto, Karl Peter [Academic Hospital Feldkirch, Department for Trauma Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Feldkirch (Austria); Krawinkel, Alessa [Academic Hospital Feldkirch, Department for Radiology, Feldkirch (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    Intra- and postoperative validation of anatomic footprint replication in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction can be conducted using fluoroscopy, radiography, or computed tomography (CT) scans. However, effectiveness and exposure to radiation of these imaging modalities are unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of fluoroscopy, radiography, and CT in detecting femoral and tibial tunnel positions following an all-inside reconstruction of the PCL ligament in vivo. The study design was a retrospective case series. Intraoperative fluoroscopic images, postoperative radiographs, and CT scans were obtained in 50 consecutive patients following single-bundle PCL reconstruction. The centers of the tibial and femoral tunnel apertures were identified and correlated to measurement grid systems. The results of fluoroscopic, radiographic, and CT measurements were compared to each other and accumulated radiation dosages were calculated. Comparing the imaging groups, no statistically significant difference could be detected for the reference of the femoral tunnel to the intercondylar depth and height, for the reference of the tibial tunnel to the mediolateral diameter of the tibial plateau and for the superoinferior distance of the tibial tunnel entry to the tibial plateau and to the former physis line. Effective doses resulting from fluoroscopic, radiographic, and CT exposure averaged 2.9 mSv, standard deviation (±SD) 4.1 mSv, to 1.3 ± 0.8 mSv and to 3.6 ± 1.0 mSv, respectively. Fluoroscopy, radiography, and CT yield approximately equal effectiveness in detecting parameters used for quality validation intra- and postoperatively. An accumulating exposure to radiation must be considered. (orig.)

  8. Painful spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis studied by radiography and single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Carrera, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared in 19 adults with radiographic evidence of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. SPECT was more sensitive than PBS when used to identify symptomatic patients and sites of painful defects in the pars interarticularis. In addition, SPECT allowed more accurate localization than PBS. In 6 patients, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis was unrealted to low back pain, and SPECT images of the posterior neural arch were normal. The authors conclude that when spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis is the cause of low back pain, pars defects are frequently heralded by increased scintigraphic activity which is best detected and localized by SPECT

  9. Painful spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis studied by radiography and single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Carrera, G.F.; Meyer, G.A.; Schwab, J.P.; Flatley, T.J.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.; Knobel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared in 19 adults with radiographic evidence of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. SPECT was more sensitive than PBS when used to identify symptomatic patients and sites of painful defects in the pars interarticularis. In addition, SPECT allowed more accurate localization than PBS. In 6 patients, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis was unrealted to low back pain, and SPECT images of the posterior neural arch were normal. The authors conclude that when spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis is the cause of low back pain, pars defects are frequently heralded by increased scintigraphic activity which is best detected and localized by SPECT.

  10. A comparative study of cone-beam computed tomography and digital periapical radiography in detecting mandibular molars root perforations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghanifar, Sina; Moudi, Ehsan; Mesgarani, Abbas; Abbaszadeh, Naghi [Dental Material Research Center, Dental Faculty, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bijani, Ali [Non-Communicable Pediatric Diseases Research Center, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital periapical radiography in the detection of mesial root perforations of mandibular molars. In this in vitro study, 48 mandibular molars were divided into 4 groups. First, the mesial canals of all the 48 teeth were endodontically prepared. In 2 groups (24 teeth each), the roots were axially perforated in the mesiolingual canal 1-3 mm below the furcation region, penetrating the root surface ({sup r}oot perforation{sup )}. Then, in one of these 2 groups, the mesial canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. Mesial canals in one of the other 2 groups without perforation (control groups) were filled with the same materials. The CBCT and periapical radiographs with 3 different angulations were evaluated by 2 oral and maxillofacial radiologists. The specificity and sensitivity of the two methods were calculated, and P<0.05 was considered significant. The sensitivity and specificity of CBCT scans in the detection of obturated root canal perforations were 79% and 96%, respectively, and in the case of three-angled periapical radiographs, they were 92% and 100%, respectively. In non-obturated root canals, the sensitivity and specificity of CBCT scans in perforation detection were 92% and 100%, respectively, and for three-angled periapical radiographs, they were 50% and 96%, respectively. For perforation detection in filled-root canals, periapical radiography with three different horizontal angulations would be trustworthy, but it is recommended that CBCT be used for perforation detection before obturating root canals.

  11. Computed tomography vs. digital radiography assessment for detection of osteolysis in asymptomatic patients with uncemented cups: a proposal for a new classification system based on computer tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandgren, Buster; Crafoord, Joakim; Garellick, Göran; Carlsson, Lars; Weidenhielm, Lars; Olivecrona, Henrik

    2013-10-01

    Digital radiographic images in the anterior-posterior and lateral view have been gold standard for evaluation of peri-acetabular osteolysis for patients with an uncemented hip replacement. We compared digital radiographic images and computer tomography in detection of peri-acetabular osteolysis and devised a classification system based on computer tomography. Digital radiographs were compared with computer tomography on 206 hips, with a mean follow up 10 years after surgery. The patients had no clinical signs of osteolysis and none were planned for revision surgery. On digital radiographs, 192 cases had no osteolysis and only 14 cases had osteolysis. When using computer tomography there were 184 cases showing small or large osteolysis and only 22 patients had no osteolysis. A classification system for peri-acetabular osteolysis is proposed based on computer tomography that is easy to use on standard follow up evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Analisis gambaran histogramdan densitas kamar pulpa pada gigi suspek pulpitis reversibel dan ireversibel dengan menggunakan radiografi cone beam computed tomography (Histogram and density analysis of irreversible and reversible pulpitissuspected tooth using cone beam computed tomography radiography)

    OpenAIRE

    Lusi Epsilawati; Suhardjo Sitam; Sam Belly; Fahmi Oscandar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the pulp is most common and difficult to diagnose. For it radiographs is necessary. One attempt to do is to assess its histogram and density. Radiography equipment that has the ability to analyze is cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The purpose of this study is to analyze radiograph of the pulp chamber histogram: peak value, grayscale and trends , as well as the density on the condition reversible and irreversible pulpitis condition. The population of this ...

  13. High-resolution computed tomography in silicosis: correlation with chest radiography and pulmonary function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Agnaldo Jose [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Pedro Ernesto Univ. Hospital. Dept. of Respiratory Function]. E-mail: phel.lop@uol.com.br; Mogami, Roberto; Capone, Domenico; Jansen, Jose Manoel [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences; Tessarollo, Bernardo [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Image; Melo, Pedro Lopes de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. of Biology

    2008-05-15

    Objective: To correlate tomographic findings with pulmonary function findings, as well as to compare chest X-ray findings with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, in patients with silicosis. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 44 non-smoking patients without a history of tuberculosis. Chest X-ray findings were classified according to the International Labour Organization recommendations. Using a semiquantitative system, the following HRCT findings were measured: the full extent of pulmonary involvement; parenchymal opacities; and emphysema. Spirometry and forced oscillation were performed. Pulmonary volumes were evaluated using the helium dilution method, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was assessed. Results: Of the 44 patients studied, 41 were male. The mean age was 48.4 years. There were 4 patients who were classified as category 0 based on X-ray findings and as category 1 based on HRCT findings. Using HRCT scans, we identified progressive massive fibrosis in 33 patients, compared with only 23 patients when X-rays were used. Opacity score was found to correlate most closely with airflow, DLCO and compliance. Emphysema score correlated inversely with volume, DLCO and airflow. In this sample of patients presenting a predominance of large opacities (75% of the individuals), the deterioration of pulmonary function was associated with the extent of structural changes. Conclusions: In the early detection of silicosis and the identification of progressive massive fibrosis, HRCT scans are superior to X-rays. (author)

  14. High-resolution computed tomography in silicosis: correlation with chest radiography and pulmonary function tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Agnaldo Jose; Mogami, Roberto; Capone, Domenico; Jansen, Jose Manoel; Tessarollo, Bernardo; Melo, Pedro Lopes de

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To correlate tomographic findings with pulmonary function findings, as well as to compare chest X-ray findings with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, in patients with silicosis. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 44 non-smoking patients without a history of tuberculosis. Chest X-ray findings were classified according to the International Labour Organization recommendations. Using a semiquantitative system, the following HRCT findings were measured: the full extent of pulmonary involvement; parenchymal opacities; and emphysema. Spirometry and forced oscillation were performed. Pulmonary volumes were evaluated using the helium dilution method, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was assessed. Results: Of the 44 patients studied, 41 were male. The mean age was 48.4 years. There were 4 patients who were classified as category 0 based on X-ray findings and as category 1 based on HRCT findings. Using HRCT scans, we identified progressive massive fibrosis in 33 patients, compared with only 23 patients when X-rays were used. Opacity score was found to correlate most closely with airflow, DLCO and compliance. Emphysema score correlated inversely with volume, DLCO and airflow. In this sample of patients presenting a predominance of large opacities (75% of the individuals), the deterioration of pulmonary function was associated with the extent of structural changes. Conclusions: In the early detection of silicosis and the identification of progressive massive fibrosis, HRCT scans are superior to X-rays. (author)

  15. Pulmonary infections in the late period after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: chest radiography versus computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, Gerd; Matzek, Wolfgang; Kalhs, Peter; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the capabilities of chest roentgenogram (CXR) and computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of pulmonary infectious disease in the late period (>100 days) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Methods: Ninety-four matched CXR and CT examinations were performed for clinical suspicion of infectious lung disease. The time gap between CXR and CT was 48 h at maximum. The image pairs were correlated with the patients' clinical course and with the results of diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). An unremarkable clinical course over the subsequent seven days after imaging and/or negative microbiological culture served as the basis for excluding infectious lung disease. Positive microbiological culture and/or improvement of symptoms after antibiotic therapy were considered as evidence of infectious disease. Results: The correlation with the clinical course and/or BAL revealed a significantly higher sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy for CT than for CXR (89% versus 58%, P < 0.0001; 78% versus 47%, P < 0.0001; 90% versus 68%, P < 0.0001, respectively). CT was significantly more diagnostic in BAL verified fungal and bacterial infections (P < 0.05). Conclusion: CT is significantly superior to CXR in the evaluation of infectious pulmonary disease in the late phase after BMT. Therefore, an unremarkable CXR should be followed by a CT scan to reliably detect or to accurately exclude early pulmonary infection in these patients

  16. High energy x-ray radiography and computed tomography of bridge pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R E; Logan, C M; Martz, H E; Updike, E; Waters, A M

    1999-01-01

    Bridge pins were used in the hanger assemblies for some multi-span steel bridges built prior to the 1980's, and are sometimes considered fracture critical elements of a bridge. During a test on a bridge conducted by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), ultrasonic field inspection results indicated that at least two pins contained cracks. Several pins were removed and selected for further examination. This provided an excellent opportunity to learn more about these pins and the application of x-ray systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as to learn more about the application of different detectors recently obtained by LLNL. Digital radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were used to characterize the bridge pins, using a LINAC x-ray source with a 9-MV bremsstrahlung spectrum. We will describe the performance of two different digital radiographic detectors. One is a detector system frequently used at LLNL consisting of a scintillator glass optically coupled to a CCD camera. The other detector is a new amorphous silicon detector recently acquired by LLNL

  17. Three-dimensional biplanar radiography as a new means of accessing femoral version: a comparitive study of EOS three-dimensional radiography versus computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerantz, M.L. [University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Glaser, Diana [Aurora Spine, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Doan, Josh [Orthopedic Biomechanics Research Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Kumar, Sita [University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Edmonds, Eric W. [University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Rady Children' s Hospital San Diego, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-17

    To validate femoral version measurements made from biplanar radiography (BR), three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions (EOS imaging, France) were made in differing rotational positions against the gold standard of computed tomography (CT). Two cadaveric femurs were scanned with CT and BR in five different femoral versions creating ten total phantoms. The native version was modified by rotating through a mid-diaphyseal hinge twice into increasing anteversion and twice into increased retroversion. For each biplanar scan, the phantom itself was rotated -10, -5, 0, +5 and +10 . Three-dimensional CT reconstructions were designated the true value for femoral version. Two independent observers measured the femoral version on CT axial slices and BR 3D reconstructions twice. The mean error (upper bound of the 95 % confidence interval), inter- and intraobserver reliability, and the error compared to the true version were determined for both imaging techniques. Interobserver intraclass correlation for CT axial images ranged from 0.981 to 0.991, and the intraobserver intraclass correlation ranged from 0.994 to 0.996. For the BR 3D reconstructions these values ranged from 0.983 to 0.998 and 0.982 to 0.998, respectively. For the CT measurements the upper bound of error from the true value was 5.4-7.5 , whereas for BR 3D reconstructions it was 4.0-10.1 . There was no statistical difference in the mean error from the true values for any of the measurements done with axial CT or BR 3D reconstructions. BR 3D reconstructions accurately and reliably provide clinical data on femoral version compared to CT even with rotation of the patient of up to 10 from neutral. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of four-view radiography and conventional computed tomography analysing sacral and pelvic fractures in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger-Vanegas, S M; Senthirajah, S K J; Nemanic, S; Baltzer, W; Warnock, J; Bobe, G

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was (1) to determine whether four-view radiography of the pelvis is as reliable and accurate as computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing sacral and pelvic fractures, in addition to coxofemoral and sacroiliac joint subluxation or luxation, and (2) to evaluate the effect of the amount of training in reading diagnostic imaging studies on the accuracy of diagnosing sacral and pelvic fractures in dogs. Sacral and pelvic fractures were created in 11 canine cadavers using a lateral impactor. In all cadavers, frog-legged ventro-dorsal, lateral, right and left ventro-45°-medial to dorsolateral oblique frog leg ("rollover 45-degree view") radiographs and a CT of the pelvis were obtained. Two radiologists, two surgeons and two veterinary students classified fractures using a confidence scale and noted the duration of evaluation for each imaging modality and case. The imaging results were compared to gross dissection. All evaluators required significantly more time to analyse CT images compared to radiographic images. Sacral and pelvic fractures, specifically those of the sacral body, ischiatic table, and the pubic bone, were more accurately diagnosed using CT compared to radiography. Fractures of the acetabulum and iliac body were diagnosed with similar accuracy (at least 86%) using either modality. Computed tomography is a better method for detecting canine sacral and some pelvic fractures compared to radiography. Computed tomography provided an accuracy of close to 100% in persons trained in evaluating CT images.

  19. Basic studies of radiation image diagnosis in veterinary medicine, 1: Comparison of the resolution of computed tomography, scanography and conventional radiography in an equine thoracic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shida, T.; Suganuma, T.; Hashizume, T.

    1984-01-01

    In radiography of the thorax and abdomen of a large animal, the extreme thickness of the body causes a large amount of scattered radiation, which makes it difficult to obtain sharp images. The image resolutions of radiographs obtained by applying conventional radiography, scanography and computed tomography [CT] on an equine thoracic phantom were compared. Tubes of various inside diameters, used to simulate the pulmonary vessels were placed in an equine thoracic phantom and radiographed by CT, scanography and conventional radiography so as to compare the various degrees of resolution of the images of the tubes obtained by these methods. CT and scanography both gave a higher resolution index than conventional radiography, and both provided recognizable images of tubes < 2 mm in diameter, which conventional radiography failed to do. Scanography and CT can be used to obtain high-quality images of the thorax and abdomen of large animals. The image quality was compared using the resolution index (RI). The RI would be a wholly practical and comprehensive index for resolution because it includes 3 factors, contrast, sharpness and magnification, and yet is easy to calculate

  20. Radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging at 0.5 Tesla of mechanically induced osteoarthritis in rabbit knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torelli, S.R.; Rahal, R.S.; Volpi, R.S.; Yamashita, S.; Mamprim, M.J.; Crocci, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the present experimental study we assessed induced osteoarthritis data in rabbits, compared three diagnostic methods, i.e., radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and correlated the imaging findings with those obtained by macroscopic evaluation. Ten young female rabbits of the Norfolk breed were used. Seven rabbits had the right knee immobilized in extension for a period of 12 weeks (immobilized group), and three others did not have a limb immobilized and were maintained under the same conditions (control group). Alterations observed by XR, CT and MRI after the period of immobilization were osteophytes, osteochondral lesions, increase and decrease of joint space, all of them present both in the immobilized and non-immobilized contralateral limbs. However, a significantly higher score was obtained for the immobilized limbs (XT: P = 0.016, CT: P 0.031, MRI: P = 0.0156). All imaging methods were able to detect osteoarthritis changes after the 12 weeks of immobilization. Macroscopic evaluation identified increased thickening of joint capsule, proliferative and connective tissue in the femoropatellar joint, and irregularities of articular cartilage, especially in immobilized knees. The differences among XR, CT and MRI were not statistically significant for the immobilized knees. However, MRI using a 0.5 Tesla scanner was statistically different from CT and XR for the non-immobilized contralateral knees. We conclude that the three methods detected osteoarthritis lesions in rabbit knees, but MRI was less sensitive than XR and CT in detecting lesions compatible with initial osteoarthritis. Since none of the techniques revealed all the lesions, it is important to use all methods to establish an accurate diagnosis. (author)

  1. COMPARISONS AMONG RADIOGRAPHY, ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR EX VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF STIFLE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN THE HORSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lasalle, Julie; Alexander, Kate; Olive, Julien; Laverty, Sheila

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of imaging characteristics of equine stifle osteoarthritis (OA) may allow earlier detection and improve prognosis. Objectives of this ex vivo, prospective, methods comparison study were to (1) describe the location and severity of naturally acquired OA lesions in the equine stifle using ultrasound (US), radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT), and macroscopic evaluation (ME); (2) compare the diagnostic performance of each imaging modality with ME; and (3) describe subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) in equine stifle joints with OA using CT. Radiographic, CT, and US evaluations were performed on 23 equine cadaver stifles and compared with ME. Significant associations were found between osteophyte global scores for all imaging modalities (CT, P ˂ 0.0001; XR, P = 0.005; US, P = 0.04) vs. ME osteophyte global scores. Osteophytes were detected most frequently in the medial femorotibial (MFT) joint. A specific pattern of osteophytes was observed, with a long ridge of new bone at the insertion of the MFT joint capsule cranially on the medial femoral condyle. A novel caudo-10°proximo-5°lateral-cranio-disto-medial oblique radiographic projection was helpful for detection of intercondylar osteophytes. Multiplanar CT reformatted images were helpful for characterizing all osteophytes. Osteophyte grades at most sites did not differ among modalities. Low sensitivity/specificity for subchondral bone sclerosis and flattening of femoral condyles suggested that these signs may not be reliable radiographic and CT indicators of equine stifle OA. Equine stifle OA was associated with a decrease in BMD and specific sites of focal subchondral bone resorption/cyst formation were found in some specimens. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  2. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography and conventional panoramic radiography in assessing the topographic relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted third molars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and value in an imaging technique field through the comparison of cone beam computed tomography and conventional panoramic radiography in assessing the topographic relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted third molars. Participants consisted of 100 patients offered the images through cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography. PSR-9000TM Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Japan) was used as the unit of cone beam computed tomography. CE-II (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Japan) and Pro Max (Planmeca Oy, Finland) were used as the unit of panoramic radiography. The images obtained through panoramic radiography were classified into 3 types according to the distance between mandibular canal and root of mandibular third molar. And they were classified into 4 types according to the proximity of radiographic feature. The images obtained through cone beam computed tomography based on the classification above were classified into 4 types according to the location between the mandibular canal and the root and were analyzed. And they were classified into buccal, inferior, lingual, and between roots, according to the location between mandibular canal and root. The data were statistically analyzed and estimated by x2-test. 1. There was no statistical significance according to 3 types (type I, type II, type III) through CBCT. 2. The results of 4 types (type A, type B, type C, type D) through CBCT were as high prevalence of CBCT 1 in type A, CBCT 2 in type B, CBCT 3 in type C, and CBCT1 in type D and those of which showed statistical significance (P value=0.03). 3. The results according to location between mandibular canal and root through CBCT recorded each 49, 25, 17, 9 as buccal, inferior, lingual, between roots. When estimating the mandibular canal and the roots through the panoramic radiography, it could be difficult to drive the views of which this estimation was considerable. Thus it is required to

  3. Cholesteatoma: computed tomography and radiography in a dog; Colesteatoma: tomografia computadorizada e radiografia em cao com otite cronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotta, Alexandra Frey; Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: a_fbelotta@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia . Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria; Arruda, Vanesa Kutz de; Amorim, Rogerio Martins [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Clinica Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Cholesteatoma, a rare and/or misdiagnosed disease, results of a serious complication in dogs with chronic otitis. This article describes a case of a dachshund sent to the veterinary hospital presenting signs of cognitive dysfunction associated to peripheral neuropathy of the facial nerve on the right side. At radiography, an enlargement and thickness of the contours associated with loss of anatomical definition of the right tympanic bulla compared to the left was seen. At tomography, this enlargement and thickness were seen with better definition, besides the fulfilling by hyperdense calcified content, bullae osteolysis and temporal bone sclerosis at the same side. (author)

  4. Efficacy of plain radiography and computer tomography in localizing the site of pelvic arterial bleeding in trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormagen, Johann B. (Dept. of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)), e-mail: johannd@medisin.uio.no; Toetterman, Anna (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Roeise, Olav (Div. of Neuroscience and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)); Sandvik, Leiv (Center for Clinical Research, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)); Kloew, Nils-E. (Dept. of Cardiovascular Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital - Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-01-15

    Background: Immediate angiography is warranted in pelvic trauma patients with suspected arterial injury (AI) in order to stop ongoing bleeding. Prior to angiography, plain pelvic radiography (PPR) and abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) are performed to identify fracture and hematoma sites. Purpose: To investigate if PPR and CT can identify the location of AI in trauma patients undergoing angiography. Material and Methods: 95 patients with pelvic fractures on PPR (29 women, 66 men), at a mean age of 44 (9-92) years, underwent pelvic angiography for suspected AI. Fifty-six of them underwent CT additionally. Right and left anterior and posterior fractures on PPR were registered, and fracture displacement was recorded for each quadrant. Arterial blush on CT was registered, and the size of the hematoma in each region was measured in cm2. AIs were registered for anterior and posterior segments of both internal iliac arteries. Presence of fractures, arterial blush, and hematomas were correlated with AI. Results: Presence of fracture in the corresponding skeletal segment on PPR showed sensitivity and specificity of 0.86 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.87 and 0.44 anteriorly. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.77 and 0.69, respectively. Fracture displacement on PPR >0.9 cm posteriorly and >1.9 cm anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.84. Sensitivities of arterial blush and hematoma on CT were 0.38 and 0.82 posteriorly, and 0.24 and 0.82 anteriorly. The specificities were 0.96 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.79 and 0.53 anteriorly, respectively. For hematomas, the AUC was 0.79 posteriorly and 0.75 anteriorly. Size of hematoma >22 cm2 posteriorly and >29 cm2 anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.85 and 0.86, respectively. Conclusion: CT findings of arterial blush and hematoma predicted site of arterial bleeding on pelvic angiography. Also, PPR predicted the site of bleeding using location of fracture and size of displacement. In the hemodynamically unstable patient, PPR may

  5. Efficacy of plain radiography and computer tomography in localizing the site of pelvic arterial bleeding in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormagen, Johann B; Tötterman, Anna; Røise, Olav; Sandvik, Leiv; Kløw, Nils-E

    2010-02-01

    Immediate angiography is warranted in pelvic trauma patients with suspected arterial injury (AI) in order to stop ongoing bleeding. Prior to angiography, plain pelvic radiography (PPR) and abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) are performed to identify fracture and hematoma sites. To investigate if PPR and CT can identify the location of AI in trauma patients undergoing angiography. 95 patients with pelvic fractures on PPR (29 women, 66 men), at a mean age of 44 (9-92) years, underwent pelvic angiography for suspected AI. Fifty-six of them underwent CT additionally. Right and left anterior and posterior fractures on PPR were registered, and fracture displacement was recorded for each quadrant. Arterial blush on CT was registered, and the size of the hematoma in each region was measured in cm(2). AIs were registered for anterior and posterior segments of both internal iliac arteries. Presence of fractures, arterial blush, and hematomas were correlated with AI. Presence of fracture in the corresponding skeletal segment on PPR showed sensitivity and specificity of 0.86 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.87 and 0.44 anteriorly. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.77 and 0.69, respectively. Fracture displacement on PPR >0.9 cm posteriorly and >1.9 cm anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.84. Sensitivities of arterial blush and hematoma on CT were 0.38 and 0.82 posteriorly, and 0.24 and 0.82 anteriorly. The specificities were 0.96 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.79 and 0.53 anteriorly, respectively. For hematomas, the AUC was 0.79 posteriorly and 0.75 anteriorly. Size of hematoma >22 cm(2) posteriorly and >29 cm(2) anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.85 and 0.86, respectively. CT findings of arterial blush and hematoma predicted site of arterial bleeding on pelvic angiography. Also, PPR predicted the site of bleeding using location of fracture and size of displacement. In the hemodynamically unstable patient, PPR may contribute equally to effective assessment of injured arteries.

  6. Morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) evidenced by gross osteology, radiography and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, M; du Plessis, W M; Groenewald, H B; Barrows, M; Koeppel, K N

    2015-12-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is a quadrupedal arboreal animal primarily distributed in the Himalayas and southern China. It is a species commonly kept in zoological collections. This study was carried out to describe the morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda evidenced by gross osteology, radiography and computed tomography as a reference for clinical use and identification of skeletons. Radiography of the pelvis and right hind limb was performed in nine and seven animals, respectively. Radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from three adult animals. Computed tomography of the torso and hind limb was performed in one animal. The pelvic bone had a wide ventromedial surface of the ilium. The trochlea of the femur was wide and shallow. The patella was similar to that seen in feline species. The medial fabella was not seen radiographically in any animal. The cochlea grooves of the tibia were shallow with a poorly defined intermediate ridge. The trochlea of the talus was shallow and presented with an almost flattened medial ridge. The tarsal sesamoid bone was always present. The lateral process of the base of the fifth metatarsal (MT) bone was directed laterally. The MT bones were widely spaced. The morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda indicated flexibility of the pelvis and hind limb joints as an adaptation to an arboreal quadrupedal lifestyle. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Imaging in rheumatoid arthritis--status and recent advances for magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, computed tomography and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Morten; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Dohn, U.M.

    2008-01-01

    , and have several documented and potential applications in RA patients. This chapter will review key aspects of the current status and recent important advances in imaging in RA, briefly discussing X-ray and computed tomography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. Suggestions for use in clinical trials...

  8. Relationships among measurements obtained by use of computed tomography and radiography and scores of cartilage microdamage in hip joints with moderate to severe joint laxity of adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mandi J; Lewis, Brooke P; Swaab, Megan E; Markel, Mark D

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate correlations among measurements on radiographic and computed tomography (CT) images with articular cartilage microdamage in lax hip joints of dogs. 12 adult mixed-breed hounds. Pelvic CT and radiography were performed. Hip joints were harvested following euthanasia. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) and PennHIP radiograph reports were obtained. Norberg angle (NA) and radiographic percentage femoral head coverage (RPC) were determined. Center-edge angle (CEA), horizontal toit externe angle (HTEA), ventral acetabular sector angle (VASA), dorsal acetabular sector angle (DASA), horizontal acetabular sector angle (HASA), acetabular index (AI), and CT percentage femoral head coverage (CPC) were measured on 2-dimensional CT images. Femoral head-acetabular shelf percentage was measured on sagittal 3-dimensional CT (SCT) and transverse 3-dimensional CT (TCT) images. Light microscopy was used to score joint cartilage. Relationships of OFA confirmation and PennHIP osteoarthritis scores with radiography, CT, and cartilage variables and relationships of cartilage scores with radiography and CT measurements were evaluated with Spearman rank correlations. Pearson correlation was used for relationships of distraction index (DI) with radiography, CT, and cartilage variables. Significant relationships included PennHIP osteoarthritis score with cartilage score, CEA, HTEA, DASA, AI, CPC, and TCT; OFA confirmation score with cartilage score, NA, RPC, CEA, HTEA, DASA, AI, CPC, and TCT; cartilage score with NA, RPC, CEA, HTEA, DASA, HASA, AI, and TCT; and DI with cartilage score, CEA, HTEA, DASA, HASA, AI, and CPC. CT appeared to be a valuable imaging modality for predicting cartilage microdamage in canine hip joints.

  9. Comparative study between computed radiography and conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorhazleena Azaman; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Sapizah Rahim; Shaharudin Sayuti; Arshad Yassin; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    In Industrial Radiography, there are many criteria that need to be considered based on established standards to accept or reject the radiographic film. For conventional radiography, we need to consider the optical density by using the densitometer when viewing the film on the viewer. But in the computed radiography (CR) we need to evaluate and performed the analysis from the quality of the digital image through grey value. There are many factors that affected the digital image quality. One of the factors which are affected to the digital image quality in the image processing is grey value that related to the contrast resolution. In this work, we performed grey value study measurement on digital radiography systems and compared it with exposed films in conventional radiography. The test sample is a steel step wedge. We found out the contrast resolution is higher in Computed Radiography compared with Conventional Radiography. (author)

  10. Computed radiography for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tatsuya; Muramatsu, Yukio

    1990-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility of using computed radiographic mammography in mass surveys of the breast, we have retrospectively examined 71 breast cancer lesions in 71 patients using computed radiographic and conventional non-screen mammographies and have carried out comparative studies on tumor detection rate and calcification. A 95.8% detection rate was obtained for the tumor image (n 71) using computed radiography (CR) and one of 93.0% using non-screen techniques. Three lesions remained undetected by either study. A 100% detection rate was obtained for calcification associated with cancer (n 33) from each method. No significant differences in either detection rate or calcification were seen between the two images. On the other hand, the ability to recognize tumor images (n 66) was as follows; CR superior to non-screen radiography in 53 lesions (80.3%), equal in eight lesions (12.1%) and inferior in five lesions (7.6%). For the calcification images (n 18), CR was superior to non-screen radiography in all 18 lesions. Obviously, CR gives better results than non-screen radiography. Furthermore, an adequate image can be obtained using CR even although the X-ray dosage is only a twentieth of that required for non-screen radiography. It can therefore be applied not only to mass surveys for breast cancer but also to routine clinical diagnoses. (author)

  11. Quality control of aluminium casting: X ray radiography or tomography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, B.; Tamziti, J.; Grignard, A.; Peix, G.; Kaftandjian, V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: X ray radiography has been for years a well known method commonly used for controlling parts either on line or off line. The purpose is to detect internal defects or to achieve reverse engineering on the parts. More recently two-dimensional or three-dimensional Computed Tomography has been introduced and provides key advantages over standard X ray radiography, such as dimensional measurement of complex objects with hidden structures and 3D defect localisation. However, from the user point of view, despite the clear advantages of tomography, the time consuming drawback is predominant, and thus, it is worth assessing the added value of tomography with respect to several radioscopic images. It is clear that there is no unique response to that question. If unacceptable defects are already detected in one radioscopic image, then the sample can be rejected and 3D tomography is useless. On another hand, 3D tomography cannot be replaced if internal structures such as holes must be measured with accuracy. The paper will present a comparison between radiography and tomography for controlling parts in the aluminium casting industry. Advantages and drawbacks of both methods will be reviewed. Performance features in both cases will be assessed in this specific industrial case by estimating the defect detection efficiency and image quality parameters. (authors)

  12. Quality comparison between DEF-10 digital image from simulation technique and Computed Tomography (CR) technique in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Nur Syatirah Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The study was conducted to make comparison of digital image quality of DEF-10 from the techniques of simulation and computed radiography (CR). The sample used is steel DEF-10 with thickness of 15.28 mm. In this study, the sample is exposed to radiation from X-ray machine (ISOVOLT Titan E) with certain parameters. The parameters used in this study such as current, volt, exposure time and distance are specified. The current and distance of 3 mA and 700 mm respectively are specified while the applied voltage varies at 140, 160, 180 and 200 kV. The exposure time is reduced at a rate of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 % for each sample exposure. Digital image of simulation produced from aRTist software whereas digital image of computed radiography produced from imaging plate. Therefore, both images were compared qualitatively (sensitivity) and quantitatively (Signal to-Noise Ratio; SNR, Basic Spatial Resolution; SRb and LOP size) using Isee software. Radiographic sensitivity is indicated by Image Quality Indicator (IQI) which is the ability of the CR system and aRTist software to identify IQI of wire type when the time exposure is reduced up to 80% according to exposure chart ( D7; ISOVOLT Titan E). The image of the thinnest wire diameter achieved by radiograph from simulation and CR are the wire numbered 7 rather than the wire numbered 8 required by the standard. In quantitative comparison, this study shows that the SNR values decreases with reducing exposure time. SRb values increases for simulation and decreases for CR when the exposure time decreases and the good image quality can be achieved at 80% reduced exposure time. The high SNR and SRb values produced good image quality in CR and simulation techniques respectively. (author)

  13. Computed radiography in NDT application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deprins, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Computed Radiography, or digital radiography by use of reusable Storage Phosphor screens, offers a convenient and reliable way to replace film. In addition to the reduced cost on consumables, the return on investment of CR systems is strongly determined by savings in exposure time, processing times and archival times. But also intangible costs like plant shutdown, environment safety and longer usability of isotopes are increasingly important when considering replacing film by Storage Phosphor systems. But mote than in traditional radiography, the use of digital images is a trade-off between the speed and the required quality. Better image quality is obtained by longer exposure times, slower phosphor screens and higher scan resolutions. Therefore, different kinds of storage phosphor screens are needed in order to cover every application. Most operations have the data, associated with the tests to be performed, centrally stored in a database. Using a digital radiography system gives not only the advantages of the manipulation of digital images, but also the digital data that is associated with it. Smart methods to associate cassettes and Storage screens with exposed images enhance the workflow of the NDT processes, and avoid human error. Automated measurements tools increase the throughput in different kinds of operations. This paper gives an overview of the way certain operations have decided to replace film by Computed Radiography, and what the major benefits for them have been.

  14. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-; Maria Monea Adriana; Monica Monea; Mihai Pop; Angela Borda

    2016-01-01

    Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT) used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 i...

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Periapical Radiography and Cone-beam Computed Tomography in Identifying Root Canal Configuration of Human Premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Thiago Oliveira; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Nascimento, Eduarda Helena Leandro; Peroni, Leonardo Vieira; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; Hassan, Bassam

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of periapical radiography (PR) and cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging in the detection of the root canal configuration (RCC) of human premolars. PR and CBCT imaging of 114 extracted human premolars were evaluated by 2 oral radiologists. RCC was recorded according to Vertucci's classification. Micro-computed tomographic imaging served as the gold standard to determine RCC. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated. The Friedman test compared both PR and CBCT imaging with the gold standard. CBCT imaging showed higher values for all diagnostic tests compared with PR. Accuracy was 0.55 and 0.89 for PR and CBCT imaging, respectively. There was no difference between CBCT imaging and the gold standard, whereas PR differed from both CBCT and micro-computed tomographic imaging (P < .0001). CBCT imaging was more accurate than PR for evaluating different types of RCC individually. Canal configuration types III, VII, and "other" were poorly identified on CBCT imaging with a detection accuracy of 50%, 0%, and 43%, respectively. With PR, all canal configurations except type I were poorly visible. PR presented low performance in the detection of RCC in premolars, whereas CBCT imaging showed no difference compared with the gold standard. Canals with complex configurations were less identifiable using both imaging methods, especially PR. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutron radiography and X-ray computed tomography for quantifying weathering and water uptake processes inside porous limestone used as building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanckele, J.; De Kock, T.; Fronteau, G.; Derluyn, H.; Vontobel, P.; Dierick, M.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2014-01-01

    Euville and Savonnières limestones were weathered by acid test and this resulted in the formation of a gypsum crust. In order to characterize the crystallization pattern and the evolution of the pore structure below the crust, a combination of high resolution X-ray computed tomography and SEM–EDS was used. A time lapse sequence of the changing pore structure in both stones was obtained and afterwards quantified by using image analysis. The difference in weathering of both stones by the same process could be explained by the underlying microstructure and texture. Because water and moisture play a crucial role in the weathering processes, water uptake in weathered and non-weathered samples was characterized based on neutron radiography. In this way the water uptake was both visualized and quantified in function of the height of the sample and in function of time. In general, the formation of a gypsum crust on limestone slows down the initial water uptake in the materials. - Highlights: • Time lapse sequence in 3D of changing pore structures inside limestone • A combination of X-ray CT, SEM and neutron radiography was used. • Quantification of water content in function of time, height and weathering • Characterization of weathering processes due to gypsum crystallization

  17. Computed tomography scout views vs. conventional radiography in body-packers – Delineation of body-packs and radiation dose in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegeler, Edvard, E-mail: edvard.ziegeler@campus.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Grimm, Jochen M., E-mail: jochen.grimm@med.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Wirth, Stefan, E-mail: tefan.wirth@med.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Uhl, Michael, E-mail: michael.uhl@polizei.bayern.de [Bavarian State Criminal Police Office, Maillingerstrasse 15, 80636 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Scherr, Michael K., E-mail: Michael.Scherr@med.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objective: To compare abdominal computed tomography (CT) scout views with conventional radiography regarding radiation dose and delineation of drug packages in a porcine body-packer model. Materials and methods: Nine samples of illicit drugs packed in ovoid plastic containers were consecutively placed in the rectum of a 121.5 kg pig cadaver. Antero-posterior and lateral scout views were obtained at 120 kVp and 80 mA, 150 mA and 200 mA, respectively, using a 64-row MDCT. Scout views were compared with conventional abdominal antero-posterior radiographs (77 kV and 106 ± 13 mAs). Visibility of three body pack characteristics (wrapping, content, shape) was rated independently by two radiologists and summarized to a delineation score ranging from 0 to 9 with a score ≥6 representing sufficient delineation. Mean delineation scores were calculated for each conventional radiography and single plane scout view separately and for a combined rating of antero-posterior and lateral scout views. Results: Even the lowest single plane scout view delineation score (5.3 ± 2.0 for 80 mA lateral; 0.4 mSv; sensitivity = 44%) was significantly higher than for conventional radiographs (3.1 ± 2.5, p < 0.001; 2.4 ± 0.3 mSv; sensitivity = 11%). Combined reading of antero-posterior and lateral scout views 80 mA yielded sufficient delineation (6.2 ± 1.4; 0.8 mSv; sensitivity = 56%). Conclusions: All CT scout views showed significantly better delineation ratings and sensitivity than conventional radiographs. Scout views in two planes at 80 mA provided a sufficient level of delineation and a sensitivity five times higher than conventional radiography at less than one third of the radiation dose. In case of diagnostic insecurity, CT can be performed without additional logistical effort.

  18. Rhinoceros feet step out of a rule-of-thumb: a wildlife imaging pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography-digital radiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Galateanu

    Full Text Available Currently, radiography is the only imaging technique used to diagnose bone pathology in wild animals situated under "field conditions". Nevertheless, while chronic foot disease in captive mega-herbivores is widely reported, foot radiographic imaging is confronted with scarcity of studies. Numerous hindrances lead to such limited numbers and it became very clear that the traditional perspective on bone imaging in domestic animals based on extensive studies and elaborated statistical evaluations cannot be extrapolated to their non-domestic relatives. For these reasons, the authors initiated a multi-modality imaging study and established a pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography (CT and digital radiography (DR, based on X-ray projections derived from three-dimensional CT reconstructed images. Whereas this approach can be applied in any clinical field, as a case of outstanding importance and great concern for zoological institutions, we selected foot bone pathologies in captive rhinoceroses to demonstrate the manifold applications of the method. Several advances were achieved, endowing the wildlife clinician with all-important tools: prototype DR exposure protocols and a modus operandi for foot positioning, advancing both traditional projections and, for the first-time, species-related radiographic views; assessment of radiographic diagnostic value for the whole foot and, in premiere, for each autopodial bone; together with additional insights into radiographic appearance of bone anatomy and pathology with a unique, simultaneous CT-DR correlation. Based on its main advantages in availing a wide range of keystone data in wildlife imaging from a limited number of examined subjects and combining advantages of CT as the golden standard method for bone diseases' diagnostic with DR's clinical feasibility under field conditions, synchronized CT-DR presents a new perspective on wildlife's health management. With this we hope to provide

  19. Rhinoceros feet step out of a rule-of-thumb: a wildlife imaging pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography-digital radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galateanu, Gabriela; Hermes, Robert; Saragusty, Joseph; Göritz, Frank; Potier, Romain; Mulot, Baptiste; Maillot, Alexis; Etienne, Pascal; Bernardino, Rui; Fernandes, Teresa; Mews, Jurgen; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Currently, radiography is the only imaging technique used to diagnose bone pathology in wild animals situated under "field conditions". Nevertheless, while chronic foot disease in captive mega-herbivores is widely reported, foot radiographic imaging is confronted with scarcity of studies. Numerous hindrances lead to such limited numbers and it became very clear that the traditional perspective on bone imaging in domestic animals based on extensive studies and elaborated statistical evaluations cannot be extrapolated to their non-domestic relatives. For these reasons, the authors initiated a multi-modality imaging study and established a pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR), based on X-ray projections derived from three-dimensional CT reconstructed images. Whereas this approach can be applied in any clinical field, as a case of outstanding importance and great concern for zoological institutions, we selected foot bone pathologies in captive rhinoceroses to demonstrate the manifold applications of the method. Several advances were achieved, endowing the wildlife clinician with all-important tools: prototype DR exposure protocols and a modus operandi for foot positioning, advancing both traditional projections and, for the first-time, species-related radiographic views; assessment of radiographic diagnostic value for the whole foot and, in premiere, for each autopodial bone; together with additional insights into radiographic appearance of bone anatomy and pathology with a unique, simultaneous CT-DR correlation. Based on its main advantages in availing a wide range of keystone data in wildlife imaging from a limited number of examined subjects and combining advantages of CT as the golden standard method for bone diseases' diagnostic with DR's clinical feasibility under field conditions, synchronized CT-DR presents a new perspective on wildlife's health management. With this we hope to provide veterinary clinicians

  20. Rhinoceros Feet Step Out of a Rule-of-Thumb: A Wildlife Imaging Pioneering Approach of Synchronized Computed Tomography-Digital Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragusty, Joseph; Göritz, Frank; Potier, Romain; Mulot, Baptiste; Maillot, Alexis; Etienne, Pascal; Bernardino, Rui; Fernandes, Teresa; Mews, Jurgen; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Currently, radiography is the only imaging technique used to diagnose bone pathology in wild animals situated under “field conditions”. Nevertheless, while chronic foot disease in captive mega-herbivores is widely reported, foot radiographic imaging is confronted with scarcity of studies. Numerous hindrances lead to such limited numbers and it became very clear that the traditional perspective on bone imaging in domestic animals based on extensive studies and elaborated statistical evaluations cannot be extrapolated to their non-domestic relatives. For these reasons, the authors initiated a multi-modality imaging study and established a pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR), based on X-ray projections derived from three-dimensional CT reconstructed images. Whereas this approach can be applied in any clinical field, as a case of outstanding importance and great concern for zoological institutions, we selected foot bone pathologies in captive rhinoceroses to demonstrate the manifold applications of the method. Several advances were achieved, endowing the wildlife clinician with all-important tools: prototype DR exposure protocols and a modus operandi for foot positioning, advancing both traditional projections and, for the first-time, species-related radiographic views; assessment of radiographic diagnostic value for the whole foot and, in premiere, for each autopodial bone; together with additional insights into radiographic appearance of bone anatomy and pathology with a unique, simultaneous CT-DR correlation. Based on its main advantages in availing a wide range of keystone data in wildlife imaging from a limited number of examined subjects and combining advantages of CT as the golden standard method for bone diseases' diagnostic with DR's clinical feasibility under field conditions, synchronized CT-DR presents a new perspective on wildlife's health management. With this we hope to provide veterinary

  1. Contribution of computed tomography in patients with lung metastases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma not apparent on plain radiography who were treated with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Pedro W.S.; Purisch, Saulo; Barroso, Alvarao L.; Rezende, Leonardo L.; Padrao, Eduardo L.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT or CAT Scan) of the chest is more sensitive than radiography in the detection of lung metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but little information is available regarding the aggregated value of this method. The present study evaluated the response of patients with lung metastases of DTC not apparent on radiography to treatment with 131 I and the value of CT in these cases. Twenty-five patients with lung metastases not apparent on radiography, who initially received 100-200 mCi I 151 , were evaluated and those presenting pulmonary uptake on post-therapy WBS were submitted to a new treatment after 6 to 12 months, and so on. The chance of detection of pulmonary uptake on post-therapy WBS did not differ between patients with negative and positive CT (100% versus 91.5%). Mean serum Tg levels were higher in patients with positive CT (108 ng/ml versus 52 ng/ml). Negative post-therapy WBS was achieved in 82% of patients with positive CT and in 92.3% with negative CT and the cumulative I 131 activity necessary to achieve this outcome did not differ between the two groups (mean = 300 mCi). Stimulated Tg was undetectable in 47% of patients with negative CT at the end of treatment, but in none of the patients whose CT continued to be positive. In patients with elevated Tg, the CT result apparently did not change the indication of therapy or the I 131 activity to be administered. In cases with lung metastases, the persistence of micronodules on CT was associated with the persistence of detectable Tg in patients presenting negative post-therapy WBS. (author)

  2. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.; Davis, J.; Morgan, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray or gamma-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that produces two-dimensional cross-sectional images of an object without the need to physically section it. CT is also known by the acronym CAT, for computerised axial tomography. This review article presents a brief historical perspective on CT, its current status and the underlying physics. The mathematical fundamentals of computed tomography are developed for the simplest transmission CT modality. A description of CT scanner instrumentation is provided with an emphasis on radiation sources and systems. Examples of CT images are shown indicating the range of materials that can be scanned and the spatial and contrast resolutions that may be achieved. Attention is also given to the occurrence, interpretation and minimisation of various image artefacts that may arise. A final brief section is devoted to the principles and potential of a range of more recently developed tomographic modalities including diffraction CT, positron emission CT and seismic tomography. 57 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs

  3. Detection of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist joints with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døhn, Uffe Møller; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Hasselquist, Maria

    2008-01-01

    , specificity and accuracy (concordance) of MRI for detecting erosions were 61%, 93% and 77%, respectively, while the respective values were 24%, 99% and 63% for radiography. The intramodality agreements when measuring erosion volumes were high for both CT and MRI (Spearman correlation coefficients 0.92 and 0...... sensitivity and good specificity and accuracy for detection of erosions in rheumatoid arthritis and healthy wrist bones, while radiography showed very low sensitivity. The tested volumetric method was highly reproducible and correlated to scores of erosions....... measuring volumes of erosions on CT and MRI is reproducible and correlated to semiquantitative assessments (scores) of erosions on CT, MRI and radiography. METHODS: Seventeen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and four healthy control individuals underwent CT, MRI and radiography of one wrist, performed...

  4. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, M.; Resnick, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has matured into a reliable and prominent tool for study of the muscoloskeletal system. When it was introduced in 1973, it was unique in many ways and posed a challenge to interpretation. It is in these unique features, however, that its advantages lie in comparison with conventional techniques. These advantages will be described in a spectrum of important applications in orthopedics and rheumatology

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  6. Illustrated computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.

    1983-01-01

    This book provides the following information: basic aspects of computed tomography; atlas of computed tomography of the normal adult; clinical application of computed tomography; and radiotherapy planning and computed tomography

  7. X-ray radiography and tomography applied to material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechapt, Jean de.

    1982-11-01

    X-ray radiography and tomography are compared to detect a defect in an object. These image acquisition processes are first modelled by a convolution system. For a fixed contrast defect and a given X ray dose, the process providing the best signal-to-noise ratio is given by calculation. Then a system for pattern recognition is given: for identifying a defect, the related signs from binary images are sorted according to their size. The improvement in the detection performance of the device, for an adapted filtration of the images obtained, is assessed. The whole of the preceding results is validated on images synthesized on a computer, selecting between tomography and radiography, the technique making it possible to ensure the detectability of a defect with a minimal dose of X photons [fr

  8. Discrete tomography in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuba, Attila; Rodek, Lajos; Kiss, Zoltan; Rusko, Laszlo; Nagy, Antal; Balasko, Marton

    2005-01-01

    Discrete tomography (DT) is an imaging technique for reconstructing discrete images from their projections using the knowledge that the object to be reconstructed contains only a few homogeneous materials characterized by known discrete absorption values. One of the main reasons for applying DT is that we will hopefully require relatively few projections. Using discreteness and some a priori information (such as an approximate shape of the object) we can apply two DT methods in neutron imaging by reducing the problem to an optimization task. The first method is a special one because it is only suitable if the object is composed of cylinders and sphere shapes. The second method is a general one in the sense that it can be used for reconstructing objects of any shape. Software was developed and physical experiments performed in order to investigate the effects of several reconstruction parameters: the number of projections, noise levels, and complexity of the object to be reconstructed. We give a summary of the experimental results and make a comparison of the results obtained using a classical reconstruction technique (FBP). The programs we developed are available in our DT reconstruction program package DIRECT

  9. Dose optimisation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner-Karoussou, A.

    2005-01-01

    After the installation of computed radiography (CR) systems in three hospitals in Luxembourg a patient dose survey was carried out for three radiographic examinations, thorax, pelvis and lumbar spine. It was found that the patient doses had changed in comparison with the patient doses measured for conventional radiography in the same three hospitals. A close collaboration between the manufacturers of the X-ray installations, the CR imaging systems and the medical physicists led to the discovery that the speed class with which each radiographic examination was to be performed, had been ignored, during installation of the digital imaging systems. A number of procedures were carried out in order to calibrate and program the X-ray installations in conjunction with the CR systems. Following this optimisation procedure, a new patient dose survey was carried out for the three radiographic examinations. It was found that patient doses for the three hospitals were reduced. (authors)

  10. Computational radiology in skeletal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peloschek, Ph.; Nemec, S.; Widhalm, P.; Donner, R.; Birngruber, E.; Thodberg, H.H.; Kainberger, F.; Langs, G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have brought rapid developments in computational image analysis in musculo-skeletal radiology. Meanwhile the algorithms have reached a maturity that makes initial clinical use feasible. Applications range from joint space measurement to erosion quantification, and from fracture detection to the assessment of alignment angles. Current results of computational image analysis in radiography are very promising, but some fundamental issues remain to be clarified, among which the definition of the optimal trade off between automatization and operator-dependency, the integration of these tools into clinical work flow and last not least the proof of incremental clinical benefit of these methods.

  11. Prevalence and Clinical Import of Thoracic Injury Identified by Chest Computed Tomography but Not Chest Radiography in Blunt Trauma: Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, Mark I; Medak, Anthony J; Hendey, Gregory W; Nishijima, Daniel K; Mower, William R; Raja, Ali S; Baumann, Brigitte M; Anglin, Deirdre R; Anderson, Craig L; Lotfipour, Shahram; Reed, Karin E; Zuabi, Nadia; Khan, Nooreen A; Bithell, Chelsey A; Rowther, Armaan A; Villar, Julian; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) diagnoses more injuries than chest radiography, so-called occult injuries. Wide availability of chest CT has driven substantial increase in emergency department use, although the incidence and clinical significance of chest CT findings have not been fully described. We determine the frequency, severity, and clinical import of occult injury, as determined by changes in management. These data will better inform clinical decisions, need for chest CT, and odds of intervention. Our sample included prospective data (2009 to 2013) on 5,912 patients at 10 Level I trauma center EDs with both chest radiography and chest CT at physician discretion. These patients were 40.6% of 14,553 enrolled in the parent study who had either chest radiography or chest CT. Occult injuries were pneumothorax, hemothorax, sternal or greater than 2 rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, thoracic spine or scapula fracture, and diaphragm or great vessel injury found on chest CT but not on preceding chest radiography. A priori, we categorized thoracic injuries as major (having invasive procedures), minor (observation or inpatient pain control >24 hours), or of no clinical significance. Primary outcome was prevalence and proportion of occult injury with major interventions of chest tube, mechanical ventilation, or surgery. Secondary outcome was minor interventions of admission rate or observation hours because of occult injury. Two thousand forty-eight patients (34.6%) had chest injury on chest radiography or chest CT, whereas 1,454 of these patients (71.0%, 24.6% of all patients) had occult injury. Of these, in 954 patients (46.6% of injured, 16.1% of total), chest CT found injuries not observed on immediately preceding chest radiography. In 500 more patients (24.4% of injured patients, 8.5% of all patients), chest radiography found some injury, but chest CT found occult injury. Chest radiography found all injuries in only 29.0% of injured patients. Two hundred and two

  12. A comparative study of cone beam computed tomography and conventional radiography in diagnosing the extent of root resorptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Alamadi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Root resorptions are assessed and diagnosed using different radiographical techniques. A comparison of the ability to assess resorptions on two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D radiographs is, hitherto, lacking. The aims of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of 2D (periapical radiographs, PA and panoramic radiograph, PAN and 3D (cone beam computed tomography, CBCT radiographic techniques in measuring slanted root resorptions compared to the true resorptions, a histological gold standard, in addition to a comparison of all the radiographic techniques to each other. Methods Radiographs (CBCT, PA, and PAN, in addition to histological sections, of extracted deciduous canines from thirty-four patients were analyzed. Linear measurements of the most and least resorbed side of the root, i.e., “slanted” resorptions, were measured using an analyzing software (Facad ®. For classification of slanted root resorptions, a modified Malmgren index was used. Results PAN underestimated the root length on both the least and most resorbed side. Small resorptions, i.e., low modified Malmgren scores, were more difficult to record and were only assessed accurately using CBCT. The root resorption scores were underestimated using PA and PAN. In assessment of linear measures, PAN differed significantly from both CBCT and PA. Conclusions CBCT is the most accurate technique when measuring and scoring slanted root resorptions.

  13. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 instruments were fractured in the root canals. Digital intraoral periapical radiographs from two angles and CBCT scans were made with the teeth fixed in position. The images were evaluated and the number of detected accidents were stated in percentages. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi square-test. Results: On digital periapical radiographs the evaluators identified 12 (66.66% perforations, 10 (100 % separated instruments and 10 (76.9% created ledges. The CBCT scans made possible the recognition of 17 (94.66 % perforations, 9 (90 % separated instruments and 13 (100% ledges. The totally recognized accidental procedures showed significant differences between the two groups. (p<0.05 Conclusion: Digital periapical radiographs are the most common imaging modalities used during endodontic treatments. Though, the CBCT allows a better identification of the procedural accidents.

  14. An evaluation of the periapical status of teeth with necrotic pulps using periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, F; Patel, S; Durán-Sindreu, F; Mercadé, M; Bueno, R; Roig, M

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the presence or absence of periapical (PA) radiolucencies on individual roots of teeth with necrotic pulps, as assessed with digital PA radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Digital PA radiographs and CBCT scans were taken from 161 endodontically untreated teeth (from 155 patients) diagnosed with non-vital pulps (pulp necrosis with normal PA tissue, symptomatic apical periodontitis, asymptomatic apical periodontitis, acute apical abscess and chronic apical abscess). Images were assessed by two calibrated endodontists to analyse the radiographic PA status of the teeth. A consensus was reached in the event of any disagreement. The data were analysed using a McNemar's test, and significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Three hundred and forty paired images of roots were assessed with both digital PA radiographs and CBCT images. Fifteen additional roots were identified with CBCT. PA radiolucencies were present in 132 (38.8%) roots when assessed with PA radiographs, and in 196 (57.6%) roots when assessed with CBCT. This difference was statistically significant (P apical periodontitis or acute apical abscess, CBCT images revealed a statistically larger number of PA radiolucencies than did PA radiographs (P asymptomatic apical periodontitis (P = 0.31) or chronic apical abscess (P = 1). Unlike PA radiographs, CBCT revealed a higher prevalence of PA radiolucencies when endodontically untreated teeth with non-vital pulps were examined. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparison of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography in Predicting Treatment Decision for Periapical Lesions: A Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Balasundaram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare the ability of endodontists to determine the size of apical pathological lesions and select the most appropriate choice of treatment based on lesions’ projected image characteristics using 2 D and 3 D images. Study Design. Twenty-four subjects were selected. Radiographic examination of symptomatic study teeth with an intraoral periapical radiograph revealed periapical lesions equal to or greater than 3 mm in the greatest diameter. Cone-beam Computed tomography (CBCT images were made of the involved teeth after the intraoral periapical radiograph confirmed the size of lesion to be equal to greater than 3 mm. Six observers (endodontists viewed both the periapical and CBCT images. Upon viewing each of the images from the two imaging modalities, observers (1 measured lesion size and (2 made decisions on treatment based on each radiograph. Chi-square test was used to look for differences in the choice of treatment among observers. Results. No significant difference was noted in the treatment plan selected by observers using the two modalities (χ2(3=.036, P>0.05. Conclusion. Lesion size and choice of treatment of periapical lesions based on CBCT radiographs do not change significantly from those made on the basis of 2 D radiographs.

  16. Comparison of panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for qualitative and quantitative measurements regarding localization of permanent impacted maxillary canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Sarıkır

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the correlation between digital panoramic radiography (DPR and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT evaluations for localization of impacted permanent maxillary canines (IPMCs and for other qualitative and quantitative parameters. Materials and Method: DPR and CBCT images of 60 patients (17 men and 43 women were examined independently by two observers. Correlations between DPR and CBCT images were evaluated regarding qualitative (bucco-palatal positioning of IPMCs, morphology and presence of root resorption of adjacent permanent lateral incisors, and contact relationship between IPMCs and adjacent permanent lateral incisors and quantitative (angle measurements variables. All evaluations were repeated 1 month later by each observer. Chi-square and t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Kappa statistics were used to assess intra- and interobserver agreement (Cohen’s κ. Results: No correlation was observed for determination of bucco-palatal positioning of IPMCs between DPR and CBCT images (p>0.05. Correlations were observed for other qualitative variables (p<0.05. Differences between DPR and CBCT images were seen for all examined quantitative variables (p<0.01. Intra- and interobserver agreements were substantial to almost-perfect. Conclusion: No significant correlation was found between DPR and CBCT images for determination of bucco-palatal positioning of IPMCs. All quantitative measurements performed on DPR and CBCT images significantly differed from each other.

  17. The Reliability of Panoramic Radiography Versus Cone Beam Computed Tomography when Evaluating the Distance to the Alveolar Nerve in the Site of Lateral Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česaitienė, Gabrielė; Česaitis, Kęstutis; Junevičius, Jonas; Venskutonis, Tadas

    2017-07-04

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to compare the reliability of panoramic radiography (PR) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the evaluation of the distance of the roots of lateral teeth to the inferior alveolar nerve canal (IANC). MATERIAL AND METHODS 100 PR and 100 CBCT images that met the selection criteria were selected from the database. In PR images, the distances were measured using an electronic caliper with 0.01 mm accuracy and white light x-ray film reviewer. Actual values of the measurements were calculated taking into consideration the magnification used in PR images (130%). Measurements on CBCT images were performed using i-CAT Vision software. Statistical data analysis was performed using R software and applying Welch's t-test and the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the mean distance from the root of the second premolar and the mesial and distal roots of the first molar to the IANC between PR and CBCT images. The difference in the mean distance from the mesial and distal roots of the second and the third molars to the IANC measured in PR and CBCT images was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS PR may be uninformative or misleading when measuring the distance from the mesial and distal roots of the second and the third molars to the IANC.

  18. Application of computed radiography to ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shigeki; Mochizuki, Fukuji; Fujita, Naotaka; Itoh, Shoichiro; Ikeda, Takashi; Toyohara, Tokiaki; Matsumoto, Kyoichi

    1984-01-01

    Computed radiography technic was applied to ERCP. Fuji Computed Radiography System was used. The pancreatogram obtained by this method was compared with that of conventional screen-film radiograph. The much finer changes of the pancreatogram can be delineated by the new method. The diagnostic ability of ERCP is thus enhanced by the introduction of FCR. (author)

  19. Computed Radiography Exposure Indices in Mammography | Koen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed Radiography Exposure Indices in Mammography. L Koen, C Herbst, W Rae. Abstract. Background. Studies indicate that computed radiography (CR) can lead to increased radiation dose to patients. It is therefore important to relate the exposure indicators provided by CR manufacturers to the radiation dose ...

  20. Upgrading of neutron radiography/tomography facility at research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Bar, Waleed; Mongy, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    A state-of-the-art neutron tomography imaging system was set up at the neutron radiography beam tube at the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) and was successfully commissioned in 2013. This study presents a set of tomographic experiments that demonstrate a high quality tomographic image formation. A computer technique for data processing and 3D image reconstruction was used to see inside a copy module of an ancient clay article provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The technique was also able to uncover tomographic imaging details of a mummified fish and provided a high resolution tomographic image of a defective fire valve. (orig.)

  1. The neutron computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, G.; Krata, S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of computer tomography (CT) was applied for neutrons instead of X-rays. The neutron radiography image of samples was scanned by microphotometer to get the transmission data. This process was so time-consuming that the number of incident angles to samples could not be increased. The transmission data was processed by FACOM computer and CT image was gained. In the experiment at the Japan Research Reactor No. 4 at Tokai-mura with 18 projection angles, the resolution of paraffin in the aluminum block was less than 0.8 mm. In the experiment at Van de Graaf accelerator of Nagoya University, this same resolution was 1.2 mm because of the angle distribution of neutron beam. This experiment is the preliminary one, the facility which utilizes neutron television and video-recorder will be necessary for the next stage. (Auth.)

  2. Radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treimer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Neutron imaging became important when, besides providing impressive radiographic and tomographic images of various objects, physical, quantification of chemical, morphological or other parameters could be derived from 2D or 3D images. The spatial resolution of approximately 50 µm (and less) yields real space images of the bulk of specimens with more than some cm 3 in volume. Thus the physics or chemistry of structures in a sample can be compared with scattering functions obtained e.g. from neutron scattering. The advantages of using neutrons become more pronounced when the neutron spin comes into play. The interaction of neutrons with magnetism is unique due to their low attenuation by matter and because their spin is sensitive to magnetic fields. Magnetic fields, domains and quantum effects such as the Meissner effect and flux trapping can only be visualized and quantified in the bulk of matter by imaging with polarized neutrons. This additional experimental tool is gaining more and more importance. There is a large number of new fields that can be investigated by neutron imaging, not only in physics, but also in geology, archeology, cultural heritage, soil culture, applied material research, magnetism, etc. One of the top applications of polarized neutron imaging is the large field of superconductivity where the Meissner effect and flux pinning can be visualized and quantified. Here we will give a short summary of the results achieved by radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons. - Highlights: • Radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons yield new results concerning the suppressed Meissner effect and magnetic flux trapping. • Suppressed Meissner effect was observed in pure lead samples and niobium. • Trapped magnetic fields in cylindrical Pb samples are squeezed around the rod axis. • The shape and the amount of trapped fields could be determined and quantified

  3. Radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treimer, Wolfgang, E-mail: treimer@helmholtz-berlin.de [University of Applied Sciences, Beuth Hochschule für Technik Berlin, Department Mathematics Physics and Chemistry, Luxemburgerstr. 10, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum für Materialien und Energie, Department G – GTOMO, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Neutron imaging became important when, besides providing impressive radiographic and tomographic images of various objects, physical, quantification of chemical, morphological or other parameters could be derived from 2D or 3D images. The spatial resolution of approximately 50 µm (and less) yields real space images of the bulk of specimens with more than some cm{sup 3} in volume. Thus the physics or chemistry of structures in a sample can be compared with scattering functions obtained e.g. from neutron scattering. The advantages of using neutrons become more pronounced when the neutron spin comes into play. The interaction of neutrons with magnetism is unique due to their low attenuation by matter and because their spin is sensitive to magnetic fields. Magnetic fields, domains and quantum effects such as the Meissner effect and flux trapping can only be visualized and quantified in the bulk of matter by imaging with polarized neutrons. This additional experimental tool is gaining more and more importance. There is a large number of new fields that can be investigated by neutron imaging, not only in physics, but also in geology, archeology, cultural heritage, soil culture, applied material research, magnetism, etc. One of the top applications of polarized neutron imaging is the large field of superconductivity where the Meissner effect and flux pinning can be visualized and quantified. Here we will give a short summary of the results achieved by radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons. - Highlights: • Radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons yield new results concerning the suppressed Meissner effect and magnetic flux trapping. • Suppressed Meissner effect was observed in pure lead samples and niobium. • Trapped magnetic fields in cylindrical Pb samples are squeezed around the rod axis. • The shape and the amount of trapped fields could be determined and quantified.

  4. Computed radiography systems performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, Clarice C.; Nersissian, Denise Y.; Furquim, Tania A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a computed radiography system was evaluated, according to the AAPM Report No. 93. Evaluation tests proposed by the publication were performed, and the following nonconformities were found: imaging p/ate (lP) dark noise, which compromises the clinical image acquired using the IP; exposure indicator uncalibrated, which can cause underexposure to the IP; nonlinearity of the system response, which causes overexposure; resolution limit under the declared by the manufacturer and erasure thoroughness uncalibrated, impairing structures visualization; Moire pattern visualized at the grid response, and IP Throughput over the specified by the manufacturer. These non-conformities indicate that digital imaging systems' lack of calibration can cause an increase in dose in order that image prob/ems can be so/ved. (author)

  5. Standard guide for computed radiography

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides general tutorial information regarding the fundamental and physical principles of computed radiography (CR), definitions and terminology required to understand the basic CR process. An introduction to some of the limitations that are typically encountered during the establishment of techniques and basic image processing methods are also provided. This guide does not provide specific techniques or acceptance criteria for specific end-user inspection applications. Information presented within this guide may be useful in conjunction with those standards of 1.2. 1.2 CR techniques for general inspection applications may be found in Practice E2033. Technical qualification attributes for CR systems may be found in Practice E2445. Criteria for classification of CR system technical performance levels may be found in Practice E2446. Reference Images Standards E2422, E2660, and E2669 contain digital reference acceptance illustrations. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the st...

  6. Optimization of the radiological protection of patients undergoing radiography, fluoroscopy and computed tomography. Final report of a coordinated research project in Africa, Asia and eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    Although radiography has been an established imaging modality for over a century, continuous developments have led to improvements in technique resulting in improved image quality at reduced patient dose. If one compares the technique used by Roentgen with the methods used today, one finds that a radiograph can now be obtained at a dose which is smaller by a factor of 100 or more. Nonetheless, some national surveys, particularly in the United Kingdom and in the United States of America in the 1980s and 1990s, have indicated large variations in patient doses for the same diagnostic examination, in some cases by a factor of 20 or more. This arises not only owing to the various types of equipment and accessories used by the different health care providers, but also because of operational factors. The IAEA has a statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionising radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of those standards. A fundamental requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), issued by the IAEA in cooperation with the FAO, ILO, WHO, PAHO and NEA, is the optimization of radiological protection of patients undergoing medical exposure. Towards its responsibility of implementation of standards and under the subprogramme of radiation safety, in 1995, the IAEA launched a coordinated research project (CRP) on radiological protection in diagnostic radiology in some countries in the Eastern European, African and Asian region. Initially, the CRP addressed radiography only and it covered wide aspects of optimisation of radiological protection. Subsequently, the scope of the CRP was extended to fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT), but it covered primarily situation analysis of patient doses and equipment quality control. It did not cover patient dose reduction aspects in fluoroscopy and CT. The project

  7. Sonography of the chest using linear-array versus sector transducers: Correlation with auscultation, chest radiography, and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasci, Ozlem; Hatipoglu, Osman Nuri; Cagli, Bekir; Ermis, Veli

    2016-07-08

    The primary purpose of our study was to compare the efficacies of two sonographic (US) probes, a high-frequency linear-array probe and a lower-frequency phased-array sector probe in the diagnosis of basic thoracic pathologies. The secondary purpose was to compare the diagnostic performance of thoracic US with auscultation and chest radiography (CXR) using thoracic CT as a gold standard. In total, 55 consecutive patients scheduled for thoracic CT were enrolled in this prospective study. Four pathologic entities were evaluated: pneumothorax, pleural effusion, consolidation, and interstitial syndrome. A portable US scanner was used with a 5-10-MHz linear-array probe and a 1-5-MHz phased-array sector probe. The first probe used was chosen randomly. US, CXR, and auscultation results were compared with the CT results. The linear-array probe had the highest performance in the identification of pneumothorax (83% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 99% diagnostic accuracy) and pleural effusion (100% sensitivity, 97% specificity, and 98% diagnostic accuracy); the sector probe had the highest performance in the identification of consolidation (89% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 95% diagnostic accuracy) and interstitial syndrome (94% sensitivity, 93% specificity, and 94% diagnostic accuracy). For all pathologies, the performance of US was superior to those of CXR and auscultation. The linear probe is superior to the sector probe for identifying pleural pathologies, whereas the sector probe is superior to the linear probe for identifying parenchymal pathologies. Thoracic US has better diagnostic performance than CXR and auscultation for the diagnosis of common pathologic conditions of the chest. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:383-389, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Detection of furcation involvement using periapical radiography and 2 cone-beam computed tomography imaging protocols with and without a metallic post: An animal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salineiro, Fernanda Cristina Sales; Gialain, Ivan Onone; Kobayashi-Velasco, Solange; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmao Paraiso [Dept. of Stomatology, School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the diagnosis of incipient furcation involvement with periapical radiography (PR) and 2 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging protocols, and to test metal artifact interference. Mandibular second molars in 10 macerated pig mandibles were divided into those that showed no furcation involvement and those with lesions in the furcation area. Exams using PR and 2 different CBCT imaging protocols were performed with and without a metallic post. Each image was analyzed twice by 2 observers who rated the absence or presence of furcation involvement according to a 5-point scale. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the observations. The accuracy of the CBCT imaging protocols ranged from 67.5% to 82.5% in the images obtained with a metallic post and from 72.5% to 80% in those without a metallic post. The accuracy of PR ranged from 37.5% to 55% in the images with a metallic post and from 42.5% to 62.5% in those without a metallic post. The area under the ROC curve values for the CBCT imaging protocols ranged from 0.813 to 0.802, and for PR ranged from 0.503 to 0.448. Both CBCT imaging protocols showed higher accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity than PR in the detection of incipient furcation involvement. Based on these results, CBCT may be considered a reliable tool for detecting incipient furcation involvement following a clinical periodontal exam, even in the presence of a metallic post.

  9. Comparison of Combined X-Ray Radiography and Magnetic Resonance (XMR) Imaging-Versus Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for the Evaluation of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acher, Peter; Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Gaya, Andrew; Miquel, Marc; Popert, Rick; Tham, Ivan; Nichol, Janette; McLeish, Kate; Deehan, Charles; Dasgupta, Prokar; Beaney, Ronald; Keevil, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated. Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability

  10. Review of medical radiography and tomography with proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert P.

    2018-01-01

    The use of hadron beams, especially proton beams, in cancer radiotherapy has expanded rapidly in the past two decades. To fully realize the advantages of hadron therapy over traditional x-ray and gamma-ray therapy requires accurate positioning of the Bragg peak throughout the tumor being treated. A half century ago, suggestions had already been made to use protons themselves to develop images of tumors and surrounding tissue, to be used for treatment planning. The recent global expansion of hadron therapy, coupled with modern advances in computation and particle detection, has led several collaborations around the world to develop prototype detector systems and associated reconstruction codes for proton computed tomography (pCT), as well as more simple proton radiography, with the ultimate intent to use such systems in clinical treatment planning and verification. Recent imaging results of phantoms in hospital proton beams are encouraging, but many technical and programmatic challenges remain to be overcome before pCT scanners will be introduced into clinics. This review introduces hadron therapy and the perceived advantages of pCT and proton radiography for treatment planning, reviews its historical development, and discusses the physics related to proton imaging, the associated experimental and computation issues, the technologies used to attack the problem, contemporary efforts in detector and computational development, and the current status and outlook.

  11. A Comparison of Angular Values of the Pelvic Limb with Normal and Medial Patellar Luxation Stifles in Chihuahua Dogs Using Radiography and Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetkaew, Thitaporn; Kalpravidh, Marissak; Penchome, Rampaipat; Wangdee, Chalika

    2018-02-01

     This article aimed to determine and compare the angular values of the pelvic limb in normal and medial patellar luxation (MPL) stifles in Chihuahuas using radiography and computed tomographic (CT) scan, to identify the relationship between pelvic limb angles and severity of MPL. In addition, radiographic and CT images were compared to determine the more suitable method of limb deformity assessment.  Sixty hindlimbs of Chihuahuas were divided into normal and grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 MPL groups. The pelvic limb angles in frontal and sagittal planes were evaluated on radiography and CT scan. Femoral and tibial torsion angles (FTA and TTA) were evaluated only by CT scan. All angles were compared among normal and MPL stifles and between radiography and CT scan.  Based on the CT scan, the mechanical lateral distal femoral angle (mLDFA), anatomical caudal proximal femoral angle (aCdPFA), and TTA were related to the severity of MPL. The mLDFA and TTA were significantly increased ( p  Chihuahuas are aLDFA, mLDFA, aCdPFA and TTA. Radiography had some limitations for evaluating pelvic limb angles. The caudocranial radiograph is recommended for the assessment of the distal femoral angles, while the craniocaudal radiograph is for the tibial angles. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  13. Corrosion Surveillance In Pipe By Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen The Man; Dao Duy Dung; Dang Thu Hong; Le Duc Thinh; Ha Hong Thu; Nguyen Trong Nghia

    2014-01-01

    Computed Radiography (CR) is a technique of digital industrial radiology which is developed to replace conventional radiography. With a CR system, the detection of the outer and inner wall surface of the pipe is done usually by edge detection and filter algorithms of the profile line at the position under investigation. Applying in industries, radiographic examination shall be performed in accordance with a written procedure. This paper summarizes collected knowledge and experimental results to establish a procedure for radiography applications in monitoring corrosion in small bore pipes. (author)

  14. What is Computed Tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging What is Computed Tomography? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Chest X ray Image back to top Computed Tomography (CT) Although also based on the variable absorption ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cone-beam Computed Tomography and Conventional Radiography on Apical Periodontitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi Dutra, Kamile; Haas, Letícia; Porporatti, André Luís; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Nascimento Santos, Juliana; Mezzomo, Luis André; Corrêa, Márcio; De Luca Canto, Graziela

    2016-03-01

    Endodontic diagnosis depends on accurate radiographic examination. Assessment of the location and extent of apical periodontitis (AP) can influence treatment planning and subsequent treatment outcomes. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the diagnostic accuracy of conventional radiography and cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging on the discrimination of AP from no lesion. Eight electronic databases with no language or time limitations were searched. Articles in which the primary objective was to evaluate the accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of any type of radiographic technique to assess AP in humans were selected. The gold standard was the histologic examination for actual AP (in vivo) or in situ visualization of bone defects for induced artificial AP (in vitro). Accuracy measurements described in the studies were transformed to construct receiver operating characteristic curves and forest plots with the aid of Review Manager v.5.2 (The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark) and MetaDisc v.1.4. software (Unit of Clinical Biostatistics Team of the Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain). The methodology of the selected studies was evaluated using the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. Only 9 studies met the inclusion criteria and were subjected to a qualitative analysis. A meta-analysis was conducted on 6 of these articles. All of these articles studied artificial AP with induced bone defects. The accuracy values (area under the curve) were 0.96 for CBCT imaging, 0.73 for conventional periapical radiography, and 0.72 for digital periapical radiography. No evidence was found for panoramic radiography. Periapical radiographs (digital and conventional) reported good diagnostic accuracy on the discrimination of artificial AP from no lesions, whereas CBCT imaging showed excellent accuracy values. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on computed tomographic (CT) scanning which has improved computer-assisted imaging modalities for radiologic diagnosis. The advantage of this modality is its ability to image thin cross-sectional planes of the body, thus uncovering density information in three dimensions without tissue superposition problems. Because this enables vastly superior imaging of soft tissues in the brain and body, CT scanning was immediately successful and continues to grow in importance as improvements are made in speed, resolution, and cost efficiency. CT scanners are used for general purposes, and the more advanced machines are generally preferred in large hospitals, where volume and variety of usage justifies the cost. For imaging in the abdomen, a scanner with a rapid speed is preferred because peristalsis, involuntary motion of the diaphram, and even cardiac motion are present and can significantly degrade image quality. When contrast media is used in imaging to demonstrate scanner, immediate review of images, and multiformat hardcopy production. A second console is reserved for the radiologist to read images and perform the several types of image analysis that are available. Since CT images contain quantitative information in terms of density values and contours of organs, quantitation of volumes, areas, and masses is possible. This is accomplished with region-of- interest methods, which involve the electronic outlining of the selected region of the television display monitor with a trackball-controlled cursor. In addition, various image- processing options, such as edge enhancement (for viewing fine details of edges) or smoothing filters (for enhancing the detectability of low-contrast lesions) are useful tools

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  19. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Emission Computed Tomography is a technique used for producing single or multiple cross-sectional images of the distribution of radionuclide labelled agents in vivo. The techniques of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are described with particular regard to the function of the detectors used to produce images and the computer techniques used to build up images. (UK)

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  2. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography is regarded by many as a complicated union of sophisticated x-ray equipment and computer technology. This book overcomes these complexities. The rigid technicalities of the machinery and the clinical aspects of computed tomography are discussed including the preparation of patients, both physically and mentally, for scanning. Furthermore, the author also explains how to set up and run a computed tomography department, including advice on how the room should be designed

  3. Image characterization of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candeias, Janaina P.; Saddock, Aline; Oliveira, Davi F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2007-01-01

    The digital radiographic image became a reality as of the 80's decade. Since then, several works have been developed with the aim of reducing the exposure time to ionizing radiation obtaining in this way an excellent image quality with a minimum exposure. In the Computerized Radiography, the conventional film is substituted for Image Plate (IP) which consists of a radiosensitive layer of phosphor crystals on a polyester backing plate. The unique design makes it reusable and easy to handle. When exposed, the IP accumulates and stores the irradiated radioactive energy. In order to qualify a computerized radiography system it is necessary to evaluate the Image Plate. In this work it was performed a series of experimental procedures with the aim of evaluating the responses characteristics for different plates. For this purpose it was used a computerized radiographic system CR Tower Scanner - GE, with three different types of IPs, all of them manufactured by GE, whose nomenclatures are IPC, IPX and IPS. It was used the Rhythm Acquire and Review programs for image acquisition and treatment, respectively. (author)

  4. EFFECTS OF X-RAY BEAM ANGLE AND GEOMETRIC DISTORTION ON WIDTH OF EQUINE THORACOLUMBAR INTERSPINOUS SPACES USING RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djernaes, Julie D.; Nielsen, Jon V.; Berg, Lise C.

    2017-01-01

    The widths of spaces between the thoracolumbar processi spinosi (interspinous spaces) are frequently assessed using radiography in sports horses; however effects of varying X-ray beam angles and geometric distortion have not been previously described. The aim of this prospective, observational...... study was to determine whether X-ray beam angle has an effect on apparent widths of interspinous spaces. Thoracolumbar spine specimens were collected from six equine cadavers and left-right lateral radiographs and sagittal and dorsal reconstructed computed tomographic (CT) images were acquired...... measurements. Effect of geometric distortion was evaluated by comparing the interspinous space in radiographs with sagittal and dorsal reconstructed CT images. A total of 49 interspinous spaces were sampled, yielding 274 measurements. X-ray beam angle significantly affected measured width of interspinous...

  5. Digital radiography in tomography of the facial part of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibing, H.P.; Vogel, H.; Biebesheimer, V.

    1988-01-01

    In 14 patients the X-ray findings of dental, mandibulary and maxillary roentgen diagnosis were compared with conventional tomography and tomography by digital radiography. All details important for diagnosis were shown by both techniques. Tomography by digital radiography offered a more convenient approach and pictures easier to be interpreted than pictures by conventional tomography. (orig.) [de

  6. Cross-sectional void fraction distribution measurements in a vertical annulus two-phase flow by high speed X-ray computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvel, G.D.; Hori, K.; Kawanishi, K.

    1995-01-01

    A Real-Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR) system and a high speed X-ray Computed tomography (X-CT) system are compared for measurement of two-phase flow. Each system is used to determine the flow regime, and the void fraction distribution in a vertical annulus flow channel. A standard optical video system is also used to observe the flow regime. The annulus flow channel is operated as a bubble column and measurements obtained for gas flow rates from 0.0 to 30.01/min. The flow regimes observed by all three measurement systems through image analysis shows that the two-dimensional void fraction distribution can be obtained. The X-CT system is shown to have a superior temporal resolution capable of resolving the void fraction distribution in an (r,θ) plane in 33.0 ms. Void fraction distribution for bubbly flow and slug flow is determined

  7. Cross-sectional void fraction distribution measurements in a vertical annulus two-phase flow by high speed X-ray computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvel, G.D. [McMaster Univ., Ontario (Canada)]|[Combustion and Heat Transfer Lab., Takasago (Japan); Hori, K.; Kawanishi, K. [Combustion and Heat Transfer Lab., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A Real-Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR) system and a high speed X-ray Computed tomography (X-CT) system are compared for measurement of two-phase flow. Each system is used to determine the flow regime, and the void fraction distribution in a vertical annulus flow channel. A standard optical video system is also used to observe the flow regime. The annulus flow channel is operated as a bubble column and measurements obtained for gas flow rates from 0.0 to 30.01/min. The flow regimes observed by all three measurement systems through image analysis shows that the two-dimensional void fraction distribution can be obtained. The X-CT system is shown to have a superior temporal resolution capable of resolving the void fraction distribution in an (r,{theta}) plane in 33.0 ms. Void fraction distribution for bubbly flow and slug flow is determined.

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  9. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Gullberg, G.T.; Huesman, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to the methods of computer assisted tomography for determination of the three-dimensional distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the human body. The major applications of emission computed tomography are in biological research and medical diagnostic procedures. The objectives of these procedures are to make quantitative measurements of in vivo biochemical and hemodynamic functions

  10. Computed Radiography: An Innovative Inspection Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, William A.; Councill, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Florida Power and Light Company's (FPL) Nuclear Division combined two diverse technologies to create an innovative inspection technique, Computed Radiography, that improves personnel safety and unit reliability while reducing inspection costs. This technique was pioneered in the medical field and applied in the Nuclear Division initially to detect piping degradation due to flow-accelerated corrosion. Component degradation can be detected by this additional technique. This approach permits FPL to reduce inspection costs, perform on line examinations (no generation curtailment), and to maintain or improve both personnel safety and unit reliability. Computed Radiography is a very versatile tool capable of other uses: - improving the external corrosion program by permitting inspections underneath insulation, and - diagnosing system and component problems such as valve positions, without the need to shutdown or disassemble the component. (authors)

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  13. Computer tomography in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of design and the action of computer tomography which was applied also for the diagnosis of nose, ear and throat diseases are discussed. Computer tomography makes possible visualization of the structures of the nose, nasal sinuses and facial skeleton in transverse and eoronal planes. The method enables an accurate evaluation of the position and size of neoplasms in these regions and differentiation of inflammatory exudates against malignant masses. In otology computer tomography is used particularly in the diagnosis of pontocerebellar angle tumours and otogenic brain abscesses. Computer tomography of the larynx and pharynx provides new diagnostic data owing to the possibility of obtaining transverse sections and visualization of cartilage. Computer tomograms of some cases are presented. (author)

  14. Computed tomography of sacro-iliac joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miquel, A.; Laredo, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Actual technologies to explore sacro-iliac joints are conventional radiography, computed tomography , scintigraphy and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Standards films are sufficient, except in beginning sacro-iliac septic inflammations where the computed tomography is superior. Two problems are generally posed for the radiologist, to differentiate a septic arthritis from a rheumatic pathology An other problem in diagnosis is to make the difference between a degenerative arthropathy (which does not need a further investigation) and an infectious rheumatic pathology where more exploration is necessary. 28 refs., 3 tabs., 13 figs

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... white on the x-ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... white on the x-ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  4. Computed tomography in sport injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, M.; Rupp, N.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability. (orig.)

  5. Computed tomography in sport injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M; Rupp, N

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability.

  6. Computed tomography in opportunistic lung infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartelius, H.

    1988-01-01

    Chest radiography in two teenage boys, one with Wiscott-Aldrich's syndrome and one with acute lymphatic leucemia in remission showed increased interstitial pattern. In both computed tomography (CT) of the lungs showed heavy interstitial pneumonia, rather different in appearance but in both cases equal to the CT findings in opportunistic lung infections known from immunoincompetent patients with for instance pneumocystis carinii and/or cytomegalo virus infections. In both patients the CT findings led to lung biopsy establishing the etiologic agent. (orig.)

  7. Direct detector radiography versus dual reading computed radiography: feasibility of dose reduction in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, Michael; Uffmann, Martin; Weber, Michael; Balassy, Csilla; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Prokop, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    The image quality of dual-reading computed radiography and dose-reduced direct radiography of the chest was compared in a clinical setting. The study group consisted of 50 patients that underwent three posteroanterior chest radiographs within minutes, one image obtained with a dual read-out computed radiography system (CR; Fuji 5501) at regular dose and two images with a flat panel direct detector unit (DR; Diagnost, Philips). The DR images were obtained with the same and with 50% of the dose used for the CR images. Images were evaluated in a blinded side-by-side comparison. Eight radiologists ranked the visually perceivable difference in image quality using a three-point scale. Then, three radiologists scored the visibility of anatomic landmarks in low and high attenuation areas and image noise. Statistical analysis was based on Friedman tests and Wilcoxon rank sum tests at a significance level of P<0.05. DR was judged superior to CR for the delineation of structures in high attenuation areas of the mediastinum even when obtained with 50% less dose (P<0.001). The visibility of most pulmonary structures was judged equivalent with both techniques, regardless of acquisition dose and speed level. Scores for image noise were lower for DR compared with CR, with the exception of DR obtained at a reduced dose. Thus, in this clinical preference study, DR was equivalent or even superior to the most modern dual read-out CR, even when obtained with 50% dose. A further dose reduction does not appear to be feasible for DR without significant loss of image quality. (orig.)

  8. Patient-Specific Instruments Based on Knee Joint Computed Tomography and Full-Length Lower Extremity Radiography in Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tian

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of PSIs based on knee joint CT and standing full-length lower extremity radiography in TKR resulted in acceptable alignment compared with the use of conventional instruments, although the marginal advantage was not statistically different. Surgical time and clinical results were also similar between the two groups. However, the PSI group had less postoperative drainage.

  9. “Drug mules” as a radiological challenge: Sensitivity and specificity in identifying internal cocaine in body packers, body pushers and body stuffers by computed tomography, plain radiography and Lodox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Patricia M., E-mail: patricia.flach@irm.uzh.ch [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Department of Neuroradiology, Inselspital Bern, University of Bern, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, University Hospital USZ, University of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Ross, Steffen G. [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Ebert, Lars [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Germerott, Tanja; Hatch, Gary M. [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Thali, Michael J. [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A. [Department of Radiology, Inselspital Bern, University of Bern, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, University Hospital USZ, University of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of computed tomography (CT), digital radiography (DR) and low-dose linear slit digital radiography (LSDR, Lodox{sup ®}) in the detection of internal cocaine containers. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained. The study collectively consisted of 83 patients (76 males, 7 females, 16–45 years) suspected of having incorporated cocaine drug containers. All underwent radiological imaging; a total of 135 exams were performed: nCT = 35, nDR = 70, nLSDR = 30. An overall calculation of all “drug mules” and a specific evaluation of body packers, pushers and stuffers were performed. The gold standard was stool examination in a dedicated holding cell equipped with a drug toilet. Results: There were 54 drug mules identified in this study. CT of all drug carriers showed the highest diagnostic accuracy 97.1%, sensitivity 100% and specificity 94.1%. DR in all cases was 71.4% accurate, 58.3% sensitive and 85.3% specific. LSDR of all patients with internal cocaine was 60% accurate, 57.9% sensitive and 63.4% specific. Conclusions: CT was the most accurate test studied. Therefore, the detection of internal cocaine drug packs should be performed by CT, rather than by conventional X-ray, in order to apply the most sensitive exam in the medico-legal investigation of suspected drug carriers. Nevertheless, the higher radiation applied by CT than by DR or LSDR needs to be considered. Future studies should include evaluation of low dose CT protocols in order to address germane issues and to reduce dosage.

  10. “Drug mules” as a radiological challenge: Sensitivity and specificity in identifying internal cocaine in body packers, body pushers and body stuffers by computed tomography, plain radiography and Lodox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, Patricia M.; Ross, Steffen G.; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Ebert, Lars; Germerott, Tanja; Hatch, Gary M.; Thali, Michael J.; Patak, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of computed tomography (CT), digital radiography (DR) and low-dose linear slit digital radiography (LSDR, Lodox ® ) in the detection of internal cocaine containers. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained. The study collectively consisted of 83 patients (76 males, 7 females, 16–45 years) suspected of having incorporated cocaine drug containers. All underwent radiological imaging; a total of 135 exams were performed: nCT = 35, nDR = 70, nLSDR = 30. An overall calculation of all “drug mules” and a specific evaluation of body packers, pushers and stuffers were performed. The gold standard was stool examination in a dedicated holding cell equipped with a drug toilet. Results: There were 54 drug mules identified in this study. CT of all drug carriers showed the highest diagnostic accuracy 97.1%, sensitivity 100% and specificity 94.1%. DR in all cases was 71.4% accurate, 58.3% sensitive and 85.3% specific. LSDR of all patients with internal cocaine was 60% accurate, 57.9% sensitive and 63.4% specific. Conclusions: CT was the most accurate test studied. Therefore, the detection of internal cocaine drug packs should be performed by CT, rather than by conventional X-ray, in order to apply the most sensitive exam in the medico-legal investigation of suspected drug carriers. Nevertheless, the higher radiation applied by CT than by DR or LSDR needs to be considered. Future studies should include evaluation of low dose CT protocols in order to address germane issues and to reduce dosage

  11. Evaluation of the effect of platelet rich plasma (PRP) on enhancement of bone healing in diaphyseal bone defects by radiography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özak, Ahmet; Yardimci, Cenk; Nİsbet, Özlem H.; Bayrak, İlkay Koray; Nİsbet, Cevat

    2010-01-01

    The effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with autogenous cancellous bone graft on enhancement of bone healing in diaphyseal bone defects was evaluated. A 4-mm defect was created in the middiaphysis of the tibias of 20 rabbits. Rabbits were divided into two groups of ten animals each: only autogenous cancellous graft, PRP and autogenous cancellous graft. In animals of group 1, only autogenous cancellous grafts, and to those in group 2, PRP and autogenous cancellous grafts, were applied to the defect. Radiographical and computed tomography (CT) views were taken and evaluated on postoperative days 0, 15, 30, 60, and 90. According to the bone formation, union, and remodeling scores, group 1 had better scores than group 2 on days 30, 60, and 90. The density was significantly increased on day 60 than on days 0, 15, and 30 in group 1. In conclusion, it was evaluated that PRP could not enhance the bone regeneration in diaphyseal defects when used with autogenous cancellous bone graft

  12. A comparison of 3-D computed tomography versus 2-D radiography measurements of ulnar variance and ulnolunate distance during forearm rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Y; Moritomo, H; Omori, S; Kataoka, T; Murase, T; Sugamoto, K

    2014-06-01

    Positive ulnar variance is associated with ulnar impaction syndrome and ulnar variance is reported to increase with pronation. However, radiographic measurement can be affected markedly by the incident angle of the X-ray beam. We performed three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography measurements of ulnar variance and ulnolunate distance during forearm rotation and compared these with plain radiographic measurements in 15 healthy wrists. From supination to pronation, ulnar variance increased in all cases on the radiographs; mean ulnar variance increased significantly and mean ulnolunate distance decreased significantly. However on 3-D imaging, ulna variance decreased in 12 cases on moving into pronation and increased in three cases; neither the mean ulnar variance nor mean ulnolunate distance changed significantly. Our results suggest that the forearm position in which ulnar variance increased varies among individuals. This may explain why some patients with ulnar impaction syndrome complain of wrist pain exacerbated by forearm supination. It also suggests that standard radiographic assessments of ulnar variance are unreliable. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Radiological protection procedures for industrial applications of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de

    2009-03-01

    Due to its very particular characteristics, industrial radiography is responsible for roughly half of the relevant accidents in nuclear industry, in developed as well as in developing countries, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Thus, safety and radiological protection in industrial gamma radiography have been receiving especial treatment by regulatory authorities of most Member States. The main objective of the present work was to evaluate, from the radioprotection point of view, the main advantages of computed radiography (CR) for filmless industrial radiography. In order to accomplish this, both techniques, i.e. conventional and filmless computed radiography were evaluated and compared through practical studies. After the studies performed at the present work it was concluded that computed radiography significantly reduces the inherent doses, reflecting in smaller restricted areas and costs, with consequent improvement in radiological protection and safety. (author)

  14. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaju PP

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis.Keywords: dental implants, cone-beam computed tomography, panoramic radiography, computed tomography

  15. Análise de carcinomas epidermóides por meio de radiografia panorâmica e tomografia computadorizada Analysis of squamous cell carcinomas by means of panoramic radiography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Cáceres PEREIRA

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo correlacionar aspectos radiográficos como, localização e extensão do tumor, infiltração óssea e de tecidos moles e destruição das corticais, obtidos nas radiografias panorâmicas com os encontrados nas tomografias computadorizadas (TCs. Os aspectos radiográficos de 48 pacientes com diagnóstico histopatológico de carcinomas epidermóides, localizados em várias regiões do complexo buco-maxilo-facial, foram analisados por 4 radiologistas. As radiografias panorâmicas e as tomografias computadorizadas foram realizadas nos hospitais e clínicas da Universidade de Iowa (EUA, FUNDECTO - USP e Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo (SP, Brasil. Como resultados, obtivemos a grande limitação da radiografia panorâmica em determinar a localização e extensão do tumor, com delimitações bastante imprecisas da lesão. Já as TCs ofereceram resultados mais direcionados como: invasão do tumor em direção a estruturas moles adjacentes, extensão da destruição óssea, bem como a profundidade da lesão, que foram confirmados com os achados cirúrgicos. Concluímos que a tomografia computadorizada demonstrou ser uma técnica bastante sensível na detecção do comprometimento ósseo e do envolvimento de tecidos moles, proporcionando, assim, o auxílio no diagnóstico e no planejamento do tratamento. No entanto, a radiografia panorâmica foi muito pouco sensível e eficaz, por mostrar apenas margens imprecisas e pouco nítidas da lesão, não avaliando o envolvimento de tecidos moles.The purpose of this work was to compare radiographic findings, such as localization and extension of tumors toward the bone and soft tissues, in panoramic radiography and computed tomography (CT. Four radiologists assessed the radiographic findings of 48 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in different sites of the maxillofacial region. Panoramic radiographs and computed

  16. Comparison of chest radiography and high-resolution computed tomography findings in early and low-grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savranlar, A.; Altin, R.; Mahmutyazicioglu, K.; Ozdemir, H.; Kart, L.; Ozer, T.; Gundogdu, S. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine

    2004-08-01

    High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is more sensitive than chest X-ray (CXR) in the depiction of parenchymal abnormalities. The paper presents and compares CXR and HRCT findings in coal workers with and without early and low-grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP). 71 coal workers were enrolled in the study. HRCT's were graded according to Hosoda and Shida's Japanese classification. After grading, 67 workers with CXR profusion 0/0-2/2 were included in the study. Four patients with major opacity were excluded. Profusion 0/1 to 1/1 cases were accepted as early and profusion and 2/2 cases as low-grade pneumoconiosis. Discordance rate was found to be higher in the early pneumoconiosis cases with negative CXR than low-grade pneumoconiosis (60, 36 and 8%, respectively). When coal miners with normal CXR were evaluated by HRCT, six out of 10 cases were diagnosed as positive. In low-grade pneumoconiosis group, the number of patients with positive CXR but negative HRCT were low in comparison to patients with CXR negative and early pneumoconiosis findings. Most of the CXR category 0 patients (10/16) were diagnosed as category 1 by HRCT. Eleven cases diagnosed as CXR category 1 were diagnosed as category 0 (7/11) and category 2 (4/11) by HRCT. In CXR category 2 (eight cases), there were four cases diagnosed as category 1 by HRCT. Overall, discordance between CXR and HRCT was high, especially for CXR negative and early pneumoconiosis cases. The role of CXR in screening coal workers to detect early pneumoconiosis findings should be questioned. The authors suggest using HRCT as a standard screening method instead of CXR to distinguish between normal and early pneumoconiosis.

  17. Radiography and tomography using fission neutrons at FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    Fission neutrons offer complementary information in radiography and tomography compared to the well established techniques using X-rays, gamma-rays, thermal or cold neutrons. They penetrate thick layers of high density materials with only little attenuation, while for light, specially for hydrogen containing materials, their attenuation is high. In the past, fast neutrons for NDT (non-destructive testing) were only available at accelerator driven systems. These high energy neutrons have to be moderated to achieve acceptable detection efficiencies thus drastically reducing the available neutron intensities and either resulting in a high beam divergence or in additional losses in neutron intensities due to beam collimation. The recently installed neutron computerized tomography and radiography system NECTAR at the Forschungsreaktor Muenchen-II (FRM-II) overcomes these disadvantages by using fission neutrons of about 1.7 MeV mean energy created in two converter plates set-up of highly enriched uranium. The beam quality, i.e. the neutron divergence can be adapted to the object to be measured by using different collimators, resulting in L/D-values up to 300. The available neutron beam intensity at the measuring position is up to 1.7E+08 cm -2 s -1 for a maximum beam area of 40 cm x 40 cm. For conventional imaging a two-dimensional detector system based on a CCD-camera is used, other more specialised systems are available. (author)

  18. Radiography and tomography using fission neutrons at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Inst. fuer Radiochemie, TU-Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Fission neutrons offer complementary information in radiography and tomography compared to the well established techniques using X-rays, gamma-rays, thermal or cold neutrons. They penetrate thick layers of high density materials with only little attenuation, while for light, specially for hydrogen containing materials, their attenuation is high. In the past, fast neutrons for NDT (non-destructive testing) were only available at accelerator driven systems. These high energy neutrons have to be moderated to achieve acceptable detection efficiencies thus drastically reducing the available neutron intensities and either resulting in a high beam divergence or in additional losses in neutron intensities due to beam collimation. The recently installed neutron computerized tomography and radiography system NECTAR at the Forschungsreaktor Muenchen-II (FRM-II) overcomes these disadvantages by using fission neutrons of about 1.7 MeV mean energy created in two converter plates set-up of highly enriched uranium. The beam quality, i.e. the neutron divergence can be adapted to the object to be measured by using different collimators, resulting in L/D-values up to 300. The available neutron beam intensity at the measuring position is up to 1.7E+08 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for a maximum beam area of 40 cm x 40 cm. For conventional imaging a two-dimensional detector system based on a CCD-camera is used, other more specialised systems are available. (author)

  19. Whole-body low-dose computed tomography in multiple myeloma staging: Superior diagnostic performance in the detection of bone lesions, vertebral compression fractures, rib fractures and extraskeletal findings compared to radiography with similar radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Lukas; Ourednicek, Petr; Meckova, Zuzana; Gavelli, Giampaolo; Straub, Jan; Spicka, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    The primary objective of the present prospective study was to compare the diagnostic performance of conventional radiography (CR) and whole-body low-dose computed tomography (WBLDCT) with a comparable radiation dose reconstructed using hybrid iterative reconstruction technique, in terms of the detection of bone lesions, skeletal fractures, vertebral compressions and extraskeletal findings. The secondary objective was to evaluate lesion attenuation in relation to its size. A total of 74 patients underwent same-day skeletal survey by CR and WBLDCT. In CR and WBLDCT, two readers assessed the number of osteolytic lesions at each region and stage according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) criteria. A single reader additionally assessed extraskeletal findings and their significance, the number of vertebral compressions and bone fractures. The radiation exposure was 2.7±0.9 mSv for WBLDCT and 2.5±0.9 mSv for CR (P=0.054). CR detected bone involvement in 127 out of 486 regions (26%; Prib fractures compared with CR (188 vs. 47; Pfractures, vertebral compressions and extraskeletal findings, which results in up- or downstaging in 24% patients according to the IMWG criteria. The attenuation of osteolytic lesions can be measured with the avoidance of the partial volume effect.

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related ...

  4. Computed tomography in traumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.; Jend, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    This volume offers a critical review and assessment of new avenues opened up by computed tomography in traumatology. Over 200 illustrations, including numerous CT scans, aid the physician engaged emergency care and postoperative treatment of accident victims. Technical prerequisites, special techniques of investigation, pathomorphology of organ changes conditioned by trauma, diagnostic leading symptoms and signs, and diagnostics of iatrogenic injuries and lesions are presented

  5. Computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, T.W.; Blake, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to computed tomography and is particularly concerned with determining the CT numbers of zones of interest in an image displayed on a cathode ray tube which zones lie in the so-called level or center of the gray scale window. (author)

  6. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  9. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is directed towards giving radiographers an introduction to and basic knowledge of computerized tomography. The technical section discusses gantries and x-ray production, computer and disc drive image display, storage, artefacts quality assurance and design of departments. The clinical section includes patient preparation, radiotherapy planning, and interpretation of images from various areas of the anatomy. (U.K.)

  10. Performance evaluation of a computed radiography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussilhe, J.; Fallet, E. [Carestream Health France, 71 - Chalon/Saone (France); Mango, St.A. [Carestream Health, Inc. Rochester, New York (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Computed radiography (CR) standards have been formalized and published in Europe and in the US. The CR system classification is defined in those standards by - minimum normalized signal-to-noise ratio (SNRN), and - maximum basic spatial resolution (SRb). Both the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast sensitivity of a CR system depend on the dose (exposure time and conditions) at the detector. Because of their wide dynamic range, the same storage phosphor imaging plate can qualify for all six CR system classes. The exposure characteristics from 30 to 450 kV, the contrast sensitivity, and the spatial resolution of the KODAK INDUSTREX CR Digital System have been thoroughly evaluated. This paper will present some of the factors that determine the system's spatial resolution performance. (authors)

  11. PENGGUNAAN COMPUTED RADIOGRAPHY UNTUK IDENTIFIKASI MADU LEBAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI MAIYENA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research on identification of honey bee using Computed Radiography has been done. The testing was carried out by providing digital radiograph of the three types of honey bee. The voltage of the x-ray generator was varied at 50 kV, 60 kV and 70 kV, while filament current was set at 100 mA and exposure time was at 5 ms. Honey bee was identified based on the image line profile that indicated the distribution of linear absorption coefficient (µ for each sample. The analyses on the image line profile showed that at the voltage of 50 kV and 70 kV the three kinds of the honey bee can be distinguished. However, at the voltage of 60 kV the difference among honey bee was unable to be identified.

  12. Computed radiography in neonatal intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, L.; Bighi, S.; Cervi, P.M.; Lupi, L.

    1991-01-01

    The Authors report their experience in the employment of a computerized digital radiographic system in Neonatal Intensive Care. The analog screen-film system is replaced by photosensitive imaging plates, scanned after X-ray exposure by a laser that releases the digital image, which can then be manipulated on computer work-stations. In a period of twelve months about 200 chest-abdomen X-ray examinations in Neonatal Intensive Care have been performed using this method with good technical and diagnostic results. The use of digital radiography in the neonatal area is of high interest: this system produces good quality images, there is a reduction in radiation dose and 'retakes', the system allows selective enhancement of different structures and their magnification. (orig.)

  13. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  15. Computed radiography imaging plates and associated methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Nathaniel F.; Moses, Alex K.

    2015-08-18

    Computed radiography imaging plates incorporating an intensifying material that is coupled to or intermixed with the phosphor layer, allowing electrons and/or low energy x-rays to impart their energy on the phosphor layer, while decreasing internal scattering and increasing resolution. The radiation needed to perform radiography can also be reduced as a result.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  17. Advanced X-ray radiography and tomography in several engineering applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Dammer, J.; Jakůbek, J.; Jeon, I.; Jiroušek, Ondřej; Kroupa, M.; Zlámal, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 633, č. 1 (2011), s. 152-155 ISSN 0168-9002. [International workshop on radiation imaging detectors /11./. Praha, 26.06.2009-02.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2101 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : digital radiography * computed tomography * X-ray crack imaging Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nima.2010.06.152

  18. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M.

    2011-01-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  19. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecherl, T., E-mail: thomas.buecherl@radiochemie.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  20. NECTAR—A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F. M.

    2011-09-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/ D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  1. Computer radiography-X-ray with vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waitiki, C.

    2006-01-01

    Computer radiography describes an entire process of creating a digital image including acquiring, processing, presenting and managing the image data. the cassettes are special in that they use an imaging plate instead of films. the imaging plate is coated with storage phosphors which captures x-ray as they pass through the patient. the imaging plate is read with a bar code reader and the imaging plate number recorded in the computer. The cassette is then loaded in the reader unit where it is read using infra-red light which excites the particles on the plate which in turn illuminates and picked by photo-sensors which converts the signal into digital pulses. the pulses then run through a board which converts it into an image which is then displayed on the control console. The plate then runs through the erasure section where it is exposed to yellow light, which erases the plate. The IP is then put back in the cassette and locked and can be reused for the next episode

  2. Compact, open-architecture computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.K.; Lim, A.; Kangarloo, H.; Eldredge, S.; Loloyan, M.; Chuang, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) was introduced in 1982, and its basic system design has not changed. Current CR systems have certain limitations: spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratios are lower than those of screen-film systems, they are complicated and expensive to build, and they have a closed architecture. The authors of this paper designed and implemented a simpler, lower-cost, compact, open-architecture CR system to overcome some of these limitations. The open-architecture system is a manual-load-single-plate reader that can fit on a desk top. Phosphor images are stored in a local disk and can be sent to any other computer through standard interfaces. Any manufacturer's plate can be read with a scanning time of 90 second for a 35 x 43-cm plate. The standard pixel size is 174 μm and can be adjusted for higher spatial resolution. The data resolution is 12 bits/pixel over an x-ray exposure range of 0.01-100 mR

  3. Computed Tomography. Chapter 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geleijns, J. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    After its clinical introduction in 1971, computed tomography (CT) developed from an X ray modality that was limited to axial imaging of the brain in neuroradiology into a versatile 3-D whole body imaging modality for a wide range of applications, including oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and interventional radiology. CT is applied for diagnosis and follow-up studies of patients, for planning of radiotherapy, and even for screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors.

  4. Computed Tomography Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  5. Mathematics of Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, William Grant

    A review of the applications of the Radon transform is presented, with emphasis on emission computed tomography and transmission computed tomography. The theory of the 2D and 3D Radon transforms, and the effects of attenuation for emission computed tomography are presented. The algebraic iterative methods, their importance and limitations are reviewed. Analytic solutions of the 2D problem the convolution and frequency filtering methods based on linear shift invariant theory, and the solution of the circular harmonic decomposition by integral transform theory--are reviewed. The relation between the invisible kernels, the inverse circular harmonic transform, and the consistency conditions are demonstrated. The discussion and review are extended to the 3D problem-convolution, frequency filtering, spherical harmonic transform solutions, and consistency conditions. The Cormack algorithm based on reconstruction with Zernike polynomials is reviewed. An analogous algorithm and set of reconstruction polynomials is developed for the spherical harmonic transform. The relations between the consistency conditions, boundary conditions and orthogonal basis functions for the 2D projection harmonics are delineated and extended to the 3D case. The equivalence of the inverse circular harmonic transform, the inverse Radon transform, and the inverse Cormack transform is presented. The use of the number of nodes of a projection harmonic as a filter is discussed. Numerical methods for the efficient implementation of angular harmonic algorithms based on orthogonal functions and stable recursion are presented. The derivation of a lower bound for the signal-to-noise ratio of the Cormack algorithm is derived.

  6. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, A.L.; Peterson, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. The tracks are supported on rollers which carry the substantial weight. Explicit engineering details are presented especially of the ball bearing races used in the rotation. (U.K.)

  7. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.T.; Hein, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. The tracks are supported on rollers which carry the substantial weight. Explicit engineering details are presented. (U.K.)

  8. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Shoichi

    1993-01-01

    Firstly, from an historic point of view, fundamental concepts on digital imaging were reviewed to provide a foundation for discussion of digital radiography. Secondly, this review summarized the results of ongoing research in computed radiography that replaces the conventional film-screen system with a photo-stimulable phosphor plate; and thirdly, image quality, radiation protection, and image processing techniques were discussed with emphasis on picture archiving and communication system environment as our final goal. Finally, future expansion of digital radiography was described based on the present utilization of computed tomography at the National Defense Medical College Hospital. (author) 60 refs

  9. Cone-beam computed tomography versus digital periapical radiography in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions: A pilot study of the diagnostic accuracy of endodontists using both techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campello, Abdrea Fagundes; Goncalves, Lucio Souza; Marques, Fabio vidal [Faculty of Dentistry, Estacio de Sa University, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Guedes, Fabio Ribeiro [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of previously trained endodontists in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital periapical radiography (DPR). An ex vivo model using dry skulls was used, in which simulated apical lesions were created and then progressively enlarged using no.1/2, no.2, no.4, and no.6 round burs. A total of 11 teeth were included in the study, and 110 images were obtained with CBCT and with an intraoral digital periapical radiographic sensor (Instrumentarium dental, Tuusula, Finland) initially and after each bur was used. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated. All images were evaluated by 10 previously trained, certified endodontists. Agreement was calculated using the kappa coefficient. The accuracy of each method in detecting apical lesions was calculated using the chi-square test. The kappa coefficient between examiners showed low agreement (range, 0.17-0.64). No statistical difference was found between CBCT and DPR in teeth without apical lesions (P=.15). The accuracy for CBCT was significantly higher than for DPR in all corresponding simulated lesions (P<.001). The correct diagnostic rate for CBCT ranged between 56.9% and 73.6%. The greatest difference between CBCT and DPR was seen in the maxillary teeth (CBCT, 71.4%; DPR, 28.6%; P<.01) and multi-rooted teeth (CBCT, 83.3%; DPR, 33.3%; P<.01). CBCT allowed higher accuracy than DPR in detecting simulated lesions for all simulated lesions tested. Endodontists need to be properly trained in interpreting CBCT scans to achieve higher diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield

  11. Some malpractices in application of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ruihong; Jia Shaotian; Wang Yusheng; Li Baohua; Chen Lin; Wang Zhenguang; Liu Jianxin; Gong Jingyue; Liu Daoyong; Xie Xuesong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To improve the CR image quality and to promote the digital image standard constitution by analyzing the common problems and malpractices in application of computed radiography. Methods: Phenomenon and reasons of 107 CR junk-films from nine three-'A'-hospitals were analyzed, discussed, recorded, and statistised by 20 radiologists, radiographers and engineers. Results: Among 107 junk films, there are 36 cases (33.64%) of incorrect operations, 29 cases (27.10%) of artifacts in reading and transferring the data of IP, 15 cases (14.02%) of artifacts in IP system, and 13 cases (12.15%) of selection of inappropriate radiographic parameters, and 9 cases (8.41%) of printer-failures, and 5 cases (4.67%) of inappropriate post-processing techniques. By analyzing the reasons of 107 junk films we found that 60.74% were due to less responsibilities and incorrect operations, and 35.51% were due to new problems in CR techniques, and other were due to inappropriate post-processing techniques. Conclusion: Responsibilities, operation regulations, digital image quality standards, studying of new techniques and appropriate use of the post-processing techniques are the key points for improving the CR image quality and the diagnosis level. (authors)

  12. [Computed tomography semiotics of osteonecrosis and sequestration in chronic hematogenic osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'iachkova, G V; Mitina, Iu L

    2007-01-01

    Based on the data of computed tomography, radiography and densitometry in 39 patients the authors describe in detail the signs of osteonecrosis and sequestration of different localization and extension.

  13. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  14. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  15. Computed Tomography diagnosis of skeletal involvement in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scutellari, Pier Nuccio; Galeotti, Roberto; Leprotti, Stefano; Piva, Nadia; Spanedda, Romedio

    1997-01-01

    The authors assess the role of Computed Topography in the diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma (MM) and investigate if Computed Tomography findings can influence the clinical approach, prognosis and treatment. 273 multiple myeloma patients submitted to Computed Tomography June 1994, to December, 1996. The patients were 143 men and 130 women (mean age: 65 years): 143 were stage I, 38 stage II and 92 stage III according to Durie and Salomon's clinical classification. All patients were submitted to blood tests, spinal radiography and Computed Tomography, the latter with serial 5-mm scans on several vertebral bodies. Computed Tomography despicted vertebral arch and process involvement in 3 cases with the vertebral pedicle sign. Moreover, Computed Tomography proved superior to radiography in showing the spread of myelomatous masses into the soft tissues in a case with solitary permeative lesion in the left public bone, which facilitated subsequent biopsy. As for extraosseous localizations, Computed Tomography demonstrated thoracic soft tissue (1 woman) and pelvic (1 man) involvement by myelomtous masses penetrating into surrounding tissues. In our series, only a case of osteosclerotic bone myeloma was observed in the pelvis, associated with lytic abnormalities. Computed Tomography findings do not seem to improve the clinical approach and therapeutic management of the disease. Nevertheless, the authors reccommend Computed Tomography for some myelomatous conditions, namely: a) in the patients with focal bone pain but normal skeletal radiographs; b) in the patients with M protein, bone marrow plasmocytosis and back pain, but with an incoclusive multiple myeloma diagnosis; c) to asses bone spread in the regions which are anatomically complex or difficult to study with radiography and to depict soft tissue involvement; d) for bone biopsy

  16. Computed tomography device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhashi, A.

    1985-01-01

    A computed tomography device comprising a subtraction unit which obtains differential data strings representing the difference between each time-serial projection data string of a group of projection data strings corresponding to a prospective reconstruction image generated by projection data strings acquired by a data acquisition system, a convolution unit which convolves each time-serial projection data string of the group of projection data strings corresponding to the prospective reconstruction image, and a back-projection unit which back-projects the convolved data strings

  17. Method for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    1980-01-01

    In transversal computer tomography apparatus, in which the positioning zone in which the patient can be positioned is larger than the scanning zone in which a body slice can be scanned, reconstruction errors are liable to occur. These errors are caused by incomplete irradiation of the body during examination. They become manifest not only as an incorrect image of the area not irradiated, but also have an adverse effect on the image of the other, completely irradiated areas. The invention enables reduction of these errors

  18. Dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andisco, D.; Blanco, S.; Buzzia, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The amount of computed tomography (CT) studies that are performed each year in the world is growing exponentially mainly due to the incorporation of multislice CT that allows studies in a few seconds. But, despite the benefit received by patients with the diagnosis, radiation dose is a concern in the professional community and it has be reduced as much as reasonably possible. This article describes the main dosimetric CT units used in order to work with this practice easily, using the values that provide modern equipment and internationally known reference levels. (authors) [es

  19. Nuclear imaging using Fuji Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yodono, Hiraku; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Katto, Keiichi; Miyakawa, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Sadao; Shinozaki, Tatsuyo

    1988-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of the Fuji Computed Radiography system (FCR) in nuclear medicine. The basic principle of the system is the conversion of the X-ray energy pattern into digital signals utilizing scanning laser stimulated luminescence. A Rollo phantom filled with 12 mCi of Tc-99m pertechnetate was used in this study. In imaging by the FCR, a low energy high resolution parallel hole collimator for a gamma camera was placed over the phantom and photons through the collimator were stored on a single imaging plate (IP) or 3 IPs covered by the lead plate, 0.3 mm in thickness. For imaging, it took 30 minutes by a single IP and 20 minutes by 3 IPs with the lead plate respectively. Each image of the phantom by the FCR was compared with that of obtained by a gamma camera. The image by a single IP was inferior in quality than that of by a gamma camera. However using 3 IPs with the lead plate, same quality image as by a gamma camera was obtained. The image by 3 IPs is similar to that of by 3 IPs with the lead plate. Based on the results, we performed liver and lung imaging by FCR using 3 IPs. The imaging time is twenty minutes. The images obtained with FCR are as good as the scinticamera image. However it has two major flawes in that the sensitivity is poor and the imaging time is long. Furthermore, at present this method can only be employed for static imaging. However we feel that future improvements in the FCR system will overcome these problems. (author)

  20. Mesenteric panniculitis: computed tomography aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Alves, Jose Ricardo Duarte; Marchiori, Edson; Pinheiro, Ricardo Andrade; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Noro, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is an inflammatory process that represents the second stage of a rare progressive disease involving the adipose tissue of the mesentery. Imaging methods used in the diagnosis of mesenteric panniculitis include barium studies, ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Computed tomography is important for both, diagnosis and evaluation of the extension of the disease and treatment monitoring. Computed tomography findings may vary according to the stage of the disease and the amount of inflammatory material or fibrosis. There is also good correlation between the computed tomography and anatomical pathology findings. The authors studied 10 patients with mesenteric panniculitis submitted to computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in one patient. In all patients, computed tomography revealed a heterogeneous mass in the mesentery with density of fat, interspersed with areas of soft tissue density and dilated vessels. (author)

  1. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Esra Abdalrhman Dfaalla

    2013-06-01

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  2. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, A.L.; O'Dell, W.R.; Brook, R.F.; Hein, P.W.; Brandt, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. A failsafe, solenoid brake is described which can lock the shaft against rotation. The gantry also contains a hoist mechanism which aids maintenance of the heavy X-ray tube and/or detector arrays. Explicit engineering details are presented. (U.K.)

  3. Radiation-absorbed doses and energy imparted from panoramic tomography, cephalometric radiography, and occlusal film radiography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankvall, G.; Hakansson, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    The absorbed doses and energy imparted from radiographic examinations of children, using panoramic tomography (PTG), cephalometric radiography (CPR), and maxillary frontal occlusal overview (FOO), were examined. The absorbed dose at various sites of the head were measured with TL dosimeters in a phantom and in patients. The energy imparted was calculated from measurements of areal exposure using a planparallel ionization chamber. The maximum absorbed doses for panoramic tomography were located around the lateral rotation center, for cephalometric radiography in the left (tube side) parotid region, and for frontal occlusal radiography in the nose. The absorbed doses in the eyes, thyroid gland, and skin are discussed and compared with previous reports and, for the most part, are found to be in agreement. The mean energy imparted from all three examination methods is 5 mJ with about 57 percent from panoramic, 33 percent from cephalometric, and 10 percent from frontal occlusal examinations. The energy imparted from cephalometric radiography can be reduced to about 10 percent with the use of an improved examination technique, leaving panoramic tomography responsible for contributing about 80 percent of the total energy imparted

  4. Application and development of Industrial Computed Tomography in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Fangeng; Xian Wu

    1996-01-01

    Compared with traditional perspective radiography, ICT (Industrial Computed Tomography) is able to acquire tomography image without the disadvantages of image overlapping and blurring that exist in traditional perspective radiography. By acquiring the 2D tomography image of the object at different stage as many as needed, it is possible to achieve 3D tomography image. In China, the first Γ-ray ICT equipment was born at Chongqing University in May 1993. For this equipment, 60 Co radiation source with 1 Ci and 30 Ci was used, and spatial resolution is about 0.5mm, and density resolution is about 0.5%, and the diameter of the test object can be 300mm, but the price of the Chinese ICT equipment is only about a half on the same type of ICT equipment producing abroad other than China. Besides Γ-ray ICT, Chinese are engaging in research and develop x-ray ICT to meet foreign and domestic need. (author)

  5. Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radiography is discussed as a method for nondestructive evaluation of internal flaws of solids. Gamma ray and X-ray equipment are described along with radiographic film, radiograph interpretation, and neutron radiography.

  6. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  7. Positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regional mycardial blood flow and substrate metabolism can be non-invasively evaluated and quantified with positron emission computed tomography (Positron-CT). Tracers of exogenous glucose utilization and fatty acid metabolism are available and have been extensively tested. Specific tracer kinetic models have been developed or are being tested so that glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be measured quantitatively by Positron-CT. Tracers of amino acid and oxygen metabolism are utilized in Positron-CT studies of the brain and development of such tracers for cardiac studies are in progress. Methods to quantify regional myocardial blood flow are also being developed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of Positron-/CT to document myocardial infarction. Experimental and clinical studies have begun to identify metabolic markers of reversibly ischemic myocardium. The potential of Positron-CT to reliably detect potentially salvageable myocardium and, hence, to identify appropriate therapeutic interventions is one of the most exciting applications of the technique

  8. Study of check image using computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    There are two image forming methods both a check image and a portal image in the linacogram. It has been established the image forming method in the check image using computed radiography (CR). On the other hand, it is not established the image forming method in the portal image using CR yet. Usually, in the electric portal imaging device (EPID) is mainly used just before radiotherapy start. The usefulness of the portal image forming method by CR using in place of EPID is possible to confirm the precision for determining to specific position at the irradiate part and to the irradiate method for the human organs. There are some technical problems that, since in the early time, the linac graphy (LG) image have low resolution power. In order to improve to the resolution power in LG image, CR image technologies have been introduced to the check image forming method. Heavy metallic sheet (HMS) is used to the front side of CR-IP cassette, and high contactness sponge is used to the back side of the cassette. Improved contactness between HMS and imaging plate (IP) by means of the high contactness sponge contributed to improve the resolution power in the check images. A lot of paper which is connected with these information have been reported. Imaging plate ST-III should be used to maintain high sensitivity in the check film image forming method. The same image forming method in the check image established by CR has been introduced into the portal image forming method in order to improve the resolution power. However, as a result, it couldn't acquired high resolution image forming in the portal images because of the combination of ST-III and radiotherapy dose. After several trials, it has been recognized that HR-V imaging plate for mammography is the most useful application to maintain high resolution power in the portal images. Also, it is possible to modify the image quality by changing GS parameter which is one of image processing parameters in CR. Furthermore, in case

  9. Computer tomography of the neurocranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliequist, B; Forssell, A

    1976-07-01

    The experience with computer tomography of the neurocranium in 300 patients submitted for computer tomography of the brain is reported. The more appropriate projections which may be obtained with the second generation of scanners in combination with an elaborated reconstruction technique seem to constitute a replacement of conventional skull films.

  10. [Computed tomography of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature...... that compares the diagnostic accuracy of multi-detector row computed tomography with that of coronary angiography Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4/6...

  11. Current radiography and tomography applications at Necsa and an envisaged upgrade towards a proposed South African national centre for radiography and tomography (SANCRAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radebe, M.J.; De Beer, F.C.

    2008-01-01

    An upgrade of the current Radiography and Tomography Research facilities is envisaged to enhance the group's support for Necsa's mission to undertake and support nuclear research and utilize penetrating radiation for the benefit of mankind. It is envisage that the SANCRAT will host neutron-, X-ray- and gamma ray penetrating radiation imaging infrastructures that can be utilized by researchers from industry as well as post graduate students from higher educational institutions. Modelling for the upgrade to a multifunctional neutron radiography and tomography facility has been underway. Upgrade plans and implementation has also begun for a 250 kV X-ray radiography set-up, that will exist independent from the neutron facility. Future expansion entails catering for a micro-focus X-ray -, and gamma ray radiography and tomography facilities. The current facilities available consist of one infrastructure facility based on two sources of penetrating radiation, i.e. SAFARI-1 research nuclear reactor as thermal neutron source and a 100 kV X-ray generator. This facility, which hosts the only operational neutron tomography R and D facility in the Southern Hemisphere and in Africa, are being extensively utilized by post graduate students and industry. The facility sees application in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines, amongst which is nuclear, geosciences, palaeontology, civil, mechanical, chemical, etc. This paper focus on case studies engaged at the current radiography and tomography facilities over the past 2 years as well as describing the envisaged upgrade initiatives to a fully equipped national centre. (authors)

  12. Current radiography and tomography applications at Necsa and an envisaged upgrade towards a proposed South African national centre for radiography and tomography (SANCRAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radebe, M.J.; De Beer, F.C. [Necsa - South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Limited, P. O.Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    An upgrade of the current Radiography and Tomography Research facilities is envisaged to enhance the group's support for Necsa's mission to undertake and support nuclear research and utilize penetrating radiation for the benefit of mankind. It is envisage that the SANCRAT will host neutron-, X-ray- and gamma ray penetrating radiation imaging infrastructures that can be utilized by researchers from industry as well as post graduate students from higher educational institutions. Modelling for the upgrade to a multifunctional neutron radiography and tomography facility has been underway. Upgrade plans and implementation has also begun for a 250 kV X-ray radiography set-up, that will exist independent from the neutron facility. Future expansion entails catering for a micro-focus X-ray -, and gamma ray radiography and tomography facilities. The current facilities available consist of one infrastructure facility based on two sources of penetrating radiation, i.e. SAFARI-1 research nuclear reactor as thermal neutron source and a 100 kV X-ray generator. This facility, which hosts the only operational neutron tomography R and D facility in the Southern Hemisphere and in Africa, are being extensively utilized by post graduate students and industry. The facility sees application in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines, amongst which is nuclear, geosciences, palaeontology, civil, mechanical, chemical, etc. This paper focus on case studies engaged at the current radiography and tomography facilities over the past 2 years as well as describing the envisaged upgrade initiatives to a fully equipped national centre. (authors)

  13. Development of computer assisted learning program using cone beam projection for head radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazeko, Kazuma; Araki, Misao; Kajiwara, Hironori; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kuwayama, Jun; Karube, Shuhei; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a computer assisted learning (CAL) program to simulate head radiography. The program provides cone beam projections of a target volume, simulating three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) of a head phantom. The generated image is 512 x 512 x 512 pixels with each pixel 0.6 mm on a side. The imaging geometry, such as X-ray tube orientation and phantom orientation, can be varied. The graphical user interface (GUI) of the CAL program allows the study of the effects of varying the imaging geometry; each simulated projection image is shown quickly in an adjoining window. Simulated images with an assigned geometry were compared with the image obtained using the standard geometry in clinical use. The accuracy of the simulated image was verified through comparison with the image acquired using radiography of the head phantom, subsequently processed with a computed radiography system (CR image). Based on correlation coefficient analysis and visual assessment, it was concluded that the CAL program can satisfactorily simulate the CR image. Therefore, it should be useful for the training of head radiography. (author)

  14. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology an...

  15. Computed tomography of the head in neurological examination of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckman, E.; Egg-Olofsson, O.; Raadberg, C.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 247 children from the departments of pediatrics and neurosurgery were examined with computed tomography of the head during a two year period in 1977-78. Pathological changes were demonstrated in 79 per cent. Supplementary neuro-radiological examination - angiography and encephalography - was necessary in 17 per cent. Computed tomography together with the clinical assessment frequently suffices for final diagnosis. Computed tomography greatly reduces the need for previously used neurological examinations including skull radiography. Complications may ensure because of over-sensitivity to intravenously administered contrast medium in connection with anesthesia, and the radiation dose particularly to the crystalline lens of the eye must be taken into account. Computed tomography should therefore be used only on strict indications after careful scrutiny of the case history and the status. (author)

  16. Computed tomography apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    In fan-beam computed tomography apparatus, timing reference pulses, normally occurring at intervals t, for data transfer and reset of approx. 500 integrators in the signal path from the detector array, are generated from the scan displacement, e.g. using a graticule and optical sensor to relate the measurement paths geometrically to the body section. Sometimes, a slow scan rate is required to provide a time-averaged density image, e.g. for planning irradiation therapy, and then the sensed impulses will occur at extended intervals and can cause integrator overload. An improvement is described which provides a pulse generator which responds to a reduced scan rate by generating a succession of further transfer and reset pulses at intervals approximately equal to t starting a time t after each timing reference pulse. Then, using an adding device and RAM, all the transferred signals integrated in the interval t' between two successive slow scan reference pulses are accumulated in order to form a corresponding measurement signal. (author)

  17. Computed tomography intravenous cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, S.; Murray, W.; Wilson, P.

    1997-01-01

    Indications for direct visualization of the bile ducts include bile duct dilatation demonstrated by ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scanning, where the cause of the bile duct dilatation is uncertain or where the anatomy of bile duct obstruction needs further clarification. Another indication is right upper quadrant pain, particularly in a post-cholecystectomy patient, where choledocholithiasis is suspected. A possible new indication is pre-operative evaluation prior to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The bile ducts are usually studied by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), or, less commonly, trans-hepatic cholangiography. The old technique of intravenous cholangiography has fallen into disrepute because of inconsistent bile-duct opacification. The advent of spiral CT scanning has renewed interest in intravenous cholangiography. The CT technique is very sensitive to the contrast agent in the bile ducts, and angiographic and three-dimensional reconstructions of the biliary tree can readily be obtained using the CT intravenous cholangiogram technique (CT IVC). Seven patients have been studied using this CT IVC technique, between February 1995 and June 1996, and are the subject of the present report. Eight further studies have since been performed. The results suggest that CT IVC could replace ERCP as the primary means of direct cholangiography, where pancreatic duct visualization is not required. (authors)

  18. Computed tomography of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmannskog, F.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Aakhus, T.; Bergan, A.; Fausa, O.; Elgjo, K.

    1980-01-01

    The findings by computed tomography in 203 cases of suspected pancreatic tumours, pancreatitis or peripancreatic abnormalities were evaluated. The appearances of the normal and the diseased pancreas are described. Computed tomography is highly accurate in detecting pancreatic masses, but can not differentiate neoplastic from inflammatory disease. The only reliable signs of pancreatic carcinoma are a focal mass in the pancreas, together with liver metastasis. When a pancreatic mass is revealed by computed tomography, CT-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas is recommended. Thus the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures and explorative laparotomy may be avoided in some patients. (Auth.)

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... is used to evaluate: complications from infections such as pneumonia a tumor that arises in the lung ...

  20. Computed tomography of drill cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.

    1985-08-01

    A preliminary computed tomography evaluation of drill cores of granite and sandstone has generated geologically significant data. Density variations as small as 4 percent and fractures as narrow as 0.1 mm were easily detected

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for ... Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top ... Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  6. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boo, D. W.; Weber, M.; Deurloo, E. E.; Streekstra, G. J.; Freling, N. J.; Dongelmans, D. A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients (n=114 patients; 50 CXR per

  7. Computed tomography of the traumatized abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Young Woon; Baik, Seung Kug; Lee, Jong Yul; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Ki [Wallace Memotial Baptist Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    Forty-seven patients with abdominal and retroperitoneal injuries were examined by computed tomography(CT). We analyzed the results of 47 patients who were confirmed of abdominal injuries by operation, clinical follow up, and repeated radiologic examinations. 1. the type of trauma was blunt in 38 patients (81%) and penerating in 9 patients (19%) 2. There were 14 splenic, 11 renal, 9 hepatic, 6 retroperitoneal, 4 pancreatic, and 3 alimentary tract injuries. 3. The patients who had been treated by conservative management were 23.4% (surgical treatment,76.6%). 4. The six ratio was 4.9 : 1.0 (male ; female). 5. CT has major advantage over plain radiography, radionuclide imaging, and angiography in assessment of trauma-induced injuries.

  8. Computed tomography of the traumatized abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young Woon; Baik, Seung Kug; Lee, Jong Yul; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Ki

    1989-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with abdominal and retroperitoneal injuries were examined by computed tomography(CT). We analyzed the results of 47 patients who were confirmed of abdominal injuries by operation, clinical follow up, and repeated radiologic examinations. 1. the type of trauma was blunt in 38 patients (81%) and penerating in 9 patients (19%) 2. There were 14 splenic, 11 renal, 9 hepatic, 6 retroperitoneal, 4 pancreatic, and 3 alimentary tract injuries. 3. The patients who had been treated by conservative management were 23.4% (surgical treatment,76.6%). 4. The six ratio was 4.9 : 1.0 (male ; female). 5. CT has major advantage over plain radiography, radionuclide imaging, and angiography in assessment of trauma-induced injuries

  9. Clinical applications of the computed tomography of the thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Eun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-06-15

    The computed tomography of the thorax has had considerably less impact in patient management than that of head and abdomen, because the convention chest radiography is a much more sensitive and accurate examination than the plain film studies of the head and abdomen. It has progressively been identified that the computed tomography of chest is superior to the conventional radiography in detection of small pulmonary nodules including occult metastatic lesions, in evaluation of character of hilar enlargement, and in staging of known bronchogenic caner. And especially in mediastinum, the computed tomography is supported to the any other conventional radiography in outlining lesions and determining character and extent of lesions. At the department of radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital , 87 cases of computed tomography of chest were performed with EMI-CT 5005 whole-body scanner from October 1977 to August 1979. The results were as following; 1. The fifty eight cases of considered to be pathologic findings were 23 pleural thickening and/or effusion, 14 bronchogenic carcinoma, 8 inflammatory lesions of lung parenchyme, 6 mediastinal lesions, 3 metastinal lesions, 3 COPD, 1 trauma, respectively. 2. No gravity-dependent change was noted in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which was frequently seen in normal subjects. Diminished numbers of pulmonary vessels was noted in COPD. 3. Small nodules in lung, retrosternal, posterior costophrenic and subpleural regions, which were not found on conventional radiography, can be detected by chest CT. 4. Differentiation of dilated central pulmonary artery from pulmonary mass in enlarged hilum and determination of adjacent mediastinal invasion, manifested by obliterated fat plane, was possible. 5. The cases of mediastinal widening such as paraspinal ilpomatosis, pericardial fat pad, teratoma, and bronchogenic cyst were easily determined by means of measuring the attenuation coefficiencies. 6. Small amount

  10. Clinical applications of the computed tomography of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong Eun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Soon Yong

    1980-01-01

    The computed tomography of the thorax has had considerably less impact in patient management than that of head and abdomen, because the convention chest radiography is a much more sensitive and accurate examination than the plain film studies of the head and abdomen. It has progressively been identified that the computed tomography of chest is superior to the conventional radiography in detection of small pulmonary nodules including occult metastatic lesions, in evaluation of character of hilar enlargement, and in staging of known bronchogenic caner. And especially in mediastinum, the computed tomography is supported to the any other conventional radiography in outlining lesions and determining character and extent of lesions. At the department of radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital , 87 cases of computed tomography of chest were performed with EMI-CT 5005 whole-body scanner from October 1977 to August 1979. The results were as following; 1. The fifty eight cases of considered to be pathologic findings were 23 pleural thickening and/or effusion, 14 bronchogenic carcinoma, 8 inflammatory lesions of lung parenchyme, 6 mediastinal lesions, 3 metastinal lesions, 3 COPD, 1 trauma, respectively. 2. No gravity-dependent change was noted in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which was frequently seen in normal subjects. Diminished numbers of pulmonary vessels was noted in COPD. 3. Small nodules in lung, retrosternal, posterior costophrenic and subpleural regions, which were not found on conventional radiography, can be detected by chest CT. 4. Differentiation of dilated central pulmonary artery from pulmonary mass in enlarged hilum and determination of adjacent mediastinal invasion, manifested by obliterated fat plane, was possible. 5. The cases of mediastinal widening such as paraspinal ilpomatosis, pericardial fat pad, teratoma, and bronchogenic cyst were easily determined by means of measuring the attenuation coefficiencies. 6. Small amount

  11. Computed radiography dose optimization in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juste, B.; Verdu, G.; Tortosa, R.; Villaescusa, J.I.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation dose reduction in pediatric X-ray imaging is especially important because of children radiation sensitivity. For any radiographic examination performed at a fixed radiographic tube potential, the patient absorbed dose is directly proportional to the value of milliampere-seconds (mAs) selected by the operator. Nevertheless, reducing X-ray exposure has the unavoidable disadvantage of increasing the quantum noise in the resultant image. The objective of this work is to identify the minimum tube current setting required for maintaining accurate examinations, to modify, if required, the daily protocols applied at La Fe de Valencia Universitary Hospital. To accomplish this goal, a noise addition software has been developed in order to study the diagnostic accuracy as a function of reducing dose by artificially increasing the image noise. The noise addition tool has been applied to several thorax images acquired from pediatric unit to simulate new lower dose radiographies and allow medical researchers to study how lower dose affects the patient pneumonia diagnosis. (author)

  12. Computer processing techniques in digital radiography research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickens, D.R.; Kugel, J.A.; Waddill, W.B.; Smith, G.D.; Martin, V.N.; Price, R.R.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and the Center for Medical Imaging Research, Nashville, TN, there are several activities which are designed to increase the information available from film-screen acquisition as well as from direct digital acquisition of radiographic information. Two of the projects involve altering the display of images after acquisition, either to remove artifacts present as a result of the acquisition process or to change the manner in which the image is displayed to improve the perception of details in the image. These two projects use methods which can be applied to any type of digital image, but are being implemented with images digitized from conventional x-ray film. One of these research endeavors involves mathematical alteration of the image to correct for motion artifacts or registration errors between images that will be subtracted. Another applies well-known image processing methods to digital radiographic images to improve the image contrast and enhance subtle details in the image. A third project involves the use of dual energy imaging with a digital radiography system to reconstruct images which demonstrate either soft tissue details or the osseous structures. These projects are discussed in greater detail in the following sections of this communication

  13. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, Md. [Delhi U.; Coutrakon, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Blazey, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Boi, S. [Northern Illinois U.; Dyshkant, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Erdelyi, B. [Northern Illinois U.; Hedin, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Johnson, E. [Northern Illinois U.; Krider, J. [Northern Illinois U.; Rukalin, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Uzunyan, S. A. [Northern Illinois U.; Zutshi, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Fordt, R. [Fermilab; Sellberg, G. [Fermilab; Rauch, J. E. [Fermilab; Roman, M. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab; Wilson, P. [Fermilab

    2016-02-04

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  14. Studies on the Fuji computed radiography depended on the panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Shiota, Satoru; Takazawa, Kazuyoshi; Yoshida, Toru; Takagi, Yoshiko; Funamoto, Choichiro

    1986-01-01

    The Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) developed recently involves the following procedures; photography in the same way as the hitherto radiography, printing auto imaging plate of photostimulable phospher, conversion to electric signals, and recording reproduced images by computerization. Highly valuable images for diagnoses in the medical field have already been obtained by the FCR. Then, we attempted to study FCR images panoramically radiographed for jaw lesions in the field of oral surgery. Method for study: As the samples to be studied, the selected subjects were cases of periodontal diseases, fracture of the jaw, odontogenic cyst and tumor, etc. In the present study the FCR images of panoramic radiography were compared with hitherto panoramic flat radiograms. Result of study: Although the images of the FCR vary depending on the methods of treatment, that is, on how gradient processing and spatial frequency enhancement are, the method of purpose-fitting treatment provided diagnostically significant images for grasping bone lesions. The images obtained from this FCR permitted us to grasp more distinctly condition of alveolar bone resorption in periodontal diseases, running of minute fracture lines in fracture of the jaw, and characteristic images of bone resorption in odontogenic cysts and tumor, etc. Thus the images of the FCR are highly useful in diagnosing bone lesions, but granularity of the images themselves have still been questioned, and additionally the images vary depending on the methods of gradient processing and spatial frequency enhancement. Therefore further repeat studies are probably needed for these questions. (author)

  15. Neuroanatomy of cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmann, H.J.; Weinrich, W.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the fundamental structures visualized by means of computed tomography, the authors present the functional systems which are relevant in neurology by means of axial cross-sections. All drawings were prepared from original preparations by means of a new technique which is similar to the grey values of X-ray CT and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. A detailed description is given of the topics of neurofunctional lesions

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to ...

  1. Physical image quality of computed radiography in mammography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norriza Mohd Isa; Muhammad Jamal Isa; Wan Muhamad Saridan Wan Hassan; Fatimah Othman

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Mammography is a screening procedure that mostly used for early detection of breast cancer. In digital imaging system, Computed Radiography is a cost-effective technology that applied indirect conversion detector. The paper presents physical image quality parameter measurements namely modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of Computed Radiography in mammography system. MTF was calculated from two different orientations of slanted images of an edge test device and NNPS was estimated using flat-field image. Both images were acquired using a standard mammography beam quality. DQE was determined by applying the MTF and NNPS values into our developed software program. Both orientations have similar DQE characteristics. (author)

  2. Digital computed radiography in industrial X-ray testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Onel, Y.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2001-01-01

    Computed radiography is used for X-ray testing in many industrial applications. There are different systems depending on the application, e.g. fast systems for detection of material inhomogeneities and slower systems with higher local resolution for detection of cracks and fine details, e.g. in highly stressed areas or in welded seams. The method is more dynamic than film methods, and digital image processing is possible during testing [de

  3. Computed tomography in renal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, W.; Eisenberger, F.; Buck, J.

    1981-01-01

    In a group of 19 patients suffering from flank trauma and gross hematuria the diagnostic value of angiography was compared with that of computed tomography. The cases that underwent both tests were found to have the some diagnosis of rupture of the kidney. Typical CT-findings in kidney rupture are demonstrated. Whereas angiography presents an exact picture of the arterial system of the kidney, including its injures computed tomography reveals the extent of organ lesons by showing extra- and intrarenal hematomas. If surgery is planned angiography is still mandatory, whereby the indication is largely determined by the clinical findings. Computed tomography as a non-invasive method is equally suitable for follow-ups. (orig.) [de

  4. Computed radiography simulation using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S.C.A.; Souza, E.M.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, R.T.

    2009-01-01

    Simulating x-ray images has been of great interest in recent years as it makes possible an analysis of how x-ray images are affected owing to relevant operating parameters. In this paper, a procedure for simulating computed radiographic images using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is proposed. The sensitivity curve of the BaFBr image plate detector as well as the characteristic noise of a 16-bit computed radiography system were considered during the methodology's development. The results obtained confirm that the proposed procedure for simulating computed radiographic images is satisfactory, as it allows obtaining results comparable with experimental data. (author)

  5. Computed radiography simulation using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, S.C.A. [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste (CCMAT)/UEZO, Av. Manuel Caldeira de Alvarenga, 1203, Campo Grande, 23070-200, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, E.M. [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, A.X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [PEN/COPPE-DNC/Poli CT, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cassiano, D.H. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/CNEN Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-09-15

    Simulating X-ray images has been of great interest in recent years as it makes possible an analysis of how X-ray images are affected owing to relevant operating parameters. In this paper, a procedure for simulating computed radiographic images using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is proposed. The sensitivity curve of the BaFBr image plate detector as well as the characteristic noise of a 16-bit computed radiography system were considered during the methodology's development. The results obtained confirm that the proposed procedure for simulating computed radiographic images is satisfactory, as it allows obtaining results comparable with experimental data.

  6. UGCT: New X-ray radiography and tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masschaele, B.C.; Cnudde, V.; Dierick, M.; Jacobs, P.; Hoorebeke, L. van; Vlassenbroeck, J.

    2007-01-01

    The UGCT (University Gent Computer Tomography) facility, a cooperation between the Radiation Physics research group and the Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology research group is a new CT facility providing a large range of scanning possibilities. Formerly a Skyscan 1072 was used to perform X-ray micro-CT scans at the UGCT facility and although this is a very powerful instrument, there were needs for a higher resolution and more flexibility. Therefore, the UCGT facility started the construction of a multidisciplinary micro-CT scanner inside a shielded room with a maximum flexibility of the set-up. The X-ray tube of this high-resolution CT scanner is a state-of-the-art open-type device with dual head: one head for high power micro-CT and one for sub-micro- or also called nano-CT. An important advantage of this scanner is that different detectors can be used to optimize the scanning conditions of the objects under investigation. The entire set-up is built on a large optical table to obtain the highest possible stability. Due to the flexible set-up and the powerful CT reconstruction software 'Octopus', it is possible to obtain the highest quality and the best signal-to-noise of the reconstructed images for each type of sample

  7. UGCT: New X-ray radiography and tomography facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masschaele, B.C. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.masschaele@ugent.be; Cnudde, V. [Department of Geology and Soil Science, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Dierick, M. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Jacobs, P. [Department of Geology and Soil Science, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Hoorebeke, L. van; Vlassenbroeck, J. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2007-09-21

    The UGCT (University Gent Computer Tomography) facility, a cooperation between the Radiation Physics research group and the Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology research group is a new CT facility providing a large range of scanning possibilities. Formerly a Skyscan 1072 was used to perform X-ray micro-CT scans at the UGCT facility and although this is a very powerful instrument, there were needs for a higher resolution and more flexibility. Therefore, the UCGT facility started the construction of a multidisciplinary micro-CT scanner inside a shielded room with a maximum flexibility of the set-up. The X-ray tube of this high-resolution CT scanner is a state-of-the-art open-type device with dual head: one head for high power micro-CT and one for sub-micro- or also called nano-CT. An important advantage of this scanner is that different detectors can be used to optimize the scanning conditions of the objects under investigation. The entire set-up is built on a large optical table to obtain the highest possible stability. Due to the flexible set-up and the powerful CT reconstruction software 'Octopus', it is possible to obtain the highest quality and the best signal-to-noise of the reconstructed images for each type of sample.

  8. Computed tomography of pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hajime; Honda, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Chikashi; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Nakayama, Takashi

    1983-01-01

    We have evaluated the value of computed tomography (CT) in distinguishing benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. CT was performed on 30 cases of solitary pulmonary nodules consisting of 17 primary lung cancers, 3 metastatic tumors and 10 benign nodules. The CT number was calculated for each lesion. Three benign nodules showed CT numbers well above the range of malignant nodules, and only in one of them was calcification visible on conventional tomography. In 6 benign nodules, the CT numbers overlapped those of malignant lesion and could not be differentiated. Thus the measurement of CT number can be useful to confirm the benign nature of certain nodules when calcification is unclear or not visible on conventional tomography. As for the morphological observation of the nodule, CT was not superior to conventional tomography and its value seems to be limited. (author)

  9. Industrial applications at the new cold neutron radiography and tomography facility of the HMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Manke, I.; Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Banhart, J.

    2005-01-01

    The new cold neutron radiography and tomography facility at the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin is suited for the investigation of components and materials from different industrial fields. The high-flux measuring position of the facility allows real-time imaging of fast dynamical processes. Cold neutrons interact stronger with the matter compared to thermal neutrons, which leads to a much better radiography contrast. Some examples of different industry applications like investigations on discharging of a Lithium battery or on oil sediments in a vent pipe are presented

  10. Developments in radiography and tomography of waste containers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roney, T.J.; Allemeier, R.T.; Galbraith, S.G.; Tow, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (IN-F-L) has been inspecting containers (boxes and drums) of nuclear waste materials using real-time radiography (RTR) for the past ten years. Requirements governing characterization of containerized waste for short-term storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal have become more stringent. These new requirements, and the need to reduce inspection times to increase throughput, necessitate improvements in the information obtained by radiographic methods. RTR provides a qualitative view of container contents, whereas quantitative information is often required. Two projects at the INEL are converting the present qualitative radiographic inspection to the more quantitative digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) methods, while retaining the RTR function. The first project is modifying, the RTR hardware at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) to allow rapid processing of analog RTR images. The digital RTR (DRTR) system described here can digitize, process, and redisplay RTR images at video frame rates allowing for real-time image improvement features such as edge detection, contrast enhancement, frame subtraction, frame averaging, and a variety of digital filtering options. The second project is developing a complete radiographic and tomographic capability that allows for greater sophistication in data acquisition and processing as the operator and/or requirements demand. The approach involves modification of an industrial CT scanner with the capability to acquire radiographic and tomographic data in several modes, including conventional RTR, DR, and CT with a linear detector for high spatial resolution, and DR and CT with an area detector for high throughput. Improvements in image quality and quantitative digital radiographic capabilities of the DRTR system are shown. Status and plans for the modified CT scanner (presently under development) are also presented

  11. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Although there are many common aspects to x-ray transmission and radionuclide emission (ECT) computerized tomography, there are added difficulties and a number of particular factors which form the basis of ECT. The relationship between the physical factors, system design, methodologic approach and assumptions of ECT is discussed. The instrumentation design and application strategies in ECT at this time are diverse and in a rapid stage of development. The approaches are divided into two major categories of Single Photon Counting (SPC) employing scanner and camera concepts with radionuclides of 99 /sup m/Tc, 201 Tl, 123 I etc., and Annihilation Coincidence Detection (ACD) of positron-emitting radionuclides. Six systems in the former and ten systems in the latter category, with examples of typical studies, illustrate the different approaches

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose sinusitis . evaluate sinuses that are filled with fluid or thickened sinus membranes . detect the presence of ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... of the Sinuses? CT is usually the first test ordered when a sinus tumor is suspected. If ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications must be taken 12 hours prior to ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications must be taken 12 hours prior to ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... to you, revolve around you during the imaging process. You will be alone in the exam room ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... artifacts on the images. This loss of image quality can resemble the blurring seen on a photograph ...

  14. Fuji computed radiography (FCR) for the diagnosis of spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Yoshichika; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi

    1987-01-01

    Since April, 1985, we have, in co-operation with the Fuji Film Co., Ltd., used Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) in the diagnosis of spinal disorders. FCR is a new computed radiographic system which uses an energy-storage phosphorus panel called an ''Imaging Plate'' as an image sensor. The ''Imaging Plate'' can be used to obtain radiographs in exactly the same way as the screen-film combination used in conventional radiography; X-rays are exposed on the ''Imaging Plate'' instead of X-ray film in the conventional fashion, and then the ''Imaging Plate'' is calculated. The processed digital data from the scans is transformed into a picture by means of digital-to-analogue conversion. The pictures are always clear and beautiful. Plain films of the spine taken by FCR are even clearer, even in the cervicothoracic region, where it is usually difficult to obtain clear cervicothoracic films in conventional radiography. We can obtain much precise information about the spinal posterior osteophytes and grafted bone, even when the patients are immobilized in a Halo apparatus. In myelography, the pictures are also clearer; we can see how the root or roots are compressed, how the dura and cord are involved in patients with cervical disc disease, and even the very narrow space between the cord and an intradural tumor. FCR is thus very useful in observing spinal disorders, either in plain films or myelography. (author)

  15. Contribution of computed tomography in patients with lung metastases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma not apparent on plain radiography who were treated with radioiodine; Contribuicao da tomografia computadorizada em pacientes com metastases pulmonares de carcinoma diferenciado de tireoide nao-aparentes na radiografia e tratados com radioiodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosario, Pedro W.S.; Purisch, Saulo [Santa Casa Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dep. de Tireoide. Servico de Endocrinologia]. E-mail: pedrorosario@globo.com; Tavares, Wilson C. [Instituto Alpha de Gastroenterologia, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barroso, Alvarao L.; Rezende, Leonardo L.; Padrao, Eduardo L. [Santa Casa Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2008-02-15

    Computed tomography (CT or CAT Scan) of the chest is more sensitive than radiography in the detection of lung metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but little information is available regarding the aggregated value of this method. The present study evaluated the response of patients with lung metastases of DTC not apparent on radiography to treatment with {sup 131}I and the value of CT in these cases. Twenty-five patients with lung metastases not apparent on radiography, who initially received 100-200 mCi I{sup 151}, were evaluated and those presenting pulmonary uptake on post-therapy WBS were submitted to a new treatment after 6 to 12 months, and so on. The chance of detection of pulmonary uptake on post-therapy WBS did not differ between patients with negative and positive CT (100% versus 91.5%). Mean serum Tg levels were higher in patients with positive CT (108 ng/ml versus 52 ng/ml). Negative post-therapy WBS was achieved in 82% of patients with positive CT and in 92.3% with negative CT and the cumulative I{sup 131} activity necessary to achieve this outcome did not differ between the two groups (mean = 300 mCi). Stimulated Tg was undetectable in 47% of patients with negative CT at the end of treatment, but in none of the patients whose CT continued to be positive. In patients with elevated Tg, the CT result apparently did not change the indication of therapy or the I{sup 131} activity to be administered. In cases with lung metastases, the persistence of micronodules on CT was associated with the persistence of detectable Tg in patients presenting negative post-therapy WBS. (author)

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about radiation dose. There always is a risk of complications from general anesthesia or sedation. Every measure will be taken to ... in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Anesthesia Safety Children and Radiation Safety ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) ...

  17. Computed tomography in hepatic echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choliz, J.D.; Olaverri, F.J.L.; Casas, T.F.; Zubieta, S.O.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 50 cases of hydatid disease of the liver. It was definite in 49 cases and negative in one case. Pre- and postcontrast scans were performed. CT may reveal the exact location and extension of cysts and possible complications. However, a false-negative case was found in a hydatid cyst located in a fatty liver

  18. Computer tomography in Caisson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, F.; Csobaly, S.; Institute for Advanced Training of Physicians, Budapest

    1981-01-01

    Computer tomography was performed on 20 patients with the early stages of Caisson osteoarthropathy, as well as in other patients with chronic bone infarcts. From their results the authors have formed the opinion that CT is valuable, not only in the diagnosis of early cases, but that it can provide significant information concerning the osteopathy and bone infarcts. (orig.) [de

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  20. Laryngopyocele: signs on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazaroglu, Hasan E-mail: hnazarog@dicle.edu.tr; Oezates, Mustafa; Uyar, Asur; Deger, Emin; Simsek, Masum

    2000-01-01

    A laryngocele is an air-filled dilation of the saccule of the larynx. An infected laryngocele is called a laryngopyocele. Our experience with a case of laryngopyocele with signs on computed tomography before and after antibiotic therapy is presented since laryngopyocele is more unusual.

  1. Laryngopyocele: signs on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroglu, Hasan; Oezates, Mustafa; Uyar, Asur; Deger, Emin; Simsek, Masum

    2000-01-01

    A laryngocele is an air-filled dilation of the saccule of the larynx. An infected laryngocele is called a laryngopyocele. Our experience with a case of laryngopyocele with signs on computed tomography before and after antibiotic therapy is presented since laryngopyocele is more unusual

  2. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  3. Industrial applications of computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carmignato, S.; Kruth, J. -P.

    2014-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of Computed Tomography(CT) is large and rapidly increasing. After a brief market overview, the paper gives a survey of state of the art and upcoming CT technologies, covering types of CT systems, scanning capabilities, and technological advances. The paper...

  4. Positron computed tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervouet, T.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Lamy, T.; Le Gouil, S.; Devillers, A.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Ansquer, C.; Cheze-le Rest, C.; Metges, J.P.; Teyton, P.; Lozach, P.; Volant, A.; Bizais, Y.; Visvikis, D.; Morel, O.; Girault, S.; Soulie, P.; Dupoiron, D.; Berthelot, C.; Lorimier, G.; Jallet, P.; Garin, E.; Prigent, F.; Lesimple, T.; Barge, M.L.; Rousseau, C.; Devillers, A.; Bernard, A.M.; Bouriel, C.; Bridji, B.; Resche, R.; Banayan, S.; Claret, M.; Ninet, J.; Janier, M.; Billotey, C.; Garin, E.; Devillers, A.; Becker, S.; Lecloirec, J.; Boucher, E.; Raoul, J.L.; Rolland, V.; Oudoux, A.; Valette, F.; Dupas, B.; Moreau, P.; Champion, L.; Anract, P.; Wartski, M.; Laurence, V.; Goldwasser, F.; Pecking, A.P.; Alberini, J.L.; Brillouet, S.; Caselles, O.; Allal, B.; Zerdoud, S.; Gansel, M.G.; Thomas, F.; Dierrickx, L.; Delord, J.P.; Marchand, C.; Resche, I.; Mahe, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Several oral communications present the interest of positron computed tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose in the detection of cancers, or for the follow up of cancers treatments in order to detect early possible relapses.PET FDG is also used to optimize the definition of target volume in order to avoid side effects and to get a better control of the illness. (N.C.)

  5. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  6. Use of Chest Computed Tomography in Stable Patients with Blunt Thoracic Trauma: Clinical and Forensic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makbule Ergin

    2011-01-01

    fractures were the most common injury. Thorax computed tomography was significantly superior to chest radiography in detecting pneumothorax , hemothorax and lung contusion. Eightyone life threatening lesions were detected and 50 (61%; pneumothorax 13, hemothorax 24, lung contusion 9,and pneumomediastinum 4 of these lesions could not be detected with plain chest radiography. The clinical management [in 15 patients (30%], and the forensic assesment was changed [in 14 (28%] patients were changed.  Conclusion:We concluded that using Computed Tomography of the thorax in thoracic travmas prive meticulous assesment in management of patients and forens icissues.

  7. Quality comparison of direct digital panoramic radiography and computed radiography panoramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Goodarzipour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Digital panoramic X-ray images can be captured using photostimulable phosphors or solid-state detectors (i.e. charge-coupled devices and Flat-Panels. The first category is defined as computed radiography (CR or semi-direct radiography. The second technology that uses solid-state detectors is known as direct digital radiography (DDR. Both of these technologies have their own advantages and disadvantages. One of the most important fields in comparison of these systems is their resultant image quality. The purpose of this study was to compare the subjective image quality of DDR and CR digital panoramic system, and to assess the overall density and contrast of their images. METHODS: 200 patients were randomly allocated to two digital systems: Promax [central control digital (CCD] and XC [photostimulable phosphor plates (PSP]. Image quality was evaluated in six regions on a 3-point scale by three oral and maxillofacial radiologists independently. In addition, observers assessed overall density and contrast of each image on a 3-point scale. RESULTS: Using chi-square test, no statistically significant differences were found (P >0.05 in subjective image quality of anatomic structures between the two radiographic systems. But DDR system outperformed CR system in overall density and contrast of the image. P values for both overall density and contrast of the images was less than 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The subjective image quality of CR and DDR panoramic systems in specified anatomic regions were found statistically comparable in this study. In overall density and contrast of the radiographs, DDR system proved better than CR system.

  8. Solitary pulmonary metastases in high-risk melanoma patients: a prospective comparison of conventional and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaston, D.K.; Putman, C.E.; Rodan, B.A.; Nicholson, E.; Ravin, C.E.; Korobkin, M.; Chen, J.T.; Seigler, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    A prospective comparison of chest radiography, conventional tomography, and computed tomography (CT) in the detection or confirmation of solitary pulmonary nodules was made in 42 patients with high propensity for pulmonary metastases due to advanced local (Clark level IV or V) or regional malignant melanoma. Unequivocal nodules were revealed by chest radiography in 11 patients, conventional tomograhy in 16, and computed tomography in 20 patients. Both plain films and tomography in three of these 20 were normal, but follow-up verified pulmonary metastases. Computed tomography detected more pulmonary nodules than conventional tomography in 11 patients in addition to identifying lesions in extrapulmonary sites. Therefore, chest CT is recommended before institution of immunotherapy or surgical removal of a solitary pulmonary melanoma metastasis. Once chemotherapy had been instituted for bulky regional or cutaneous involvement, however, the findings of either conventional or computed tomography were comparable in this study

  9. Cranial computed tomography in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkai, P.; Bogerts, B.

    1993-01-01

    Computed tomography has gained importance as a diagnostic tool in psychiatry to exclude structural brain pathology, but has passed on its role in research to magnetic resonance tomography. It helps to distinguish between senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia. The enlargement of the ventricular system and cortical sulci is well established in schizophrenic and affective psychosis. Some alcohol addicts show a considerable degree of cerebral atrophy, only exceeded by demented patients, but this condition is potentially reversible. To screen psychiatric patients by CT is recommendable, as 2-10% of hospitalized psychiatric patients have structural brain disease. (orig.) [de

  10. Advances in computed radiography systems and their physical imaging characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, A.R.; Davies, A.G.; Kengyelics, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Radiological imaging is progressing towards an all-digital future, across the spectrum of medical imaging techniques. Computed radiography (CR) has provided a ready pathway from screen film to digital radiography and a convenient entry point to PACS. This review briefly revisits the principles of modern CR systems and their physical imaging characteristics. Wide dynamic range and digital image enhancement are well-established benefits of CR, which lend themselves to improved image presentation and reduced rates of repeat exposures. However, in its original form CR offered limited scope for reducing the radiation dose per radiographic exposure, compared with screen film. Recent innovations in CR, including the use of dual-sided image readout and channelled storage phosphor have eased these concerns. For example, introduction of these technologies has improved detective quantum efficiency (DQE) by approximately 50 and 100%, respectively, compared with standard CR. As a result CR currently affords greater scope for reducing patient dose, and provides a more substantive challenge to the new solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors

  11. A method to optimize the processing algorithm of a computed radiography system for chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2007-09-01

    A test methodology using an anthropomorphic-equivalent chest phantom is described for the optimization of the Agfa computed radiography "MUSICA" processing algorithm for chest radiography. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lung, heart and diaphragm regions of the phantom, and the "system modulation transfer function" (sMTF) in the lung region, were measured using test tools embedded in the phantom. Using these parameters the MUSICA processing algorithm was optimized with respect to low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution. Two optimum "MUSICA parameter sets" were derived respectively for maximizing the CNR and sMTF in each region of the phantom. Further work is required to find the relative importance of low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution in chest images, from which the definitive optimum MUSICA parameter set can then be derived. Prior to this further work, a compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was applied to a range of clinical images. A group of experienced image evaluators scored these images alongside images produced from the same radiographs using the MUSICA parameter set in clinical use at the time. The compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was shown to produce measurably better images.

  12. Lag screw stabilization of a cervical vertebral fracture by use of computed tomography in a horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, H.G.; Tucker, R.L.; Grant, B.D.; Roberts, G.D.; Prades, M.

    1995-01-01

    A traumatic fracture of C2 was diagnosed radiographically in a 1-year-old German Warm-blood stallion. Fracture configuration was difficult to see on survey radiographs. Computed tomography yielded a more accurate assessment of the fracture and facilitated fracture repair with cortical lag screws. Precise screw placement, to avoid spinal cord damage, was obtained by use of computed tomography. Follow-up radiography revealed normal bone healing, and the horse was in dressage schooling 24 months after surgery

  13. Protean appearance of craniopharyngioma on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danziger, A.; Price, H.I.

    1979-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas present a diverse appearance on computed tomography. Histological diagnosis is not always possible, but computed tomography is of great assistance in the delineation of the tumour as well as of the degree of associated hydrocephalus. Computed tomography also enables rapid non-invasive follow-up after surgery or radiotherapy, or both

  14. Scheme for radiography/tomography with a low-brilliance neutron source at the CPHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhifeng; Xiao Yongshun; Zhang Ran; Li Yuanji; Han Xiaoxue; Shao Beibei; Wang Xuewu; Wei Jie; Loong, C.-K.

    2011-01-01

    A cold neutron radiography/tomography instrument was designed and will soon undergo construction at the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) of Tsinghua University, China. In this paper, we report the physical design of the instrument and propose a scheme to implement several techniques at a later phase to enhance the utilization of the flux on larger samples. This includes code-aperture, grating-based imaging, prompt gamma-ray analysis and 3D emission CT.

  15. Computers in dental radiography: a scenario for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The recent emergence of cost-effective computing power makes it possible to integrate sophisticated data-sampling and image-interpretation techniques into dental radiography for the first time. A prototype system is being developed to permit clinical information expressed in three dimensions--plus time--to be made visible almost instantly. The associated X-ray dose for a complete three-dimensional survey of a selected dental region is predicted to be less than that required for a single conventional periapical radiograph exposed on D-speed film

  16. Industrial applications of computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Kanglong; Qiang Yujun; Yang Fujia

    1992-01-01

    Industrial computer tomography (CT) and its application is a rapidly developing field of high technology. CT systems have been playing important roles in nondestructive testing (NDT) of products and equipment for a number of industries. Recently, the technique has advanced into the area of industrial process control, bringing even greater benefit to mankind. The basic principles and typical structure of an industrial CT system Descriptions are given of some successful CT systems for either NDT application or process control purposes

  17. Computed tomography of projectile injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, A.J.; Rutty, G.N.; Robinson, C.; Morgan, B.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a gold standard in clinical imaging but forensic professions have been slow to embrace radiological advances. Forensic applications of CT are now exponentially expanding, replacing other imaging methods. As post-mortem cross-sectional imaging increases, radiologists will fall under increasing pressure to interpret complex forensic cases involving both living and deceased patients. This review presents a wide variety of weapon and projectile types aiding interpretation of projectile injuries both in forensic and clinical practice

  18. Computed tomography in osteoid osteoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, J.L.; Aubspin, D.; Buchon, R.; Schoenenberger, P.; Flageat, J.

    1989-01-01

    Four cases of suspected osteoid osteoma were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). The role of CT was related, as a key diagnostic tool: radionuclide imaging is helpful in directing subsequent CT scans, which allows the study of complex anatomical sites (spine) or the analysis of atypical lesions (invisible nidus, sclerosis or lytic lesions, double nidus...). CT provides the surgeon with the exact location and extent of the lesion, and thus, CT may allow a more limited surgical resection of the involved bone [fr

  19. Fuji computed radiography (FCR) for the diagnosis of spinal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Yoshichika; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi

    1987-04-01

    Since April, 1985, we have, in co-operation with the Fuji Film Co., Ltd., used Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) in the diagnosis of spinal disorders. FCR is a new computed radiographic system which uses an energy-storage phosphorus panel called an ''Imaging Plate'' as an image sensor. The ''Imaging Plate'' can be used to obtain radiographs in exactly the same way as the screen-film combination used in conventional radiography; X-rays are exposed on the ''Imaging Plate'' instead of X-ray film in the conventional fashion, and then the ''Imaging Plate'' is calculated. The processed digital data from the scans is transformed into a picture by means of digital-to-analogue conversion. The pictures are always clear and beautiful. Plain films of the spine taken by FCR are even clearer, even in the cervicothoracic region, where it is usually difficult to obtain clear cervicothoracic films in conventional radiography. We can obtain much precise information about the spinal posterior osteophytes and grafted bone, even when the patients are immobilized in a Halo apparatus. In myelography, the pictures are also clearer; we can see how the root or roots are compressed, how the dura and cord are involved in patients with cervical disc disease, and even the very narrow space between the cord and an intradural tumor. FCR is thus very useful in observing spinal disorders, either in plain films or myelography.

  20. The value of computed tomography in ''sciatica''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm-Jurkovic, H.; Hammer, B.

    1981-01-01

    13 cases of therapy-resistant lumboischialgia without herniated disk, caused in 12 cases by a tumour and in 1 case by an abscess, were examined by computed tomography of the lumbar and pelvic region. This method is indicated immediately after insufficient results of conventional X-ray methods (including tomography) and of lumbosacral radiculography. The computed tomography is indispensable also in patients with ''sciatica'' with a known malignoma. The information given by computed tomography is essential for the therapy planning. (author)

  1. Computed tomography of the ossicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakeres, D.W.; Weider, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Otologists and otolaryngologists have described in detail the disorders which are unique to the ossicles. However the anatomy and spectrum of pathology and anatomy of the ossicles are not familiar to most radiologists. Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) and a systematic approach to evaluation now allow accurate identification of even subtle abnormalities of the ossicles. We present the normal anatomy, ossicular abnormalities, and indications for computed tomographic study. Because of the greater diagnostic capability of CT, the radiologist's role has increased in evaluation and treatment planning of patients with suspected ossicular abnormalities. (orig.)

  2. Synchrotron radiography and tomography of a PEM fuel cell; Synchrotron-Radiographie und -Tomographie einer PEM-Brennstoffzelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markoetter, Henning; Manke, Ingo [Helmholtzzentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Berlin (Germany). Fachgruppe Bildgebende Verfahren; Arlt, Tobias [TU Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Banhart, John [TU Berlin, Institut fuer angewandte Materialforschung, Berlin (Germany); TU Berlin, Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaften und -technologien, Berlin (Germany); Riesemeier, Heinrich [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Arbeitsgruppe Synchrotronstrahlanalytik (Germany); Krueger, Philipp [CONSULECTRA Unternehmensberatung GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Haussmann, Jan; Klages, Merle [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Scholta, Joachim [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung, Stuttgart (Germany). Fachgruppe Brennstoffzellen-Stacks

    2013-06-01

    The three dimensional water distribution and transport pathways in gas diffusion layers (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuell cell (PEM FC) are analysed at various operating conditions. The method of quasi in-situ X-ray tomography is used for a three dimensional visualization of the water distribution and the GDL structure. Based on the results of dynamic radiographic measurements water transport pathways are located and subsequently investigated in detail by means of tomography. The combination of 2D and 3D techniques allows for an identification of 3D transport pathways through the GDl.

  3. Cysticercosis of the brain. The value of computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida-Pinto, J.; Veiga-Pires, J.A.; Stocker, A.; Coelho, T.; Monteiro, L.

    Incidence and radiologic findings of neurocysticercosis were investigated in a series of 23 800 consecutive head examinations using computed tomography (CT). The condition was diagnosed in 168 case (0.7%). The parenchymatous form was the most common presentation (96.3%), while the meningeal form corresponded to only 11.9% of cases. These two forms coexisted in some cases. These findings reversed the knowledge on the condition based on conventional radiography. The different CT appearances in the brain are described and a new radiologic protocol for the CT evaluation of the condition is advocated, which includes a follow-up after a trial cure with Praziquantel in the presence of cysts not associated with suggestive brain calcifications. CT were more sensitive than conventional radiography in the differentiation between dead and living larvae, thus having an impact on the therapeutic management of the patients.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed radiography in Achilles tendon rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenaga, Tateo; Hachiya, Junichi; Miyasaka, Yasuo

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Radiography (CR) were performed in 15 patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture who were treated conservatively without surgery. MRI was obtained using Toshiba MRT 50 A superconductive machine, operaing at 0.5 Tesla. CR was performed by CR-101, Fuji Medical System. In fresh cases, ruptured tendons showed intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images. Thickening of the tendon was observed in all cases except in very acute stage. Configuration of thickend tendons tends to be dumbbell shape in subacute stage and fusiform in chronic stage of more than six months after the initial trauma. In cases which showed high signal intensity at the ruptured area both on T1 and T2 weighted images, migration of fat into the sapces between the ruptured tendons was considered to be the major source of increased signal intensity. Computed radiography showed thickening of the tendon, blurring of anterior margin of the tendon, and decreased translucency of pre-Achilles fat pad. However, MRI better demonstrated the details of ruptured tendons when compared to CR, and thought to be an usefull way of following up the healing process of the ruptured tendon to facilitate more reasonable judgement of the time of removing plaster casts and stating exercise. (author)

  5. Quality assurance of computed and digital radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, C.; Gorman, D.; Byrne, P.; Larkin, A.; Dowling, A.; Malone, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) and digital radiography (DR) are replacing traditional film screen radiography as hospitals move towards digital imaging and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Both IPEM and KCARE have recently published quality assurance and acceptance testing guidelines for DR. In this paper, the performance of a range of CR and DR systems is compared. Six different manufacturers are included. Particular attention is paid to the performance of the systems under automatic exposure control (AEC). The patient is simulated using a range of thicknesses of tissue equivalent material. Image quality assessment was based on detector assessment protocols and includes pixel value measures as well as subjective assessment using Leeds Test Objects. The protocols for detector assessment cover a broad range of tests and in general detectors (whether DR or CR) performed satisfactorily. The chief limitation in performing these tests was that not all systems provided ready access to pixel values. Subjective tests include the use of the Leeds TO20. As part of this work, suggested reference values are provided to calculate the TO20 image quality factor. One consequence of moving from film screen to digital technologies is that the dynamic range of digital detectors is much wider, and increased exposures are no longer evident from changes in image quality. As such, AEC is a key parameter for CR and DR. Dose was measured using a standard phantom as a basic means of comparing systems. In order to assess the AEC performance, exit doses were also measured while varying phantom thickness. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were calculated on a number of systems where pixel values were available. SNR was affected by the selection of acquisition protocol. Comparisons between different technologies and collation of data will help refine acceptance thresholds and contribute to optimising dose and image quality. (authors)

  6. The radiologic finding in pneumomediastinum. Value of conventional radiography and comparison with computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.F.; Hlawatsch, A.; Heussel, C.P.; Schweden, F.; Kauczor, H.U.

    1997-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum, or mediastinal emphysema, may be difficult to demonstrate and is not always easy to differentiate from pneumothorax and pneumopericardium by conventional radiography, especially in severely ill patients. In this article, we evaluate the sensitivity of plain films in detecting pneumomediastinum, and describe the conventional radiography and computerized tomography (CT) findings associated with this entity. The etiology and CT findings in 24 patients who had been diagnosed as having pneumomediastinum by CT were reviewed. Conventional radiographs were available for review in 19 of these cases. Radiographic and CT findings were retrospectively compared, using CT as reference technique. We looked for abnormal mediastinal air collections and their location, as well as pathologic findings such as pneumothorax or pneumopericardium. Classical radiographic signs were also evaluated. Conventional radiography showed mediastinal air in 17 patients (89,5%) and classical radiographic signs were observed in 13 (68,4%). The results of the comparative study of plain films and CT revealed the following sites of mediastinal air: superior mediastinum (9/15), anterior mediastinum (14/19), middle mediastinum (7/12) and posterior mediastinum (4/14). The incidences of pneumothorax (7/12) and pneumopericardium (1/4) were also recorded. The comparative study of conventional radiography and CT demonstrated that Ct is a more reliable technique for determining the diagnosis, location and extent of pneumomediastinum and differentiating it from pneumothorax and pneumopericardium, especially in severely ill patients. Therefore, CT is recommended in patients with evident clinical suspicion of pneumomediastinum. (Author) 23 refs

  7. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 19,2016 What is Computerized Tomography (CT)? CT is a noninvasive test that uses ...

  8. The history of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, J.

    1980-01-01

    New scientific discoveries are often made by the synthetising of other discoveries. Computed tomography is such an example. The three necessary elements were: 1/ the fact that certain simple crystals scintillate when exposed to X-rays, 2/ the advent of electronics and 3/ that of computers. The fact that X-rays cause crystals to scintillate was learnt very shortly after Roentgen's discovery, electronics and computers coming very much later. To put all these together and apply them to diagnostic radiology, and at the same time dismiss the concept so firmly ingrained in everyone's mind that an X-ray picture must be produced on photographic film, required a genius. (orig./VJ) [de

  9. Industrial radiography with Ir-192 using computed radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngernvijit, Narippawaj; Punnachaiya, Suvit; Chankow, Nares; Sukbumperng, Ampai; Thong-Aram, Decho

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the utilization of a low activity Ir-192 gamma source for industrial radiographic testing using the Computed Radiography (CR) system. Due to a photo-salbutamol Imaging Plate (I P) using in CR is much more radiation sensitive than a type II film with lead foil intensifying screen, the exposure time with CR can be significantly reduced. For short-lived gamma-ray source like Ir-192 source, the exposure time must be proportionally increased until it is not practical particularly for thick specimens. Generally, when the source decays to an activity of about 5 Ci or less, it will be returned to the manufacturer as a radioactive waste. In this research, the optimum conditions for radiography of a 20 mm thick welded steel sample with 2.4 Ci Ir-192 was investigated using the CR system with high resolution image plate, i.e. type Bas-SR of the Fuji Film Co. Ltd. The I P was sandwiched by a pair of 0.25 mm thick Pb intensifying sere en. Low energy scattered radiations was filtered by placing another Pb sheet with a thickness of 3 mm under the cassette. It was found that the CR image could give a contrast sensitivity of 2.5 % using only 3-minute exposure time which was comparable to the image taken by the type II film with Pb intensifying screen using the exposure time of 45 minutes

  10. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic. (orig.)

  11. Duodenal diverticulitis. computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.; Martin, S.; Garcia, J.; Dominguez, A.

    2001-01-01

    Duodenal diverticular occur very frequently among the general public. However, duodenal diverticulitis is a very uncommon clinical entity, the diagnosis of which requires radiological studies since the clinical signs cam mimic a great number of disease processes with different treatments. We present a case of duodenal diverticulitis in which the diagnosis according to ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) studies was confirmed intraoperatively. We also review the few cases of this entity reported in the literature. The CT findings are highly suggestive of duodenal diverticulitis given their similarity to those associated with diverticulitis at other sites. (Author) 5 refs,

  12. Mathematical foundations of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.T.; Keinert, F.

    1985-01-01

    Along with a review of some of the mathematical foundations of computed tomography, the article contains new results on derivation of reconstruction formulas in a general setting encompassing all standard formulas; discussion and examples of the role of the point spread function with recipes for producing suitable ones; formulas for, and examples of, the reconstruction of certain functions of the attenuation coefficient, e.g., sharpened versions of it, some of them with the property that reconstruction at a point requires only the attenuation along rays meeting a small neighborhood of the point

  13. High speed computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maydan, D.; Shepp, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray generation and detection apparatus for use in a computer assisted tomography system which permits relatively high speed scanning. A large x-ray tube having a circular anode (3) surrounds the patient area. A movable electron gun (8) orbits adjacent to the anode. The anode directs into the patient area xrays which are delimited into a fan beam by a pair of collimating rings (21). After passing through the patient, x-rays are detected by an array (22) of movable detectors. Detector subarrays (23) are synchronously movable out of the x-ray plane to permit the passage of the fan beam

  14. Brain metastases: computed tomography assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, Victoria; Yagual, Glenda; Vinueza, Clayreth

    1998-01-01

    Intracranial metastatic tumor is relatively frequent in patients with cancer from other origin. Its location and type of metastasis varies in relation to its linage from the primary tumor. And the sequence goes from the most frequent: lung and breast cancer, melanoma, GU tract, leukemia, GI tract, head and neck tumor. Computed tomography findings are extremely varied and non specific, so there are no radiologic characteristics even from the primary tumor. We reviewed 29 TC studies in the Radiology department of ION-SOLCA, from patients with diagnosis of brain metastasis, our findings showed the great variability in the radio-diagnosis imaging. (The author)

  15. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic

  16. Whole-body computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegener, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    The vast literature on whole-body CT is presented in this bibliography which is published as a self-contained supplement to the monography entitled whole-body CT. For this documentation, the following journals have been scanned back to the year 1980: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography (JCAT), Fortschritte auf dem Gebiet der Roentgenstrahlen (RoeFo), Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), Der Radiologe, Neuroradiology, and American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR). The supplement includes keyword indexes that can be searched for terms indicating body organs, body regions, or certain lesions. The author index offers an additional access to the publication wanted. (orig./MG) [de

  17. New microfocus bremsstrahlung source based on betatron B-18 for high-resolution radiography and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychkov, M. M.; Kaplin, V. V.; Malikov, E. L.; Smolyanskiy, V. A.; Stepanov, I. B.; Lutsenko, A. S.; Gentsel'man, V.; Vas'kovskiy, I. K.

    2018-01-01

    New microfocus source of hard bremsstrahlung (photon energy > 1 MeV), based on the betatron B-18 with a narrow Ta target inside, for high-resolution radiography and tomography is presented. The first studies of the source demonstrate its possibilities for practical applications to detect the microdefects in products made from heavy materials and to control gaps in joints of parts of composite structures of engineering facilities. The radiography method was used to investigate a compound object consisting of four vertically arranged steel bars between which surfaces were exposed gaps of 10 μm in width. The radiographic image of the object, obtained with a magnification of 2.4, illustrates the good sensitivity of detecting the gaps between adjacent bars, due to the small width of the linear focus of the bremsstrahlung source.

  18. Accuracy of panoramic radiography and linear tomography in mandibular canal localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashizadeh Fakhar H.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Accurate bone measurements are essential to determine the optimal size and length of dental implants. The magnification factor of radiographic images may vary with the imaging technique used. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of linear tomography and panoramic radiography in vertical measurements, as well as the accuracy of linear tomography in mandibular width estimation. "nMaterials and Methods: In this test evaluation study, the vertical distances between the crest and the superior border of the inferior alveolar canal, marked with a metal ball, was measured by linear tomography and panoramic radiography in 23 sites of four dry mandible bones. Also the mandibular width was measured at the same sites. Then, the bones were sectioned through the marked spots and the radiographic measurements were compared with actual values. "nResults: The vertical magnification factor in tomograms and panoramic radiographs was 1.79 (SD=0.17 and 1.69 (SD=0.23, respectively. The horizontal magnification of tomograms was 1.47 (SD=0.17. A significant correlation was found between the linear tomographic and actual values, regarding vertical dimensions (p<0.001, r=0.968 and width (p<0.001, r=0.813. The correlation was significant but lower in panoramic radiographs (p<0.001, r=0.795. Applying the magnification values suggested by the manufacturer, the mean difference of vertical measurements between the tomographic sections was 2.5 mm (SD=3.4 but 3.8 mm (SD=1.65 in panoramic radiographs. The mean of absolute difference in mandibular width between the tomographic sections and reality was 0.3mm (SD=1.13. In the linear tomograms, 4.3% of vertical and 56.5% of the width measurements were in the ±1mm error limit. Only 4.3% of the vertical measurements were within this range in the panthomographs. The linear regression equation between the actual values and those obtained by radiography in vertical dimensions showed that 87.5% of

  19. Radiography and partial tomography of wood with thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterloh, K.; Fratzscher, D.; Schwabe, A.; Schillinger, B.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2011-09-01

    The effective high neutron scattering absorption coefficient of hydrogen (48.5 cm 2/g) due to the scattering allows neutrons to reveal hydrocarbon structures with more contrast than X-rays, but at the same time limits the sample size and thickness that can be investigated. Many planar shaped objects, particularly wood samples, are sufficiently thin to allow thermal neutrons to transmit through the sample in a direction perpendicular to the planar face but not in a parallel direction, due to increased thickness. Often, this is an obstacle that prevents some tomographic reconstruction algorithms from obtaining desired results because of inadequate information or presence of distracting artifacts due to missing projections. This can be true for samples such as the distribution of glue in glulam (boards of wooden layers glued together), or the course of partially visible annual rings in trees where the features of interest are parallel to the planar surface of the sample. However, it should be possible to study these features by rotating the specimen within a limited angular range. In principle, this approach has been shown previously in a study with fast neutrons [2]. A study of this kind was performed at the Antares facility of FRM II in Garching with a 2.6×10 7/cm 2 s thermal neutron beam. The limit of penetration was determined for a wooden step wedge carved from a 2 cm×4 cm block of wood in comparison to other materials such as heavy metals and Lucite as specimens rich in hydrogen. The depth of the steps was 1 cm, the height 0.5 cm. The annual ring structures were clearly detectable up to 2 cm thickness. Wooden specimens, i.e. shivers, from a sunken old ship have been subjected to tomography. Not visible from the outside, clear radial structures have been found that are typical for certain kinds of wood. This insight was impaired in a case where the specimen had been soaked with ethylene glycol. In another large sample study, a planar board made of glulam has

  20. Radiography and partial tomography of wood with thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Fratzscher, D.; Schwabe, A.; Schillinger, B.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2011-01-01

    The effective high neutron scattering absorption coefficient of hydrogen (48.5 cm 2 /g) due to the scattering allows neutrons to reveal hydrocarbon structures with more contrast than X-rays, but at the same time limits the sample size and thickness that can be investigated. Many planar shaped objects, particularly wood samples, are sufficiently thin to allow thermal neutrons to transmit through the sample in a direction perpendicular to the planar face but not in a parallel direction, due to increased thickness. Often, this is an obstacle that prevents some tomographic reconstruction algorithms from obtaining desired results because of inadequate information or presence of distracting artifacts due to missing projections. This can be true for samples such as the distribution of glue in glulam (boards of wooden layers glued together), or the course of partially visible annual rings in trees where the features of interest are parallel to the planar surface of the sample. However, it should be possible to study these features by rotating the specimen within a limited angular range. In principle, this approach has been shown previously in a study with fast neutrons . A study of this kind was performed at the Antares facility of FRM II in Garching with a 2.6x10 7 /cm 2 s thermal neutron beam. The limit of penetration was determined for a wooden step wedge carved from a 2 cmx4 cm block of wood in comparison to other materials such as heavy metals and Lucite as specimens rich in hydrogen. The depth of the steps was 1 cm, the height 0.5 cm. The annual ring structures were clearly detectable up to 2 cm thickness. Wooden specimens, i.e. shivers, from a sunken old ship have been subjected to tomography. Not visible from the outside, clear radial structures have been found that are typical for certain kinds of wood. This insight was impaired in a case where the specimen had been soaked with ethylene glycol. In another large sample study, a planar board made of glulam has been

  1. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Fuji computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCutcheon, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the technical details of Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) and its use as it relates to managing pediatric dose for X-ray examinations. Since its introduction in 1983, Fuji (Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.) has developed an extensive set of menu selections with default processing algorithms and corresponding display processing parameters modified for all pediatric exam types. Continued development of imaging plate technology, FCR reader design and image processing have all contributed to improving image quality and creating the opportunity to lower the dose required for pediatric exams. Fuji continues to advance CR and electronic imaging technologies; some of these developments, that may enable lower dose examinations for pediatric imaging in the future, are also described in this paper. (orig.)

  2. Dose determination in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descamps, C.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Germanier, A.

    2011-10-01

    In the last years the methodologies to determine the dose in computed tomography have been revised. In this work was realized a dosimetric study about the exploration protocols used for simulation of radiotherapy treatments. The methodology described in the Report No. 111 of the American Association of Medical Physiques on a computed tomograph of two cuts was applied. A cylindrical phantom of water was used with dimensions: 30 cm of diameter and 50 cm of longitude that simulates the absorption and dispersion conditions of a mature body of size average. The doses were determined with ionization chamber and thermoluminescent dosimetry. The results indicate that the dose information that provides the tomograph underestimates the dose between 32 and 35%.

  3. Computed tomography of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, I.; Antoun, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Until the advent of Computed Tomography (CT), axial studies of the spine were limited in the main to gross bony anatomy and to conventional transaxial tomography (TAT). Others studied the upper cervical cord in transverse section during gas myelography and encephalography. The potential role of CT in the evaluation of spinal anatomy and disease was recognized, however, at an early stage in the development of the general purpose CT scanner. CT is not organ specific and therefore provides a uniformly thin (1.5-13 mm) axial section displaying detailed spinal topographical anatomy against a background of paravertebral muscles, vascular structures and body cavity organs. The relationships of the apophyseal joints to the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina are particularly well displayed. The study of neural tissue and pathology within the spinal canal is facilitated by the use of a non-ionic water-soluble contrast medium (viz. metrizamide) in the subarachnoid spaces. The high sensitivity of CT to very small changes in X-ray attenuation permits studies to be continued over several hours. The digital derivation of the sequential CT transaxial sections enables not only interrogation of data and quantitative studies to be made but also makes possible computer-generated reconstructions in other planes

  4. Motion artifacts in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.K.

    1979-01-01

    In the year 1972, the first Computed Tomography Scanner (or CT) was introduced and caused a revolution in the field of Diagnostic Radiology. A tomogram is a cross-sectional image of a three-dimensional object obtained through non-invasive measurements. The image that is presented is very similar to what would be seen if a thin cross-sectional slice of the patient was examined. In Computed Tomography, x-rays are passed through the body of a patient in many different directions and their attenuation is detected. By using some mathematical theorems, the attenuation information can be converted into the density of the patient along the x-ray path. Combined with modern sophisticated computer signal processing technology, a cross-sectional image can be generated and displayed on a TV monitor. Usually a good CT image relies on the patient not moving during the x-ray scanning. However, for some unconscious or severely ill patients, this is very difficult to achieve. Thus, the motion during the scan causes the so-called motion artifacts which distort the displayed image and sometimes these motion artifacts make diagnosis impossible. Today, to remove or avoid motion artifacts is one of the major efforts in developing new scanner systems. In this thesis, a better understanding of the motion artifacts problem in CT scaning is gained through computer simulations, real scanner experiments and theoretical analyses. The methods by which the distorted image can be improved are simulated also. In particular, it is assumed that perfect knowledge of the patient motion is known since this represents the theoretical limit on how well the distorted image can be improved

  5. X-ray phase radiography and tomography with grating interferometry and the reverse projection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Ge, Xin; Wu, Zhao; Chen, Heng; Wang, Shenghao; Wu, Ziyu; Zhu, Peiping; Yuan, Qingxi; Huang, Wanxia; Zhang, Kai

    2013-01-01

    X-ray grating interferometry provides substantially increased contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging methods, and therefore new and complementary information. Compared with other phase-contrast imaging techniques, x-ray grating interferometry can overcome some of the problems that have impaired the applications of x-ray phase-contrast radiography and phase tomography. Recently, special attention has been paid to the development of quantitative phase retrieval methods, which is mandatory to perform x-ray phase tomography, to achieve material identification, to differentiate distinct tissues, etc. Typically, the phase-stepping approach has been utilized for phase retrieval in grating interferometry. This method requires a grating scanning and acquisition of multiple radiographic projections, and therefore is disadvantageous in terms of imaging speed and radiation damage. Here we present an innovative, highly sensitive approach, dubbed ‘reverse projection’ (RP), for quantitative phase retrieval. Compared with the phase-stepping approach, the present RP method abandons grating scanning completely, and thus is advantageous due to its much higher efficiency and the reduced radiation dose, without the degradation of reconstruction quality. This review presents a detailed explanation of the principle of the RP method. Both radiography and phase tomography experiments are performed to validate the RP method. We believe that this new technique will find widespread applications in biomedical imaging and in vivo studies. (paper)

  6. Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TR-7681 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles by Michael C Golt, Chris M...Laboratory Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles by Michael C Golt and Matthew S Bratcher Weapons and Materials Research...values to account for projectile variability in the ballistic evaluation of armor. 15. SUBJECT TERMS computed tomography , CT, BS41, projectiles

  7. Measuring Weld Profiles By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Noncontacting, nondestructive computer tomography system determines internal and external contours of welded objects. System makes it unnecessary to take metallurgical sections (destructive technique) or to take silicone impressions of hidden surfaces (technique that contaminates) to inspect them. Measurements of contours via tomography performed 10 times as fast as measurements via impression molds, and tomography does not contaminate inspected parts.

  8. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and

  9. Assessment of weld thickness loss in offshore pipelines using computed radiography and computational modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S.C.A.; Souza, E.M.; Oliveira, D.F.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, R.T.; Marinho, C.; Camerini, C.S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to guarantee the structural integrity of oil plants it is crucial to monitor the amount of weld thickness loss in offshore pipelines. However, in spite of its relevance, this parameter is very difficult to determine, due to both the large diameter of most pipes and the complexity of the multi-variable system involved. In this study, a computational modeling based on Monte Carlo MCNPX code is combined with computed radiography to estimate the weld thickness loss in large-diameter offshore pipelines. Results show that computational modeling is a powerful tool to estimate intensity variations in radiographic images generated by weld thickness variations, and it can be combined with computed radiography to assess weld thickness loss in offshore and subsea pipelines.

  10. On-demand rather than daily-routine chest radiography prescription may change neither the number nor the impact of chest computed tomography and ultrasound studies in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröner, Anke; Binnekade, Jan M; Graat, Marleen E; Vroom, Margreeth B; Stoker, Jaap; Spronk, Peter E; Schultz, Marcus J

    2008-01-01

    Elimination of daily-routine chest radiographs (CXRs) may influence chest computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound practice in critically ill patients. This was a retrospective cohort study including all patients admitted to a university-affiliated intensive care unit during two consecutive periods of 5 months, one before and one after elimination of daily-routine CXR. Chest CT and ultrasound studies were identified retrospectively by using the radiology department information system. Indications for and the diagnostic/therapeutic yield of chest CT and ultrasound studies were collected. Elimination of daily-routine CXR resulted in a decrease of CXRs per patient day from 1.1 +/- 0.3 to 0.6 +/- 0.4 (P chest CT studies nor the ratio of chest CT studies per patient day changed with the intervention: Before elimination of daily-routine CXR, 52 chest CT studies were obtained from 747 patients; after elimination, 54 CT studies were obtained from 743 patients. Similarly, chest ultrasound practice was not affected by the change of CXR strategy: Before and after elimination, 21 and 27 chest ultrasound studies were performed, respectively. Also, timing of chest CT and ultrasound studies was not different between the two study periods. During the two periods, 40 of 106 chest CT studies (38%) and 18 of 48 chest ultrasound studies (38%) resulted in a change in therapy. The combined therapeutic yield of chest CT and ultrasound studies did not change with elimination of daily-routine CXR. Elimination of daily-routine CXRs may not affect chest CT and ultrasound practice in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit.

  11. An introduction to emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes salient features of the theory and an examination of practical considerations for someone who is using or introducing tomography, selecting equipment for it or wishing to develop a clinical application. Emphasis is on gamma camera tomography. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: emission computed and gamma camera tomography and the relationship to other medical imaging techniques, the tomographic reconstruction technique theory, rotating gamma camera tomography, attenuation correction and quantitative reconstruction, other single photon tomographic techniques, positron tomography, image display, clinical application of single photon and positron tomography, and commercial systems for SPECT. Substantial bibliography. (U.K.)

  12. Chest tube placement in thorax trauma - comparison chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, P.; Maas, R.; Buecheler, E.; Tesch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of chest tube placement in patients with thoracic trauma with regard to chest tube malposition in chest radiography in the supine position compared to additional computed tomography of the thorax. Material and methods: Apart from compulsory chest radiography after one or multiple chest tube insertions, 31 severely injured patients with thoracic trauma underwent a CT scan of the thorax. These 31 patients with 40 chest tubes constituted the basis for the present analysis. Results: In chest radiography in the supine position there were no chest tube malpositions (n=40); In the CT scans 25 correct positions, 7 pseudo-malpositions, 6 intrafissural and 2 intrapulmonary malpositions were identified. Moreover 16 sufficient, 18 insufficient and 6 indifferent functions of the chest tubes were seen. Conclusion: In case of lasting clinical problems and questionable function of the chest tube, chest radiography should be supplemented by a CT scan of the thorax in order to estimate the position of the chest tube. (orig.) [de

  13. Computed tomography of surface related radionuclide distributions ('BONN'-tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockisch, A.; Koenig, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method called the 'BONN' tomography is described to produce planar projections of circular activity distributions using standard single photon emission computed tomography. The clinical value of the method is demonstrated for bone scans of the jaw, thorax, and pelvis. Numerical or projection-related problems are discussed. (orig.) [de

  14. An industrial demonstration of computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, L.R.

    1985-09-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is a nondestructive testing technique for generating quantitative density (linear attenuation coefficient) maps of a cross section through an object. By using a series of parallel tomographic images taken at different elevations, a three-dimensional (3-D) map of the object can be obtained. To demonstrate the power of tomography, a 3-D region of a motorcycle carburetor has been imaged using twenty-four parallel two-dimensional images. From these data, new images in planes orthogonal to the original planes have been generated, thereby improving the user's ability to visualize the position of components within the carburetor. The data have also been used to demonstrate the relationship between tomography and radiography

  15. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-12-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children.

  16. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children

  17. Computed tomography in hepatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with hepatic injury from blunt upper abdominal trauma were examined by computed tomography (CT). The spectrum of CT findings was recorded, and the size of the hepatic laceration and the associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs nonoperative). While the need for surgery correlated roughly with the size of the hepatic laceration, the size of the associated hemoperitoneum was an important modifying factor. Fifteen patients with hepatic lacerations but little or no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. CT seems to have significant advantages over hepatic scintigraphy, angiography, and diagnostic peritoneal lavage. By combining inforamtion on the clinical state of the patient and CT findings, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased

  18. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions

  19. Using the computed tomography in comparison to the orthogonal radiography based treatment planning in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in cervical uteri cancer patients; a single institution feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Yasir A; El-Sayed, Mohamed E; El-Taher, Zeinab H; Zaza, Khaled O; Moftah, Belal A; Hassouna, Ashraf H; Ghassal, Noor M

    2008-03-01

    Brachytherapy is an integral part in the treatment of cervical uteri cancer patients. Orthogonal treatment planning is the standard mode of calculation based on reference points. Introduction of the innovative 3-D computer based treatment planning allows accurate calculation based on volumetric information as regards the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). Also provide dose volume histogram (DVH) for proper estimation of the dose in relation to the volume. To correlate and compare the information obtained from the two approaches for high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical uteri cancer; the orthogonal conventional method and the computerized tomography (CT) three dimensions (3D) based calculation method in relation to the target and organ at risk (OAR). From 6 patients of cervical uteri cancer, 21 applications with orthogonal planning using the Brachy Vision treatment planning system version 7.3.10 were performed. In 10 applications; comparison between orthogonal and CT based planning was done. In orthogonal planning; the dose to point A, rectum and bladder were defined according to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendation. From the CT based planning the target volume and dose volume histogram lpar;DVH) were calculated for the clinical target volume (CTV), rectum and bladder. From these two sets, information was obtained and compared and mean values were derived. For dose prescription at point A, an average of 63.5% of CTV received the prescribed dose. The mean ICRU dose to the bladder point is 2.9 Gy+/-1.2 SD (Standard Deviation) and 17% of the bladder volume derived from CT was encompassed by 2.9 Gy isodose line. The mean ICRU dose at the rectum point is 3.4 Gy+/-1.2 SD and 21% of the rectum volume from CT was encompassed by 3.4 Gy isodose line. The maximum dose to the rectum and the bladder derived from the CT and compared to the maximal dose at ICRU is 1.7 and 2.8 times higher than the orthogonal reference points; with the corresponding p

  20. Using the Computed Tomography in Comparison to the Orthogonal Radiography Based Treatment Planning in High dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy in Cervical Uteri Cancer Patients; A Single Institution Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAHADUR, Y.A.; EL-SAYED, M.E.; HASSOUNA, A.H.; EL-TAHER, Z.H.; GHASSAL, N.M.; ZAZA, Kh.O.M.D.; OFTAH, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy is an integral part in the treatment of cervical uteri cancer patients. Orthogonal treatment planning is the standard mode of calculation based on reference points. Introduction of the innovative 3-D computer based treatment planning allows accurate calculation based on volumetric information as regards the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). Also provide dose volume histogram (DVH) for proper estimation of the dose in relation to the volume. Aim: To correlate and compare the information obtained from the two approaches for high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical uteri cancer; the orthogonal conventional method and the computerized tomography (CT) three dimensions (3D) based calculation method in relation to the target and organ at risk (OAR). Methods: From 6 patients of cervical uteri cancer, 21 applications with orthogonal planning using the Brachy Vision treatment planning system version 7.3.10 were performed. In 10 applications; comparison between orthogonal and CT based planning was done. In orthogonal planning; the dose to point A, rectum and bladder were defined according to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendation. From the CT based planning the target volume and dose volume histogram (DVH) were calculated for the clinical target volume (CTV), rectum and bladder. From these two sets, information was obtained and compared and mean values were derived. Results: For dose prescription at point A, an average of 63.5% of CTV received the prescribed dose. The mean ICRU dose to the bladder point is 2.9 Gy±l .2 SD (Standard Deviation) and 17% of the bladder volume derived from CT was encompassed by 2.9 Gy isodose line. The mean ICRU dose at the rectum point is 3.4 Gy±1.2 SD and 21% of the rectum volume from CT was encompassed by 3.4 Gy isodose line. The maximum dose to the rectum and the bladder derived from the CT and compared to the maximal dose at ICRU is 1.7 and 2.8 times higher than the orthogonal reference points; with the

  1. MYTHS vesus reality in computed radiography image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mango, Steve; Castro, Luiz

    2009-01-01

    As NDE operation - particularly radiographic testing - ransition form analog to digital technologies such as computed radiography (CR), users are learning that there's more to digital image quality than meets the eye. In fact, there are ultiple factors that determine the final perceived image quality of a computed radiograph. Many of these factors are misunderstood, and some are touted as the ''key parameter'' or ''magic bullet'' in producing optiumum image quality, In reality, such claims are oversimplified, and are more marketing hype than reality. The truth?. Perceived image quality results form the cascaded effects of many factor - such as sharpness, system noise, spot size and pixel size, subject contrast, bit depth, radiographic technique, and so on. Many of these factors are within the control of rdiographers or designers of equipment and media. This paper will explain some of these key factors, dispel some of the myths surrounding them, and will show that qualities such as bigger, smaller, more, or less are not always better when it comes to CR image quality. (authors)

  2. Clinical Evaluation of a Dual-Side Readout Technique Computed Radiography System in Chest Radiography of Premature Neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlander, A.; Hansson, J.; Soederberg, J.; Steneryd, K.; Baath, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recently, the dual-side readout technique has been introduced in computed radiography, leading to an increase in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) compared with the single-side readout technique. Purpose: To evaluate if the increase in DQE with the dual-side readout technique results in a higher clinical image quality in chest radiography of premature neonates at no increase in radiation dose. Material and Methods: Twenty-four chest radiographs of premature neonates were collected from both a single-side readout technique system and a double-side readout technique system. The images were processed in the same image-processing station in order for the comparison to be only dependent on the difference in readout technique. Five radiologists rated the fulfillment of four image quality criteria, which were based on important anatomical landmarks. The given ratings were analyzed using visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis. Results: The VGC analysis showed that the reproduction of the carina with the main bronchi and the thoracic vertebrae behind the heart was better with the dual-side readout technique, whereas no significant difference for the reproduction of the central vessels or the peripheral vessels could be observed. Conclusions: The results indicate that the higher DQE of the dual-side readout technique leads to higher clinical image quality in chest radiography of premature neonates at no increase in radiation dose. Keywords: Digital radiography; lung; observer performance; pediatrics; thorax

  3. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, L.D.; Ritman, E.L.; Robb, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Presented here is a brief introduction to two-, three-, and four-dimensional computed tomography. More detailed descriptions of the mathematics of reconstruction and of CT scanner operation are presented elsewhere. The complementary tomographic imaging methods of single-photon-emission tomography (SPECT) positron-emission tomography (PET), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, ulltrasound sector scanning, and ulltrasound computer-assisted tomography [UCAT] are only named here. Each imaging modality ''probes'' the body with a different energy form, yielding unique and useful information about tomographic sections through the body

  5. Temporal digital subtraction radiography with a personal computer digital workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircos, L.; Holt, W.; Khademi, J.

    1990-01-01

    Technique have been developed and implemented on a personal computer (PC)-based digital workstation to accomplish temporal digital subtraction radiography (TDSR). TDSR is useful in recording radiologic change over time. Thus, this technique is useful not only for monitoring chronic disease processes but also for monitoring the temporal course of interventional therapies. A PC-based digital workstation was developed on a PC386 platform with add-in hardware and software. Image acquisition, storage, and processing was accomplished using 512 x 512 x 8- or 12-bit frame grabber. Software and hardware were developed to accomplish image orientation, registration, gray scale compensation, subtraction, and enhancement. Temporal radiographs of the jaws were made in a fixed and reproducible orientation between the x-ray source and image receptor enabling TDSR. Temporal changes secondary to chronic periodontal disease, osseointegration of endosseous implants, and wound healing were demonstrated. Use of TDSR for chest imaging was also demonstrated with identification of small, subtle focal masses that were not apparent with routine viewing. The large amount of radiologic information in images of the jaws and chest may obfuscate subtle changes that TDSR seems to identify. TDSR appears to be useful as a tool to record temporal and subtle changes in radiologic images

  6. Computed tomography of basal ganglia calcifications in pseudo- and idiopathic hypoparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunaga, Masao; Otsuka, Nobuaki; Ono, Shimato; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Nishishita, Soichi; Morita, Rikushi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Torizuka, Kanji.

    1987-12-01

    It is well known that patients with pseudo (PHP)- and idiopathic (IHP) hypoparathyroidism are frequently associated with intracranial calcifications. The relative sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) and conventional skull radiography in detecting basal ganglia calcifications was studied in two patients with PHP and six with IHP. CT was more sensitive: the detection rate was 71 % (5/7) for CT and 14 % (1/7) for skull radiography. Furthermore, patients with more prolonged hypocalcemia showed a higher incidence of calcifications. Thus, CT was useful as a diagnostic technique in the early detection of calcified basal ganglia.

  7. Computed tomography of basal ganglia calcifications in pseudo- and idiopathic hypoparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Masao; Otsuka, Nobuaki; Ono, Shimato; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Nishishita, Soichi; Morita, Rikushi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Torizuka, Kanji.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that patients with pseudo (PHP)- and idiopathic (IHP) hypoparathyroidism are frequently associated with intracranial calcifications. The relative sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) and conventional skull radiography in detecting basal ganglia calcifications was studied in two patients with PHP and six with IHP. CT was more sensitive: the detection rate was 71 % (5/7) for CT and 14 % (1/7) for skull radiography. Furthermore, patients with more prolonged hypocalcemia showed a higher incidence of calcifications. Thus, CT was useful as a diagnostic technique in the early detection of calcified basal ganglia. (author)

  8. Digital radiography: are the manufacturers' settings too high? Optimisation of the Kodak digital radiography system with aid of the computed radiography dose index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Sinead E.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2002-01-01

    Manufacturers offer exposure indices as a safeguard against overexposure in computed radiography, but the basis for recommended values is unclear. This study establishes an optimum exposure index to be used as a guideline for a specific CR system to minimise radiation exposures for computed mobile chest radiography, and compares this with manufacturer guidelines and current practice. An anthropomorphic phantom was employed to establish the minimum milliamperes consistent with acceptable image quality for mobile chest radiography images. This was found to be 2 mAs. Consecutively, 10 patients were exposed with this optimised milliampere value and 10 patients were exposed with the 3.2 mAs routinely used in the department of the study. Image quality was objectively assessed using anatomical criteria. Retrospective analyses of 717 exposure indices recorded over 2 months from mobile chest examinations were performed. The optimised milliampere value provided a significant reduction of the average exposure index from 1840 to 1570 (p<0.0001). This new ''optimum'' exposure index is substantially lower than manufacturer guidelines of 2000 and significantly lower than exposure indices from the retrospective study (1890). Retrospective data showed a significant increase in exposure indices if the examination was performed out of hours. The data provided by this study emphasise the need for clinicians and personnel to consider establishing their own optimum exposure indices for digital investigations rather than simply accepting manufacturers' guidelines. Such an approach, along with regular monitoring of indices, may result in a substantial reduction in patient exposure. (orig.)

  9. Computed tomography of obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jung Hek; Lee, Joong Suk; Chun, Beung He; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1982-01-01

    It is well known that the computed tomography (CT) is very useful in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice. We have studied 55 cases of obstructive jaundice with whole body scanner from Jun.1980 to Jun. 1981. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution was 36 males and 19 females, and 40 cases of obstructive jaundice were seen in fifth, sixth, and seventh decades. 2. Causes of obstructive jaundice were 25 cases of pancreas cancer, 8 cases of common duct cancer, 4 cases of gallbladder cancer, 4 cases of ampulla vater cancer, 12 cases of common duct stone, and 2 cases of common duct stricture. 3. Levels of obstruction were 8 cases of hepatic portion, 15 cases of suprapancreatic portion, 28 cases of pancreatic portion, and 4 cases of ampullary portion. 4. In tumorous condition, CT demonstrated metastasis of other organs, 9 cases of the liver, 1 case of the lung, 3 cases of the pancreas, 3 cases of the common bile duct, 1 case of the stomach, and 12 cases of adjacent lymph nodes. 5. Associated diseases were 12 cases of intrahepatic stone, 4 cases of clonorchiasis, 2 cases of pancreas pseudocyst, 1 cases of hydronephrosis, and 1 case of renal cyst

  10. Errors in abdominal computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, S.; Marting, I.; Dixon, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-nine patients are presented in whom a substantial error was made on the initial abdominal computed tomography report. Certain features of these errors have been analysed. In 30 (43.5%) a lesion was simply not recognised (error of observation); in 39 (56.5%) the wrong conclusions were drawn about the nature of normal or abnormal structures (error of interpretation). The 39 errors of interpretation were more complex; in 7 patients an abnormal structure was noted but interpreted as normal, whereas in four a normal structure was thought to represent a lesion. Other interpretive errors included those where the wrong cause for a lesion had been ascribed (24 patients), and those where the abnormality was substantially under-reported (4 patients). Various features of these errors are presented and discussed. Errors were made just as often in relation to small and large lesions. Consultants made as many errors as senior registrar radiologists. It is like that dual reporting is the best method of avoiding such errors and, indeed, this is widely practised in our unit. (Author). 9 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Brain perfusion: computed tomography applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    Within recent years, the broad introduction of fast multi-detector computed tomography (CT) systems and the availability of commercial software for perfusion analysis have made cerebral perfusion imaging with CT a practical technique for the clinical environment. The technique is widely available at low cost, accurate and easy to perform. Perfusion CT is particularly applicable to those clinical circumstances where patients already undergo CT for other reasons, including stroke, head injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and radiotherapy planning. Future technical developments in multi-slice CT systems may diminish the current limitations of limited spatial coverage and radiation burden. CT perfusion imaging on combined PET-CT systems offers new opportunities to improve the evaluation of patients with cerebral ischaemia or tumours by demonstrating the relationship between cerebral blood flow and metabolism. Yet CT is often not perceived as a technique for imaging cerebral perfusion. This article reviews the use of CT for imaging cerebral perfusion, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages and draws comparisons between perfusion CT and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  12. X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, Willi A

    2006-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  13. Computed tomography of epileptic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Mana; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changes seen on cranial computed tomography (CT) of epileptic children, especially in the area of the temporal horn. The subjects were 242 epileptic children excluding those with encephalitis, brain tumor, neurocutaneous syndromes, degenerative disease, hydrocephalus etc. The control subjects were 195 children without any neurological disease and symptoms. CT scan were taken with a TCT-60A whole body scanner, and 14 check points were evaluated excluding the temporal horn. 195 epileptic children (N-group) and all control children were normal at 14 check points. Next, the areas of the temporal horns and adjoining hemispheres of the epileptic children (N-group) and control children were examined with Muto-Tablet-Desitizer. The temporal horn ratio ((area of temporal horn/area of ipsilateral hemisphere) x 100) was greater in younger children of the control group, and it was higher in epileptic than in control children. Enlargement of the temporal horn was seen in 1 % of the controls and in 35 % of the 125 epileptic children with normal measurements at 14 points on CT scans (p < 0.01). The frequency of enlargement of temporal horns was not variable among different epileptic types. In the epileptic children with normal CT scans except for enlargement of temporal horns behavioral disturbances were 6 boys and 5 had enlarged temporal horns (bilateral 1 case, left side 1 case, right side 3 cases). (author)

  14. Computed Tomography of Interacerebral Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Lee, Kwan Seh; Park, Soo Soung

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate and reliable method for the diagnosis of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. The precise anatomic extent of the nematoma, associated cerebral edema, ventricular deformity and displacement, and hydrocephalus are all readily assessed. Aside from head trauma, the principal cause of intracerebral hematoma is hypertensive vascular disease. Although hematomas from various causes may present similar CT appearances frequently the correct etiology may be suggested by consideration of patient's age, clinical history, and the location of the hematoma. The analytical study was performed in 180 cases of intracerebral hemorrhages by CT from October 1981 to January 1983. The results were as follows; 1. The most prevalent age group was 6th decade (37.2%). Male was prevalent to female at the ration of 1.6 to 1. 2. The most common symptom and sign was mental disturbance (48.7%), motor weakness (23%), headache (10.6%), nausea and vomiting (9.8%). 3. The causes of hemorrhage were hypertension (53.9%), head trauma (30.6%), aneurysm (6.1%) and A-V malformation (7.2%). 4. The frequent locations of hemorrhage were basal ganglia and thalamus (40.4%), lobes (35%), ventricles (21.8%). 5. The distribution of hemorrhage was intracerebral hemorrhage (65.6%), intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage (30.3%), intraventricular hemorrhage (4.4%).

  15. Recent Developments in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, D.; Dafni, E.; Levene, S.; Malamud, G.; Shapiro, O.; Shechter, G.; Zahavi, O.

    1999-01-01

    Computerized Tomography. has become, during the past few years, one of the mostly used apparatus in X-ray diagnosis. Its clinical applications has penetrated to various fields, like operational guidance, cardiac imaging, computer aided surgery etc. The first second-generation CT scanners consisted of a rotate-rotate system detectors array and an X-ray tube. These scanners were capable of acquiring individual single slices, the duration of each being several seconds. The slow scanning rate, and the then poor computers power, limited the application range of these scanners, to relatively stable organs, short body coverage at given resolutions. Further drawbacks of these machines were weak X-ray sources and low efficiency gas detectors. In the late 80's the first helical scanners were introduced by Siemens. Based on a continuous patient couch movement during gantry rotation, much faster scans could be obtained, increasing significantly the volume coverage at a given time. In 1992 the first dual-slice scanners, equipped with high efficiency solid state detectors were introduced by Elscint. The acquisition of data simultaneously from two detector arrays doubled the efficiency of the scan. Faster computers and stronger X-ray sources further improved the performance, allowing for a new range of clinical applications. Yet, the need for even faster machines and bigger volume coverage led to further R and D efforts by the leading CT manufacturers. In order to accomplish the most demanding clinical needs, innovative 2 dimensional 4-rows solid-state detector arrays were developed, together with faster rotating machines and bigger X-ray tubes, all demanding extremely accurate and robust mechanical constructions. Parallel, multi-processor custom computers were made, in order to allow the on-line reconstruction of the growing amounts of raw data. Four-slice helical scanners, rotating at 0.5 sec per cycle are being tested nowadays in several clinics all over the world. This talk

  16. Performance characteristics of a Kodak computed radiography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, C D; Peppler, W W; Dobbins, J T

    1999-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a photostimulable phosphor based computed radiographic (CR) system were studied. The modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the Kodak Digital Science computed radiography (CR) system (Eastman Kodak Co.-model 400) were measured and compared to previously published results of a Fuji based CR system (Philips Medical Systems-PCR model 7000). To maximize comparability, the same measurement techniques and analysis methods were used. The DQE at four exposure levels (30, 3, 0.3, 0.03 mR) and two plate types (standard and high resolution) were calculated from the NPS and MTF measurements. The NPS was determined from two-dimensional Fourier analysis of uniformly exposed plates. The presampling MTF was determined from the Fourier transform (FT) of the system's finely sampled line spread function (LSF) as produced by a narrow slit. A comparison of the slit type ("beveled edge" versus "straight edge") and its effect on the resulting MTF measurements was also performed. The results show that both systems are comparable in resolution performance. The noise power studies indicated a higher level of noise for the Kodak images (approximately 20% at the low exposure levels and 40%-70% at higher exposure levels). Within the clinically relevant exposure range (0.3-3 mR), the resulting DQE for the Kodak plates ranged between 20%-50% lower than for the corresponding Fuji plates. Measurements of the presampling MTF with the two slit types have shown that a correction factor can be applied to compensate for transmission through the relief edges.

  17. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Disseminated Cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Singhal, Abhinav; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Tripathi, Madhavi; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis without pulmonary involvement is a very rare phenomenon. Patterns of organ involvement in cryptococcosis resemble various other infective conditions as well as malignant conditions on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient who had disseminated cryptococcosis. The rarity of the case being noninvolvement of lungs and meninges and resembling more like lymphoma due to the diffuse involvement of the lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm.

  18. Correlation of the clinical and physical image quality in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the quality of visually graded patient (clinical) chest images and a quantitative assessment of chest phantom (physical) images acquired with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. The results of a previously published study, in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer-simulated postero-anterior chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme, were used for the clinical image quality measurement. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose efficiency (eDE) were used as physical image quality metrics measured in a uniform chest phantom. Although optimal values of these physical metrics for chest radiography were not derived in this work, their correlation with VGAS in images acquired without an antiscatter grid across the diagnostic range of X-ray tube voltages was determined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Clinical and physical image quality metrics increased with decreasing tube voltage. Statistically significant correlations between VGAS and CNR (R=0.87, pchest CR images acquired without an antiscatter grid. A statistically significant correlation has been found between the clinical and physical image quality in CR chest imaging. The results support the value of using CNR and eDE in the evaluation of quality in clinical thorax radiography.

  19. Computed tomography of the facial canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Sousuke

    1983-01-01

    The radiological details of the facial canal was investigated by computed tomography. In the first part of this study, dry skulls were used to delineate the full course of the facial canal by computed tomography. In the second part of this study, the patients with chronic otitis media and secondary cholesteatoma were evaluated. The labyrinthine and tympanic parts of the canal were well demonstrated with the axial scanning, and the mastoid part with the coronal scanning. Moreover, computed tomography showed excellent delineation of the middle ear contents. In patients with secondary cholesteatoma, the destructions of the intratympanic course of the bony facial canal were also assessed preoperatively. (author)

  20. Development of computer-aided auto-ranging technique for a computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, M.; Shimura, K.; Nakajima, N.; Kato, H.

    1988-01-01

    For a computed radiography system, the authors developed a computer-aided autoranging technique in which the clinically useful image data are automatically mapped to the available display range. The preread image data are inspected to determine the location of collimation. A histogram of the pixels inside the collimation is evaluated regarding characteristic values such as maxima and minima, and then the optimal density and contrast are derived for the display image. The effect of the autoranging technique was investigated at several hospitals in Japan. The average rate of films lost due to undesirable density or contrast was about 0.5%

  1. Attenuation Correction Strategies for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and 4-Dimensional Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Tinsu; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses attenuation correction strategies in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and 4 dimensional PET/CT imaging. Average CT scan derived from averaging the high temporal resolution CT images is effective in improving the registration of the CT and the PET images and quantification of the PET data. It underscores list mode data acquisition in 4 dimensional PET and introduces 4 dimensional CT popular in thoracic treatment planning to 4 dimensional PET/CT. ...

  2. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1987-01-01

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos

  3. Computed tomography of cerebrovascular accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Deuk; Moon, Yang In; Lim, Se Hwan; Lee, Cheorl Woo; Kim, Byung Chan; Won, Jong Jin

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an accurate and noninvasive method in the evaluation of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) for detection of nature, location, extension and associated changes. Retrospective analysis was done in 402 patients of clinically suspected CVA who were performed CT in our hospital from December 1985 to December 1987. The results were as follows; 1. The analysis of CT findings in 402 patients showed 321 cases of CVA, 79 cases of normal findings, and 2 cases of brain tumors. 2. Among 321 cases of CVA, intracerebral hemorrhage was noted in 158 cases, cerebral infarction in 126 cases, and subarachnoid hemorrhage in 37 cases. 3. The common sites of cerebral hemorrhage were basal ganglia in 99 cases, especially putamen, thalamus in 32 cases, and cerebrum, cerebellum in 11 cases respectively. Cerebral infarction was found chiefly at the areas distributed by the middle cerebral artery: cerebral lobe 55 cases and basal ganglia 51 cases. The aneurysm was the most common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and its common site was posterior communicating artery and middle cerebral artery areas. 4. The common shape of cerebral infarction was oval in basal ganglia and wedged in the cerebral lobes. The contrast enhancement of the cerebral infarction was observed in 10% of cases between the 3rd days and 2nd weeks after onset, and was usually gyral patients (77.7%). 5. The aneurysm was noted as enhancing nodule on contrast CT in all 14 cases. In conclusion, the most common cause of CVA is intracerebral hemorrhage in Iri, Korea. High resolution contrast enhanced CT can be used in the diagnosis of the ruptured cerebral aneurysm without the aid of cerebral angiography

  4. Computed tomography of cerebrovascular accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Deuk; Moon, Yang In; Lim, Se Hwan; Lee, Cheorl Woo; Kim, Byung Chan; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is an accurate and noninvasive method in the evaluation of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) for detection of nature, location, extension and associated changes. Retrospective analysis was done in 402 patients of clinically suspected CVA who were performed CT in our hospital from December 1985 to December 1987. The results were as follows; 1. The analysis of CT findings in 402 patients showed 321 cases of CVA, 79 cases of normal findings, and 2 cases of brain tumors. 2. Among 321 cases of CVA, intracerebral hemorrhage was noted in 158 cases, cerebral infarction in 126 cases, and subarachnoid hemorrhage in 37 cases. 3. The common sites of cerebral hemorrhage were basal ganglia in 99 cases, especially putamen, thalamus in 32 cases, and cerebrum, cerebellum in 11 cases respectively. Cerebral infarction was found chiefly at the areas distributed by the middle cerebral artery: cerebral lobe 55 cases and basal ganglia 51 cases. The aneurysm was the most common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and its common site was posterior communicating artery and middle cerebral artery areas. 4. The common shape of cerebral infarction was oval in basal ganglia and wedged in the cerebral lobes. The contrast enhancement of the cerebral infarction was observed in 10% of cases between the 3rd days and 2nd weeks after onset, and was usually gyral patients (77.7%). 5. The aneurysm was noted as enhancing nodule on contrast CT in all 14 cases. In conclusion, the most common cause of CVA is intracerebral hemorrhage in Iri, Korea. High resolution contrast enhanced CT can be used in the diagnosis of the ruptured cerebral aneurysm without the aid of cerebral angiography.

  5. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos.

  6. Image quality in coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Gerke, Oke; Thygesen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) technology is rapidly evolving and software solution developed to optimize image quality and/or lower radiation dose. Purpose To investigate the influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) at different radiation doses in coronary CT...

  7. Evaluation of computed tomography for obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Shoji; Toda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    1980-01-01

    Findings of computed tomography were reviewed in 54 cases where obstructive jaundice was suggested by liver function studies and computed tomography was done with the diagnosis subsequently confirmed by surgery. Dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct was found in 49 (91%) of the cases and the site of obstruction was determined in 44 cases (82%). The cause was shown in 28 cases (52%). By disease, the cause was correctly diagnosed with gallbladder in 40%, bile duct cancer in 46%, pancreas cancer in 71%, and choledocal cyst in 100%, but cholelithiasis was diagnosed correctly in only 17%. Further, non-calcium cholelithiasis is very difficult to diagnose by computed tomography. Computed tomography is a useful tool for diagnosis of obstructive jaundice as a noninvasive means of evaluating the patient; however, concomitand use of other diagnostic studies is essential for greater accuracy of diagnosis. (author)

  8. Computed tomography and/or ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, S.; Kishikawa, T.; Huewel, N.; Kazner, E.; Grumme, T.; Lanksch, W.

    1982-01-01

    It is discussed if in intracranial tumors, especially in tumors of the posterior cranial fossa, a CT and/or a ventriculography should be practiced. We have made investigations of 134 patients, 93 of whom were children up to 14 years of age. Each case was undertaken computed tomography as well as ventriculography. The results are clearly demonstrating the superiority of computed tomography compared with ventriculography. Ventriculography is a surgical intervention stressing the patients, side-effects may occur, and sometimes serious complications are caused. Modern computed tomography is producing pictures of high quality, which are highly sufficient for neurosurgical intervention. Very rarely additional angiography has to be performed. The diagnosis of intracranial tumors can fully be established by computed tomography, whereas ventriculography is no longer necessary. (orig.) [de

  9. Examination of weld defects by computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jovanović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Defects in metal arc gas (MAG welds made in S235JR low carbon steel of 6 mm thickness were examined. A sample containing lack of fusion (LOF and pores was examined by computed tomography – CT. The computed tomography examination was performed in order to define LOF size and position as well as dimensions and distribution of accompanying pores in the weld metal.

  10. Dose optimization in computed tomography: ICRP 87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The doses given in the use of computed tomography scans are studied, aiming to calibrate the limits of irradiation in patients who need these tests. Furthermore, a good value of computed tomography should be guaranteed by physicians and radiologists for people not being irradiated unfairly, reducing doses and unnecessary tests. A critical evaluation by an ethics committee is suggested for cases where the test is performed for medical research without a cause [es

  11. Quantitative computed tomography evaluation of pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan; Buelund, Lene Elisabeth; Strathe, Anders Bjerring

    2009-01-01

    Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present.......Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present....

  12. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  13. Development of emission computed tomography in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, E.

    1984-01-01

    Two positron emission computed tomography (PCT) devices developed in Japan are described. One is for head and the other for wholebody. The devices show fairly quantitative images with slight modifications of the existing algorithms because they were developed based on filtered back-projection. The PCT device seems to be better than the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) since it provides adequade compensation for photon attenuation in patients. (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Goussard, Pierre; Sorantin, Erich

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns.

  15. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre [Tygerberg Hospital, Stellenbosch University, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Sorantin, Erich [Medical University Graz, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria)

    2017-10-15

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns. (orig.)

  16. Recent Developments in Computed Tomography for Urolithiasis: Diagnosis and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Mc Laughlin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To critically evaluate the current literature in an effort to establish the current role of radiologic imaging, advances in computed tomography (CT and standard film radiography in the diagnosis, and characterization of urinary tract calculi. Conclusion. CT has a valuable role when utilized prudently during surveillance of patients following endourological therapy. In this paper, we outline the basic principles relating to the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as a result of CT scanning. We discuss the current developments in low-dose CT technology, which have resulted in significant reductions in CT radiation doses (to approximately one-third of what they were a decade ago while preserving image quality. Finally, we will discuss an important recent development now commercially available on the latest generation of CT scanners, namely, dual energy imaging, which is showing promise in urinary tract imaging as a means of characterizing the composition of urinary tract calculi.

  17. The Applications of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics: A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarudi, Amir Hosein; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Safi, Yaser; Aghdasi, Mohammad Mehdi; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    By producing undistorted three-dimensional images of the area under examination, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems have met many of the limitations of conventional radiography. These systems produce images with small field of view at low radiation doses with adequate spatial resolution that are suitable for many applications in endodontics from diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. This review article comprehensively assembles all the data from literature regarding the potential applications of CBCT in endodontics. PMID:25598804

  18. Metrological study of CFRP drilled holes with x-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kourra, Nadia; Warnett, Jason M.; Attridge, Alex; Kiraci, Ercihan; Gupta, Aniruddha; Barnes, Stuart; Williams, M. A. (Mark A.)

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of composite materials is continuously growing with new varieties being developed and tested with different machining processes to establish their suitability. Destructive as well as non-destructive methods, such as ultrasonics, X-ray radiography and eddy-current, have previously been used to ensure that the combination of particular machining methods and composites provide the required quality that can allow the required lifespan of the final product. X-ray computed tomography...

  19. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of unusual causes of ankle pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, S.

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography and MRI are frequently utilized to evaluate ankle pain that remains unexplained by radiography. The most common causes of ankle pain are related to trauma and the imaging appearances of these entities are well established in the radiologic and orthopedic literature. A smaller percentage is comprised of non-traumatic disorders. Our goal is to emphasize the value of CT and MRI in recognition of these less common and unusual causes of ankle pain. Copyright (2006) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Frequent Computed Tomography Scanning Due to Incomplete Three-View X-Ray Imaging of the Cervical Spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltzherr, Teun Peter; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Goslings, J. Carel

    2010-01-01

    Background: Conventional C-spine imaging (3-view series) is still widely used in trauma patients, although the utilization of computed tomography (CT) scanning is increasing. The aim of this study was to analyze the value of conventional radiography and the frequency of subsequent CT scanning due to

  1. Computed tomography of intraventricular hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bum Shin; Shin, Kyoung Hee; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a new non-invasive diagnostic imaging method, which has ability to differentiate C.S.F., hematoma, and even edematous brain from normal brain tissue. Prior to the introduction of the CT, the diagnosis of the intraventricular hemorrhage in living patients was difficult and was confirmed by surgery of autopsy. Intracranial hemorrhages are visible on the CT with density higher than brain tissue in acute phase. CT is an accurate method for detecting of intraventricular hemorrhage including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. CT is also useful as a guidance and in the evaluation of fate of the hematomas by easily performable follow up studies. The causes of the intraventricular hemorrhages are hypertension, rupture of aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, head trauma, brain tumor, and others. This study included evaluation of CT of 69 patients who show the high density in cerebral ventricular system during the period of 31 months from Feb. 1979 to Aug. 1981 in the Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 69 patient was broad ranging from 1 month to 80 years. 28% of patients were in the 6th decade. The mate to female ratio was 2 : 1. 2. The consciousness of patients at CT study: Those were conscious in 11 cases, stuporous in 41 cases and unconscious in 17 cases. 3. The causes of intraventricular hemorrhages were hypertension in 28 cases, head trauma in 12 cases, aneurysm in 4 cases, tumor in 2 cases and others in 23 cases. 4. 9 cases showed intraventricular hematomas only, other 60 cases showed associated intracranial hematomas: Those were intracerebral hematomas in 53 cases including 30 cases of basal ganglial and thalamic hematomas, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 17 cases, epidural hematomas in 3 cases, and subdural hematomas in 2 cases. 5. All cases of the intraventricular hematomas except one sowed hematoma in the lateral

  2. Computed tomography in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Ro; Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung; Sim, Bo Sung

    1981-01-01

    Computed Tomography has become increasingly important diagnostic method as the initial examination in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage with direct detection of extravasated blood in basal cistern and cortical sulci. Furthermore, CT provides better and exact visualization of the presence, localization, extent and degree of intracerebral, intraventricular and subdural hemorrhage, infarction, hydrocephalus and rebleeding which may be associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and also could detect the causative lesions with contrast enhancement in many cases. The purpose of the paper is to describe the CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to various causes and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Authors analysed a total of 153 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage confirmed by lumbar puncture at Seoul National University Hospital from March 1979 to April 1981, with special emphasis on CT findings. All of the cases took CT scan and 125 cases of them angiography. The results are as follows: 1. Most prevalent age group was 4th to 6th decades (78%). The ratio of male to female was 1.1: 1. 2. Of 125 cases with angiography, aneurysm was a major cause (68%). Others were arterio-venous malformation (9.6%), Moya-moya disease (4%) and unknown (18.4%). 3. Of all 153 cases with CT scan, hemorrhage was demonstrated in 98 cases (64.1%); SAH in 72 cases (47.1%), ICH in 65 cases (42.5%), IVH in 34 cases (22.2%) and SDH in 1 case (0.7%). SAH combined with ICH was a major group (34.7%) in SAH. Detection rate of SAH was 68.3% within the first 7 days and 5.8% after 7 dyas. 4. In aneurysms, SAH was detected in 60 of 85 cases (70.6%); 88.1% within the first 7 dyas and 5.6% after 7 dyas. Anterior communicating artery was the most common site of the aneurysms (40%), in which detection rate of SAH was 100% within the first 7 days. SAH was combined with ICH in 38.3%. 5. On CT, SAH of unilateral Sylvian fissure was pathognomonic for ruptured MCA

  3. Computed Tomography evaluation of maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Natraj Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The maxillofacial region, a complex anatomical structure, can be evaluated by conventional (plain films, Tomography, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography, Orthopantomogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The study was conducted with objective of describing various forms of maxillofacial injuries, imaging features of different types of maxillofacial fractures and the advantage of using Three- Dimensional Computed Tomography reconstructed image. Materials & Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients during April 2014 to September 2016 using Toshiba Aquilion Prime 160 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography scanner.Results: The maxillofacial fractures were significantly higher in male population (88% than female population (12 %. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injury others being physical assault and fall from height. It was most common in 31-40 years (26% and 21-30 (24% years age group. Maxillary sinus was the commonest fracture (36% followed by nasal bone and zygomatic bone (30%, mandible and orbital bones (28%. Soft tissue swelling was the commonest associated finding. Three dimensional images (3 D compared to the axial scans missed some fractures. However, the extension of the complex fracture lines and degree of displacement were more accurately assessed. Complex fractures found were Le fort (6% and naso-orbito-ethmoid (4% fractures.Conclusion: The proper evaluation of complex anatomy of the facial bones requires Multidetector Computed Tomography which offers excellent spatial resolution enabling multiplanar reformations and three dimensional reconstructions for enhanced diagnostic accuracy and surgical planning.

  4. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanning for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although the site of nosocomial sepsis in the critically ill ventilated patient is usually identifiable, it may remain occult, despite numerous investigations. The rapid results and precise anatomical location of the septic source using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, in combination with computed ...

  5. Method and Apparatus for Computed Imaging Backscatter Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Meng, Christopher (Inventor); Sabri, Nissia (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods of x-ray backscatter radiography are provided. A single-sided, non-destructive imaging technique utilizing x-ray radiation to image subsurface features is disclosed, capable of scanning a region using a fan beam aperture and gathering data using rotational motion.

  6. Flat-detector computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struffert, T.; Doerfler, A.

    2009-01-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range than available with film-screen and phosphor luminescence, radiography flat detector technology is now widely accepted for neuroangiographic imaging. Especially flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT), which uses rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology, is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. As ''angiographic CT'' FD-CT may be helpful in many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures, e.g. intracranial stenting for cerebrovascular stenoses, stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms and embolization of arteriovenous malformations. By providing morphologic, CT-like images of the brain within the angiography suite FD-CT allows rapid visualization of periprocedural hemorrhaging and may thus improve rapid complication management without the need of patient transfer. In addition, myelography and postmyelographic FD-CT imaging can be carried out using a single modality. Spinal interventions, such as kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty might also benefit from FD-CT. Imaging of the temporal bone may also develop into an important field of FD-CT. This paper briefly reviews the technical principles of FD technology and the potential applications in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology. (orig.) [de

  7. Applications of some non destructive testing techniques to the characterization of calcareous rocks: ultrasounds, X and gamma-ray radiography, tomography, neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicardy, O.

    1986-02-01

    NUCLEART Laboratory has been developping various techniques of conservation of art objects made of wood or stone. It has, among others, achieved a technique of strengthening porous stone objects, by resin impregnation followed by polymerization under gamma rays. The good conduct of such operations implies the existence of characterization means, before and after treatment of the objects. Two means of rocks characterization have been studied: - ultrasound techniques, - radiography techniques. The first part consists in a general description of the calcareous rocks morphology and a presentation of the studied specimens. The second part deals with the application of ultrasound techniques to rocks. Experimentally, one pays particular attention to the specific aspects of ultrasounds propagation inside materials like porous rocks, and especially diffusion phenomena. Results were interpreted in terms of propagation medium structure. Practical interest for rocks control through such techniques has been underligned. The third part concerns the application of radiographic techniques to calcareous rocks. Experimental work consists in establishing exposure curves for a wide range of energy, and the images quality determination. Through a statistics approach, and using digitalization techniques, one has done an exhaustive study of the radiographic noise. Moreover two techniques close to conventional radiography were explored: neutron radiography and X-ray tomography. Their specificity and interest in the case of calcareous rocks have been shown [fr

  8. Computed tomography of cartilaginous tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincek, B.; Triller, J.; Robotti, G.; Gumppenberg, S. von

    1984-01-01

    The compound tomography (CT) morphology of cartilaginous tumors and the utility of CT in their diagnostic work-up is presented on the basis of 19 cases. CT provided unique informations regarding definition of tumor extent and tumor relationship to adjacent structures particularly in the axial skeleton. CT has diminished the indications for angiography in cartilaginous tumors. (orig.) [de

  9. Whole lung computed tomography for detection of pulmonary metastasis of osteosarcoma confirmed at thoracotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Itsuro; Fukuma, Seigo; Sawada, Kinya; Seki, Yasuo; Tanaka, Fumitaka

    1980-01-01

    Whole lung computed tomography (CT) was performed in patients with osteosarcoma of bone to evaluate its diagnostic efficacy in comparison to that in conventional chest radiography and in whole lung tomography to detect metastatic nodules in the lung. In 11 of the 12 patients with osteosarcoma, CT detected pulmonary nodules and in 6 of the 11 patients pulmonary nodules were detected by CT, conventional chest radiography and whole lung tomography, respectively, and 22 pulmonary nodules were resected at thoracotomy and proved to be metastatic lesions. Nineteen nodules of the 22 nodules resected were detected by CT and nine of the 22 nodules were discovered only by CT, while only 10 of 22 nodules were recognized by the conventional chest radiography and the whole lung tomography. Two pulmonary nodules, measuring 1 mm and 2 mm in diameter, respectively, were not detected by any of these three methods. In three nodules that showed to be false positive in CT in the two patients, two nodules were histologically suture granulomas induced by the previous operation, and a deformed protuberance of the chest wall was erroneously interpreted to be a subpleural and intrapulmonary nodule in the remaining. We conclude that CT is the most efficient method to detect pulmonary nodules in the patients with osteosarcoma, but that the minimal size of the detectable nodule by CT is 3 mm in diameter. But a smaller nodule having a tendency to ossify can be detected by CT. (author)

  10. Radiation Effects in Paediatric radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutwasi, O.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging has evolved from single technique to a field which we have a choice from many modalities. Some without radiation. Radiation producing modalities include plain films (low dose), Fluoroscopy (mid range dose), Computed tomography (high dose). Radiography dose can significantly be influenced in plain radiography by varying speed of screens, cassette construction and type of radiography. E.g. digital or computed. In computed or digital radiography we are no longer able to tell h igh dose b y the quality of images. The final image is by great extend a product of post processing algorithms. It's for this reasons that the basic understanding of the sensitivity and specifying of various types of examinations and of specifically radiation effects is mandatory for a paediatric imager

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are located in ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this series of pictures, or slices of the ...

  13. Computer axial tomography in geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duliu, Octavian G.

    2002-01-01

    Computer Axial Tomography (CAT) is one of the most adequate non-invasive techniques for the investigation of the internal structure of a large category of objects. Initially designed for medical investigations, this technique, based on the attenuation of X- or gamma-ray (and in some cases neutrons), generates digital images which map the numerical values of the linear attenuation coefficient of a section or of the entire volume of the investigated sample. Shortly after its application in medicine, CAT has been successfully used in archaeology, life sciences, and geosciences as well as for the industrial materials non-destructive testing. Depending on the energy of the utilized radiation as well as on the effective atomic number of the sample, CAT can provide with a spatial resolution of 0.01 - 0.5 mm, quantitative as well as qualitative information concerning local density, porosity or chemical composition of the sample. At present two types of axial Computer Tomographs (CT) are in use. One category, consisting of medical as well as industrial CT is equipped with X-ray tubes while the other uses isotopic gamma-ray sources. CT provided with intense X-ray sources (equivalent to 12-15 kCi or 450-550 TBq) has the advantage of an extremely short running time (a few seconds and even less) but presents some disadvantages known as beam hardening and absorption edge effects. These effects, intrinsically related to the polychromatic nature of the X-rays generated by classical tubes, need special mathematical or physical corrections. A polychromatic X-ray beam can be made almost monochromatic by means of crystal diffraction or by using adequate multicomponent filters, but these devices are costly and considerably diminish the output of X-ray generators. In the case of CT of the second type, monochromatic gamma-rays generated by radioisotopic sources, such as 169 Yb (50.4 keV), 241 Am (59 keV), 192 Ir (310.5 and 469.1 keV ) or 137 Cs (662.7 keV), are used in combination with

  14. High-resolution computed tomography findings in pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Rosana Souza [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho. Unit of Radiology; Capone, Domenico; Ferreira Neto, Armando Leao [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at characterizing main lung changes observed in pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis by means of high-resolution computed tomography. Materials and Methods: High-resolution computed tomography findings in eight patients with proven disease diagnosed by open lung biopsy, immunohistochemistry studies and/or extrapulmonary manifestations were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Small rounded, thin-walled cystic lesions were observed in the lung of all the patients. Nodules with predominantly peripheral distribution over the lung parenchyma were observed in 75% of the patients. The lesions were diffusely distributed, predominantly in the upper and middle lung fields in all of the cases, but involvement of costophrenic angles was observed in 25% of the patients. Conclusion: Comparative analysis of high-resolution computed tomography and chest radiography findings demonstrated that thinwalled cysts and small nodules cannot be satisfactorily evaluated by conventional radiography. Because of its capacity to detect and characterize lung cysts and nodules, high-resolution computed tomography increases the probability of diagnosing pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. (author)

  15. Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the evaluation of opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (OMA) syndrome is the most common paraneoplastic neurological syndrome of childhood, associated with occult neuroblastoma in 20%-50% of all cases. OMA is the initial presentation of neuroblastoma in 1%-3% of children. Conventional radiological imaging approaches include chest radiography and abdominal computed tomography (CT). Nuclear medicine techniques, in form of 123 I/ 131 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy have been incorporated in various diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of OMA. We describe use of somatostatin receptor PET/CT with 68 Gallium- DOTA-DPhe 1 , Tyr 3 -octreotate (DOTATATE) in diagnosis of neuroblastoma in two cases of OMA

  16. Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the evaluation of opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-04-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (OMA) syndrome is the most common paraneoplastic neurological syndrome of childhood, associated with occult neuroblastoma in 20%-50% of all cases. OMA is the initial presentation of neuroblastoma in 1%-3% of children. Conventional radiological imaging approaches include chest radiography and abdominal computed tomography (CT). Nuclear medicine techniques, in form of (123)I/(131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy have been incorporated in various diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of OMA. We describe use of somatostatin receptor PET/CT with (68)Gallium- DOTA-DPhe(1), Tyr(3)-octreotate (DOTATATE) in diagnosis of neuroblastoma in two cases of OMA.

  17. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: Impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boo, D.W.; Weber, M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Streekstra, G.J.; Freling, N.J.; Dongelmans, D.A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). Methods and materials: Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients (n = 114 patients; 50 CXR per acquisition technique) underwent clinically indicated bedside CXR obtained with either CR (single read-out powder plates) or mobile DR (GOS-TFT detectors) at identical or 50% reduced dose (DR 50% ). Delineation of anatomic structures and devices used for patient monitoring, overall image quality and disease were scored by four readers. In 12 patients pairs of follow-up CR and DR images were available, and in 15 patients pairs of CR and DR 50% images were available. In these pairs the overall image quality was also compared side-by-side. Results: Delineation of anatomy in the mediastinum was scored better with DR or DR 50% than with CR. Devices used for patient monitoring were seen best with DR, with DR 50% being superior to CR. In the side-by-side comparison, the overall image quality of DR and DR 50% was rated better than CR in 96% (46/48) and 87% (52/60), respectively. Inter-observer agreement for the assessment of pathology was fair for CR and DR 50% (κ = 0.33 and κ = 0.39, respectively) and moderate for DR (κ = 0.48). Conclusion: Mobile DR units offer better image quality than CR for bedside chest radiography and allow for 50% dose reduction. Inter-observer agreement increases with image quality and is superior with DR, while DR 50% and CR are comparable.

  18. Indication for dental computed tomography. Case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schom, C.; Engelke, W.; Kopka, L.; Fischer, U.; Grabbe, E.

    1996-01-01

    Based on case reports, common indications for dental computed tomography are demonstrated and typical findings are analysed. From a group of 110 patients who had a reformatted computed tomography of the maxilla and mandibula, 10 typical cases were chosen as examples and are presented with a detailed description of the findings. The most important indication was the analysis of the morphology of the alveolar ridge needed in presurgical planning for osseointegrated implants as well as in special cases of postsurgical control. Apart from implantology, the method could be used in cases of mandibular cysts and bony destructions. In conclusion, dental computed tomography has become established mainly in implantology. It can provide valuable results in cases where a demonstration of the bone in all dimensions and free of overlappings and distortions is needed. (orig.) [de

  19. Radiological protection procedures for industrial applications of computed radiography; Procedimentos de protecao radiologica em aplicacoes industriais da radiografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de

    2009-03-15

    Due to its very particular characteristics, industrial radiography is responsible for roughly half of the relevant accidents in nuclear industry, in developed as well as in developing countries, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Thus, safety and radiological protection in industrial gamma radiography have been receiving especial treatment by regulatory authorities of most Member States. The main objective of the present work was to evaluate, from the radioprotection point of view, the main advantages of computed radiography (CR) for filmless industrial radiography. In order to accomplish this, both techniques, i.e. conventional and filmless computed radiography were evaluated and compared through practical studies. After the studies performed at the present work it was concluded that computed radiography significantly reduces the inherent doses, reflecting in smaller restricted areas and costs, with consequent improvement in radiological protection and safety. (author)

  20. Computed simulation of radiographies of pipes - validation of techniques for wall thickness measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellon, C.; Tillack, G.R.; Nockemann, C.; Wenzel, L.

    1995-01-01

    A macroscopic model of radiographic NDE methods and applications is given. A computer-aided approach for determination of wall thickness from radiographs is presented, guaranteeing high accuracy and reproducibility of wall thickness determination by means of projection radiography. The algorithm was applied to computed simulations of radiographies. The simulation thus offers an effective means for testing such automated wall thickness determination as a function of imaging conditions, pipe geometries, coatings, and media tracking, and likewise is a tool for validation and optimization of the method. (orig.) [de

  1. Computed tomography in malignant primary bone tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersjes, W.; Harder, T.; Haeffner, P.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of computed tomography is examined in malignant primary bone tumours using a strongly defined examination group of 13 Patients (six Ewing's-sarcomas, five osteosarcomas, one chondrosarcoma and one spindle-shaped cell sarcoma). Computed tomography is judged superior compared to plain radiographs in recognition of bone marrow infiltration and presentation of parosteal tumour parts as well as in analysis of tissue components of tumours, CT is especially suitable for therapy planning and evaluating response to therapy. CT does not provide sufficient diagnostic information to determine dignity and exact diagnosis of bone tumours. (orig.) [de

  2. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...... examined the content, data quality, and research potential of the WDHR-CCTR. METHODS: We retrieved 2008-2012 data to examine the 1) content; 2) completeness of procedure registration using the Danish National Patient Registry as reference; 3) completeness of variable registration comparing observed vs...

  3. Computed tomography versus invasive coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napp, Adriane E.; Haase, Robert; Laule, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: More than 3.5 million invasive coronary angiographies (ICA) are performed in Europe annually. Approximately 2 million of these invasive procedures might be reduced by noninvasive tests because no coronary intervention is performed. Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate...... angiography (ICA) is the reference standard for detection of CAD.• Noninvasive computed tomography angiography excludes CAD with high sensitivity.• CT may effectively reduce the approximately 2 million negative ICAs in Europe.• DISCHARGE addresses this hypothesis in patients with low-to-intermediate pretest...

  4. Physics of x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akutagawa, W.M.; Huth, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    Sections are included on theoretical limits of x-ray computed tomography and the relationship of these limits to human organ imaging and specific disease diagnosis; potential of x-ray computed tomography in detection of small calcified particles in early breast cancer detection; early lung cancer measurement and detection; advanced materials for ionizing radiation detection; positron system with circular ring transaxial tomographic camera; contrast mechanism of transmission scanner and algorithms; and status of design on a 200 keV scanning proton microprobe

  5. Computed tomography in dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Masahiko; Fujii, Tsutomu; Tanii, Yasuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) examinations of 7 patients with dementia of Alzheimer type were reviewed and correlated with clinical stages. The findings of CT were also compared with those of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). There was no positive correlation between the degree of cerebral atrophy on CT and clinical stage. Cerebral atrophy seemed to be influenced by aging, ill duration, and the degree of dementia. The cerebral/cerebellar uptake ratio of RI on SPECT was significantly decreased with the progression of clinical stage. SPECT seemed to reflect the degree of dementia, irrespective of ages and ill duration. (N.K.)

  6. Compton radiography, 3. Compton scinti-tomography of the chest diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, S; Sera, K; Shishido, F; Fukuda, H [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis, Leprosy and Cancer; Mishina, H

    1977-10-01

    The compton radiography aims at collection of depth information by recording with a scinticamera those Compton rays that have resulted from scattering of a monoenergetic gamma beam by a volume of interest. Appreciably clear clinical scinti-tomograms were obtained of the chest wall, and intrathoracic structures such as the lungs, intrapulmonary pathologies, and mediastinum. This was achieved without any computer assistance for image reconstruction such as those in the case of XCT. Apparently, suitable corrections of the attenuations of the primary monoenergetic gamma rays and secondary Compton rays would greatly improve the image quality, and imaging time and radiation exposure as well. This technic is simple in principle, relatively cheap, and yet prospective of development of stereoptic fluoroscopy that would be extremely helpful in guiding such procedures as visceral biopsies.

  7. The clinical application of computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Sen; Guo Tianchang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn, especially in chest radiography. Methods: Bedside CR images were selected in 100 cases randomly. The exposure parameters were optimized using the large latitude of CR. The details of images were post-processed and adjusted using spatial tuning technique. Then CR photography was compared with conventional X-ray photography. Results: The images acquired with CR had good contrast, high definition, and little distortion, in which the condemned image rate was 1%. While in conventional X-ray photography, the unsuccessful imaging rate is 9%. Conclusion: Bedside computed radiography of new-born, especially the chest imaging, is very helpful to improve image quality and positive rate of the diagnosis. (authors)

  8. Progress in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappelle, A.

    2016-01-01

    Because of its practical aspect digital radiography is more and more used in the industrial sector. There are 2 kinds of digital radiography. First, the 'computed radiography' that uses a photon-stimulated screen, and after radiation exposure this screen must be read by an analyser to get a digit image. The second type is the 'direct radiography' that allows one to get a digit radiograph of the object directly. Digital radiography uses the same radioactive nuclides as radiography with silver films: cobalt, iridium or selenium. The spatial resolution of digital radiography is less good than with classical silver film radiography but digital radiography offers a better visual contrast. (A.C.)

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this series ... Sometimes ultrasound is substituted for CT as a method of imaging in these procedures in children. A ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ... diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special image recording plate . Bones appear ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  14. Simulation Study of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Industrial Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2008-01-01

    SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) provides for an invaluable non-invasive technique for the characterization and activity distribution of the gamma-emitting source. For many applications of radioisotopes for medical and industrial application, not only the positional information of the distribution of radioisotopes is needed but also its strength. The well-established X-ray radiography or transmission tomography techniques do not yield sufficient quantitative information about these objects. Emission tomography is one of the important methods for such characterization. Application of parallel beam, fan beam and 3D cone beam emission tomography methods have been discussed in this paper. Simulation studies to test these algorithms have been carried out to validate the technique.

  15. Paradoxical emboli: demonstration using helical computed tomography of the pulmonary artery associated with abdominal computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delalu, P.; Ferretti, G.R.; Bricault, I.; Ayanian, D.; Coulomb, M.

    2000-01-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman with a recent history of a cerebrovascular accident. Because of clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism and negative Doppler ultrasound findings of the lower limbs, spiral computed tomography of the pulmonary artery was performed and demonstrated pulmonary emboli. We emphasize the role of computed tomography of the abdomen, performed 3 min after the thoracic acquisition, which showed an unsuspected thrombus within the abdominal aorta and the left renal artery with infarction of the left kidney. Paradoxical embolism was highly suspected on computed tomography data and confirmed by echocardiography which demonstrated a patent foramen ovale. (orig.)

  16. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M G Gerritsen

    Full Text Available We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4% had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197. Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose.

  17. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, M G; Willemink, M J; Pompe, E; van der Bruggen, T; van Rhenen, A; Lammers, J W J; Wessels, F; Sprengers, R W; de Jong, P A; Minnema, M C

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4%) had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197). Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose.

  18. Computed Tomography Study Of Complicated Bacterial Meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To monitor the structural intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis using computed tomography (CT) scan. Retrospective study of medical and radiological records of patients who underwent CT scan over a 4 year period. AUniversityTeachingHospital in a developing country. Thirty three patients with clinically and ...

  19. Computed tomography - old ideas and new technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, Dominik; Boas, F.E. [Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Several recently introduced 'new' techniques in computed tomography - iterative reconstruction, gated cardiac CT, multiple-source, and dual-energy CT - actually date back to the early days of CT. We review the historic origins and evolution of these techniques, which may provide some insight into the latest innovations in commercial CT systems. (orig.)

  20. Computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1982-01-01

    This book is intended to be the current standard for computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma. It summarizes two years of experience at San Francisco General Hospital. The book is organized into seven chapters, covering head, maxillofacial, laryngeal, spinal, chest, abdominal, acetabular, and pelvic trauma. Extremity trauma is not discussed

  1. Computed tomography (CT) and diastematomyelia's diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, M.B. dos; Luca, V. de; Ferreira, M.A.S.; Barros, A.P. de

    1982-01-01

    After a case of diastematomyelia observed at the University Hospital (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) a review is done of the pertaining literature, and the contribution of the computed tomography for the diagnosis of this disease is emphasized. (Author) [pt

  2. Computed tomography evaluation of petrous bone fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Petrous bone trauma is the sequel of blunt head injury and can have life threatening complications resulting in immediate mortality. Early detection and good knowledge of the Computed Tomography (CT) findings ensure prompt treatment of both fractures and complications. Objective: To document the ...

  3. Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are an essential part of modern healthcare. Marked increases in clinical demand for these imaging modalities are straining healthcare expenditure and threatening health system sustainability. The number of CT and MRI scans requested in ...

  4. Comparison on Computed Tomography using industrial items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In a comparison involving 27 laboratories from 8 countries, measurements on two common industrial items, a polymer part and a metal part, were carried out using X-ray Computed Tomography. All items were measured using coordinate measuring machines before and after circulation, with reference...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion in Abdominal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Lundsgaard; Norling, Rikke; Lauridsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion is an evolving method to visualize perfusion in organs and tissue. With the introduction of multidetector CT scanners, it is now possible to cover up to 16 cm in one rotation, and thereby making it possible to scan entire organs such as the liver with a fixed...

  6. Computed tomography of intussusception in adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Cha, Soon Joo; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1984-01-01

    Intussusception is rare in adult and usually caused by organic lesions, although there is a significant number of so-called idiopathic cases. The diagnosis of intussusception have been made by plain abdomen, barium enema and small bowel series. But recently ultrasound and computed tomography make a contribution to diagnose intussusception. Computed tomography is not the primary means for evaluating a gastrointestinal tract abnormality but also provides valuable information in evaluating disorders affecting the hollow viscera of the alimentary tract. Computed tomography image of intussusception demonstrates a whirl like pattern of bowel loops separated by fatty stripe correlating of the intestinal walls. Abdominal ultrasonogram was used as the initial diagnostic test in 2 cases out of total 4 cases, with abdominal mass of unknown cause. It revealed a typical pattern, composed of a round or oval mass with central dense echoes and peripheral poor echoes. We report 4 all cases of intussusception in adult who were performed by computed tomography and/or ultrasound. All cases were correlated with barium enema examination and/or surgical reports.

  7. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    An interlaboratory comparison on industrial X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was organized by the Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and carried out within the project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning...

  8. Computed Tomography in the Modern Slaughterhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb

    of technology. Recently, the use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) coupled with methods from image analysis has been introduced as a powerful means to optimise production, by providing detailed information on the raw materials. This thesis covers two aspects of the application of CT in the modern abattoir...

  9. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...

  10. Investigation of measuring strategies in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel; Hiller, Jochen; Cantatore, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography has entered the industrial world in 1980’s as a technique for non-destructive testing and has nowadays become a revolutionary tool for dimensional metrology, suitable for actual/nominal comparison and verification of geometrical and dimensional tolerances. This paper evaluates...

  11. Computed tomography in severe protein energy malnutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Househam, K C; de Villiers, J F

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography of the brain was performed on eight children aged 1 to 4 years with severe protein energy malnutrition. Clinical features typical of kwashiorkor were present in all the children studied. Severe cerebral atrophy or brain shrinkage according to standard radiological criteria was present in every case. The findings of this study suggest considerable cerebral insult associated with severe protein energy malnutrition.

  12. Computed tomography of the iliopsoas muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nino-Murcia, M.; Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an ideal method for the imaging of the psoas muscle. The authors present 13 cases of patients with psoas abnormalities diagnosed by CT. The CT features of the different pathologic entities and comparison of CT with other imaging modalities are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal

  14. Observer training for computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boo, Diederick W.; van Hoorn, François; van Schuppen, Joost; Schijf, Laura; Scheerder, Maeke J.; Freling, Nicole J.; Mets, Onno; Weber, Michael; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess whether short-term feedback helps readers to increase their performance using computer-aided detection (CAD) for nodule detection in chest radiography. The 140 CXRs (56 with a solitary CT-proven nodules and 84 negative controls) were divided into four subsets of 35; each were read in a

  15. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Noriko; Sato, Hiromi; Kawaguchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Katsuzo; Tanaka, Makoto

    1982-01-01

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis. (author)

  16. Misty mesentery: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahualli, Jorge; Mendez Uriburu, Luis; Ravera, Maria L.; Cikman, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    An alteration in the density of the mesenteric adipose tissue is often the principal clue of underlying mesenteric and bowel disease. The term 'Misty Mesentery' describes the computed tomographic appearance of mesenteric fat infiltrated by inflammatory cells, fluid (edema, lymph, and/or blood), tumor, and fibrosis. (author) [es

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detectors rotate around the patient. At the same time, the examination table is moving through the scanner, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this series of pictures, or slices of the body, to ...

  19. Computed Tomography in Forensic Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2015-01-01

    was not used. Autopsies were performed according to the Danish government's official guidelines. PMCT and autopsy findings were interpreted independent of each other. Diagnoses, including the cause of death and histology findings, were registered in a computer database (SPSS) together with information about...

  20. Computed tomography in Alexander's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, I M; Kendall, B E

    1980-10-01

    Two cases of biopsy-proven Alexander's disease are described with computed tomographic changes which, in our experience and on survey of the literature, have not occurred in any other condition. Such changes in a child with a progressive condition consistent with Alexander's disease, strongly support the diagnosis.

  1. Computed tomography of limy bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kimoto, Masatoshi; Gunge, Nobuharu; Sano, Kaizo; Yamashita, Sachiko; Hirano, Yutaka

    1983-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of three cases of limy bile was reported. The CT findings consist of uniform high density within gallbladder, niveau formation between limy bile and noncalcified bile. Sagittal reconstruction of CT images was especially useful in the differentiation of limy bile and gallstones. (author)

  2. Digital radiography is promising in industrial testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Fabbro, F.

    2015-01-01

    Digital radiography has recently entered the industrial world as a tool for non-destructive testing. There are 3 types of digital radiography: computed radiography (CR), direct radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). In computed radiography, traditional silver-halide films are replaced by photostimulable phosphor imaging plates that are activated through laser scanning and digitized. Direct radiography uses a flat panel detector (FPD) composed of X-ray detectors that performs an immediate digital conversion of the image that can be read by a computer. DR is a perfect tool for industrial testing but the fragility of the FPD panels reduces its uses. Computed tomography is based on the principle of DR to get data corresponding to successive cross-section images of the object. These data are processed by a software to get a 3-dimensional image of the object. CT was first developed for medical use but requires some improvement to become more accurate, faster, particularly for big objects. In recent years DR has enjoyed the highest growth rate in digital radiography. (A.C.)

  3. neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron radiography (or radiology) is a diverse filed that uses neutrons of various energies, subthermal, thermal, epithermal or fast in either steady state or pulsed mode to examine objects for industrial, medical, or other purposes, both microscopic and macroscopic. The applications include engineering design, biological studies, nondestructive inspection and materials evaluation. In the past decade, over 100 different centers in some 30 countries have published reports of pioneering activities using reactors, accelerators and isotopic neutron sources. While film transparency and electronic video are most common imaging methods for static or in motion objects respectively, there are other important data gathering techniques, including track etch, digital gauging and computed tomography. A survey of the world-wide progress shows the field to be gaining steadily in its diversity, its sophistication and its importance. (author)

  4. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara C, A.; Rivera M, T.; Osorio V, M.; Hernandez O, O.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we studied the dosimetry performed on CT scan in two different equipment, SOMATOM and Phillips, with 16 and 64 slice respectively. We used 51 pellets of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF: Mg, Ti) also knows as TLD-100 due to its physical properties and its easy of use, in this study, first analysis a batch of 56 pellets, but only 53 pellets were optimal for this study, cesium-137 was used as source irradiation, then proceeded to calibrate the batch with X-rays source, measuring the corresponding dose in a Farmers ionization chamber, then, we obtained a calibration curve, and we used as reference to calculation of the applied dose, finally designing ergonomic mesh, were it was deposited a TLD 100, placed in a regions of interest were made to each scan type. Once characterized our material proceeded to testing in 30 patients, which were irradiated with X-ray tube, whose operation was performed at 80, 120 kV with a current of 100, 300 and 400 m A according to scanning protocol. Overall we measured dose of 5 mGy to 53 mGy, these measurements reflect significant dose to can induced cancer, due previous reports published, that doses greater than 20 mGy there is a risk of developing cancer in the long term, but in practice when it assigned a medical diagnosis, there are no dose limits due to benefits patients, however, IAEA publish recommendations that allow us to carry out optimum handling of ionizing radiation, among these is the quality control of the tomography equipment that helps greatly reduce patient dose. (Author)

  5. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara C, A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Osorio V, M. [ISSSTE, Centro Medico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, Felix Cuevas 540, Col. del Valle, 03100 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Hernandez O, O., E-mail: armando_lara_cam@yahoo.com.mx [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis 148, Col. Doctores, 06726 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we studied the dosimetry performed on CT scan in two different equipment, SOMATOM and Phillips, with 16 and 64 slice respectively. We used 51 pellets of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF: Mg, Ti) also knows as TLD-100 due to its physical properties and its easy of use, in this study, first analysis a batch of 56 pellets, but only 53 pellets were optimal for this study, cesium-137 was used as source irradiation, then proceeded to calibrate the batch with X-rays source, measuring the corresponding dose in a Farmers ionization chamber, then, we obtained a calibration curve, and we used as reference to calculation of the applied dose, finally designing ergonomic mesh, were it was deposited a TLD 100, placed in a regions of interest were made to each scan type. Once characterized our material proceeded to testing in 30 patients, which were irradiated with X-ray tube, whose operation was performed at 80, 120 kV with a current of 100, 300 and 400 m A according to scanning protocol. Overall we measured dose of 5 mGy to 53 mGy, these measurements reflect significant dose to can induced cancer, due previous reports published, that doses greater than 20 mGy there is a risk of developing cancer in the long term, but in practice when it assigned a medical diagnosis, there are no dose limits due to benefits patients, however, IAEA publish recommendations that allow us to carry out optimum handling of ionizing radiation, among these is the quality control of the tomography equipment that helps greatly reduce patient dose. (Author)

  6. Evaluation of imaging reformation with cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone density and shape in mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sang Woo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwan, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic estimation of destruction and formation of bone has the typical limit according to capacity of x-ray generator and image detector. So the aim of this study was to find out how much it can reproduce the shape and the density of bone in the case of using recently developed dental type of cone beam computed tomography, and which image is applied by new detector and mathematic calculation. Cone beam computed tomography (PSR 9000N, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd., Japan) and soft x-ray radiography were executed on dry mandible that was already decalcified during 5 hours, 10 hours, 15 hours, 20 hours, and 25 hours. Estimating and comparing of those came to the following results. The change of inferior border of mandible and anterior border of ramous in the region of cortical bone was observed between first 5 and 10 hours of decalcification. The reproduction of shape and density in the region of cortical bone and cancellous bone can be hardly observed at cone beam computed tomography compared with soft x-ray radiography. The difference of decrease of bone density according to hours of decalcification increase was not reproduced at cone beam computed tomography compared with soft x-ray radiography. CBCT images revealed higher spatial resolution. However, contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity is the inferiority of images' property.

  7. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-01-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.)

  8. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  9. Microfocus computed tomography in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obodovskiy, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    Recent advances in the field of high-frequency power schemes for X-ray devices allow the creation of high-resolution instruments. At the department of electronic devices and Equipment of the St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, a model of a microfocus computer tomograph was developed. Used equipment allows to receive projection data with an increase up to 100 times. A distinctive feature of the device is the possibility of implementing various schemes for obtaining projection data.

  10. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  11. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis. (orig.)

  12. Orbital computed tomography: technical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; Miller, N.R.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic scanning has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of orbital disease. The best use of this methodology requires knowledge of the principles and appropriate attention to scanning protocols. Computed tomographic scanning of the orbit is a demanding technique requiring thin sections through planes precisely positioned from the topographical anatomy. Ideally, orbital CT should include both transverse axial and coronal sections: The pathological condition and its plane of growth will influence the selection of the optimal plane or section. Coronal sections may be obtained either directly or indirectly by computer reconstruction from contiguous transverse images. Sagittal or oblique sections or both also are useful and may be obtained directly or indirectly. Difficulty in patient positioning may preclude direct sagittal imaging, however. The use of intravenous contrast enhancement is not necessary as a routine technique unless a mass is identified or suspected. Where surgical resection or biopsy of a space-occupying lesion is contemplated, contrast enhancement can be valuable in assessing relative vascularity and aiding diagnostic specificity. It should be continually emphasized that CT is a powerful technology which, in orbital diagnosis, produces the highest yield when clinician and radiologist collaborate in the radiodiagnostic workup. The clinical information supplied by the referring ophthalmologist is used by the radiologist both in the selection of the appropriate techniques for investigation and in striving to achieve the most specific conclusion

  13. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Bonanno, D. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Maccioni, G. [INFN – Cagliari Division, Cagliari (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E. [Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to ~1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of ~15′ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  14. Measuring techniques in emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.; Knoop, B.

    1988-01-01

    The chapter reviews the historical development of the emission computed tomography and its basic principles, proceeds to SPECT and PET, special techniques of emission tomography, and concludes with a comprehensive discussion of the mathematical fundamentals of the reconstruction and the quantitative activity determination in vivo, dealing with radon transformation and the projection slice theorem, methods of image reconstruction such as analytical and algebraic methods, limiting conditions in real systems such as limited number of measured data, noise enhancement, absorption, stray radiation, and random coincidence. (orig./HP) With 111 figs., 6 tabs [de

  15. Computed tomography of the skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, R.; Heller, M.

    1990-01-01

    Patients showing severe multiple injuries, require special care and attention in the hospital. In these cases, the range of the diagnostic measures taken subsequent to computed tomography of the cranium must be broadened to include examinations of the vertebral column and pelvic ring for traumatic lesions. Radiological routine procedures are discussed wit hthe view of throwing some light on the problems involved incomputed tomography of the vertebral disks. In degenerative processes associated with spinal stenosis and hypertrophic facets it has been found that angular-sagittal-reconstruction may be quite useful. Computed tomography provides valuable information on morphological factors and has great discriminating power in the diagnosis of skeletal tumours of the extremities. Quantitative computed tomography offers unprecedented possibilities in the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Here, particular care must be taken to avoid inaccuracies of measurement as a result of incorrectly performed examinations. In malignant bone tumours the method of dynamic scanning permits the success or failure of any radiotherapeutic or chemical measures taken to be evaluated at an early stage. The success or failure of any radiotherapeutic or chemical measures taken to to treat malignant bone tumours can be evaluated at an early stage using the method on dynamic scanning. (orig.) [de

  16. Comparison between conventional tomography and computer tomography in diseases of the sacroiliac joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritz, J.D.; Ganter, H.; Winter, C.; Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Giessen

    1990-01-01

    16 patients with diseases of the sacroiliac joints were examined both with computer tomography and with conventional tomography. Both techniques were characterized by a high sensitivity. Computer tomography was superior in exactly delineating the extent of the pathologic changes. In conventional tomography the joint surface was more blurred, erosions were larger, and signs of ankylosis were more expanded, so that the joints seemed to be more altered in 8 cases than demonstrated by computer tomography. Very accurate changes like subchondral cysts were recognized only in the computer tomograms. In all cases in which anteroposterior radiographs revealed no clear result, the authors recommend to additionally employ computer tomography. (orig.) [de

  17. Computed tomography in diagnostics of effluent otitis media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imomova, L.S.; Norboev, Z.; Kalandarov, S.Ch.

    2011-01-01

    This article is devoted to computed tomography in diagnostics of effluent otitis media. The purpose of present work is to assess the possibilities of computed tomography method of temporal bone in the diagnostics of otitis media.

  18. Computed tomography of the menisci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.; Rupp, N.; Paar, O.; Rodammer, G.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients were examined with CT of the menisci. All findings were confirmed by arthroscopy. One false positive diagnosis of a torn meniscus was made, caused by partial volume effect. In seven patients with irregular degenerative changes of the menisci, the abnormality could be clearly demonstrated. One meniscus ganglion was shown. Seven meniscus lesions, which were not shown by arthrography or arthroscopy, were clearly demonstrated by CT. The computer tomographic demonstration of menisci can replace knee arthrography as the examination of choice and should be performed before carrying out arthroscopy. (orig.) [de

  19. Does transitioning from computed radiography (CR) to direct radiography (DR) with portable imaging systems affect workflow efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Raja L.; Roth, Christopher G.; Smith, Elizabeth; Dave, Jaydev K.

    2018-03-01

    In digital radiography, computed radiography (CR) technology is based on latent image capture by storage phosphors whereas direct radiography (DR) technology is based either on indirect conversion using a scintillator or direct conversion using a photoconductor. DR-based portable imaging systems may enhance workflow efficiency. The purpose of this work was to investigate changes in workflow efficiency at a tertiary healthcare center after transitioning from CR to DR technology for imaging with portable x-ray units. An IRB exemption was obtained. Data for all inpatient-radiographs acquired with portable x-ray units from July-2014 till June-2015 (period 1) with CR technology (AMX4 or AMX4+ portable unit from GE Healthcare, NX workstation from Agfa Healthcare for digitization), from July-2015 till June-2016 (period 2) with DR technology (Carestream DRX-Revolution x-ray units and DRX-1C image receptors) and from July-2016 till January-2017 (period 3; same DR technology) were extracted using Centricity RIS-IC (GE Healthcare). Duration between the imaging-examination scheduled time and completed time (timesch-com) was calculated and compared using non-parametric tests (between the three time periods with corrections for multiple comparisons; three time periods were used to identify if there were any other potential temporal trends not related to transitioning from CR to DR). IBM's SPSS package was used for statistical analysis. Overall data was obtained from 33131, 32194, and 18015 cases in periods 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Independent-Samples Kruskal-Wallis test revealed a statistically significant difference in timesch-com across the three time periods (χ2(2, n= 83,340) = 2053, p < 0.001). The timesch-com was highest for period 1 i.e., radiographs acquired with CR technology (median: 64 minutes) and it decreased significantly for radiographs acquired with DR technology in periods 2 (median: 49 minutes; p < 0.001) and 3 (median∶ 44 minutes; p < 0.001). Overall

  20. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  1. Computed tomography of tibial plateau fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, M.; Firooznia, H.; Golimbu, C.; Bonamo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty patients with tibial plateau fractures were studied by conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT) in order to determine the role and feasibility of CT in management of such patients. CT resulted in less discomfort to the patient and provided optimal visualization of the plateau defect and the split fragments. It proved more accurate than conventional tomography in assessing depressed and split fractures when they involved the anterior or posterior border of the plateau and in demonstrating the extent of fracture comminution. Split fragments with an oblique plane of fracture also were seen better by CT. The degree of fracture depression and separation as measured by the computerized technique was often more accurate than measurements obtained from conventional tomograms

  2. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...... applications. This thesis takes a systematic approach toward establishing quantitative understanding of conditions for sparse reconstruction to work well in CT. A general framework for analyzing sparse reconstruction methods in CT is introduced and two sets of computational tools are proposed: 1...... contributions to a general set of computational characterization tools. Thus, the thesis contributions help advance sparse reconstruction methods toward routine use in...

  3. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zani, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray radiography is a very common technique used to check the homogeneity of a material or the inside of a mechanical part. Generally the radiation that goes through the material to check, produced an image on a sensitized film. This method requires time because the film needs to be developed, digital radiography has no longer this inconvenient. In digital radiography the film is replaced by digital data and can be processed as any computer file. This new technique is promising but its main inconvenient is that today its resolution is not so good as that of film radiography. (A.C.)

  4. Computed tomography of pelvic fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimoto, Makoto; Hashimoto, Keiji; Hiraki, Yoshio

    1984-12-01

    Plain x-ray and computed tomographic (CT) findings were compared in 7 patients with pelvic fractures (2 males and 5 females) aged between 35 and 50 year. Plain x-rays had a higher sensitivity than CT in detecting fractures of the ischiatic and pubic ramuses, and deviation of bone fragments. CT was superior to plain x-rays near the acetabulum and in detecting deviation of bone fragments. Although there were no differences between the two modalities in detecting fractures of the wing of ilium, CT was more useful than plain x-rays in visualizing deviation of bone fragments. CT clearly visualized not only fractures but also injuries of the soft tissues, such as pelvic viscera and muscles, and the presence of hematoma. CT seems to be a useful method for observing the condition and process of pelvic injuries and for deciding treatment protocols.

  5. The new neutron radiography/tomography/imaging station DINGO at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.

    2011-01-01

    A new neutron imaging instrument will be built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument will be designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defence, industrial, mining, space and aircraft applications. It will also be a useful tool for assessing oil and water flow in sedimentary rock reservoirs (like the North West Shelf), assessing water damage in aircraft components, and the study of hydrogen distribution and cracking in steel. The instrument is planned to be completed by the end of June 2013 and is currently in the design stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it also depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The designated instrument position for DINGO is the beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The estimated flux for an L/D of approximately 250 at HB-2 is calculated by Mcstas simulation in a range of 4.75x10 7 n/cm 2 s, which is in the same range of other facilities like ANSTARES (FRM II; Schillinger et al., 2004 ) or BT2 (NIST; Hussey et al., 2005 ). A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator place in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 250 and 1000. A secondary collimator will separate the two beams and block one. The whole instrument will operate in two different positions, one for high resolution and the other for high speed.

  6. The new neutron radiography/tomography/imaging station DINGO at OPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.

    2011-09-01

    A new neutron imaging instrument will be built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument will be designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defence, industrial, mining, space and aircraft applications. It will also be a useful tool for assessing oil and water flow in sedimentary rock reservoirs (like the North West Shelf), assessing water damage in aircraft components, and the study of hydrogen distribution and cracking in steel. The instrument is planned to be completed by the end of June 2013 and is currently in the design stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it also depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The designated instrument position for DINGO is the beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The estimated flux for an L/ D of approximately 250 at HB-2 is calculated by Mcstas simulation in a range of 4.75×10 7 n/cm 2 s, which is in the same range of other facilities like ANSTARES (FRM II; Schillinger et al., 2004 [1]) or BT2 (NIST; Hussey et al., 2005 [2]). A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator place in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/ D of 250 and 1000. A secondary collimator will separate the two beams and block one. The whole instrument will operate in two different positions, one for high resolution and the other for high speed.

  7. Image quality and patient exposure in mammography, tomography, angiography, and bone radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haus, A.G.; Rossmann, K.; Doi, K.; Chiles, J.T.

    1975-01-01

    In diagnostic radiology, the physical factors affecting image quality and patient exposure are complex and must be studied for each individual procedure. They are a function of recording system unsharpness, geometric unsharpness, image noise, and of the shape, size, and absorption properties of the anatomic part radiographed and the lesion to be detected. The choice of recording system has a significant effect on image quality, and the speed of the recording system is directly related to patient exposure for each procedure. In this presentation, the complexities involved in the selection of recording systems for four radiologic procedures are discussed. We describe in detail our most recent work on mammography with the Lo-Dose system, whereby a significant reduction in exposure may not reduce, but may even increase the diagnostic accuracy by reducing geometric unsharpness. We also describe several examples: (a) in tomography, image resolution is not decreased and diagnostic certainty is affected by a change from a medium-speed screen to a high-speed screen recording system (patient exposure is reduced by a factor of 2); (b) in fine-detail skeletal radiography, the diagnostic information is increased significantly by a change from a conventional screen-film technique to a non-screen technique with fine-grain film and optical magnification, but at the cost of increased patient exposure; and (c) in cerebral angiography, diagnostic information can be increased by use of a screen-film recording system of higher resolution, but lower speed for imaging of small blood vessels. Modulation Transfer Functions and clinical examples are used to illustrate each procedure. (U.S.)

  8. Image quality and patient exposure in mammography, tomography, angiography and bone radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haus, A.G.; Rossmann, K.; Doi, K.; Chiles, J.T.

    1975-01-01

    In diagnostic radiology, the physical factors affecting image quality and patient exposure are complex and must be studied for each individual procedure. They are a function of recording system unsharpness, geometric unsharpness, image noise, and of the shape, size, and absorption properties of the anatomic part radiographed and the lesion to be detected. The choice of recording system has a significant effect on image quality, and the speed of the recording system is directly related to patient exposure for each procedure. This paper discusses the complexities involved in the selection of recording systems for four radiologic procedures. The authors describe in detail their most recent work on mammography with the Lo-Dose system, whereby a significant reduction in exposure may not reduce, but may even increase, the diagnostic accuracy by reducing geometric unsharpness. We also describe several examples: (a) in tomography, image resolution is not decreased and diagnostic certainty is affected by a change from a medium-speed screen to a high-speed screen recording system (patient exposure is reduced by a factor of 2); (b) in fine-detail skeletal radiography, the diagnostic information is increased significantly by a change from a conventional screen-film technique to a non-screen technique with fine-grain film and optical magnification, but at the cost of increased patient exposure; and (c) in cerebral angiography, diagnostic information can be increased by use of a screen-film recording system of higher resolution, but lower speed for imaging of small blood vessels. Modulation transfer functions and clinical examples are used to illustrate each procedure. (author)

  9. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect the...

  10. Quantitative neutron radiography using neutron absorbing honeycomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Oda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kohei; Tasaka, Kanji; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1993-01-01

    This investigation concerns quantitative neutron radiography and computed tomography by using a neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator. By setting the neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator between object and imaging system, neutrons scattered in the object were absorbed by the honeycomb material and eliminated before coming to the imaging system, but the neutrons which were transmitted the object without interaction could reach the imaging system. The image by purely transmitted neutrons gives the quantitative information. Two honeycombs were prepared with coating of boron nitride and gadolinium oxide and evaluated for the quantitative application. The relation between the neutron total cross section and the attenuation coefficient confirmed that they were in a fairly good agreement. Application to quantitative computed tomography was also successfully conducted. The new neutron radiography method using the neutron-absorbing honeycomb collimator for the elimination of the scattered neutrons improved remarkably the quantitativeness of the neutron radiography and computed tomography. (author)

  11. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  12. Computed and conventional chest radiography: a comparison of image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, K.; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Ng, K-H.; Hussain, A.F.; Mahmud, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the image quality and entrance skin dose (ESD) for film-screen and computed chest radiography. Analysis of the image quality and dose on chest radiography was carried out on a conventional X-ray unit using film-screen, storage phosphor plates and selenium drum direct chest radiography. For each receptor, ESD was measured in 60 patients using thermoluminescent dosemeters. Images were printed on 35 x 43 cm films. Image quality was assessed subjectively by evaluation of anatomic features and estimation of the image quality, following the guidelines established by the protocols of the Commission of the European Communities. There was no statistically significant difference noted between the computed and conventional images (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P>0.05). Imaging of the mediastinum and peripheral lung structures were better visualized with the storage phosphor and selenium drum technique than with the film-screen combination. The patients' mean ESD for chest radiography using the storage phosphor, film-screen combination and selenium drum was 0.20, 0.20 and 0.25 mGy, respectively, with no statistically significant difference with P > 0.05 (χ 2 tests) Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  13. Emission computed tomography: methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Greenberg, J.; Fowler, J.; Christman, D.; Rosenquist, A.; Rintelmann, W.; Hand, P.; MacGregor, R.; Wolf, A.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for the determination of local cerebral glucose metabolism using positron emission computed tomography is described as an example of the development of use of this methodology for the study of these parameters in man. The method for the determination of local cerebral glucose metabolism utilizes 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([ 18 F]-FDG). In this method [ 18 F]-FDG is used as a tracer for the exchange of glucose between plasma and brain and its phosphorylation by hexokinase in the tissue. The labelled product of metabolism, [ 18 F]-FDG phosphate, is essentially trapped in the tissue over the time course of the measurement. The studies demonstrate the potential usefulness of emission computed tomography for the measurement of various biochemical and physiological parameters in man. (Auth.)

  14. Computed tomography of chest wall abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Junpei; Morimoto, Shizuo; Akira, Masanori

    1986-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions of the chest wall become less common because of the improvement of antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents. Over a 5-year period, 7 patients with chest wall inflammatory diseases underwent chest computed tomography. These were 2 tuberculous pericostal abscesses, 2 empyema necessitatis, 1 spinal caries, and 2 bacterial chest wall abscesses (unknown organisms). Computed tomography (CT) helped in demonstrating the density, border, site, and extent of the lesions. CT images also demonstrated the accompaning abnormalities which included bone changes, pleural calcification, or old tuberculous changes of the lung. CT was very effective to demonstrate the communicating portions from the inside of the bony thorax to the outside of the bony thorax in 2 empyema necessitatis. (author)

  15. Soil structure changes evaluated with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate in millimetric scale changes in soil bulk density and porosity, using the gamma-ray computed tomography in soil samples with disturbed structure due to wetting and drying (W-D) cycles. Soil samples with 98.1 cm 3 were sieved using a 2 mm mesh and homogeneously packed in PVC cylinders. Soil samples were submitted to 1, 2, and 3 W-D cycles. Control samples were not submitted to W-D cycles. After repetitions of W-D cycles, soil sample porosity decreased and soil layers became denser. Computed tomography allowed a continuous analysis of soil bulk density and also soil porosity along millimetric (0.08 cm) layers, what cannot be provided by traditional methods used in soil physics. (author)

  16. Possibilities of computer tomography in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vymazal, J.; Bauer, J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer tomography was performed in 41 patients with multiple sclerosis, the average age of patients being 40.8 years. Native examinations were made of 17 patients, examinations with contrast medium of 19, both methods were used in the examination of 5 patients. In 26 patients, i.e. in almost two-thirds, cerebral atrophy was found, in 11 of a severe type. In 9 patients atrophy affected only the hemispheres, in 16 also the stem and cerebellum. The stem and cerebellum only were affected in 1 patient. Hypodense foci were found in 21 patients, i.e. more than half of those examined. In 9 there were multiple foci. In most of the 19 examined patients the hypodense changes were in the hemispheres and only in 2 in the cerebellum and brain stem. No hyperdense changes were detected. The value and possibilities are discussed of examinations by computer tomography multiple sclerosis. (author)

  17. Basic principle of cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2006-01-01

    The use of computed tomography for dental procedures has increased recently. Cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the dentomaxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing high resolution in images of high diagnostic quality. This technology allows for 3-dimensional representation of the dentomaxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion, but at lower equipment cost, simpler image acquisition and lower patient dose. Because this technology produces images with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution, it is ideally suited for dedicated dentomaxillofacial imaging. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of cone beam scanning technology and compare it with the fan beam scanning used in conventional CT and the basic principles of currently available CBCT systems

  18. Contrast-induced nephropathy after computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano da Silva Selistre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast induced nephropathy is the third most prevalent preventable cause of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients. It defined as an absolute increase in serum creatinine ≥ 0.5 mg/dL and relative ≥ 25% increase. Objective: We studied the risk factors to intravenous injection contrast nephropathy after computed tomography. Methods: We studied 400 patients prospectively. Results: The incidence of contrast induced nephropathy, with an absolute or a relative increase were 4.0% and 13.9%, respectively. Diabetes and cardiac failure were independent risk factors for CIN a relative increase de serum creatinine (O.R.: 3.5 [95% CI: 1.92-6.36], p < 0.01, 2.61 [95% CI: 1.14-6.03%], p < 0.05, respectively. Conclusions: We showed association between uses of intravenous injection contrast after computed tomography with acute injury renal, notably with diabetes and heart failure.

  19. Simplified techniques of cerebral angiography using a mobile X-ray unit and computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondo, Gakuji; Ishiwata, Yusuke; Yamashita, Toshinori; Iida, Takashi; Moro, Yutaka

    1989-01-01

    Simplified techniques of cerebral angiography using a mobile X-ray unit and computed radiography (CR) are discussed. Computed radiography is a digital radiography system in which an imaging plate is used as an X-ray detector and a final image is displayed on the film. In the angiograms performed with CR, the spatial frequency components can be enhanced for the easy analysis of fine blood vessels. Computed radiography has an automatic sensitivity and a latitude-setting mechanism, thus serving as an 'automatic camera.' This mechanism is useful for radiography with a mobile X-ray unit in hospital wards, intensive care units, or operating rooms where the appropriate setting of exposure conditions is difficult. We applied this mechanism to direct percutaneous carotid angiography and intravenous digital subtraction angiography with a mobile X-ray unit. Direct percutaneous carotid angiography using CR and a mobile X-ray unit were taken after the manual injection of a small amount of a contrast material through a fine needle. We performed direct percutaneous carotid angiography with this method 68 times on 25 cases from August 1986 to December 1987. Of the 68 angiograms, 61 were evaluated as good, compared with conventional angiography. Though the remaining seven were evaluated as poor, they were still diagnostically effective. This method is found useful for carotid angiography in emergency rooms, intensive care units, or operating rooms. Cerebral venography using CR and a mobile X-ray unit was done after the manual injection of a contrast material through the bilateral cubital veins. The cerebral venous system could be visualized from 16 to 24 seconds after the beginning of the injection of the contrast material. We performed cerebral venography with this method 14 times on six cases. These venograms were better than conventional angiograms in all cases. This method may be useful in managing patients suffering from cerebral venous thrombosis. (J.P.N.)

  20. Xenon as an adjunct in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.E.; Radue, E.W.; Zilkha, E.; Loh, L.

    1979-01-01

    Nonradioactive xenon was used for enhancement in computed tomography in a series of 18 patients requiring general anesthesia. The method and results are described. The properties of xenon are radically different from those of intravenous iodides, and the enhancement patterns demonstrate different aspects of both normal and abnormal tissues. In our limited experience, it has been of value in those isodense and low attenuation lesions that have not enhanced after intravenous Conray. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB [de